Science.gov

Sample records for acid ffa kinetics

  1. Selective Orthosteric Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes; Smith, Nicola J.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Grundmann, Manuel; Hudson, Brian D.; Ward, Richard J.; Drewke, Christel; Milligan, Graeme; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond

    2011-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2; GPR43) is a G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that is implicated in inflammatory and metabolic disorders. The SCFA propionate has close to optimal ligand efficiency for FFA2 and can hence be considered as highly potent given its size. Propionate, however, does not discriminate between FFA2 and the closely related receptor FFA3 (GPR41). To identify FFA2-selective ligands and understand the molecular basis for FFA2 selectivity, a targeted library of small carboxylic acids was examined using holistic, label-free dynamic mass redistribution technology for primary screening and the receptor-proximal G protein [35S]guanosine 5′-(3-O-thio)triphosphate activation, inositol phosphate, and cAMP accumulation assays for hit confirmation. Structure-activity relationship analysis allowed formulation of a general rule to predict selectivity for small carboxylic acids at the orthosteric binding site where ligands with substituted sp3-hybridized α-carbons preferentially activate FFA3, whereas ligands with sp2- or sp-hybridized α-carbons prefer FFA2. The orthosteric binding mode was verified by site-directed mutagenesis: replacement of orthosteric site arginine residues by alanine in FFA2 prevented ligand binding, and molecular modeling predicted the detailed mode of binding. Based on this, selective mutation of three residues to their non-conserved counterparts in FFA3 was sufficient to transfer FFA3 selectivity to FFA2. Thus, selective activation of FFA2 via the orthosteric site is achievable with rather small ligands, a finding with significant implications for the rational design of therapeutic compounds selectively targeting the SCFA receptors. PMID:21220428

  2. Identification of diarylsulfonamides as agonists of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120).

    PubMed

    Sparks, Steven M; Chen, Grace; Collins, Jon L; Danger, Dana; Dock, Steven T; Jayawickreme, Channa; Jenkinson, Stephen; Laudeman, Christopher; Leesnitzer, M Anthony; Liang, Xi; Maloney, Patrick; McCoy, David C; Moncol, David; Rash, Vincent; Rimele, Thomas; Vulimiri, Padmaja; Way, James M; Ross, Sean

    2014-07-15

    The exploration of a diarylsulfonamide series of free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120) agonists is described. This work led to the identification of selective FFA4 agonist 8 (GSK137647A) and selective FFA4 antagonist 39. The in vitro profile of compounds 8 and 39 is presented herein.

  3. Extracellular Ionic Locks Determine Variation in Constitutive Activity and Ligand Potency between Species Orthologs of the Free Fatty Acid Receptors FFA2 and FFA3*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Pandey, Sunil K.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2 and FFA3) are G protein-coupled receptors for short chain free fatty acids (SCFAs). They respond to the same set of endogenous ligands but with distinct rank-order of potency such that acetate (C2) has been described as FFA2-selective, whereas propionate (C3) is non-selective. Although C2 was confirmed to be selective for human FFA2 over FFA3, this ligand was not selective between the mouse orthologs. Moreover, although C3 was indeed not selective between the human orthologs, it displayed clear selectivity for mouse FFA3 over mouse FFA2. This altered selectivity to C2 and C3 resulted from broad differences in SCFAs potency at the mouse orthologs. In studies to define the molecular basis for these observations, marked variation in ligand-independent constitutive activity was identified using a [35S]GTPγS assay. The orthologs with higher potency for the SCFAs, human FFA2 and mouse FFA3, displayed high constitutive activity in this assay, whereas the orthologs with lower potency for the agonist ligands, mouse FFA2 and human FFA3, did not. Sequence alignments of the second extracellular loop identified single negatively charged residues in FFA2 and FFA3 not conserved between species and predicted to form ionic lock interactions with arginine residues within the FFA2 or FFA3 agonist binding pocket to regulate constitutive activity and SCFA potency. Reciprocal mutation of these residues between species orthologs resulted in the induction (or repression) of constitutive activity and in most cases also yielded corresponding changes in SCFA potency. PMID:23066016

  4. Short-chain free fatty acid receptors FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41 as new potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ulven, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The deorphanization of the free fatty acid (FFA) receptors FFA1 (GPR40), FFA2 (GPR43), FFA3 (GPR41), GPR84, and GPR120 has made clear that the body is capable of recognizing and responding directly to nonesterified fatty acid of virtually any chain length. Colonic fermentation of dietary fiber produces high concentrations of the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate, a process which is important to health. The phylogenetically related 7-transmembrane (7TM) receptors free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2) and FFA3 are activated by these SCFAs, and several lines of evidence indicate that FFA2 and FFA3 mediate beneficial effects associated with a fiber-rich diet, and that they may be of interest as targets for treatment of inflammatory and metabolic diseases. FFA2 is highly expressed on immune cells, in particular neutrophils, and several studies suggest that the receptor plays a role in diseases involving a dysfunctional neutrophil response, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both FFA2 and FFA3 have been implicated in metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and in regulation of appetite. More research is however required to clarify the potential of the receptors as drug targets and establish if activation or inhibition would be the preferred mode of action. The availability of potent and selective receptor modulators is a prerequisite for these studies. The few modulators of FFA2 or FFA3 that have been published hitherto in the peer-reviewed literature in general have properties that make them less than ideal as such tools, but published patent applications indicate that better tool compounds might soon become available which should enable studies critical to validate the receptors as new drug targets. PMID:23060857

  5. Effects of arachidonic acid on FFA4 receptor: Signaling, phosphorylation and internalization.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Comonfort, S; Takei, Y; Tsujimoto, G; Hirasawa, A; García-Sáinz, J A

    2017-02-01

    Arachidonic acid increased intracellular calcium, in cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged human FFA4 receptors, with an EC50 of ~40µM. This action was not blocked by cyclooxygenase or lipoxigenase inhibitors but it was inhibited by AH7614, a FFA4 antagonist. Arachidonic acid induced ERK activation accompanied by EGF receptor transactivation. However, EGF transactivation was not the major mechanism through which the fatty acid induced ERK phosphorylation, as evidenced by the inability of AG1478 to block it. Arachidonic acid increased FFA4 receptor phosphorylation that reached its maximum within 15min with an EC50 of ~30µM; inhibitors of protein kinase C partially diminish this effect and AH7614 blocked it. Arachidonic acid induced rapid and sustained Akt/PKB phosphorylation and FFA4 - β-arrestin interaction. Confocal microscopy evidenced that FFA4 receptor activation and phosphorylation were associated to internalization. In conclusion, arachidonic acid is a bona fide FFA4 receptor agonist.

  6. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids accelerate airway repair by activating FFA4 in club cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Park, Soo-Jin; Kang, Saeromi; Koh, Jung-Min; Sato, Koichi; Chung, Hae Young; Okajima, Fumikazu; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-03-17

    A GPCR named FFA4 (also known as GPR120) was found to act as a GPCR for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Its expression has been reported in lung epithelial club cells. The authors investigated whether supplementation of the omega-3 fatty acids benefits lung health. Omacor® (7.75 mg kg-1), clinically prescribed preparation of omega-3 fatty acids and FFA4-knockout mice were utilized in a naphthalene-induced mouse model of acute airway injury (one injection of 30 mg kg-1, i.p.). Naphthalene injection induced complete destruction of bronchiolar epithelial cells within a day. Appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cells was observed after 21 days in control mice. It was found, however, that supplementation of omacor accelerated the recovery. The appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cells was observed between 7 and 14 days after naphthalene injury in omacor-treated mice. In isolated club cells, omega-3 fatty acids were found to stimulate cell proliferation and migration but to inhibit cell differentiation. Using pharmacological tools and FFA4-knockout mice, FFA4 was found to be responsible for omega-3 fatty acids-induced proliferation in vitro in club cells. Furthermore, accelerated recovery from naphthalene-induced airway injury in omacor-treated mice was not observed in FFA4-knockout mice in vivo. Present findings indicate that omega-3 fatty acids-induced proliferation of bronchiole epithelial cells through FFA4 is responsible for omacor-induced accelerated recovery from airway injury. Therefore, intermittent administration of omacor needs to be tested for acute airway injury, because omega-3 fatty acids stimulate proliferation but inhibits differentiation of club cells.

  7. [Profile of free fatty acids (FFA) in serum of young Colombians with obesity and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bermudez, J A; Velásquez, C M

    2014-12-01

    Obesity produces greater circulation of free fatty acids (FFA). In adults, the FFA composition changes in states of obesity; in adolescents, the results are contradictory. This study compare the FFA profile of obese youth with and without Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and explore the association between FFA and metabolic alterations of obesity and MetS. A cross-sectional study with 96 young people between 10 and 18 years old was divided into three groups: 1) obese youth with MetS, 2) obese youth without MetS; and 3) adequate weight (AW), matched according to age, gender, pubertal maturation and socioeconomic stratum. The nutritional status was classified according to the body-mass index (BMI), according to the World Health Organization 2007 (WHO, 2007); the waist circumference (WC), adiposity, lipid profile, highly-sensitive reactive C protein (hsRCP), glucose, insulin and insulin resistance (IR), according to the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA Calculator Version 2.2.2). The FFA serum concentration was determined by gas chromatography. Both obese groups had higher adiposity, inflamation (hsRCP), FFA totals and frequency palmitoleic-16:Jn7, compared to AW. The obese with MetS presented more metabolic alterations, a greater amount of dihomo-γ-linolenic (DHGL-20:3n6) and a 20:3n6/18:2n6 relation, indicative of increased activity of A6 desaturase (D6D). The FFA totals, palmitoleic-l6:1n7, DHGL-20:3n6, D6D activity and hsRCP significantly correlated with variables of adiposity, IR and triglicerides. The results in obese with MetS corroborate the association among central obesity, inflammation and increased lipolysis in visceral adipose tissue and metabolic alterations.

  8. The Molecular Basis of Ligand Interaction at Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120)*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain fatty acid receptor FFA4 (previously GPR120) is receiving substantial interest as a novel target for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory disease. This study examines for the first time the detailed mode of binding of both long-chain fatty acid and synthetic agonist ligands at FFA4 by integrating molecular modeling, receptor mutagenesis, and ligand structure-activity relationship approaches in an iterative format. In doing so, residues required for binding of fatty acid and synthetic agonists to FFA4 have been identified. This has allowed for the refinement of a well validated model of the mode of ligand-FFA4 interaction that will be invaluable in the identification of novel ligands and the future development of this receptor as a therapeutic target. The model reliably predicted the effects of substituent variations on agonist potency, and it was also able to predict the qualitative effect of binding site mutations in the majority of cases. PMID:24860101

  9. Concomitant Action of Structural Elements and Receptor Phosphorylation Determines Arrestin-3 Interaction with the Free Fatty Acid Receptor FFA4*

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Prihandoko, Rudi; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being nutrients, free fatty acids act as signaling molecules by activating a family of G protein-coupled receptors. Among these is FFA4, previously called GPR120, which responds to medium and long chain fatty acids, including health-promoting ω-3 fatty acids, which have been implicated in the regulation of metabolic and inflammatory responses. Here we show, using mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, and phosphospecific antibodies, that agonist-regulated phosphorylation of the human FFA4 receptor occurred primarily at five residues (Thr347, Thr349, Ser350, Ser357, and Ser360) in the C-terminal tail. Mutation of these residues reduced both the efficacy and potency of ligand-mediated arrestin-3 recruitment as well as affecting recruitment kinetics. Combined mutagenesis of all five of these residues was insufficient to fully abrogate interaction with arrestin-3, but further mutagenesis of negatively charged residues revealed additional structural components for the interaction with arrestin-3 within the C-terminal tail of the receptor. These elements consist of the acidic residues Glu341, Asp348, and Asp355 located close to the phosphorylation sites. Receptor phosphorylation thus operates in concert with structural elements within the C-terminal tail of FFA4 to allow for the recruitment of arrestin-3. Importantly, these mechanisms of arrestin-3 recruitment operate independently from Gq/11 coupling, thereby offering the possibility that ligands showing stimulus bias could be developed that exploit these differential coupling mechanisms. Furthermore, this provides a strategy for the design of biased receptors to probe physiologically relevant signaling. PMID:24817122

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B; Fix, Louise C; Galvan, Brianna M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891-induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor-induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation.

  11. Liver free fatty acid (FFA) accumulation as an indicator of ischemic injury during cold preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, E.M.; Kang, Y.; DeWolf, A.M.; Lin, M.R.; Bleyaert, A.L.; Winter, P.M.

    1987-05-01

    Reliable assessment of hepatic viability prior to harvest and transplant could improve graft success and aid in evaluating the efficacy of liver preservation techniques. Hepatic tissue metabolites, protein (Pr) synthesis, and ATP have been studied, but none reliably correlate with hepatic viability. Therefore, they studied changes in liver FFA relative to changes in ATP and Pr synthesis during cold ischemic preservation. Rats mechanically ventilated on 0.5% isoflurane/70% N/sub 2/O/30% O/sub 2/ were heparinized and their livers perfused with air-equilibrated Euro-Collins solution (ECS) at 0-4/sup 0/C and kept on ice. A piece of the liver was removed after 0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h of preservation for ATP and FFA analysis. A portion of the liver was sliced (250 ..mu..m thick) and incubated in vitro for /sup 14/C-lysine incorporation in albumin. ATP, FFA and Pr synthesis were unchanged in the first 8 h, but markedly decreased between 8 and 12 h with little change thereafter. In contrast, between 8 and 48 h, arachidonic and stearic acids increased by 5 and 2-fold, respectively. Changes in ATP and Pr synthesis correlate with the empirically derived clinical maximum of 8 to 12 h preservation. FFA accumulation appears to reflect hepatic ischemic injury and may be a means of evaluating the quality of a donor liver.

  12. Dietary Fatty Acids and Their Potential for Controlling Metabolic Diseases Through Activation of FFA4/GPR120.

    PubMed

    Ulven, Trond; Christiansen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the amount and type of ingested fat impacts the development of obesity and metabolic diseases, but the potential for beneficial effects from fat has received less attention. It is becoming clear that the composition of the individual fatty acids in diet is important. Besides acting as precursors of potent signaling molecules, dietary fatty acids act directly on intracellular and cell surface receptors. The free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4, previously GPR120) is linked to the regulation of body weight, inflammation, and insulin resistance and represents a potential target for the treatment of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. In this review, we discuss the various types of dietary fatty acids, the link between FFA4 and metabolic diseases, the potential effects of the individual fatty acids on health, and the ability of fatty acids to activate FFA4. We also discuss the possibility of dietary schemes that implement activation of FFA4.

  13. Structure−Activity Study of Dihydrocinnamic Acids and Discovery of the Potent FFA1 (GPR40) Agonist TUG-469

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFA1 or GPR40), which is highly expressed on pancreatic β-cells and amplifies glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Several FFA1 agonists containing the para-substituted dihydrocinnamic acid moiety are known. We here present a structure−activity relationship study of this compound family suggesting that the central methyleneoxy linker is preferable for the smaller compounds, whereas the central methyleneamine linker gives higher potency to the larger compounds. The study resulted in the discovery of the potent and selective full FFA1 agonist TUG-469 (29). PMID:24900217

  14. Defining the Molecular Basis for the First Potent and Selective Orthosteric Agonists of the FFA2 Free Fatty Acid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hansen, Anna Mette; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Murdoch, Hannah; Pandey, Sunil K.; Ward, Richard J.; Marquez, Rudi; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    FFA2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that responds to short chain fatty acids and has generated interest as a therapeutic target for metabolic and inflammatory conditions. However, definition of its functions has been slowed by a dearth of selective ligands that can distinguish it from the closely related FFA3. At present, the only selective ligands described for FFA2 suffer from poor potency, altered signaling due to allosteric modes of action, or a lack of function at non-human orthologs of the receptor. To address the need for novel selective ligands, we synthesized two compounds potentially having FFA2 activity and examined the molecular basis of their function. These compounds were confirmed to be potent and selective orthosteric FFA2 agonists. A combination of ligand structure-activity relationship, pharmacological analysis, homology modeling, species ortholog comparisons, and mutagenesis studies were then employed to define the molecular basis of selectivity and function of these ligands. From this, we identified key residues within both extracellular loop 2 and the transmembrane domain regions of FFA2 critical for ligand function. One of these ligands was active with reasonable potency at rodent orthologs of FFA2 and demonstrated the role of FFA2 in inhibition of lipolysis and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion in murine-derived 3T3-L1 and STC-1 cell lines, respectively. Together, these findings describe the first potent and selective FFA2 orthosteric agonists and demonstrate key aspects of ligand interaction within the binding site of FFA2 that will be invaluable in future ligand development at this receptor. PMID:23589301

  15. Kinetic study of free fatty acid esterification reaction catalyzed by recoverable and reusable hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Hung

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic performance and recoverability of several homogeneous acid catalysts (hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids) for the esterification of enzyme-hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) and methanol were studied. Although all tested catalysts drove the reaction to a high yield, hydrochloric acid was the only catalyst that could be considerably recovered and reused. The kinetics of the esterification reaction catalyzed by hydrochloric acid was investigated under varying catalyst loading (0.1-1M), reaction temperature (303-343K), and methanol/FFA molar ratio (1:1-20:1). In addition, a pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model incorporating the above factors was developed. A good agreement (r(2)=0.98) between the experimental and calculated data was obtained, thus proving the reliability of the model. Furthermore, the reusability of hydrochloric acid in FFA esterification can be predicted by the developed model. The recoverable hydrochloric acid achieved high yields of FFA esterification within five times of reuse.

  16. A New Pain Regulatory System via the Brain Long Chain Fatty Acid Receptor GPR40/FFA1 Signal.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

     An increasingly large number of pharmacological and physiological works on fatty acids have shown that the functional properties of fatty acids are regulated by the amount of individual fatty acid intake and the distribution of fatty acids among organs. Recently, it has been determined that G-protein-coupled receptor 40/free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFA1) is activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR40/FFA1 is mainly expressed in the β cell of the pancreas, spinal cord and brain. It is reported that this receptor has a functional role in controlling blood glucose levels via the modulation of insulin secretion. However, its physiological function in the brain remains unknown. Our previous studies have shown that GPR40/FFA1 is expressed in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-positive neurons of the arcuate nucleus, serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus, and in noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Furthermore, the intracerebroventricular injection of DHA or GW9508, which is a selective GPR40/FFA1 agonist, attenuates formalin-induced inflammatory pain behavior through increasing β-endorphin release in the hypothalamus. It also suppresses complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest that brain free long-chain fatty acids-GPR40/FFA1 signaling might have an important role in the modulation of endogenous pain control systems. In this review, I discuss the current status and our recent study regarding a new pain regulatory system via the brain long chain fatty acid receptor GPR40/FFA1 signal.

  17. Conjugated Linoleic Acids Mediate Insulin Release through Islet G Protein-coupled Receptor FFA1/GPR40*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johannes; Liebscher, Kathrin; Merten, Nicole; Grundmann, Manuel; Mielenz, Manfred; Sauerwein, Helga; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Ulven, Trond; Ullrich, Susanne; Gomeza, Jesús; Drewke, Christel; Kostenis, Evi

    2011-01-01

    Among dietary components, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) have attracted considerable attention as weight loss supplements in the Western world because they reduce fat stores and increase muscle mass. However, a number of adverse effects are also ascribed to the intake of CLAs such as aggravation of insulin resistance and the risk of developing diabetes. However, the mechanisms accounting for the effects of CLAs on glucose homeostasis are incompletely understood. Herein we provide evidence that CLAs specifically activate the cell surface receptor FFA1, an emerging therapeutic target to treat type 2 diabetes. Using different recombinant cellular systems engineered to stably express FFA1 and a set of diverse functional assays including the novel, label-free non-invasive dynamic mass redistribution technology (Corning® Epic® biosensor), both CLA isomers cis-9, trans-11-CLA and trans-10, cis-12-CLA were found to activate FFA1 in vitro at concentrations sufficient to also account for FFA1 activation in vivo. Each CLA isomer markedly increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in insulin-producing INS-1E cells that endogenously express FFA1 and in primary pancreatic β-cells of wild type but not FFA1−/− knock-out mice. Our findings establish a clear mechanistic link between CLAs and insulin production and identify the cell surface receptor FFA1 as a molecular target for CLAs, explaining their acute stimulatory effects on insulin secretion in vivo. CLAs are also revealed as insulinotropic components in widely used nutraceuticals, a finding with significant implication for development of FFA1 modulators to treat type 2 diabetes. PMID:21339298

  18. FFA Contests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Herbert

    1977-01-01

    A teacher educator gives reasons why the vocational agriculture teacher should become involved in preparing his students for Future Farmers of America (FFA) contests and some steps and precautions he should take to successfully integrate FFA contests into the instructional program. (MF)

  19. The short-chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M; Angueira, Anthony R; Brodsky, Michael; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gilbert, Jack A; Lowe, William L; Layden, Brian T

    2015-11-15

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression is higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Together, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis.

  20. The short chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis

    DOE PAGES

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M.; ...

    2015-09-22

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression ismore » higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Altogether, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis.« less

  1. The short chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M.; Angueira, Anthony R.; Brodsky, Michael; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Backhed, Fredrik; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lowe, Jr., William L.; Layden, Brian T.

    2015-09-22

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression is higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Altogether, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis.

  2. Discovery of TUG-770: A Highly Potent Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) Agonist for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1 or GPR40) enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells and currently attracts high interest as a new target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We here report the discovery of a highly potent FFA1 agonist with favorable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The compound efficiently normalizes glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice, an effect that is fully sustained after 29 days of chronic dosing. PMID:23687558

  3. Relationship between body fat mass and free fatty acid kinetics in men and women.

    PubMed

    Mittendorfer, Bettina; Magkos, Faidon; Fabbrini, Elisa; Mohammed, B Selma; Klein, Samuel

    2009-10-01

    An increased release of free fatty acids (FFAs) into plasma likely contributes to the metabolic complications associated with obesity. However, the relationship between body fat and FFA metabolism is unclear because of conflicting results from different studies. The goal of our study was to determine the inter-relationships between body fat, sex, and plasma FFA kinetics. We determined FFA rate of appearance (Ra) in plasma, by using stable isotopically labeled tracer techniques, during basal conditions in 106 lean, overweight, and obese, nondiabetic subjects (43 men and 63 women who had 7.0-56.0% body fat). Correlation analyses demonstrated: (i) no differences between men and women in the relationship between fat mass (FM) and total FFA Ra (micromol/min); (ii) total FFA Ra increased linearly with increasing FM (r=0.652, P<0.001); (iii) FFA Ra per kg FM decreased in a curvilinear fashion with increasing FM (r=-0.806; P<0.001); (iv) FFA Ra in relationship to fat-free mass (FFM) was greater in obese than lean subjects and greater in women than in men; and (v) abdominal fat itself was not an important determinant of total FFA Ra. We conclude that total body fat, not regional fat distribution or sex, is an important modulator of the rate of FFA release into plasma. Although increased adiposity is associated with a decrease in fatty acid release in relationship to FM, this downregulation is unable to completely compensate for the increase in FM, so total FFA Ra and FFA Ra with respect to FFM are greater in women than in men and in obese than in lean subjects.

  4. The Pharmacology of TUG-891, a Potent and Selective Agonist of the Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120), Demonstrates Both Potential Opportunity and Possible Challenges to Therapeutic Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Butcher, Adrian J.; Pediani, John D.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Heathcote, Helen; Tobin, Andrew B.; Ulven, Trond

    2013-01-01

    TUG-891 [3-(4-((4-fluoro-4′-methyl-[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy)phenyl)propanoic acid] was recently described as a potent and selective agonist for the long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) receptor 4 (FFA4; previously G protein–coupled receptor 120, or GPR120). Herein, we have used TUG-891 to further define the function of FFA4 and used this compound in proof of principle studies to indicate the therapeutic potential of this receptor. TUG-891 displayed similar signaling properties to the LCFA α-linolenic acid at human FFA4 across various assay end points, including stimulation of Ca2+ mobilization, β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 recruitment, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Activation of human FFA4 by TUG-891 also resulted in rapid phosphorylation and internalization of the receptor. While these latter events were associated with desensitization of the FFA4 signaling response, removal of TUG-891 allowed both rapid recycling of FFA4 back to the cell surface and resensitization of the FFA4 Ca2+ signaling response. TUG-891 was also a potent agonist of mouse FFA4, but it showed only limited selectivity over mouse FFA1, complicating its use in vivo in this species. Pharmacologic dissection of responses to TUG-891 in model murine cell systems indicated that activation of FFA4 was able to mimic many potentially beneficial therapeutic properties previously reported for LCFAs, including stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells, enhancing glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and inhibiting release of proinflammatory mediators from RAW264.7 macrophages, which suggests promise for FFA4 as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Together, these results demonstrate both potential but also significant challenges that still need to be overcome to therapeutically target FFA4. PMID:23979972

  5. Modeling population kinetics of free fatty acids in isolated rat hepatocytes using Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Alessandra; Thomaseth, Karl; Valerio, Anna

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is the characterization, by means of mathematical models, of the activity of isolated hepatic rat cells as regards the conversion of free fatty acids (FFA) to ketone bodies (KB). A new physiologically based compartmental model of FFA metabolism is used within a context of population pharmacokinetics. This analysis is based on a hierarchical model, that differs from standard model formulations, to account for the fact that some data sets belong to the same animal but have been collected under different experimental conditions. The statistical inference problem has been addressed within a Bayesian context and solved by using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. The results obtained in this study indicate that, although hormones epinephrine and insulin are important metabolic regulatory factors in vivo, the conversion of FFA to KB by isolated hepatic rat cells is not significantly affected by epinephrine and only little influenced by insulin. So we conclude that in vivo, the interaction of these two hormones with other compounds not considered in this study plays a fundamental role in ketogenesis. From this study it appears that mathematical models of metabolic processes can be successfully employed in population kinetic studies using MCMC methods.

  6. Prevocational Agribusiness and the FFA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kenneth A.

    1975-01-01

    The author discusses the development of the career education concept relating to agribusiness at the junior high and middle school level. In the prevocational agribusiness program, it is also effective to supplement the program with an FFA chapter. (JB)

  7. Kinetic study on microwave-assisted esterification of free fatty acids derived from Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Thanh; Yusup, Suzana; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great attention has been paid to advanced microwave technology that can be used to markedly enhance the biodiesel production process. Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil containing high free fatty acids (FFA) was utilized as a non-edible feedstock for biodiesel production. Microwave-assisted esterification pretreatment was conducted to reduce the FFA content for promoting a high-quality product in the next step. At optimum condition, the conversion was achieved 94.43% using 2wt% of sulfuric acid as catalyst where as 20.83% conversion was attained without catalyst. The kinetics of this esterification reaction was also studied to determine the influence of factors on the rate of reaction and reaction mechanisms. The results indicated that microwave-assisted esterification was of endothermic second-order reaction with the activation energy of 53.717kJ/mol.

  8. Evaluation of feeding glycerol on free-fatty acid production and fermentation kinetics of mixed ruminal microbes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krueger, N A; Anderson, R C; Tedeschi, L O; Callaway, T R; Edrington, T S; Nisbet, D J

    2010-11-01

    Ruminant-derived foods contain high proportions of saturated fats as a result of ruminal biohydrogenation that rapidly saturates and thus limits the availability of free unsaturated fatty acids for assimilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of glycerol on ruminal free-fatty acid (FFA) production rates and in vitro fermentation kinetics of alfalfa hay. In vitro incubations demonstrated 48% and 77% reductions in rates of FFA accumulation in incubations supplemented with 2% and 20% glycerol as compared to controls. In vitro incubations with alfalfa hay demonstrated that increasing levels of glycerol did not affect NDF digestibility of the hay. Additionally, increasing amounts of glycerol decreased the acetate to propionate ratio in the rumen. These results suggest that inhibiting bacterial fat degradation may promote ruminal passage of total lipid, thereby providing greater proportions of beneficial unsaturated fat for incorporation into beef products.

  9. Advising an Urban FFA Chapter: A Narrative of Two Urban FFA Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Advising an urban FFA chapter can be a challenge for urban agriculture teachers. The contextual differences between the rural-oriented FFA and urban FFA members can make bridging the gap difficult. This narrative study sought to explore how the urban context shapes the work of an FFA chapter from the perspectives of two FFA advisors at the same…

  10. Influence of FFA Activities on Critical Thinking Skills in Texas Three-Star FFA Chapters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Lindsey; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of FFA activities on critical thinking skills of Texas FFA members in three-star FFA chapters. This descriptive study was conducted in eight purposively selected three-star FFA chapters throughout Texas. Three-star chapters are those chapters who have emerged as outstanding programs…

  11. The hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jenny S.; Seward, Terry M.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental data on the hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid were acquired using a custom-built spectrophotometric reaction cell which permits in situ observation under hydrothermal conditions. The results of this study indicate that the reaction kinetics of dilute aspartic acid solutions are significantly different depending on the presence or absence of catalytic surfaces such as standard metal alloys. The spectroscopic data presented here represent the first direct observations, in situ and in real time, of an amino acid reacting in a hydrothermal solution. Quantitative kinetic information, including rate constants, concentration versus time profiles, and calculations of the individual component spectra, was obtained from the data using a chemometric approach based on factor analysis/principle component analysis which treats the rate expressions simultaneously as a system of differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 1. Identification of the products was confirmed where possible by high pressure anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The reaction kinetics of aspartic acid under hydrothermal conditions was observed to be highly complex, in contrast to previous studies which indicated almost exclusively deamination. At lower temperatures (120-170 °C), several different reaction pathways were observed, including decarboxylation and polymerization, and the catalytic effects of reactor surfaces on the aspartic acid system were clearly demonstrated. At higher temperatures (above 170 °C), aspartic acid exhibited highly complex behaviour, with evidence indicating that it can simultaneously dimerize and cyclize, deaminate (by up to two pathways), and decarboxylate (by up to two pathways). These higher temperature kinetics were not fully resolvable in a quantitative manner due to the complexity of the system and the constraints of UV spectroscopy. The results of this study provide strong evidence that the reaction

  12. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure.

  13. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Our research in the general area of acid catalysis involves the characterization of solid acidity and the corresponding assessment of catalytic performance of acidic materials. Acid characterization studies are required to provide essential information about the type of acid site (i.e., Lewis versus Bronsted), the strength of the sites, and the mobility of molecules adsorbed on the acid sites. An accurate measure of acid strength is given by the heat of adsorption of a basic probe molecule on the acid site. A thermodynamic representation of the mobility of adsorbed species on these sites is given by the entropy of adsorption. Important techniques used in these acid site characterization studies include microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric measurements, temperature programmed desorption, infrared spectroscopy and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The combination of these acid site characterization studies with reaction kinetics measurements of selected catalytic processes allows the elucidation of possible relationships between surface thermodynamic and kinetic properties of acidic sites. Such relationships are important milestones in formulating effective strategies for the effective utilization of solid acid catalysts. Current work in this direction involves methylamine syntheses over various zeolites, and the basic probe molecules employed include ammonia, methanol, water and mono-, di- and tri-methylamines. 31 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Reaction kinetics of free fatty acids esterification in palm fatty acid distillate using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi, Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new strategy of preparing novel carbon-based solid acids has been developed. In this research, the esterification reactions of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) with methanol, using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst from biomass wastes as catalyst, were studied. In this study, the coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalysts were synthesized by sulfonating the coconut shell biochar using concentrated H2SO4. The kinetics of free fatty acid (FFA) esterification in PFAD using a coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst was also studied. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1-10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (6:1-12:1), and the reaction temperature (40-60°C) were studied for the conversion of PFAD to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimal conditions were an methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 12:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60°C. The proposed kinetic model shows a reversible second order reaction and represents all the experimental data satisfactorily, providing deeper insight into the kinetics of the reaction.

  15. Crystallization kinetics of citric acid anhydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemdili, L.; Koutchoukali, O.; Bouhelassa, M.; Seidel, J.; Mameri, F.; Ulrich, J.

    2016-10-01

    The solubility curve, metastable zone width (MSZW) and Crystallization kinetics (nucleation and growth) were measured and estimated during batch crystallization of citric acid anhydrate (CAA). The solubility of citric acid in pure water was measured over the temperature range from 15 to 60 °C using a refractometer. The experimental data were correlated by the modified Apelblat equation. The MSZW was determined under four cooling rates for different citric acid concentrations by means of an ultrasonic technique. The primary nucleation kinetics of CAA was calculated based on these data and the polythermal method of Nyvlt. It was found that the MSZW obtained is in good agreement with literature. Crystal growth rates were calculated by two methods. The first one used seeded isothermal growth experiments (desupersaturation curve) and the derivatives method of Garside. The second method used the measurement of the dimension change of a single crystal in a microscopic cell at different supersaturation levels.

  16. Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, V B; Babayan, S Y; Tairyan, V I; Arakelyan, A V; Parsadanyan, M A; Vardevanyan, P O

    2006-02-01

    Ligand binding to nucleic acids (NA) is considered as a stationary Markov process. It is shown that the probabilistic description of ligand-NA binding allows one to describe not only the kinetics of the change of number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. The general analysis of absorption isotherms and kinetics of ligand binding to NA make it possible to determine of rate constants of ligand-NA complex formation and dissociation.

  17. The New FFA--Relevant, Flexible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Future Farmers of America, Washington, DC.

    To make education more relevant, the 1972 national seminar sought ways of integrating the Future Farmers of America (FFA) program with the broadened agricultural instruction program. Topics discussed included: (1) "Role of the FFA in the Changing Program of Agricultural Education" - William Gray (Moderator), (2) "But How Do We Get…

  18. Parliamentary Procedure for the FFA Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joestgen, John G.

    Information and examples concerning parliamentary procedures are presented in this instructional manual written for Wisconsin Future Farmers of America (FFA) members and FFA parliamentary procedure teams. Topics include the following: secretary minutes (bylaws, officers, quorum, order of business, meeting and session, introducing business,…

  19. Kinetics of Non-Catalytic Esterification of Free Fatty Acids Present in Jatropha Oil.

    PubMed

    Prasanna Rani, Karna Narayana; Ramana Neeharika, Tulasi Sri Venkata; Kumar, Thella Prathap; Satyavathi, Bankupalli; Sailu, Chintha

    2016-05-01

    Non-catalytic esterfication of free fatty acids (FFA) present in vegetable oils is an alternative pretreatment process for the biodiesel production. Biodiesel, consists of long-chain fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and is obtained from renewable sources such as vegetable oils or animal fat. This study presents kinetics of thermal esterification of free fatty acids present in jatropha oil with methanol. The effect of process parameters like reaction time (1-5 h), temperature (170-190°C) and oil to methanol ratio (1:3-1:5) at constant pressure was investigated. The optimal conditions were found to be oil to methanol ratio of 1:4, 190°C, at 27.1 bar and 5 h which gave a maximum conversion of 95.1%. A second order kinetic model for both forward and backward reactions was proposed to study the reaction system. A good agreement was observed between the experimental data and the model values. The activation energy for forward reaction and the heat of reaction were found to be 36.364 Kcal/mol and 1.74 Kcal/mol respectively.

  20. A kinetic study on the Novozyme 435-catalyzed esterification of free fatty acids with octanol to produce octyl esters.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Avisha; Mitra, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Octyl esters can serve as an important class of biolubricant components replacing their mineral oil counterparts. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the enzymatic esterification reaction of free fatty acids (FFA, from waste cooking oil) with octanol in a solvent-free system using a commercial lipase Novozyme 435. It was found that the esterificaton reaction followed the Ping-pong bi-bi kinetics with no inhibition by substrates or products within the studied concentration range. The maximum reaction rate was estimated to be 0.041 mol L(-1) g(-1) h(-1) . Additionally, the stability of Novozyme 435 in the current reaction system was studied by determining its activity and final conversion of FFA to esters after 12 successive utilizations. Novozyme 435 exhibited almost 100% enzyme activity up to 7 cycles of reaction and gradually decreased (by 5%) thereafter. The kinetic parameters evaluated from the study shall assist in the design of reactors for large-scale production of octyl esters from a cheap biomass source. The enzyme reusability data can further facilitate mass production by curtailing the cost of expensive enzyme consumption.

  1. Robust expertise effects in right FFA

    PubMed Central

    McGugin, Rankin Williams; Newton, Allen T; Gore, John C; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is one of several areas in occipito-temporal cortex whose activity is correlated with perceptual expertise for objects. Here, we investigate the robustness of expertise effects in FFA and other areas to a strong task manipulation that increases both perceptual and attentional demands. With high-resolution fMRI at 7Telsa, we measured responses to images of cars, faces and a category globally visually similar to cars (sofas) in 26 subjects who varied in expertise with cars, in (a) a low load 1-back task with a single object category and (b) a high load task in which objects from two categories rapidly alternated and attention was required to both categories. The low load condition revealed several areas more active as a function of expertise, including both posterior and anterior portions of FFA bilaterally (FFA1/FFA2 respectively). Under high load, fewer areas were positively correlated with expertise and several areas were even negatively correlated, but the expertise effect in face-selective voxels in the anterior portion of FFA (FFA2) remained robust. Finally, we found that behavioral car expertise also predicted increased responses to sofa images but no behavioral advantages in sofa discrimination, suggesting that global shape similarity to a category of expertise is enough to elicit a response in FFA and other areas sensitive to experience, even when the category itself is not of special interest. The robustness of expertise effects in right FFA2 and the expertise effects driven by visual similarity both argue against attention being the sole determinant of expertise effects in extrastriate areas. PMID:25192631

  2. Robust expertise effects in right FFA.

    PubMed

    McGugin, Rankin Williams; Newton, Allen T; Gore, John C; Gauthier, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is one of several areas in occipito-temporal cortex whose activity is correlated with perceptual expertise for objects. Here, we investigate the robustness of expertise effects in FFA and other areas to a strong task manipulation that increases both perceptual and attentional demands. With high-resolution fMRI at 7T, we measured responses to images of cars, faces and a category globally visually similar to cars (sofas) in 26 subjects who varied in expertise with cars, in (a) a low load 1-back task with a single object category and (b) a high load task in which objects from two categories were rapidly alternated and attention was required to both categories. The low load condition revealed several areas more active as a function of expertise, including both posterior and anterior portions of FFA bilaterally (FFA1/FFA2, respectively). Under high load, fewer areas were positively correlated with expertise and several areas were even negatively correlated, but the expertise effect in face-selective voxels in the anterior portion of FFA (FFA2) remained robust. Finally, we found that behavioral car expertise also predicted increased responses to sofa images but no behavioral advantages in sofa discrimination, suggesting that global shape similarity to a category of expertise is enough to elicit a response in FFA and other areas sensitive to experience, even when the category itself is not of special interest. The robustness of expertise effects in right FFA2 and the expertise effects driven by visual similarity both argue against attention being the sole determinant of expertise effects in extrastriate areas.

  3. Factors Impacting Members Decision to Continue FFA beyond High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanok, Danielle E.; Stripling, Christopher T.; Stephens, Carrie A.; Griffith, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the factors influencing FFA members to continue their FFA experience beyond high school. Two focus groups were conducted, one for collegiate FFA members and one for past/current state officers. Participants provided several areas of improvement for collegiate and alumni FFA membership. Participants noted…

  4. Critical Theory View of the National FFA Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Urban FFA members face unique challenges if they want to become active members in the National FFA Organization. FFA leaders have realized that the FFA organization does not represent the evolving demographics of America and have made efforts to cater to urban and diverse high school audiences with some success. This study seeks to explore this…

  5. Urban FFA Members' Sense of the Organizational Culture of the FFA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture shapes how members of a group act. The culture has the power to exclude potential new members who do not fit into the culture of the organization. Research on urban school-based agriculture programs has indicated that urban agriculture students face barriers to their participation in the National FFA Organization (FFA).…

  6. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  7. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  8. [Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids at random fillings].

    PubMed

    Arakelian, V B; Babaian, S Iu; Tairian, V I; Arakelian, A V; Parsadanian, M A; Vardevanian, P O

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding with nucleic acids is described in frames of the theory of random processes. It is shown that the probabilistic description of binding of a ligand to nucleic acid allows one to describe not only the kinetics of changes in the number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. A general analysis of absorption isotherms and the kinetics of ligand binding with nucleic acids allows one to determine the rate constants of formation and decomposition of the ligand-nucleic acid complex. A comparison of the results obtained with the case of low fillings is conducted.

  9. Electrode kinetics at a platinum anode in chloroacetic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lotvin, B.M.; Vasil'ev, Yu.B.

    1987-02-01

    It was shown by direct comparison of kinetic and adsorption data that at platinum in solutions of mono- and trichloroacetic acid, the anodic processes are entirely analogous in character to the processes occurring in acetate solutions. The lack of Kolbe electrosynthesis products in the electrolysis of chloroacetic acids is to the special reaction features of the secondary chloroalkyl radicals.

  10. FFA4/GPR120 agonists: a survey of the recent patent literature.

    PubMed

    Formicola, Rosa; Pevarello, Paolo; Kuhn, Christina; Liberati, Chiara; Piscitelli, Francesco; Sodano, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    FFA4/GPR120, a member of the rhodopsin family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is becoming an important target for therapeutic intervention in several areas of disease, including metabolic diseases, inflammation and cancer. In the last few years several patents on original chemotypes have been generated by different companies. In this review an analysis of the patents in the FFA4 agonism field is presented, with an emphasis on the documents published between 2013 and mid-2015. A discussion of the biological methods used in the patents is included. The general interest in this area is growing fast as half of the existing patents on FFA4 agonists have been issued after 2013. There is, however, a need of further diversifying new chemical classes away form the current substrate-like, carboxylic acid-containing agonists.

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of surface acidity. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    Our research in the general area of acid catalysis involves the characterization of solid acidity and the corresponding assessment of catalytic performance of acidic materials. Acid characterization studies are required to provide essential information about the type of acid site (i.e., Lewis versus Bronsted), the strength of the sites, and the mobility of molecules adsorbed on the acid sites. An accurate measure of acid strength is given by the heat of adsorption of a basic probe molecule on the acid site. A thermodynamic representation of the mobility of adsorbed species on these sites is given by the entropy of adsorption. Important techniques used in these acid site characterization studies include microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric measurements, temperature programmed desorption, infrared spectroscopy and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The combination of these acid site characterization studies with reaction kinetics measurements of selected catalytic processes allows the elucidation of possible relationships between surface thermodynamic and kinetic properties of acidic sites. Such relationships are important milestones in formulating effective strategies for the effective utilization of solid acid catalysts. Current work in this direction involves methylamine syntheses over various zeolites, and the basic probe molecules employed include ammonia, methanol, water and mono-, di- and tri-methylamines. 31 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids through asymmetric protolactonization promoted by chiral phosphonous acid diester.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Masayuki; Sakakura, Akira; Ishihara, Kazuaki

    2013-06-07

    Chiral phosphonium salts induce the kinetic resolution of racemic α-substituted unsaturated carboxylic acids through asymmetric protolactonization. Both the lactones and the recovered carboxylic acids are obtained with high enantioselectivities and high S (= kfast/kslow) values. Asymmetric protolactonization also leads to the desymmetrization of achiral carboxylic acids. Notably, chiral phosphonous acid diester not only induced the enantioselectivity but also promoted protolactonization.

  13. Kinetic studies of corn stover saccharification using sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, N.; Macdonald, D.G.; Bakhshi, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis in corn stover were studied with a nonisothermal technique. Reactions were arrested at temperatures between 160 and 240/sup 0/C and product sugars were analyzed using a Bio-Rad HPX-85 liquid chromatographic column. A simple first-order series reaction model was used for both cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis rections. Kinetic parameters were obtained for three different sulphuric acid concentrations (0.49, 0.92, and 1.47 wt %). Activation energies remained constant over this acid concentration range but the preexponential factors showed an increase with acid concentration. Relationships were obtained between the preexponential factors and acid concentrations. Cellulose hydrolysis and glucose degradation reactions were observed to be of higher order with respect to acid concentration in comparison with the previous studies with other raw materials.

  14. Kinetic studies of corn stover saccharification using sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, N.; Macdonald, D.G.; Bakhshi, N.N.

    1984-04-01

    The kinetics of crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis in corn stover were studied with a nonisothermal technique. Reactions were arrested at temperatures between 160 and 240 degrees C and product sugars were analyzed using a Bio-Rad HPX-85 liquid chromatographic column. A simple first-order series reaction model was used for both cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis reactions. Kinetic parameters were obtained for three different sulphuric acid concentrations (0.49, 0.92, and 1.47 weight %). Activation energies remained constant over this acid concentration range but the preexponential factors showed an increase with acid concentration. Relationships were obtained between the preexponential factors and acid concentrations. Cellulose hydrolysis and glucose degradation reactions were observed to be of higher order with respect to acid concentration in comparison with the previous studies with other raw materials. (Refs. 22).

  15. Regulation of prohormone convertase 2 protein expression via GPR40/FFA1 in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Aizawa, Fuka; Nishinaka, Takashi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2015-09-05

    Previous studies have shown that the administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or GW9508, a GPR40/FFA1 (free fatty acid receptor) agonist, facilitates β-endorphin release in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in mice. However, the mechanisms mediating β-endorphin release induced by GPR40/FFA1 agonists remain unknown. In this study, we focused on the changes in expression of hypothalamic prohormone convertase (PC) 2, which is a calcium-dependent subtilisin-related proteolytic enzyme. The intracerebroventricular injection of DHA or GW9508 significantly increased PC2 protein expression in the hypothalamus. This increase in PC2 expression was inhibited by pretreatment with GW1100, a GPR40/FFA1 antagonist. Furthermore, PC2 protein expression gradually increased over time after complete Freund's adjuvant. These increase in PC2 expression were inhibited by pretreatment with GW1100. However, GW1100 by itself had no effect on PC2 levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that activation of the hypothalamic GPR40/FFA1 signaling pathway may regulate β-endorphin release via PC2, and regulate the endogenous pain control system.

  16. Methylene Blue-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Experiment in Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snehalatha, K. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise involving methylene blue and L-ascorbic acid in a simple clock reaction technique to illustrate the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. If stock solutions are supplied and each type of experiment takes no more than half an hour, the entire investigation can be completed in three practical sessions of three hours…

  17. Oleic acid exposure of cultured endothelial cells alters lipid mediator production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel, biodiesel, and other combustion sources contain free fatty acid (FFA) components capable of entering the body through particulate inhalation. FFA can also be endogenously released into circulation in response to stress. When in circulation, bioactive FFA may interact with...

  18. Kinetics of haloacetic acid reactions with Fe(0).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Arnold, William A; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2004-12-15

    Detailed kinetic studies of the reactions of haloacetic acids (HAAs) with Fe(0) were performed in longitudinally mixed batch reactors. The reactions of tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), bromodichloroacetic acid, and chlorodibromoacetic acid were mass transfer limited, with corrected mass transfer coefficients of 3.7-3.9 x 10(-4) m/s. The reactions of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), and bromoacetic acid (BAA) were reaction limited. Bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were partially reaction limited. For the reaction limited species and partially reaction limited species, intra- and interspecies competition effects were observed. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson kinetic model incorporating a mass transfer term was adopted to account for these effects. The lumped kinetic parameters for the HAAs ranged from 0.04 to 248 microM min(-1) for an iron loading of 0.3 g of Fe/125 mL and followed the trend DBAA > BCAA > TCAA > BAA > DCAA. The adsorption parameters ranged from 0.0007 to 0.0065 microM(-1). The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the reaction of TBAA or BAA with Fe(0) was also investigated. No significant effect of DO on the reaction rate of TBAA, which is a mass transfer limited species, was observed. A lag phase, however, was observed for the reaction of BAA, which is a reaction limited species, until the DO was depleted. Simulations were performed to investigate the potential significance of the reactions of HAAs with Fe(0) in water distribution systems.

  19. State FFA Officers' Confidence and Trustworthiness of Biotechnology Information Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingenbach, Gary J.; Rutherford, Tracy A.

    2007-01-01

    Are state FFA officers' awareness levels of agricultural topics reported in mass media superior to those who do not serve in leadership roles? The purpose of this study was to determine elected state FFA officers' awareness of biotechnology, and their confidence and trust of biotechnology information sources. Descriptive survey methods were used…

  20. Agrarianism: An Ideology of the National FFA Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The traditions of the National FFA Organization (FFA) are grounded in agrarianism. This ideology focuses on the ability of farming and nature to develop citizens and integrity within people. Agrarianism has been an important thread of American rhetoric since the founding of country. The ideology has morphed over the last two centuries as the…

  1. Factors Influencing or Discouraging Secondary School Students' FFA Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Kirstin; Henry, Anna L.; Bird, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern adolescents are faced with a variety of choices regarding how to spend their free time. As recruitment and increased student participation continues to be a major priority of the National FFA Organization, it is essential to explore the reasons why students make the choice to become or not to become a member of FFA. This study was a part of…

  2. The Benefits of FFA Membership as Part of Agricultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Chelsea; Stephens, Carrie A.; Stripling, Christopher; Cross, Tim; Sanok, Danielle E.; Brawner, Shelby

    2016-01-01

    The study sought to identify the benefits of FFA membership based on the fulfillment of three basic human needs: love and belonging, self-esteem, and self-actualization. The study focused on the fulfillment of FFA members' basic human needs as defined by Abraham Maslow. The three needs on which this study focused are: love and belonging,…

  3. Ganoderic Acid A Metabolites and Their Metabolic Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang-Rui; Feng, Li; Ye, Lin-Hu; Wang, Li-Sha; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Tao, Xue; Chang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderic acid A (GAA), a representative active triterpenoid from Ganoderma lucidum, has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidative, cytotoxic, hepatoprotective and anticancer activities. The present study aims (1) to identify GAA metabolites, in vivo by analyzing the bile, plasma and urine after intravenous administration to rats (20 mg/kg), and in vitro by incubating with rat liver microsomes (RLMs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs); (2) to investigate the metabolic kinetics of main GAA metabolites. Using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS techniques, a total of 37 metabolites were tentatively characterized from in vivo samples based on their fragmentation behaviors. The metabolites detected in in vitro samples were similar to those found in vivo. GAA underwent extensive phase I and II metabolism. The main metabolic soft spots of GAA were 3, 7, 11, 15, 23-carbonyl groups (or hydroxyl groups) and 12, 20, 28 (29)-carbon atoms. Ganoderic acid C2 (GAC2) and 7β,15-dihydroxy-3,11,23-trioxo-lanost-26-oic acid were two main reduction metabolites of GAA, and their kinetics followed classical hyperbolic kinetics. The specific isoenzyme responsible for the biotransformation of the two metabolites in RLMs and HLMs was CYP3A. This is the first report on the comprehensive metabolism of GAA, as well as the metabolic kinetics of its main metabolites.

  4. Ganoderic Acid A Metabolites and Their Metabolic Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang-Rui; Feng, Li; Ye, Lin-Hu; Wang, Li-Sha; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Tao, Xue; Chang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderic acid A (GAA), a representative active triterpenoid from Ganoderma lucidum, has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidative, cytotoxic, hepatoprotective and anticancer activities. The present study aims (1) to identify GAA metabolites, in vivo by analyzing the bile, plasma and urine after intravenous administration to rats (20 mg/kg), and in vitro by incubating with rat liver microsomes (RLMs) and human liver microsomes (HLMs); (2) to investigate the metabolic kinetics of main GAA metabolites. Using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS techniques, a total of 37 metabolites were tentatively characterized from in vivo samples based on their fragmentation behaviors. The metabolites detected in in vitro samples were similar to those found in vivo. GAA underwent extensive phase I and II metabolism. The main metabolic soft spots of GAA were 3, 7, 11, 15, 23-carbonyl groups (or hydroxyl groups) and 12, 20, 28 (29)-carbon atoms. Ganoderic acid C2 (GAC2) and 7β,15-dihydroxy-3,11,23-trioxo-lanost-26-oic acid were two main reduction metabolites of GAA, and their kinetics followed classical hyperbolic kinetics. The specific isoenzyme responsible for the biotransformation of the two metabolites in RLMs and HLMs was CYP3A. This is the first report on the comprehensive metabolism of GAA, as well as the metabolic kinetics of its main metabolites. PMID:28326038

  5. Kinetic Monte Carlo method applied to nucleic acid hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Sauerwine, Ben; Widom, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo on coarse-grained systems, such as nucleic acid secondary structure, is advantageous for being able to access behavior at long time scales, even minutes or hours. Transition rates between coarse-grained states depend upon intermediate barriers, which are not directly simulated. We propose an Arrhenius rate model and an intermediate energy model that incorporates the effects of the barrier between simulated states without enlarging the state space itself. Applying our Arrhenius rate model to DNA hairpin folding, we demonstrate improved agreement with experiment compared to the usual kinetic Monte Carlo model. Further improvement results from including rigidity of single-stranded stacking.

  6. Effects of Acute Supramaximal Cycle Exercise on Plasma FFA Concentration in Obese Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study are 1) to evaluate the free fatty acid (FFA) profile and 2) to determine the relative anaerobic and aerobic contributions to total energy consumption during repeated supramaximal cycling bouts (SCE) in adolescent boys with different body weight statuses. Materials and Methods Normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB) adolescent boys (n =15 per group) completed a SCE sessions consisted of 6 x 6s maximal sprints with 2 min of passive rest between each repetition. Plasma FFA levels were determined at rest, immediately after a 10 min warm-up, and immediately at the end of SCE. The anaerobic and aerobic contributions (%) were measured via repeated SCE bouts. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) index. Results The FFA concentrations measured immediately after SCE were higher in the OB group than in the OW and NW (p<0.01 and p<0.01, respectively) groups. Moreover, the anaerobic contributions to SCE were significantly lower in obese adolescents (p<0.01) and decreased significantly during the 2nd, 3rd and 4th repetitions. The FFA levels were significantly associated with the HOMA-IR index and aerobic contribution among adolescent boys (r=0.83 and r=0.91, respectively, p<0.01). Conclusion In contrast to the NW and OW groups, there is an increase in lipid mobilization and sift to aerobic energy metabolism during SCE in the OB group. PMID:26076464

  7. Adiponectin concentrations increase during acute FFA elevation in humans treated with rosiglitazone.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Mittermayer, F; Krugluger, W; Roden, M; Schernthaner, G; Wolzt, M

    2007-10-01

    The adipocytokine adiponectin is released by adipocytes upon activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). PPAR gamma has binding sites for thiazolidinediones and free fatty acids (FFAs). To evaluate if adiponectin serum concentrations are synergistically regulated by FFAs and thiazolidinediones IN VIVO plasma FFAs were acutely elevated in healthy subjects pre-treated with rosiglitazone or placebo. Sixteen healthy male subjects (23-37 years) were included in this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel-group study. Rosiglitazone 8 mg or placebo was administered daily for 21 days. On the last day plasma FFA concentrations were increased by an intravenous triglyceride/heparin infusion. Blood for determination of adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, resistin, FFAs, glucose, and insulin was drawn at baseline and on day 21 before and after 5 hours of triglyceride/heparin infusion. Adiponectin concentrations increased and FFA levels decreased in subjects receiving rosiglitazone (all p<0.05 VS. baseline). Lipid infusion significantly increased FFA plasma concentrations, with an attenuated elevation in rosiglitazone-treated subjects. However, adiponectin concentrations were only increased in subjects on rosiglitazone (p=0.018 VS. before lipid infusion), but not in controls. Leptin increased during lipid infusion in subjects receiving placebo but not in those on rosiglitazone. CRP and resistin were not affected by rosiglitazone or FFAs. The acute increase in circulating adiponectin concentrations during acutely elevated FFA depends on PPAR gamma activation in healthy subjects.

  8. An Examination of Middle School Agricultural Education and FFA Programs: Survey Results from State FFA Executive Secretaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Rosemarie; McCaslin, N. L.

