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Sample records for acid ffa kinetics

  1. Development and Characterization of a Potent Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1) Fluorescent Tracer.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Hudson, Brian D; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Milligan, Graeme; Ulven, Trond

    2016-05-26

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) is a potential target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although several potent agonists have been described, there remains a strong need for suitable tracers to interrogate ligand binding to this receptor. We address this by exploring fluorophore-tethering to known potent FFA1 agonists. This led to the development of 4, a high affinity FFA1 tracer with favorable and polarity-dependent fluorescent properties. A close to ideal overlap between the emission spectrum of the NanoLuciferase receptor tag and the excitation spectrum of 4 enabled the establishment of a homogeneous BRET-based binding assay suitable for both detailed kinetic studies and high throughput competition binding studies. Using 4 as a tracer demonstrated that the compound acts fully competitively with selected synthetic agonists but not with lauric acid and allowed for the characterization of binding affinities of a diverse selection of known FFA1 agonists, indicating that 4 will be a valuable tool for future studies at FFA1. PMID:27074625

  2. A Fall in Plasma Free Fatty Acid (FFA) Level Activates the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Independent of Plasma Glucose: Evidence for Brain Sensing of Circulating FFA

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Oh, Ki-Sook; Kang, Insug

    2012-01-01

    The brain responds to a fall in blood glucose by activating neuroendocrine mechanisms for its restoration. It is unclear whether the brain also responds to a fall in plasma free fatty acids (FFA) to activate mechanisms for its restoration. We examined whether lowering plasma FFA increases plasma corticosterone or catecholamine levels and, if so, whether the brain is involved in these responses. Plasma FFA levels were lowered in rats with three independent antilipolytic agents: nicotinic acid (NA), insulin, and the A1 adenosine receptor agonist SDZ WAG 994 with plasma glucose clamped at basal levels. Lowering plasma FFA with these agents all increased plasma corticosterone, but not catecholamine, within 1 h, accompanied by increases in plasma ACTH. These increases in ACTH or corticosterone were abolished when falls in plasma FFA were prevented by Intralipid during NA or insulin infusion. In addition, the NA-induced increases in plasma ACTH were completely prevented by administration of SSR149415, an arginine vasopressin receptor antagonist, demonstrating that the hypothalamus is involved in these responses. Taken together, the present data suggest that the brain may sense a fall in plasma FFA levels and activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to increase plasma ACTH and corticosterone, which would help restore FFA levels. Thus, the brain may be involved in the sensing and control of circulating FFA levels. PMID:22669895

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and other FFA4 agonists inhibit growth factor signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B; Fix, Louise C; Galvan, Brianna M; Meier, Kathryn E

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4'-methyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891-induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor-induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation.

  4. Liver free fatty acid (FFA) accumulation as an indicator of ischemic injury during cold preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, E.M.; Kang, Y.; DeWolf, A.M.; Lin, M.R.; Bleyaert, A.L.; Winter, P.M.

    1987-05-01

    Reliable assessment of hepatic viability prior to harvest and transplant could improve graft success and aid in evaluating the efficacy of liver preservation techniques. Hepatic tissue metabolites, protein (Pr) synthesis, and ATP have been studied, but none reliably correlate with hepatic viability. Therefore, they studied changes in liver FFA relative to changes in ATP and Pr synthesis during cold ischemic preservation. Rats mechanically ventilated on 0.5% isoflurane/70% N/sub 2/O/30% O/sub 2/ were heparinized and their livers perfused with air-equilibrated Euro-Collins solution (ECS) at 0-4/sup 0/C and kept on ice. A piece of the liver was removed after 0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h of preservation for ATP and FFA analysis. A portion of the liver was sliced (250 ..mu..m thick) and incubated in vitro for /sup 14/C-lysine incorporation in albumin. ATP, FFA and Pr synthesis were unchanged in the first 8 h, but markedly decreased between 8 and 12 h with little change thereafter. In contrast, between 8 and 48 h, arachidonic and stearic acids increased by 5 and 2-fold, respectively. Changes in ATP and Pr synthesis correlate with the empirically derived clinical maximum of 8 to 12 h preservation. FFA accumulation appears to reflect hepatic ischemic injury and may be a means of evaluating the quality of a donor liver.