    A study collected information from 52 of the 53 state Future Farmers of America (FFA) executive secretaries who were sent questionnaires on middle school student enrollment in agricultural education and membership in the national FFA organization. Results showed that 30 states have agricultural education programs in the middle school level, with a…

  9. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  10. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  11. Biodegradation kinetics of trans-4-methyl-1-cyclohexane carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Paslawski, Janice C; Headley, John V; Hill, Gordon A; Nemati, Mehdi

    2009-02-01

    Naphthenic acids are a complex mixture of organic compounds which naturally occur in crude oil. Low molecular weight components of the naphthenic acids are known to be toxic in aquatic environments and there is a need to better understand the factors controlling the kinetics of their biodegradation. In this study, a relatively low molecular weight naphthenic acid compound (trans-isomer of 4-methyl-1-cyclohexane carboxylic acid) and a microbial culture developed in our laboratory were used to study the biodegradation of this naphthenic acid and to evaluate the kinetics of the process in batch cultures. The initial concentration of trans-4-methyl-1-cyclohexane carboxylic acid (50-750 mg l(-1)) did not affect the maximum specific growth rate of the bacteria at 23 degrees C (0.52 day(-1)) to the maximum biodegradable concentration (750 mg l(-1)). The maximum yield observed at this temperature and at a neutral pH was 0.21 mg of biomass per milligram of substrate. Batch experiments indicated that biodegradation can be achieved at low temperatures; however, the biodegradation rate at room temperature (23 degrees C) and neutral pH was 5 times faster than that observed at 4 degrees C. Biodegradation at various pH conditions indicated a maximum specific growth rate of 1.69 day(-1) and yield (0.41 mg mg(-1)) at a pH of 10.

  12. Kinetic study of sulphuric acid hydrolysis of protein feathers.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamad Bouhamed, Sana; Kechaou, Nabil

    2017-02-28

    Poultry feather keratin is the most important by-product from the poultry industry due to its abundance. Different methods have been still applied to process this by-product such as enzymatic hydrolysis which is expensive and inapplicable at the industrial level. This paper presents a study of acid hydrolysis of poultry feathers using different types of acids, sulphuric acid concentration, different temperatures and solid to liquid ratio to obtain a liquid product rich in peptides. The feathers analysis revealed a crude protein content of 88.83%. A maximum peptides production of 676 mg/g was reached using sulphuric acid, 1 molar acid concentration and 50 g/l solid to liquid ratio at a temperature of 90 °C after 300 min. A reaction scheme for protein aggregation and decomposition to polypeptides and amino acids was proposed and a kinetic model for peptides production was developed. The proposed kinetic model proved to be well adapted to the experimental data with R (2) = 0.99.

  13. Kinetic and equilibrium lithium acidities of arenes: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Streitwieser, Andrew; Shah, Kamesh; Reyes, Julius R; Zhang, Xingyue; Davis, Nicole R; Wu, Eric C

    2010-08-26

    Kinetic acidities of arenes, ArH, measured some time ago by hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics with lithium cyclohexylamide (LiCHA) in cyclohexylamine (CHA) show a wide range of reactivities that involve several electronic mechanisms. These experimental reactivities give an excellent Brønsted correlation with equilibrium lithium ion pair acidities (pK(Li)) derived as shown recently from computations of ArLi.2E (E = dimethyl ether). The various electronic mechanisms are well modeled by ab initio HF calculations with modest basis sets. Additional calculations using NH(3) as a model for CHA further characterize the TS of the exchange reactions. The slopes of Brønsted correlations of ion pair systems can vary depending on the nature of the ion pairs.

  14. Insulin-Mediated FFA Suppression Is Associated with Triglyceridemia and Insulin Sensitivity Independent of Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Nikki C.; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Khosla, Sundeep

    2012-01-01

    Context: A central/visceral fat distribution and excess free fatty acid (FFA) availability are associated with dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. However, these two characteristics often coexist, making it difficult to detect the independent contributions of each. Whether FFA suppression is more closely linked to metabolic abnormalities is not clear. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between FFA suppression, body fat distribution, and fitness as contributors toward insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia. Design: We measured systemic palmitate turnover using an iv infusion of [9,10-3H]palmitate; upper body sc adipose tissue (UBSQ) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and a single-slice abdominal computed tomography scan; fitness with a graded exercise treadmill test; and insulin sensitivity with both the iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) (SIIVGTT) and mixed meal tolerance test (SIMeal). Setting: The study was conducted at a General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Baseline data were obtained from 140 elderly adults (age, 60–88 yr; 83 males) and 60 young adults (age, 18–31 yr; 31 males) who participated in a previously published trial assessing the effects of 2-yr supplementation of dehydroepiandrosterone or testosterone on body composition, glucose metabolism, and bone density. Interventions: There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measures: We measured fasting plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations, SIIVGTT, and SIMeal. Results: Using multivariate regression analysis, the strongest combined predictors of TG concentrations were VAT, postmeal nadir FFA concentrations, sex, and age. The best predictors of SIIVGTT were IVGTT nadir palmitate concentration, VAT, UBSQ fat, fitness, and age, whereas the best predictors of SIMeal were meal nadir palmitate concentration, UBSQ fat, fitness, and sex. Conclusions: FFA suppression is associated with both fasting TG concentrations and insulin

  15. Kinetics of Methylene Blue Reduction by Ascorbic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowry, Sarah; Ogren, Paul J.

    1999-07-01

    The redox reactions of methylene blue (MB+) often occur on a time scale of a few seconds to minutes. They may be followed visually for qualitative interpretations and spectrophotometrically for quantitative determinations. The experimental simplicity of MB+ reaction systems has also occasionally led to erroneous conclusions based upon oversimplified data treatment and assumptions. This paper compares spectrophotometric studies of MB+ reduction by ascorbic acid at low pH with previous conclusions based upon visual determinations of color loss. Spectrophotometric studies of the temporal decay of MB+ absorbance at 665 nm show that the reaction is first order in MB+, ascorbic acid, and HCl. A slower reaction occurs with only MB+ and ascorbic acid present. Regeneration of MB+ color by reaction with dissolved oxygen, the "blue bottle" reaction, is particularly significant when the reaction with ascorbic acid is slow. Methylene blue chemistry continues to provide a wealth of examples suitable for undergraduate kinetics studies.

  16. Meeting record for FFA working meeting of November 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1992-01-03

    This document provides a meeting record of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) working meeting to discuss progress on old issues and further required actions regarding environmental impacts of the Savannah River Facility. (FI)

  17. Simultaneous ozonation kinetics of phenolic acids present in wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, F.J.; Beltran-Heredia, J.; Acero, J.L.; Pinilla, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Among the several chemical processes conducted for the removal of organic matter present in wastewaters coming from some agro-industrial plants (wine distilleries, olive oil mills, etc), the oxidation by ozone has shown a great effectiveness in the destruction of specially refractory pollutants: it is demonstrated that the biodegradability of those wastewaters increases aflcer an ozonation pretreatment. Their great pollutant character is imputed to the presence of some organic compounds, like phenols and polyphenols, which are toxic and inhibit the latter biological treatments. In this research, a competitive kinetic procedure reported by Clurol and Nekouinaini is applied to determine the degradation rate constants by ozone of several phenolic acids which are present in the wastewaters from the olive oil obtaining process. The resulting kinetic expressions for the ozonation reactions are useful for the successful design and operation of ozone reactors in water and wastewaters treatment plants.

  18. Sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Liu, Cheng-jun; Shi, Pei-yang; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Mao-fa; Zhang, Qing-song; Zevenhoven, Ron; Saxén, Henrik

    2015-03-01

    The sulfuric acid leaching kinetics of South African chromite was investigated. The negative influence of a solid product layer constituted of a silicon-rich phase and chromium-rich sulfate was eliminated by crushing the chromite and by selecting proper leaching conditions. The dimensionless change in specific surface area and the conversion rate of the chromite were observed to exhibit a proportional relationship. A modified shrinking particle model was developed to account for the change in reactive surface area, and the model was fitted to experimental data. The resulting model was observed to describe experimental findings very well. Kinetics analysis revealed that the leaching process is controlled by a chemical reaction under the employed experimental conditions and the activation energy of the reaction is 48 kJ·mol-1.

  19. Kinetics of 3-nitrotyrosine modification on exposure to hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Curtis, M P; Neidigh, J W

    2014-11-01

    The markers 3-nitrotyrosine and 3-chlorotyrosine are measured as surrogates for reactive nitrogen species and hypochlorous acid respectively, which are both elevated in inflamed human tissues. Previous studies reported a loss of 3-nitrotyrosine when exposed to hypochlorous acid, suggesting that observations of 3-nitrotyrosine underestimate the presence of reactive nitrogen species in diseased tissue (Whiteman and Halliwell, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 258, 168-172 (1999)). This report evaluates the significance of 3-nitrotyrosine loss by measuring the kinetics of the reaction between 3-nitrotyrosine and hypochlorous acid. The results demonstrate that 3-nitrotyrosine is chlorinated by hypochlorous acid or chloramines to form 3-chloro-5-nitrotyrosine. As 3-nitrotyrosine from in vivo samples is usually found within proteins rather than as free amino acid, we also examined the reaction of 3-nitrotyrosine modification in the context of peptides. The chlorination of 3-nitrotyrosine in peptides was observed to occur up to 700-fold faster than control reactions using equivalent amino acid mixtures. These results further advance our understanding of tyrosine chlorination and the use of 3-nitrotyrosine formed in vivo as a biomarker of reactive nitrogen species.

  20. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A N; Echarte, María M

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ') while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way.

  1. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A. N.; Echarte, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ′) while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way. PMID:27242809

  2. An Analysis of FFA Chapter Demographics as Compared to Schools and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Shannon; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.; Outley, Corliss

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study was a special project for the National FFA [Future Farmers of America] Organization to determine the demographic makeup of rural, suburban, urban, and randomly selected at-large FFA chapters from the four national FFA regions. Summary data for this study revealed that gender in selected FFA chapters was 55% male and 45%…

  3. Winning the War: A Historical Analysis of the FFA during World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Connors, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The United States' participation in World War II affected millions of men, women, and children, both at home and around the world. The war effort also affected the Future Farmers of America (FFA). FFA members, agriculture teachers, and national FFA officers all volunteered to serve their country during the war. Local FFA chapters and individual…

  4. Abiotic Racemization Kinetics of Amino Acids in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Andrew D.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10−5–11×10−5 yr−1. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations. PMID:23951211

  5. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid.

  6. Kinetics of acid base catalyzed transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil.

    PubMed

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M P

    2010-10-01

    Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstock for biodiesel production in India. Limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high free fatty acids containing oil. The present study reports the results of kinetic study of two-step acid base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at an optimum temperature of 65 °C and 50 °C for esterification and transesterification respectively under the optimum methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H₂SO₄ and NaOH. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The results indicate that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min⁻¹ and 0.008 min⁻¹ respectively. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained.

  7. Effect of borax on the crystallization kinetics of boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ömer

    2002-03-01

    The effect of different borax concentrations on the growth and dissolution rates of boric acid crystals were measured in a fluidized bed crystallizer under well-established conditions of supersaturation and undersaturation and fluidization. It was found that the presence of borax in boric-acid solution decreases the mass-transfer coefficient, kd, the surface-reaction constant, kr and reaction order r pertaining to growth and dissolution rates of boric acid crystals. The effectiveness factors were estimated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitudes of the two resistances in series, diffusion and integration. The controlling mechanism is mainly by integration for the crystal growth of boric acid in the pure state and in the presence of borax in solution. The kinetic parameters ( kr, kd, r) were determined by a new method which is called trial and error under no assumption. This method gives a high accuracy of determination of the mass-transfer coefficient, kd, the surface-reaction constant, kr and surface-reaction order, r. The relative standard deviation between the equation Rg= kr(( ρα- ρeq)- Rg(1- wα)/ kd) r and those experimentally obtained and represented by the equation Rg= kg( ρα- ρeq) g do not exceed 0.013 for both the growth and dissolution regions.

  8. Bond energies in polyunsaturated acids and kinetics of co-oxidation of protiated and deuterated acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, Z. S.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Pliss, E. M.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational program specially designed to analyze co-oxidation of substances in mixtures is suggested. The rigorous kinetic scheme of 32 reactions describing co-oxidation of isotope differing polyunsaturated fatty acids was computed to enlighten experimentally detected enormously large H/D isotope effects. The latter were shown to depend on the kinetic chain length and exhibit two extreme regimes of short and long chains which characterize isotope effects on the initiation and propagation chain reactions of hydrogen (deuterium) atom abstraction. No protective effect of deuterated polyunsaturated acids on the oxidation of protiated acids was detected. Protective effect of the deuterated compounds on the biologically important processes seems to be induced by the low yield of products formed in the chain termination reactions due to the low rate of initiation by deuterated compounds.

  9. Kinetics of DNA Strand Displacement Systems with Locked Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olson, Xiaoping; Kotani, Shohei; Yurke, Bernard; Graugnard, Elton; Hughes, William L

    2017-03-30

    Locked nucleic acids (LNAs) are conformationally restricted RNA nucleotides. Their increased thermal stability and selectivity toward their complements make them well-suited for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although the structural and thermodynamic properties of LNA-LNA, LNA-RNA, and LNA-DNA hybridizations are known, the kinetic effects of incorporating LNA nucleotides into DNA strand displacement systems are not. Here, we thoroughly studied the strand displacement kinetics as a function of the number and position of LNA nucleotides in DNA oligonucleotides. When compared to that of an all-DNA control, with an identical sequence, the leakage rate constant was reduced more than 50-fold, to an undetectable level, and the invasion rate was preserved for a hybrid DNA/LNA system. The total performance enhancement ratio also increased more than 70-fold when calculating the ratio of the invading rate to the leakage rate constants for a hybrid system. The rational substitution of LNA nucleotides for DNA nucleotides preserves sequence space while improving the signal-to-noise ratio of strand displacement systems. Hybrid DNA/LNA systems offer great potential for high-performance chemical reaction networks that include catalyzed hairpin assemblies, hairpin chain reactions, motors, walkers, and seesaw gates.

  10. Kinetic studies of clavulanic acid recovery by ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Barboza, M; Almeida, R M; Hokka, C O

    2001-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a beta-lactamase inhibitor produced by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nowadays, the combination of CA with amoxycillin is the most successful example of the use of a beta-lactam antibiotic sensitive to beta-lactamases together with an inhibitor of these enzymes. Clavulanic acid is purified from fermentation broth by a series of steps consisting mainly of two-phase separation processes such as liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption or ion-exchange chromatography, among others. Amberlite IRA 400, a strong anion-exchange resin, has a very high adsorption capacity for CA (Mayer et al. 1997). This resin can be pre-treated with NaCl (chloride cycle), to remove selectively only those anions, which are able to displace chloride from the resin or with NaOH (hydroxyl cycle), to remove all species of anions. In order to decide the best operating conditions for CA recovery by ion-exchange resins and then to construct a model of this separation process, batch experiments were conducted using Amberlite IRA 400 in the chloride cycle. These runs were carried out in a 200 ml stirred tank, at two different initial solution pH, 6.2 and 4.0; the temperature was maintained at 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C during adsorption and 30 degrees C during the desorption step. It was possible, on the basis of these batch results, to model the separation process, including the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium data and mass transfer limitations.

  11. Kinetics of non-isothermal decomposition of cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-rui; Qi, Zhen-li; Chen, Fei-xiong; Yue, Xia-xin

    2014-07-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of cinnamic acid were investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry at four heating rates. The activation energies of this process were calculated from analysis of TG curves by methods of Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, Distributed Activation Energy Model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger, respectively. There are only one stage of thermal decomposition process in TG and two endothermic peaks in DSC. For this decomposition process of cinnamic acid, E and log A[s-1] were determined to be 81.74 kJ mol-1 and 8.67, respectively. The mechanism was Mampel Power law (the reaction order, n = 1), with integral form G(α) = α (α = 0.1-0.9). Moreover, thermodynamic properties of Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ were 77.96 kJ mol-1, -90.71 J mol-1 K-1, 119.41 kJ mol-1.

  12. Cometary impact and amino acid survival - Chemical kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9?? above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometa??ry delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  13. Occupational Aspirations of State FFA Contest and Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Blannie E.; Doerfert, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A study explored the occupational aspirations of 300 (of 503) students with high levels of participation in Future Farmers of America's (FFA) Computers in Agriculture (CIA), Proficiency Award (PA), and Prepared and Extemporaneous Speaking (PES) contests. CIA and PES winners aspired to professional occupations more than PA winners. PES winners…

  14. Identifying Quality Indicators of SAE and FFA: A Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Charles Cordell, III; Kitchel, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine quality indicators for SAE and FFA according to 36 experts across the United States. This is a part of a larger study looking at all components of the traditional three-circle model. The study utilized the Delphi technique to garner expert opinion about quality indicators in Agricultural Education. For…

  15. Examining Year-Long Leadership Gains in FFA Members by Prior FFA Involvement, Class Year, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosch, David; Simonsen, Jon C.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Students (N = 160) in three diverse FFA chapters were surveyed in early fall, midwinter, and late spring in regard to their leadership skills, confidence in leading, and motivation to engage in leadership-oriented behaviors. The results indicated small-to-moderate gains in transformational leadership skill and a marginally significant…

  16. Factors Related to the Success of New Mexico Vocational Agriculture Teachers as FFA Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    A study to identify characteristics which are related to the degree of success of an FFA advisor, and to identify competencies in which a teacher's perceived proficiency are related to his success as an FFA advisor. (HD)

  17. Kinetic characterization of a novel acid ectophosphatase from Enterobacter asburiae.

    PubMed

    Sato, Vanessa Sayuri; Galdiano Júnior, Renato F; Rodrigues, Gisele Regina; Lemos, Eliana G M; Pizauro Junior, João Martins

    2016-02-01

    Expression of acid ectophosphatase by Enterobacter asburiae, isolated from Cattleya walkeriana (Orchidaceae) roots and identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis, was strictly regulated by phosphorus ions, with its optimal activity being observed at an inorganic phosphate concentration of 7 mM. At the optimum pH 3.5, intact cells released p-nitrophenol at a rate of 350.76 ± 13.53 nmol of p-nitrophenolate (pNP)/min/10(8) cells. The membrane-bound enzyme was obtained by centrifugation at 100,000 × g for 1 h at 4 °C. p-Nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) hydrolysis by the enzyme follows "Michaelis-Menten" kinetics with V = 61.2 U/mg and K0.5 = 60 μM, while ATP hydrolysis showed V = 19.7 U/mg, K0.5 = 110 μM, and nH = 1.6 and pyrophosphate hydrolysis showed V = 29.7 U/mg, K0.5 = 84 μM, and nH = 2.3. Arsenate and phosphate were competitive inhibitors with K i = 0.6 mM and K i = 1.8 mM, respectively. p-Nitrophenyl phosphatase (pNPPase) activity was inhibited by vanadate, while p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, EDTA, calcium, copper, and cobalt had no inhibitory effects. Magnesium ions were stimulatory (K0.5 = 2.2 mM and nH = 0.5). Production of an acid ectophosphatase can be a mechanism for the solubilization of mineral phosphates by microorganisms such as Enterobacter asburiae that are versatile in the solubilization of insoluble minerals, which, in turn, increases the availability of nutrients for plants, particularly in soils that are poor in phosphorus.

  18. The Impact of Learning Styles on Learning Outcomes at FFA Camp: What Campers Retain over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Terry, Robert, Jr.; Kelsey, Kathleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-four states host FFA summer camps to support adolescent maturation along with indoctrination into the culture and values of the FFA. Camps typically include a variety of activities designed to engage members in social activities and non-formal academic content. More than 1500 campers attend the Oklahoma FFA Alumni Leadership Camp annually…

  19. Student Self-Perceptions of Leadership in Two Missouri FFA Chapters: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagay, Rachel Bartholomew; Marx, Adam A.; Simonsen, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study is the self-perceptions of leadership engagement of FFA members in two FFA chapters in Missouri. This multiple case study used documentation of student self-perceptions, researcher observations, and focus groups. The two cases included 24 high school students comprised of FFA officers and members, who provided their…

  20. Self-Perceived Youth Leadership and Life Skills of Iowa FFA Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingenbach, Gary J.; Kahler, Alan A.

    1997-01-01

    The Youth Leadership and Life Skills Development Scale was completed by 282 of 316 Iowa Future Farmers of America (FFA) members. The strongest relationship appeared between their scores and FFA leadership activities. Other factors affecting life/leadership skills development included after-school jobs, years in FFA, grades, and gender. (SK)

  1. ADAPTING THE FFA TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE. RESEARCH SERIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KANTER, EARL F.; BENDER, RALPH E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONAL STUDY WAS TO SUGGEST WAYS OF ADAPTING THE FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA (FFA) TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE THROUGH IDENTIFYING NEW PURPOSES OF THE FFA AND EVALUATING SELECTED OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL AND STATE FFA ACTIVITIES. MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES OFFICE OF EDUCATION, HEAD STATE…

  2. A kinetic study on the isomerization of hop alpha-acids.

    PubMed

    Jaskula, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2008-08-13

    In this article, a detailed study on hop alpha-acid isomerization kinetics is presented. Because of the complex wort matrix and interfering interactions occurring during real wort boiling (i.e., trub formation and alpha-acids/iso-alpha-acids complexation), this investigation on alpha-acid isomerization kinetics was performed in aqueous buffer solution as a function of time (0-90 min) and heating temperature (80-100 degrees C). Rate constants and activation energies for the formation of individual iso-alpha-acids were determined. It was found that iso-alpha-acid formation follows first-order kinetics and Arrhenius behavior. Differences in activation energies for the formation of trans- and cis-isomers were noticed, the activation energy for the formation of trans-iso-alpha-acids being approximately 9 kJmol (-1) lower.

  3. Kinetics of Acid Reactions: Making Sense of Associated Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In chemical kinetics, in addition to the concepts related to kinetics, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and the characteristics of the reactants are often involved when comparing the rates of different reactions, making such comparisons very challenging for students at all levels, as well as for pre-service science teachers. Consequently, four…

  4. Yeast display evolution of a kinetically efficient 13-amino acid substrate for lipoic acid ligase

    PubMed Central

    Puthenveetil, Sujiet; Liu, Daniel S.; White, Katharine A.; Thompson, Samuel; Ting, Alice Y.

    2009-01-01

    E. coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) catalyzes ATP-dependent covalent ligation of lipoic acid onto specific lysine sidechains of three acceptor proteins involved in oxidative metabolism. Our lab has shown that LplA and engineered mutants can ligate useful small-molecule probes such as alkyl azides (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487) and photocrosslinkers (Angew. Chem Int. Ed Engl. 2008, 47, 7018–7021) in place of lipoic acid, facilitating imaging and proteomic studies. Both to further our understanding of lipoic acid metabolism, and to improve LplA’s utility as a biotechnological platform, we have engineered a novel 13-amino acid peptide substrate for LplA. LplA’s natural protein substrates have a conserved β-hairpin structure, a conformation that is difficult to recapitulate in a peptide, and thus we performed in vitro evolution to engineer the LplA peptide substrate, called “LplA Acceptor Peptide” (LAP). A ~107 library of LAP variants was displayed on the surface of yeast cells, labeled by LplA with either lipoic acid or bromoalkanoic acid, and the most efficiently labeled LAP clones were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Four rounds of evolution followed by additional rational mutagenesis produced a “LAP2” sequence with a kcat/Km of 0.99 μM−1min−1, >70-fold better than our previous rationally-designed 22-amino acid LAP1 sequence (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487), and only 8-fold worse than the kcat/Km values of natural lipoate and biotin acceptor proteins. The kinetic improvement over LAP1 allowed us to rapidly label cell surface peptide-fused receptors with quantum dots. PMID:19863063

  5. Kinetics of the reaction between ozone and phenolic acids present in agro-industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Heredia, J; Torregrosa, J; Dominguez, J R; Peres, J A

    2001-03-01

    The kinetics of the ozonation of three phenolic acids is investigated from ozone absorption experiments in a semi-continuous reactor. After the evaluation of stoichiometric ratios for the individual reactions between ozone and each phenolic acid, the oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid by ozone is performed in a first stage. The influence of the operating variables on the degradation process is established, and the application of a mass transfer with chemical reaction model based on the film theory leads to the determination of the reaction orders and kinetic rate constants. The experimental absorption rates obtained agree well with those calculated theoretically. In the second stage, a mixture of ferulic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid), beta-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) and p-hydroxybenzoic acid is ozonated under different experimental conditions. The kinetic study is performed by means of a competitive method that takes p-hydroxybenzoic acid as reference compound. The application of this model allows to determine the kinetic rate constants for each compound, which are correlated as a function of pH and temperature. The results obtained support that the kinetic regime of absorption is fast and pseudo-first order with respect to ozone, a condition required by the competitive method used.

  6. Ozonation kinetics of phenolic acids present in wastewaters from olive oil mills

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, F.J.; Beltran-Heredia, J.; Acero, J.L.; Pinilla, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A kinetic study of the degradation by ozone of eight phenolic acids present in wastewaters from olive oil mills has been performed by using a competition kinetic method. The selected phenolic acids are: caffeic, p-coumaric, syringic, vanillic, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic, veratric, p-hydroxy-benzoic, and protocatechuic. The influence of the operating variables (temperature, pH, and ozone partial pressure in the gas stream) is established, and the stoichiometric ratios for the individual direct reactions between ozone and each acid are determined. Once the reaction rate constants are evaluated, they are correlated as a function of temperature and pH into kinetic expressions which are provided for every phenolic acid. The global process occurs in the fast and pseudo-first-order kinetic regime of absorption, a condition required by the competition model to be used.

  7. Effects of Increased Free Fatty Acid Availability on Adipose Tissue Fatty Acid Storage in Men

    PubMed Central

    Mundi, Manpreet S.; Koutsari, Chistina

    2014-01-01

    Context: A portion of free fatty acids (FFA) released from adipose tissue lipolysis are re-stored in adipocytes via direct uptake. Rates of direct adipose tissue FFA storage are much greater in women than men, but women also have greater systemic FFA flux and more body fat. Objective: We tested the hypotheses that experimental increases in FFA in men would equalize the rates of direct adipose tissue FFA storage in men and women. Design: We used a lipid emulsion infusion to raise FFA in men to levels seen in post-absorptive women. Direct FFA storage (μmol·kg fat−1·min−1) rates in abdominal and femoral fat was assessed using stable isotope tracer infusions to measure FFA disappearance rates and an iv FFA radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Setting: These studies were performed in a Clinical Research Center. Participants: Data from 13 non-obese women was compared with that from eight obese and eight non-obese men. Intervention: The men received a lipid emulsion infusion to raise FFA. Main Outcome Measures: We measured the rates of direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral adipose tissue. Results: The three groups were similar in age and FFA flux by design; obese men had similar body fat percentage as non-obese women. Despite matching for FFA concentrations and flux, FFA storage per kg abdominal (P < .01) and femoral (P < .001) fat was less in both lean and obese men than in non-obese women. Abdominal FFA storage rates were correlated with proteins/enzymes in the FFA uptake/triglyceride synthesis pathway in men. Conclusion: The lesser rates of direct FFA adipose tissue in men compared with women cannot be explained by reduced FFA availability. PMID:25192251

  8. Kinetics of the reactions of hypochlorous acid and amino acid chloramines with thiols, methionine, and ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Peskin, A V; Winterbourn, C C

    2001-03-01

    Thiol oxidation by hypochlorous acid and chloramines is a favorable reaction and may be responsible for alterations in regulatory or signaling pathways in cells exposed to neutrophil oxidants. In order to establish the mechanism for such changes, it is necessary to appreciate whether these oxidants are selective for different thiols as compared with other scavengers. We have measured rate constants for reactions of amino acid chloramines with a range of thiols, methionine, and ascorbate, using a combination of stopped-flow and competitive kinetics. For HOCl, rate constants are too fast to measure directly by our system and values relative to reduced glutathione were determined by competition with methionine. For taurine chloramine, the rate constants for reaction with 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid, GSH, methionine, and ascorbate at pH 7.4 were 970, 115, 39, and 13 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Values for 10 thiols varied by a factor of 20 and showed an inverse relationship to the pK(a) of the thiol group. Rate constants for chloramines of glycine and N-alpha-acetyl-lysine also showed these relationships. Rates increased with decreasing pH, suggesting a mechanism involving acid catalysis. For hypochlorous acid, rates of reaction with 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid, GSH, cysteine, and most of the other thiols were very similar. Relative reactivities varied by less than 5 and there was no dependence on thiol pK(a). Chloramines have the potential to be selective for different cellular thiols depending on their pK(a). For HOCl to be selective, other factors must be important, or its reactions could be secondary to chloramine formation.

  9. Fluorescence methods to study DNA translocation and unwinding kinetics by nucleic acid motors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christopher J; Tomko, Eric J; Wu, Colin G; Lohman, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    Translocation of nucleic acid motor proteins (translocases) along linear nucleic acids can be studied by monitoring either the time course of the arrival of the motor protein at one end of the nucleic acid or the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis by the motor protein during translocation using pre-steady state ensemble kinetic methods in a stopped-flow instrument. Similarly, the unwinding of double-stranded DNA or RNA by helicases can be studied in ensemble experiments by monitoring either the kinetics of the conversion of the double-stranded nucleic acid into its complementary single strands by the helicase or the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis by the helicase during unwinding. Such experiments monitor translocation of the enzyme along or unwinding of a series of nucleic acids labeled at one position (usually the end) with a fluorophore or a pair of fluorophores that undergo changes in fluorescence intensity or efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We discuss how the pre-steady state kinetic data collected in these ensemble experiments can be analyzed by simultaneous global nonlinear least squares (NLLS) analysis using simple sequential "n-step" mechanisms to obtain estimates of the macroscopic rates and processivities of translocation and/or unwinding, the rate-limiting step(s) in these mechanisms, the average "kinetic step-size," and the stoichiometry of coupling ATP binding and hydrolysis to movement along the nucleic acid.

  10. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  11. Kinetics of browning and correlations between browning degree and pyrazine compounds in l-ascorbic acid/acidic amino acid model systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Nong; Zhou, Yong-Yan; Yang, Yi-Ni

    2017-04-15

    The kinetics of browning and the correlation between browning products (BPs) and pyrazine compounds were investigated by heating equimolar l-ascorbic acid (ASA)/acidic amino acids under weak alkaline conditions at 120-150°C for 10-120min. The formations of BPs and pyrazine compounds from the reaction were monitored by UV-vis and SPME-GC-FID, respectively. The formation of BPs in both ASA/l-glutamic acid and ASA/l-aspartic acid model reaction systems followed zero order reaction kinetics with activation energies (Ea) of 90.13 and 93.38kJ/mol, respectively. ASA/l-aspartic acid browned at a slightly higher rate than ASA/l-glutamic acid. The total concentration of pyrazine compounds was highly and positively correlated with that of BPs. Based on the observed kinetic data, the formation mechanisms of BPs and pyrazine compounds were proposed.

  12. The Quest for the FFA and Where It Led.

    PubMed

    Kanwisher, Nancy

    2017-02-01

    This article tells the story behind our first paper on the fusiform face area (FFA): how we chose the question, developed the methods, and followed the data to find the FFA and subsequently many other functionally specialized cortical regions. The paper's impact had less to do with the particular findings in the paper itself and more to do with the method that it promoted and the picture of the human mind and brain that it led to. The use of a functional localizer to define a candidate region in each subject individually enabled us not just to make pictures of brain activation, but also to ask principled, hypothesis-driven questions about a thing in nature. This method enabled stronger and more extensive tests of the function of each cortical region than had been possible before in humans and, as a result, has produced a large body of evidence that the human cortex contains numerous regions that are specifically engaged in particular mental processes. The growing inventory of cortical regions with distinctive and often very specific functions can be seen as an initial sketch of the basic components of the human mind. This sketch also serves as a roadmap into the vast and exciting new landscape of questions about the computations, structural connections, time course, development, plasticity, and evolution of each of these regions, as well as the hardest question of all: how do these regions work together to produce human intelligence?

  13. Delphinidin Reduces Glucose Uptake in Mice Jejunal Tissue and Human Intestinal Cells Lines through FFA1/GPR40.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Teuber, Stefanie; Morera, Francisco J; Ojeda, Camila; Flores, Carlos A; Hidalgo, María A; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos; Burgos, Rafael A

    2017-04-05

    Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effects of anthocyanins are, however, hard to explain, given their very low bioavailability due to poor intestinal absorption. We propose that free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also named GPR40), is involved in an inhibitory effect of the anthocyanidin delphinidin over intestinal glucose absorption. We show the direct effects of delphinidin on the intestine using jejunum samples from RF/J mice, and the human intestinal cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, and NCM460. By the use of specific pharmacological antagonists, we determined that delphinidin inhibits glucose absorption in both mouse jejunum and a human enterocytic cell line in a FFA1-dependent manner. Delphinidin also affects the function of sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). Intracellular signaling after FFA1 activation involved cAMP increase and cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations originated from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and were followed by store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Taken together, our results suggest a new GPR-40 mediated local mechanism of action for delphinidin over intestinal cells that may in part explain its antidiabetic effect. These findings are promising for the search for new prevention and pharmacological treatment strategies for DM2 management.

  14. Disproportionation Kinetics of Hypoiodous Acid As Catalyzed and Suppressed by Acetic Acid-Acetate Buffer.

    PubMed

    Urbansky, Edward T.; Cooper, Brian T.; Margerum, Dale W.

    1997-03-26

    The kinetics of the disproportionation of hypoiodous acid to give iodine and iodate ion (5HOI right harpoon over left harpoon 2I(2) + IO(3)(-) + H(+) + 2H(2)O) are investigated in aqueous acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer. The rate of iodine formation is followed photometrically at -log [H(+)] = 3.50, 4.00, 4.50, and 5.00, &mgr; = 0.50 M (NaClO(4)), and 25.0 degrees C. Both catalytic and inhibitory buffer effects are observed. The first process is proposed to be a disproportionation of iodine(I) to give HOIO and I(-); the iodide then reacts with HOI to give I(2). The reactive species (acetato-O)iodine(I), CH(3)CO(2)I, is postulated to increase the rate by assisting in the formation of I(2)O, a steady-state species that hydrolyzes to give HOIO and I(2). Inhibition is postulated to result from the formation of the stable ion bis(acetato-O)iodate(I), (CH(3)CO(2))(2)I(-), as buffer concentration is increased. This species is observed spectrophotometrically with a UV absorption shoulder (lambda = 266 nm; epsilon = 530 M(-)(1) cm(-)(1)). The second process is proposed to be a disproportionation of HOIO to give IO(3)(-) and I(2). Above 1 M total buffer, the reaction becomes reversible with less than 90% I(2) formation. Rate and equilibrium constants are resolved and reported for the proposed mechanism.

  15. FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo is mediated by PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Park, Edward; Mori, Yusaku; Haber, C Andrew; Han, Ping; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Stavar, Laura; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Ivovic, Alexander; Yu, Zhiwen; Li, Deling; Bowman, Thomas A; Dewald, Jay; El-Benna, Jamel; Brindley, David N; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K T; Najjar, Sonia M; McKay, Robert A; Bhanot, Sanjay; Fantus, I George; Giacca, Adria

    2014-07-01

    Fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although PKC and inflammatory pathways have been implicated in fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance, the sequence of events leading to impaired insulin signaling is unknown. We used Wistar rats to investigate whether PKCδ and oxidative stress play causal roles in this process and whether this occurs via IKKβ- and JNK-dependent pathways. Rats received a 7-h infusion of Intralipid plus heparin (IH) to elevate circulating free fatty acids (FFA). During the last 2 h of the infusion, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with tracer was performed to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), prevented IH-induced hepatic insulin resistance in parallel with prevention of decreased IκBα content, increased JNK phosphorylation (markers of IKKβ and JNK activation, respectively), increased serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2, and impaired insulin signaling in the liver without affecting IH-induced hepatic PKCδ activation. Furthermore, an antisense oligonucleotide against PKCδ prevented IH-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) (marker of NADPH oxidase activation) and hepatic insulin resistance. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, prevented IH-induced hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance similarly to NAC. These results demonstrate that PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress play a causal role in FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo and suggest that the pathway of FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance is FFA → PKCδ → NADPH oxidase and oxidative stress → IKKβ/JNK → impaired hepatic insulin signaling.

  16. Characterizing acid diffusion lengths in chemically amplified resists from measurements of deprotection kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Pandey, Yogendra Narayan; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-10-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tertbutyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a nonlinear dependence on acid loading. Fickian diffusion is approached by increasing the postexposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings demonstrate that acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. To complement the analysis of bulk kinetics, acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  17. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, P<0.05). Batch tests showed carbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  18. Effects of L-Aspartic acid on the step retreat kinetics of calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Effects of L-Aspartic acid (L-Asp) on step retreat kinetics in the dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocities under surface-controlled kinetics were determined from in-situ atomic force microscopic observations using an improved flow-through system. Comparison of the present results with those obtained under a mixed kinetics condition revealed that the addition of L-Asp promotes the transport process in the calcite dissolution through acid-base and/or complex forming reactions in the diffusion boundary layer. Additionally, promotion of the acute and obtuse step retreats by the L-Asp additive was observed under surface-controlled kinetics. This report is the first to clarify that L-Asp promotes surface processes in the dissolution of calcite.

  19. A kinetic study on benzoic acid pungency and sensory attributes of benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Otero-Losada, M E

    1999-06-01

    Aqueous solutions of benzoic acid (BA) were evaluated by two methods: (i) sensory profile: a descriptive test of sensory attributes combined with semiquantitative analysis; and (ii) pungency intensity measures as a function of time: a computerized recording using specific software. Kinetic parameters evaluated were maximal intensity (I(MAX)), total time of pungency (Ttot), rates of increase (V1) and decrease (V2), half-life (T1/2), area under curve (AUC) and time to maximal intensity (T(IMAX)). Results were analyzed by ANOVA, LSD test, iterative calculations and adjustment to equations according to mathematical models, regression analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and clusters analysis. Pungency was the main sensory attribute of BA (3-36 mM) in the tongue and epiglottis. The seven kinetic parameters showed concentration-dependency (P < 0.001) and were described by different functions: (i) lineal: I(MAX) = 2.24 +/- 0.14C - 3.06 +/- 2.58, R2 = 0.98; T(IMAX) = 0.19 +/- 0.02C + 6.87 +/- 0.47, R2 = 0.92; V1 = 0.68 +/- 0.03C + 0.10 +/- 0.69, R2 = 0.99; AUC = 49.10 +/- 3.17C - 230.78 +/- 59.66, R2 = 0.98; (ii) potency: T1/2 = 6.62 +/- 0.61C(0.39+/-0.03), R2 = 0.97; V2 = 1.07 +/- 0.11C(0.53+/-0.04), R2 = 0.98; Ttot = 8.08 +/- 1.01C(0.43+/-0.04), R2 = 0.96. PCA revealed high correlation between (i) T(IMAX) and Ttot; (ii) T1/2 and V2; and (iii) I(MAX) and V1. Stimuli grouped across three main clusters: (i) 3 and 6 mM; (ii) 9, 12 and 18 mM; and (iii) 24 and 36 mM. Maximal pungency intensity best correlated with both concentration and persistence among kinetic parameters. Prototypical prickling of BA was observed at 12 and 18 mM.

  20. Kinetic modeling of free fatty acid production in Escherichia coli based on continuous cultivation of a plasmid free strain.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Lennen, Rebecca M; Ranatunga, Don R; Bothfeld, William H; Marner, Wesley D; Pfleger, Brian F

    2012-06-01

    The microbial production of free fatty acids (FFAs) and reduced derivatives is an attractive process for the renewable production of diesel fuels. Toward this goal, a plasmid-free strain of Escherichia coli was engineered to produce FFAs by integrating three copies of a thioesterase gene from Umbellularia californica (BTE) under the control of an inducible promoter onto the chromosome. In batch culture, the resulting strain produced identical titers to a previously reported strain that expressed the thioesterase from a plasmid. The growth rate, glucose consumption rate, and FFA production rate of this strain were studied in continuous cultivation under carbon limitation. The highest yield of FFA on glucose was observed at a dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1) with the highest specific productivity observed at a dilution rate of 0.2 h(-1). The observed yields under the lowest dilution rate were 15% higher than that observed in batch cultures. An increase in both productivity and yield (≈ 40%) was observed when the composition of the nutrients was altered to shift the culture toward non-carbon limitation. A deterministic model of the production strain has been proposed and indicates that maintenance requirements for this strain are significantly higher than wild-type E. coli.

  1. FFA2 Contribution to Gestational Glucose Tolerance Is Not Disrupted by Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Fisch, Robert; Bughara, Moneb; Wicksteed, Barton; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    During the insulin resistant phase of pregnancy, the mRNA expression of free fatty acid 2 receptor (Ffar2) is upregulated and as we recently reported, this receptor contributes to insulin secretion and pancreatic beta cell mass expansion in order to maintain normal glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. As impaired gestational glucose levels can affect metabolic health of offspring, we aimed to explore the role of maternal Ffar2 expression during pregnancy on the metabolic health of offspring and also the effects of antibiotics, which have been shown to disrupt gut microbiota fermentative activity (the source of the FFA2 ligands) on gestational glucose homeostasis. We found that maternal Ffar2 expression and impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy had no effect on the growth rates, ad lib glucose and glucose tolerance in the offspring between 3 and 6 weeks of age. To disrupt short chain fatty acid production, we chronically treated WT mice and Ffar2-/- mice with broad range antibiotics and further compared their glucose tolerance prior to pregnancy and at gestational day 15, and also quantified cecum and plasma SCFAs. We found that during pregnancy antibiotic treatment reduced the levels of SCFAs in the cecum of the mice, but resulted in elevated levels of plasma SCFAs and altered concentrations of individual SCFAs. Along with these changes, gestational glucose tolerance in WT mice, but not Ffar2-/- mice improved while on antibiotics. Additional data showed that gestational glucose tolerance worsened in Ffar2-/- mice during a second pregnancy. Together, these results indicate that antibiotic treatment alone is inadequate to deplete plasma SCFA concentrations, and that modulation of gut microbiota by antibiotics does not disrupt the contribution of FFA2 to gestational glucose tolerance. PMID:27959892

  2. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, [sup 2]D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  3. Kinetics of acid-catalyzed cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Levin, M E; Gonzales, N O; Zimmerman, L W; Yang, J

    2006-03-17

    The cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide, in the presence of sulfuric acid, to form phenol and acetone has been examined by adiabatic calorimetry. As expected, acid can catalyze cumene hydroperoxide reaction at temperatures below that of thermally-induced decomposition. At elevated acid concentrations, reactivity is also observed at or below room temperature. The exhibited reactivity behavior is complex and is significantly affected by the presence of other species (including the products). Several reaction models have been explored to explain the behavior and these are discussed.

  4. Kinetic studies of the strengthening effect on liquid hot water pretreatments by organic acids.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Huisheng; Lv, Chunliu; Zhang, Minhua; Liu, Jiatao; Meng, Fanmei; Geng, Zhong Feng

    2017-03-22

    The liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatments would be accelerated by the organic acids produced from the process. In the study, the organic acids included not only acetic acid but also lactic acid during LHW hydrolysis of reeds, at 180-220°C and for 15-135min. The lactic acid was presumably produced from xylose degradation in the pretreatment process. The different organic acids, such as acetic acid, lactic acid and acetic-lactic acids, were used to strengthen the LHW pretreatments for increasing xylose production. Moreover, the work presented kinetic models of xylose and hemicellulose at different conditions, considering the generation of lactic acid. The experimental and kinetic results both indicated that acetic-lactic acids had synergistic catalytic effect on the reaction, which could not only inhibit the degradation of xylose, but also promote the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Besides, the highest concentration of xylose of 7.323g/L was obtained at 200°C, for 45min and with 1wt% acetic-lactic acids.

  5. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  6. A study on degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) during cooking.

    PubMed

    Nisha, P; Singhal, Rekha S; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of ascorbic acid degradation in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) as well as in pure ascorbic acid solutions at initial concentrations present in amla over a temperature range of 50-120 degrees C (steady-state temperature) has been studied. The ascorbic acid degradation followed first-order reaction kinetics where the rate constant increased with an increase in temperature. The temperature dependence of degradation was adequately modeled by the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were found to be 4.09 kcal/mole for amla and 4.49 kcal/mole for pure vitamin solution. The degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid was also evaluated in normal open pan cooking, pressure-cooking and a newly developed and patented fuel-efficient EcoCooker (unsteady state heating process). A mathematical model was developed using the steady-state kinetic parameters obtained to predict the losses of ascorbic acid from the time-temperature data of the unsteady state heating processing method. The results obtained indicate the ascorbic acid degradation is of a similar order of magnitude in all the methods of cooking.

  7. KINETICS OF AMINO ACID INCORPORATION INTO SERUM PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Green, H.; Anker, H. S.

    1955-01-01

    1. The effect of varying body temperature on the rate of amino acid incorporation into serum protein does not give support to the idea that the rate of this process is adjusted in vivo to restore those protein molecules destroyed by thermal denaturation. The experimentally observed Q10 was about 3.9. 2. When amino acids are injected into the blood of animals in a steady state of serum protein turnover, a period of time elapses before these amino acids can be found in the serum proteins. This has been called transit time. At a given temperature (31°) it is the same in rabbits, turtles, and Limulus (1 hour). In rabbits and turtles it has a Q10 of 3.2. It appears to be specifically related to the process of synthesis (or release) of serum proteins. 3. It was not possible to affect the transit time or the incorporation rate by the administration of amino acid analogues. PMID:13221773

  8. Kinetics and Effects of Dichloroacetic Acid in Rainbow Trout

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halogenated acetic acids (HAAs) are continuously released to surface waters in municipal wastewater effluents. Very little is known, however, about their potential to adversely impact aquatic life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the uptake, distribution, elimination...

  9. Kinetic and spectrophotometric studies on the renaturation of deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Thrower, K J; Peacocke, A R

    1968-10-01

    The kinetics of the renaturation of Escherichia coli DNA in 0.4-1.0m-sodium chloride at temperatures from 60 degrees to 90 degrees have been studied. The extent of renaturation was a maximum at 65 degrees to 75 degrees and increased with ionic strength, and the rate constant increased with both ionic strength and temperature. The energy and entropy of activation of renaturation were calculated to be 6-7kcal.mole(-1) and -40cal.deg.(-1)mole(-1) respectively. It has been shown that renaturation is a second-order process for 5hr. under most conditions. The results are consistent with a reaction in which the rate-controlling step is the diffusion together of two separated complementary DNA strands and the formation of a nucleus of base pairs between them. The kinetics of the renaturation of T7-phage DNA and Bordetella pertussis DNA have also been studied, and their rates of renaturation related quantitatively to the relative heterogeneity of the DNA samples. By analysis of the spectra of DNA at different stages during renaturation it was shown that initially the renatured DNA was rich in guanine-cytosine base pairs and non-random in base sequence, but that, as equilibrium was approached, the renatured DNA gradually resembled native DNA more closely. The rate constant for the renaturation of guanine-cytosine base pairs was slightly higher than for adenine-thymine base pairs.

  10. Experimental and kinetic modelling studies on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant to levulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Girisuta, B; Danon, B; Manurung, R; Janssen, L P B M; Heeres, H J

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive experimental and modelling study on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant (Eichhornia crassipes) to optimise the yield of levulinic acid (LA) is reported (T=150-175 degrees CH2SO4 = 0.1-1M, water hyacinth intake=1-5wt%). At high acid concentrations (>0.5M), LA was the major organic acid whereas at low acid concentrations (<0.1M) and high initial intakes of water hyacinth, the formation of propionic acid instead of LA was favoured. The highest yield of LA was 53mol% (35wt%) based on the amount of C6-sugars in the water hyacinth (T=175 degrees CH2SO4 =1M , water hyacinth intake=1wt%). The LA yield as a function of the process conditions was modelled using a kinetic model originally developed for the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of cellulose and good agreement between the experimental and modelled data was obtained.

  11. Kinetic modeling on batch-cooling crystallization of zinc lactate: The influence of malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Qian, Gang; Zhou, Xinggui

    2017-04-01

    Influence of malic acid, which acts as an impurity, on the crystallization kinetics of zinc lactate has been investigated in this work. Crystallization of zinc lactate with a linear cooling profile was carried out in a batch crystallizer and a population balance model was used to estimate the crystallization kinetics for each studied system by using the nonlinear optimization method. The predicted results related to the concentration profile of zinc lactate are in good agreement with the experimental data. The influence of malic acid on the crystallization of zinc lactate is discussed herein.

  12. Kinetics of glucose decomposition during dilute-acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qian; Lee, Yong Y; Torget, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Recent research work in-house both at Auburn University and National Renewable Energy Laboratory has demonstrated that extremely low concentrations of acid (e.g., 0.05-0.2 wt% sulfuric acid) and high temperatures (e.g., 200-230 degrees C) are reaction conditions that can be effectively applied for hydrolysis of the cellulosic component of biomass. These conditions are far from those of the conventional dilute-acid hydrolysis processes, and the kinetic data for glucose decomposition are not currently available. We investigated the kinetics of glucose decomposition covering pH values of 1.5-2.2 and temperatures of 180-230 degrees C using glass ampoule reactors. The primary factors controlling glucose decomposition are the reaction medium, acid concentration, and temperature. Based on the experimental data, a kinetic model was developed and the best-fit kinetic parameters were determined. However, a consistent discrepancy in the rate of glucose disappearance was found between that of the model based on pure glucose data and that observed during the actual process of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis. This was taken as an indication that glucose recombines with acid-soluble lignin during the hydrolysis process, and this conclusion was incorporated accordingly into the overall model of glucose decomposition.

  13. A Status Report on Middle Grade Agricultural Education and FFA Programs in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Rosemarie; McCaslin, N. L.

    1994-01-01

    Census of 52 Future Farmers of America (FFA) executive secretaries found the following: 30 states have middle-grade agricultural education; 19 have middle-grade FFA membership; 14 have a core agriculture curriculum; 17 have state-level competitions; most do not favor national middle-grade competitions; and few disadvantages apart from potential…

  14. Bridging Horizons. An Advisor's Guide to FFA Involvement for Members with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploss, Adrienne J.; Field, William E.; Frick, Martin J.

    This guide is designed to provide Future Farmers of America (FFA) advisors with information to assist them in their efforts to include all youth in FFA, including those with disabilities. It addresses benefits of involving youth with disabilities and federal, state, and local legislation and regulations concerning people with disabilities.…

  15. Examining Camper Learning Outcomes and Knowledge Retention at Oklahoma FFA Leadership Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Terry, Robert, Jr.; Kelsey, Kathleen D.

    2014-01-01

    The National FFA Organization is committed to providing non-formal learning activities focusing on leadership education. Summer camps are a major component of FFA activities and concentrate on personal growth, leadership development, and recreational activities for youth. This repeated measures study determined the level of cognitive gain and the…

  16. Fitting Vo-Ag and FFA Together Best for Students and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, H. Leon

    1979-01-01

    The Future Farmers of America (FFA) is more than a leadership development organization and when used as an intracurricular activity, it can serve as a teaching tool. The FFA adds advantages to the program in areas such as supervised experience, award motivation, providing real world experience, public relations, travel, and competition. (LRA)

  17. Barriers to Participation in the National FFA Organization According to Urban Agriculture Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Urban youth engaged in after-school organizations have more positive attributes compared to their unengaged contemporaries. The FFA is one particular intra-curricular organization with after-school components; yet, urban students do not participate in FFA at the same levels as rural students. The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore…

  18. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  19. Kinetics of Hydrochloric Acid Leaching of Titanium from Titanium-Bearing Electric Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fuqiang; Chen, Feng; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao; Travyanov, Andrew Yakovlevich; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2016-05-01

    The hydrochloric acid leaching of titanium from titanium-bearing electric furnace slag was investigated under different experimental conditions. The results indicate that particle size, hydrochloric acid concentration and reaction temperature were of significance to the leaching kinetics. Specifically, reaction temperature was the most important factor followed by hydrochloric acid concentration and particle size. The shrinking core model was used to describe the leaching process which was controlled by surface chemical reaction. The kinetic equation was obtained and the activation energy was found to be 43.16 kJ/mol. Iron and calcium species were almost completely dissolved in the acid when the extraction degree of titanium reached 99.84%. MgO (19.34 wt.%) and Al2O3 (32.45 wt.%) in the spinel were still in the leaching residue and SiO2 (43.53 wt.%) in the form of quartz remained in the leaching residue.

  20. Spectrophotometric method for determination and kinetics of amino acids through their reaction with syringaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1998-02-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of amino acids. The method is based on the reaction between amino acids and syringaldehyde at pH 9.0, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption at 420 nm in aqueous methyl alcohol. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range of 0.025-0.5 mM of original amino acid. The kinetics of the reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rates of the reaction were investigated as a function of pH of the reaction medium and structure of the amino compounds. Logarithms of the second-order rate constants increased with amino acid anion concentration as the pH was increased. The mechanisms of the reaction have been discussed.

  1. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of surface acidity. Progress report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    Catalytic cracking of isobutane and 2-methyl-hexane over various USY-zeolite catalysts was studied. A kinetic model was developed for isobutane cracking over calcined and steamed Y-zeolite catalysts. Catalyst steaming leads to decreased Bronsted acidity. The studies of catalyst acid and basic properties were broadened to include alumina-supported metal oxides and a sulfated zirconia catalyst (isomerization of normal butane).

  3. Oxidation kinetics of crystal violet by potassium permanganate in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sameera Razi; Ashfaq, Maria; Mubashir; Masood, Summyia

    2016-05-01

    The oxidation kinetics of crystal violet (a triphenylmethane dye) by potassium permanganate was focused in an acidic medium by the spectrophotometric method at 584 nm. The oxidation reaction of crystal violet by potassium permanganate is carried out in an acidic medium at different temperatures ranging within 298-318 K. The kinetic study was carried out to investigate the effect of the concentration, ionic strength and temperature. The reaction followed first order kinetics with respect to potassium permanganate and crystal violet and the overall rate of the reaction was found to be second order. Thermodynamic activation parameters like the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H*), free energy change (Δ G*), and entropy change (Δ S*) have also been evaluated.

  4. Kinetic modeling of the photocatalytic degradation of clofibric acid in a slurry reactor.

    PubMed

    Manassero, Agustina; Satuf, María Lucila; Alfano, Orlando Mario

    2015-01-01

    A kinetic study of the photocatalytic degradation of the pharmaceutical clofibric acid is presented. Experiments were carried out under UV radiation employing titanium dioxide in water suspension. The main reaction intermediates were identified and quantified. Intrinsic expressions to represent the kinetics of clofibric acid and the main intermediates were derived. The modeling of the radiation field in the reactor was carried out by Monte Carlo simulation. Experimental runs were performed by varying the catalyst concentration and the incident radiation. Kinetic parameters were estimated from the experiments by applying a non-linear regression procedure. Good agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental data, with an error of 5.9 % in the estimations of the primary pollutant concentration.

  5. Kinetic Classroom: Acid-Base and Redox Demonstrations with Student Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomax, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    Describes classroom activities that involve student movement to demonstrate principles of kinetics. This classroom method can be used for any topic related to dynamic processes. The method used in this activity illustrates Brxnsted-Lowry acid-base theory and redox reactions. Takes advantage of analogies between proton and electron transfers. Use…

  6. Phospholipids and poly(glutamic acid)/hydrolyzed gluten: interaction and kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of poly (glutamic acid) (PGA) and Hydrolyzed wheat gluten (HG) on the thermal and kinetics properties of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). A model system containing 3, 6 and 10% PGA or HG was added to 40% LPC aqueous suspension. ...

  7. Degradation kinetic modelling of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Remini, Hocine; Mertz, Christian; Belbahi, Amine; Achir, Nawel; Dornier, Manuel; Madani, Khodir

    2015-04-15

    The stability of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) during one month of storage was investigated at 4-37 °C. The effects of ascorbic acid fortification (at 100, 200 mg L(-1)) and deaeration, temperature/time storage on the kinetic behaviour were determined. Ascorbic acid was monitored by HPLC-DAD and colour intensity by spectrophotometric measurements. Degradation kinetics were best fitted by first-order reaction models for both ascorbic acid and colour intensity. Three models (Arrhenius, Eyring and Ball) were used to assess the temperature-dependent degradation. Following the Arrhenius model, activation energies were ranged from 51 to 135 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid and from 49 to 99 kJ mol(-1) for colour intensity. The effect of storage temperature and deaeration are the most influent factors on kinetics degradation, while the fortification revealed no significant effect on ascorbic acid content and colour intensity.

  8. Adipose Tissue Free Fatty Acid Storage In Vivo: Effects of Insulin Versus Niacin as a Control for Suppression of Lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asem H; Mundi, Manpreet; Koutsari, Christina; Bernlohr, David A; Jensen, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    Insulin stimulates the translocation fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) to plasma membrane, and thus greater free fatty acid (FFA) uptake, in adipocyte cell models. Whether insulin stimulates greater FFA clearance into adipose tissue in vivo is unknown. We tested this hypothesis by comparing direct FFA storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue during insulin versus niacin-medicated suppression of lipolysis. We measured direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral subcutaneous fat in 10 and 11 adults, respectively, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia or after oral niacin to suppress FFA compared with 11 saline control experiments. Direct palmitate storage was assessed using a [U-(13)C]palmitate infusion to measure palmitate kinetics and an intravenous palmitate radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Plasma palmitate concentrations and flux were suppressed to 23 ± 3 and 26 ± 5 µmol ⋅ L(-1) (P = 0.91) and 44 ± 4 and 39 ± 5 µmol ⋅ min(-1) (P = 0.41) in the insulin and niacin groups, respectively, much less (P < 0.001) than the saline control group (102 ± 8 and 104 ± 12 µmol ⋅ min(-1), respectively). In the insulin, niacin, and saline groups, abdominal palmitate storage rates were 0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.25 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid(-1) ⋅ min(-1), respectively (P = NS), and femoral adipose storage rates were 0.19 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.05 vs. 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid(-1) ⋅ min(-1), respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, insulin does not increase FFA storage in adipose tissue compared with niacin, which suppresses lipolysis via a different pathway.

  9. Adipose Tissue Free Fatty Acid Storage In Vivo: Effects of Insulin Versus Niacin as a Control for Suppression of Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asem H.; Mundi, Manpreet; Koutsari, Christina; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the translocation fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) to plasma membrane, and thus greater free fatty acid (FFA) uptake, in adipocyte cell models. Whether insulin stimulates greater FFA clearance into adipose tissue in vivo is unknown. We tested this hypothesis by comparing direct FFA storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue during insulin versus niacin-medicated suppression of lipolysis. We measured direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral subcutaneous fat in 10 and 11 adults, respectively, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia or after oral niacin to suppress FFA compared with 11 saline control experiments. Direct palmitate storage was assessed using a [U-13C]palmitate infusion to measure palmitate kinetics and an intravenous palmitate radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Plasma palmitate concentrations and flux were suppressed to 23 ± 3 and 26 ± 5 µmol ⋅ L−1 (P = 0.91) and 44 ± 4 and 39 ± 5 µmol ⋅ min−1 (P = 0.41) in the insulin and niacin groups, respectively, much less (P < 0.001) than the saline control group (102 ± 8 and 104 ± 12 µmol ⋅ min−1, respectively). In the insulin, niacin, and saline groups, abdominal palmitate storage rates were 0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.25 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively (P = NS), and femoral adipose storage rates were 0.19 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.05 vs. 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, insulin does not increase FFA storage in adipose tissue compared with niacin, which suppresses lipolysis via a different pathway. PMID:25883112

  10. Characterization of the esterification reaction in high free fatty acid oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altic, Lucas Eli Porter

    Energy and vegetable oil prices have caused many biodiesel producers to turn to waste cooking oils as feedstocks. These oils contain high levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) which make them difficult or impossible to convert to biodiesel by conventional production methods. Esterification is required for ultra-high FFA feedstocks such as Brown Grease. In addition, ultrasonic irradiation has the potential to improve the kinetics of the esterification reaction. 2-level, multi-factor DOE experiments were conducted to characterize the esterification reaction in ultra-high FFA oils as well as determine whether ultrasonic irradiation gives any benefit besides energy input. The study determined that sulfuric acid content had the greatest effect followed by temperature and water content (inhibited reaction). Methanol content had no effect in the range studied. A small interaction term existed between sulfuric acid and temperature. The study also concluded that sonication did not give any additional benefit over energy input.

  11. 4-Hydroxy cinnamic acid as mushroom preservation: Anti-tyrosinase activity kinetics and application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Chen, Qing-Xi; Cui, Yi; Gao, Huan-Juan; Xu, Lian; Yu, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Chong-Ling; Wang, Qin

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in post-harvest browning of fruit and vegetable. To control and inhibit its activity is the most effective method for delaying the browning and extend the shelf life. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on mushroom tyrosinase was investigated using the kinetics method of substrate reaction. The results showed that the inhibition of tyrosinase by 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid was a slow, reversible reaction with fractional remaining activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction on 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid with tyrosinase. Furthermore, the molecular docking was used to simulate 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid dock with tyrosinase. The results showed that 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid interacted with the enzyme active site mainly through the hydroxy competed with the substrate hydroxy group. The cytotoxicity study of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid indicated that it had no effects on the proliferation of normal liver cells. Moreover, the results of effects of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on the preservation of mushroom showed that it could delay the mushroom browning. These results provide a comprehensive underlying the inhibitory mechanisms of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and its delaying post-harvest browning, that is beneficial for the application of this compound.

  12. Kinetic study for copper adsorption onto soil minerals in the absence and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Komy, Zanaty R; Shaker, Ali M; Heggy, Said E M; El-Sayed, Mohamed E A

    2014-03-01

    Equilibrium and kinetics of Cu(2+) adsorption onto soil minerals (kaolinite and hematite) in the absence and presence of humic acid have been investigated under various conditions. The influences of ionic strength, pH and solution cations on the rate of the adsorption have been studied. The rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals in the absence or the presence of humic acid increased with decreasing ionic strength, increasing pH and in the presence of the background electrolyte K(+) rather than Ca(2+). Humic acid enhanced the rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals. The adsorption equilibrium data showed that adsorption behavior of Cu(2+) could be described more reasonably by Langmiur adsorption isotherm than Freundlich isotherm in the absence or presence of humic acid. Pseudo first and pseudo second order models were used to evaluate the kinetic data and the rate constants. The results indicated that the adsorption of Cu(2+) onto hematite and kaolinite in the absence and presence of humic acid is more conforming to pseudo second order kinetics.

  13. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase II. Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, M.B.; Isbell, R.E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions. The first reaction forms glucose by hydrolyzing the cellulose polymer and a subsequent reaction decomposes the glucose. The maximum theoretical yield depends on the ratio of the rate constants for these two reactions. The rate constants of both reactions were measured in a series of experiments studying temperature and concentration effects. The results suggest that the glucose decomposition reaction is similar with the two acids but that the cellulose hydrolysis reaction mechanism with phosphoric acid may be different than with sulfuric acid. The studies show phosphoric acid is unpromising and much inferior to sulfuric acid as the catalytic agent. Under the conditions studied, 0.8 wt % sulfuric acid gives a greater yield of glucose than 8.0 wt % phosphoric acid.

  14. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  15. New method for spectrophotometric determination of quinones and barbituric acid through their reaction. A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1996-11-01

    A new and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of p-benzoquinone, p-chloranil and 1.4-naphthoquinone. The method is based on the reaction between quinones and barbituric acid, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption between 485 and 555 nm in 50% methyl alcohol-water mixture. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range 0.025-05 mM of orginal quinone. The kinetics of the reaction between p-benzoquinone and barbituric acid was studied in a range of methyl alcohol-water mixtures. The reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rate increases with increasing dielectric constant. The method was applied for determination of barbituric acid with p-benzoquinone in the concentration range of 0.025-0.345 mM. Other barbiturates do not interfere.

  16. Kinetic investigation of recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 on hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shiping; Hays Putnam, Anna-Maria A; LaBarre, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    The kinetic investigation of hyaluronidases using physiologically relevant hyaluronic acid (HA or hyaluronan) substrate will provide useful and important clues to their catalytic behavior and function in vivo. We present here a simple and sensitive method for kinetic measurement of recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 (rHuPH20) on HA substrates with sizes ranging from 90 to 752 kDa. The method is based on 2-aminobenzamide labeling of hydrolyzed HA products combined with separation by size exclusion-ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection. rHuPH20 was found to follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics during the initial reaction time. Optimal reaction rates were observed in the pH range of 4.5-5.5. The HA substrate size did not have significant effects on the initial rate of the reaction. By studying HA substrates of 215, 357, and 752 kDa, the kinetic parameters Km, Vmax, and kcat were determined to be 0.87-0.91 mg/ml, 1.66-1.74 NM s(-1), and 40.5-42.4 s(-1), respectively. This method allows for direct measurement of kinetics using physiologically relevant HA substrates and can be applied to other hyaluronidase kinetic measurements.

  17. The sulfuric acid leaching of Bayer electrofilter fines: A practical kinetical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho Martínez, J. P.; Ayala, Espina J.; García Coque, M. P.; Fernández, Pérez B.; Costales, Alonso D.

    2006-08-01

    Electrofilter fines, which are by-products of the Bayer process for the production of alumina from bauxite, were characterized to evaluate the alumina that was potentially extractable with sulfuric acid. Acid leaching is carried out at different concentrations of sulfuric acid, at different temperatures, pulp densities, and times, to dissolve gibbsite and transition aluminas. The result is an aluminum sulfate solution. This article reports on a study of the kinetics of the leaching reaction at 90°C with two pulp densities: 10% and 30%.

  18. Kinetic resolution of acids in acylation reactions in the presence of chiral tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.M.; Dem'yanovich, V.M.; Khlebnikov, V.A.

    1988-07-10

    Asymmetric synthesis has now become an important method for the production of optically active compounds, and its most attractive form is asymmetric catalysis. This work was devoted to an investigation into asymmetric catalysis with chiral tertiary amines in acylation reactions. During the acylation of alcohols and amines by the action of racemic 2-phenylpropionic and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropionic acids in the presence of S-nicotine the initial acids are resolved kinetically. The (R)-2-phenylpropionic acid obtained in this way had an optical purity of 0.5-1.5%.

  19. Adsorption kinetics of organophosphonic acids on plasma-modified oxide-covered aluminum surfaces.

    PubMed

    Giza, M; Thissen, P; Grundmeier, G

    2008-08-19

    Tailoring of oxide chemistry on aluminum by means of low-pressure water and argon plasma surface modification was performed to influence the kinetics of the self-assembly process of octadecylphosphonic acid monolayers. The plasma-induced surface chemistry was studied by in situ FTIR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Ex situ IRRAS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of the adsorbed self-assembled monolayers. The plasma-induced variation of the hydroxide to oxide ratio led to different adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid from dilute ethanol solutions as measured by means of a quartz crystal microbalance. Water plasma treatment caused a significant increase in the density of surface hydroxyl groups in comparison to that of the argon-plasma-treated surface. The hydroxyl-rich surface led to significantly accelerated adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid with a time of monolayer formation of less than 1 min. On the contrary, decreasing the surface hydroxyl density slowed the adsorption kinetics.

  20. Kinetic study of the complexation of gallic acid with Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li-li; Li, Ying-hua; Lu, Xiu-yang

    2009-10-01

    Kinetic study on the complexation of gallic acid with ferrous sulfate was performed using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Under the experimental conditions, the stoichiometric composition of the formed complex is 1:1. The complexation reaction was found to be a second-order one. The influences of temperature, ionic strength and solvents on the complexation reaction were investigated. According to the Arrhenius equation, the apparent activation energy of the complexation reaction was evaluated to be 71.64 kJ × mol -1. A three-step reaction mechanism was proposed, which can well explain the kinetic results obtained.

  1. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    salicylic acid in water, in terms of transformation products, kinetic, mechanism, as well as degradation pathways.

  2. Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Dicyanocobinamide and Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Dhiman; Ali, Iyad; Abdulridha, Rasha M.; Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl) from dicyanocobinamide ((CN)2-Cbi). Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl)(CN)-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl)2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM−1s−1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands. PMID:25375773

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of chondroitin-4-sulfate polysaccharide by chromic acid in aqueous perchlorate solutions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Refat; Ibrahim, Samia; Dahy, Abdel Rahman; Zaafarany, Ishaq; Tirkistani, Fahd; Takagi, Hideo

    2013-02-15

    The kinetics of chromic acid oxidation of chondroitin-4-sulfate polysaccharide as sulfated carbohydrates at a constant ionic strength of 4.0 mol dm(-3) has been investigated, spectrophotometrically. The reaction kinetics showed a first-order dependence in chromic acid and fractional-first-order kinetics with respect to the chondroitin-4-sulfate concentration. The influence of [H(+)] on the reaction rates showed that the oxidation process is acid-catalyzed. Added Mn(2+) ions indicated the formation of Cr(IV) as intermediate species. A kinetic evidence for formation of 1:1 intermediate complex was revealed. The kinetic parameters have been evaluated and a tentative reaction mechanism in good consistent with the kinetic results obtained is discussed.

  4. Kinetics of color development of melanoidins formed from fructose/amino acid model systems.

    PubMed

    Echavarría, A P; Pagán, J; Ibarz, A

    2014-03-01

    The formation of soluble melanoidins from a single combination of sugar (fructose) and amino acid model systems were evaluated kinetically. The selected amino acids, commonly found in apple juice and highly reactive in the Maillard reaction, were asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The effect of these reagents and the treatment at different temperatures (50 , 85 , and 100 ) during 96 h on the color intensity of the melanoidin formed was measured by absorbance at different wavelengths (280, 325, 405, and 420 nm). The absorbance of the melanoidin formed from all model systems was located on the wavelength of 405 nm, that is, the area of the visible spectrum close to the UV region. The color of the melanoidins was directly measured using the CIELAB color space system. A first-order kinetic model was applied to the evolution of the ΔE * (color difference) and L * (lightness) of the color. The fructose/aspartic acid model system values of a * (redness) and b * (yellowness) were found in the brown-red zone. Therefore, the color development of the melanoidins was influenced by the type of amino acid and temperature. Especially, it is thought that the a * and b * values can be used to explain the differences among the amino acids in the color development of melanoidins.

  5. Kinetics of sulfuric acid leaching of cadmium from Cd-Ni zinc plant residues.

    PubMed

    Safarzadeh, Mohammad Sadegh; Moradkhani, Davood; Ojaghi-Ilkhchi, Mehdi

    2009-04-30

    Cd-Ni filtercakes are produced continuously at the third purification step in the electrolytic production of zinc in the National Iranian Lead and Zinc Company (NILZ) in northwestern Iran. In this research, the dissolution kinetics of cadmium from Cd-Ni residues produced in NILZ plant has been investigated. Hence, the effects of temperature, sulfuric acid concentration, particle size and stirring speed on the kinetics of cadmium dissolution in sulfuric acid were studied. The dissolution kinetics at 25-55 degrees C and tacid concentration, solid/liquid ratio and particle size were also achieved. The rate of reaction at first 5 min based on diffusion-controlled process can be expressed by a semi-empirical equation as:It was determined that the dissolution rate increased with increasing sulfuric acid concentration and decreasing particle size.

  6. Kinetic study of empty fruit bunch using hot liquid water and dilute acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Seok; Choi, Won Il; Kang, Minsu; Park, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jin-Suk

    2012-07-01

    Empty fruit bunch (EFB), a residual product of the palm plantation, is an attractive biomass for biorefinery. As xylan is susceptible to high temperature pretreatment, it is important to setup a proper pretreatment condition to maximize the sugar recovery from EFB. Kinetic parameters of mathematical models were obtained in order to predict the concentration of xylose, glucose, furfural, and acetic acid in the hydrolysate and to find production conditions of xylose. We investigated the kinetics of hot liquid water and dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis over a 40-min period using a self-designed setup by measuring the concentrations of released sugars (xylose, glucose) and degradation products (acetic acid and furfural). The reaction was performed within the range 160∼180 °C, under reaction conditions of various concentration of sulfuric acid (0.1∼0.2%) and 1:7 solid-liquid ratio in a batch reactor. The kinetic constants can be expressed by the Arrhenius equation with the activation energy for the hydrolysis of sugar and decomposition of sugar. The activation energy of xylose was determined to be 136.2187 kJ mol(-1).

  7. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase 2: Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M. B.; Isbell, R. E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions.

  8. Reaction kinetics of waste sulfuric acid using H2O2 catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiade; Hong, Binxun; Tong, Xinyang; Qiu, Shufeng

    2016-12-01

    The process of recovering waste sulfuric acids using H2O2 catalytic oxidation is studied in this paper. Activated carbon was used as catalyst. Main operating parameters, such as temperature, feed rate of H2O2, and catalyst dosage, have effects on the removal of impurities from waste sulfuric acids. The reaction kinetics of H2O2 catalytic oxidation on impurities are discussed. At a temperature of 90°C, H2O2 feeding rate of 50 g (kg waste acid)(-1) per hour, and catalyst dosage of 0.2 wt% (waste acid weight), the removal efficiencies of COD and chrominance were both more than 99%, the recovery ratio of sulfuric acid was more than 95%, and the utilization ratio of H2O2 was 88.57%.

  9. Localized surface plasmon resonance sensor for simultaneous kinetic determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Khodaveisi, Javad; Dashti, Razieh

    2013-01-31

    A new sensor for simultaneous determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide using silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as a chromogenic reagent is introduced. The silver nanoparticles have the catalytic ability for the decomposition of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide; then the decomposition of them induces the degradation of silver nanoparticles. Hence, a remarkable change in the localized surface plasmon resonance absorbance strength could be observed. Spectra-kinetic approach and artificial neural network was applied for the simultaneous determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Linear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of (8.20×10(-5) to 2.00×10(-3) mol L(-1)) for peroxyacetic acid and (2.00×10(-5) to 4.80×10(-3) mol L(-1)) for hydrogen peroxide. The analytical performance of this sensor has been evaluated for the detection of simultaneous determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in real samples.

  10. Amino Acid Specific Effects on RNA Tertiary Interactions: Single-Molecule Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhigyan; Sung, Hsuan-Lei; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-10-10

    In light of the current models for an early RNA-based universe, the potential influence of simple amino acids on tertiary folding of ribozymal RNA into biochemically competent structures is speculated to be of significant evolutionary importance. In the present work, the folding-unfolding kinetics of a ubiquitous tertiary interaction motif, the GAAA tetraloop-tetraloop receptor (TL-TLR), is investigated by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy in the presence of natural amino acids both with (e.g., lysine, arginine) and without (e.g., glycine) protonated side chain residues. By way of control, we also investigate the effects of a special amino acid (e.g., proline) and amino acid mimetic (e.g., betaine) that contain secondary or quaternary amine groups rather than a primary amine group. This combination permits systematic study of amino acid induced (or amino acid like) RNA folding dynamics as a function of side chain complexity, pKa, charge state, and amine group content. Most importantly, each of the naturally occurring amino acids is found to destabilize the TL-TLR tertiary folding equilibrium, the kinetic origin of which is dominated by a decrease in the folding rate constant (kdock), also affected by a strongly amino acid selective increase in the unfolding rate constant (kundock). To further elucidate the underlying thermodynamics, single-molecule equilibrium constants (Keq) for TL-TLR folding have been probed as a function of temperature, which reveal an amino acid dependent decrease in both overall exothermicity (ΔΔH° > 0) and entropic cost (-TΔΔS° < 0) for the overall folding process. Temperature-dependent studies on the folding/unfolding kinetic rate constants reveal analogous amino acid specific changes in both enthalpy (ΔΔH(⧧)) and entropy (ΔΔS(⧧)) for accessing the transition state barrier. The maximum destabilization of the TL-TLR tertiary interaction is observed for arginine, which is consistent with early

  11. Tracking the oxidative kinetics of carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in the house sparrow using exhaled 13CO2.

    PubMed

    McCue, M D; Sivan, O; McWilliams, S R; Pinshow, B

    2010-03-01

    Clinicians commonly measure the (13)CO(2) in exhaled breath samples following administration of a metabolic tracer (breath testing) to diagnose certain infections and metabolic disorders. We believe that breath testing can become a powerful tool to investigate novel questions about the influence of ecological and physiological factors on the oxidative fates of exogenous nutrients. Here we examined several predictions regarding the oxidative kinetics of specific carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in a dietary generalist, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). After administering postprandial birds with 20 mg of one of seven (13)C-labeled tracers, we measured rates of (13)CO(2) production every 15 min over 2 h. We found that sparrows oxidized exogenous amino acids far more rapidly than carbohydrates or fatty acids, and that different tracers belonging to the same class of physiological fuels had unique oxidative kinetics. Glycine had a mean maximum rate of oxidation (2021 nmol min(-1)) that was significantly higher than that of leucine (351 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that nonessential amino acids are oxidized more rapidly than essential amino acids. Exogenous glucose and fructose were oxidized to a similar extent (5.9% of dose), but the time required to reach maximum rates of oxidation was longer for fructose. The maximum rates of oxidation were significantly higher when exogenous glucose was administered as an aqueous solution (122 nmol min(-1)), rather than as an oil suspension (93 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that exogenous lipids negatively influence rates of exogenous glucose oxidation. Dietary fatty acids had the lowest maximum rates of oxidation (2-6 nmol min(-1)), and differed significantly in the extent to which each was oxidized, with 0.73%, 0.63% and 0.21% of palmitic, oleic and stearic acid tracers oxidized, respectively.

  12. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Saturated N-Heterocycles by Enantioselective Amidation with Chiral Hydroxamic Acids.

    PubMed

    Kreituss, Imants; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2016-12-20

    The preparation of enantioenriched chiral compounds by kinetic resolution dates back to the laboratories of Louis Pasteur in the middle of the 19th century. Unlike asymmetric synthesis, this process can always deliver enantiopure material (ee > 99%) if the reactions are allowed to proceed to sufficient conversion and the selectivity of the process is not unity (s > 1). One of the most appealing and practical variants is acylative kinetic resolution, which affords easily separable reaction products, and several highly efficient enzymatic and small molecule catalysts are available. Unfortunately, this method is applicable to limited substrate classes such as alcohols and primary benzylamines. This Account focuses on our work in catalytic acylative kinetic resolution of saturated N-heterocycles, a class of molecules that has been notoriously difficult to access via asymmetric synthesis. We document the development of hydroxamic acids as suitable catalysts for enantioselective acylation of amines through relay catalysis. Alongside catalyst optimization and reaction development, we present mechanistic studies and theoretical calculation accounting for the origins of selectivity and revealing the concerted nature of many amide-bond forming reactions. Immobilization of the hydroxamic acid to form a polymer supported reagent allows simplification of the experimental setup, improvement in product purification, and extension of the substrate scope. The kinetic resolutions are operationally straight forward: reactions proceed at room temperature and open to air conditions, without generation of difficult-to-remove side products. This was utilized to achieve decagram scale resolution of antimalarial drug mefloquine to prepare more than 50 g of (+)-erythro-meflqouine (er > 99:1) from the racemate. The immobilized quasienantiomeric acyl hydroxamic acid reagents were also exploited for a rare practical implementation of parallel kinetic resolution that affords both enantiomers of

  13. Hydrolysis of Sulfur Dioxide in Small Clusters of Sulfuric Acid: Mechanistic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Fang, Sheng; Wang, Zhixiu; Yi, Wencai; Tao, Fu-Ming; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2015-11-17

    The deposition and hydrolysis reaction of SO2 + H2O in small clusters of sulfuric acid and water are studied by theoretical calculations of the molecular clusters SO2-(H2SO4)n-(H2O)m (m = 1,2; n = 1,2). Sulfuric acid exhibits a dramatic catalytic effect on the hydrolysis reaction of SO2 as it lowers the energy barrier by over 20 kcal/mol. The reaction with monohydrated sulfuric acid (SO2 + H2O + H2SO4 - H2O) has the lowest energy barrier of 3.83 kcal/mol, in which the cluster H2SO4-(H2O)2 forms initially at the entrance channel. The energy barriers for the three hydrolysis reactions are in the order SO2 + (H2SO4)-H2O > SO2 + (H2SO4)2-H2O > SO2 + H2SO4-H2O. Furthermore, sulfurous acid is more strongly bonded to the hydrated sulfuric acid (or dimer) clusters than the corresponding reactant (monohydrated SO2). Consequently, sulfuric acid promotes the hydrolysis of SO2 both kinetically and thermodynamically. Kinetics simulations have been performed to study the importance of these reactions in the reduction of atmospheric SO2. The results will give a new insight on how the pre-existing aerosols catalyze the hydrolysis of SO2, leading to the formation and growth of new particles.

  14. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-02

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood.

  15. Optimization and kinetic analysis on the sulfuric acid - Catalyzed depolymerization of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian-Qian; Ma, Yu-Long; Chang, Xuan; Sun, Yong-Gang

    2015-09-20

    The objectives of this work were to optimize the experimental condition and to study the kinetic behavior of wheat straw depolymerization with sulfuric acid (2 wt%, 3 wt%, and 4 wt%) at different temperatures (120°C, 130°C, and 140°C). The two-fraction kinetic model was obtained for the prediction of the generations of product and by-product during depolymerization. The kinetic parameters of the two-fraction model were analyzed using an Arrhenius-type equation. Applying the kinetic two-fraction model, the optimum condition for wheat straw depolymerization was 3 wt% H2SO4 at 130°C for 75 min, which yielded a high concentration of fermentable sugars (xylose 8.934 g/L, glucose 1.363 g/L, and arabinose 1.203 g/L) and low concentrations of microbial inhibitors (furfural 0.526 g/L and acetic acid 1.192 g/L). These results suggest that the model obtained in this study can satisfactorily describe the formation of degradation products and the depolymerization mechanism of wheat straw.

  16. Effect of kinetics of complexation by humic acid on toxicity of copper to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Kim, S.D.; Cha, D.K.; Allen, H.E.

    1999-05-01

    The rate of reaction of trace metal ions is an important consideration when studying the chemistry of trace metals in natural waters. The application of speciation models to natural water systems requires knowledge of kinetics if reactions are slow. Most bioassay and toxicity tests conducted in static and flow-through systems have not taken reaction kinetics into account. Therefore, results from these studies may overestimate the toxicity in the receiving waters. In the present study, the kinetics of the interaction of Cu(II) with humic acid (HA) and its influence on the toxicity of copper to Ceriodaphnia dubia were investigated by both chemical kinetic studies using a copper ion selective electrode and bioassay tests using a continuous flow-through bioassay system. A two-ligand site, with fist-order rate constants, model gave a very good description of experimental kinetic data of the change of free Cu{sup 2+} concentration. Average k{sub 1} was 1.85/h and average k{sub 2} was 0.094/h. Bioassay tests indicated that different reaction times of copper with HA solution produced different toxic effects to organisms. The authors determined the hydrodynamic characteristics of the bioassay chambers to better describe the exposure of the organisms to free Cu{sup 2+}. The bioassays supported the free ion activity model that the bioavailability and therefore toxicity of copper was directly correlated to the free Cu{sup 2+} concentration rather than to the total copper concentration. It was further shown that conventional chemical kinetics can be used to predict the toxicity of copper in these bioassays. This study supports the importance of considering reaction kinetics when studying the chemistry of trace metals in natural waters.

  17. Kinetics of hyaluronan hydrolysis in acidic solution at various pH values.

    PubMed

    Tømmeraas, Kristoffer; Melander, Claes

    2008-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was hydrolyzed using varying temperatures (40, 60, and 80 degrees C) and acid concentrations (0.0010, 0.010, 0.10, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.0 M HCl). The degradation process was monitored by determination of weight average molecular weight ( M w) by size-exclusion chromatography with online multiangle laser light scattering, refractive index, and intrinsic viscosity detectors (SEC-MALLS-RI-visc) on samples taken out continuously during the hydrolysis. SEC-MALLS-RI-visc showed that the degradation gave narrow molecular weight distributions with polydispersity indexes ( M w/ M n) of 1.3-1.7. Kinetic plots of 1/ M w versus time gave linear plots showing that acid hydrolysis of HA is a random process and that it follows a first order kinetics. For hydrolysis in HCl at 60 and 80 degrees C, it was shown that the kinetic rate constant ( k h) for the degradation depended linearly on the acid concentration. Further, the dependence of temperature on the hydrolysis in 0.1 M HCl was found to give a linear Arrhenius plot (ln k h vs 1/ T), with an activation energy ( E a) of 137 kJ/mol and Arrhenius constant ( A) of 7.86 x 10 (15) h (-1). (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize the product of extensive hydrolysis (48 h at 60 degrees C in 0.1 M HCl). No indication of de- N-acetylation of the N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) units or other byproducts were seen. Additionally, a low molecular weight HA was hydrolyzed in 0.1 M DCl for 4 h at 80 degrees C. It was shown that it was primarily the beta-(1-->4)-linkage between GlcNAc and glucuronic acid (GlcA) that was cleaved during hydrolysis at pH < p K a,GlcA. The dependence of the hydrolysis rate constant was further studied as a function of pH between -0.3 and 5. The degradation was found to be random (linear kinetic plots) over the entire pH range studied. Further, the kinetic rate constant was found to depend linearly on pH in the region -0.3 to 3. Above this pH (around the p K a of HA), the kinetic constant

  18. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions.

  19. Kinetics of dodecanoic acid adsorption from caustic solution by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Phillip; Wu, Sophie Hua

    2003-10-15

    This study examines the influences of adsorbent porosity and surface chemistry and of carbon dosage on dodecanoic acid adsorption kinetics from aqueous and 2 M NaOH solutions as batch adsorption processes. Both adsorbents are steam-activated carbons prepared from either coconut or coal precursors. Prior to use the adsorbents were washed in deionized water or 2 M NaOH. Mass transfer coefficients and effective overall diffusion coefficients indicate a minor contribution from adsorbent porosity. In contrast, high surface oxygen content impedes transport to and into the adsorbent structure. Carbon dosage shows a proportional increase in transport coefficients with increasing mass; these coefficients are constant when normalized per unit mass. Neither water nor NaOH treatment of the adsorbents has a significant influence on dodecanoic acid adsorption kinetics. Molecular and Knudsen diffusion coefficients are defined to demonstrate that the overall effective diffusion coefficient values and the diffusion process are controlled by surface diffusion.

  20. A novel kinetic model for polysaccharide dissolution during atmospheric acetic acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuebing; Morikawa, Yuichi; Qi, Feng; Zeng, Jing; Liu, Dehua

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid (AcH) pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with the catalysis of sulfuric acid (SA) could greatly enhance the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. However, polysaccharide dissolution happened inevitably during the pretreatment. It was found that the simplest model, which assumes that the total polysaccharides were reactive to be dissolved, could not well describe the kinetic behavior of polysaccharide dissolution. A novel pseudo-homogenous kinetic model was thus developed by introducing a parameter termed as "potential dissolution degree" (δ(d)) based on the multilayered structure of cell wall. It was found that solid xylan and glucan dissolutions were a first-order reaction with respect to the dissolvable fraction. Due to the delignification action of AcH, polysaccharide dissolutions were enhanced in AcH media compared with those in aqueous system. Acetylizations of cellulose and sugars were also observed, and AcH concentration showed a significant influence on the degree of acetylization.

  1. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Tetrathionate-Hypochlorous Acid Reaction in Nearly Neutral Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dénes; Horváth, Attila K.

    2009-11-01

    The tetrathionate-hypochlorous acid reaction has been investigated in nearly neutral medium at I = 0.5 M ionic strength and T = 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in dihydrogen-phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate buffer by UV-vis spectrophotometry. In excess of hypochlorous acid, the stoichiometry was found to be S4O62- + 7HOCl + 3H2O → 4SO42- + 7Cl- + 13H+, but in excess of tetrathionate colloidal sulfur precipitates. On the basis of the simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, a nine-step kinetic model with four fitted and five fixed rate coefficients is proposed. Analogous oxidation reactions of tetrathionate are also compared and discussed.

  2. Kinetic energy releases of small amino acids upon interaction with keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, S.; Alvarado, F.; Postma, J.; Sobocinski, P.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2009-01-01

    In chromatin, DNA is tightly packed into one complex together with histone and non-histone proteins. These proteins are known to protect the DNA against indirect and to some extent even direct radiation damage. Radiation action upon amino acids is thus one of the primary steps in biological radiation action. In this paper we investigate the ionization and fragmentation of the gas-phase amino acids glycine, alanine and valine upon interaction with keV α-particles. High resolution coincidence time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the dominant fragmentation channels as well as fragment kinetic energies.

  3. Kinetics of the extraction of succinic acid with tri-n-octylamine in 1-octanol solution.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young-Si; Huh, Yun Suk; Hong, Won Hi; Hong, Yeon Ki

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic studies for the extraction of succinic acid from aqueous solution with 1-octanol solutions of tri-n-octylamine (TOA) were carried out using a stirred cell with a microporous hydrophobic membrane. The interfacial concentrations of species were correlated and thus the intrinsic kinetics was obtained. The overall extraction process was controlled by the chemical reaction at or near the interface between the aqueous and organic phases. The formation reaction of succinic acid-TOA complex was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of succinic acid in the aqueous phase and the order of 0.5 with respect to that of TOA in the organic phase with a rate constant of (3.14 +/- 0.6) x 10(-8) m(2.5) x mol(-0.5) x s(-1). The dissociation reaction of succinic acid-TOA complex was found to be the second-order with respect to that of succinic acid-TOA complex in the organic phase and the order of -2 with respect to that of TOA in the organic phase with a rate constant of (1.44 +/- 1.4) x 10(-4) mol x m(-2) x s(-1).

  4. Kinetics of gas phase formic acid decomposition on platinum single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Michael D.; Milligan, Cory A.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-06-01

    Formic acid dehydrogenation turnover rates (TORs) were measured on Pt(111), Pt(100), and polycrystalline Pt foil surfaces at a total pressure of 800 Torr between 413 and 513 K in a batch reactor connected to an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The TORs, apparent activation energies, and reaction orders are not sensitive to the structure of the Pt surface, within the precision of the measurements. CO introduced into the batch reactor depressed the formic acid dehydrogenation TOR and increased the reaction's apparent activation energies on Pt(111) and Pt(100), consistent with behavior predicted by the Temkin equation. Two reaction mechanisms were explored which explain the formic acid decomposition mechanism on Pt, both of which include dissociative adsorption of formic acid, rate limiting formate decomposition, and quasi-equilibrated hydrogen recombination and CO adsorption. No evidence was found that catalytic supports used in previous studies altered the reaction kinetics or mechanism.

  5. Predicting protein decomposition: the case of aspartic-acid racemization kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M J; Waite, E R; van Duin, A C

    1999-01-01

    The increase in proportion of the non-biological (D-) isomer of aspartic acid (Asp) relative to the L-isomer has been widely used in archaeology and geochemistry as a tool for dating. the method has proved controversial, particularly when used for bones. The non-linear kinetics of Asp racemization have prompted a number of suggestions as to the underlying mechanism(s) and have led to the use of mathematical transformations which linearize the increase in D-Asp with respect to time. Using one example, a suggestion that the initial rapid phase of Asp racemization is due to a contribution from asparagine (Asn), we demonstrate how a simple model of the degradation and racemization of Asn can be used to predict the observed kinetics. A more complex model of peptide bound Asx (Asn + Asp) racemization, which occurs via the formation of a cyclic succinimide (Asu), can be used to correctly predict Asx racemization kinetics in proteins at high temperatures (95-140 degrees C). The model fails to predict racemization kinetics in dentine collagen at 37 degrees C. The reason for this is that Asu formation is highly conformation dependent and is predicted to occur extremely slowly in triple helical collagen. As conformation strongly influences the rate of Asu formation and hence Asx racemization, the use of extrapolation from high temperatures to estimate racemization kinetics of Asx in proteins below their denaturation temperature is called into question. In the case of archaeological bone, we argue that the D:L ratio of Asx reflects the proportion of non-helical to helical collagen, overlain by the effects of leaching of more soluble (and conformationally unconstrained) peptides. Thus, racemization kinetics in bone are potentially unpredictable, and the proposed use of Asx racemization to estimate the extent of DNA depurination in archaeological bones is challenged. PMID:10091247

  6. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  7. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover.

  8. pH modulation of transient state kinetics of enzymes. II. Transient state kinetics of plant cell wall acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Crasnier, M; Ricard, J

    1984-03-01

    The pre-steady-state kinetics of plant cell wall acid phosphatase has been investigated at different pH values. The approach of the steady stale lasts about 1 or 2 s and may be fitted with two exponential terms. For certain pH values the approach to the steady state exhibits damped oscillations. Plotting the sum and the product of the two time constants of these exponentials as a function of substrate concentration yields two straight lines. From the slopes and intercepts of these lines one may determine the values of rate and ionization constants involved in the reaction scheme. The results obtained are consistent with the view that the binding of the substrate to the enzyme does not induce a 'slow' conformation change of the enzyme. The enzyme reacts with its substrate while being mostly in its ionized form. Release of p-nitrophenol is also favoured by this ionized form of the enzyme. However, the hydrolysis of the phosphoryl-enzyme complex mostly occurs from the protonated form of the enzyme. The ionization constants of the free enzyme and of the various enzyme-ligand complexes are very similar.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of Lauric Acid Hydroxylation by Human Cytochrome P450 4A11

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2–2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-2H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable “metabolic switching” to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-2H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc.108, 7074–7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-3H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol.87, 607–625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C–H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation. PMID:25203493

  10. Kinetic analysis of lauric acid hydroxylation by human cytochrome P450 4A11.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghak; Cha, Gun-Su; Nagy, Leslie D; Yun, Chul-Ho; Guengerich, F Peter

    2014-10-07

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2-2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-(2)H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable "metabolic switching" to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-(2)H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 108, 7074-7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-(3)H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol. 87, 607-625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C-H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation.

  11. Decomposition of hydroxy amino acids in foraminiferal tests; kinetics, mechanism and geochronological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Shou, M.-Y.; Man, E.H.; Schroeder, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The diagenesis of the hydroxy amino acids serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests has been investigated. The decomposition pathways of these amino acids are complex; the principal reactions appear to be dehydration, aldol cleavage and decarboxylation. Stereochemical studies indicate that the ??-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) detected in foraminiferal tests is the end product of threonine dehydration pathway. Decomposition of serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests from two well-dated Caribbean deep-sea cores, P6304-8 and -9, has been found to follow irreversible first-order kinetics. Three empirical equations were derived for the disappearance of serine and threonine and the appearance of ABA. These equations can be used as a new geochronological method for dating foraminiferal tests from other deep-sea sediments. Preliminary results suggest that ages deduced from the ABA kinetics equation are most reliable because "species effect" and contamination problems are not important for this nonbiological amino acid. Because of the variable serine and threonine contents of modern foraminiferal species, it is likely that the accurate age estimates can be obtained from the serine and threonine decomposition equations only if a homogeneous species assemblage or single species sample isolated from mixed natural assemblages is used. ?? 1978.

  12. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors.

  13. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.6×10 -6 M and calibration rang is 8×10 -6-1.2×10 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 8×10 -6 and 2×10 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  14. Biodegradation kinetics of 4-fluorocinnamic acid by a consortium of Arthrobacter and Ralstonia strains.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Syed A; Wietzes, Piet; Janssen, Dick B

    2012-02-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain G1 is able to grow on 4-fluorocinnamic acid (4-FCA) as sole carbon source. The organism converts 4-FCA into 4-fluorobenzoic acid (4-FBA) and utilizes the two-carbon side-chain for growth with some formation of 4-fluoroacetophenone as a dead-end side product. We also have isolated Ralstonia sp. strain H1, an organism that degrades 4-FBA. A consortium of strains G1 and H1 degraded 4-FCA with Monod kinetics during growth in batch and continuous cultures. Specific growth rates of strain G1 and specific degradation rates of 4-FCA were observed to follow substrate inhibition kinetics, which could be modeled using the kinetic models of Haldane-Andrew and Luong-Levenspiel. The mixed culture showed complete mineralization of 4-FCA with quantitative release of fluoride, both in batch and continuous cultures. Steady-state chemostat cultures that were exposed to shock loadings of substrate responded with rapid degradation and returned to steady-state in 10-15 h, indicating that the mixed culture provided a robust system for continuous 4-FCA degradation.

  15. A hybrid SVM-FFA method for prediction of monthly mean global solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Mohammadi, Kasra; Tong, Chong Wen; Zamani, Mazdak; Motamedi, Shervin; Ch, Sudheer

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a hybrid support vector machine-firefly optimization algorithm (SVM-FFA) model is proposed to estimate monthly mean horizontal global solar radiation (HGSR). The merit of SVM-FFA is assessed statistically by comparing its performance with three previously used approaches. Using each approach and long-term measured HGSR, three models are calibrated by considering different sets of meteorological parameters measured for Bandar Abbass situated in Iran. It is found that the model (3) utilizing the combination of relative sunshine duration, difference between maximum and minimum temperatures, relative humidity, water vapor pressure, average temperature, and extraterrestrial solar radiation shows superior performance based upon all approaches. Moreover, the extraterrestrial radiation is introduced as a significant parameter to accurately estimate the global solar radiation. The survey results reveal that the developed SVM-FFA approach is greatly capable to provide favorable predictions with significantly higher precision than other examined techniques. For the SVM-FFA (3), the statistical indicators of mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), root mean square error (RMSE), relative root mean square error (RRMSE), and coefficient of determination ( R 2) are 3.3252 %, 0.1859 kWh/m2, 3.7350 %, and 0.9737, respectively which according to the RRMSE has an excellent performance. As a more evaluation of SVM-FFA (3), the ratio of estimated to measured values is computed and found that 47 out of 48 months considered as testing data fall between 0.90 and 1.10. Also, by performing a further verification, it is concluded that SVM-FFA (3) offers absolute superiority over the empirical models using relatively similar input parameters. In a nutshell, the hybrid SVM-FFA approach would be considered highly efficient to estimate the HGSR.

  16. Optimization and Kinetic Studies on Biodiesel Production from Kusum (Schleichera triguga) Oil Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sarve, Antaram; Varma, Mahesh N; Sonawane, Shriram S

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the low-cost non-edible kusum (Schleichera triguga) oil with a substantial amount of free fatty acid (FFA) was utilized for biodiesel synthesis. In pretreatment step, FFA was reduced by the acid catalyzed esterification method. Then, response surface method (RSM) in conjunction with centre composite design (CCD) containing 30 experimental runs were statistically employed for process optimization and kinetic study for the base catalyzed transesterification process. A statistical model predicted highest fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield of 97.37% at the optimal values of process parameters as follows: sodium methoxide concentration 0.9 wt% of oil, Methanol to oil molar ratio 9:1, temperature 58.9 ℃ and reaction time 58.5 min. Using these optimal parameters under experimental conditions in three independent replicates an actual FAME content of 98.14% was obtained which was in reasonable agreement with predicted one. The developed kinetic model suggested a 1.8(th) order reaction with activation energy of 31.42 kcal mol(-1) and frequency factor of 5.53×10(19) L mol(-1)min(-1). Furthermore, Important fuel properties of kusum oil biodiesel (KOB) was compared with ASTM 6751 and DIN EN 14214. The viscosity was found to be 5.34 Cst at 40 °C and the flash point was 152°C.

  17. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, M. C.; Stanisavljev, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of the complex reaction between I- and H2O2 in acid media was investigated. The particular attention was focused on the determination of the rate constant of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 involved in the investigated complex process. The examination of the whole kinetics was performed by simultaneously monitoring the evolution of O2 pressure, I{3/-} and I- concentrations. We modeled the behavior of experimentally followed components based on Liebhafsky's research. Our preliminary results suggest a significantly higher rate constant (3.5 × 107 M-1 s-1) of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 as those proposed in the literature.

  18. Chemorheological analysis and model-free kinetics of acid catalysed furfuryl alcohol polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guigo, Nathanael; Mija, Alice; Vincent, Luc; Sbirrazzuoli, Nicolas

    2007-10-21

    The complete curing of furfuryl alcohol (FA), was studied by chemorheological analysis and model-free kinetics under isothermal and non-isothermal modes. Polymerization of FA under acidic catalysis involves complex reactions, with several steps (such as condensations and Diels-Alder cycloadditions). To account for the polymerization complexity, kinetic analysis of DSC data was performed with a model-free isoconversional method. The obtained E(alpha)-dependencies were closely-correlated with the variation of complex viscosity during curing. Linear condensations are predominant during the early curing stage and are followed by two distinct stages of branching cycloadditions. Gelation and vitrification, identified by rheometric measurements, were associated with a decrease of the overall reaction rate that becomes controlled by diffusion of small oligomers. Before vitrification, the rate of crosslinking is limited by the mobility of longer polymer chains and diffusion encounters a large energy barrier due to the cooperative nature of the motions, leading to higher E(alpha) values.

  19. Kinetics of liquid-solid reactions in naphthenic acid conversion and Kraft pulping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling

    Two liquid-solid reactions, in which the morphology of the solid changes as the reactions proceeds, were examined. One is the NA conversion in oil by decarboxylation on metal oxides and carbonates, and the other is the Kraft pulping in which lignin removal by delignification reaction. In the study of the NA conversion, CaO was chosen as the catalyst for the kinetic study from the tested catalysts based on NA conversion. Two reaction mixtures, carrier oil plus commercial naphthenic acids and heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) from Athabasca bitumen, were applied in the kinetic study. The influence of TAN, temperature, and catalyst loading on the NA conversion and decarboxylation were studied systematically. The results showed that the removal rate of TAN and the decarboxylation of NA were both independent of the concentration of NA over the range studied, and significantly dependent on reaction temperature. The data from analyzing the spent catalyst demonstrated that calcium naphthenate was an intermediate of the decarboxylation reaction of NA, and the decomposition of calcium naphthenate was a rate-determining step. In the study on the delignification of the Kraft pulping, a new mechanism was proposed for the heterogeneous delignification reaction during the Kraft pulping process. In particular, the chemical reaction mechanism took into account the heterogeneous nature of Kraft pulping. Lignin reacted in parallel with sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide. The mechanism consists of three key kinetic steps: (1) adsorption of hydroxide and hydrosulfide ions on lignin; (2) surface reaction on the solid surface to produce degraded lignin products; and (3) desorption of degradation products from the solid surface. The most important step for the delignification process is the surface reaction, rather than the reactions occurring in the liquid phase. A kinetic model has, thus, been developed based on the proposed mechanism. The derived kinetic model showed that the mechanism

  20. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (II): Process simulation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Two groups of sequencing batch reactors were used to study the metabolism substrate transformation of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAO) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) fed with mixed acetic and propionic acids. Seven stoichiometry parameters and 24 kinetic parameters were contained in the PAO and GAO kinetic model, and stoichiometry parameters were deduced from the stoichiometry models, while kinetic parameters were determined by experimental results. The kinetic model parameters of stoichiometry and kinetics were determined according the experiments and the literature. Subsequently, the substrate transformations of PAO and GAO were calculated by the Matlab software. The model curves matched the SBR experimental data well, indicating that the kinetic model based on SCFAs metabolism could be used to simulate PAO and GAO in anaerobic-aerobic conditions.

  1. Quantitative analysis of myocardial kinetics of 15-p-(iodine-125) iodophenylpentadecanoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, T.R.; Holden, J.E.; Ng, C.K.; Raffel, D.M.; Gatley, S.J.

    1989-07-01

    Myocardial extraction and the characteristic tissue clearance of radioactivity following bolus injections of a radioiodinated (/sup 125/I) long chain fatty acid (LCFA) analog 15-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) were examined in the isolated perfused working rat heart. Radioactivity remaining in the heart was monitored with external scintillation probes. A compartmental model which included nonesterified tracer, catabolite, and complex lipid compartments successfully fitted tissue time-radioactivity residue curves, and gave a value for the rate of IPPA oxidation 1.8 times that obtained from steady-state release of tritiated water from labeled palmitic acid. The technique was sensitive to the impairment of LCFA oxidation in hearts of animals treated with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor, 2(5(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl)oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA). IPPA or similar modified fatty acids may be better than /sup 11/C-labeled physiological fatty acids such as palmitate in this type of study, because efflux of unoxidized tracer and catabolite(s) from the heart are kinetically more distinct, and their contributions to the early data can be reliably separated. This technique may be suitable for extension to in vivo measurements with position tomography and appropriate modified fatty acids.

  2. Kinetic modeling of lactic acid production from batch submerged fermentation of cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Tango, M.S.A.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1999-12-01

    A kinetic model for the production of lactic acid through batch submerged fermentation of cheese whey using Lactobacillus helveticus was developed. The model accounts for the effect of substrate limitation, substrate inhibition, lactic acid inhibition, maintenance energy and cell death on the cell growth, substrate utilization, and lactic acid production during the fermentation process. The model was evaluated using experimental data from Tango and Ghaly (1999). The predicted results obtained from the model compared well with experimental (R{sup 2} = 0.92--0.98). The model was also used to investigate the effect of the initial substrate concentration on the lag period, fermentation time, specific growth rate, and cell productivity during batch fermentation. The maximum specific growth rate ({micro}{sub m}), the saturation constant (K{sub S}), the substrate inhibition constant (K{sub IS}), and the lactic acid inhibition constant (K{sub IP}) were found to be 0.25h{sup {minus}1}, 0.9 g/L, 250.0 g/L, and 60.0 g/L, respectively. High initial lactose concentration in cheese whey reduced both the specific growth rate and substrate utilization rate due to the substrate inhibition phenomenon. The maximum lactic acid production occurred at about 100 g/L initial lactose concentration after 40 h of fermentation. The maximum lactic acid concentration above which Lactobacillus helveticus did not grow was found to be 80.0 g/L.

  3. Structure and kinetics of fatty acid Langmuir monolayers on zinc salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Cantin, Sophie; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Perrot, Françoise; Goldmann, Michel

    2013-12-19

    The adsorption of zinc cations under behenic acid Langmuir monolayers was investigated by means of isotherm measurements, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Brewster angle microscopy. The structure of the films was characterized as a function of Zn(2+) concentration, for three different counterions (chloride, iodide, bromide) and at two subphase pHs (5.5 and 7.5). At pH 5.5 and in the studied concentration range, Zn(2+) adsorption leads to a condensation of the fatty acid monolayer with the same phase transitions as over pure water. In contrast, at higher pH the organic X-phase is evidenced immediately above a concentration threshold without any ion organization. Even though Cu(2+) and Zn(2+)cations induce both the fatty acid X-phase, the kinetics of its formation appears strongly different. Indeed, as for Mg(2+) and Cd(2+), the intermediate new I-structure is evidenced in the course of Zn(2+) adsorption although superstructures are observed only for Mg(2+) and Cd(2+). However, for Zn(2+), the I-phase evolves to the final state through a new structure called X' and a continuous X'-X transition. Finally, any effect of the counterion is evidenced neither during the kinetic process nor in the final state.

  4. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  5. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  6. Origin of Kinetic Resolution of Hydroxy Esters through Catalytic Enantioselective Lactonization by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Changotra, Avtar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-08-05

    Kinetic resolution is a widely used strategy for separation and enrichment of enantiomers. Using density functional theory computations, the origin of how a chiral BINOL-phosphoric acid catalyzes the selective lactonization of one of the enantiomers of α-methyl γ-hydroxy ester is identified. In a stepwise mechanism, the stereocontrolling transition state for the addition of the hydroxyl group to the si face of the ester carbonyl in the case of the S isomer exhibits a network of more effective noncovalent interactions between the substrate and the chiral catalyst.

  7. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  8. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  9. Kinetics and thermodynamic studies for removal of acid blue 129 from aqueous solution by almond shell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency and performance of Almond shell (AS) adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Acid Blue 129 (AB129) from wastewater is presented in this report. The influence of variables including pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal have been investigated in batch method by one at a time optimization method. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by four widely used isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D–R). It was found that adsorption of AB129 on AS well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of dye molecules onto the surface of the adsorbent. More than 98% removal efficiency was obtained within 14 min at adsorbent dose of 0.4 g for initial dye concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 2. Kinetics of the adsorption process was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order model. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb’s free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of AB129 adsorption on all adsorbents. This work can be used in design of adsorption columns for dyes removal. PMID:24620822

  10. Multinuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of single amino acid replacements in staphylococcal nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Alexandrescu, A.T.; Ulrich, E.L.; Mills, D.A.; Markley, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Staphylococcal nuclease hydrolyzes the 5'-phosphate bond of deoxythymidine 5'-p-nitrophenylphosphate to yield p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) and deoxythymidine in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The PNPP produced can be hydrolyzed to p-nitrophenol and inorganic phosphate by alkaline phosphatase in a coupled assay to provide a chromophore suitable for kinetic studies. By using this assay, the following single amino acid replacements have been characterized at 20 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ and pH 9.25 with the following results (kinetic parameters are expressed relative to those for SNase). SNase, Km = 2.5 mM, V = 1, V/K = 1; substitution of Tyr for Phe at position 85 (Y85F), Km = 61 mM, V/K = 1; H124R, Km = 3.8 mM, V = 3, V/K = 6; H46Y, Km = 2.5 mM, V = 0.78, V/K = 0.66; F76V, Km = 2.4 mM, V = 2.1, and V/K = 2. Only a small perturbation in the kinetic constants is seen for H124R, H46Y, and F76V. Removal of the hydroxyl from tyrosine 85 diminishes the affinity for substrate. Interactions of the wild-type and variant nucleases with metal ions and inhibitors are being investigated by /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 113/Cd NMR.

  11. Kinetics of enzymatic synthesis of liquid wax ester from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Radzi, Salina Mat; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ariff, Arbakariya; Rahman, Mohammad Basyaruddin Abdul; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of wax ester synthesis from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol using immobilized lipase from Candida antartica as catalyst was studied with different types of impeller (Rushton turbine and AL-hydrofoil) to create different mixing conditions in 2l stirred tank reactor. The effects of catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, and impeller tip speed on the synthesis were also evaluated. Rushton turbine impeller exhibited highest conversion rate at lower impeller tip speed as compared to AL-hydrofoil impeller. A second-order reversible kinetic model from single progress curve for the prediction of fractional conversion at given reaction time was proposed and the corresponding kinetic parameter values were calculated by non-linear regression method. The results from the simulation using the proposed model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. Activation energy shows a value of 21.77 Kcal/mol. The thermodynamic parameters of the process, enthalpy and entropy, were 21.15 Kcal/mol and 52.07 cal/mol.K, respectively.

  12. Complexes between ovalbumin nanoparticles and linoleic acid: Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2016-11-15

    Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of complex formation between heat-induced aggregates of ovalbumin (ovalbumin nanoparticles, OVAn) and linoleic acid (LA) were evaluated. Extrinsic fluorescence data were fitted to modified Scatchard model yielding the following results: n: 49±2 LA molecules bound per OVA monomer unit and Ka: 9.80±2.53×10(5)M. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties were analyzed by turbidity measurements at different LA/OVA monomer molar ratios (21.5-172) and temperatures (20-40°C). An adsorption approach was used and a pseudo-second-order kinetics was found for LA-OVAn complex formation. This adsorption process took place within 1h. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that LA adsorption on OVAn was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropically-driven process, highlighting the hydrophobic nature of the LA and OVAn interaction. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed that both OVAn and LA-OVAn complexes have a roughly rounded form with size lower than 100nm.