  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Other FFA4 Agonists Inhibit Growth Factor Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Quisenberry, Chrystal B.; Fix, Louise C.; Galvan, Brianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) are proposed to have many beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanisms underlying their potential cancer preventative effects are unclear. G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1/GPR40 and FFA4/GPR120, specifically bind n-3 FAs as agonist ligands. In this study, we examined the effects of n-3 FAs in human prostate cancer cell lines. Initial studies established that the long-chain n-3 FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid, inhibit proliferation of DU145 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogenic lipid mediator. When added alone to serum-starved DU145 cells, EPA transiently activates signaling events, including p70S6K phosphorylation. However, when added 15 minutes prior to LPA, EPA suppresses LPA-induced activating phosphorylations of ERK, FAK, and p70S6K, and expression of the matricellular protein CCN1. The rapid onset of the inhibitory action of EPA suggested involvement of a GPCR. Further studies showed that DU145 and PC-3 cells express mRNA and protein for both FFA4 and FFA1. TUG-891 (4-[(4-fluoro-4′-methyl[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy]-benzenepropanoic acid), a selective agonist for FFA4, exerts inhibitory effects on LPA- and epidermal growth factor–induced proliferation and migration, similar to EPA, in DU145 and PC-3 cells. The effects of TUG-891 and EPA are readily reversible. The FFA1/FFA4 agonist GW9508 (4-[[(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl]amino]-benzenepropranoic acid) likewise inhibits proliferation at doses that block FFA4. Knockdown of FFA4 expression prevents EPA- and TUG-891–induced inhibition of growth and migration. Together, these results indicate that activation of FFA4 initiates signaling events that can inhibit growth factor–induced signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppression of cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25491146

  6. Kinetic study of free fatty acid esterification reaction catalyzed by recoverable and reusable hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Hung

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic performance and recoverability of several homogeneous acid catalysts (hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids) for the esterification of enzyme-hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) and methanol were studied. Although all tested catalysts drove the reaction to a high yield, hydrochloric acid was the only catalyst that could be considerably recovered and reused. The kinetics of the esterification reaction catalyzed by hydrochloric acid was investigated under varying catalyst loading (0.1-1M), reaction temperature (303-343K), and methanol/FFA molar ratio (1:1-20:1). In addition, a pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model incorporating the above factors was developed. A good agreement (r(2)=0.98) between the experimental and calculated data was obtained, thus proving the reliability of the model. Furthermore, the reusability of hydrochloric acid in FFA esterification can be predicted by the developed model. The recoverable hydrochloric acid achieved high yields of FFA esterification within five times of reuse.

  7. The short-chain fatty acid receptor, FFA2, contributes to gestational glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Miles; Priyadarshini, Medha; Gibbons, Sean M; Angueira, Anthony R; Brodsky, Michael; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gilbert, Jack A; Lowe, William L; Layden, Brian T

    2015-11-15

    The structure of the human gastrointestinal microbiota can change during pregnancy, which may influence gestational metabolism; however, a mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we observed that in wild-type (WT) mice the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes increased during pregnancy. Along with these changes, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are mainly produced through gut microbiota fermentation, significantly changed in both the cecum and peripheral blood throughout gestation in these mice. SCFAs are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) such as free fatty acid receptor-2 (FFA2), and we have previously demonstrated that the fatty acid receptor-2 gene (Ffar2) expression is higher in pancreatic islets during pregnancy. Using female Ffar2-/- mice, we explored the physiological relevance of signaling through this GPCR and found that Ffar2-deficient female mice developed fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance in the setting of impaired insulin secretion compared with WT mice during, but not before, pregnancy. Insulin tolerance tests were similar in Ffar2-/- and WT mice before and during pregnancy. Next, we examined the role of FFA2 in gestational β-cell mass, observing that Ffar2-/- mice had diminished gestational expansion of β-cells during pregnancy. Interestingly, mouse genotype had no significant impact on the composition of the gut microbiome, but did affect the observed SCFA profiles, suggesting a functional difference in the microbiota. Together, these results suggest a potential link between increased Ffar2 expression in islets and the alteration of circulating SCFA levels, possibly explaining how changes in the gut microbiome contribute to gestational glucose homeostasis. PMID:26394664

  8. Determination of plasma-free fatty acid kinetics with tracers: Methodologic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, J.M.; Jensen, M.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Plasma-free fatty acids (FFA) are an important source of energy for a variety of tissues. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the measurement of FFA kinetics in vivo, using radiolabeled or stable isotopic tracers. Standard techniques for measurement of FFA-specific activity are relatively imprecise and have limited sensitivity. The authors have developed a method for determination of the concentration and specific activity of individual plasma FFA that is precise (coefficient of variation less than 2%) and sensitive (detection limit in the high femptomolar to low picomolar range). Using this method, one can measure the kinetics of three or more long-chain fatty acids simultaneously. Its sensitivity is a particular advantage if one wishes to measure low rates of FFA turnover such as are encountered during hyperinsulinemia. It has been suggested that, for optimal accuracy in the determination of substrate kinetics, the tracer should be administered in the left ventricle and mixed venous blood samples should be obtained from the right heart. They have conducted experiments in dogs which demonstrate that peripheral tracer infusion and more conventional arterial (or arterialized venous) sampling actually provide more accurate estimates of FFA turnover; this is fortunate, since intracardiac infusion and sampling are not practical for human studies. 39 references.