  13. A simple and fast kinetic assay for phytases using phytic acid-protein complex as substrate.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy Thi; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Dalsgaard, Søren; Yu, Shukun

    2011-03-15

    Phytase (EC 3.1.3.-) hydrolyzes phytate (IP(6)) present in cereals and grains to release inorganic phosphate (P(i)), thereby making it bioavailable. The most commonly used method to assay phytase, developed nearly a century ago, measures the P(i) liberated from IP(6). This traditional endpoint assay is time-consuming and well known for its cumbersomeness in addition to requiring extra caution for handling the toxic regents used. This article reports a simple, fast, and nontoxic kinetic method adaptable for high throughput for assaying phytase using IP(6)-lysozyme as a substrate. The assay is based on the principle that IP(6) forms stable turbid complexes with positively charged lysozyme in a wide pH range, and hydrolysis of the IP(6) in the complex is accompanied by a decrease in turbidity monitored at 600 nm. The turbidity decrease correlates well to the released P(i) from IP(6). This kinetic method was found to be useful in assaying histidine acid phytases, including 3- and 6-phytases, a class representing all commercial phytases, and alkaline β-propeller phytase from Bacillus sp. The influences of temperature, pH, phosphate, and other salts on the kinetic assay were examined. All salts, including NaCl, CaCl(2), and phosphate, showed a concentration-dependent interference.

  14. Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of dichloroacetic acid from aqueous solution using mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Cao, Yang; Chen, Shenglu

    2014-08-01

    The presence of disinfection by-products, such as trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in water, is believed to be harmful to human health. In this work, mesoporous carbon was synthesized with the evaporation-induced self-assembly method and employed to evaluate the effects of initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature on the removal of dichloroacetic acid in batch experiments. Adsorption equilibrium was established in 480 min and the maximum adsorption (350mg/g) of dichloroacetic acid on the mesoporous carbon was observed to occur at 308 K and pH 3.0. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were used to analyse the equilibrium data at different temperatures; kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models and found that the adsorption capacity, mass transfer coefficient and diffusivity of dichloroacetic acid were directly affected by the physical and chemical parameters. In addition, the various thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (Delta G), enthalpy (Delta H = 54.35 kJmol-1) and entropy (Delta S = 258.36 Jmol-1 K-1) were calculated to analyse the adsorption process. The experimental results indicated that the mesoporous carbon was an excellent adsorbent for dichloroacetic acid removal from aqueous solutions.

  15. Active food packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymers: study of the release kinetics of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Otero-Pazos, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bernaldo de Quirós, Ana; Sendón, Raquel; Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Moreno-Bondi, M Cruz; Angulo, Immaculada; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2014-11-19

    A novel active packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was developed for the controlled release of ferulic acid. The release kinetics of ferulic acid from the active system to food simulants (10, 20, and 50% ethanol (v/v), 3% acetic acid (w/v), and vegetable oil), substitutes (95% ethanol (v/v) and isooctane), and real food samples at different temperatures were studied. The key parameters of the diffusion process were calculated by using a mathematical modeling based on Fick's second law. The ferulic acid release was affected by the temperature as well as the percentage of ethanol of the simulant. The fastest release occurred in 95% ethanol (v/v) at 20 °C. The diffusion coefficients (D) obtained ranged between 1.8 × 10(-11) and 4.2 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s. A very good correlation between experimental and estimated data was obtained, and consequently the model could be used to predict the release of ferulic acid into food simulants and real food samples.

  16. Kinetics of octacalcium phosphate crystal growth in the presence of organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossl, Paul R.; Inskeep, William P.

    1992-05-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is an important P solid phase in geochemical and biological systems and has been recognized as a precursor phase to the formation of thermodynamically more stable hydroxyapatite (HAP). Metastability of OCP with respect to HAP may be explained by precipitation kinetics and the influence of dissolved organic C (DOC) on crystal growth. Octacalcium phosphate precipitation was measured at pH 6.0 and 25°C in the absence and presence of organic acids commonly found in natural waters and soil solutions using a seeded crystal growth constant composition method. Rate constants for OCP precipitation were calculated from the following expression: Rate = kS(IAP 1/8 - K sp1/8) n, where k is the rate constant (L 7 mol -6 m -2 s -1), S is OCP seed crystal surface area (m 2 L -1), IAP = ion activity product, Ksp = OCP solubility constant (mol 8 L -8), and n is the rate reaction order. The rate constant for OCP precipitation in the absence of organic acids was 10 34.93·L 7 mol -6 m -2 s -1. Humic, fulvic, tannic, and citric acids were added to OCP crystal growth experiments at total soluble (C TS) C levels ranging from 20 μM to 2 mM. Inhibition of OCP precipitation was nearly complete (99% ) in the presence of 1.0 mM C TS as humic acid. At the same level of C TS, OCP precipitation was inhibited by 97,88, and 68% in the presence of fulvic, citric, and tannic acids, respectively. Inhibition of precipitation is caused by adsorption of organic acids onto OCP surfaces blocking active crystal growth sites. The ability of organic acids to inhibit OCP crystal growth is related to their hydrophobicity, functional group content, size, geometry, and orientation on the crystal surface. Precipitation kinetics and crystal growth inhibition by organic acids may explain the metastability of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and OCP with respect to thermodynamically more stable HAP often observed in geochemical environments.

  17. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  18. Reaction Kinetics for the Biocatalytic Conversion of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid to 2-Hydroxyphenazine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingmin; Cao, Hongxia; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    The phenazine derivative 2-hydroxyphenazine (2-OH-PHZ) plays an important role in the biocontrol of plant diseases, and exhibits stronger bacteriostatic and fungistatic activity than phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) toward some pathogens. PhzO has been shown to be responsible for the conversion of PCA to 2-OH-PHZ, however the kinetics of the reaction have not been systematically studied. Further, the yield of 2-OH-PHZ in fermentation culture is quite low and enhancement in our understanding of the reaction kinetics may contribute to improvements in large-scale, high-yield production of 2-OH-PHZ for biological control and other applications. In this study we confirmed previous reports that free PCA is converted to 2-hydroxy-phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA) by the action of a single enzyme PhzO, and particularly demonstrate that this reaction is dependent on NADP(H) and Fe3+. Fe3+ enhanced the conversion from PCA to 2-OH-PHZ and 28°C was a optimum temperature for the conversion. However, PCA added in excess to the culture inhibited the production of 2-OH-PHZ. 2-OH-PCA was extracted and purified from the broth, and it was confirmed that the decarboxylation of 2-OH-PCA could occur without the involvement of any enzyme. A kinetic analysis of the conversion of 2-OH-PCA to 2-OH-PHZ in the absence of enzyme and under different temperatures and pHs in vitro, revealed that the conversion followed first-order reaction kinetics. In the fermentation, the concentration of 2-OH-PCA increased to about 90 mg/L within a red precipitate fraction, as compared to 37 mg/L within the supernatant. The results of this study elucidate the reaction kinetics involved in the biosynthesis of 2-OH-PHZ and provide insights into in vitro methods to enhance yields of 2-OH-PHZ. PMID:24905009

  19. Kinetic and Thermochemical Studies of Weakly-Bound HO2 Complexes with Carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Nicovich, J. M.; McKee, M. L.; Wine, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that HO2 radicals are able to form strong hydrogen bonds with some closed-shell species, which can potentially influence our understanding of HO2 chemistry in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this study, a laser flash photolysis-tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technique has been employed to study the formation of HO2 complexes with formic and acetic acids. At low temperatures, equilibration kinetics have been observed, allowing adduct formation and dissociation rate coefficients to be obtained and adduct binding enthalpies to be determined. This is the first experimental study of the HO2-carboxylic acid complexes and the binding energies are in good agreement with the most recent theoretical estimates. The potential role of HO2-RC(O)OH adducts in atmospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  20. Influence of polycarboxylic acid chelating agents on the kinetics of the dissolution of metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatlova, N.M.; Gorichev, I.G.; Dukhanin, V.S.; Malov, L.V.

    1986-11-01

    The factors influencing the rate of dissolution of metal oxides in aqueous solutions of acids in the presence of polycarboxylic acid chelating agents and other complexing agents have been quantitatively compared in this review, and the decisive role of the gradient of protons and electrons in the realization of this process has been revealed. The main hypotheses of the proposed conceptions of the electron-proton theory for the dissolution of metal oxides have been stated: 1) The rate-limiting step is charge transfer (first hypothesis); 2) The rate limiting step is the desorption of the dissolution products (second hypothesis). The applicability of the proposed electron-proton theory to the theoretical substantiation of all the experimentally observed kinetic features of the influence of various factors has been demonstrated. Practical recommendations for the effective utilization of the chelating agents considered for removing iron oxide surface deposits have been given.

  1. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  2. Origin of fatty acid synthesis - Thermodynamics and kinetics of reaction pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1991-01-01

    The primitiveness of contemporary fatty acid biosynthesis was evaluated by using the thermodynamics and kinetics of its component reactions to estimate the extent of its dependence on powerful and selective catalysis by enzymes. Since this analysis indicated that the modern pathway is not primitive because it requires sophisticated enzymatic catalysis, an alternative pathway of primitive fatty acid synthesis is proposed that uses glycolaldehyde as a substrate. In contrast to the modern pathway, this primitive pathway is not dependent on an exogenous source of phosphoanhydride energy. Furthermore, the chemical spontaneity of its reactions suggests that it could have been readily catalyzed by the rudimentary biocatalysts available at an early stage in the origin of life.

  3. Amino acid supplementation does not alter whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in Arabian geldings.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Kristine L; Geor, Raymond J; Hanigan, Mark D; Harris, Pat A

    2012-03-01

    Stable isotope infusion methods have not been extensively used in horses to study protein metabolism. The objectives were to develop infusion and sampling methodologies for [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and apply these methods to determine whether the addition of supplemental amino acids to a control diet affected whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in mature horses. Arabian geldings were studied using a 6-h primed (9 μmol/kg), constant (6 μmol · kg(-1) · h(-1)) i.v. infusion of L-[1-(13)C] phenylalanine, with blood and breath sampled every 30 min, to measure whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in response to receiving the control diet (n = 12) or the control diet supplemented with equimolar amounts of glutamate (+Glu; 55 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), leucine (+Leu; 49 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), lysine (+Lys; 55 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), or phenylalanine (+Phe; 62 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 6). The plasma concentrations of the supplemented amino acid in horses receiving the +Leu, +Lys, and +Phe diets were 58, 53, and 36% greater, respectively, than for the control treatment (P < 0.05). Isotopic plateau was attained in blood [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and breath (13)CO(2) enrichments by 60 and 270 min, respectively. Phenylalanine flux (+20%) and oxidation (+110%) were greater (P < 0.05) in horses receiving the +Phe treatment than in those fed the control diet. There was no effect of treatment diet on nonoxidative phenylalanine disposal or phenylalanine release from protein breakdown. The developed methods are a valuable way to study protein metabolism and assess dietary amino acid adequacy in horses and will provide a useful tool for studying amino acid requirements in the future.

  4. Kinetic model and thermodynamic study of Acid Red 1 entrapment at electropolymerised polypyrrole films.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mominul; Wong, Danny K Y

    2015-11-01

    This work is focussed on the determination of a kinetic model and the thermodynamic study of the electrochemical entrapment of the model azo dye, Acid Red 1, at conducting polypyrrole films, which is proposed as a potential green technology for treatment of azo dyes in industrial effluents. The entrapment kinetic data were found to follow a pseudosecond order model involving an intra-particle diffusion. However, the equilibrium data obtained for Acid Red 1 entrapment at polypyrrole did not obey any common surface adsorption models such as the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Accordingly, the entrapment process may lead to an enhanced quantity of dye embedded in a polypyrrole film, making it a more effective and efficient technology than those involving only adsorption. Similarly, dye leakage from polypyrrole film surface to a sample matrix will be easily prevented. For this treatment process, a negative ΔG° range between -1.46±0.78 and -2.94±0.24 kJ mol(-1) at the corresponding temperature range of 298-318 K, and a ΔH° of 20.5±2.5 kJ mol(-1) indicate a spontaneous and endothermic entrapment process. Also, a positive ΔS° (73.6±8.2 J mol(-1) K(-1)) reveals increased randomness of the interface and an affinity of Acid Red 1 towards polypyrrole films. A low activation energy (7.67±0.80 kJ mol(-1)) confirms a physical process for Acid Red 1 entrapment at polypyrrole films.

  5. Coal desulfurization in oxidative acid media using hydrogen peroxide and ozone: a kinetic and statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Carrillo-Pedroza; A. Davalos Sanchez; M. Soria-Aguilar; E.T. Pecina Trevino

    2009-07-15

    The removal of pyritic sulfur from a Mexican sub-bituminous coal in nitric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acid solutions was investigated. The effect of the type and concentration of acid, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone as oxidants, in a temperature range of 20-60{sup o}C, was studied. The relevant factors in pyrite dissolution were determined by means of the statistical analysis of variance and optimized by the response surface method. Kinetic models were also evaluated, showing that the dissolution of pyritic sulfur follows the kinetic model of the shrinking core model, with diffusion through the solid product of the reaction as the controlling stage. The results of statistical analysis indicate that the use of ozone as an oxidant improves the pyrite dissolution because, at 0.25 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 20{sup o}C and 0.33 g/h O{sub 3}, the obtained dissolution is similar to that of 1 M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 40{sup o}C. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of bromide by periodate in aqueous acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Szél, Viktor; Csekő, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-11-13

    The periodate–bromide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically mainly in excess of bromide ion, monitoring the formation of the total amount of bromine at 450 nm at acidic buffered conditions and at a constant ionic strength in the presence of a phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer. The stoichiometry of the reaction was established to be strictly IO4(–) + 2Br(–) + 2H(+) → Br2 + IO3(–) + H2O. The formal kinetic order of the reactants was found to be perfectly one and two in the cases of periodate and bromide, respectively, but that of the hydrogen ion lies between one and two. We have also provided experimental evidence that dihydrogen phosphate accelerates the formation of bromine, suggesting the appearance of strong buffer assistance. On the basis of the experiments, a simple two-step kinetic model is proposed involving BrIO3 as a key intermediate that perfectly explains all of the experimental findings. Furthermore, we have also shown that in huge excess of bromide, the apparent rate coefficient obtained from the individual curve fitting method of the absorbance–time series is necessarily independent of the initial periodate concentration that may falsely be interpreted as the rate of bromine formation is also independent of the concentration of periodate.

  7. Inhibition kinetics of acid and alkaline phosphatases by atrazine and methomyl pesticides.

    PubMed

    El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Badawy, Mohamed E I

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the kinetic characteristics of acid and alkaline phosphatases isolated from different sources and to study the effects of the herbicide atrazine and insecticide methomyl on the activity and kinetic properties of the enzymes. Acid phosphatase (ACP) was isolated from the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. lycopersicum); alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was isolated from two sources, including mature earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) and larvae of the Egyptian cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). The specific activities of the enzymes were 33.31, 5.56 and 0.72 mmol substrate hydrolyzed per minute per milligram protein for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively. The inhibition kinetics indicated that atrazine and methomyl caused competitive-non-competitive inhibition of the enzymes. The relationships between estimates of K(m) and V(max) calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation have been explored. The extent of the inhibition was different, as estimated by the values of the inhibition constant Ki that were found to be 3.34 × 10(-3), 1.12 × 10(-2) and 1.07 × 10(-2) mM for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively, with methomyl. In the case of atrazine, K(i) were found to be 8.99 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-2) and 1.36 × 10(-2) mM for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively.

  8. Equivalent absorption and in vivo kinetics of tritiated folic acid and 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolic acid in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, S.D.; Gregory, J.F. )

    1990-02-26

    The intestinal absorption and in vivo turnover kinetics of ({sup 3}H)folic acid (FA) and (6S)-5-formyl-({sup 3}H)tetrahydrofolate (5-CHO-THF) were examined to determine whether differences exist in the inherent bioavailability of these forms of the vitamin. Following oral administration of 2 {mu}Ci/100 g body weight (in 50 mM sodium ascorbate, pH 7), a biphasic pattern of urinary tritium excretion was observed for each labeled folate. The following kinetic results were obtained (n=9). Little tritium was found in the GI tract after 8 hours, which indicated nearly complete absorption of each folate. HPLC analysis of urine revealed similar excretory patterns over 0-8 days post-dose for each folate administered, and the patterns of hepatic ({sup 3}H)folates were equivalent when examined after 8 hours and 4 days post-dose. These findings indicate that the bioavailability FA and 5-formyl-THF is equivalent.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of pentathionate ion by chlorine dioxide in a slightly acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Csekő, György; Petz, Andrea; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-02-27

    The chlorine dioxide-pentathionate reaction has been studied at a slightly acidic medium by conventional UV-vis spectroscopy monitoring the absorbance at 430 nm. We have shown that pentathionate was oxidized to sulfate, but chlorate is also a marginal product of the reaction besides the chloride ion. The stoichiometry of the reaction can be established as a linear combination of two limiting stoichiometries under our experimental conditions. Kinetics of the reaction was found to be also complex because initial rate studies revealed that formal kinetic orders of both the hydrogen ion and chlorine dioxide is far from unity. Moreover, log-log plot of the initial rate against pentathionate concentration indicated a nonconstant formal kinetic order. We also observed a significant catalytic effect of chloride ion. Based on our observations and simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, an 11-step kinetic model is obtained with 6 fitted rate coefficients. A relatively simple rate equation has also been derived and discussed.

  10. Mammalian cell DNA damage and repair kinetics of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Pals, Justin; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second most common class of chlorinated water disinfection by-products (DBPs). The single cell gel electrophoresis genotoxicity assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was modified to include liquid holding recovery time to measure genomic DNA damage and repair kinetics of three monoHAAs: chloroacetic acid (CAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA), and iodoacetic acid (IAA). The rank order of genotoxic potency was IAA > BAA > CAA from previous research. The concentration of each HAA was chosen to generate approximately the same level of genotoxic damage. No cytotoxicity was expressed during the 24 h liquid holding period. Nuclei from CHO cells treated with BAA showed the lowest rate of DNA repair (t(50) = 296 min) compared to that of CAA or IAA (t(50) = 134 and 84 min, respectively). The different rates of genomic repair expressed by IAA or CAA versus BAA suggest that different distributions of DNA lesions are induced. The use of DNA repair coupled with genomic technologies may lead to the understanding of the biological and genetic mechanisms involved in toxic responses induced by DBPs.

  11. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies for removal of acid azo dyes by aniline formaldehyde condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terangpi, Praisy; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of two acid dyes named Acid orange 8 (AO8) and Acid violet 7 (AV7) by amine based polymer aniline formaldehyde condensate (AFC) was studied. Adsorption of both dyes was favored at acidic pH. Electrostatic attraction between protonated amine group (NH3 +) of AFC and anionic sulfonate group (SO3 -) of dye molecule along with hydrogen bond formation and interaction between aromatic group of dye and AFC were responsible mechanisms for dye uptake. Isotherm of AO8 was Type I and followed Langmuir isotherm model. AV7 isotherm on AFC was of Type III and followed Freundlich model. Kinetics study showed that external mass transfer was the rate limiting step followed by intraparticle diffusion. Maximum adsorption capacities of AO8 and AV7 were observed as 164 and 68 mg/g. AO8 dye being smaller in molecular size was adsorbed more due to higher diffusion rate and higher dye: AFC ratio, which enhanced the interaction between dye and polymer.

  12. Kinetics of atmospheric oxidation of nitrous acid by oxygen in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgal, Punit K.; Bansal, S. P.; Gupta, K. S.

    The facts that the high concentrations of nitrous acid have been reported in dew, fog, rain and cloud water and that its oxidation by dissolved oxygen is very fast in freezing conditions have led us to study the kinetics of aqueous phase oxidation of nitrous acid by dissolved oxygen in the pH range 1.0-4.5 at 30 °C. The reaction was followed by measuring [O 2] and under pseudo-first-order conditions the results were in agreement with the rate law: -d[O]t/dt=k0[N]02[H]2[O]t/(K+[H])2, where k0 is third-order composite rate coefficient and Ka is the dissociation constant of HNO 2. The values of k0 and Ka were determined to be 1×10 2 L 2 mol -2 s -1 and 3.84×10 -4, respectively. Consistent with the kinetics results two alternative mechanisms have been considered. The first of these mechanisms assumes an intermediate complex formation, [HNO 2.O 2], by the reaction of HNO 2 and O 2 in a rapid pre-equilibrium, followed by the reaction of this intermediate with another molecule of HNO 2. The second mechanism, originally proposed by Damschen and Martin [1983. Aqueous aerosol oxidation of nitrous acid by O 2, O 3 and H 2O 2. Atmospheric Environment 17, 2005-2011], assumes the formation of a dimer, [HNO 2] 2, in a rapid pre-equilibrium followed by the reaction of the dimer with O 2 to form HNO 3. The application of the mechanisms to fast oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen under freezing conditions is discussed.

  13. Kinetic and thermodynamic origins of osmolyte-influenced nucleic acid folding.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Dupuis, Nicholas F; Nesbitt, David J

    2015-03-05

    The influential role of monovalent and divalent metal cations in facilitating conformational transitions in both RNA and DNA has been a target of intense biophysical research efforts. However, organic neutrally charged cosolutes can also significantly alter nucleic acid conformational transitions. For example, highly soluble small molecules such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and urea are occasionally utilized by organisms to regulate cellular osmotic pressure. Ensemble studies have revealed that these so-called osmolytes can substantially influence the thermodynamics of nucleic acid conformational transitions. In the present work, we exploit single-molecule FRET (smFRET) techniques to measure, for first time, the kinetic origins of these osmolyte-induced changes to the folding free energy. In particular, we focus on smFRET RNA and DNA constructs designed as model systems for secondary and tertiary structure formation. These findings reveal that TMAO preferentially stabilizes both secondary and tertiary interactions by increasing kfold and decreasing kunfold, whereas urea destabilizes both conformational transitions, resulting in the exact opposite shift in kinetic rate constants (i.e., decreasing kfold and increasing kunfold). Complementary temperature-dependent smFRET experiments highlight a thermodynamic distinction between the two different mechanisms responsible for TMAO-facilitated conformational transitions, while only a single mechanism is seen for the destabilizing osmolyte urea. Finally, these results are interpreted in the context of preferential interactions between osmolytes, and the solvent accessible surface area (SASA) associated with the (i) nucleobase, (ii) sugar, and (iii) phosphate groups of nucleic acids in order to map out structural changes that occur during the conformational transitions.

  14. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, {sup 2}D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  15. Preparation of biodiesel from rice bran fatty acids catalyzed by heterogeneous cesium-exchanged 12-tungstophosphoric acids.

    PubMed

    Srilatha, K; Sree, Rekha; Prabhavathi Devi, B L A; Sai Prasad, P S; Prasad, R B N; Lingaiah, N

    2012-07-01

    Biodiesel synthesis from rice bran fatty acids (RBFA) was carried out using cesium exchanged 12-tungstophosphoric acid (TPA) catalysts. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts were derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of NH(3) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The characterization techniques revealed that the Keggin structure of TPA remained intact as Cs replaced protons. The partial exchange of Cs for protons resulted in an increase in acidity and the catalysts with one Cs(+) (Cs(1)H(2)PW(12)O(40)) showed highest acidity. Under optimized conditions about 92% conversion of RBFA was obtained. The catalyst was reused for five times and retained of its original activity. Pseudo-first order model was applied to correlate the experimental kinetic data. Modified tungstophosphoric acids are efficient solid acid catalysts for the synthesis of biodiesel from the oils containing high FFA.

  16. A Nationwide Examination of Middle School Enrollment in Agricultural Education and Membership in the National FFA Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Rosemarie; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the status of middle and junior high school agricultural education and FFA (Future Farmers of America) programs. In spring 1991. questionnaires were sent to all state FFA Executive Secretaries (n=53); 52 returned questionnaires. Three teachers in each of 9 states identified as having middle or junior high…

  17. Relationship of Length of Vocational Agriculture Teacher Contract to Supervised Occupational Experience Program Scope and FFA Chapter Activity Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Larry R.

    A study examined the relationship of length of vocational agriculture teacher contract to supervised occupational experience program scope and Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapter activity level. A questionnaire measuring the activity level of the FFA chapter and soliciting information on various extraneous variables was administered to the…

  18. Career Development, Supervised Agricultural Experience, and FFA. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannebach, Alfred J.; And Others

    This curriculum guide was developed to help teachers and administrators in Connecticut Regional Vocational Agriculture Centers to update and upgrade their vocational agriculture curriculum in the areas of career development, supervised agricultural experience (SAE), and Future Farmers of America (FFA). The curriculum incorporates the competencies…

  19. Needed: Educational Objectives and Administrative Criteria for the National FFA Contests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mack W.; Kahler, Alan A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish overall educational objectives and administrative criteria for the national Future Farmers of America (FFA) contests. Through a series of three questionnaires, input was received from a Delphi panel of 33 members that generated and identified objectives and criteria. (CH)

  20. A Historical Review of Leadership Development in the FFA and 4-H

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Tracy S.; Scholl, Jan F.; Dunigan, Anne H.; Mamontova, Nadezhda

    2007-01-01

    FFA and 4-H are two youth-based organizations that cite leadership development as a key foundational component. The purpose of this study was to review and document the historical development of leadership events and activities in both programs. Evidence can be found of leadership development in schools, conferences, and camps. Leadership-related…

  1. Spectrophotometric method for fast quantification of ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid in simple matrix for kinetics measurements.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ruiz, Braulio; Roux, Stéphanie; Courtois, Francis; Bonazzi, Catherine

    2016-11-15

    A simple, rapid and reliable method was developed for quantifying ascorbic (AA) and dehydroascorbic (DHAA) acids and validated in 20mM malate buffer (pH 3.8). It consists in a spectrophotometric measurement of AA, either directly on the solution added with metaphosphoric acid or after reduction of DHAA into AA by dithiothreitol. This method was developed with real time measurement of reactions kinetics in bulk reactors in mind, and was checked in terms of linearity, limits of detection and quantification, fidelity and accuracy. The linearity was found satisfactory on the range of 0-6.95mM with limits of detection and quantification of 0.236mM and 0.467mM, respectively. The method was found acceptable in terms of fidelity and accuracy with a coefficient of variation for repeatability and reproducibility below 6% for AA and below 15% for DHAA, and with a recovery range of 97-102% for AA and 88-112% for DHAA.

  2. Alkylation of nucleic acids by DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinolinium aniline mustards: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The rate of constant for hydrolysis of a series of 4-substituted aniline mustards Ar-X-pC6H4-N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is 4-anilinoquinolinium and X = O, CH2, CONH and CO, have been measured in water and 0.02 M imidazole buffer at 37 degrees C and in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C. The equilibrium binding constants of the compounds and their hydrolysis products to nucleic acids of differing base composition have been determined at varying ionic strengths, and the results are consistent with the compounds binding as expected in the DNA minor groove. The alkylating reactivity of the mustards towards these nucleic acids has been measured in water at 37 degrees C and in 0.01 M HEPES buffer over a range of temperatures from 25 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters for these kinetic and equilibrium studies suggests that the interaction with nucleic acids is via an internal SN2 mechanism involving an aziridinium ion.

  3. Effect of acoustically assisted treatments on vitamins, antioxidant activity, organic acids and drying kinetics of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Óscar; Gomes, Wesley; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the application of an acoustically assisted treatment on the vitamins (C, B1, B2, B3, and B5), the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP), the polyphenol and flavonoid contents, the organic acid contents (citric and malic) and drying kinetics of pineapple (Ananas comosus var. Perola) have been studied. Treatments were carried out using two different soaking media: distilled water and pineapple juice at 30°C during 10, 20 and 30min without and with acoustic assistance (23.2W/L). After treatment, samples were dried at 60°C and 0.5m/s during 8h. The quality parameters were determined in untreated, treated, and treated-dried samples. The acoustic assistance promoted an increment of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B5, total flavonoid and malic acid contents, and a reduction of vitamin C, total polyphenol content, antioxidant activity and citric acid content in treated samples. However, in all treated-dried samples the final content of those quality parameters was higher than the observed in the untreated dried sample.

  4. Azo dye Acid Red 27 decomposition kinetics during ozone oxidation and adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Beak, Mi H; Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Kim, Dong S

    2009-05-01

    To elucidate the effects of ozone dosage, catalysts, and temperature on azo dye decomposition rate in treatment processes, the decomposition kinetics of Acid Red 27 by ozone was investigated. Acid Red 27 decomposition rate followed the first-order reaction with complete dye discoloration in 20 min of ozone reaction. The dye decay rate increases as ozone dosage increases. Using Mn, Zn and Ni as transition metal catalysts during the ozone oxidation process, Mn displayed the greatest catalytic effect with significant increase in the rate of decomposition. The rate of decomposition decreases with increase in temperature and beyond 40 degrees C, increase in decomposition rate was followed by a corresponding increase in temperature. The FT-IR spectra in the range of 1,000-1,800 cm(-1) revealed specific band variations after the ozone oxidation process, portraying structural changes traceable to cleavage of bonds in the benzene ring, the sulphite salt group, and the C-N located beside the -N = N- bond. From the (1)H-NMR spectra, the breaking down of the benzene ring showed the disappearance of the 10 H peaks at 7-8 ppm, which later emerged with a new peak at 6.16 ppm. In a parallel batch test of azo dye Acid Red 27 adsorption onto activated carbon, a low adsorption capacity was observed in the adsorption test carried out after three minutes of ozone injection while the adsorption process without ozone injection yielded a high adsorption capacity.

  5. [8-hydroxy-dihydroberberine ameliorated insulin resistance induced by high FFA and high glucose in 3T3-L1 adipocytes].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-jun; Lu, Fu-er; Yi, Ping; Wang, Zeng-si; Wei, Shi-chao; Chen, Guang; Dong, Hui; Zou, Xin

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of 8-hydroxy-dihydroberberine on insulin resistance induced by high free fatty acid (FFA) and high glucose in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and its possible molecular mechanism. Palmic acid or glucose in combination with insulin was used to induce insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. 8-Hydroxy-dihydroberberine and berberine were added to the cultured medium separately, which were considered as treated group and positive control group. The rate of glucose uptake was determined by 2-deoxy-[3H]-D-glucose method. The amount of glucose consumption in the medium was measured by glucose oxidase method. Cell growth and proliferation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes were detected with Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. After incubated with palmic acid for 24 hours or glucose with insulin for 18 hours, the rate of glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was inhibited by 67% and 58%, respectively. The amount of glucose consumption in 3T3-L1 adipose cells was decreased by 41% after cells were incubated with palmic acid for 24 h. However, the above changes were reversed by pretreatment with 8-hydroxy-dihydroberberine for 24 and 48 h. Significant difference existed between groups. Insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which is induced by high FFA and high glucose, could be ameliorated by 8-hydroxy-dihydroberberine.

  6. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Begg, James D; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A; Wong, Jennifer C; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-03-03

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu-FA-mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. However, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.

  7. Formic Acid Decomposition on Au catalysts: DFT, Microkinetic Modeling, and Reaction Kinetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Suyash; Li, Sha; Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Alba-Rubio, Ana C.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach is presented that uses a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model, reaction kinetics experiments, and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging to unravel the reaction mechanism and provide insights into the nature of active sites for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Au/SiC catalysts. All input parameters for the microkinetic model are derived from periodic, self-consistent, generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PW91) density functional theory calculations on the Au(111), Au(100), and Au(211) surfaces and are subsequently adjusted to describe the experimental HCOOH decomposition rate and selectivity data. It is shown that the HCOOH decomposition follows the formate (HCOO) mediated path, with 100% selectivity toward the dehydrogenation products (CO21H2) under all reaction conditions. An analysis of the kinetic parameters suggests that an Au surface in which the coordination number of surface Au atoms is 4 may provide a better model for the active site of HCOOH decomposition on these specific supported Au catalysts.

  8. Isotherm and kinetics study for acrylic acid removal using powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Prasad, B; Mishra, I M

    2010-04-15

    The potential of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for the adsorption of acrylic acid (AA) from aqueous solution was studied at the initial concentration (C(0)) in the range of 50-500 mg/l over the temperature range of 303-348 K. The equilibrium adsorption studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of adsorbent dosage and contact time, change in pH by adding adsorbents and the initial concentration. Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson (R-P) equilibrium isotherm models were tested to represent the data. Error functions were used to test their validity to fit of the adsorption data with the isotherm and kinetic models. The Freundlich isotherm equation is found to best represent the equilibrium separation data in the temperature range of 303-348 K. The maximum adsorption capacity of AA onto PAC was obtained as q(m)=36.23 mg/g with an optimum PAC dosage w=20 g/l at 303 K for C(0)=100 mg/l. The pseudo-second-order kinetics is found to represent the experimental AA-PAC data. The negative value of DeltaG(ad)(o) (-16.60 to -18.18 kJ/mol K) indicate the feasibility and spontaneity of the adsorption process.

  9. Kinetics of 3-chlorotyrosine formation and loss due to hypochlorous acid and chloramines.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Matthew P; Hicks, Andrew J; Neidigh, Jonathan W

    2011-03-21

    The persistent activation of innate immune cells in chronic inflammation is gaining recognition as a contributing factor in a number of human diseases. A distinguishing feature of activated leukocytes at sites of inflammation is their production of reactive species such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Investigating the role of reactive molecules such as HOCl in inflammation and human disease requires appropriate biomarkers. The preferred biomarker for HOCl, and by extension its synthesizing enzyme myeloperoxidase, is 3-chlorotyrosine. 3-Chlorotyrosine is a chemically stable product formed when HOCl, or an HOCl-generated chloramine, reacts with the tyrosine side chain and is readily measured by sensitive mass spectrometry methods. However, Whiteman and Spencer ((2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 371, 50 - 53.) noted that 3-chlorotyrosine is degraded by HOCl, calling into question its use as a biomarker. The kinetic rate constants for the reaction of 3-chlorotyrosine with HOCl, histidine chloramine, or lysine chloramine to form 3,5-dichlorotyrosine are reported. The kinetics of tyrosine chlorination in the context of a peptide with a nearby lysine residue was also determined and further supports the role of chloramines in the chlorination of protein-bound tyrosine residues. The likelihood of free and protein-bound 3,5-dichlorotyrosine occurring in vivo, given the reported rate constants, is discussed.

  10. Dynamic modeling of in vitro lipid digestion: individual fatty acid release and bioaccessibility kinetics.

    PubMed

    Giang, T M; Gaucel, S; Brestaz, P; Anton, M; Meynier, A; Trelea, I C; Le Feunteun, S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the role of triacylglycerol (TAG) composition in fatty acids (FA) of o/w emulsions on both the pancreatic lipolysis kinetics and the bioaccessibility of released products (i.e. contained within the bile salt micellar phase). A mathematical model was developed and its predictions were compared to a set of experimental data obtained during an in vitro digestion of a whey protein stabilized emulsion. Modeling results show that FA residues of TAG were hydrolyzed at specific rates, inducing different bioaccessibility kinetics. The estimated lipolysis rate constants of the studied FA (C8:0, C10:0≫C18:1 n-9≫C12:0>C14:0>C16:0≈C16:1 n-7>C22:6 n-3) were in close agreement with the available literature on the substrate specificity of pancreatic lipase. Results also suggest that lipolysis products are very rapidly solubilized in the bile salt mixed micelles with no fractionation according to the FA carbon chain.

  11. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Begg, James D.; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A.; Wong, Jennifer C.; Kersting, Annie B.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-01-21

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu–FA–mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. In conclusion, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.

  12. Human Exposure and Elimination Kinetics of Chlorinated Polyfluoroalkyl Ether Sulfonic Acids (Cl-PFESAs).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Vestergren, Robin; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Chuangxiu; Liang, Yong; Cai, Yaqi

    2016-03-01

    The incomplete mass-balance of organic fluorine in human serum indicates the existence of unknown per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) with persistent and bioaccumulative properties. Here we characterized human exposure and elimination kinetics of chlorinated polyfluoroalkyl ether sulfonic acids (Cl-PFESAs) in metal plating workers (n = 19), high fish consumers (n = 45), and background controls (n = 8). Cl-PFESAs were detected in >98% of the sampled individuals with serum concentrations ranging <0.019-5040 ng/mL. Statistically higher median serum levels were observed in high fish consumers (93.7 ng/mL) and metal plating workers (51.5 ng/mL) compared to the background control group (4.78 ng/mL) (Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, p < 0.01). Cl-PFESAs could account for 0.269 to 93.3% of ∑PFASs in human serum indicating that this compound class may explain a substantial fraction of previously unidentified organic fluorine in the Chinese population. Estimated half-lives for renal clearance (median 280 years; range 7.1-4230 years) and total elimination (median 15.3 years; range 10.1-56.4 years) for the eight carbon Cl-PFESA suggest that this is the most biopersistent PFAS in humans reported to date. The apparent ubiquitous distribution and slow elimination kinetics in humans underscore the need for more research and regulatory actions on Cl-PFESAs and PFAS alternatives with similar chemical structures.

  13. Phosphatidic acid stimulates cardiac KATP channels like phosphatidylinositols, but with novel gating kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Gao, Lizhi; Wang, Wenxia

    2003-01-01

    Membrane-bound anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositols have the capacity to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels through a mechanism involving long-range electrostatic interaction between the lipid headgroup and channel. However, it has not yet been determined whether the multiple effects of phosphatidylinositols reported in the literature all result from this general electrostatic interaction or require a specific headgroup structure. The present study investigated whether phosphatidic acid (PA), an anionic phospholipid substantially different in structure from phosphatidylinositols, evokes effects similar to phosphatidylinositols on native K(ATP) channels of rat heart and heterogeneous Kir6.2/SUR2A channels. Channels treated with PA (0.2-1 mg/ml applied to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane) exhibited higher activity, lower sensitivity to ATP inhibition, less Mg(2+)-dependent nucleotide stimulation, and poor sulfonylurea inhibition. These effects match the spectrum of phosphatidylinositols' effects, but, in addition, PA also induced a novel pattern in gating kinetics, represented by a decreased mean open time (from 12.2 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 0.7 ms). This impact on gating kinetics clearly distinguishes PA's effects from those of phosphatidylinositols. Results indicate that multiple effects of anionic phospholipids on K(ATP) channels are related phenomena and can likely be attributed to a common mechanism, but additional specific effects due to other mechanisms may also coincide.

  14. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite

    DOE PAGES

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Begg, James D.; Mason, Harris; ...

    2015-01-21

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presencemore » of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu–FA–mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. In conclusion, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.« less

  15. Kinetic studies on the inactivation of Escherichia coli RTEM beta-lactamase by clavulanic acid.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Charnas, R L; Knowles, J R

    1978-05-30

    The kinetic details of the irreversible inactivation of the Escherichia coli RTEM beta-lactamase by clavulanic acid have been elucidated. Clavulanate is destroyed by the enzyme and simultaneously inhibits it by producing two catalytically inactive forms. One of these is transiently stable and decomposes to free enzyme (k = 3.8 X 10(-3) S-1), while the other corresponds to an irreversibly inactivated form. The transient complex is formed from the Michaelis complex at a rate (k approximately 3 X 10(-2) S-1) which is some threefold faster than the rate of formation of the irreversibly inactivated complex. The transient complex is, therefore, the principle enzyme form present after short time periods. In the presence of excess clavulanate, however, all the enzyme accumulates into the irreversibly inactivated form. The number of clavulanate turnovers that occur prior to complete enzyme inactivation is 115.

  16. Kinetic modeling of hardwood prehydrolysis. Part II. Xylan removal by dilute hydrochloric acid prehydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, A.H.; Libkie, K.; Springer, E.L.

    1986-06-01

    A study was made of the kinetics of xylan hemicellulose removal with 0.10 M HCl at 120 degrees C from quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), paper birch (Betula papyrifera), American elm (Ulmus americana), red maple (Acer rubrum), and southern red oak (Quercus falcata). The mathematical model developed in Part I to describe the kinetics of xylan removal by water prehydrolysis of these species could be used to model xylan removal with dilute hydrochloric acid. Xylan removal could thus be modelled as the sum of two parallel first-order reactions - one fast and one slow. However, unlike the case with water prehydrolysis where the rate constants for the fast and slow reaction processes could be correlated with each other, they could not be correlated for HCl prehydrolysis. Instead, these constant values determined for each species clustered about average values for all the species as a whole. A single set of parameters determined from a nonlinear least squares fit of the experimental prehydrolysis data for all the species as a whole to the model could be used to describe the course of xylan removal from all the species. The fact that one set of parameters could be used suggests that the same reactions are taking place on prehydrolysis and the chemical structure and physical morphology of the xylan hemicellulose were essentially the same in the species studied and probably in all temperate hardwood species. The model thus provides a good approximation of xylan removal from any temperate hardwood with dilute hydrochloric acid at the reaction conditions studied. 20 references.

  17. Kinetics during the redox biotransformation of pollutants mediated by immobilized and soluble humic acids.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; Martínez, Claudia M; Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Márquez, Arturo; Arriaga, Sonia

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the kinetic constraints during the redox biotransformation of the azo dye, Reactive Red 2 (RR2), and carbon tetrachloride (CT) mediated by soluble humic acids (HAs) and immobilized humic acids (HAi), as well as by the quinoid model compounds, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate (NQS). The microbial reduction of both HAs and HAi by anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was the rate-limiting step during decolorization of RR2 since the reduction of RR2 by reduced HAi proceeded at more than three orders of magnitute faster than the electron-transferring rate observed during the microbial reduction of HAi by AGS. Similarly, the reduction of RR2 by reduced AQDS proceeded 1.6- and 1.9-fold faster than the microbial reduction of AQDS by AGS when this redox mediator (RM) was supplied in soluble and immobilized form, respectively. In contrast, the reduction of NQS by AGS occurred 1.6- and 19.2-fold faster than the chemical reduction of RR2 by reduced NQS when this RM was supplied in soluble and immobilized form, respectively. The microbial reduction of HAs and HAi by a humus-reducing consortium proceeded 1,400- and 790-fold faster than the transfer of electrons from reduced HAs and HAi, respectively, to achieve the reductive dechlorination of CT to chloroform. Overall, the present study provides elucidation on the rate-limiting steps involved in the redox biotransformation of priority pollutants mediated by both HAs and HAi and offers technical suggestions to overcome the kinetic restrictions identified in the redox reactions evaluated.

  18. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of acid-pretreated coconut coir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatmawati, Akbarningrum; Agustriyanto, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Biomass waste utilization for biofuel production such as bioethanol, has become more prominent currently. Coconut coir is one of lignocellulosic food wastes, which is abundant in Indonesia. Bioethanol production from such materials consists of more than one step. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis is crucial steps to produce sugar which can then be fermented into bioethanol. In this research, ground coconut coir was pretreated using dilute sulfuric acid at 121°C. This pretreatment had increased the cellulose content and decreased the lignin content of coconut coir. The pretreated coconut coir was hydrolyzed using a mix of two commercial cellulase enzymes at pH of 4.8 and temperature of 50°C. The enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted at several initial coconut coir slurry concentrations (0.1-2 g/100 mL) and reaction times (2-72 hours). The reducing sugar concentration profiles had been produced and can be used to obtain reaction rates. The highest reducing sugar concentration obtained was 1,152.567 mg/L, which was produced at initial slurry concentration of 2 g/100 mL and 72 hours reaction time. In this paper, the reducing sugar concentrations were empirically modeled as a function of reaction time using power equations. Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis reaction is adopted. The kinetic parameters of that model for sulfuric acid-pretreated coconut coir enzymatic hydrolysis had been obtained which are Vm of 3.587×104 mg/L.h, and KM of 130.6 mg/L.

  19. Metabolic and transcriptional analysis of acid stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a focus on the kinetics of lactic acid pools.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P; Voit, Eberhard O; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H(+)-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by (13)C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results.

  20. Optimization and kinetic modeling of esterification of the oil obtained from waste plum stones as a pretreatment step in biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Milan D; Veličković, Ana V; Joković, Nataša M; Stamenković, Olivera S; Veljković, Vlada B

    2016-02-01

    This study reports on the use of oil obtained from waste plum stones as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production. Because of high free fatty acid (FFA) level (15.8%), the oil was processed through the two-step process including esterification of FFA and methanolysis of the esterified oil catalyzed by H2SO4 and CaO, respectively. Esterification was optimized by response surface methodology combined with a central composite design. The second-order polynomial equation predicted the lowest acid value of 0.53mgKOH/g under the following optimal reaction conditions: the methanol:oil molar ratio of 8.5:1, the catalyst amount of 2% and the reaction temperature of 45°C. The predicted acid value agreed with the experimental acid value (0.47mgKOH/g). The kinetics of FFA esterification was described by the irreversible pseudo first-order reaction rate law. The apparent kinetic constant was correlated with the initial methanol and catalyst concentrations and reaction temperature. The activation energy of the esterification reaction slightly decreased from 13.23 to 11.55kJ/mol with increasing the catalyst concentration from 0.049 to 0.172mol/dm(3). In the second step, the esterified oil reacted with methanol (methanol:oil molar ratio of 9:1) in the presence of CaO (5% to the oil mass) at 60°C. The properties of the obtained biodiesel were within the EN 14214 standard limits. Hence, waste plum stones might be valuable raw material for obtaining fatty oil for the use as alternative feedstock in biodiesel production.

  1. Kinetics and selectivity of oxidation of saturated hydrocarbons in sulphuric acid media containing anthracene and cyclohexane oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, Ye.S.; Lutsyk, A.I.; Suikov, S.Yu.; Tishchenko, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    Solutions of anthracene and cyclohexene in 93% sulphuric acid are sources of fairly stable species, which oxidize tertiary and secondary C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons at 90/sup 0/C. A study was made of kinetics and selectivity of the first stage of oxidation of paraffins in these systems. The selectivity, isotope effect and kinetics of oxidation of the anthraceneH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ system and oligomers of cyclohexene-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ are similar and approximate to the oxidizing agent-sulphuric acid systems, previously examined. Based on this analogy a mechanism is proposed for the oxidative homolysis of C-H bonds for the first stage of oxidation of saturated hydrocarbons in anthracene-sulphuric acid and cyclohexene-sulphuric acid systems.

  2. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (I): Model constitution].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Based on activated sludge model No. 2 (ASM2), the anaerobic/aerobic kinetic model of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAO) was established with mixed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as the base substance in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The characteristic of the PAO model was that the anaerobic metabolism rates of glycogen degradation, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates synthesis and polyphosphate hydrolysis were expressed by SCFAs uptake equation, and the effects of anaerobic maintenance on kinetics and stoichiometry were considered. The PAO kinetic model was composed of 3 soluble components, 4 particulate components and a pH parameter, which constituted the matrix of stoichiometric coefficients. On the basis of PAO model, the GAO kinetic model was established, which included 7 processes, and phosphorus content influenced the aerobic metabolism only.

  3. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters.

  4. Cometary impact and amino acid survival--chemical kinetics and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S

    2006-06-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9 degrees above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometary delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely.

  5. The parsley plastocyanin-turnip cytochrome f complex: a structurally distorted but kinetically functional acidic patch.

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Peter B; Hunter, David M; Sato, Katsuko; McFarlane, William; Dennison, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    In general, inter-protein electron transfer proceeds via the formation of transient complexes. The initial stage of the interaction between plastocyanin (PCu) and cytochrome f (cyt f ) from plants is mediated by complementary electrostatics. Given the diffuse nature of its acidic patch, parsley PCu is an atypical example of a plant PCu. The interaction of this PCu with turnip cyt f was investigated by stopped-flow kinetics, NMR spectroscopy and protein-docking simulations. We show that, despite the altered acidic patch, parsley PCu is as efficient as spinach PCu in accepting electrons from cyt f, over the physiological range of ionic strength. At high ionic strength, the rate constant for the reaction of cyt f with parsley PCu is twice that of the spinach protein. This difference in reactivity is attributed to variations in the hydrophobic patch of parsley PCu. The results of NMR studies and protein-docking simulations indicate that parsley PCu and its spinach analogue adopt different orientations in their complexes with cyt f. PMID:14585099

  6. Kinetic properties of two Rhizopus exo-polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic characteristics of two Rhizopus oryzae exo-polygalacturonases acting on galacturonic acid oligomers (GalpA) were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). RPG15 hydrolyzing (GalpA)2 demonstrated a Km of 55 uM and kcat of 10.3 s^-1^ while RPG16 was shown to have greater af...

  7. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of acid tar waste from crude benzol refining: A thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Chihobo, Chido H; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Kuipa, Pardon K; Simbi, David J

    2016-12-01

    Pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical conversion technology that may be utilised as a safe disposal option for acid tar waste. The kinetics of acid tar pyrolysis were investigated using thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectrometry under a nitrogen atmosphere at different heating rates of 10, 15 and 20 K min(-1) The thermogravimetric analysis shows three major reaction peaks centred around 178 °C, 258 °C, and 336 °C corresponding to the successive degradation of water soluble lower molecular mass sulphonic acids, sulphonated high molecular mass hydrocarbons, and high molecular mass hydrocarbons. The kinetic parameters were evaluated using the iso-conversional Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. A variation in the activation energy with conversion revealed that the pyrolysis of the acid tar waste progresses through complex multi-step kinetics. Mass spectrometry results revealed a predominance of gases such as hydrogen, methane and carbon monoxide, implying that the pyrolysis of acid tar waste is potentially an energy source. Thus the pyrolysis of acid tar waste may present a viable option for its environmental treatment. There are however, some limitations imposed by the co-evolution of corrosive gaseous components for which appropriate considerations must be provided in both pyrolysis reactor design and selection of construction materials.

  8. Study of reaction parameters and kinetics of esterification of lauric acid with butanol by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sini; Agarwal, Madhu; Chaurasia, S P

    2013-12-01

    Esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol, catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase (CAL) in aqueous-organic biphasic solvent system was studied. Effects of various reaction parameters on esterification were investigated, such as type and amount of solvent, amount of buffer, pH, temperature, speed of agitation, amount of enzyme, butanol and lauric acid. The most suitable reaction conditions for esterification were observed at 50 degrees C and pH 7.0 using 5000 micromoles of lauric acid, 7000 pmoles of butanol, 0.25 ml phosphate buffer, 1 ml of isooctane as the solvent and 50 mg of immobilized enzyme in the reaction medium at agitation speed of 150 rpm. Maximum esterification of 96.36% was acheived in 600 min of reaction time at n-butanol to lauric acid molar ratio of 1: 0.7. Kinetic study for the esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol using immobilized CAL was carried out and the kinetic constants were estimated by using non-linear regression method. The estimated value of Michaelis kinetic constants for butanol (KmBt) and acid (KmAc) were 451.56 (M) and 4.7 x 10(-7)(M), respectively and the value of dissociation constant (KBt) of the butanol-lipase complex was 9.41 x 10(7)(M). The estimated constants agreed fairly well with literature data.

  9. A comparative study of the kinetics of amino acid racemization/epimerization in fossil and modern mollusk shells

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfriend, G.A. Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington DC ); Meyer, V.R. )

    1991-11-01

    The present study examines the question of whether heating experiments on modern shell material accurately model the pattern of kinetics of racemization/epimerization in fossils. Using one modern sample and four fossil samples (dating to 9700-1700 yr B.P.) of a species of land snail from the Negev Desert, the kinetic behavior of the samples in laboratory heating experiments are compared. Results are then compared to the Holocene trend in kinetic patterns observed in a large series of radio-carbon-dated shells. For most amino acids (alanine, alloisoleucine/isoleucine, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid), the fossil material displays the same pattern of kinetics in relation to time as the modern shells; deviant patterns are observed for aspartic acid, proline, and methionine. Adherence to a first order kinetic pattern in heated shells occurs only in alloisoleucine/isoleucine (within the range of D/L ratios studied). Differences in the temperature dependence of racemization/epimerization rates are found between modern and fossil samples. In most cases this relationship when extrapolated to natural temperatures, does not agree well with observed rates of racemization/epimerization in the fossil series. However the pattern of change in rate of racemization/epimerization with time in heating experiments generally follows the trend observed in the fossil series rather well. The experiments indicate that heating experiment results for certain amino acids, such as the widely used alloisoleucine/isoleucine, do give good predictions of kinetic patterns in relation to time in fossils but that predictions of the temperature dependence of rates are less accurate.

  10. The Kinetics and Mechanism of the Decomposition of Murexide in Acid Solution: An Experiment for Teaching Principles of Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Wilhelm; Rees, Norman H.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for an experiment on the decomposition of murexide in acid solution. The experiment, suitable for advanced courses, can be easily performed in a 6-hour laboratory period. (JN)

  11. Protective Effect of Unsaturated Fatty Acids on Palmitic Acid-Induced Toxicity in Skeletal Muscle Cells is not Mediated by PPARδ Activation.

    PubMed

    Tumova, Jana; Malisova, Lucia; Andel, Michal; Trnka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA) are able to prevent deleterious effects of saturated FFA in skeletal muscle cells although the mechanisms involved are still not completely understood. FFA act as endogenous ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of PPARδ, the most common PPAR subtype in skeletal muscle, plays a role in mediating the protective effect of unsaturated FFA on saturated FFA-induced damage in skeletal muscle cells and to examine an impact on mitochondrial respiration. Mouse C2C12 myotubes were treated for 24 h with different concentrations of saturated FFA (palmitic acid), unsaturated FFA (oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid), and their combinations. PPARδ agonist GW501516 and antagonist GSK0660 were also used. Both mono- and polyunsaturated FFA, but not GW501516, prevented palmitic acid-induced cell death. Mono- and polyunsaturated FFA proved to be effective activators of PPARδ compared to saturated palmitic acid; however, in combination with palmitic acid their effect on PPARδ activation was blocked and stayed at the levels observed for palmitic acid alone. Unsaturated FFA at moderate physiological concentrations as well as GW501516, but not palmitic acid, mildly uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Our results indicate that although unsaturated FFA are effective activators of PPARδ, their protective effect on palmitic acid-induced toxicity is not mediated by PPARδ activation and subsequent induction of lipid regulatory genes in skeletal muscle cells. Other mechanisms, such as mitochondrial uncoupling, may underlie their effect.

  12. Kinetics of the electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid on ultrananocrystalline boron doped conductive diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Fernández-González, Carolina; Gómez-Lavín, Sonia; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical degradation and mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Model aqueous solutions of PFOA (100mg/L) were electro-oxidized under galvanostatic conditions in a flow-by undivided cell provided with a tungsten cathode and an anode formed by a commercial ultrananocrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) coating on a niobium substrate. A systematic experimental study was conducted in order to analyze the influence of the following operation variables: (i) the supporting electrolyte, NaClO4 (1.4 and 8.4g/L) and Na2SO4 (5g/L); (ii) the applied current density, japp, in the range 50-200 A/m(2) and (iii) the hydrodynamic conditions, in terms of flowrate in the range 0.4×10(-4)-1.7×10(-4)m(3)/s and temperature in the range 293-313K. After 6h of treatment and at japp 200A/m(2), PFOA removal was higher than 93% and the mineralization ratio, obtained from the decrease of the total organic carbon (TOC) was 95%. The electrochemical generation of hydroxyl radicals in the supporting electrolyte was experimentally measured based on their reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The enhanced formation of hydroxyl radicals at higher japp was related to the faster kinetics of PFOA removal. The fitting of experimental data to the proposed kinetic model provided the first order rate constants of PFOA degradation, kc(1) that moved from 2.06×10(-4) to 15.58×10(-4)s(-1), when japp varied from 50 to 200A/m(2).

  13. Physiological Effects of Free Fatty Acid Production in Genetically Engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Ruffing, Anne M.; Jones, Howland D.T.