  9. FFA International Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Future Farmers of America, Washington, DC.

    The document provides a list of 10 of the international agriculture activities available for the Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapters' participation: Work Experience Abroad (WEA); Development Projects; FFA Study Seminars; Care, Inc.; Walk for Development; Agriculutural Seminars; Heifer Project; CROP; World Neighbors; and Meals for Millions.…

  10. Density distribution of free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2)-expressing and GLP-1-producing enteroendocrine L cells in human and rat lower intestine, and increased cell numbers after ingestion of fructo-oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Tanaka, Ryo; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2011-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a multifunctional hormone in glucose metabolism and intestinal function released by enteroendocrine L-cells. The plasma concentration of GLP-1 is increased by indigestible carbohydrates and luminal infusion of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). However, the triggers and modulators of the GLP-1 release remain unclear. We hypothesized that SCFAs produced by bacterial fermentation are involved in enteroendocrine cell proliferation and hormone release through free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2, also known as FFAR2 or GPR43) in the large intestine. Fructo-oligosaccharide (Fructo-OS), fermentable indigestible carbohydrate, was used as a source of SCFAs. Rats were fed an indigestible-carbohydrate-free diet (control) or a 5% Fructo-OS-containing diet for 28 days. FFA2-, GLP-1-, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-positive enteroendocrine cells were quantified immunohistochemically in the colon, cecum, and terminal ileum. The same analysis was performed in surgical specimens from human lower intestine. The coexpression of FFA2 with GLP-1 was investigated both in rats and humans. Fructo-OS supplementation in rats increased the densities of FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells in rat proximal colon, by over two-fold, relative to control, in parallel with GLP-1-containing L-cells. The segmental distributions of these cells in human were similar to rats fed the control diet. The FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells were GLP-1-containing L-cells, but not 5-HT-containing EC cells, in both human and rat colon and terminal ileum. Fermentable indigestible carbohydrate increases the number of FFA2-positive L-cells in the proximal colon. FFA2 activation by SCFAs might be an important trigger for produce and release GLP-1 by enteroendocrine L-cells in the lower intestine.

  11. Comprehensive kinetic studies of acidic oil continuous esterification by cation-exchange resin in fixed bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Feng, Yaohui; Ren, Yanbiao; Liu, Xuan; Gao, Aoran; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Li, Jianxin

    2012-06-01

    Biodiesel produced by esterification from molar ratio of methanol to free fatty acid (FFA) as 25:1 in presence of triglyceride was carried out with cation-exchange resin as a heterogeneous catalyst in three different scales of fixed bed reactors from minireactor (6.8 mm × 110 mm) to pilot scale reactor (70 mm × 1260 mm) at 338 K. The kinetic study of esterification was undertaken in terms of pseudo-homogeneous mechanism and performed as a first order reaction with elimination of the solid-liquid internal and external mass transfer resistances. Moreover, a kinetic model of FFA esterification was developed to illustrate the relationship between the FFA conversion and the catalyst bed height of fixed bed reactor. The model was also suitable for various resins in fixed bed reactor. The theoretical predictions were in agreement with the experimental data with root mean square (RMS) errors <10.

  12. Functional Subdomains within Human FFA

    PubMed Central

    Çukur, Tolga; Huth, Alexander G.; Nishimoto, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is a well-studied human brain region that shows strong activation for faces. In functional MRI studies, FFA is often assumed to be a homogeneous collection of voxels with similar visual tuning. To test this assumption, we used natural movies and a quantitative voxelwise modeling and decoding framework to estimate category tuning profiles for individual voxels within FFA. We find that the responses in most FFA voxels are strongly enhanced by faces, as reported in previous studies. However, we also find that responses of individual voxels are selectively enhanced or suppressed by a wide variety of other categories and that these broader tuning profiles differ across FFA voxels. Cluster analysis of category tuning profiles across voxels reveals three spatially segregated functional subdomains within FFA. These subdomains differ primarily in their responses for nonface categories, such as animals, vehicles, and communication verbs. Furthermore, this segregation does not depend on the statistical threshold used to define FFA from responses to functional localizers. These results suggest that voxels within FFA represent more diverse information about object and action categories than generally assumed. PMID:24133276