    2012-01-01

    The direct conversion of carbon dioxide into biofuels by photosynthetic microorganisms is a promising alternative energy solution. In this study, a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, is engineered to produce free fatty acids (FFA), potential biodiesel precursors, via gene knockout of the FFA-recycling acyl-ACP synthetase and expression of a thioesterase for release of the FFA. Similar to previous efforts, the engineered strains produce and excrete FFA, but the yields are too low for large-scale production. While other efforts have applied additional metabolic engineering strategies in an attempt to boost FFA production, we focus on characterizing the engineered strains to identify the physiological effects that limit cell growth and FFA synthesis. The strains engineered for FFA-production show reduced photosynthetic yields, chlorophyll-a degradation, and changes in the cellular localization of the light-harvesting pigments, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin. Possible causes of these physiological effects are also identified. The addition of exogenous linolenic acid, a polyunsaturated FFA, to cultures of S. elongatus 7942 yielded a physiological response similar to that observed in the FFA-producing strains with only one notable difference. In addition, the lipid constituents of the cell and thylakoid membranes in the FFA-producing strains show changes in both the relative amounts of lipid components and the degree of saturation of the fatty acid side chains. These changes in lipid composition may affect membrane integrity and structure, the binding and diffusion of phycobilisomes, and the activity of membrane-bound enzymes including those involved in photosynthesis. Thus, the toxicity of unsaturated FFA and changes in membrane composition may be responsible for the physiological effects observed in FFA-producing S. elongatus 7942. These issues must be addressed to enable the high yields of FFA synthesis necessary for large-scale biofuel

  14. The novel kinetics expression of Cadmium (II) removal using green adsorbent horse dung humic acid (Hd-Ha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Rahmat; Santosa, Sri Juari; Rusdiarso, Bambang

    2017-03-01

    Humic acid from dry horse dung powder has been prepared and this horse dung humic acid (HD-HA) was then applied as a sorbent to adsorb Cadmium(II) from a solution. Characterization of HD-HA was conducted by detection of its functional group, UV-Vis spectra, ash level, and total acidity. Result of the work showed that HD-HA had similar character compared with peat soil humic acid (PS-HA) and previous researchers. The adsorption study of this work was investigated by batch experiment in pH 5. The thermodynamics parameters in this work were determined by the Langmuir isotherm model for monolayer sorption and Freundlich isotherm model multilayer sorption. Monolayer sorption capacity (b) for HD-HA was 1.329 × 10-3 mol g-1, equilibrium constant (K) was 5.651 (mol/L)-1, and multilayer sorption capacity was 2.646 × 10-2 mol g-1. The kinetics parameters investigated in this work were determined by the novel kinetics expression resulted from the mathematical derivation the availability of binding sites of sorbent. Adsorption rate constant (ka) from this novel expression was 43.178 min-1 (mol/L)-1 and desorption rate constant (kd) was 1.250 × 10-2 min-1. Application of the kinetics model on sorption Cd(II) onto HD-HA showed the nearly all of models gave a good linearity. However, only this proposed kinetics expression has good relation with Langmuir model. The novel kinetics expression proposed in this paper seems to be more realistic and reasonable and close to the experimental real condition because the value of ka/kd (3452 (mol/L)-1) was fairly close with K from Langmuir isotherm model (5651 (mol/L)-1). Comparison of this novel kinetics expression with well-known Lagergren pseudo-first order kinetics and Ho pseudo-second order kinetics was also critically discussed in this paper.

  15. Kinetic analysis of the role of histidine chloramines in hypochlorous acid mediated protein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2005-05-17

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H(2)O(2) and chloride ions by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) released from activated leukocytes. In addition to its potent antibacterial effects, excessive HOCl production can lead to host tissue damage, with this implicated in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, cystic fibrosis, and arthritis. HOCl reacts rapidly with biological materials, with proteins being major targets. Chlorinated amines (chloramines) formed from Lys and His side chains and alpha-amino groups on proteins are major products of these reactions; these materials are however also oxidants and can undergo further reactions. In this study, the kinetics of reaction of His side-chain chloramines with other protein components have been investigated by UV/visible spectroscopy and stopped flow methods at pH 7.4 and 22 degrees C, using the chloramines of the model compound 4-imidazoleacetic acid and N-alpha-acetyl-histidine. The second-order rate constants decrease in a similar order (Cys > Met > disulfide bonds > Trp approximately alpha-amino > Lys > Tyr > backbone amides > Arg) to the corresponding reactions of HOCl, but are typically 5-25 times slower. These rate constants are consistent with His side-chain chloramines being important secondary oxidants in HOCl-mediated damage. These studies suggest that formation and subsequent reactions of His side-chain chloramines may be responsible for the targeted secondary modification of selected protein residues by HOCl that has previously been observed experimentally and highlight the importance of chloramine structure on their subsequent reactivity.

  16. Distinct decalcification process of dentin by different cariogenic organic acids: Kinetics, ultrastructure and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Y-C; Burwell, A.K.; Saeki, K.; Fernandez-Martinez, A.; Pugach, M.K.; Nonomura, G.; Habelitz, S.; Ho, S.P.; Rapozo-Hilo, M.; Featherstone, J.D.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We studied artificial dentin lesions in human teeth generated by lactate and acetate buffers (pH 5.0), the two most abundant acids in caries. The objective of this study was to determine differences in mechanical properties, mineral density profiles and ultrastructural variations of two different artificial lesions with the same approximate depth. Methods 0.05 M (pH 5.0) acetate or lactate buffer was used to create 1) 180 μm-deep lesions in non-carious human dentin blocks (acetate 130 h; lactate 14days); (2) demineralized, ~180 μm-thick non-carious dentin discs (3 weeks). We performed nanoindentation to determine mechanical properties across the hydrated lesions, and micro X-ray computed tomography (MicroXCT) to determine mineral profiles. Ultrastructure in lesions was analyzed by TEM/selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Demineralized dentin discs were analyzed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Results Diffusion-dominated demineralization was shown based on the linearity between lesion depths versus the square root of exposure time in either solution, with faster kinetics in acetate buffer. Nanoindentation revealed lactate induced a significantly sharper transition in reduced elastic modulus across the lesions. MicroXCT showed lactate demineralized lesions had swelling and more disorganized matrix structure, whereas acetate lesions had abrupt X-ray absorption near the margin. At the ultrastructural level, TEM showed lactate was more effective in removing minerals from the collagenous matrix, which was confirmed by SAXS analysis. Conclusions These findings indicated the different acids yielded lesions with different characteristics that could influence lesion formation resulting in their distinct predominance in different caries activities, and these differences may impact strategies for dentin caries remineralization. PMID:26745819

  17. [Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in TiO2 dispersion and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Jie; Yu, Ze-Bin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Liu, Qing; Liu, Yu-Xin; He, Li-Li

    2014-07-01

    Decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is of prime importance since it is recognized as a persistent organic pollutant and is widespread in the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA by TiO2 (P25) was investigated under 254 nm UV light. Experimental conditions including initial pH, TiO2 content and PFOA concentration, were varied to demonstrate their effects on the decomposition of PFOA. It was observed that the photocatalytic degradation kinetics of PFOA could be fitted to the quasi-first-order equation. The pH played a determinant role in the decomposition of PFOA and the presence of O2 increased the degradation rate. Optimal conditions for a complete removal were obtained using 1.5 g x L(-1) TiO2 at pH 3 in air atmosphere, with a rate constant of 0.420 6 h(-1). The contribution experiments of various reactive species produced during the photocatalysis were also investigated with the addition of different scavengers and it was found that photogenerated holes (h+) was the major reactive species which was responsible for 66.1% of the degradation rate, and the *OH was involved in PFOA degradation as well. In addition, the photocatalytic experiment with the addition of NaF indicated that the adsorption of PFOA was of primary importance for the photocatalytic decomposition. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length as intermediates and products were identified with UPLC-QTOF/MS, and a possible mechanism for PFOA decomposition was proposed.

  18. The kinetics of process dependent ammonia inhibition of methanogenesis from acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher Allen; Novak, John; Takacs, Imre; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir

    2012-12-01

    Advanced anaerobic digestion processes aimed at improving the methanization of sewage sludge may be potentially impaired by the production of inhibitory compounds (e.g. free ammonia). The result of methanogenic inhibition is relatively high effluent concentrations of acetic acid and other soluble organics, as well as reduced methane yields. An extreme example of such an advanced process is the thermal hydrolytic pretreatment of sludge prior to high solids digestion (THD). Compared to a conventional mesophilic anaerobic digestion process (MAD), THD operates in a state of constant inhibition driven by high free ammonia concentrations, and elevated pH values. As such, previous investigations of the kinetics of methanogenesis from acetic acid under uninhibited conditions do not necessarily apply well to the modeling of extreme processes such as THD. By conducting batch ammonia toxicity assays using biomass from THD and MAD reactors, we compared the response of these communities over a broad range of ammonia inhibition. For both processes, increased inhibitor concentrations resulted in a reduction of biomass growth rate (r(max) = μ(max)∙X) and a resulting decrease in the substrate half saturation coefficient (K(S)). These two parameters exhibited a high degree of correlation, suggesting that for a constant transport limited system, the K(S) was mostly a linear function of the growth rate. After correcting for reactor pH and temperature, we found that the THD and MAD biomass were both able to perform methanogenesis from acetate at high free ammonia concentrations (equivalent to 3-5 g/L total ammonia nitrogen), albeit at less than 30% of their respective maximum rates. The reduction in methane production was slightly less pronounced for the THD biomass than for MAD, suggesting that the long term exposure to ammonia had selected for a methanogenic pathway less dependent on those organisms most sensitive to ammonia inhibition (i.e. aceticlastic methanogens).

  19. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution.

  20. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle--kinetics and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate --> pyruvate --> oxaloacetate --> malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life.

  1. Kinetics of phenolic and phthalic acid esters biodegradation in membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The kinetic of phenolic and phthalic acid esters (PAEs) biodegradation in membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal landfill leachate was investigated. Laboratory-scale MBR was fed with mixture of fresh and stabilized landfill leachate containing carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 10, 6, 3 and operated under different solid retention time (SRT) of 90, 15 and 5 d. Batch experiments using MBR sludge obtained from each steady-state operating condition revealed highest biodegradation rate constant (k) of 0.059-0.092 h(-1) of the phenolic and PAEs compounds at C/N of 6. Heterotrophic bacteria were the major group responsible for biodegradation of compounds whereas the presence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) helped accelerating their removals. Heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria found under high ammonia condition had an important role in enhancing the biodegradation of phenols and PAEs by releasing phenol hydroxylase (PH), esterase (EST) and phthalate dioxygenase (PDO) enzymes and the presence of AOB helped improving biodegradation of phenolic and PAEs compounds through their co-metabolism.

  2. Kinetic evaluation and process performance of a fixed film bioreactor removing phthalic acid and dimethyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Mesdaghinia, Ali-Reza; Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2009-08-15

    Phthalate esters are toxic organic contaminants which can enter into the environment through various industrial processes. In this study, a 6-liter fixed film bioreactor was used to examine biodegradation of phthalic acid (PA) and dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in synthetic wastewater. Effect on the process of two operating factors, namely hydraulic retention time (HRT) (at four levels ranging between 6 and 48 h) and initial phthalate concentrations (at six levels ranging from 10mg to 500 mg/l), was investigated. The process was stable at all operating conditions, except for the condition with influent PA and DMP of 500 mg/l and HRT of 6h. More than 95% removal efficiency was achieved for the conditions with HRT longer than 10h. Remarkable amount of DMP (398 mg/kg of sludge) was adsorbed on the biomass due to its higher hydrophobicity compared to PA (171 mg/kg). The kinetic parameters (mu(m,)K(s), Y and K(d)) were determined and compared for both substrates, PA and DMP.

  3. Formic acid dehydrogenation with bioinspired iridium complexes: a kinetic isotope effect study and mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Xu, Shaoan; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    Highly efficient hydrogen generation from dehydrogenation of formic acid is achieved by using bioinspired iridium complexes that have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions of the bipyridine or bipyrimidine ligand (i.e., OH in the second coordination sphere of the metal center). In particular, [Ir(Cp*)(TH4BPM)(H2 O)]SO4 (TH4BPM: 2,2',6,6'-tetrahydroxyl-4,4'-bipyrimidine; Cp*: pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) has a high turnover frequency of 39 500 h(-1) at 80 °C in a 1 M aqueous solution of HCO2 H/HCO2 Na and produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide without carbon monoxide contamination. The deuterium kinetic isotope effect study clearly indicates a different rate-determining step for complexes with hydroxyl groups at different positions of the ligands. The rate-limiting step is β-hydrogen elimination from the iridium-formate intermediate for complexes with hydroxyl groups at ortho positions, owing to a proton relay (i.e., pendent-base effect), which lowers the energy barrier of hydrogen generation. In contrast, the reaction of iridium hydride with a proton to liberate hydrogen is demonstrated to be the rate-determining step for complexes that do not have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions.

  4. Kinetics and optical spectroscopic studies on the purple acid phosphatase from beef spleen.

    PubMed

    Davis, J C; Lin, S S; Averill, B A

    1981-07-07

    A new purification scheme has been developed for the purple acid phosphatase from beef spleen; typical yields are 8 mg of homogeneous enzyme per kg of spleen in only five steps. Kinetics studies have shown that the enzyme is strongly inhibited by fluoride, phosphate, and [p-(acetylamino)-benzyl]phosphonate, a nonhydrolyzable substrate analogue; the last two of these show simple competitive inhibition. In contrast, cyanide, azide, tartrate, and p-nitrophenol show no inhibition at concentrations up to 10 mM. Molecular weight estimations by gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography give a value of 40 000 for the native enzyme, which is shown to consist of two subunits of apparent molecular weight 24 000 and 15 000. Careful metal analyses indicate the presence of 2.1 +/- 0.1 iron atoms per enzyme molecule, and less than 0.1 copper, zinc, nickel, or manganese atom per enzyme. The purple enzyme (lambda max 550 nm) is reversibly converted to a pink, active form (lambda max 505 nm) upon treatment with mild reducing agents (dithioerythritol or ascorbate). Addition of competitive inhibitors to the pink form causes rapid reversion to the purple form. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at several temperatures showed only weak g = 4.3 signals (less than 0.1 spin/molecule) for the native, reduced, and inhibited forms of the enzyme.

  5. Prediction of solute kinetics, acid-base status, and blood volume changes during profiled hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Colí, L; Brighenti, C; Chiari, L; de Pascalis, A; Avanzolini, G

    2000-02-01

    A mathematical model of solute kinetics oriented to the simulation of hemodialysis is presented. It includes a three-compartment model of body fluids (plasma, interstitial and intracellular), a two-compartment description of the main solutes (K+, Na+, Cl-, urea, HCO3-, H+), and acid-base equilibrium through two buffer systems (bicarbonate and noncarbonic buffers). Tentative values for the main model parameters can be given a priori, on the basis of body weight and plasma concentration values measured before beginning the session. The model allows computation of the amount of sodium removed during hemodialysis, and may enable the prediction of plasma volume and osmolarity changes induced by a given sodium concentration profile in the dialysate and by a given ultrafiltration profile. Model predictions are compared with clinical data obtained during 11 different profiled hemodialysis sessions, both with all parameters assigned a priori, and after individual estimation of dialysances and mass-transfer coefficients. In most cases, the agreement between the time pattern of model solute concentrations in plasma and clinical data was satisfactory. In two sessions, blood volume changes were directly measured in the patient, and in both cases the agreement with model predictions was acceptable. The present model can be used to improve the dialysis session taking some characteristics of individual patients into account, in order to minimize intradialytic unbalances (such as hypotension or disequilibrium syndrome).

  6. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  7. Stability of HAMLET--a kinetically trapped alpha-lactalbumin oleic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina; Linse, Sara

    2005-02-01

    The stability toward thermal and urea denaturation was measured for HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and alpha-lactalbumin, using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Under all conditions examined, HAMLET appears to have the same or lower stability than alpha-lactalbumin. The largest difference is seen for thermal denaturation of the calcium free (apo) forms, where the temperature at the transition midpoint is 15 degrees C lower for apo HAMLET than for apo alpha-lactalbumin. The difference becomes progressively smaller as the calcium concentration increases. Denaturation of HAMLET was found to be irreversible. Samples of HAMLET that have been renatured after denaturation have lost the specific biological activity toward tumor cells. Three lines of evidence indicate that HAMLET is a kinetic trap: (1) It has lower stability than alpha-lactalbumin, although it is a complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid; (2) its denaturation is irreversible and HAMLET is lost after denaturation; (3) formation of HAMLET requires a specific conversion protocol.

  8. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  9. Kinetic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compound Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm the proposed mechanisms a kentic study of several possible intermediates was done under similar acidolysis conditions. Epoxystyrene and 1-phenyl-1,2-ethandiol were used as intermediates. 2-phenoxyvinylbenzene was synthesized and subsequently deconstructed in H2SO4. The kinetics and product distribution of these intermediates were then used in confirming our proposed mechanisms.

  10. Influence of Filler on the Mechanical Properties and Kinetic Crystallization Behavior of Polylactic Acid (PLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuta, Ryo; Inoue, Ryohei; Hara, Ryosuke; Sato, Sadao

    The kinetic crystallization behavior of PLA (polylactic acid) and PLA/MMT nanocomposites containing 3 wt% montmorillonite (MMT) was examined in order to develop a new technique for obtaining the relative crystallization degree of a material from the spherulite occupation area based on images obtained using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. In addition, the relative crystallization degree is discussed in terms of the Ozawa theory. The effect of MMT filler on the mechanical properties of PLA/MMT nanocomposites, the number of spherulites generated in the nanocomposites, and the linear growth rate of these spherulites were also examined experimentally. The relative crystallization curves obtained by CCD and by DSC measurement were found to be approximately the same. Moreover, it was found that the Ozawa theory could be applied not only to PLA but also to PLA/MMT nanocomposites. In these nanocomposites, the number of spherulites decreased and the linear growth rate slightly increased ; moreover, the rate of crystallization also increased. The tensile and flexural modulus of the PLA/MMT nanocomposites containing 3 wt% MMT were 5.2-14.3% greater than those of PLA, and annealing resulted in a further increase of about 4.0-20.7%. However, the Izod impact value decreased due to the increase in rigidity caused by annealing and the addition of filler.

  11. Whole Body Creatine and Protein Kinetics in Healthy Men and Women: Effects of creatine and amino acid supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Kalhan, Satish C; Gruca, Lourdes; Marczewski, Susan; Bennett, Carole; Kummitha, China

    2015-01-01

    Creatine kinetics were measured in young healthy subjects, eight males and seven females, age 20–30 years, after an overnight fast on creatine free diet. Whole body turnover of glycine and its appearance in creatine was quantified using [1-13C] glycine and the rate of protein turnover was quantified using L-ring [2H5] phenylalanine. The creatine pool size was estimated by the dilution of a bolus [C2H3] creatine. Studies were repeated following a five days supplement creatine 21g.day−1 and following supplement amino acids 14.3 g.day−1. Creatine caused a ten folds increase in the plasma concentration of creatine and a 50% decrease in the concentration of guanidinoacetic acid. Plasma amino acids profile showed a significant decrease in glycine, glutamine and taurine and a significant increase in citrulline, valine, lysine and cysteine. There was a significant decrease in the rate of appearance of glycine, suggesting a decrease in de-novo synthesis (p=0.006). The fractional and absolute rate of synthesis of creatine was significantly decreased by supplemental creatine. Amino acid supplement had no impact on any of the parameters. Creatine supplement caused a significant decrease in the rate of synthesis of creatine. This is the first detailed analysis of creatine kinetics and the effects of creatine supplement in healthy young men and women. These methods can be applied for the analysis of creatine kinetics in different physiological states. PMID:26480831

  12. Enzymatic Synthesis of Furfuryl Alcohol Ester with Oleic Acid by Candida antarctica Lipase B and Its Kinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Avery; Dey, Tanmoy; Ghosh, Mahua; Ghosh, Jaydip; Ghosh, Santinath

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the successful enzymatic production of furfuryl oleate and its detailed kinetic study by Michaelis-Menten model. Esterification of oleic acid and furfuryl alcohol by Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozym 435 preparation) in a solvent free system was studied in the present work at 1:1 molar ratio of furfuryl alcohol and oleic acid. About 99 % conversion (on the basis of oleic acid) has been achieved within 6 h at 5 % enzyme concentration. Ping-pong bi-bi mechanism (inhibition phenomenon taken into account) was applied to describe the ratios as a complex kinetic model. The kinetic parameters were determined using MATLAB language programme. The two initial rate constants KA and KB respectively were found out by different progress curves plotted with the help of MATLAB language programme. It was concluded from the results that furfuryl alcohol considerably inhibited the enzymatic reaction while oleic acid had negligible inhibitory effect. It was clearly seen that the initial rate was increased with the increase in the furfuryl alcohol concentration until 2 M/L after which there was a drop in the initial rate depicting the inhibitory effect of furfuryl alcohol. Surprisingly, it has been observed that addition of 0.1 mol of product activated the esterification reaction. Finally, the model was found to be statistically fitting well with the experimental data.

  13. Whole body creatine and protein kinetics in healthy men and women: effects of creatine and amino acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, Satish C; Gruca, Lourdes; Marczewski, Susan; Bennett, Carole; Kummitha, China

    2016-03-01

    Creatine kinetics were measured in young healthy subjects, eight males and seven females, age 20-30 years, after an overnight fast on creatine-free diet. Whole body turnover of glycine and its appearance in creatine was quantified using [1-(13)C] glycine and the rate of protein turnover was quantified using L-ring [(2)H5] phenylalanine. The creatine pool size was estimated by the dilution of a bolus [C(2)H3] creatine. Studies were repeated following a five days supplement creatine 21 g.day(-1) and following supplement amino acids 14.3 g day(-1). Creatine caused a ten-fold increase in the plasma concentration of creatine and a 50 % decrease in the concentration of guanidinoacetic acid. Plasma amino acids profile showed a significant decrease in glycine, glutamine, and taurine and a significant increase in citrulline, valine, lysine, and cysteine. There was a significant decrease in the rate of appearance of glycine, suggesting a decrease in de-novo synthesis (p = 0.006). The fractional and absolute rate of synthesis of creatine was significantly decreased by supplemental creatine. Amino acid supplement had no impact on any of the parameters. This is the first detailed analysis of creatine kinetics and the effects of creatine supplement in healthy young men and women. These methods can be applied for the analysis of creatine kinetics in different physiological states.

  14. Kinetic Behavior of Leucine and Other Amino Acids Modulating Cognitive Performance via mTOR Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-02

    Acid BBB Transporter Type Structure Leucine L1 Essential Neutral Non-polar (hydrophobic) Branched chain Aspartic Acid Acidic X- Acidic Polar Glutamine...compared with other tissues. • Effects of leucine on other amino acids were analyzed. Those measured were aspartic acid , glutamic acid, serine, histidine

  15. Evaluation of a new protocol for enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of 3-hydroxy-3-(aryl)propanoic acids.

    PubMed

    Koszelewski, Dominik; Zysk, Małgorzata; Brodzka, Anna; Żądło, Anna; Paprocki, Daniel; Ostaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-12-07

    The application of tandem metal-enzyme dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) is a powerful tool for the manufacture of high-value chemical commodities. A new protocol of kinetic resolution based on irreversible enzymatic esterification of carboxylic acids with orthoesters was introduced to obtain optically active β-hydroxy esters. This procedure was combined with metal catalyzed racemization of the target substrate providing both (R) and (S) enantiomers of ethyl 3-hydroxy-3-(4-nitrophenyl)propanoate with a high yield of 89% at 40 °C. A substantial influence of the enzyme type, organic co-solvent, and metal catalyst on the conversion and enantioselectivity of the enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution was noted.

  16. Kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of safranine by dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Abbasi, S.; Rezaei, B.

    2001-08-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid has been described based on its catalytic effect on the redox reaction between safranine and dichromate in dilute sulfuric acid media. The reaction is monitored photometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of safranine at the maximum wavelength of 530 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a calibration graph from 0.10 to 10.00 μg ml -1 of oxalic acid with a detection limit of 0.08 μg ml -1 was obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for ten replicate measurements of 1.0 and 5.0 μg ml -1 oxalic acid was 2.7 and 2.5%, respectively. The purposed method is simple, sensitive, selective and inexpensive. The applicability of the proposed method was determined by the determination of oxalic acid in spinach and wastewater samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of safranine by dichromate.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, A A; Abbasi, S; Rezaei, B

    2001-08-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of oxalic acid has been described based on its catalytic effect on the redox reaction between safranine and dichromate in dilute sulfuric acid media. The reaction is monitored photometrically by measuring the decrease in absorbance of safranine at the maximum wavelength of 530 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a calibration graph from 0.10 to 10.00 microg ml(-1) of oxalic acid with a detection limit of 0.08 microg ml(-1) was obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for ten replicate measurements of 1.0 and 5.0 microg ml(-1) oxalic acid was 2.7 and 2.5%, respectively. The purposed method is simple, sensitive, selective and inexpensive. The applicability of the proposed method was determined by the determination of oxalic acid in spinach and wastewater samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Oxidative degradation of organic acid conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization: products, kinetics and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.J.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1987-03-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant k/sub 12/ is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times the ratio of the concentration of dissolved S(IV) and organic acid. It is not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Fe, Co, and Ni and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnifies these effects. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately 3 times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids, while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude factor. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product - smaller dicarboxylic acids, monocarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons. 30 references, 7 figures, 7 tables.

  19. Repositioning the catalytic triad aspartic acid of haloalkane dehalogenase: effects on stability, kinetics, and structure.

    PubMed

    Krooshof, G H; Kwant, E M; Damborský, J; Koca, J; Janssen, D B

    1997-08-05

    Haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of haloalkanes via an alkyl-enzyme intermediate. The covalent intermediate, which is formed by nucleophilic substitution with Asp124, is hydrolyzed by a water molecule that is activated by His289. The role of Asp260, which is the third member of the catalytic triad, was studied by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of Asp260 to asparagine resulted in a catalytically inactive D260N mutant, which demonstrates that the triad acid Asp260 is essential for dehalogenase activity. Furthermore, Asp260 has an important structural role, since the D260N enzyme accumulated mainly in inclusion bodies during expression, and neither substrate nor product could bind in the active-site cavity. Activity for brominated substrates was restored to D260N by replacing Asn148 with an aspartic or glutamic acid. Both double mutants D260N+N148D and D260N+N148E had a 10-fold reduced kcat and 40-fold higher Km values for 1,2-dibromoethane compared to the wild-type enzyme. Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the D260N+N148E double mutant showed that the decrease in kcat was mainly caused by a 220-fold reduction of the rate of carbon-bromine bond cleavage and a 10-fold decrease in the rate of hydrolysis of the alkyl-enzyme intermediate. On the other hand, bromide was released 12-fold faster and via a different pathway than in the wild-type enzyme. Molecular modeling of the mutant showed that Glu148 indeed could take over the interaction with His289 and that there was a change in charge distribution in the tunnel region that connects the active site with the solvent. On the basis of primary structure similarity between DhlA and other alpha/beta-hydrolase fold dehalogenases, we propose that a conserved acidic residue at the equivalent position of Asn148 in DhlA is the third catalytic triad residue in the latter enzymes.

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic studies on acid dye Acid Red 88 adsorption by magnetic ZnFe2O4 spinel ferrite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Konicki, Wojciech; Sibera, Daniel; Mijowska, Ewa; Lendzion-Bieluń, Zofia; Narkiewicz, Urszula

    2013-05-15

    A magnetic ZnFe2O4 (MNZnFe) was synthesized by microwave assisted hydrothermal method and was used as an adsorbent for the removal of acid dye Acid Red 88 (AR88) from aqueous solution. The effects of various parameters such as initial AR88 concentration (10-56 mg L(-1)), pH solution (3.2-10.7), and temperature (20-60°C) were investigated. Prepared magnetic ZnFe2O4 was characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM, ICP-AES, BET, FTIR, and measurements of the magnetic susceptibility. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and intraparticle diffusion model were used to examine the adsorption kinetic data. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamics parameters, ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°, indicate that the adsorption of AR88 onto MNZnFe was spontaneous and exothermic in nature.

  1. Effects of rice harvest moisture on kernel damage and milled rice surface free fatty acid levels.

    PubMed

    Parker, Amanda M; Proctor, Andrew; Eason, Robert L; Jain, Vishal

    2007-01-01

    Surface free fatty acid (FFA) on milled rice is a key factor in determining rice quality and acceptability to the brewing industry. Rice FFA oxidizes, causing off-flavors and odors to develop, compromising the brewing quality of milled rice. The effect of harvest moisture (13%, 16%, and 20%), harvester type (1688 Case and 9500 John Deere), and rice variety (Cocodrie and Bengal) on harvest damaged rough rice and milled rice surface FFA after drying to 12% moisture and 6 mo rough rice storage was examined. The Case harvester produced more damaged kernels than the John Deere harvester, but this was not reflected in surface FFA development. There were no significant FFA differences in variety or harvester type. Rice harvested at a higher moisture content (20%) produced significantly greater FFA values, with a peak near 0.1%, than rice harvested at lower moisture contents (13% and 16%), which had FFA values near 0.08%. Retention of bran by damaged kernels at high harvest moisture probably was responsible for promoting surface FFA development, but if bran was lost at lower harvest moistures, surface FFA, development was limited. Harvest moisture affected milled rice FFA, although rough rice was dried to 12% immediately after harvesting.

  2. Improved Free Fatty Acid Production in Cyanobacteria with Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as Host

    PubMed Central

    Ruffing, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial free fatty acids (FFAs) have been proposed as a potential feedstock for renewable energy. The ability to directly convert carbon dioxide into FFAs makes cyanobacteria ideal hosts for renewable FFA production. Previous metabolic engineering efforts using the cyanobacterial hosts Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have demonstrated this direct conversion of carbon dioxide into FFAs; however, FFA yields in these hosts are limited by the negative impact of FFA production on the host cell physiology. This work investigates the use of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as a cyanobacterial host for FFA production. In comparison to S. elongatus PCC 7942, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 strains produced and excreted FFAs at similar concentrations but without the detrimental effects on host physiology. The enhanced tolerance to FFA production with Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was found to be temperature-dependent, with physiological effects such as reduced photosynthetic yield and decreased photosynthetic pigments observed at higher temperatures. Additional genetic manipulations were targeted for increased FFA production, including thioesterases and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Overexpression of non-native RuBisCO subunits (rbcLS) from a psbAI promoter resulted in more than a threefold increase in FFA production, with excreted FFA concentrations reaching >130 mg/L. This work illustrates the importance of host strain selection for cyanobacterial biofuel production and demonstrates that the FFA tolerance of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 can allow for high yields of excreted FFA. PMID:25152890

  3. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of Lithospermic Acid under Low Oxygen Condition Using Quantitative 1H NMR with HPLC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianyang; Gong, Xingchu; Qu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    A novel quantitative 1H NMR (Q-NMR) combined with HPLC-MS method has been proposed for investigating the degradation process of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) components. Through this method, in-situ monitoring of dynamics degradation process of lithospermic acid (LA), one of the popular polyphenolic acids in TCM, was realized under low oxygen condition. Additionally, this methodology was proved to be simple, rapid and specific. Degradation kinetic runs have been carried out to systematically investigate the effects of two key environmental factors, initial pH values and temperatures. Eight main degradation products of LA were detected, seven of which were tentatively structural elucidated with the help of both NMR and LC-MS in this work and salvianolic acid A (Sal A) was the primary degradation product of LA. A possible degradation pathway of LA was proposed, subsequently. The results showed that the degradation of LA followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent degradation kinetic constants increased as the initial pH value of the phosphate buffer increased. Under the given conditions, the rate constants of overall degradation as a function of temperature obeyed the Arrhenius equation. Our results proved that the Q-NMR combined with HPLC-MS method can be one of the most promising techniques for investigating degradation process of active components in TCM. PMID:27776128

  4. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  5. Arterio-venous balance studies of skeletal muscle fatty acid metabolism: what can we believe?

    PubMed Central

    Guo, ZengKui

    2013-01-01

    The arterio-venous balance (A-V balance/difference) technique has been used by a number of groups, including ours, to study skeletal muscle fatty acid metabolism. Several lines of evidence indicate that, like glycogen, intramyocellular triglycerides (imcTG) are an energy source for local use. As such, the report that increased release of free fatty acids (FFA) via lipolysis from skeletal muscle, but not from adipose tissue, is responsible for the increased systemic lipolysis during IL-6 infusion in healthy humans is somewhat unexpected (26). It appears that given the complex anatomy of human limbs, as to be discussed in this review, it is virtually impossible to determine whether any fatty acids being released into the venous circulation of an arm or leg derive from the lipolysis of intermuscular fat residing between muscle groups, intramuscular fat residing within muscle groups (between epimysium and perimysium, or bundles), or the intramyocellular triglyceride droplets (imcTG). In many cases, it may even be difficult to be confident that there is no contribution of FFA from subcutaneous adipose tissue. This question is fundamentally important as one attempts to interpret the results of skeletal muscle fatty acid metabolism studies using the A-V balance technique. In this Perspectives article, we examine the reported results of fatty acid kinetics obtained using the techniques to evaluate the degree of and how to minimize contamination when attempting to sample skeletal muscle-specific fatty acids. PMID:23941872

  6. Laboratory study on OH-initiated degradation kinetics of dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chengyue; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2015-04-28

    Dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a specific organic tracer for the pyrolysis of conifer resin. To understand its atmospheric stability, the degradation behavior of particulate DHAA in the presence of hydroxyl radicals (OH) was investigated under different environmental conditions using a stainless steel reactor with volume of 30 cm(3), in the dark. At 25 °C and 40% relative humidity (RH), the second-order rate constant (k2) of pure DHAA with OH was measured to be 5.72 ± 0.87 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The influence of temperature, RH and mixing state on the degradation kinetics of DHAA were also investigated. At 40% RH, k2 of pure DHAA increases with increasing temperature and follows the Arrhenius equation k2 = (8.9 ± 1.9) × 10(-10) exp[-(1508.2 ± 64.2)/T], while RH does not have significant impact on k2 at 25 °C. At 25 °C and 40% RH, compared with pure DHAA, the corresponding k2 for DHAA mixed with (NH4)2SO4 decreased to 4.58 ± 0.95 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), while the value was 3.30 ± 0.79 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) when mixed with soot. The atmospheric lifetime of DHAA varied from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 4.4 ± 0.8 days under different environmental conditions. This study indicates that degradation of DHAA by OH radicals is appreciable, and a significant error in source apportionment should be introduced if the contribution of degradation to DHAA concentration is not considered during air mass aging.

  7. Chemical kinetic behavior of chlorogenic acid in protecting erythrocyte and DNA against radical-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tang, You-Zhi; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2008-11-26

    As an abundant ingredient in coffee, chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a well-known antioxidant. Although some works have dealt with its radical-scavenging property, the present work investigated the protective effects of CGA on the oxidation of DNA and on the hemolysis of human erythrocytes induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH) by means of chemical kinetics. The inhibition period (t(inh)) derived from the protective effect of CGA on erythrocyte and DNA was proportional to its concentration, t(inh) = (n/R(i))[CGA], where R(i) refers to the radical-initiation rate, and n indicates the number of radical-propagation chains terminated by CGA. It was found that the n of CGA to protect erythrocytes was 0.77, lower than that of vitamin E (2.0), but higher than that of vitamin C (0.19). Furthermore, CGA facilitated a mutual protective effect with VE and VC on AAPH-induced hemolysis by increasing n of VE and VC. CGA was also found to be a membrane-stabilizer to protect erythrocytes against hemin-induced hemolysis. Moreover, the n of CGA was only 0.41 in the process of protecting DNA. This fact revealed that CGA served as an efficient antioxidant to protect erythrocytes more than to protect DNA. Finally, the reaction between CGA and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS(+*)) or 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) revealed that CGA was able to trap radicals by reducing radicals more than by donating its hydrogen atoms to radicals.

  8. Acetate and other Volatile Fatty Acids - Key Intermediates in marine sediment metabolism - Thermodynamic and kinetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glombitza, C.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) play important roles as key intermediates in the anaerobic metabolism of subsurface microbial communities. Usually they are present in marine sediment pore water in low concentrations as a result of balanced production and consumption, both occurring in the same sediment zone. Thus their low concentrations represent a steady state condition regulated by either thermodynamics or kinetics. We have developed a novel analytical approach for the parallel measurement of several VFAs directly from marine pore water without any sample pretreatment by the use of a 2-dimensional ion chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. In a first study we analyzed acetate, formate, and propionate in pore water from sediment cores retrieved from 5 different stations within and offshore of the Godhåbsfjord (Greenland). The sediment cores represent different sedimentological conditions, ranging from a typical marine sedimentation site to a glacier/freshwater dominated site. In addition to VFA concentrations, we measured sulfate concentrations, sulfate reduction rates, and cell abundances. We calculated the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) available for sulfate reduction (SR), as well as the VFA turnover times by the in-situ SR rates. The turnover time for acetate by SR ranged from several hours to days in the top cm of sediment and increased to several hundred years at the bottom of the SR zone. From the associated cell abundances we calculated that the VFA turnover times were significantly longer than the diffusion times of the VFA between individual cells. This shows that VFA consumption in the SR zone, and concomitantly the observed pore water concentrations, are not constrained by diffusion. DG values for SR using acetate were >36 kJ/mol which is significantly above the lower limit for anaerobic microbial energy metabolism. It thus remains unclear what controls the VFA concentrations in the sediment.

  9. Bimolecular glutathione conjugation kinetics of ethacrynic acid in rat liver: in vitro and perfusion studies.

    PubMed

    Tirona, R G; Pang, K S

    1999-09-01

    The conjugation kinetics of glutathione (GSH) and ethacrynic acid (EA) were studied in rat liver perfusion studies, where efficient removal occurred (steady-state extraction ratio E(ss), approximately 0.8-0.4 at concentrations ranging from 10-200 microM) despite the appreciable plasma protein binding. The declining E(ss) paralleled the saturation in GSH conjugate (EA-SG) formation; EA-SG primarily appeared in bile as the unchanged glutathionyl adduct (90%) and minimally as cleavage products. The GSH conjugation of EA in perfused liver was described by the constants K(m)(overall) of 67 microM and V(max)(overall) of 0.23 micromol/min/g liver. These differed from those observed for the bimolecular nonenzymatic (constant of 126 microM(-1) min(-1)) and enzymatic (K(m) for GSH and EA were 1.2 mM and 94 microM, respectively; V(max) of 533 nmol/min/mg liver cytosolic protein or 32 micromol/min/g liver) GSH conjugation of EA in vitro. But they were similar to those estimated for EA uptake in isolated rat hepatocytes by saturable (K(m)(uptake) = 57 microM, and V(max)(uptake) = 0.55 micromol/min/g liver) and nonsaturable (0.015 ml/min/mg) processes. At increasing EA concentrations (>25 microM), time-dependent changes were observed for E(ss) and EA-SG formation, which rapidly decreased with time after the attainment of steady state due to the rapid loss of cellular GSH. The composite data were described adequately by a physiological model that accounted for transport and the GSH-dependent conjugation of EA. The results suggest that the rate-limiting process for hepatic EA GSH conjugation is cellular uptake, but cosubstrate availability controls the rate of metabolism when GSH becomes depleted.

  10. Reaction kinetics and critical phenomena: iodination of acetone in isobutyric acid + water near the consolute point.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baichuan; Baird, James K

    2010-01-14

    The rate of iodination of acetone has been measured as a function of temperature in the binary solvent isobutyric acid (IBA) + water near the upper consolute point. The reaction mixture was prepared by the addition of acetone, iodine, and potassium iodide to IBA + water at its critical composition of 38.8 mass % IBA. The value of the critical temperature determined immediately after mixing was 25.43 degrees C. Aliquots were extracted from the mixture at regular intervals in order to follow the time course of the reaction. After dilution of the aliquot with water to quench the reaction, the concentration of triiodide ion was determined by the measurement of the optical density at a wavelength of 565 nm. These measurements showed that the kinetics were zeroth order. When at the end of 24 h the reaction had come to equilibrium, the critical temperature was determined again and found to be 24.83 degrees C. An Arrhenius plot of the temperature dependence of the observed rate constant, k(obs), was linear over the temperature range 27.00-38.00 degrees C, but between 25.43 and 27.00 degrees C, the values of k(obs) fell below the extrapolation of the Arrhenius line. This behavior is evidence in support of critical slowing down. Our experimental method and results are significant in three ways: (1) In contrast to in situ measurements of optical density, the determination of the optical density of diluted aliquots avoided any interference from critical opalescence. (2) The measured reaction rate exhibited critical slowing down. (3) The rate law was pseudo zeroth order both inside and outside the critical region, indicating that the reaction mechanism was unaffected by the presence of the critical point.

  11. Photometric and fluorometric continuous kinetic assay of acid phosphatases with new substrates possessing longwave absorption and emission maxima.

    PubMed

    Koller, E; Wolfbeis, O S

    1984-11-15

    A direct and continuous kinetic method for the photometric and fluorometric determination of various acid phosphatases is described. It is based on new coumarin-derived phosphates, which after enzymatic hydrolysis undergo dissociation to form intensely colored and strongly fluorescent phenolate anions. The latter have absorption maxima ranging from 385 to 505 nm, and fluorescence maxima between 470 and 595 nm. The new substrates were compared with respect to their rate of enzymatic hydrolysis, optimum pH, and detection limits of acid phosphatase from potato and wheat germ. Detection limits of 0.001 unit/ml were found by photometry, and as low as 0.00006 unit/ml by fluorometry. The principal advantages of the new substrates over existing ones are longwave absorptions and emissions, large Stokes shifts, and the low pKa values of the corresponding phenols, thus allowing a direct and continuous assay of acid phosphatase even in weakly acidic solutions.

  12. Adsorption of humic acid from aqueous solutions on crosslinked chitosan-epichlorohydrin beads: kinetics and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Wan Ngah, W S; Hanafiah, M A K M; Yong, S S

    2008-08-01

    The adsorption of humic acid on crosslinked chitosan-epichlorohydrin (chitosan-ECH) beads was investigated. Chitosan-ECH beads were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), surface area and pore size analyses, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Batch adsorption experiments were carried out and optimum humic acid adsorption on chitosan-ECH beads occurred at pH 6.0, agitation rate of 300 rpm and contact time of 50 min. Adsorption equilibrium isotherms were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models. Freundlich model was found to show the best fit for experimental data while the maximum adsorption capacity determined from Langmuir model was 44.84 mg g(-1). The adsorption of humic acid on chitosan-ECH beads was best described with pseudo-first-order kinetic model. For desorption study, more than 60% of humic acid could be desorbed from the adsorbent using 1.0M HCl for 180 min.

  13. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 μg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 microg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Tuning Lipase Reaction for Production of Fatty Acids from Oil.

    PubMed

    Odaneth, Annamma A; Vadgama, Rajeshkumar N; Bhat, Anuradha D; Lali, Arvind M

    2016-10-01

    Fats or oils are split partially or completely to obtain fatty acids that find wide applications in oleo-chemical industries. Lipase-mediated complete splitting (hydrolysis) of oils is a green process having great potential to replace the traditional methods of oil splitting. However, cost of lipases, mechanistic kinetic equilibrium and associated operational limitations prove to be deterrents for scale up of the enzymatic oil splitting process. In the present study, we demonstrate the use of immobilised 1,3-regioselective lipase (HyLIP) for complete hydrolysis of oil in monophasic reaction medium. Incorporation of a polar organic solvent (tert-butanol, 1:5, v/v) homogenises the oil-water mixture and contributes positively towards complete hydrolysis. The monophasic oil hydrolysis reaction with optimised water concentration (0.05 %, v/v) gave Free Fatty Acid (FFA) yield of 88 % (HyLIP and Novozym-435) and 66 % (TLIM and RMIM). Smart reaction engineering and modification of the reaction intermediates to favourable substrate lead to ∼99 % degree of hydrolysis of triglycerides with ∼90 % FFA yield using 1,3-regioselective lipase. The present work becomes basic platform for developing technologies for synthesis of fatty acids, monoglycerides, diglycerides and glycerol.

  16. Kinetic studies on the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid by spinach-beet phenolase.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, R J; Vaughan, P F

    1975-01-01

    1. A spectrophotometric assay is described that enables the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid, catalysed by spinach-beet phenolase, to be followed continuously. 2. Initial-velocity and inhibitor studies indicate that the order of substrate addition is oxygen, p-coumaric acid and electron donor, with an irreversible step separating the binding of each substrate. 3. Caffeic acid is most likely to act as electron donor at the active site; other electron donors, such as ascorbic acid, NADH and dimethyltetrahydropteridine, function mainly to recycle cofactor amounts of caffeic acid. 4. A reaction scheme, consistent with these data, is proposed. PMID:170916

  17. Callus Growth Kinetics of Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) and Content of Fatty Acids from Crude Oil Obtained In Vitro.

    PubMed

    da Luz Costa, Jefferson; da Silva, André Luís Lopes; Bier, Mário César Jucoski; Brondani, Gilvano Ebling; Gollo, André Luiz; Letti, Luiz Alberto Junior; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The callus growth kinetics allows identifying the appropriate moment for callus pealing and monitoring the accumulation of primary and secondary metabolites. The physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a plant species used for biofuel production due to its high oil content; however, this plant presents a great amount of bioactive compounds which can be useful for industry. The aim of this research was to establish a calli growth curve and to evaluate the fatty acid profile of crude oil extracted from callus. The callus growth kinetics presented a sigmoid standard curve with six distinct phases: lag, exponential, linear, deceleration, stationary, and decline. Total soluble sugars were higher at the inoculation day. Reducing sugars were higher at the inoculation day and at the 80th day. The highest percentage of ethereal extract (oil content) was obtained at the 120th day of culture, reaching 18 % of crude oil from the callus. The calli produced medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids (from 10 to 18 carbon atoms). The palmitic acid was the fatty acid with the highest proportion in oil (55.4 %). The lipid profile obtained in callus oil was different from the seed oil profile.

  18. Effect of Humic Acid on As Redox Transformation and Kinetic Adsorption onto Iron Oxide Based Adsorbent (IBA)

    PubMed Central

    Fakour, Hoda; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of arsenic (As) during the adsorption process, the present study elucidated natural organic matter (NOM) effects on As adsorption-desorption kinetics and speciation transformation. The experimental procedures were conducted by examining interactions of arsenate and arsenite with different concentrations of humic acid (HA) as a model representative of NOM, in the presence of iron oxide based adsorbent (IBA), as a model solid surface in three environmentally relevant conditions, including the simultaneous adsorption of both As and HA onto IBA, HA adsorption onto As-presorbed IBA, and As adsorption onto HA-presorbed IBA. Experimental adsorption-desorption data were all fitted by original and modified Lagergren pseudo-first and -second order adsorption kinetic models, respectively. Weber’s intraparticle diffusion was also used to gain insight into the mechanisms and rate controlling steps, which the results suggested that intraparticle diffusion of As species onto IBA is the main rate-controlling step. Different concentrations of HA mediated the redox transformation of As species, with a higher oxidation ability than reduction. The overall results indicated the significant effect of organic matter on the adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of As species, and consequently, the fate, transport and mobility of As in different environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:25325357

  19. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water: Multifactorial determination of significant factors.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; de Oliveira Livera, Diogo; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Vijayaraghavan, Sucharita; Wong, Timothy; Gu, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is generated as a byproduct of bitumen extraction in Canada's oil sands. Due to the water's toxicity, associated with dissolved acid extractable organics (AEO), especially naphthenic acids (NAs), along with base-neutral organics, OSPW may require treatment to enable safe discharge to the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalysis is a promising advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW remediation, however, predicting treatment efficacy can be challenging due to the unique water chemistry of OSPW from different tailings ponds. The objective of this work was to study various factors affecting the kinetics of photocatalytic AEO degradation in OSPW. The rate of photocatalytic treatment varied significantly in two different OSPW sources, which could not be accounted for by differences in AEO composition, as studied by high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The effects of inorganic water constituents were investigated using factorial and response surface experiments, which revealed that hydroxyl (HO) radical scavenging by iron (Fe(3+)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) inhibited the NA degradation rate. The effects of NA concentration and temperature on the treatment kinetics were also evaluated in terms of Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Arrhenius models; pH and temperature were identified as weak factors, while dissolved oxygen (DO) was critical to the photo-oxidation reaction. Accounting for all of these variables, a general empirical kinetic expression is proposed, enabling prediction of photocatalytic treatment performance in diverse sources of OSPW.

  20. Nutritional value of protein hydrolysis products (oligopeptides and free amino acids) as a consequence of absorption and metabolism kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerat, A.

    1995-01-01

    When pigs were submitted to duodenal infusion of solutions containing a large percentage of small peptides (PEP) or free amino acids with the same pattern (AAL) amino acids appear in the portal blood more rapidly and more uniformly after infusion of PEP then after infusion of AAL, with the notable exception of methionine for which the opposite was true. These differences were lowered when a carbohydrate (maltose dextrin) was present in the solution, but nevertheless remained significant for the first hour after the infusion. The long-term (8-hour) uptake of free amino acids into the liver and the peripheral tissues differed in profile according to the nature of the duodenal infusion. Peripheral uptake was appreciably less well balanced after infusion of free amino acids (deficiency of threonine and phenylalanine) than after infusion of small peptides (deficiency of methionine). Accordingly, in the rat, under conditions of discontinuous enteral nutrition the mixture of small peptides was of greater nutritive value than the mixture of free amino acids. It thus appears that the absorption kinetics which results in important variations in the temporal distribution of free amino acids in the tissues may be at the origin of transitory imbalances in tissue amino acid uptake, and as a result of a lower nutritive value.

  1. Effects of acetic acid on the kinetics of xylose fermentation by an engineered, xylose-isomerase-based Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Bellissimi, Eleonora; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2009-05-01

    Acetic acid, an inhibitor released during hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks, has previously been shown to negatively affect the kinetics and stoichiometry of sugar fermentation by (engineered) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. This study investigates the effects of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae RWB 218, an engineered xylose-fermenting strain based on the Piromyces XylA (xylose isomerase) gene. Anaerobic batch cultures on synthetic medium supplemented with glucose-xylose mixtures were grown at pH 5 and 3.5, with and without addition of 3 g L(-1) acetic acid. In these cultures, consumption of the sugar mixtures followed a diauxic pattern. At pH 5, acetic acid addition caused increased glucose consumption rates, whereas specific xylose consumption rates were not significantly affected. In contrast, at pH 3.5 acetic acid had a strong and specific negative impact on xylose consumption rates, which, after glucose depletion, slowed down dramatically, leaving 50% of the xylose unused after 48 h of fermentation. Xylitol production was absent (<0.10 g L(-1)) in all cultures. Xylose fermentation in acetic -acid-stressed cultures at pH 3.5 could be restored by applying a continuous, limiting glucose feed, consistent with a key role of ATP regeneration in acetic acid tolerance.

  2. Competitive Oxidation Kinetics and Microbial Ecology: Intermediate Sulfur Transformations in Acid Mine Drainage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G. K.; Hamers, R. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that oxidation of pyrite proceeds through several intermediate sulfur species, notably elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and polythionates (Schippers et al., 1996). However, detailed sampling and analysis of flowing waters and pore waters failed to detect intermediate sulfur species in the 5-way area of the Richmond metal sulfide deposit at the Iron Mountain Mine in northern California. Potential energy available from the oxidation of intermediate sulfur species is considerable, so microbial activity may explain absence of intermediate sulfur compounds at the site. However, the abundance of sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms in areas of active pyrite oxidation at the 5-way is generally low (Bond et al. 2000). Rapid inorganic oxidation rates may prevent microorganisms from utilizing these intermediate sulfur species, thus shaping the structure of microbial communities in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments. Rates and mechanisms of oxidation for tetrathionate and elemental sulfur have been experimentally determined. Batch and flow-through experiments have indicated very slow oxidation of elemental sulfur in inorganic solutions analogous to AMD environments. Results for tetrathionate indicate the importance of non-metabolic and inorganic processes, including surface catalysis and the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Surface catalysis occurs through trithionate on iron oxide surfaces. Hydroxyl radicals may be formed directly by microbes living in proximity to pyrite surfaces, or at pyrite surfaces undergoing wetting and drying cycles. Further experiments investigating the importance of organic compounds associated with iron-oxidizing microorganisms acting as electron transport shuttles and/or wetting agents and ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of potential reactants and intermediates are currently being performed. It is suggested that inorganic processes involved with seasonal wetting and drying of pyritic sediment

  3. Acid catalyzed alcoholysis of sulfinamides: unusual stereochemistry, kinetics and a question of mechanism involving sulfurane intermediates and their pseudorotation.

    PubMed

    Bujnicki, Bogdan; Drabowicz, Józef; Mikołajczyk, Marian

    2015-02-11

    The synthesis of optically active sulfinic acid esters has been accomplished by the acid catalyzed alcoholysis of optically active sulfinamides. Sulfinates are formed in this reaction with a full or predominant inversion of configuration at chiral sulfur or with predominant retention of configuration. The steric course of the reaction depends mainly on the size of the dialkylamido group in the sulfinamides and of the alcohols used as nucleophilic reagents. It has been found that bulky reaction components preferentially form sulfinates with retention of configuration. It has been demonstrated that the stereochemical outcome of the reaction can be changed from inversion to retention and vice versa by adding inorganic salts to the acidic reaction medium. The unusual stereochemistry of this typical bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction, as confirmed by kinetic measurements, has been rationalized in terms of the addition-elimination mechanism, A-E, involving sulfuranes as intermediates which undergo pseudorotations.

  4. Nitrogen removal of ramie stalk treated by acid wastewater combined with Clostridium thermocellum and the kinetic study of pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Buyun; Li, Ting; Zhu, Ning; Xiao, Bo

    2013-02-01

    A pretreatment was developed to remove nitrogen from ramie residue and cotton stalk to eliminate potential nitrogen pollutants in biomass energy production. In the pretreatment, straw was treated with acid wastewater from bioleaching for 3 h followed by Clostridium thermocellum incubation for 2 h. Most nitrogen was removed from biomass waste and the major was that in protein. Pyrolysis process revealed most hemicellulose was removed and the kinetics fitted the first-order equation well. Apparent activation energy of ramie residue increased a little and mass loss became concentrated. Ultimate analysis and pyrolysis analysis revealed the treatment did not weaken the application value of biomass in energy production. Replacing acid wastewater with sulphuric acid, a higher nitrogen removal could be achieved; however, activation energy increased sharply.

  5. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (III): Model application].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    The kinetic model based on SCFAs metabolism was applied for the prediction of phosphorus-and glycogen-accumulating organisms (PAO and GAO) competition with different carbon sources and m(P)/m(COD) ratios. When acetic acid was used as the sole carbon source, the biomass compositions were almost the same as those before cultivation, and neither PAO nor GAO could be out-competed from EBPR. However, increasing propionic acid in the influent helped PAO to be the predominance organism, and EBPR performance kept excellent when the ratio of propionate to mixed acids (acetate + propionate) was higher than 0.33. It also found that the m(P)/m(COD) ratio should be kept at 0.04-0.10 to avoid phosphorus became a limiting factor for PAO growth. This was because at low m(P)/m(COD) ratios, such as 0.01, GAO would take up 95% of the total (PAO + GAO) biomass.