  13. Prevocational Agribusiness and the FFA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kenneth A.

    1975-01-01

    The author discusses the development of the career education concept relating to agribusiness at the junior high and middle school level. In the prevocational agribusiness program, it is also effective to supplement the program with an FFA chapter. (JB)

  14. Kinetic study on microwave-assisted esterification of free fatty acids derived from Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Thanh; Yusup, Suzana; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great attention has been paid to advanced microwave technology that can be used to markedly enhance the biodiesel production process. Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil containing high free fatty acids (FFA) was utilized as a non-edible feedstock for biodiesel production. Microwave-assisted esterification pretreatment was conducted to reduce the FFA content for promoting a high-quality product in the next step. At optimum condition, the conversion was achieved 94.43% using 2wt% of sulfuric acid as catalyst where as 20.83% conversion was attained without catalyst. The kinetics of this esterification reaction was also studied to determine the influence of factors on the rate of reaction and reaction mechanisms. The results indicated that microwave-assisted esterification was of endothermic second-order reaction with the activation energy of 53.717kJ/mol. PMID:27019128

  15. Kinetic study on microwave-assisted esterification of free fatty acids derived from Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Thanh; Yusup, Suzana; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great attention has been paid to advanced microwave technology that can be used to markedly enhance the biodiesel production process. Ceiba pentandra Seed Oil containing high free fatty acids (FFA) was utilized as a non-edible feedstock for biodiesel production. Microwave-assisted esterification pretreatment was conducted to reduce the FFA content for promoting a high-quality product in the next step. At optimum condition, the conversion was achieved 94.43% using 2wt% of sulfuric acid as catalyst where as 20.83% conversion was attained without catalyst. The kinetics of this esterification reaction was also studied to determine the influence of factors on the rate of reaction and reaction mechanisms. The results indicated that microwave-assisted esterification was of endothermic second-order reaction with the activation energy of 53.717kJ/mol.

  16. Fatty acid and glycerol kinetics in septic patients and in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The response to glucose infusion and parenteral feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J H; Wolfe, R R

    1987-01-01

    The rates of glycerol and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics in normal volunteers (VOL), non-weight-losing (NWL) gastrointestinal cancer patients, weight-losing (WL) gastrointestinal cancer patients, and in severely septic patients, using constant infusions of d-glycerol and 1-13C palmitic acid; were determined. Rates of FFA oxidation have also been quantitated. Measurements were made in the basal state, during glucose infusion (4 mg/kg/min), and during total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Rates of glycerol and FFA appearance (Ra) in volunteers and NWL cancer patients were similar, and in both groups there was a significant suppression after glucose infusion. The basal Ra values for glycerol and FFA were 2.4 +/- 0.2 and 6.5 +/- 0.8 mumol/kg/min, respectively, in the volunteers, and in the NWL cancer patients the corresponding values were 2.7 +/- 0.4 and 7.1 +/- 1.1 mumol/kg/min (not significantly different). Compared with the volunteers, the rates of glycerol and FFA turnover were significantly elevated in both septic patients and WL cancer patients. The values for glycerol and FFA Ra were 6.3 +/- 1.1 and 13.1 +/- 3.0 mumol/kg/min, respectively, in the septic patients. The corresponding values were 4.1 +/- 0.4 and 11.7 +/- 1.6 mumol/kg/min in the WL cancer patients. In contrast to the response seen in the volunteers and NWL cancer patients, glucose infusion did not suppress lipolysis in either the septic or WL cancer patients. In all groups studied, glucose infusion resulted in an increase in FFA recycling. Despite the fact that the WL cancer patients had an increased FFA availability, they were significantly less able to oxidize either endogenous FFA or infused lipid when compared with NWL cancer patients (the basal % of FFA uptake oxidized in WL cancer patients was 10 +/- 2% vs. 18 +/- 3% in NWL cancer patients). In contrast, the septic patients had an enhanced capacity to oxidize either endogenous FFA or infused lipid (the basal % of FFA uptake oxidized was 40 +/- 8

  17. Reaction kinetics of free fatty acids esterification in palm fatty acid distillate using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi, Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new strategy of preparing novel carbon-based solid acids has been developed. In this research, the esterification reactions of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) with methanol, using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst from biomass wastes as catalyst, were studied. In this study, the coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalysts were synthesized by sulfonating the coconut shell biochar using concentrated H2SO4. The kinetics of free fatty acid (FFA) esterification in PFAD using a coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst was also studied. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1-10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (6:1-12:1), and the reaction temperature (40-60°C) were studied for the conversion of PFAD to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimal conditions were an methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 12:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60°C. The proposed kinetic model shows a reversible second order reaction and represents all the experimental data satisfactorily, providing deeper insight into the kinetics of the reaction.