  6. A Novel RSSI Prediction Using Imperialist Competition Algorithm (ICA), Radial Basis Function (RBF) and Firefly Algorithm (FFA) in Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Shidrokh; Haslina Hassan, Wan; Abdalla Hashim, Aisha-Hassan; Soleymani, Seyed Ahmad; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Zakaria, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to design a vertical handover prediction method to minimize unnecessary handovers for a mobile node (MN) during the vertical handover process. This relies on a novel method for the prediction of a received signal strength indicator (RSSI) referred to as IRBF-FFA, which is designed by utilizing the imperialist competition algorithm (ICA) to train the radial basis function (RBF), and by hybridizing with the firefly algorithm (FFA) to predict the optimal solution. The prediction accuracy of the proposed IRBF–FFA model was validated by comparing it to support vector machines (SVMs) and multilayer perceptron (MLP) models. In order to assess the model’s performance, we measured the coefficient of determination (R2), correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The achieved results indicate that the IRBF–FFA model provides more precise predictions compared to different ANNs, namely, support vector machines (SVMs) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). The performance of the proposed model is analyzed through simulated and real-time RSSI measurements. The results also suggest that the IRBF–FFA model can be applied as an efficient technique for the accurate prediction of vertical handover. PMID:27438600

  7. TCF2 attenuates FFA-induced damage in islet β-cells by regulating production of insulin and ROS.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yingna; Liang, Chunlian

    2014-07-30

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are cytotoxic to pancreatic islet β-cells and play a crucial role in the diabetes disease process. A recent study revealed a down-regulation of transcription factor 2 (TCF2) levels during FFA-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells. However, its function during this process and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, treatment with palmitic acid (PA) at high levels (400 and 800 μM) decreased β-cell viability and TCF2 protein expression, along with the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Western and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the positive regulatory effect of TCF2 on GSIS through promotion of the key regulators pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in β-cells. In addition, both PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK showed decreased expression in PA (800 μM)-treated β-cells. Overexpression of TCF2 could effectively restore the inhibitory effect of PA on the activation of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK as well as β-cell viability, simultaneously, inhibited PA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. After blocking the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signals with their specific inhibitor, the effect of overexpressed TCF2 on β-cell viability and ROS production was obviously attenuated. Furthermore, a protective effect of TCF2 on GSIS by positive modulation of JNK-PDX1/GLUT2 signaling was also confirmed. Accordingly, our study has confirmed that TCF2 positively modulates insulin secretion and further inhibits ROS generation via the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Our work may provide a new therapeutic target to achieve prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  8. Adsorption of aluminum and lead from wastewater by chitosan-tannic acid modified biopolymers: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamics and process mechanism.

    PubMed

    Badawi, M A; Negm, N A; Abou Kana, M T H; Hefni, H H; Abdel Moneem, M M

    2017-06-01

    Chitosan was reacted by tannic acid to obtain three modified chitosan biopolymer. Their chemical structures were characterized by FTIR and elemental analysis. The prepared biopolymers were used to adsorb Al(III) and Pb(II) metal ions from industrial wastewater. The factors affecting the adsorption process were biosorbent amount, initial concentration of metal ion and pH of the medium. The adsorption efficiency increased considerably with the increase of the biosorbent amount and pH of the medium. The adsorption process of biosorbent on different metal ions was fitted by Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption kinetics was followed Pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process occurred according to diffusion mechanism which was confirmed by the interparticle diffusion model. The modified biopolymers were efficient biosorbents for removal of Pb(II) and Al(III) metal ions from the medium.

  9. Specific catalysis of asparaginyl deamidation by carboxylic acids: kinetic, thermodynamic, and quantitative structure-property relationship analyses.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian D; Tran, Benjamin; Moore, Jamie M R; Sharma, Vikas K; Kosky, Andrew

    2014-04-07

    Asparaginyl (Asn) deamidation could lead to altered potency, safety, and/or pharmacokinetics of therapeutic protein drugs. In this study, we investigated the effects of several different carboxylic acids on Asn deamidation rates using an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb1*) and a model hexapeptide (peptide1) with the sequence YGKNGG. Thermodynamic analyses of the kinetics data revealed that higher deamidation rates are associated with predominantly more negative ΔS and, to a lesser extent, more positive ΔH. The observed differences in deamidation rates were attributed to the unique ability of each type of carboxylic acid to stabilize the energetically unfavorable transition-state conformations required for imide formation. Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) analysis using kinetic data demonstrated that molecular descriptors encoding for the geometric spatial distribution of atomic properties on various carboxylic acids are effective determinants for the deamidation reaction. Specifically, the number of O-O and O-H atom pairs on carboxyl and hydroxyl groups with interatomic distances of 4-5 Å on a carboxylic acid buffer appears to determine the rate of deamidation. Collectively, the results from structural and thermodynamic analyses indicate that carboxylic acids presumably form multiple hydrogen bonds and charge-charge interactions with the relevant deamidation site and provide alignment between the reactive atoms on the side chain and backbone. We propose that carboxylic acids catalyze deamidation by stabilizing a specific, energetically unfavorable transition-state conformation of l-asparaginyl intermediate II that readily facilitates bond formation between the γ-carbonyl carbon and the deprotonated backbone nitrogen for cyclic imide formation.

  10. [Effects of several low-molecular-weight organic acids on the release kinetic of endosulfan from red soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-hua; Wu, Yu; Jiang, Xin; Xia, Li-ling; Ni, Li-xiao

    2009-10-15

    The kinetic release behaviors of a-endosulfan from red soil with three kinds of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOA: oxalate, tartrate and citrate) solution and water leaching were investigated by kinetic device designed by ourselves and batch method. The results show that: the release percentage of endosulfan from red soil by tartrate and citrate solution (10 mmol/L) can increase by 7%-18% more than that by distilled water and oxalate solution, especially for tartrate solution. There is no significant difference between distilled water and oxalate solution for the release percentage of endosulfan (p > 0.05). There are two stages of quick and slow for the release of endosulfan from red soil, and the leaching speed is quicker especially for the initial 200 mL leaching solution. When using distilled water or oxalate solution as leaching solution, the best equations that described the kinetic release behavior of endosulfan from red soil were parabola diffuse equation and double constant equation, and weren't the apparent first dynamics equation that represented the simple surface diffusion mechanism. The kinetic release behavior of endosulfan in tartrate or citrate leaching system can be described by Elovich equation (R2 > 0.99, p < 0.0001), it implied that the simple surface diffusion mechanism is not the primary factor that effected the release of endosulfan, which three-dimensional molecule structure is complex, from red soil in aqueous phase leaching systems, and it maybe related to the outward diffuse mechanism from soil particle, activation and deactivation function of soil particles surface, the dissolution of soil mineral surface and structure change of inherent organic matter that coating onto the soil mineral surface induced by LMW organic acid. It suggested that the tartrate and citrate induced the complication of the release mechanisms of the pesticides from red soil.

  11. Nonoxidative Free Fatty Acid Disposal Is Greater in Young Women than Men

    PubMed Central

    Koutsari, Christina; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Khosla, Sundeep

    2011-01-01

    Context: Large increases in systemic free fatty acid (FFA) availability in the absence of a corresponding increase in fatty acid oxidation can create a host of metabolic abnormalities. These adverse responses are thought to be the result of fatty acids being shunted into hepatic very low-density lipoprotein-triglyceride production and/or intracellular lipid storage and signaling pathways because tissues are forced to increase nonoxidative FFA disposal. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine whether variations in postabsorptive nonoxidative FFA disposal within the usual range predict insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia. Design: We measured: systemic FFA turnover using a continuous iv infusion of [9–10, 3H]palmitate; substrate oxidation with indirect calorimetry combined with urinary nitrogen excretion; whole-body and peripheral insulin sensitivity with the labeled iv glucose tolerance test minimal model. Setting: the study was conducted at the Mayo Clinic General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Participants included healthy, postabsorptive, nonobese adults (21 women and 21 men). Interventions: There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measures: Nonoxidative FFA disposal (micromoles per minute), defined as the FFA disappearance rate minus fatty acid oxidation. Results: Women had 64% greater nonoxidative FFA disposal rate than men but a better lipid profile and similar insulin sensitivity. There was no significant correlation between nonoxidative FFA disposal and whole-body sensitivity, peripheral insulin sensitivity, or fasting serum triglyceride concentrations in men or women. Conclusions: Healthy nonobese women have greater rates of nonoxidative FFA disposal than men, but this does not appear to relate to adverse health consequences. Understanding the sex-specific interaction between adipose tissue lipolysis and peripheral FFA removal will help to discover new approaches to treat FFA-induced abnormalities. PMID:21123445

  12. Enhancement of L-lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by kinetic optimization and citrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Qian, He; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Efficient L-lactic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by Lactobacillus casei G-02 using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) in fed-batch culture is demonstrated. The kinetic analysis in the SSF signified that the inulinase activity was subjected to product inhibition, while the fermentation activity of G-02 was subjected to substrate inhibition. It was also found that the intracellularly NOX activity was enhanced by the citrate metabolism, which increased the carbon flux of Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway dramatically, and resulted more ATP production. As a result, when the SSF was carried out at 40 degrees after the initial hydrolysis of 1 h with supplemented sodium citrate of 10g/L, L-lactic acid concentration of 141.5 g/L was obtained in 30 h with a volumetric productivity of 4.7 g/L/h. The conversion efficiency and product yield were 93.6% of the theoretical lactic acid yield and 52.4 g lactic acid/100 g Jerusalem artichoke flour, respectively. Such a high concentration of lactic acid with high productivity from Jerusalem artichoke has not been reported previously, and hence G-02 could be a potential candidate for economical production of L-lactic acid from Jerusalem artichoke at a commercial scale.

  13. S-oxygenation of thiocarbamides IV: Kinetics of oxidation of tetramethylthiourea by aqueous bromine and acidic bromate.

    PubMed

    Ajibola, Risikat O; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2011-04-07

    The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of tetramethylthiourea (TTTU) by bromine and acidic bromate has been studied in aqueous media. The kinetics of reaction of bromate with TTTU was characterized by an induction period followed by formation of bromine. The reaction stoichiometry was determined to be 4BrO(3)(-) + 3(R)(2)C═S + 3H(2)O → 4Br(-) + 3(R)(2)C═O + 3SO(4)(2-) + 6H(+). For the reaction of TTTU with bromine, a 4:1 stoichiometric ratio of bromine to TTTU was obtained with 4Br(2) + (R)(2)C═S + 5H(2)O → 8Br(-) + SO(4)(2-) + (R)(2)C═O + 10H(+). The oxidation pathway went through the formation of tetramethythiourea sulfenic acid as evidenced by the electrospray ionization mass spectrum of the dynamic reaction solution. This S-oxide was then oxidized to produce tetramethylurea and sulfate as final products of reaction. There was no evidence for the formation of the sulfinic and sulfonic acids in the oxidation pathway. This implicates the sulfoxylate anion as a precursor to formation of sulfate. In aerobic conditions, this anion can unleash a series of genotoxic reactive oxygen species which can explain TTTU's observed toxicity. A bimolecular rate constant of 5.33 ± 0.32 M(-1) s(-1) for the direct reaction of TTTU with bromine was obtained.

  14. Enzymatic saccharification of acid pretreated corn stover: Empirical and fractal kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-11-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover was studied at agitation speeds from 50 to 500rpm in a stirred tank bioreactor, at high solid concentrations (20% w/w dry solid/suspension), 50°C and 15.5mgprotein·gglucane(-1). Two empirical kinetic models have been fitted to empirical data, namely: a potential model and a fractal one. For the former case, the global order dramatically decreases from 13 to 2 as agitation speed increases, suggesting an increment in the access of enzymes to cellulose in terms of chemisorption followed by hydrolysis. For its part, the fractal kinetic model fits better to data, showing its kinetic constant a constant augmentation with increasing agitation speed up to a constant value at 250rpm and above, when mass transfer limitations are overcome. In contrast, the fractal exponent decreases with rising agitation speed till circa 0.19, suggesting higher accessibility of enzymes to the substrate.

  15. Kinetics of 12-Hydroxyoctadecanoic Acid SAFiN Crystallization Rationalized Using Hansen Solubility Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Michael A; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2016-12-06

    Changes in solvent chemistry influenced kinetics of both nucleation and crystallization of 12-hydroxyoctadecenoic, as determined using differential scanning calorimetry and applying a modified Avrami model to the calorimetric data. Altering solvent properties influenced solvent-gelator compatibility, which in turn altered the chemical potential of the system at the onset of crystallization, the kinetics of gelation, and the resulting 12HOA crystal fiber length. The chemical potential at the onset of crystallization was linearly correlated to both the hydrogen-bonding Hansen solubility parameter and the solvent-gelator vectorial distance in Hansen space, Ra. Our work suggests that solvent properties can be modulated to affect the solubility of 12HOA, which in turn influences the kinetics of crystallization and the self-assembly of this organogelator into supramolecular crystalline structures. Therefore, modulation of solvent properties during organogelation can be used to control fiber length and thus engineer the physical properties of the gel.

  16. Conversion of hemicellulose sugars catalyzed by formic acid: kinetics of the dehydration of D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Dussan, Karla; Girisuta, Buana; Lopes, Marystela; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B

    2015-04-24

    The pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass produces a liquid stream of hemicellulose-based sugars, which can be further converted to high-value chemicals. Formosolv pulping and the Milox process use formic acid as the fractionating agent, which can be used as the catalyst for the valorisation of hemicellulose sugars to platform chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the reaction kinetics of major components in the hemicelluloses fraction of biomass, that is, D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-glucose. The kinetics experiments for each sugar were performed at temperatures between 130 and 170 °C in various formic acid concentrations (10-64 wt %). The implications of these kinetic models on the selectivity of each sugar to the desired products are discussed. The models were used to predict the reaction kinetics of solutions that resemble the liquid stream obtained from the fractionation process of biomass using formic acid.

  17. Design, synthesis and in vitro kinetic study of tranexamic acid prodrugs for the treatment of bleeding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Rafik; Ghareeb, Hiba; Dajani, Khuloud Kamal; Scrano, Laura; Hallak, Hussein; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Mecca, Gennaro; Bufo, Sabino A.

    2013-07-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of several maleamic acid amide derivatives four tranexamic acid prodrugs were designed. The DFT results on the acid catalyzed hydrolysis revealed that the reaction rate-limiting step is determined on the nature of the amine leaving group. When the amine leaving group was a primary amine or tranexamic acid moiety, the tetrahedral intermediate collapse was the rate-limiting step, whereas in the cases by which the amine leaving group was aciclovir or cefuroxime the rate-limiting step was the tetrahedral intermediate formation. The linear correlation between the calculated DFT and experimental rates for N-methylmaleamic acids 1- 7 provided a credible basis for designing tranexamic acid prodrugs that have the potential to release the parent drug in a sustained release fashion. For example, based on the calculated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) rates the predicted t1/2 (a time needed for 50 % of the prodrug to be converted into drug) values for tranexamic acid prodrugs ProD 1- ProD 4 at pH 2 were 556 h [50.5 h as calculated by B3LYP/311+G(d,p)] and 6.2 h as calculated by GGA: MPW1K), 253 h, 70 s and 1.7 h, respectively. Kinetic study on the interconversion of the newly synthesized tranexamic acid prodrug ProD 1 revealed that the t1/2 for its conversion to the parent drug was largely affected by the pH of the medium. The experimental t1/2 values in 1 N HCl, buffer pH 2 and buffer pH 5 were 54 min, 23.9 and 270 h, respectively.

  18. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  19. Kinetics and methane gas yields of selected C1 to C5 organic acids in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Chen, Qian; Guo, Jialiang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and other short-chain organic acids such as lactic and pyruvic acids are intermediates in anaerobic organic degradation. In this study, anaerobic degradation of seven organic acids in salt form was investigated, including formate (C1), acetate (C2), propionate (C3), pyruvate (C3), lactate (C3), butyrate (C4), and valerate (C5). Microbial growth kinetics on these organic acids were determined individually at 37 °C through batch anaerobic digestion tests by varying substrate concentrations from 250 to 4000 mg COD/L. The cumulative methane generation volume was determined real-time by respirometry coupled with gas chromatographic analysis while methane yield and related kinetics were calculated. The methane gas yields (fe, mg CH4 COD/mg substrate COD) from anaerobic degradation of formate, acetate, propionate, pyruvate, lactate, butyrate, and valerate were 0.44 ± 0.27, 0.58 ± 0.05, 0.53 ± 0.18, 0.24 ± 0.05, 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.43 ± 0.15, 0.49 ± 0.11, respectively. Anaerobic degradation of formate showed self-substrate inhibition at the concentrations above 3250 mg COD/L. Acetate, propionate, pyruvate, butyrate, lactate, and valerate did not inhibit methane production at the highest concentrations tested (i.e., 4000 mg COD/L). Microbes growing on acetate had the highest overall specific growth rate (0.30 d(-1)) in methane production. For comparison, the specific microbial growth rates on formate, propionate, pyruvate, butyrate, lactate, and valerate for methane production were 0.10, 0.06, 0.08, 0.07, 0.05, 0.15 d(-1), respectively.

  20. Inter- versus intra-molecular cyclization of tripeptides containing tetrahydrofuran amino acids: a density functional theory study on kinetic control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N V Suresh; Priyakumar, U Deva; Singh, Harjinder; Roy, Saumya; Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti

    2012-07-01

    Density functional B3LYP method was used to investigate the preference of intra- and inter-molecular cyclizations of linear tripeptides containing tetrahydrofuran amino acids. Two distinct model pathways were conceived for the cyclization reaction, and all possible transition states and intermediates were located. Analysis of the energetics indicate intermolecular cyclization being favored by both thermodynamic and kinetic control. Geometric and NBO analyses were performed to explain the trends obtained along both the reaction pathways. Conceptual density functional theory-based reactive indices also show that reaction pathways leading to intermolecular cyclization of the tripeptides are relatively more facile compared to intramolecular cyclization.

  1. Structure and kinetics of formation of interphase layers of synthetic fatty acid aluminum soap at the water/oil interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chalykh, A.E.; Matveev, V.V.; Mityuk, D.Y.; Shal't, S.Y.; Tarasevich, B.N.

    1986-02-01

    The authors investigate the kinetics of formation of interphase layers (IL) at the interface between the phases: a 0.15% solution of aluminum soap of synthetic fatty acids (SFA) (fraction C/sub 17/-C/sub 21/) in n-decane/distilled water. The structure and the morphological properties of IL were investigated by transmission electron spectroscopy. The electron micrographs of the interphase layer of the soap at different stages of its formation show that the formation of a new phase starts with the appearance of small dispersed particles with spherical and fibrillar shapes. The results obtained supplement the authors' concepts about the mechanism of spontaneous microemulsification.

  2. Catalytic synthesis of biodiesel from high free fatty acid-containing feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recyclable and reusable heterogeneous diarylammonium catalysts are highly effective in catalyzing the esterification of the free fatty acid (FFA) present in greases to methyl esters to reduce the FFA content from 12-40 wt% to 0.5 – 1 wt%. The resulting ester-glyceride mixture (pretreated grease) co...

  3. Functional genomics analysis of free fatty acid production under continuous phosphate limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Korosh, Travis C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-10-13

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are an attractive platform chemical that serves as a functional intermediate in metabolic pathways for producing oleochemicals. Many groups have established strains of Escherichia coli capable of producing various chain-length mixtures of FFA by heterologous expression of acyl-ACP thioesterases. For example, high levels of dodecanoic acid are produced by an E. coli strain expressing the Umbellularia californica FatB2 thioesterase, BTE. Prior studies achieved high dodecanoic acid yields and productivities under phosphate-limiting media conditions. In an effort to understand the metabolic and physiological changes that led to increased FFA production, the transcriptome of this strain was assessed as a function of nutrient limitation and growth rate. FFA generation under phosphate limitation led to consistent changes in transporter expression, osmoregulation, and central metabolism. Guided by these results, targeted knockouts led to a further ~11 % in yield in FFA.

  4. Ferrate promoted oxidative cleavage of sulfonamides: Kinetics and product formation under acidic conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonamide-based antibiotics are often detected in surface waters and secondary wastewater effluents and pose an eminent threat for the development of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes in aquatic environment. This paper presents the kinetics and stoichiometry of the oxid...

  5. Nitro-fatty acid reaction with glutathione and cysteine. Kinetic analysis of thiol alkylation by a Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura M S; Baker, Paul R S; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J; Fink, Mitchell; Woodcock, Steven R; Branchaud, Bruce P; Radi, Rafael; Freeman, Bruce A

    2007-10-19

    Fatty acid nitration by nitric oxide-derived species yields electrophilic products that adduct protein thiols, inducing changes in protein function and distribution. Nitro-fatty acid adducts of protein and reduced glutathione (GSH) are detected in healthy human blood. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses reveal that nitroalkene derivatives of oleic acid (OA-NO2) and linoleic acid (LNO2) rapidly react with GSH and Cys via Michael addition reaction. Rates of OA-NO2 and LNO2 reaction with GSH, determined via stopped flow spectrophotometry, displayed second-order rate constants of 183 M(-1)S(-1) and 355 M(-1)S(-1), respectively, at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C. These reaction rates are significantly greater than those for GSH reaction with hydrogen peroxide and non-nitrated electrophilic fatty acids including 8-iso-prostaglandin A2 and 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2. Increasing reaction pH from 7.4 to 8.9 enhanced apparent second-order rate constants for the thiol reaction with OA-NO2 and LNO2, showing dependence on the thiolate anion of GSH for reactivity. Rates of nitroalkene reaction with thiols decreased as the pKa of target thiols increased. Increasing concentrations of the detergent octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside decreased rates of nitroalkene reaction with GSH, indicating that the organization of nitro-fatty acids into micellar or membrane structures can limit Michael reactivity with more polar nucleophilic targets. In aggregate, these results reveal that the reversible adduction of thiols by nitro-fatty acids is a mechanism for reversible post-translational regulation of protein function by nitro-fatty acids.

  6. Kinetics of the esterification of active pharmaceutical ingredients containing carboxylic acid functionality in polyethylene glycol: formulation implications.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Moesgaard, Birthe; Østergaard, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are attractive as excipients in the manufacture of drug products because they are water soluble and poorly immunogenic. They are used in various pharmaceutical preparations. However, because of their terminal hydroxyl groups, PEGs can participate in esterification reactions. In this study, kinetics of two active pharmaceutical ingredients, cetirizine and indomethacin possessing carboxylic acid functionality, has been studied in PEG 400 and PEG 1000 at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C, and 80 °C. HPLC-UV was applied for the determination of concentrations in the kinetic studies, whereas HPLC-MS was used to identify reaction products. The esterification reactions were observed to be reversible. A second-order reversible kinetic model was applied and rate constants were determined. The rate constants demonstrated that cetirizine was esterified about 240 times faster than indomethacin at 80 °C. The shelf-life for cetirizine in a PEG 400 formulation at 25 °C expressed as t(95%) was predicted to be only 30 h. Further, rate constants for esterification of cetirizine in PEG 1000 in relation to PEG 400 decreased by a factor of 10, probably related to increased viscosity. However, it is important to be aware of this drug-excipient interaction, as it can reduce the shelf-life of a low-average molecular weight PEG formulation considerably.

  7. Adsorption Kinetics of Acid Orange 7 on Nano-CeO2-TiO2 in Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaozhen; Zhao, Bin; Gu, Mingjie; Li, Ruixing

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the application of nano-CeO2-TiO2 as a sorbent in wastewater treatment, CeO2-TiO2 powder was prepared by the solvothermal method and then characterized. The adsorption kinetics of the adsorption of acid orange 7 (AO7) on CeO2-TiO2 were investigated under various conditions, such as initial concentration, temperature, and pH of the AO7 solution. Kinetic analyses were conducted with both Lagergren pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models. The results showed that the CeO2-TiO2 powder was composed of cubic CeO2 and anatase TiO2 with a specific surface area of 140.42 m2 x g(-1). The adsorption capacity of AO7 on CeO2-TiO2 increased with increasing starting concentration of AO7, but decreased with increasing temperature. The most favorable pH range of the A07 solution was 3-8 for the adsorption of AO7 on CeO2-TiO2. The results revealed that the adsorption kinetics of AO7 on CeO2-TiO2 matched the pseudo-second order model very well. The results indicate that CeO2-TiO2 has a potential application in the removal of AO7 from wastewater.

  8. Accumulating Evidence Supports a Taste Component for Free Fatty Acids in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The requisite criteria for what constitutes a taste primary have not been established. Recent advances in understanding of the mechanisms and functions of taste have prompted suggestions for an expanded list of unique taste sensations, including fat, or more specifically, free fatty acids (FFA). A set of criteria are proposed here and the data related to FFA are reviewed on each point. It is concluded that the data are moderate to strong that there are: A) adaptive advantages to FFA detection in the oral cavity; B) adequate concentrations of FFA to serve as taste stimuli; C) multiple complimentary putative FFA receptors on taste cells; D) signals generated by FFA that are conveyed by gustatory nerves; E) sensations generated by FFA that can be detected and scaled by psychophysical methods in humans when non-gustatory cues are masked; and F) physiological responses to oral fat/FFA exposure. On no point is there strong evidence challenging these observations. The reviewed findings are suggestive, albeit not definitive, that there is a taste component for FFA. PMID:21557960

  9. Changes in the serum composition of free-fatty acids during an intravenous glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Soriguer, Federico; García-Serrano, Sara; García-Almeida, Jose M; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; García-Arnés, Juan; Tinahones, Francisco J; Cardona, Isabel; Rivas-Marín, Jose; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that measuring the free-fatty acids (FFA) during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) may provide information about the metabolic associations between serum FFA and carbohydrate and insulin metabolism. We evaluated the FFA profile during an IVGTT and determined whether this test changes the composition and concentration of FFA. An IVGTT was given to 38 severely obese persons before and 7 months after undergoing bariatric surgery and also to 12 healthy, nonobese persons. The concentration and composition of the FFA were studied at different times during the test. The concentration of FFA fell significantly faster during the IVGTT in the controls and in the severely obese persons with normal-fasting glucose (NFG) than in the severely obese persons with impaired-fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (P < 0.05). Significant differences were found in the time to minimum serum concentrations of FFA (control = NFG < IFG < T2DM) (P < 0.001). These variables improved after bariatric surgery in the three groups. The percentage of monounsaturated and n-6 polyunsaturated FFA in the control subjects and in the obese persons, both before and after surgery, decreased significantly during the IVGTT. In conclusion, during an IVGTT, severely obese persons with IFG or T2DM experienced a lower fall in the FFA than the severely obese persons with NFG and the controls, becoming normal after bariatric surgery.

  10. Bioremoval of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 by Pseudomonas putida and its adsorption isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arunarani, A; Chandran, Preethy; Ranganathan, B V; Vasanthi, N S; Sudheer Khan, S

    2013-02-01

    Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 are the most important group of synthetic colourants extensively used in textile industries for dyeing cotton, wool, silk and nylon. Release of these dye pollutants in to the environment adversely affects the human health and aquatic organisms. The present study we used Pseudomonas putida MTCC 4910 for the adsorptive removal of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 from the aqueous solutions. The pH (4-9) and NaCl concentrations (1mM-1M) did not influence the adsorption process. The equilibrium adsorption process fitted well to Freundlich model than Langmuir model. The kinetics of adsorption fitted well by pseudo-second-order. Thus in the present study an attempt has been made to exploit the dye removal capability of P. putida MTCC 4910, and it was found to be an efficient microbe that could be used for bio removal of dyes from textile effluents.

  11. Enantiodivergent Atroposelective Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation: Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keiji; Itakura, Tsubasa; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-09-12

    Reported herein is an enantiodivergent synthesis of chiral biaryls by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction. Upon treatment of biaryl lactols with aromatic amines and a Hantzsch ester in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving a reductive amination reaction proceeded smoothly to furnish both R and S isomers of chiral biaryls with excellent enantioselectivities by proper choice of hydroxyaniline derivative. This trend was observed in wide variety of substrates, and various chiral biphenyl and phenyl naphthyl adducts were synthesized with satisfactory enantioselectivities in enantiodivergent fashion. The enantiodivergent synthesis of synthetically challenging, chiral o-tetrasubstituted biaryls were also accomplished, and suggests high synthetic potential of the present method.

  12. Intestinal Dysbiosis Is Associated with Altered Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Serum-Free Fatty Acids in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; López, Patricia; Sánchez, Borja; González, Sonia; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Suárez, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic impairments are a frequent hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased serum levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are commonly found in these patients, although the underlying causes remain elusive. Recently, it has been suggested that factors other than inflammation or clinical features may be involved. The gut microbiota is known to influence the host metabolism, the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) playing a potential role. Taking into account that lupus patients exhibit an intestinal dysbiosis, we wondered whether altered FFA levels may be associated with the intestinal microbial composition in lupus patients. To this aim, total and specific serum FFA levels, fecal SCFA levels, and gut microbiota composition were determined in 21 SLE patients and 25 healthy individuals. The Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (F/B) ratio was strongly associated with serum FFA levels in healthy controls (HC), even after controlling for confounders. However, this association was not found in lupus patients, where a decreased F/B ratio and increased FFA serum levels were noted. An altered production of SCFA was related to the intestinal dysbiosis in lupus, while SCFA levels paralleled those of serum FFA in HC. Although a different serum FFA profile was not found in SLE, specific FFA showed distinct patterns on a principal component analysis. Immunomodulatory omega-3 FFA were positively correlated to the F/B ratio in HC, but not in SLE. Furthermore, divergent associations were observed for pro- and anti-inflammatory FFA with endothelial activation biomarkers in lupus patients. Overall, these findings support a link between the gut microbial ecology and the host metabolism in the pathological framework of SLE. A potential link between intestinal dysbiosis and surrogate markers of endothelial activation in lupus patients is supported, FFA species having a pivotal role. PMID:28167944

  13. Intestinal Dysbiosis Is Associated with Altered Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Serum-Free Fatty Acids in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; López, Patricia; Sánchez, Borja; González, Sonia; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Suárez, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic impairments are a frequent hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased serum levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are commonly found in these patients, although the underlying causes remain elusive. Recently, it has been suggested that factors other than inflammation or clinical features may be involved. The gut microbiota is known to influence the host metabolism, the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) playing a potential role. Taking into account that lupus patients exhibit an intestinal dysbiosis, we wondered whether altered FFA levels may be associated with the intestinal microbial composition in lupus patients. To this aim, total and specific serum FFA levels, fecal SCFA levels, and gut microbiota composition were determined in 21 SLE patients and 25 healthy individuals. The Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes (F/B) ratio was strongly associated with serum FFA levels in healthy controls (HC), even after controlling for confounders. However, this association was not found in lupus patients, where a decreased F/B ratio and increased FFA serum levels were noted. An altered production of SCFA was related to the intestinal dysbiosis in lupus, while SCFA levels paralleled those of serum FFA in HC. Although a different serum FFA profile was not found in SLE, specific FFA showed distinct patterns on a principal component analysis. Immunomodulatory omega-3 FFA were positively correlated to the F/B ratio in HC, but not in SLE. Furthermore, divergent associations were observed for pro- and anti-inflammatory FFA with endothelial activation biomarkers in lupus patients. Overall, these findings support a link between the gut microbial ecology and the host metabolism in the pathological framework of SLE. A potential link between intestinal dysbiosis and surrogate markers of endothelial activation in lupus patients is supported, FFA species having a pivotal role.

  14. Free Fatty Acid Receptors and Cancer: From Nutrition to Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2017-01-01

    The effects of fatty acids on cancer cells have been studied for decades. The roles of dietary long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and of microbiome-generated short-chain butyric acid, have been of particular interest over the years. However, the roles of free fatty acid receptors (FFARs) in mediating effects of fatty acids in tumor cells have only recently been examined. In reviewing the literature, the data obtained to date indicate that the long-chain FFARs (FFA1 and FFA4) play different roles than the short-chain FFARs (FFA2 and FFA3). Moreover, FFA1 and FFA4 can in some cases mediate opposing actions in the same cell type. Another conclusion is that different types of cancer cells respond differently to FFAR activation. Currently, the best-studied models are prostate, breast, and colon cancer. FFA1 and FFA4 agonists can inhibit proliferation and migration of prostate and breast cancer cells, but enhance growth of colon cancer cells. In contrast, FFA2 activation can in some cases inhibit proliferation of colon cancer cells. Although the available data are sometimes contradictory, there are several examples in which FFAR agonists inhibit proliferation of cancer cells. This is a unique response to GPCR activation that will benefit from a mechanistic explanation as the field progresses. The development of more selective FFAR agonists and antagonists, combined with gene knockout approaches, will be important for unraveling FFAR-mediated inhibitory effects. These inhibitory actions, mediated by druggable GPCRs, hold promise for cancer prevention and/or therapy.

  15. The influence of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and coumarin on flavonoid production by fungus Phellinus sp.: modeling of production kinetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Li, Le; Peterson, Eric Charles; Ruan, Tingting; Duan, Xiaoyi

    2015-11-01

    For the purpose of improving the fungal production of flavonoids, the influence of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and coumarin on flavonoid production by fungus Phellinus sp. P0988 was investigated by developing the corresponding kinetics of flavonoid production in a 7-L bioreactor. Phellinus sp. was confirmed to form flavonoids in pellets and broth when cultivated in basic medium, and the optimum concentration of NAA and coumarin in medium for flavonoid production were determined to be 0.03 and 0.02 g/L, respectively. The developed unstructured mathematical models were in good agreement with the experimental results with respect to flavonoid production kinetic profiles with NAA and coumarin supplementation at optimum levels and revealed significant accuracy in terms of statistical consistency and robustness. Analysis of these kinetic processes indicated that NAA and coumarin supplementations imposed a stronger positive influence on flavonoid production and substrate consumption compared to their effects on cell growth. The separate addition of NAA and coumarin resulted in enhancements in final product accumulation and productivity, achieving final flavonoid concentrations of 3.60 and 2.75 g/L, respectively, and glucose consumption showed a significant decrease compared to the non-supplemented control as well. Also, the separate presence of NAA and coumarin respectively decreased maintenance coefficients (M s) from 2.48 in the control to 1.39 and 0.22, representing decreases of 43.9 and 91.1 %, respectively. The current study is the first known application of mathematical kinetic models to explore the influence of medium components adding on flavonoid production by fungi.

  16. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  17. Adsorption of food dyes acid blue 9 and food yellow 3 onto chitosan: stirring rate effect in kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dotto, G L; Pinto, L A A

    2011-03-15

    Adsorption of food dyes acid blue 9 and food yellow 3 onto chitosan was studied. Stirring rate influence on kinetics and mechanism was verified. Infra-red analysis was carried out before and after adsorption in order to verify the adsorption nature. Adsorption experiments were carried out in batch systems with different stirring rates (15-400 rpm). Kinetic behavior was analyzed through the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. Adsorption mechanism was verified according to the film diffusion model and HSDM model. Pseudo-second-order and Elovich models were satisfactory in order to represent experimental data in all stirring rates. For both dyes, adsorption occurred by film and intraparticle diffusion, and the stirring rate increase caused a decrease in film diffusion resistance. Therefore, the film diffusivity increased the adsorption capacity and, consequently, intraparticle diffusivity increased. In all stirring rates, the rate-limiting step was film diffusion. Adsorption of acid blue 9 and food yellow 3 onto chitosan occurred by chemiosorption.

  18. Performance, kinetic, and biodegradation pathway evaluation of anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor in removing phthalic acid esters from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Ehsan; Yousefzadeh, Samira; Ansari, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Hamid Reza; Azari, Ali; Miri, Mohammad; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Kakavandi, Babak; Ahmadi, Peyman; Badi, Mojtaba Yegane; Gholami, Mitra; Sharafi, Kiomars; Karimaei, Mostafa; Ghoochani, Mahboobeh; Brahmand, Masoud Binesh; Mohseni, Seyed Mohsen; Sarkhosh, Maryam; Rezaei, Soheila; Asgharnia, Hosseinali; Dehghanifard, Emad; Jafari, Behdad; Mortezapour, Alireza; Moghaddam, Vahid Kazemi; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Molla; Taghipour, Nader

    2017-02-20

    Emerging and hazardous environmental pollutants like phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are one of the recent concerns worldwide. PAEs are considered to have diverse endocrine disrupting effects on human health. Industrial wastewater has been reported as an important environment with high concentrations of PAEs. In the present study, four short-chain PAEs including diallyl phthalate (DAP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and phthalic acid (PA) were selected as a substrate for anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor (AnFFFBR). The process performances of AnFFFBR, and also its kinetic behavior, were evaluated to find the best eco-friendly phthalate from the biodegradability point of view. According to the results and kinetic coefficients, removing and mineralizing of DMP occurred at a higher rate than other phthalates. In optimum conditions 92.5, 84.41, and 80.39% of DMP, COD, and TOC were removed. DAP was found as the most bio-refractory phthalate. The second-order (Grau) model was selected as the best model for describing phthalates removal.

  19. Performance, kinetic, and biodegradation pathway evaluation of anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor in removing phthalic acid esters from wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ehsan; Yousefzadeh, Samira; Ansari, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Hamid Reza; Azari, Ali; Miri, Mohammad; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Kakavandi, Babak; Ahmadi, Peyman; Badi, Mojtaba Yegane; Gholami, Mitra; Sharafi, Kiomars; Karimaei, Mostafa; Ghoochani, Mahboobeh; Brahmand, Masoud Binesh; Mohseni, Seyed Mohsen; Sarkhosh, Maryam; Rezaei, Soheila; Asgharnia, Hosseinali; Dehghanifard, Emad; Jafari, Behdad; Mortezapour, Alireza; Moghaddam, Vahid Kazemi; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Molla; Taghipour, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Emerging and hazardous environmental pollutants like phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are one of the recent concerns worldwide. PAEs are considered to have diverse endocrine disrupting effects on human health. Industrial wastewater has been reported as an important environment with high concentrations of PAEs. In the present study, four short-chain PAEs including diallyl phthalate (DAP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and phthalic acid (PA) were selected as a substrate for anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor (AnFFFBR). The process performances of AnFFFBR, and also its kinetic behavior, were evaluated to find the best eco-friendly phthalate from the biodegradability point of view. According to the results and kinetic coefficients, removing and mineralizing of DMP occurred at a higher rate than other phthalates. In optimum conditions 92.5, 84.41, and 80.39% of DMP, COD, and TOC were removed. DAP was found as the most bio-refractory phthalate. The second-order (Grau) model was selected as the best model for describing phthalates removal. PMID:28216654

  20. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26796668

  1. Performance, kinetic, and biodegradation pathway evaluation of anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor in removing phthalic acid esters from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Ehsan; Yousefzadeh, Samira; Ansari, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Hamid Reza; Azari, Ali; Miri, Mohammad; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Kakavandi, Babak; Ahmadi, Peyman; Badi, Mojtaba Yegane; Gholami, Mitra; Sharafi, Kiomars; Karimaei, Mostafa; Ghoochani, Mahboobeh; Brahmand, Masoud Binesh; Mohseni, Seyed Mohsen; Sarkhosh, Maryam; Rezaei, Soheila; Asgharnia, Hosseinali; Dehghanifard, Emad; Jafari, Behdad; Mortezapour, Alireza; Moghaddam, Vahid Kazemi; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Molla; Taghipour, Nader

    2017-02-01

    Emerging and hazardous environmental pollutants like phthalic acid esters (PAEs) are one of the recent concerns worldwide. PAEs are considered to have diverse endocrine disrupting effects on human health. Industrial wastewater has been reported as an important environment with high concentrations of PAEs. In the present study, four short-chain PAEs including diallyl phthalate (DAP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and phthalic acid (PA) were selected as a substrate for anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactor (AnFFFBR). The process performances of AnFFFBR, and also its kinetic behavior, were evaluated to find the best eco-friendly phthalate from the biodegradability point of view. According to the results and kinetic coefficients, removing and mineralizing of DMP occurred at a higher rate than other phthalates. In optimum conditions 92.5, 84.41, and 80.39% of DMP, COD, and TOC were removed. DAP was found as the most bio-refractory phthalate. The second-order (Grau) model was selected as the best model for describing phthalates removal.

  2. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  3. Kinetics of eicosapentaenoic acid in brain, heart and liver of conscious rats fed a high n-3 PUFA containing diet.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Miki; Chang, Lisa; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2013-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), a precursor of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may benefit cardiovascular and brain health. Quantifying EPA's in vivo kinetics might elucidate these effects. [1-(14)C]EPA was infused i.v. for 5min in unanesthetized male rats fed a standard EPA-DHA diet. Plasma and microwaved tissue were analyzed. Kinetic parameters were calculated using our compartmental model. At 5min, 31-48% of labeled EPA in brain and heart was oxidized, 7% in liver. EPA incorporation rates from brain and liver precursor EPA-CoA pools into lipids, mainly phospholipids, were 36 and 2529nmol/s/g×10(-4), insignificant for heart. Deacylation-reacylation half-lives were 22h and 38-128min. Conversion rates to DHA equaled 0.65 and 25.1nmol/s/g×10(-4), respectively. The low brain concentration and incorporation rate and high oxidation of EPA suggest that, if EPA has a beneficial effect in brain, it might result from its suppression of peripheral inflammation and hepatic conversion to bioactive DHA.

  4. Kinetics and Mechanisms of the Acid-base Reaction Between NH3 and HCOOH in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Jennifer B.; Öberg, Karin I.; Rajappan, Mahesh; Fayolle, Edith C.

    2016-10-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules are commonly observed during star formation, and are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Reactions between ions and neutral molecules in ices may provide an alternative cold channel to complexity, as ion-neutral reactions are thought to have low or even no-energy barriers. Here we present a study of the kinetics and mechanisms of a potential ion-generating, acid-base reaction between NH3 and HCOOH to form the salt NH{}4+HCOO-. We observe salt growth at temperatures as low as 15 K, indicating that this reaction is feasible in cold environments. The kinetics of salt growth are best fit by a two-step model involving a slow “pre-reaction” step followed by a fast reaction step. The reaction energy barrier is determined to be 70 ± 30 K with a pre-exponential factor 1.4 ± 0.4 × 10-3 s-1. The pre-reaction rate varies under different experimental conditions and likely represents a combination of diffusion and orientation of reactant molecules. For a diffusion-limited case, the pre-reaction barrier is 770 ± 110 K with a pre-exponential factor of ˜7.6 × 10-3 s-1. Acid-base chemistry of common ice constituents is thus a potential cold pathway to generating ions in interstellar ices.

  5. Beyond the FFA: The Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobes in Face Processing

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jessica A.; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has supported the existence of a specialized face-processing network that is distinct from the visual processing areas used for general object recognition. The majority of this work has been aimed at characterizing the response properties of the fusiform face area (FFA) and the occipital face area (OFA), which together are thought to constitute the core network of brain areas responsible for facial identification. Although accruing evidence has shown that face-selective patches in the ventral anterior temporal lobes (vATLs) are interconnected with the FFA and OFA, and that they play a role in facial identification, the relative contribution of these brain areas to the core face-processing network has remained unarticulated. Here we review recent research critically implicating the vATLs in face perception and memory. We propose that current models of face processing should be revised such that the ventral anterior temporal lobes serve a centralized role in the visual face-processing network. We speculate that a hierarchically organized system of face processing areas extends bilaterally from the inferior occipital gyri to the vATLs, with facial representations becoming increasingly complex and abstracted from low-level perceptual features as they move forward along this network. The anterior temporal face areas may serve as the apex of this hierarchy, instantiating the final stages of face recognition. We further argue that the anterior temporal face areas are ideally suited to serve as an interface between face perception and face memory, linking perceptual representations of individual identity with person-specific semantic knowledge. PMID:24937188

  6. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  7. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  8. The kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Kochergin, B. A.; Antina, E. V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of a comparative study of the oxidation of bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and their mixture in aqueous solutions under the action of air oxygen and hydrogen peroxide are presented. The observed and true rate constants for the oxidation reactions were determined. It was shown that the oxidation of tetrapyrrole pigment occurred under these conditions bypassing the stage of biliverdin formation to monopyrrole products. Simultaneous oxidation of bilirubin and ascorbic acid was shown to be accompanied by the inhibition of ascorbic acid oxidation by bilirubin, whereas ascorbic acid itself activated the oxidation of bilirubin.

  9. Oxidation of psychotropic drugs by Chloramine-T in acid medium: a kinetic study using spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, R. J. D.; Ananda, S.; Venkatesha, B. M.; Made Gowda, N. M.

    2002-03-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of psychotropic drugs, chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPH) and fluphenazine dihydrochloride (FPH), by Chloramine-T (CAT) in pH 1.6 buffer medium has been studied spectrophotometrically at λmax=570 and 530 nm, respectively, at 30°C. The reaction rate shows a fractional-order dependence on [CAT] and first-order dependence on each [substrate]. The reaction rate also shows an inverse fractional-order in [H +]. Additions of halide ions and the reduction product of CAT, p-toluenesulfonamide, and variation of ionic strength and dielectric constant of the medium do not have any significant effect on the reaction rate. The activation parameters for the reaction were evaluated. The proposed general mechanism and the derived rate law are consistent with the observed kinetics.

  10. Modulating Membrane Composition Alters Free Fatty Acid Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M.; Pfleger, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial synthesis of free fatty acids (FFA) is a promising strategy for converting renewable sugars to advanced biofuels and oleochemicals. Unfortunately, FFA production negatively impacts membrane integrity and cell viability in Escherichia coli, the dominant host in which FFA production has been studied. These negative effects provide a selective pressure against FFA production that could lead to genetic instability at industrial scale. In prior work, an engineered E. coli strain harboring an expression plasmid for the Umbellularia californica acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase was shown to have highly elevated levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. The change in membrane content was hypothesized to be one underlying cause of the negative physiological effects associated with FFA production. In this work, a connection between the regulator of unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in E. coli, FabR, thioesterase expression, and unsaturated membrane content was established. A strategy for restoring normal membrane saturation levels and increasing tolerance towards endogenous production of FFAs was implemented by modulating acyl-ACP pools with a second thioesterase (from Geobacillus sp. Y412MC10) that primarily targets medium chain length, unsaturated acyl-ACPs. The strategy succeeded in restoring membrane content and improving viability in FFA producing E. coli while maintaining FFA titers. However, the restored fitness did not increase FFA productivity, indicating the existence of additional metabolic or regulatory barriers. PMID:23349781

  11. Modulating membrane composition alters free fatty acid tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lennen, Rebecca M; Pfleger, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Microbial synthesis of free fatty acids (FFA) is a promising strategy for converting renewable sugars to advanced biofuels and oleochemicals. Unfortunately, FFA production negatively impacts membrane integrity and cell viability in Escherichia coli, the dominant host in which FFA production has been studied. These negative effects provide a selective pressure against FFA production that could lead to genetic instability at industrial scale. In prior work, an engineered E. coli strain harboring an expression plasmid for the Umbellularia californica acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase was shown to have highly elevated levels of unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membrane. The change in membrane content was hypothesized to be one underlying cause of the negative physiological effects associated with FFA production. In this work, a connection between the regulator of unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in E. coli, FabR, thioesterase expression, and unsaturated membrane content was established. A strategy for restoring normal membrane saturation levels and increasing tolerance towards endogenous production of FFAs was implemented by modulating acyl-ACP pools with a second thioesterase (from Geobacillus sp. Y412MC10) that primarily targets medium chain length, unsaturated acyl-ACPs. The strategy succeeded in restoring membrane content and improving viability in FFA producing E. coli while maintaining FFA titers. However, the restored fitness did not increase FFA productivity, indicating the existence of additional metabolic or regulatory barriers.

  12. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with (/sup 14/C)taurocholate

    SciTech Connect

    Jazrawi, R.P.; Ferraris, R.; Bridges, C.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-07-01

    The apparent fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75-SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ((14C)CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75-SeHCAT than for (14C)CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75-SeHCAT than for (14C)CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function.

  13. Yield and kinetic constants estimation in the production of hydroxy fatty acids from oleic acid in a bioreactor by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 42A2.

    PubMed

    Martin-Arjol, Ignacio; Llacuna, Joan Llorens; Manresa, Angeles

    2014-12-01

    We modelled the production of hydroxy fatty acids from oleic acid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 42A2 in a bioreactor with a non-dispersive aeration system. First, we designed an adapted wetted-wall gas-absorption column, offering a k La value of 39.9 h(-1), to enhance oxygen absorption in the culture media and prevent foam formation. Then, we analysed different kinetic models to simulate the yield coefficients and the kinetic constants in this bacterial transformation. Monod model fitting (μ max1 = 0.51 h(-1), K S1 = 1.60 C-mol l(-1), μ max2 = 0.12 h(-1), K S2 = 0.035 C-mol l(-1), and k 2 = 0.033 h(-1)) showed a good accuracy with the experimental data sets and was chosen for its simplicity. Lastly, mass balances were carried out to establish the stoichiometry of this biotransformation with the following yield coefficients, Υ X/OA, Υ X/(10S)-HPOME and Υ (10S)-HPOME/(7S10S)-HPOME of 0.172, 0.347 and 2.388 C-mol C-mol(-1), respectively.

  14. Modeling of free fatty acid dynamics: insulin and nicotinic acid resistance under acute and chronic treatments.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robert; Kroon, Tobias; Almquist, Joachim; Jirstrand, Mats; Oakes, Nicholas D; Evans, Neil D; Chappel, Michael J; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2017-02-21

    Nicotinic acid (NiAc) is a potent inhibitor of adipose tissue lipolysis. Acute administration results in a rapid reduction of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. Sustained NiAc exposure is associated with tolerance development (drug resistance) and complete adaptation (FFA returning to pretreatment levels). We conducted a meta-analysis on a rich pre-clinical data set of the NiAc-FFA interaction to establish the acute and chronic exposure-response relations from a macro perspective. The data were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects framework. We also developed a new turnover model that describes the adaptation seen in plasma FFA concentrations in lean Sprague-Dawley and obese Zucker rats following acute and chronic NiAc exposure. The adaptive mechanisms within the system were described using integral control systems and dynamic efficacies in the traditional [Formula: see text] model. Insulin was incorporated in parallel with NiAc as the main endogenous co-variate of FFA dynamics. The model captured profound insulin resistance and complete drug resistance in obese rats. The efficacy of NiAc as an inhibitor of FFA release went from 1 to approximately 0 during sustained exposure in obese rats. The potency of NiAc as an inhibitor of insulin and of FFA release was estimated to be 0.338 and 0.436 [Formula: see text], respectively, in obese rats. A range of dosing regimens was analyzed and predictions made for optimizing NiAc delivery to minimize FFA exposure. Given the exposure levels of the experiments, the importance of washout periods in-between NiAc infusions was illustrated. The washout periods should be [Formula: see text]2 h longer than the infusions in order to optimize 24 h lowering of FFA in rats. However, the predicted concentration-response relationships suggests that higher AUC reductions might be attained at lower NiAc exposures.

  15. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of acid Orange 52 dye biosorption by Paulownia tomentosa Steud. leaf powder as a low-cost natural biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih; Saygideger, Saadet D

    2010-07-01

    The biosorption of Acid Orange 52 onto the leaf powder of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied in a batch adsorption system to estimate the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as a function of solution pH, biosorbent concentration, dye concentration, biosorbent size, temperature and contact time. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for modeling the biosorption equilibrium. The experimental equilibrium data could be well interpreted by the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms with maximum adsorption capacity of 10.5 mg g(-1). In order to state the sorption kinetics, the fits of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were investigated. It was obtained that the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second order rate kinetics. Thermodynamic studies indicated that this system was exothermic process. The results revealed that P. tomentosa leaf powder could be an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of wastewater containing Acid Orange 52.

  16. An Examination of Middle School Enrollment in Agricultural Education and Membership in the National FFA Organization in the United States. Summary of Research 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Rosemarie; And Others

    The status of middle and junior high school agricultural education and Future Farmers of America (FFA) programs in the United States was the focus of a study. Data were collected through a census of the FFA executive secretaries and a survey of a purposive sample of 27 successful middle or junior high school agricultural education programs in 9…

  17. Factors Related to the Success of New Mexico Vocational Agriculture Teachers as FFA Advisors. Summary of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Paul R.; Bender, Ralph E.

    This study was designed to (1) identify competencies in which a New Mexico vocational agriculture teacher's perceived level of proficiency was related to the degree of success of his Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapter, (2) identify characteristics possessed by New Mexico vocational agriculture teachers which showed a significant relationship…

  18. Synthesis of β- and γ-hydroxy α-amino acids via enzymatic kinetic resolution and cyanate-to-isocyanate rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Szcześniak, Piotr; Październiok-Holewa, Agnieszka; Klimczak, Urszula; Stecko, Sebastian

    2014-12-05

    A new strategy for stereoselective preparation of all four isomers of β- and γ-hydroxy α-amino acids is presented. The developed procedure is based on enzymatic kinetic resolution and cyanate-to-isocyanate rearrangement as key steps. Stereocontrol is achieved by proper choice of the starting hydroxyacid, the course of kinetic resolution, and the stereospecific sigmatropic rearrangement step, which proceeds with full chirality transfer.

  19. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  20. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bioactivation via S-Oxygenation of Anti-Tubercular Agent Ethionamide by Peracetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Logan, Isabelle E; Eskew, Matthew W; Omondi, Benard; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-10-11

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of the important antitubercular agent, ethionamide, ETA (2-ethylthioisonicotinamide), by peracetic acid (PAA) have been studied. It is effectively a biphasic reaction with an initial rapid first phase of the reaction which is over in about 5 s and a second slower phase of the reaction which can run up to an hour. The first phase involves the addition of a single oxygen atom to ethionamide to form the S-oxide. The second phase involves further oxidation of the S-oxide to desulfurization of ETA to give 2-ethylisonicotinamide. In contrast to the stability of most organosulfur compounds, the S-oxide of ETA is relatively stable and can be isolated. In conditions of excess ETA, the stoichiometry of the reaction was strictly 1:1: CH3CO3H + Et(C5H4)C(═S)NH2 → CH3CO2H + Et(C5H4)C(═NH)SOH. In this oxidation, it was apparent that only the sulfur center was the reactive site. Though ETA was ultimately desulfurized, only the S-oxide was stable. Electrospray ionization (ESI) spectral analysis did not detect any substantial formation of the sulfinic and sulfonic acids. This suggests that cleavage of the carbon-sulfur bond occurs at the sulfenic acid stage, resulting in the formation of an unstable sulfur species that can react further to form more stable sulfur species. In this oxidation, no sulfate formation was observed. ESI spectral analysis data showed a final sulfur species in the form of a dimeric sulfur monoxide species, H3S2O2. We derived a bimolecular rate constant for the formation of the S-oxide of (3.08 ± 0.72) × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1). Oxidation of the S-oxide further to give 2-ethylisonicotinamide gave zero order kinetics.

  1. Reaction of isoprene on thin sulfuric acid films: kinetics, uptake, and product analysis.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Brandon M; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-06-15

    A high vacuum Knudsen flow reactor was used to determine the reactive uptake coefficient, gamma, of isoprene on sulfuric acid films as a function of sulfuric acid weight percent, temperature, and relative humidity. No discernible dependence was observed for gamma over the range of temperatures (220 - 265 K) and pressures (10(-7) Torr -10(-4) Torr) studied. However, the uptake coefficient increased with increased sulfuric acid concentration between the range of 78 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-4)) and 93 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-3)). In addition to the Knudsen Cell, a bulk study was conducted between 60 and 85 wt % H(2)SO(4) to quantify uptake at lower acid concentrations and to determine reaction products. After exposing sulfuric acid to gaseous isoprene the condensed phase products were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Isoprene was observed to polymerize in the sulfuric acid and form yellow/red colored monoterpenes and cyclic sesquiterpenes. Finally, addition of water to the 85 wt % sulfuric acid/isoprene product mixture released these terpenes from the condensed phase into the gas phase. Together these experiments imply that direct isoprene uptake will not produce significant SOA; however, terpene production from the small uptake may be relevant for ultrafine particles and could affect growth and nucleation.

  2. GPR40/FFA1 and Neutral Sphingomyelinase Are Involved in Palmitate-Boosted Inflammatory Response of Microvascular Endothelial Cells to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongyang; Li, Yanchun; Jin, Junfei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Increased levels of both saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are associated with type 2 diabetes. However, it remains largely unknown how SFAs interact with LPS to regulate inflammatory responses in microvascular endothelial cells (MIC ECs) that are critically involved in atherosclerosis as a diabetic complication. In this study, we compared the effects of LPS, palmitic acid (PA), the most abundant saturated fatty acid, or the combination of LPS and PA on interleukin (IL)-6 expression by MIC ECs and explored the underlying mechanisms. Methods Human cardiac MIC ECs were treated with LPS, PA and LPS plus PA and the regulatory pathways including receptors, signal transduction, transcription and post-transcription, and sphingolipid metabolism for IL-6 expression were investigated. Results G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)40 or free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1), but not toll-like receptor 4, was involved in PA-stimulated IL-6 expression. PA not only stimulated IL-6 expression by itself, but also remarkably enhanced LPS-stimulated IL-6 expression via a cooperative stimulation on mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways, and both transcriptional and post-transcriptional activation. Furthermore, PA induced a robust neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase)-mediated sphingomyelin hydrolysis that was involved in PA-augmented IL-6 upregulation. Conclusion PA boosted inflammatory response of microvascular endothelial cells to LPS via GPR40 and nSMase. PMID:25795558

  3. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, June 1991--November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 {mu}M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 {mu}M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K{sub i} for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  4. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. McInerney

    1996-06-24

    The factors that affect the rate and extent of a model aromatic compound, benzoate, in methanogenic environments was studied. Benzoate is degraded to a threshold concentration below which no further substrate degradation occurs. The threshold concentration depended on the substrate concentration and the amount of acetate present. The threshold value was not a function of the kinetic ability of the organism or toxicity of the end products. Rather a minimal Gibb's free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. In addition, new bacterial species were isolated and described, that degrade benzoate or reduce iron, cobalt and other metals.

  5. THE KINETICS OF SAPONIFICATION OF IODOACETIC ACID BY SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND BY CERTAIN ALKALINE BUFFER SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    Brdicka, R

    1936-07-20

    1. The rate of the saponification of iodoacetic acid in sodium hydroxide and alkaline buffer solutions yielding glycollic acid was measured by means of Heyrovský's polarographic method. 2. From the bimolecular velocity constants, increasing with the ionic strength of the solution, the Brönsted factor, F, which characterizes the primary salt effect, was calculated. 3. In the borate buffer solutions the monomolecular constants of the saponification were determined which, at values above the pH of neutralization of boric acid, show a proportionality to the concentration of hydroxyl anions. Below the pH of neutralization of boric acid, they are proportional to the concentration of borate anions.

  6. Transport of fluorescent bile acids by the isolated perfused rat liver: kinetics, sequestration, and mobilization.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, F; Schteingart, C D; Ton-Nu, H T; Cerrè, C; Steinbach, J H; Yeh, H Z; Hofmann, A F

    1998-08-01

    Hepatocyte transport of six fluorescent bile acids containing nitrobenzoxadiazolyl (NBD) or a fluorescein derivative on the side chain was compared with that of natural bile acids using the single-pass perfused rat liver. Compounds were infused at 40 nmol/g liver min for 15 minutes; hepatic uptake and biliary recovery were measured; fractional extraction, intrinsic basolateral clearance, and sequestration (nonrecovery after 45 minutes of additional perfusion) were calculated. Fluorescent bile acids were efficiently extracted during the first 3 minutes (70%-97%), but net extraction decreased with time mostly because of regurgitation into the perfusate. For cholylglycine and ursodeoxycholylglycine (UDC-glycine), extraction was 94% to 99%, and regurgitation did not occur. Intrinsic hepatic clearance of fluorescent bile acids (2-7 mL/g liver x min) was lower than that of cholylglycine (9.0 +/- 0.6; mean +/- SD) and UDC-glycine (21.4 +/- 0.4). Sequestration at 60 minutes was 8% to 26% for fluorescent bile acids with a cholyl moiety (cholylglycylaminofluorescein [CGamF], cholyllysylfluorescein [C-L-F], cholyl-[N epsilon-NBD]-lysine [C-L-NBD], and cholylaminofluorescein [CamF]), 32% for ursodeoxycholylaminofluorescein (UDCamF), and 88% for ursodeoxycholyl-(N epsilon-NBD)lysine (UDC-L-NBD). Cholylglycine and UDC-glycine had <3% retention. Biliary secretion of sequestered UDCamF, but not of UDC-L-NBD, was induced by adding dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (DBcAMP) to the perfusate, possibly by translocation to the canaliculus of pericanalicular vesicles containing fluorescent bile acids. Biliary secretion of UDC-L-NBD, but not of UDCamF, was induced by adding cholyltaurine or UDC-taurine, possibly by inhibition of binding to intracellular constituents or of transport into organelles. It is concluded that fluorescent bile acids are efficiently transported across the basolateral membrane, but in contrast to natural conjugated bile acids, are sequestered in the

  7. Kinetics and toxic effects of repeated intravenous dosage of formic acid in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Liesivuori, J.; Kosma, V. M.; Naukkarinen, A.; Savolainen, H.

    1987-01-01

    Adult male rabbits were injected i.v. with 100 mg buffered formic acid per kg body weight daily for 5 days with 24 h between the doses. The fifth dose was labelled with 14C-formic acid. Rabbits were killed 1, 2 and 20 h after the last injection. The highest formic acid concentrations were found one hour after the fifth dose. Total formic acid concentrations were always higher than radiometrically measured. The maximum concentrations of formic acid in brain, heart, kidney and liver were roughly similar to the concentration which inhibits half of the cytochrome oxidase activity in vitro. Histological studies clearly demonstrated the histotoxic changes at cellular level. Calcium deposits were detected in all organs of the injected rabbits. They were absent in control animals. It seems that the formic acid metabolism is slow and that it may cause sufficient hypoxic acidosis to allow the calcium influx and cellular damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3426949

  8. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution by nitric-acid treated water-hyacinth.

    PubMed

    El-Khaiary, Mohammad I

    2007-08-17

    Kinetics adsorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of a cationic dye (methylene blue, MB) onto nitric-acid treated water-hyacinth (N-WH). Results showed that N-WH can remove MB effectively from aqueous solution. The loading of MB onto N-WH was found to increase significantly with increasing the initial MB concentration, but the residual concentration of MB in solution also increased. A complete removal of MB from solution was only achieved at the lower range of initial MB concentration (less than 286 mg/L). Temperature had a slight effect on the amount adsorbed at equilibrium. The adsorption rate was fast and more than half of the adsorbed-MB was removed in the first 15 min at room temperature, which makes the process practical for industrial application. The adsorption kinetics at room temperature could be expressed by the pseudo second order model, while at higher temperatures (45-80 degrees C) and low MB concentration (97 mg/L) both Lagergren's model and the pseudo second order model can be used to predict the kinetics of adsorption. The overall rate of dye uptake was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at the beginning of adsorption, then gradually changed to intraparticle diffusion control at a later stage. The initial period where external mass transfer is the rate controlling step was found to increase with increasing initial MB concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The increase in temperature was also found to increase the rate of adsorption and reduce the time required to reach equilibrium. The initial rate of adsorption, h(o), was calculated, it was found to increase with increasing temperature, while the increase in MB concentration decreased h(o) at the lower concentration range then increased h(o) again at high concentration. The value of the activation coefficient, E, was found to be 8.207 kJ/mol, which indicates a diffusion controlled process.

  10. The Effect of Oxygen Supply on the Dual Growth Kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under Acidic Conditions for Biogas Desulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%–6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration. PMID:25633028

  11. Theoretical analysis of kinetic isotope effects on proton transfer reactions between substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes and substituted acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Richard, John P; Gao, Jiali

    2009-10-07

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on a series of carboxylic acid-catalyzed protonation reactions of aryl-substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes (X-1) to form oxocarbenium ions have been computed using the second-order Kleinert variational perturbation theory (KP2) in the framework of Feynman path integrals (PI) along with the potential energy surface obtained at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained, demonstrating that this novel computational approach for computing KIEs of organic reactions is a viable alternative to the traditional method employing Bigeleisen equation and harmonic vibrational frequencies. Although tunneling makes relatively small contributions to the lowering of the free energy barriers for the carboxylic acid catalyzed protonation reaction, it is necessary to include tunneling contributions to obtain quantitative estimates of the KIEs. Consideration of anharmonicity can further improve the calculated KIEs for the protonation of substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes by chloroacetic acid, but for the reactions of the parent and 4-NO(2) substituted alpha-methoxystyrene with substituted carboxylic acids, the correction of anharmonicity overestimates the computed KIEs for strong acid catalysts. In agreement with experimental findings, the largest KIEs are found in nearly ergoneutral reactions, DeltaG(o) approximately 0, where the transition structures are nearly symmetric and the reaction barriers are relatively low. Furthermore, the optimized transition structures are strongly dependent on the free energy for the formation of the carbocation intermediate, that is, the driving force DeltaG(o), along with a good correlation of Hammond shift in the transition state structure.

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Kinetic Isotope Effects on Proton Transfer Reactions between Substituted α-Methoxystyrenes and Substituted Acetic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Yiu; Richard, John P.; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on a series of carboxylic acid-catalyzed protonation reactions of aryl-substituted α-methoxystyrenes (X-1) to form oxocarbenium ions have been computed using the Kleinert variational second-order perturbation theory (KP2) in the framework of Feynman path integrals (PI) along with the potential energy surface obtained at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained, demonstrating that this novel computational approach for computing KIEs of organic reactions is a viable alternative to the traditional method employing Bigeleisen equation and harmonic vibrational frequencies. Although tunneling makes relative small contributions to the lowering of the free energy barriers for the carboxylic acid catalyzed protonation reaction, it is necessary to include tunneling contributions to obtain quantitative estimates of the KIEs. Consideration of anharmonicity can further improve the calculated KIEs for the protonation of substituted α-methoxystyrenes by chloroacetic acid, but for the reactions of the parent and 4-NO2 substituted α-methoxystyrene with substituted carboxylic acids, the correction of anharmonicity overestimates the computed KIEs for strong acid catalysts. In agreement with experimental findings, the largest KIEs are found in nearly ergoneutral reactions, ΔGo ≈ 0, where the transition structures are nearly symmetric and the reaction barriers are relatively low. Furthermore, the optimized transition structures are strongly dependent on the free energy for the formation of the carbocation intermediate, i.e., the driving force ΔGo, along with a good correlation of Hammond shift in the transition state structure. PMID:19754046

  13. Study of photo-oxidative reactivity of sunscreening agents based on photo-oxidation of uric acid by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Moradmand Jalali, Hamed; Bashiri, Hadis; Rasa, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the mechanism of free radical production by light-reflective agents in sunscreens (TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2) was obtained by applying kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The values of the rate constants for each step of the suggested mechanism have been obtained by simulation. The effect of the initial concentration of mineral oxides and uric acid on the rate of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of some sun care agents has been studied. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental data for the production of free radicals by sun care agents.

  14. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal

    PubMed Central

    Badescu, George O.; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Napier, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA. PMID:27023768

  15. A kinetic study of plutonium dioxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid using iron (II) as an electron transfer catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Effective dissolution of plutonium dioxide has traditionally been accomplished by contact with strong nitric acid containing a small amount of fluoride at temperatures of {approximately} 100 C. In spite of these aggressive conditions, PuO{sub 2} dissolution is sometimes incomplete requiring additional contact with the solvent. This work focused on an alternative to conventional dissolution in nitric acid where an electron transfer catalyst, Fe(II), was used in hydrochloric acid. Cyclic voltammetry was employed as an in-situ analytical technique for monitoring the dissolution reaction rate. The plutonium oxide selected for this study was decomposed plutonium oxalate with > 95% of the material having a particle diameter (< 70 {micro}m) as determined by a scanning laser microscopy technique. Attempts to dry sieve the oxide into narrow size fractions prior to dissolution in the HCl-Fe(II) solvent system failed, apparently due to significant interparticle attractive forces. Although sieve splits were obtained, subsequent scanning laser microscopy analysis of the sieve fractions indicated that particle segregation was not accomplished and the individual sieve fractions retained a particle size distribution very similar to the original powder assemblage. This phenomena was confirmed through subsequent dissolution experiments on the various screen fractions which illustrated no difference in kinetic behavior between the original oxide assemblage and the sieve fractions.

  16. Partial purification and kinetic characterization of acid phosphatase from garlic seedling.

    PubMed

    Yenigün, Begüm; Güvenilir, Yüksel

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain purer acid phosphatases than produced by prior art by operating under conditions that improve the final product. The study features are the use of a mild nonionic detergent, 40-80% saturation with (NH4)2SOm4, maintained at low temperature to remove impurity, and the use of chromatografic columns to concentrate the acid phosphatase and remove non-acid phosphatase proteins with lower or higher molecular weights. Acid phosphatase was isolated and purified from garlic seedlings by a streamline method without the use of proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes, butanol, or other organic solvents. Grown garlic seedlings of 10- 15 cm height were homogenized with 0.1 M acetate buffer containing 0.1 M NaCl and 0.1% Triton X-100. After homogenization, the supernatant was filtered with paper filters. Filtrated supernatant was cooled to 4 degrees C, followed by a threestep fractionation of the proteins with ammonium sulfate. The crude enzyme was isolated as a green precipitate that was dissolved in a small amount of 0.1 M acetate buffer containing 0.1 M NaCl and 0.1% Triton X-100. Garlic seedling acid phosphatase was purified with ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE cellulose). The column was equilibrated with 0.1 M acetate buffer. Acid phosphatase was purified 40-fold from the starting material. The specific activity of the pure enzyme was 168 U/mg. A variety of stability and activity profiles were determined for the purified garlic seedling acid phosphatase: optimum pH, optimum temperature, pH stability, temperature stability, thermal inactivation, substrate specificity, effect of enzyme concentration, effect of substrate concentration, activation energy, and effect of inhibitor and activator. The molecular mass of acid phosphatase was estimated to be 58 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH was 5.7 and the optimum temperature was 50 degrees C. The enzyme was stable at pH 4.0-10.0 and 40-60 degrees C

  17. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  18. Kinetics and microbial ecology of batch sulfidogenic bioreactors for co-treatment of municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongyang; Weidhaas, Jennifer L; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics and microbial ecology in sulfidogenic bioreactors used in a novel two-stage process for co-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) were investigated. Michaelis-Menten modeling of COD oxidation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) (Vmax=0.33mgL(-1)min(-1), Km=4.3mgL(-1)) suggested that the Vmax can be reasonably achieved given the typical COD values in MWW and anticipated mixing with AMD. Non-competitive inhibition modeling (Ki=6.55mgL(-1)) indicated that excessive iron level should be avoided to limit its effects on SRB. The COD oxidation rate was positively correlated to COD/sulfate ratio and SRB population, as evidenced by dsrA gene copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed diverse microbial communities dominated by sulfate reducing delta-proteobacteria. Microbial community and relative quantities of SRB showed significant differences under different COD/sulfate ratios (0.2, 1 and 2), and the highest dsrA gene concentration and most complex microbial diversity were observed under COD/sulfate ratio 2. Major species were associated with Desulfovirga, Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, and Syntrophus sp. The reported COD kinetics, SRB abundances and the phylogenetic profile provide insights into the co-treatment process and help identify the parameters of concerns for such technology development.

  19. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters.

  20. Application of zeolite-activated carbon macrocomposite for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7: isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chi Kim; Bay, Hui Han; Neoh, Chin Hong; Aris, Azmi; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the adsorption behavior of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) from aqueous solution onto macrocomposite (MC) was investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorbent, MC, which consists of a mixture of zeolite and activated carbon, was found to be effective in removing AO7. The MC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, point of zero charge, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. A series of experiments were performed via batch adsorption technique to examine the effect of the process variables, namely, contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. The dye equilibrium adsorption was investigated, and the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tempkin isotherm models. The Langmuir isotherm model fits the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. For the kinetic study, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion model were used to fit the experimental data. The adsorption kinetic was found to be well described by the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption process is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectral and high performance liquid chromatography analysis were carried out before and after the adsorption process. For the phytotoxicity test, treated AO7 was found to be less toxic. Thus, the study indicated that MC has good potential use as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solution.

  1. Impact of processing conditions on the kinetic of vitamin C degradation and 2-furoylmethyl amino acid formation in dried strawberries.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Soria, A Cristina; Olano, Agustín; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a study on the usefulness of the determination of vitamin C together with indicators of the initial steps of Maillard reaction (2-furoylmethyl amino acids, 2-FM-AA) during the convective drying of strawberries has been carried out for the first time, paying special attention to the kinetics of degradation and formation, respectively, of both parameters. Formation of 2-FM-AA of Lys, Arg and GABA and vitamin C loss increased with time and temperature following, respectively, a zero and first-order kinetics. As supported by its lower activation energy, 2-FM-GABA (55.9 kJ/mol) and 2-FM-Lys+2-FM-Arg (58.2 kJ/mol) were shown to be slightly more sensitive indicators than vitamin C (82.1 kJ/mol). The obtained results, together with a complementary study on the rehydration ability and sensorial attributes of samples, pointed out the suitability of the convective drying system to obtain dried strawberries of high nutritive quality and bioactivity and good consumer acceptance.

  2. Removal kinetics of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase by various plasmapheresis modalities in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Kurashima, Naoki; Maeda, Takuma; Miyamoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Iimori, Soichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2014-06-01

    Plasmapheresis is one of the acute treatment modalities for neurological disorders associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD). However, there is little information about the removal kinetics of anti-GAD by various plasmapheresis modalities. Here, we investigated the removal rate of anti-GAD and fibrinogen (Fib) by immunoadsorption (IA), plasma exchange using a conventional plasma separator (OP-PE), and plasma exchange using a high cut-off selective membrane plasma separator (EC-PE) in two cases of anti-GAD-associated neurological diseases. In case 1, IA and OP-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 38.2% and 69.1% and Fib: 67.7% and 68.2%, respectively. In case 2, OP-PE and EC-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 65.8% and 48.5% and Fib: 68.5% and 19.8%, respectively. OP-PE could remove anti-GAD more efficiently than IA. Further, EC-PE could maintain coagulation factors such as Fib better than IA and OP-PE. It is important to select the appropriate plasmapheresis modality on the basis of the removal kinetics.

  3. Enhanced heat stability and kinetic parameters of maize endosperm ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase by alteration of phylogenetically identified amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Georgelis, Nikolaos; Hannah, L Curtis

    2014-02-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) controls the rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis and is regulated at various levels. Cereal endosperm enzymes, in contrast to other plant AGPases, are particularly heat labile and transgenic studies highlight the importance of temperature for cereal yield. Previously, a phylogenetic approach identified Type II and positively selected amino acid positions in the large subunit of maize endosperm AGPase. Glycogen content, kinetic parameters and heat stability were measured in AGPases having mutations in these sites and interesting differences were observed. This study expands on our earlier evolutionary work by determining how all Type II and positively selected sites affect kinetic constants, heat stability and catalytic rates at increased temperatures. Variants with enhanced properties were identified and combined into one gene, designated Sh2-E. Enhanced properties include: heat stability, enhanced activity at 37 °C, activity at 55 °C, reduced Ka and activity in the absence of activator. The resulting enzyme exhibited all improved properties of the various individual changes. Additionally, Sh2-E was expressed with a small subunit variant with enhanced enzyme properties resulting in an enzyme that has exceptional heat stability, a high catalytic rate at increased temperatures and significantly decreased Km values for both substrates in the absence of the activator.

  4. Kinetic Aspects of Leaching Zinc from Waste Galvanizing Zinc by Using Hydrochloric Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sminčáková, Emília; Trpčevská, Jarmila; Pirošková, Jana

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the results of acid leaching of flux skimmings coming from two plants are presented. Sample A contained two phases, Zn(OH)Cl and NH4Cl. In sample B, the presence of three phases, Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O, (NH4)2(ZnCl4) and ZnCl2(NH3)2, was proved. The aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and distilled water was used as the leaching medium. The effects of the leaching time, temperature and concentration of the leaching medium on the zinc extraction were investigated. The apparent activation energy, E a = 4.61 kJ mol-1, and apparent reaction order n = 0.18 for sample A, and the values E a = 6.28 kJ mol-1 and n = 0.33 for sample B were experimentally determined. Zinc leaching in acid medium is a diffusion-controlled process.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetics study on the adsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution onto powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chaojie; Li, Fei; Bo, Xiaowen; Liu, Guangfu; Zhou, Qi

    2009-09-30

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was applied to remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the aqueous PFOA solution in this study. Contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature were analyzed as the effect factors in the adsorption reaction. The contact time of maximum PFOA uptake was around 1h while the sorption removal efficiency increased with the PAC concentrations. And the process of adsorption increased from 303 K to 313 K and then decreased from 313 K to 323 K. Among four applied models, the experimental isotherm data were discovered to follow Langmuir isotherm model more closely. Thermodynamically, adsorption was endothermic because enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs constants were 198.5 kJ/mol, 0.709 kJ/mol/K and negative, respectively, which also indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and feasible. From kinetic analysis, the adsorption was suggested to be pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of PFOA on the PAC was mainly controlled by particle diffusion.

  6. Kinetics of sorption of Cu(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid chelated anions on cross-linked, polyaminated chitosan beads

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, R.S.; Ju, C.Y.

    1998-08-01

    Rates of sorption of Cu(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelated anions from aqueous solutions on cross-linked, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-modified chitosan beads were measured in a batch stirred vessel. All experiments were carried out in an equimolar solution of Cu(II) and EDTA (0.47--3.15 mol/m{sup 3}). It was shown that the rates of sorption increased with an increase in the initial concentration of Cu(II), pH, and temperature but decreased with an increase in the molecular weight of PEI introduced in the beads. The widely used homogeneous diffusion model based on Fick`s law and the shrinking core model cannot describe the sorption process. On the contrary, the kinetic data were well fit by the Elovich equation. The apparent activation energies evaluated (3.5--8.4 kcal/mol at pH 3) indicated the combined film and particle diffusion mechanism.

  7. Sugar-assisted kinetic resolution of amino acids and amplification of enantiomeric excess of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Córdova, Armando; Sundén, Henrik; Xu, Yongmei; Ibrahem, Ismail; Zou, Weibiao; Engqvist, Magnus

    2006-07-17

    The origins of biological homochirality have intrigued researchers since Pasteur's discovery of the optical activity of biomolecules. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a novel alternative for the evolution of homochirality that is not based on autocatalysis and forges a direct relationship between the chirality of sugars and amino acids. This process provides a mechanism in which a racemic mixture of an amino acid can catalyze the formation of an optically active organic molecule in the presence of a sugar product of low enantiomeric excess.

  8. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, November 1993--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1994-12-06

    Factors influencing the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Nonlinear regression analysis showed that the cause of the benzoate threshold was not a diminished benzoate degradation capacity. Analysis of cocultures with hydrogen users that differed in their hydrogen utilization capacities showed that the threshold did not depend on the kinetic properties of the syntrophic partner. These data support a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and exclude the possibility that a change in the affinity of the enzyme system due to acetate inhibition caused the threshold. Modeling studies showed that the threshold value could be predicted from the concentrations of the end products, assuming a critical Gibb`s free energy value. This work shows that interspecies acetate transfer is important in controlling the extent of metabolism by syntrophic organisms.

  9. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, November 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1993-11-12

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, in coculture with different sulfate reducers was studied with sulfate or nitrate as the electron acceptor. A threshold value for benzoate degradation dependent on the acetate concentration was observed with sulfate, but not nitrate, as the electron acceptor. No threshold was observed in tricultures containing an acetate-using sulfate reducer. The addition of the acetate-using sulfate reducer to cocultures that had degraded benzoate to its threshold value resulted in further degradation of benzoate to levels below the analytical detection limit (ca. 200 nM). These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and exclude the possibility that the threshold was the result of the inhibitory action of the undissociated form of acetate.

  10. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikanto, Joonas; Duplissy, Jonathan; Määttänen, Anni; Henschel, Henning; Donahue, Neil M.; Brus, David; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We derive a version of Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by quantum chemical results on sulfuric acid-water hydration to describe neutral and ion-induced particle formation in the binary sulfuric acid-water system. The theory is extended to treat the kinetic regime where the nucleation free energy barrier vanishes at high sulfuric acid concentrations or low temperatures. In the kinetic regime particle formation rates become proportional to sulfuric acid concentration to second power in the neutral system or first power in the ion-induced system. We derive simple general expressions for the prefactors in kinetic-type and activation-type particle formation calculations applicable also to more complex systems stabilized by other species. The theory predicts that the binary water-sulfuric acid system can produce strong new particle formation in the free troposphere both through barrier crossing and through kinetic pathways. At cold stratospheric and upper free tropospheric temperatures neutral formation dominates the binary particle formation rates. At midtropospheric temperatures the ion-induced pathway becomes the dominant mechanism. However, even the ion-induced binary mechanism does not produce significant particle formation in warm boundary layer conditions, as it requires temperatures below 0°C to take place at atmospheric concentrations. The theory successfully reproduces the characteristics of measured charged and neutral binary particle formation in CERN CLOUD3 and CLOUD5 experiments, as discussed in a companion paper.

  11. Invariant Aspartic Acid in Muscle Nicotinic Receptor Contributes Selectively to the Kinetics of Agonist Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    We examined functional contributions of interdomain contacts within the nicotinic receptor ligand binding site using single channel kinetic analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and a homology model of the major extracellular region. At the principal face of the binding site, the invariant αD89 forms a highly conserved interdomain contact near αT148, αW149, and αT150. Patch-clamp recordings show that the mutation αD89N markedly slows acetylcholine (ACh) binding to receptors in the resting closed state, but does not affect rates of channel opening and closing. Neither αT148L, αT150A, nor mutations at both positions substantially affects the kinetics of receptor activation, showing that hydroxyl side chains at these positions are not hydrogen bond donors for the strong acceptor αD89. However substituting a negative charge at αT148, but not at αT150, counteracts the effect of αD89N, demonstrating that a negative charge in the region of interdomain contact confers rapid association of ACh. Interpreted within the structural framework of ACh binding protein and a homology model of the receptor ligand binding site, these results implicate main chain amide groups in the domain harboring αW149 as principal hydrogen bond donors for αD89. The specific effect of αD89N on ACh association suggests that interdomain hydrogen bonding positions αW149 for optimal interaction with ACh. PMID:15504901

  12. Effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the kinetics of voltage‐gated proton channels heterologously expressed in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawanabe, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Key points Arachidonic acid (AA) greatly enhances the activity of the voltage‐gated proton (Hv) channel, although its mechanism of action and physiological function remain unclear.In the present study, we analysed the effects of AA on proton currents through Hv channels heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells.The dramatic increase in proton current amplitude elicited by AA was accompanied by accelerated activation kinetics and a leftward shift in the voltage‐dependence of activation.Mutagenesis studies suggest the two aforementioned effects of AA reflect two distinct structural mechanisms.Application of phospholipase A2, which liberates AA from phospholipids in the membrane, also enhances Hv channel activity, supporting the idea that AA modulates Hv channel activity within physiological contexts. Abstract Unsaturated fatty acids are key components of the biological membranes of all cells, and precursors of mediators for cell signalling. Arachidonic acid (AA) is an unsaturated fatty acid known to modulate the activities of various ion channels, including the voltage‐gated proton (Hv) channel, which supports the rapid production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytes through regulation of pH and membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanisms and physiological functions of the effects of AA on Hv channels remain unclear. In the present study, we report an electrophysiological analysis of the effects of AA on the mouse Hv channel (mHv1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells. Application of AA to excised inside‐out patch membranes rapidly induced a robust increase in the amplitude of the proton current through mHv1. The current increase was accompanied by accelerated activation kinetics and a small leftward shift of the current–voltage relationship. In monomeric channels lacking the coiled‐coil region of the channel protein, the shift in the current–voltage relationship was diminished but activation and deactivation remained

  13. Kinetics, aggregation behavior and optimization of the fractionation of whey protein isolate with hydrochloric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated WPI solutions (10% (w/w)) containing approximately 30% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 60% beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) were fractionated with HCl at acidic pH and moderate temperatures to denature alpha-LA and recover the alpha-LA aggregates via centrifugation. Aggregation behavior an...

  14. Electrochemical destruction of trans-cinnamic acid by advanced oxidation processes: kinetics, mineralization, and degradation route.

    PubMed

    Flores, Nelly; Thiam, Abdoulaye; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Centellas, Francesc; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Garrido, José Antonio; Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi

    2016-01-14

    Acidic solutions of trans-cinnamic acid at pH 3.0 have been comparatively treated by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). The electrolytic experiments were carried out with a boron-doped diamond (BDD)/air-diffusion cell. The substrate was very slowly abated by AO-H2O2 because of its low reaction rate with oxidizing (•)OH produced from water discharge at the BDD anode. In contrast, its removal was very rapid and at similar rate by EF and PEF due to the additional oxidation by (•)OH in the bulk, formed from Fenton's reaction between cathodically generated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The AO-H2O2 treatment yielded the lowest mineralization. The EF process led to persistent final products like Fe(III) complexes, which were quickly photolyzed upon UVA irradiation in PEF to give an almost total mineralization with 98 % total organic carbon removal. The effect of current density and substrate concentration on all the mineralization processes was examined. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of electrolyzed solutions allowed identifying five primary aromatics and one heteroaromatic molecule, whereas final carboxylic acids like fumaric, acetic, and oxalic were quantified by ion exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). From all the products detected, a degradation route for trans-cinnamic acid is proposed.

  15. Kinetic characteristics of polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid chains found in pectin. Interest in polygalacturonase enzymes continues as they are useful in a number of industrial processes and conversely, detrimental, as they are involved in maceration of economically important crops. While a good...

  16. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  17. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  18. Determination of an ageing factor for lead/acid batteries. 1. Kinetic aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenta-Deu, C.; Donaire, T.

    The capacity of lead/acid batteries decreases with the number of cycles. This process is known as ageing. The reduction of capacity affects not only the operation time but also the performance of the accumulator and of the system attached to the battery. One of the main procedures affected by the battery ageing is the determination of the state-of-charge. In this paper, a parameter called 'ageing factor', fa, which represents the reduction of the available energy in lead/acid batteries, is introduced. A method to calculate this factory and its incidence on battery performance has also been developed. The method is intended to predict 'ageing' effects on lead/acid batteries as a non-destructive method, as well as on-line battery operation. The method is based on the effective reduction in electrolyte specific gravity in a fully charged lead/acid battery computed from the change of the slope of the electrolyte density during charge with the number of cycles, and the subsequent reduction in discharge time. A correlation process between the reduction of the energy delivered by the electrochemical cell, the reduction of the discharge time, and the apparent change of the slope of electrolyte density has been developed, resulting in an analytical expression that may be used to compute the effective reduction in available energy in lead/acid batteries. The results of the experiments have proven the merit of the proposed system: the predicted values are in good agreement with experimental data, the associated error in the a estimation being lower than 9%, a result which has been considered acceptable to validate the proposed method.

  19. Kinetic features of xylan de-polymerization in production of xylose monomer and furfural during acid pretreatment for kenaf, forage sorghums and sunn hemp feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kamireddy, Srinivas Reddy; Kozliak, Evguenii I.; Tucker, Melvin; Ji, Yun

    2014-08-01

    A kinetic study of acid pretreatment was conducted for sorghum non-brown mid rib (SNBMR) (Sorghum bicolor L Moench), sorghum-brown mid rib (SBMR), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L) and kenaf (Gossypiumhirsutum L), focusing on rates of xylose monomer and furfural formation. The kinetics was investigated using two independent variables, reaction temperature (150 and 160°C) and acid concentration (1 and 2 wt%), with a constant dry biomass loading of 10 wt% and a treatment time up to 20 min while sampling the mixture every 2 min. The experimental data were fitted using a two-step kinetic model based on irreversible pseudo first order kinetics at each step. Varied kinetic orders on the acid concentration, ranging from 0.2 to >3, were observed for both xylose and furfural formation, the values depending on the feedstock. The crystallinity index of raw biomass was shown to be a major factor influencing the rate of both xylose and furfural formation. As a result, a positive correlation was observed between the activation energy and biomass crystallinity index for xylose formation.

  20. Kinetic features of xylan de-polymerization in production of xylose monomer and furfural during acid pretreatment for kenaf, forage sorghums and sunn hemp feedstocks

    DOE PAGES

    Kamireddy, Srinivas Reddy; Kozliak, Evguenii I.; Tucker, Melvin; ...

    2014-08-01

    A kinetic study of acid pretreatment was conducted for sorghum non-brown mid rib (SNBMR) (Sorghum bicolor L Moench), sorghum-brown mid rib (SBMR), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L) and kenaf (Gossypiumhirsutum L), focusing on rates of xylose monomer and furfural formation. The kinetics was investigated using two independent variables, reaction temperature (150 and 160°C) and acid concentration (1 and 2 wt%), with a constant dry biomass loading of 10 wt% and a treatment time up to 20 min while sampling the mixture every 2 min. The experimental data were fitted using a two-step kinetic model based on irreversible pseudo first ordermore » kinetics at each step. Varied kinetic orders on the acid concentration, ranging from 0.2 to >3, were observed for both xylose and furfural formation, the values depending on the feedstock. The crystallinity index of raw biomass was shown to be a major factor influencing the rate of both xylose and furfural formation. As a result, a positive correlation was observed between the activation energy and biomass crystallinity index for xylose formation.« less

  1. RNA-Seq analysis and targeted mutagenesis for improved free fatty acid production in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-energy-density biofuels are typically derived from the fatty acid pathway, thus establishing free fatty acids (FFAs) as important fuel precursors. FFA production using photosynthetic microorganisms like cyanobacteria allows for direct conversion of carbon dioxide into fuel precursors. Recent studies investigating cyanobacterial FFA production have demonstrated the potential of this process, yet FFA production was also shown to have negative physiological effects on the cyanobacterial host, ultimately limiting high yields of FFAs. Results Cyanobacterial FFA production was shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lead to increased cell membrane permeability. To identify genetic targets that may mitigate these toxic effects, RNA-seq analysis was used to investigate the host response of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Stress response, nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis, and protein folding genes were up-regulated during FFA production while genes involved in carbon and hydrogen metabolisms were down-regulated. Select genes were targeted for mutagenesis to confirm their role in mitigating FFA toxicity. Gene knockout of two porins and the overexpression of ROS-degrading proteins and hypothetical proteins reduced the toxic effects of FFA production, allowing for improved growth, physiology, and FFA yields. Comparative transcriptomics, analyzing gene expression changes associated with FFA production and other stress conditions, identified additional key genes involved in cyanobacterial stress response. Conclusions A total of 15 gene targets were identified to reduce the toxic effects of FFA production. While single-gene targeted mutagenesis led to minor increases in FFA production, the combination of these targeted mutations may yield additional improvement, advancing the development of high-energy-density fuels derived from cyanobacteria. PMID:23919451

  2. Depression of serum calcium by increased plasma free fatty acids in the rat: a mechanism for hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lee, K H; Napier, T W; Fournier, P O; Duchainey, D; Axelrod, L

    1985-10-01

    Some patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis have marked hypocalcemia and high levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs). This study tests the hypothesis that increased plasma FFAs can significantly reduce the calcium level in vivo, a phenomenon which is different from local formation of calcium soaps due to lipolysis of adipose tissue lipids. Free fatty acid elevation was induced in rats by the administration of heparin and by the infusion of triglycerides. The results show that, compared with controls, induction of elevated FFA (from 1.57 +/- 0.08 mEq/L to 5.64 +/- 0.35, mean +/- SEM) causes the concentration of calcium to fall rapidly (from 9.04 +/- 0.06 mg/dl to 8.42 +/- 0.10, p less than 0.001). There is a significant (p less than 0.001) positive correlation between spontaneous baseline concentration of FFA and the responsiveness of calcium concentration to FFA challenge. At near-normal levels of FFA there is a significant (p less than 0.001) correlation between the magnitude of increased FFA concentration and decreased calcium concentration. Additional studies in vivo and in vitro show that elevated plasma triglycerides per se did not interfere with measurement of calcium concentration; however, FFA-albumin complexes bind calcium and lower its measured value. These findings suggest that (a) changes in the concentration of FFA occurring spontaneously may affect measured serum calcium concentration; (b) the observed depression of serum calcium concentration may be due in part to intravascular sequestration of calcium by FFA, but increased flux of circulating calcium-FFA complexes into extravascular and intracellular sites may also be important; (c) the markedly increased FFA concentration in some patients with acute pancreatitis may contribute significantly to hypocalcemia and calcium flux in these patients. As parathyroid hormone secretion, function, or integrity may be impaired in pancreatitis, the depressant effect of FFA could be even

  3. Thiol and sulfenic acid oxidation of AhpE, the one-cysteine peroxiredoxin from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: kinetics, acidity constants, and conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Martín; Turell, Lucía; Manta, Bruno; Botti, Horacio; Monteiro, Gisele; Netto, Luis E S; Alvarez, Beatriz; Radi, Rafael; Trujillo, Madia

    2009-10-13

    Drug resistance and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are partially related to the pathogen's antioxidant systems. Peroxide detoxification in this bacterium is achieved by the heme-containing catalase peroxidase and different two-cysteine peroxiredoxins. M. tuberculosis genome also codifies for a putative one-cysteine peroxiredoxin, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase E (MtAhpE). Its expression was previously demonstrated at a transcriptional level, and the crystallographic structure of the recombinant protein was resolved under reduced and oxidized states. Herein, we report that the conformation of MtAhpE changed depending on its single cysteine redox state, as reflected by different tryptophan fluorescence properties and changes in quaternary structure. Dynamics of fluorescence changes, complemented by competition kinetic assays, were used to perform protein functional studies. MtAhpE reduced peroxynitrite 2 orders of magnitude faster than hydrogen peroxide (1.9 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) vs 8.2 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C, respectively). The latter also caused cysteine overoxidation to sulfinic acid, but at much slower rate constant (40 M(-1) s(-1)). The pK(a) of the thiol in the reduced enzyme was 5.2, more than one unit lower than that of the sulfenic acid in the oxidized enzyme. The pH profile of hydrogen peroxide-mediated thiol and sulfenic acid oxidations indicated thiolate and sulfenate as the reacting species. The formation of sulfenic acid as well as the catalytic peroxidase activity of MtAhpE was demonstrated using the artificial reducing substrate thionitrobenzoate. Taken together, our results indicate that MtAhpE is a relevant component in the antioxidant repertoire of M. tuberculosis probably involved in peroxide and specially peroxynitrite detoxification.

  4. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-08

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  5. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, March 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney M.J.

    1995-06-23

    Factors affecting the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Cocultures of a syntrophic benzoate degrader, strain SB, with a hydrogen/formate-using sulfate reducer degraded benzoate to a threshold that depended on the amount of substrate and acetate present. The benzoate threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather, a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. A sensitive assay to detect low formate concentrations was developed to measure the formate levels when the benzoate threshold was reached. We showed that increased acetate concentrations, even when hydrogen and formate levels are low, affects the extent of benzoate degradation, implicating the importance of interspecies acetate transfer. In addition to benzoate, various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, 2-methylbutyrate, and methyl esters of fatty acids supported growth in coculture with a hydrogen-using partner. SB is the only syntrophic bacterium known to use both benzoate and fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SB clustered with sulfate reducers in the delta subclass of the Proteobacteria. SB grew well in coculture with Desulfoarculus baarsii, a sulfate reducer that uses formate but not hydrogen. This unequivocally shows that SB can grow by interspecies formate transfer.

  6. Effects of phosphoric acid concentration on oxygen reduction kinetics at platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, K.L.; Chin, D.T.; Gonzalez, E.R.; Srinivasan, S.

    1984-04-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction was investigated at platinum electrodes in phosphoric acid in the concentration range 0.7M(6.6%) to 17.5M(95%) at 25/sup 0/C using the rotating ring-disk electrode technique. As a complement, cyclic voltammograms on platinum and potentials of zero charge of mercury were obtained as a function of phosphoric aci concentration. The mechanism of the oxygen electrode reaction is discussed in terms of the direct four-electron transfer reduction to water and the formation of hydrogen peroxide as an intermediate in a parallel two-electron transfer reaction The rate constants of the intermediate reaction steps were calculated from the ring-disk data for various potentials and electrolyte concentrations. The characteristics of the reaction were found to be markedly dependent on the concentration of phosphoric acid. These results are interpreted in terms of changes in oxygen solubility, proton activity, and double laye characteristics when passing over from a water to a phosphoric acid solvent structure.

  7. Mechanism and kinetics of aluminum dissolution during copper sorption by acidity paddy soil in South China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiya; Li, Yujiao; Wen, Qinliang; Dong, Changxun; Pan, Genxing

    2015-08-01

    Soil aggregates were prepared from a bulk soil collected from paddy soil in the Taihu Lake region and aluminum (Al) dissolution, solution pH changes during copper (Cu(2+)) sorption were investigated with static sorption and magnetic stirring. Kinetics of Cu(2+) sorption and Al dissolution were also studied by magnetic stirring method. No Al dissolution was observed until Cu(2+) sorption was greater than a certain value, which was 632, 450, 601 and 674 mg/kg for sand, clay, silt, and coarse silt fractions, respectively. Aluminum dissolution increased with increasing Cu(2+) sorption and decreasing solution pH. An amount of dissolved Al showed a significant positive correlation with non-specific sorption of Cu(2+) (R(2)>0.97), and it was still good under different pH values (R(2)>0.95). Copper sorption significantly decreased solution pH. The magnitude of solution pH decline increased as Cu(2+) sorption and Al dissolution increased. The sand and clay fraction had a less Al dissolution and pH drop due to the higher ferric oxide, Al oxide and organic matter contents. After sorption reaction for half an hour, the Cu(2+) sorption progress reached more than 90% while the Al dissolution progress was only 40%, and lagged behind the Cu(2+) sorption. It indicated that aluminum dissolution is associated with non-specific sorption.

  8. Kinetic and spectral investigation of allosteric interaction of coenzymes with 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumiło, S.; Czygier, M.; Kondracikowska, J.; Dobrzyń, P.; Czerniecki, J.

    2002-09-01

    The possible role of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) in the regulation of both multienzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) has been investigated by kinetic and spectral methods. The purified PDC and OGDC from animal heart muscle were near saturated with endogenous TPP. The PDC containing the bound coenzyme showed hysteretic behaviour manifested in a lag phase of the catalysed reaction after the contact of PDC with substrates. Exogenous TPP added to the full reaction medium led to a disappearance of the lag phase and to strong reduction of the Michaelis constant ( Km) value for pyruvate, and more moderate decrease of Km for both coenzyme A and NAD. In the case of OGDC exogenous TPP also decreased S 0.5 ( Km) for substrate 2-oxoglutarate. In addition, exogenous TPP changed both the UV and circular dichroism spectra of PDC and last one of OGDC, and lowered the fluorescence emission of the multienzyme complexes containing bound molecules of endogenous coenzyme in their active sites. Thiamine pyrophosphate seems to play, besides its coenzyme function, the role of positive allosteric effector which causes conformational changes of the multienzyme complexes and increases their affinity to substrates.

  9. Lipid clustering in bilayers detected by the fluorescence kinetics and anisotropy of trans-parinaric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes Mateo, C; Brochon, J C; Pilar Lillo, M; Ulises Acuña, A

    1993-01-01

    Fluid heterogeneity in lipid bilayers and shows a simple and useful method to quantify this heterogeneity. Taking advantage of the maximum entropy method, we have resolved the probe fluorescence lifetime distributions in homogeneous solutions and in single and two-component lipid bilayers at different temperatures. A precise description of the emission kinetics was obtained as a function of viscosity in the homogeneous solution and as a function of the phase composition (gel/fluid) in the lipid bilayers. These data show, unambiguously, that the same distribution pattern, with two well resolved lifetime classes, is observed both in pure solvents and in fluid bilayers. This distribution is modified during the thermotropic phase transition, with the appearance of a long lifetime component. The anisotropy experiments confirm that the amplitude of this component is proportional to the fraction of probe located in the gel phase. From this fraction we have quantified the amount of gel phase in the binary bilayer system dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and determined the thermotropic phase diagram of the mixture. This phase diagram agrees well with that calculated assuming ideal mixing of the lipids (Marbrey, S., and J.M. Sturtevant. 1976. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 73:862-3866). PMID:8298047

  10. Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes by Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Kenneth R.; Hudson, Brian D.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Dietary free fatty acids (FFAs), such as ω-3 fatty acids, regulate metabolic and anti-inflammatory processes, with many of these effects attributed to FFAs interacting with a family of G protein-coupled receptors. Selective synthetic ligands for free fatty acid receptors (FFA1-4) have consequently been developed as potential treatments for type 2 diabetes (T2D). In particular, clinical studies show that Fasiglifam, an agonist of the long-chain FFA receptor, FFA1, improved glycemic control and reduced HbA1c levels in T2D patients, with a reduced risk of hypoglycemia. However, this ligand was removed from clinical trials due to potential liver toxicity and determining if this is a target or a ligand-specific feature is now of major importance. Pre-clinical studies also show that FFA4 agonism increases insulin sensitivity, induces weight loss, and reduces inflammation and the metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are linked with FFA2 and FFA3 activation. In this review, we therefore show that FFA receptor agonism is a potential clinical target for T2D treatment and discuss ongoing drug development programs within industry and academia aimed at improving the safety and effectiveness of these potential treatments. PMID:25221541

  11. Microencapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins with different fatty acid composition: Kinetic stability of astaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Andrés; Masson, Lilia; Velasco, Joaquín; del Valle, José Manuel; Robert, Paz

    2016-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a natural source of astaxanthin (AX). However, AX loses its natural protection when extracted from this microalga. In this study, a supercritical fluid extract (SFE) of H. pluvialis was obtained and added to oils with different fatty acid compositions (sunflower oil (SO) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO)). The oleoresins of H. pluvialis ((SO+SFE) and (HOSO+SFE)) were encapsulated with Capsul by spray drying. The stability of the oleoresins and powders were studied at 40, 50 and 70° C. AX and alpha-tocopherol (AT) degradation followed a zero-order and first-order kinetic model, respectively, for all systems. The encapsulation of oleoresins improved the stability of AX and AT to a greater extent in oleoresins with a monounsaturated fatty acid profile, as shown by the significantly lowest degradation rate constants and longest half-lives. Therefore, the encapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins is an alternative to developing a functional ingredient for healthy food design.

  12. Chemical kinetics of 5-o-caffeoylquinic acid in superheated steam: effect of isomerization on mate (Ilex paraguariensis) manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zanoelo, Everton Fernando; Benincá, Cristina

    2009-12-23

    A set of experiments was carried out to investigate the chemical stability of 5-o-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) in the presence of superheated steam. A batch cylindrical reactor made of glass and isothermally operated between 398 and 499 K was used in the experiments. A high-performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a diode array detector was applied to monitor the 5-CQA concentrations. The conversions of 5-CQA were correctly reproduced with a simplified kinetic model represented by a reversible pseudofirst-order reaction of isomerization. The effect of temperature on the forward rate constant was represented by the Arrhenius equation with parameters tuned on experimental data. The heat of isomerization of 5-CQA and the equilibrium constant at 298 K were calculated by involving the integrated form of the van't Hoff equation. The observed reaction was revealed to not be detrimental for the quality of manufactured leaves and branches of mate because the content of total chlorogenic acids was not changed.

  13. In vitro gas production kinetics and short-chain fatty acid production from rumen incubation of diets supplemented with hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Lavrenčič, A; Levart, A; Košir, I J; Čerenak, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.) from two varieties Aurora and Dana, differing in their α- and β-acid contents, on rumen microbial activity measured with in vitro gas production kinetics and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production. Hop cones were added to the total mixed dairy cow ration (CONT) in concentrations simulating a cow's daily intake of 50, 100 and 200 g of hop cones - the concentrations of hop cones expressed on a substrate basis were 43, 82 and 153 mg/g of substrate. Substrates were anaerobically incubated in glass syringes, and gas production kinetic parameters were determined by fitting data with the Gompertz model. Gas produced after 24 h (Gas24), maximum fermentation rate (MFR) and time of maximum fermentation rate (TMFR) were calculated from the estimated gas production kinetic parameters. After 24 h of incubation, the fermentation liquids of each substrate were taken for the determination of SCFA. Increasing the hop cone concentration decreased the total potential gas production, Gas24, MFR and shortened TMFR. The highest hop cone concentration significantly decreased acetic and butyric acid productions and total SCFA production after 24 h of incubation, but not propionic acid production, resulting in a decreased ratio between acetic acid and propionic acid.

  14. Associations of free fatty acids with insulin secretion and action among African-American and European-American girls and women.

    PubMed

    Goree, Laura Lee T; Darnell, Betty E; Oster, Robert A; Brown, Marian A; Gower, Barbara A

    2010-02-01

    Ethnic differences in insulin secretion and action between African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs) may influence mobilization of free fatty acids (FFAs). We tested the hypotheses that FFA concentrations would be associated with measures of insulin secretion and action before and during a glucose challenge test. Subjects were 48 prepubertal girls, 60 premenopausal women, and 46 postmenopausal women. Fasting insulin (insulin(0)), the acute insulin response to glucose (AIR(g)), the insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), basal and nadir FFA (FFA(0), FFA(nadir)), and nadir time (TIME(nadir)) were determined during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis was conducted to identify associations of FFA(0), FFA(nadir), and TIME(nadir) with ethnicity, age group, insulin measures, indexes of body composition from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and measures of fat distribution from computed tomography scan. In this population, insulin(0) and AIR(g) were higher among AAs vs. EAs, whereas S(I) was lower, independent of age group. MLR analyses indicated that FFA(0) was best predicted by lean tissue mass (LTM), leg fat mass, ethnicity (lower in AAs), S(I), and insulin(0). FFA(nadir) was best predicted by FFA(0), age group, and intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT). TIME(nadir) was best predicted by leg fat mass, AIR(g), and S(I). In conclusion, indexes of insulin secretion and action were associated with FFA dynamics in healthy girls and women. Lower FFA(0) among AAs was independent of insulin(0) and S(I). Whether lower FFA(0) is associated with substrate oxidation or risk for obesity remains to be determined.

  15. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  16. In vitro analysis of flufenamic acid activity against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A; Jahng, Maximillian; Rane, Hallie S; Asare, Kingsley; Kulkarny, Vibhati V; Bernardo, Stella M; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-01-01

    In a recent high-throughput screen against specific Candida albicans drug targets, several compounds that exhibited non-specific antifungal activity were identified, including the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flufenamic acid (FFA). This study sought to determine the effect of different doses of FFA, alone or in combination with fixed concentrations of the standard antifungal agents amphotericin B (AmB), caspofungin (CAS) or fluconazole (FLU), for the prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microplate followed by evaluation of antifungal activity using the XTT assay. FFA concentrations of ≥512mg/L demonstrated >80% prevention of biofilm formation. FFA concentrations of 1024mg/L demonstrated >85% reduction of mature biofilms. When FFA (≥8mg/L) was used in combination with FLU (32mg/L), antifungal activity increased to 99% for the prevention of biofilm formation. Similarly, when a FFA concentration of ≥8mg/L was used in combination with either AmB (0.25mg/L) or CAS (0.125mg/L), antifungal activity also increased up to 99% for the prevention of biofilm formation. The inhibitory effect of FFA on C. albicans biofilms has not been reported previously, therefore these findings suggest that FFA in combination with traditional antifungals might be useful for the treatment and prevention of C. albicans biofilms.

  17. Flufenamic acid prevents behavioral manifestations of salicylate-induced tinnitus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ustundag, Yasemin; Bulut, Funda; Demir, Caner Feyzi; Bal, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tinnitus is defined as a phantom auditory sensation, the perception of sound in the absence of external acoustic stimulation. Given that flufenamic acid (FFA) blocks TRPM2 cation channels, resulting in reduced neuronal excitability, we aimed to investigate whether FFA suppresses the behavioral manifestation of sodium salicylate (SSA)-induced tinnitus in rats. Material and methods Tinnitus was evaluated using a conditioned lick suppression model of behavioral testing. Thirty-one Wistar rats, randomly divided into four treatment groups, were trained and tested in the behavioral experiment: (1) control group: DMSO + saline (n = 6), (2) SSA group: DMSO + SSA (n = 6), (3) FFA group: FFA (66 mg/kg bw) + saline (n = 9), (4) FFA + SSA group: FFA (66 mg/kg bw) + SSA (400 mg/kg bw) (n = 10). Localization of TRPM2 to the plasma membrane of cochlear nucleus neurons was demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Results Pavlovian training resulted in strong suppression of licking, having a mean value of 0.05 ±0.03 on extinction day 1, which is below the suppression training criterion level of 0.20 in control tinnitus animals. The suppression rate for rats having both FFA (66 mg/kg bw) and SSA (400 mg/kg bw) injections was significantly lower than that for the rats having SSA injections (p < 0.01). Conclusions We suggest that SSA-induced tinnitus could possibly be prevented by administration of a TRPM2 ion channel antagonist, FFA at 66 mg/kg bw. PMID:26925138

  18. Transient and steady-state kinetics of the oxidation of substituted benzoic acid hydrazides by myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Burner, U; Obinger, C; Paumann, M; Furtmüller, P G; Kettle, A J

    1999-04-02

    Myeloperoxidase is the most abundant protein in neutrophils and catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid. This potent oxidant plays a central role in microbial killing and inflammatory tissue damage. 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH) is a mechanism-based inhibitor of myeloperoxidase that is oxidized to radical intermediates that cause enzyme inactivation. We have investigated the mechanism by which benzoic acid hydrazides (BAH) are oxidized by myeloperoxidase, and we have determined the features that enable them to inactivate the enzyme. BAHs readily reduced compound I of myeloperoxidase. The rate constants for these reactions ranged from 1 to 3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 (15 degrees C, pH 7.0) and were relatively insensitive to the substituents on the aromatic ring. Rate constants for reduction of compound II varied between 6.5 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 for ABAH and 1.3 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 for 4-nitrobenzoic acid hydrazide (15 degrees C, pH 7.0). Reduction of both compound I and compound II by BAHs adhered to the Hammett rule, and there were significant correlations with Brown-Okamoto substituent constants. This indicates that the rates of these reactions were simply determined by the ease of oxidation of the substrates and that the incipient free radical carried a positive charge. ABAH was oxidized by myeloperoxidase without added hydrogen peroxide because it underwent auto-oxidation. Although BAHs generally reacted rapidly with compound II, they should be poor peroxidase substrates because the free radicals formed during peroxidation converted myeloperoxidase to compound III. We found that the reduction of ferric myeloperoxidase by BAH radicals was strongly influenced by Hansch's hydrophobicity constants. BAHs containing more hydrophilic substituents were more effective at converting the enzyme to compound III. This implies that BAH radicals must hydrogen bond to residues in the distal heme pocket before they can reduce the ferric enzyme. Inactivation of myeloperoxidase by BAHs

  19. Kinetic catalytic determination of trace Cu(II) in water samples with the thioglycolic/thiolactic acid-chromate reaction.

    PubMed

    Rustoiu-Csavdari, A; Mihai, D; Bâldea, I

    2005-04-01

    The use of two novel similar indicator reactions as applied to the kinetic determination of Cu(II) in water is investigated. The methods rely on the catalytic effect of the analyte on the oxidation of thioglycolic (TGA) and thiolactic (TLA) acids by chromate in acidic media. The extent of the reactions was followed spectrophotometrically at 345 nm. Pseudo-first-order rate coefficients, k(obsd), were determined as a function of catalyst concentration. Interference of Fe(III) and Pb(II) was suppressed by complexation with pyrophosphate. For the reaction of TGA, a linear regression for k(obsd) versus [Cu(II)] was obtained for the entire concentration range considered. Although the plot corresponding to TLA oxidation exhibits a sharp change of slope at approximately 1.8x10(-5) M Cu(II), it can still be described effectively by two linear regressions with different slopes. The reaction of TGA is more sensitive than that of TLA at low Cu(II) concentration. The opposite is true for higher catalyst contents. The detection limits were 65 microg L(-1) for TGA and of 80 microg L(-1) for TLA oxidation, respectively. The relative standard deviations, of 0.4% for TGA and 1.1% for TLA oxidation, respectively, were obtained for five replicate runs at 1000 microg L(-1). Samples of river and wastewater from the mining region of Baia-Mare, Northern Romania were analyzed using the more sensitive reaction of thioglycolic acid. Results were compared to those obtained by the officially standardized methods. Good agreement was obtained, even for an untreated sample. Measurements did not require prior separation of interfering species.

  20. Semisynthesis of radiolabeled amino acid and lipid brevetoxin metabolites and their blood elimination kinetics in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Leighfield, Tod A; Muha, Noah; Miles, Christopher O; Ramsdell, John S

    2013-06-17

    Brevetoxin B (BTX-B), produced by dinoflagellates of the species Karenia, is a highly reactive molecule, due in part to an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde group at the terminal side chain, leading to the production of metabolites in shellfish by reduction, oxidation, and conjugation. We have investigated in mice the blood elimination of three common bioactive brevetoxin metabolites found in shellfish, which have been semisynthesized from BTX-B in radioactive forms. BTX-B was reduced at C42 to yield [(3)H] dihydro-BTX-B. [(3)H] S-desoxy-BTX-B2 (cysteine brevetoxin B) was semisynthesized from BTX-B by the conjugation of cysteine at the C50 olefinic group then [(3)H] radiolabeled by C42 aldehyde reduction. [(14)C] N-Palmitoyl-S-desoxy-BTX-B2 was prepared using S-desoxy-BTX-B2 as the starting material with addition of the [(14)C] radiolabeled fatty acid via cysteine-amide linkage. The elimination of intravenously administered [(3)H] S-desoxy-BTX-B2, [(14)C] N-palmitoyl-S-desoxy-BTX-B2, or [(3)H] dihydro-BTX-B was measured in blood collected from C57BL/6 mice over a 48 h period. Each brevetoxin metabolite tested exhibited biexponential elimination kinetics and fit a two-compartment model of elimination that was applied to generate toxicokinetic parameters. The rate of transfer between the central compartment (i.e., blood) and the peripheral compartment (e.g., tissue) for each brevetoxin differed substantially, with dihydro-BTX-B exchanging rapidly with the peripheral compartment, S-desoxy-BTX-B2 eliminating rapidly from the central compartment, and N-palmitoyl-S-desoxy-BTX-B2 eliminating slowly from the central compartment. Toxicokinetic parameters were analyzed in the context of the unique structure of each brevetoxin metabolite resulting from a reduction, amino acid conjugation, or fatty acid addition to BTX-B.

  1. Reduction of [VO2(ma)2]- and [VO2(ema)2]- by ascorbic acid and glutathione: kinetic studies of pro-drugs for the enhancement of insulin action.

    PubMed

    Song, Bin; Aebischer, Nicolas; Orvig, Chris

    2002-03-25

    To shed light on the role of V(V) complexes as pro-drugs for their V(IV) analogues, the kinetics of the reduction reactions of [VO2(ma)2]- or [VO2(ema)2]- (Hma = maltol, Hema = ethylmaltol), with ascorbic acid or glutathione, have been studied in aqueous solution by spectrophotometric and magnetic resonance methods. EPR and 51V NMR studies suggested that the vanadium(V) in each complex was reduced to vanadium(IV) during the reactions. All the reactions studied showed first-order kinetics when the concentration of ascorbic acid or glutathione was in large excess and the observed first-order rate constants have a linear relationship with the concentrations of reductant (ascorbic acid or glutathione). Potentiometric results revealed that the most important species in the neutral pH range is [VO2(L)2]- for the V(V) system where L is either ma- or ema-. An acid dependence mechanism was proposed from kinetic studies with varying pH and varying maltol concentration. The good fits of the second order rate constant versus pH or the total concentration of maltol, and the good agreement of the constants obtained between fittings, strongly supported the mechanism. Under the same conditions, the reaction rate of [VO2(ma)2]- with glutathione is about 2000 times slower than that of [VO2(ma)2]- with ascorbic acid, but an acid dependence mechanism can also be used to explain the results for the reduction with glutathione. Replacing the methyl group in maltol with an ethyl group has little influence on the reduction rate with ascorbic acid, and the kinetics are the same no matter whether [VO2(ma)2]- or [VO2(ema)2]- is reduced.

  2. Kinetics of uptake and distribution of arachidonic acid by rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, T.W.; Duncan, D.P.; Forman, H.J.

    1988-10-01

    The time course of uptake and distribution of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) into rat alveolar macrophage phospholipid pools was examined. Macrophages incubated with exogenous /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI-1640 containing 0.1% bovine serum albumin (BSA), incorporated this radiolabel into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol (PI) with plateaus reached within 2 to 4 hours, which remained relatively constant for up to 18 hours. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-AA into phosphatidylethanolamine was small, but continued to increase for 14 hours. Analysis of phosphate content in phospholipid pools revealed that treatment with exogenous 5 nM arachidonic acid had no effect upon pool sizes, but there was a selective incorporation of /sup 3/H-AA into PI. Cells were incubated with /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI alone or medium containing either 0.2% lactalbumin, fetal calf serum at variable concentrations, 10% Nu Serum, or 0.1% BSA. Incubation of macrophages with /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI alone or containing 0.2% lactalbumin, resulted in approximately 70% of the radiolabel taken up by the cells being incorporated into triglyceride. The addition of BSA to RPMI-1640 medium was found to facilitate selective uptake of /sup 3/H-AA into phospholipids. Approximately 70% of incorporated /sup 3/H-AA was releasable through the action of exogenous phospholipase A2.

  3. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer.

  4. Thermal degradation kinetics of sucrose palmitate reinforced poly(lactic acid) biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Valapa, Ravibabu; Pugazhenthi, Gopal; Katiyar, Vimal

    2014-04-01

    The current work is focused on investigating the influence of novel bio-filler, "sucrose palmitate (SP)" on the thermal degradation behavior of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) biocomposites in order to render its suitability for food packaging application. Thermal degradation behavior of the PLA biocomposites was investigated by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) using dynamic heating regime. The differential TG analysis revealed that there is no change in the Tmax value (357 °C) for PLA and its composites up to 5 wt% of bio-filler loading. This reveals that the sucrose palmitate acts as a protective barrier by decelerating the thermal degradation rate of PLA. In the case of 10 wt% of the filler incorporated in the PLA matrix, Tmax rapidly shifted to lower temperature (324 °C). This downturn in Tmax at higher loading of the filler is due to the increase in acidic sites and enhancement in the rate of degradation is observed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis revealed unimodal melting peak indicating the α-crystalline form of PLA. Based on the thermal degradation profile of sucrose palmitate, possible mechanism for degradation of PLA composites is proposed. The activation energies (Ea) of thermal degradation of PLA and PLA composites were evaluated by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger methods.

  5. Serum fatty acid binding protein 4, free fatty acids and metabolic risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Sidika E.; Almario, Rogelio U.; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein (FABP) 4 chaperones free fatty acids (FFA) in the adipocytes during lipolysis. Serum FFA relates to Metabolic Syndrome (METS) and serum FABP4 is emerging as a novel risk marker. In 36 overweight/obese women, serum FABP4 and FFA were measured hourly during 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin resistance was determined using frequently sampled intravenous GTT (FS-IVGTT). Serum lipids and inflammation markers were measured at fasting. During OGTT, serum FABP4 decreased by 40%, reaching its nadir at 3h (from 45.3±3.1 to 31.9±1.6 ng/mL) and stayed below the baseline at 5 h (35.9±2.2 ng/mL) (p < 0.0001 for both, compared to the baseline). Serum FFA decreased by 10 fold, reaching a nadir at 2h (from 0.611±0.033 to 0.067±0.004 mmol/L), then rebounded to 0.816±0.035 mmol/ L at 5h (p < 0.001 for both, compared to baseline). Both fasting-FABP4 and nadir-FABP4 correlated with obesity. Nadir-FABP4 correlated also with insulin resistance parameters from FS-IVGTT and with inflammation. Nadir-FFA, but not fasting-FFA, correlated with the METS-parameters. In conclusion, fasting-FABP4 related to metabolic risk markers more strongly than fasting-FFA. Nadir-FABP4 and nadir-FFA measured after glucose loading may provide better risk assessment than the fasting values. PMID:19394980

  6. In vivo kinetics and spectra of 5-aminolaevulinic acid-induced fluorescence in an amelanotic melanoma of the hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Abels, C.; Heil, P.; Dellian, M.; Kuhnle, G. E.; Baumgartner, R.; Goetz, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    For successful photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and effective photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the clinically used 'photosensitiser' 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), knowledge of the maximal fluorescence intensity and of the maximal tumour-host tissue fluorescence ratio following systemic or local application is required. Therefore, time course and type of porphyrin accumulation were investigated in neoplastic and surrounding host tissue by measuring the kinetics and spectra of ALA-induced fluorescence in vivo. Experiments were performed in the amelanotic melanoma A-Mel-3 grown in the dorsal skinfold chamber preparation of Syrian golden hamsters. The kinetics of fluorescent porphyrins was quantified up to 24 h after i.v. injection of 100 mg kg-1, 500 mg kg-1 or 1,000 mg kg-1 body weight ALA by intravital fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis (n = 18). In separate experiments fluorescence spectra were obtained for each dose by a simultaneous optical multichannel analysing device (n = 3). A three-compartment model was developed to simulate fluorescence kinetics in tumours. Maximal fluorescence intensity (per cent of reference standard; mean +/- s.e.) in the tumour arose 150 min post injection (p.i.) (1,000 mg kg-1, 109 +/- 34%; 500 mg kg-1, 148 +/- 36%) and 120 min p.i. (100 mg kg-1, 16 +/- 8%). The fluorescence in the surrounding host tissue was far less and reached its maximum at 240 min (100 mg kg-1, 6 +/- 3%) and 360 min p.i. (500 mg kg-1, 50 +/- 8%) and (1,000 mg kg-1, 6 +/- 19%). Maximal tumour-host tissue ratio (90:1) was encountered at 90 min after injection of 500 mg kg-1. The spectra of tissue fluorescence showed maxima at 637 nm and 704 nm respectively. After 300 min (host tissue) and 360 min (tumour tissue) additional emission bands at 618 nm and 678 nm were detected. These bands indicate the presence of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) and of another porphyrin species in the tumour not identified yet. Tumour selectivity of ALA-induced PPIX accumulation

  7. Effects of a pharmacological dose of cholecystokinin on bile acid kinetics and biliary cholesterol saturation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Jazrawi, R P; Northfield, T C

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms influencing bile acid pool size and cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder bile, eight obese volunteers were placed on a low calorie diet for six weeks, and given intramuscular injections of a pharmacological dose of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP, 5 micrograms) at mealtimes for half that period (alternating order). During CCK-OP administration, postprandial emptying of the gall bladder (mean +/- SEM) increased from 58 +/- 11% to 82 +/- 5% (p less than 0.005), and small intestinal transit time decreased from 205 +/- 27 to 178 +/- 26 minutes (NS). Bile acid pool size decreased from 4.6 +/- 0.3 to 3.1 +/- 0.3 mmol (p less than 0.001), while fractional turnover rate for chenodeoxycholic acid increased from 0.23 +/- 0.02 to 0.36 +/- 0.03 per day (p less than 0.005), suggesting an increase in recycling frequency of the pool. Synthesis rate was unchanged (0.43 +/- 0.08 vs 0.44 +/- 0.07 mmol/day), suggesting a new steady state. The cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder bile increased in all subjects from 1.3 +/- 0.1 to 1.6 +/- 0.1 (p less than 0.005). Fasting gall bladder volume was reduced from 29 +/- 4 to 20 +/- 7 ml (p less than 0.01). Fractional turnover rate on the two regimens correlated with gall bladder emptying (n = 16, r = 0.61, p less than 0.01), but not with small intestinal transit time (r = 0.07, NS). Bile acid pool size correlated with fractional turnover rate (r = -0.73, p less than 0.005) and with cholesterol saturation index (r = -0.56, p less than 0.025). These findings suggest that CCK influences bile acid kinetics and cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder in man; and that these effects of CCK are mainly mediated via alterations in gall bladder emptying rather than through alterations in small intestinal transit rate. PMID:3957106

  8. Dissolution kinetics of a lunar glass simulant at 25 degrees C: the effect of pH and organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eick, M. J.; Grossl, P. R.; Golden, D. C.; Sparks, D. L.; Ming, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    The dissolution kinetics of a simulated lunar glass were examined at pH 3, 5, and 7. Additionally, the pH 7 experiments were conducted in the presence of citric and oxalic acid at concentrations of 2 and 20 mM. The organic acids were buffered at pH 7 to examine the effect of each molecule in their dissociated form. At pH 3, 5, and 7, the dissolution of the synthetic lunar glass was observed to proceed via a two-stage process. The first stage involved the parabolic release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe, and the linear release of Si. Dissolution was incongruent, creating a leached layer rich in Si and Ti which was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During the second stage the release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe was linear. A coupled diffusion/surface dissolution model was proposed for dissolution of the simulated lunar glass at pH 3, 5, and 7. During the first stage the initial release of mobile cations (i.e., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe) was limited by diffusion through the surface leached layer of the glass (parabolic release), while Si release was controlled by the hydrolysis of the Si-O-Al bonds at the glass surface (linear release). As dissolution continued, the mobile cations diffused from greater depths within the glass surface. A steady-state was then reached where the diffusion rate across the increased path lengths equalled the Si release rate from the surface. In the presence of the organic acids, the dissolution of the synthetic lunar glass proceeded by a one stage process. The release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe followed a parabolic relationship, while the release of Si was linear. The relative reactivity of the organic acids used in the experiments was citrate > oxalate. A thinner leached layer rich in Si/Ti, as compared to the pH experiments, was observed using TEM. Rate data suggest that the chemisorption of the organic anion to the surface silanol groups was responsible for enhanced dissolution in the presence of the organic acids. It is proposed that the increased

  9. Kinetics of amino acid and glucose absorption following pancreatic diversion in the pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerat, A.; Calmes, R.; Corring, T.; Vaissade, P.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in the pig to determine the consequences of deprivation of exocrine pancreatic secretion on the composition and quantity of nutrients absorbed after intake of a balanced diet. Five growing pigs (53.8 kg body weight) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein and the carotid artery and with an electromagnetic flow probe around the portal vein to measure the exchanges between the blood and the intestinal lumen. They were also fitted with a permanent catheter in the duct of Wirsung to educe the exocrine pancreatic secretion and another one in the duodenum in order to reintroduce it. In each animal, glucose, amino-N and amino acid absorption as well as insulin and glucagon production were measured over a period of 10 h after the meal (semi-purified diet based on purified starch and containing 180 g fish meal/kg, DM content of the meal 731 g), either in the presence of pancreatic juice (group C: immediate reintroduction), or in the absence of pancreatic juice (group D: deprivation). The deprivation of pancreatic juice provoked a marked depression in the absorption of glucose (D 67.9 (SEM 27.9) g/10 h, C 437.7 (SEM 39.5) g/10 h, P < 0.001), and of amino-N (D 7.55 (SEM 0.54) g/10 h, C 15.80 (SEM 0.79) g/10 h, P < 0.001). The composition of the mixture of amino acids in the portal blood was only slightly modified: only the levels of histidine (P < 0.05) and of valine (P < 0.06, NS) decreased in the absence of pancreatic juice. Insulin production was much lower (by 64%, P < 0.05) in the absence of pancreatic juice whereas that of glucagon was not affected.

  10. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  11. Kinetic analysis of delta-6-desaturation in liver microsomes: influence of gamma-linoleic acid dietary supplementation to young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Hrelia, S; Bordoni, A; Motta, P; Celadon, M; Biagi, P L

    1991-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated the ability-of a gamma-linoleic acid (GLA) dietary supplementation (as evening primrose oil--EPO) to counteract the fall off in delta-6-desaturase (D6D) activity of linoleic acid and alpha-linoleic acid in aged rats. Kinetic parameters of the D6D were determined in order to test the possibility that there may be a significant influence of GLA administration to young and aged rats on the Vm and Km values for 6-desaturation of both the substrates. In young rats GLA supplementation did not affect the kinetic parameters, while in old rats it produced an increase of Vm values of 6-desaturation for both the substrates. Thus the administration of small doses of GLA to old rats might offer substantial protection against the loss of D6D affinity observed in aging, enhancing the capacity of the enzyme itself.

  12. Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction of ozone with linoleic acid and its dependence on temperature, physical state, RH, and ozone concentration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guang; Holladay, Sara; Langlois, Danielle; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-03-07

    Heterogeneous reaction between ozone and linoleic acid (LA) thin film was investigated by a flow reactor coupled to attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (FR-ATR-IR) over wide ranges of temperature, relative humidity (RH), and ozone concentration under atmospheric pressure condition. Pseudo-first-order rate constants kapp and overall reactive uptake coefficients γ were acquired on the basis of changes in absorbance from peaks located near 1743, 1710, 1172, and 1110 cm(-1), which can be assigned to C═O in ester, C═O in acid, and C-C and C-O stretching modes, respectively. Results showed that the kapp and γ increased nearly by a factor of 6 with increasing temperatures from 258 to 314 K. It was noted the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was much more pronounced at lower temperatures. Such behavior can be explained by a change in the physical state of LA at lower temperatures. In addition, kapp and γ were enhanced by 2-fold as the RH increased from 0 to 80%. Moreover, the effect of ozone concentration on the reaction kinetics was reported for the first time. kapp was found to display a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on ozone concentration with KO3 = (1.146 ± 0.017) × 10(-15) molecules cm(-3) and k[S] = 0.0522 ± 0.0004 s(-1), where KO3 is a parameter that describes the partitioning of ozone to the thin film surface, and k[S] is the maximum pseudo-first-order coefficient at high ozone concentration. Furthermore, yields and hygroscopic properties of reaction products were also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The intensity ratio of two C═O stretching bands, A1743/A1710, which was utilized as an indicator of the product yields, increased sharply with increasing temperatures in the lower temperature region (258-284 K), and then remained nearly constant in the higher temperature region (284-314 K). The product yields showed no significant variation with RH, for the intensity ratio of A1743/A1710 barely changed in the wide RH range 0

  13. Study on degradation kinetics of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid in aqueous solutions and identification of its major degradation product by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qili; Guan, Jiao; Rong, Rong; Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Zhiguo

    2015-08-10

    A RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the degradation kinetic study of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid (HPABA), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, which would provide a basis for further studies on HPABA. The effects of pH, temperature, buffer concentration and ionic strength on the degradation kinetics of HPABA were discussed. Experimental parameters such as degradation rate constants (k), activation energy (Ea), acid and alkali catalytic constants (k(ac), k(al)), shelf life (t1/2) and temperature coefficient (Q10) were calculated. The results indicated that degradation kinetics of HPABA followed zero-order reaction kinetics; degradation rate constants (k) of HPABA at different pH values demonstrated that HPABA was more stable in neutral and near-neutral conditions; the function of temperature on k obeyed the Arrhenius equation (r = 0.9933) and HPABA was more stable at lower temperature; with the increase of ionic strength and buffer concentration, the stability of HPABA was decreased. The major unknown degradation product of HPABA was identified by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS with positive electrospray ionization. Results demonstrated that the hydrolysis product was the primary degradation product of HPABA and it was deduced as anthranilic acid.

  14. Release Kinetic in Yogurt from Gallic Acid Microparticles with Chemically Modified Inulin.

    PubMed

    García, Paula; Vergara, Cristina; Robert, Paz

    2015-10-01

    Gallic acid (GA) was encapsulated with native (NIn), cross-linked (CIn) and acetylated (AIn) inulin by spray-drying. Inulin microparticles were characterized by encapsulation efficiency (EE) and their release profile in yogurt. The EE was significantly higher for GA-CIn (98%) compared with GA-NIn (81%) and GA-AIn (77%) microparticles, showing the effect of the modification of inulin on interaction of GA-polymer. GA release profile data in yogurt for GA-CIn, GA-NIn and GA-AIn were fitted to Peppas and Higuchi models in order to obtain the GA release rate constant. Although the GA release rate constants were significantly different among systems, these differences were slight and the GA release was fast (80% < 2 h) in the three systems, showing that inulin-systems did not control GA release in yogurt. The mechanism of GA release followed a Fickian diffusion and relaxation of chains for all microparticles. According to the release profile, these microparticles would be best suited for use in instant foods.

  15. Kinetics study of phase separation in polyacrylic acid/nematic LC system by optical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Maria; Krolikowski, Z.

    2002-06-01

    Thin polymer layers containing liquid crystal LC of non- linear optical properties were obtained from polyacrylic acid. Samples were produced by phase separation as a consequence of chemical polymerization (PIPS method) resulting in precipitation of liquid crystals in the form of droplets in a polymer matrix being formed. Films were produced in variable conditions of polymerization time and temperature and different content of an initiator (1 - 3 wt%). They contained of 10 - 40 wt% of LC. The cell thickness was constant and equal to 20 micrometers . Systems obtained in this way were subjected to thermo-optical and electro-optical studies, morphological structure investigation and DSC analysis. The polymerization time has a significant influence on the size and number of LC droplets. The presence of benzoyl peroxide can cause partial destruction of LC properties which is reflected by a decrease of isotropization temperature TI of the liquid crystal. An increase of the initiator amount shortens the time of polymerization (ti), while process enthalpy ((Delta) H) increases. Hence, the liquid crystal separation time decreases as well. Films prepared by this method present good electro-optical properties. Rise and decay times of orientation are short and equal to 2 - 17 ms (depending on driving voltage applied) and about 80 ms, respectively. Threshold voltage for the best sample is equal to 5 V. Optimal conditions are found: LC content equals 20%, wt(i) equals 1%, polymerization temperature Tp equals 100 - 110 degree(s)C.

  16. Isothermal crystallization kinetics of Poly (lactic acid) studied by ultrafast chip calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Zijie; Zhou, Dongshan; Xue, Gi

    2012-02-01

    Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) is a biocompatible, biodegradable polymer which has attracted much attention. The crystallization ability, as one of the most factors influencing the physical properties of the biomaterials such as thermal, mechanical, and biodegradable properties, has been widely studied mainly by differential scanning calorimeters. However, although the crystallization of PLA is relatively slow, it's difficult to avoid the crystallization from the nuclei or the structure reorganization of the metastable crystalline formed during the annealing process when we use the normal DSC with the heating rate on the level of tens of K/min. With the chip calorimeter whose scanning rate can go up to 1000 K/s, we can avoid the structure reorganization of metastable crystalline during the heating. In this case we annealed the PLA sample in the 80-120^oC temperature range and found the relationship between the onset the melting temperature Tm and crystallization temperature Tc is Tm= 0.53Tc+ 213.5 and the equilibrium melting temperature is Tm,f =179.6^oC.

  17. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  18. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-01-26

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor.

  19. Novel insights in transport mechanisms and kinetics of phenylacetic acid and penicillin-G in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Douma, Rutger D; Deshmukh, Amit T; de Jonge, Lodewijk P; de Jong, Bouke W; Seifar, Reza M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2012-01-01

    Although penicillin-G (PenG) production by the fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is a well-studied process, little is known about the mechanisms of transport of the precursor phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the product PenG over the cell membrane. To obtain more insight in the nature of these mechanisms, in vivo stimulus response experiments were performed with PAA and PenG in chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum at time scales of seconds to minutes. The results indicated that PAA is able to enter the cell by passive diffusion of the undissociated acid at a high rate, but is at the same time actively excreted, possibly by an ATP-binding cassette transporter. This results in a futile cycle, dissipating a significant amount of metabolic energy, which was confirmed by increased rates of substrate and oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production. To estimate the kinetic properties of passive import and active export of PAA over the cell membrane, a dynamic mathematical model was constructed. With this model, a good description of the dynamic data could be obtained. Also, PenG was found to be rapidly taken up by the cells upon extracellular addition, indicating that PenG transport is reversible. The measured concentration gradient of PenG over the cell membrane corresponded well with facilitated transport. Also, for PenG transport, a dynamic model was constructed and validated with experimental data. The outcome of the model simulations was in agreement with the presence of a facilitated transport system for PenG.

  20. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  1. Kinetic and equilibrium constants of phytic acid and ferric and ferrous phytate derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heighton, Lynne; Schmidt, Walter F; Siefert, Ronald L

    2008-10-22

    Inositol phosphates are metabolically derived organic phosphates (P) that increasingly appear to be an important sink and source of P in the environment. Salts of myo-inositol hexakisdihydrogen phosphate (IHP) or more commonly phytate are the most common inositol phosphates in the environment. IHP resists acidic dephosphorylation and enzymatic dephosphorylation as ferric or ferrous IHP. Mobility of IHP iron complexes is potentially pH and redox responsive, making the time scale and environmental fate and transport of the P associated with the IHP of interest to the mass balance of phosphorus. Ferric and ferrous complexes of IHP were investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (1)H NMR) and enzymatic dephosphorylation. Ferrous IHP was found to form quickly and persist for a longer period then ferric IHP. Dissociation constants derived from (1)H NMR experiments of chemically exchanging systems at equilibrium were 1.11 and 1.19 and formation constants were 0.90 and 0.84 for ferric and ferrous IHP, respectively. The recovery of P from enzymatic dephosphorylation of ferric and ferrous IHP was consistent with the magnitude of the kinetic and equilibrium rate constants.

  2. Adsorption and photodegradation kinetics of herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid with MgFeTi layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong; Beak, Min-wook; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-01

    The calcined layered double hydroxides (cLDHs) Ti-doped and undoped MgFe for this study were prepared by co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) techniques and tested for adsorption and photodegradation (including photocatalytic and photo-Fenton-like) of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation. In the range of studied operating conditions, the as-prepared samples exhibited excellent photo-Fenton-like activity, leading to more than 80-95% degradation of 2,4,5-T at initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) with 4 g calcined LDHs per liter, was accomplished in 360 min, while 2,4,5-T half-life time was as short as 99-182 min. The kinetics of adsorption and photodegradation of 2,4,5-T were also discussed. These results offered a green, low cost and high efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  3. Locked nucleic acids (LNAs) reveal sequence requirements and kinetics of Xist RNA localization to the X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Kavitha; Levasseur, Pierre; Aristarkhov, Alexander; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction of the mammalian genome is transcribed into long noncoding RNAs. The RNAs remain largely uncharacterized as the field awaits new technologies to aid functional analysis. Here, we describe a unique use of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) for studying nuclear long noncoding RNA, an RNA subclass that has been less amenable to traditional knockdown techniques. We target LNAs at Xist RNA and show displacement from the X chromosome with fast kinetics. Xist transcript stability is not affected. By targeting different Xist regions, we identify a localization domain and show that polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is displaced together with Xist. Thus, PRC2 depends on RNA for both initial targeting to and stable association with chromatin. H3K27-trimethyl marks and gene silencing remain stable. Time-course analysis of RNA relocalization suggests that Xist and PRC2 bind to different regions of the X at the same time but do not reach saturating levels immediately. Thus, LNAs provide a tool for studying an emerging class of regulatory RNA and offer a window of opportunity to target epigenetic modifications with possible therapeutic applications. PMID:21135235

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical formation of iron oxidation products on steel immersed in sour acid media.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Espejel, Antonio; Palomar-Pardavé, Manuel; Cabrera-Sierra, Román; Romero-Romo, Mario; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Arce-Estrada, Elsa M

    2011-03-03

    From electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, potential steps, and EIS), XRD, and SEM-EDX, the kinetics and mechanism of anodic film formation applying anodic potential steps on steel immersed in sour acid media was determined. It was found, from a thermodynamic analysis, based on equilibrium phase diagrams of the system considered in this work, that iron oxidation may produce different new solid phases, depending on the applied potential, the first being the iron oxidation associated with formation of FeS((c)) species, which in turn can be reoxidized to FeS(2(c)) or even to Fe(2)O(3(c)) at higher potential values. From analysis of the corresponding experimental potentiostatic current density transients, it was concluded that the electrochemical anodic film formation involves an E(1)CE(2) mechanism, whereby the first of the two simultaneous processes were the Fe electrochemical oxidation (E(1)) followed by FeS precipitation (C) that occurs by 3D nucleation and growth limited by mass transfer reaction and FeS oxidation (E(2)) forming a mix of different stoichiometry iron sulphides and oxides. From EIS measurements, it was revealed that the anodic film's charge transfer resistance diminishes as the potential applied for its formation becomes more anodic, thus behaving poorly against corrosion.

  5. Kinetic modeling and scale up of lipoic acid (LA) production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Shilpa S; Singhal, Rekha S

    2013-08-01

    Scale up studies for production of lipoic acid (LA) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported in this paper for the first time. LA production in batch mode was carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor at varying agitation and aeration with maximum LA production of 512 mg/L obtained at 350 rpm and 25 % dissolved oxygen in batch culture conditions. Thus, LA production increased from 352 mg/L in shake flask to 512 mg/L in batch mode in a 5 L stirred tank bioreactor. Biomass production under these conditions was mathematically explained using logistic equation and data obtained for LA production and substrate utilization were successfully fitted using Luedeking-Piret and Mercier's models. The kinetic studies showed LA production to be growth associated. Further enhancement of LA production was carried out using fed-batch (variable volume) and semi-continuous modes of fermentation. Semi-continuous fermentation with three feeding cycles of sucrose effectively increased the production of LA from 512 to 725 mg/L.

  6. Valproic Acid Downregulates RBP4 and Elicits Hypervitaminosis A-Teratogenesis—A Kinetic Analysis on Retinol/Retinoic Acid Homeostatic System

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chao-Ming; Chang, Chi-Huang; Wang, Hui-Er; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Peng, Robert Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic and anti-migraine prophylactic drug. VPA exhibits two severe side effects, namely acute liver toxicity and teratogenicity. These side effects are usually seen at the genetic and somatic levels. The cited action mechanisms involve inhibition of histone deacetylase, hypofolatenemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, and reactive oxidative stress. The proteomic information associated with VPA teratogenicity is still unavailable. We hypothesized that proteomic analysis might help us identify functional proteins that could be relevantly affected by VPA, and this phenomenon could be very sensitive in early embryonic stage, resulting in VPA teratogenicity. Methodology/Principal Findings Proteomic analysis on the chicken embryos at Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 28 showed that there were significant downregulations of ovotransferrins, carbonic anhydrase-2, retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4), NADH cytochrome b5 reductase 2 (CYB5R2), apolipoprotein A1, and protein SET, together with upregulation of 60S ribosomal protein L22. Among these, RBP4 was the most significantly downregulated (−32%). Kinetic analysis suggested that this situation could trigger hypervitaminosis A (+39.3%), a condition that has been well known to induce teratogenesis.. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report showing that VPA dowregulates RBP4. Our finding not only has led to a possible mechanism of VPA teratogenesis, but also has initiated new preventive strategies for avoiding VPA teratogeneis. PMID:23028466

  7. Calibration of amino acid racemization (AAR) kinetics in United States mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain Quaternary mollusks using 87Sr/ 86Sr analyses: Evaluation of kinetic models and estimation of regional Late Pleistocene temperature history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wehmiller, J. F.; Harris, W.B.; Boutin, B.S.; Farrell, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of amino acid racemization (AAR) for estimating ages of Quaternary fossils usually requires a combination of kinetic and effective temperature modeling or independent age calibration of analyzed samples. Because of limited availability of calibration samples, age estimates are often based on model extrapolations from single calibration points over wide ranges of D/L values. Here we present paired AAR and 87Sr/ 86Sr results for Pleistocene mollusks from the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA. 87Sr/ 86Sr age estimates, derived from the lookup table of McArthur et al. [McArthur, J.M., Howarth, R.J., Bailey, T.R., 2001. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy: LOWESS version 3: best fit to the marine Sr-isotopic curve for 0-509 Ma and accompanying Look-up table for deriving numerical age. Journal of Geology 109, 155-169], provide independent age calibration over the full range of amino acid D/L values, thereby allowing comparisons of alternative kinetic models for seven amino acids. The often-used parabolic kinetic model is found to be insufficient to explain the pattern of racemization, although the kinetic pathways for valine racemization and isoleucine epimerization can be closely approximated with this function. Logarithmic and power law regressions more accurately represent the racemization pathways for all amino acids. The reliability of a non-linear model for leucine racemization, developed and refined over the past 20 years, is confirmed by the 87Sr/ 86Sr age results. This age model indicates that the subsurface record (up to 80m thick) of the North Carolina Coastal Plain spans the entire Quaternary, back to ???2.5Ma. The calibrated kinetics derived from this age model yield an estimate of the effective temperature for the study region of 11??2??C., from which we estimate full glacial (Last Glacial Maximum - LGM) temperatures for the region on the order of 7-10??C cooler than present. These temperatures compare favorably with independent paleoclimate information

  8. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated.

  9. Production of lactobionic acid and sorbitol from lactose/fructose substrate using GFOR/GL enzymes from Zymomonas mobilis cells: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Pedruzzi, Israel; da Silva, Eduardo A Borges; Rodrigues, Alírio E

    2011-07-10

    In this work, we have investigated the kinetics of the biotechnological production of lactobionic acid (LBA) and sorbitol by the catalytic action of glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFOR) and glucono-δ-lactonase (GL) enzymes. The cells of bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ATCC 29191 containing this enzymatic complex were submitted to permeabilization and reticulation procedures. The effect of the concentration of substrates on the rate of product formation using a mobilized cell system was investigated. The application of higher fructose concentration seems to not affect the initial rate of formation of the bionic acid. Under conditions of low initial concentration of lactose, the experimental kinetic data of the bi-substrate reaction were modelled by assuming a rate equation of the classical ping-pong mechanism. The found kinetic parameters displayed a low affinity of the GFOR enzyme for both substrates. The enzymatic system did not exhibit normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics in response to a change of concentration of lactose, when fructose was held constant, presenting a sigmoid relationship between initial velocity and substrate concentration. A rate equation based on Hill kinetics was used to describe the kinetic behaviour of this enzyme-substituted reaction at higher lactose concentrations. The results from batch experiments using immobilized cells within Ca-alginate beads revealed that there is no pronounced occurrence of mass transfer limitations on LBA production for beads with 1.2 mm in average diameter. This discussion aids for defining the best operating conditions to maximize the productivity for LBA and sorbitol in this bioconversion and also for reducing the complexity of downstream separation processes.

  10. Lipid metabolism during bacterial growth, sporulation, and germination: kinetics of fatty acid and macromolecular synthesis during spore germination and outgrowth of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, K W; De Pinto, J; Bulla, L A

    1975-01-01

    The timing and kinetics of fatty acid synthesis are delineated for Bacillus thuringiensis spore germination and outgrowth by analyzing [U-14C]acetate and [2-3H]glycerol incorporation into chloroform-methanol-extractable and trichloroacetic acid-precipitable lipids. In addition to measurement of pulsed and continuous labeling of fatty acids, monitoring the incorporation of radioactive phenylalanine, thymidine, and uridine from the onset of germination through first cell division provides a profile of biochemical activities related to membrane differentiation and cellular development. Upon germination, ribonucleic acid synthesis is initiated, immediately followed by rapid and extensive fatty acid synthesis that in turn precedes protein, deoxyribonucleic acid and triglyceride synthesis. Significantly, formation of fatty acids from acetate exhibits further developmental periodicity in which a large transient increase in fatty acid synthetic activity coincides with the approach of cell division. Radiorespirometric analyses indicates only slight oxidative decarboxylation of acetate and corroborates the extreme involvement of acetate in specific fatty acid biosynthetic reactions throughout cellular modification. These findings graphically demonstrate an intimate association of fatty acid metabolism with commitment to spore outgrowth and subsequent cell division.

  11. Inhibition of potato lipoxygenase by linoleyl hydroxamic acid: kinetic and EPR spectral evidence for a two-step reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A; Reddy, C Channa

    2002-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of an electrophoretically pure potato tuber lipoxygenase (ptLOX) was studied by EPR spectroscopy. An EPR spectrum of the 'native' ptLOX recorded at 4.5+/-0.5 K showed signals of a high-spin (pseudo) axial Fe(3+) with a g-value of approx. 6.3+/-0.1 with a shoulder at g=5.9+/-0.1, and a rhombic Fe(3+) signal at g=4.35+/-0.05. When the enzyme was treated with a 2-fold molar excess of 13(S)-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid [13(S)-HPODE], a 3-fold increase in the integral intensity of the g=6.3 signal was observed, indicating that 25% of the native ptLOX iron was in ferrous state. The positional isomer 9(S)-HPODE caused similar spectral changes. Therefore the catalytic centre of ptLOX appears to accommodate both positional isomers of linoleic acid hydroperoxides in a manner that ensures proper alignment of their hydroperoxy groups with the iron centre of the enzyme. Treatment of the Fe(3+)-ptLOX form with a 3-fold molar excess of linoleyl hydroxamic acid (LHA) completely quenched the g=6.3 signal. Concurrently, a dramatic increase in the signal at g=4.35 was detected, which was attributed to a newly formed LHA-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. The spectral characteristics of the complex are similar to those of a 4-nitrocatechol-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. From these observations, we conclude that LHA did not reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), but rather formed a LHA-Fe(3+)-ptLOX complex. Formation of such a complex may be responsible for the inhibitory activity of LHA, at least in the initial stages of enzyme inhibition. A prolonged 15 min incubation of the complex at 23+/-1 degrees C led to the partial quenching of the g=4.35 signal. The quenching is attributed to the reduction of Fe(3+)-ptLOX by LHA, with concomitant formation of its oxidation product(s). A kinetic scheme for the inhibition is proposed. PMID:11985498

  12. Extracellular Loop 2 of the Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 Mediates Allosterism of a Phenylacetamide Ago-Allosteric ModulatorS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nicola J.; Ward, Richard J.; Stoddart, Leigh A.; Hudson, Brian D.; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Morris, Joanne C.; Tränkle, Christian; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Adams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Allosteric agonists are powerful tools for exploring the pharmacology of closely related G protein-coupled receptors that have nonselective endogenous ligands, such as the short chain fatty acids at free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41, respectively). We explored the molecular mechanisms mediating the activity of 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide (4-CMTB), a recently described phenylacetamide allosteric agonist and allosteric modulator of endogenous ligand function at human FFA2, by combining our previous knowledge of the orthosteric binding site with targeted examination of 4-CMTB structure-activity relationships and mutagenesis and chimeric receptor generation. Here we show that 4-CMTB is a selective agonist for FFA2 that binds to a site distinct from the orthosteric site of the receptor. Ligand structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the N-thiazolyl amide is likely to provide hydrogen bond donor/acceptor interactions with the receptor. Substitution at Leu173 or the exchange of the entire extracellular loop 2 of FFA2 with that of FFA3 was sufficient to reduce or ablate, respectively, allosteric communication between the endogenous and allosteric agonists. Thus, we conclude that extracellular loop 2 of human FFA2 is required for transduction of cooperative signaling between the orthosteric and an as-yet-undefined allosteric binding site of the FFA2 receptor that is occupied by 4-CMTB. PMID:21498659

  13. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  14. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  15. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flufenamic acid is a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yuan; Li, Kai; Yan, Qiaojing; Koizumi, Schuichi; Shi, Liye; Takahashi, Shuhei; Zhu, Ying; Matsue, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masayuki; Kitamura, Masanori; Yao, Jian

    2011-10-01

    Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties. In addition, it modulates multiple channel activities. The mechanisms underlying the pharmacological actions of FFA are presently unclear. Given that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has both anti-inflammatory and channel-regulating functions, we examined whether FFA induces AMPK activation. 1) Exposure of several different types of cells to FFA resulted in an elevation of AMPKα phosphorylation at Thr172. This effect of FFA was reproduced by functionally and structurally similar mefenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, niflumic acid, and meclofenamic acid. 2) FFA-induced activation of AMPK was largely abolished by the treatment of cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester) (an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator) or depletion of extracellular Ca(2+), whereas it was mimicked by stimulation of cells with the Ca(2+) ionophore 5-(methylamino)-2-({(2R,3R,6S,8S,9R,11R)-3,9,11-trimethyl-8-[(1S)-1-methyl-2-oxo-2-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)ethyl]-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undec-2-yl}methyl)-1,3-benzoxazole-4-carboxylic acid (A23187) or ionomycin. 3) FFA triggered a rise in intracellular Ca(2+), which was abolished by cyclosporine, a blocker of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Cyclosporine also abolished FFA-induced activation of AMPK. 4) Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) with 7-oxo-7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benz[de]isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid acetate (STO-609) or down-regulation of CaMKKβ with short interfering RNA largely abrogated FFA-induced activation of AMPK. 5) FFA significantly suppressed nuclear factor-κB activity and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression triggered by interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α. This suppression was also largely abrogated by STO-609. Taken together, we conclude that FFA induces AMPK activation through the Ca(2+)-CaMKKβ pathway

  16. Omega-3 free fatty acids inhibit tamoxifen-induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufan; Guo, Yang; Wu, Yikuan; Zhu, Shenglong; He, Zhao; Chen, Yong Q

    2015-04-03

    Fish oil, which contains omega-3 fatty acids mainly in the form of triglycerides, has benefits for reducing breast cancer risk, similar to tamoxifen action. However, it remains to be elucidated whether the combination of omega-3 free fatty acid (ω-3FFA) with tamoxifen leads to improved treatment in breast cancer. In this study, we observed that ω-3FFA induces MCF-7 cell apoptosis to suppress cell growth. The treatment of breast cancer cells with ω-3FFA attenuated tamoxifen-induced cell apoptosis. ω-3FFA and tamoxifen significantly increased Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation levels in a dose and time dependent manner. Compared to ω-3FFA alone, the combination of tamoxifen with ω-3FFA significantly increased Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation levels. Because Erk1/2 and Akt activation has been linked to tamoxifen-related anti-estrogen resistance in breast cancer patients, these results indicate that ω-3FFA may interfere with the effects of tamoxifen in the prevention of breast cancer risk.

  17. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  18. Lipase-mediated enantioselective kinetic resolution of racemic acidic drugs in non-standard organic solvents: Direct chiral liquid chromatography monitoring and accurate determination of the enantiomeric excesses.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Aboul-Enein, Mohammed Nabil; El-Azzouny, Aida; El-Behairy, Mohammed F

    2010-02-12

    The enantioselective resolution of a set of racemic acidic compounds such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) of the group arylpropionic acid derivatives is demonstrated. Thus, a set of lipases were screened and manipulated in either the esterification or hydrolysis mode for the enantioselective kinetic resolution of these racemates in non-standard organic solvents. The accurate determination of the enantiomeric excesses of both substrate and product during such reaction is demonstrated. This was based on the development of a direct and reliable enantioselective high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous baseline separation of both substrate and product in one run without derivatization. This was achieved using the immobilized chiral stationary phase namely Chiralpak IB, a 3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate derivative of cellulose (the immobilized version of Chiralcel OD) which proved to be versatile for the monitoring of the lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of racemates in non-standard organic solvents.

  19. Adsorption of methyl orange and salicylic acid on a nano-transition metal composite: Kinetics, thermodynamic and electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Arshadi, M; Mousavinia, F; Amiri, M J; Faraji, A R

    2016-12-01

    In this work synthesis of Mn-nanoparticles (MnNPs) supported on the Schiff base modified nano-sized SiO2Al2O3 mixed-oxides (Si/Al) and its implementation as an adsorbent for the removal of organic pollutions such as methyl orange (MO) and salicylic acid (SA) was investigated. Si/Al were functionalized by grafting Schiff base ligand and in the next step, MnNPs were prepared over the modified nano sol-gel Si/Al. Structures and adsorption characteristics of the obtained organometallic-modified SiO2/Al2O3 mixed oxide were studied by several methods such as elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). EPR data of the immobilized manganese ions resulted that the transition state of active sites in the nano-adsorbent are in the form of Mn(II) ions at the surface. The adsorption properties of heterogeneous Mn(II) ions showed that this nano-adsorbent has very good potential to remove MO and SA ions from aqueous solution. The removal efficiency of the SAPAS@MnNPs towards MO reached out to 89.3 and 29.1% and for SA approached to 54.6 and 18.9% at 150 and 500mg/dm(3) initial organic pollution concentrations, respectively. To investigate the adsorption kinetic of Mn(II) ions onto the nano-sized support, pseudo first and pseudo second order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models have also been applied to the equilibrium adsorption data. The contact time to obtain equilibrium for maximum adsorption capacity was 45min. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature and it was well explained with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. No remarkable loss of removal capacity even after 8th times regeneration

  20. Cerebral lateralization of face-sensitive areas in left-handers: only the FFA does not get it right.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Henryk; Dricot, Laurence; Hanseeuw, Bernard; Rossion, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    Face perception is highly lateralized to the right hemisphere (RH) in humans, as supported originally by observations of face recognition impairment (prosopagnosia) following brain damage. Divided visual field presentations, neuroimaging and event-related potential studies have supported this view. While the latter studies are typically performed in right-handers, the few reported cases of prosopagnosia with unilateral left damage were left-handers, suggesting that handedness may shift or qualify the lateralization of face perception. We tested this hypothesis by recording the whole set of face-sensitive areas in 11 left-handers, using a face-localizer paradigm in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (faces, cars, and their phase-scrambled versions). All face-sensitive areas identified (superior temporal sulcus, inferior occipital cortex, anterior infero-temporal cortex, amygdala) were strongly right-lateralized in left-handers, this right lateralization bias being as large as in a population of right-handers (40) tested with the same paradigm (Rossion et al., 2012). The notable exception was the so-called 'Fusiform face area' (FFA), an area that was slightly left lateralized in the population of left-handers. Since the left FFA is localized closely to an area sensitive to word form in the human brain ('Visual Word Form Area' - VWFA), the enhanced left lateralization of the FFA in left-handers may be due to a decreased competition with the representation of words. The implications for the neural basis of face perception, aetiology of brain lateralization in general, and prosopagnosia are also discussed.

  1. Plasma HDL reduces nonesterified fatty acid hydroperoxides originating from oxidized LDL: a mechanism for its antioxidant ability.

    PubMed

    Kotosai, Mari; Shimada, Sachiko; Kanda, Mai; Matsuda, Namiko; Sekido, Keiko; Shimizu, Yoshibumi; Tokumura, Akira; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji

    2013-06-01

    The antioxidant property of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is thought to be involved in potential anti-atherogenic effects but the exact mechanism is not known. We aimed to reveal the contribution of HDL on the elimination of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) derived from oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Oxidized LDL prepared by copper ion-induced oxidation contained nonesterified fatty acid hydroperoxides (FFA-OOH) and lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPtdCho), in addition to cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides (CE-OOH) and phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PtdCho-OOH). A platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) inhibitor suppressed formation of FFA-OOH and lysoPtdCho in oxidized LDL. Among LOOH species, FFA-OOH was preferentially reduced by incubating oxidized LDL with HDL. HDL exhibited selective FFA-OOH reducing ability if it was mixed with a liposomal solution containing FFA-OOH, CE-OOH and PtdCho-OOH. Two-electron reduction of the hydroperoxy group to the hydroxy group was confirmed by the formation of 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid from 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid in HPLC analyses. This reducing effect was also found in apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1). FFA-OOH released from PtdCho-OOH due to PAF-AH activity in oxidized LDL undergo two-electron reduction by the reducing ability of apoA1 in HDL. This preferential reduction of FFA-OOH may participate in the mechanism of the antioxidant property of HDL.

  2. A study of pH-dependent photodegradation of amiloride by a multivariate curve resolution approach to combined kinetic and acid-base titration UV data.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Michele; Ioele, Giuseppina; Mas, Sílvia; Tauler, Romà; Ragno, Gaetano

    2012-11-21

    Amiloride photostability at different pH values was studied in depth by applying Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) to the UV spectrophotometric data from drug solutions exposed to stressing irradiation. Resolution of all degradation photoproducts was possible by simultaneous spectrophotometric analysis of kinetic photodegradation and acid-base titration experiments. Amiloride photodegradation showed to be strongly dependent on pH. Two hard modelling constraints were sequentially used in MCR-ALS for the unambiguous resolution of all the species involved in the photodegradation process. An amiloride acid-base system was defined by using the equilibrium constraint, and the photodegradation pathway was modelled taking into account the kinetic constraint. The simultaneous analysis of photodegradation and titration experiments revealed the presence of eight different species, which were differently distributed according to pH and time. Concentration profiles of all the species as well as their pure spectra were resolved and kinetic rate constants were estimated. The values of rate constants changed with pH and under alkaline conditions the degradation pathway and photoproducts also changed. These results were compared to those obtained by LC-MS analysis from drug photodegradation experiments. MS analysis allowed the identification of up to five species and showed the simultaneous presence of more than one acid-base equilibrium.

  3. Developments in bile acid kinetic measurements using (13)C and (2)H: 10(5) times improved sensitivity during the last 40 years.

    PubMed

    Stellaard, Frans; Brufau, Gemma; Boverhof, Renze; Jonkers, Elles Zwanet; Boer, Theo; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-12-01

    Bile acid kinetics involve the measurement of pool sizes and turnover rates of individual bile acids. The technique is based on isotope dilution and was first described in the 1950s using radioactive (14)C-labelled cholic acid (CA). It took until the 1970s before stable isotopes were introduced for this purpose ((13)C, (2)H) and isotope analysis methods were developed for CA and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) applying gas chromatography/electron impact mass spectrometry. Until the 1980s, the isotope enrichment measurements were performed in bile samples aspirated from the duodenum. Thereafter, methodology became available allowing measurements to be performed in blood requiring at least 2 ml serum samples. Simultaneous measurement of kinetics of metabolically dependent CA and deoxycholic acid using (13)C and (2)H labels was introduced. Until the 1990s, this technique was only possible in adult humans due to the large sample sizes. Introduction of pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatisation and electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECN-MS) reduced the sample volume to 50 microl serum. This allowed isotope abundance measurement of CA in rats and in mice. However, repetitive collection of 100 microl blood samples in mice is too invasive (collection via the orbita) and exhaustive. Therefore, the method development is now focussing on enhanced sensitivity and reduction of blank effects originating from the sample preparation. The final goal is to determine CA isotope enrichments in 20 microl mouse blood obtained from the tail vein. This paper shows the feasibility of reaching this goal.

  4. Performance, kinetics, and equilibrium of methylene blue adsorption on biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Dongmei; Wan, Shungang; Yu, Zebin

    2015-12-01

    Biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids at low temperatures was utilized as adsorbent to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that the carboxyl group was introduced on the biochar surface. Adsorption experiment data indicated that eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric acid showed higher MB adsorption efficiency than that modified with tartaric and acetic acids. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing MB adsorption on biochar compared with pseudo-first-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The calculated values of ΔG(0) and ΔH(0) indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption process. MB adsorption on biochar followed the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities for eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids were 178.57, 99.01, and 29.94 mg g(-1), respectively, at 35°C.

  5. Influence of organic acids on kinetic release of chromium in soil contaminated with leather factory waste in the presence of some adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) (MgO, ZnO, TiO2) and clay minerals (bentonite, zeolite) on the release of chromium (Cr) from leather factory waste (LFW) and LFW treated soil using organic acids. Chromium release from all treatments was studied in the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and CaCl2 solutions. The results showed that, in all treatments, organic acids released more Cr than inorganic salt (CaCl2). The release of Cr by citric acid was higher than that by oxalic acid. In LFW treated soil and LFW, the release of Cr from the all treatments with NPs was less than that from the clay mineral treatments. On the other hand, in the presence of organic acids, Cr release by NPs and clay minerals decreased. Two kinetic models including pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order model were tested to describe the time dependent Cr release data. Among the kinetic models used, the pseudo-second-order model generally gave the best fits to experimental data. Before and after release experiments, Cr in LFW, treated LFW, control soil and LFW treated soils were fractionated. In all treatments, the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES). The organic acids were effective in reducing the exchangeable (EXC), bound to organic matter (OM) and bound to carbonate (CAR) fractions of Cr in all treatments, whereas, after release of Cr from treated soils, Cr remained mainly in the RES fraction. The application of NPs and clay minerals in soil led to a significant transformation of Cr from mobile fractions to the RES fraction. Therefore, organic ligands played a dominant role in mobility and bioavailability of Cr and the removal of Cr by adsorbents.

  6. Fatty acid compositions of triglycerides and free fatty acids in sebum depend on amount of triglycerides, and do not differ in presence or absence of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Numata, Shigeki; Matsusue, Miyuki; Mashima, Yasuo; Miyawaki, Masaaki; Yamada, Shunji; Yagami, Akiko; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    To clarify the influence of the fatty acid composition of sebum in acne vulgaris, we investigated the amounts and fatty acid compositions of triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA), and the amounts of cutaneous superficial Propionibacterium acnes in acne patients and healthy subjects. The foreheads of 18 female patients, 10 male patients, 10 healthy females and 10 healthy males were studied in a Japanese population. There were significant differences in the amounts of sebum, TG and cutaneous superficial P. acnes, as well as the fatty acid compositions of TG and FFA between acne patients and healthy subjects in females. Their fatty acid compositions were correlated with the amount of TG with or without acne. It was clarified that the fatty acid compositions of TG and FFA depended on the amount of TG, and there were no differences in the fatty acid composition in the presence and absence of acne.

  7. Ferric sulphate catalysed esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ooi, Chun Weng; Motala, Nafisa Osman; Ismail, Mohd Anas Farhan

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) in waste cooking oil catalysed by ferric sulphate was studied as a pre-treatment step for biodiesel production. The effects of reaction time, methanol to oil ratio, catalyst concentration and temperature on the conversion of FFA were investigated on a laboratory scale. The results showed that the conversion of FFA reached equilibrium after an hour, and was positively dependent on the methanol to oil molar ratio and temperature. An optimum catalyst concentration of 2 wt.% gave maximum FFA conversion of 59.2%. For catalyst loadings of 2 wt.% and below, this catalysed esterification was proposed to follow a pseudo-homogeneous pathway akin to mineral acid-catalysed esterification, driven by the H(+) ions produced through the hydrolysis of metal complex [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+) (aq).

  8. Polar modified post-cross-linked resin and its adsorption toward salicylic acid from aqueous solution: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenyu; He, Chunlian; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, You-Nian

    2015-08-01

    A novel polar modified post-cross-linked resin PDMPA was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for adsorption of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PDMPA was prepared by a suspension polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) and divinylbenzene (DVB), a Friedel-Crafts reaction and an amination reaction. After characterization of the chemical and pore structure of PDMPA, the adsorption behaviors of salicylic acid on PDMPA were determined in comparison with the precursor resins. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of salicylic acid on PDMPA was much larger than the precursor resins and the equilibrium data were correlated by both of the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The pseudo-second-order rate equation fitted the kinetic data better than the pseudo-first-order rate equation, and the micropore diffusion model could characterize the kinetic data very well. The dynamic experimental results showed that the breakthrough point and saturated point of salicylic acid on PDMPA were 40.3 and 92.4BV (1BV=10mL) at a feed concentration of 995.8mg/L and a flow rate of 1.4mL/min, and the resin column could be regenerated by 16.0BV of a mixture desorption solvent containing 0.01mol/L of NaOH (w/v) and 50% of ethanol (v/v).

  9. Thermodynamics of axial substitution and kinetics of reactions with amino acids for the paddlewheel complex tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III).

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo L S R; van Eldik, Rudi; de Oliveira Silva, Denise

    2012-06-18

    The known paddlewheel, tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III), offers a versatile synthetic route to a novel class of antitumor diruthenium(II,III) metallo drugs, where the equatorial ligands are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory carboxylates. This complex was studied here as a soluble starting prototype model for antitumor analogues to elucidate the reactivity of the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) framework. Thermodynamic studies on equilibration reactions for axial substitution of water by chloride and kinetic studies on reactions of the diaqua complexes with the amino acids glycine, cysteine, histidine, and tryptophan were performed. The standard thermodynamic reaction parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔV° were determined and showed that both of the sequential axial substitution reactions are enthalpy driven. Kinetic rate laws and rate constants were determined for the axial substitution reactions of coordinated water by the amino acids that gave the corresponding aqua(amino acid)-Ru(2) substituted species. The results revealed that the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) paddlewheel framework remained stable during the axial ligand substitution reactions and was also mostly preserved in the presence of the amino acids.

  10. Bitter gourd seed fatty acid rich in 9c,11t,13t-conjugated linolenic acid induces apoptosis and up-regulates the GADD45, p53 and PPARgamma in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Masashi; Sahara, Takehiko; Suzuki, Rikako; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Takuji; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) seed oil (BGO) is a unique oil which contains 9cis, 11trans, 13tran