  18. The FFA--A Model for FFJ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; Haye, Winston

    1977-01-01

    Favorable attitudes toward Future Farmers of America (FFA) activities in providing leadership experiences for vocational agriculture students, shown by a survey of Jamaican high school administrators and vocational agriculture teachers, indicated that selected FFA activities could be transported to Jamaica. A proposed program of activities for a…

  19. The New FFA--Relevant, Flexible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Future Farmers of America, Washington, DC.

    To make education more relevant, the 1972 national seminar sought ways of integrating the Future Farmers of America (FFA) program with the broadened agricultural instruction program. Topics discussed included: (1) "Role of the FFA in the Changing Program of Agricultural Education" - William Gray (Moderator), (2) "But How Do We Get the Job Done?"…

  20. Crystallization kinetics of citric acid anhydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemdili, L.; Koutchoukali, O.; Bouhelassa, M.; Seidel, J.; Mameri, F.; Ulrich, J.

    2016-10-01

    The solubility curve, metastable zone width (MSZW) and Crystallization kinetics (nucleation and growth) were measured and estimated during batch crystallization of citric acid anhydrate (CAA). The solubility of citric acid in pure water was measured over the temperature range from 15 to 60 °C using a refractometer. The experimental data were correlated by the modified Apelblat equation. The MSZW was determined under four cooling rates for different citric acid concentrations by means of an ultrasonic technique. The primary nucleation kinetics of CAA was calculated based on these data and the polythermal method of Nyvlt. It was found that the MSZW obtained is in good agreement with literature. Crystal growth rates were calculated by two methods. The first one used seeded isothermal growth experiments (desupersaturation curve) and the derivatives method of Garside. The second method used the measurement of the dimension change of a single crystal in a microscopic cell at different supersaturation levels.

  1. Robust expertise effects in right FFA.

    PubMed

    McGugin, Rankin Williams; Newton, Allen T; Gore, John C; Gauthier, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is one of several areas in occipito-temporal cortex whose activity is correlated with perceptual expertise for objects. Here, we investigate the robustness of expertise effects in FFA and other areas to a strong task manipulation that increases both perceptual and attentional demands. With high-resolution fMRI at 7T, we measured responses to images of cars, faces and a category globally visually similar to cars (sofas) in 26 subjects who varied in expertise with cars, in (a) a low load 1-back task with a single object category and (b) a high load task in which objects from two categories were rapidly alternated and attention was required to both categories. The low load condition revealed several areas more active as a function of expertise, including both posterior and anterior portions of FFA bilaterally (FFA1/FFA2, respectively). Under high load, fewer areas were positively correlated with expertise and several areas were even negatively correlated, but the expertise effect in face-selective voxels in the anterior portion of FFA (FFA2) remained robust. Finally, we found that behavioral car expertise also predicted increased responses to sofa images but no behavioral advantages in sofa discrimination, suggesting that global shape similarity to a category of expertise is enough to elicit a response in FFA and other areas sensitive to experience, even when the category itself is not of special interest. The robustness of expertise effects in right FFA2 and the expertise effects driven by visual similarity both argue against attention being the sole determinant of expertise effects in extrastriate areas.

  2. Robust expertise effects in right FFA

    PubMed Central

    McGugin, Rankin Williams; Newton, Allen T; Gore, John C; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The fusiform face area (FFA) is one of several areas in occipito-temporal cortex whose activity is correlated with perceptual expertise for objects. Here, we investigate the robustness of expertise effects in FFA and other areas to a strong task manipulation that increases both perceptual and attentional demands. With high-resolution fMRI at 7Telsa, we measured responses to images of cars, faces and a category globally visually similar to cars (sofas) in 26 subjects who varied in expertise with cars, in (a) a low load 1-back task with a single object category and (b) a high load task in which objects from two categories rapidly alternated and attention was required to both categories. The low load condition revealed several areas more active as a function of expertise, including both posterior and anterior portions of FFA bilaterally (FFA1/FFA2 respectively). Under high load, fewer areas were positively correlated with expertise and several areas were even negatively correlated, but the expertise effect in face-selective voxels in the anterior portion of FFA (FFA2) remained robust. Finally, we found that behavioral car expertise also predicted increased responses to sofa images but no behavioral advantages in sofa discrimination, suggesting that global shape similarity to a category of expertise is enough to elicit a response in FFA and other areas sensitive to experience, even when the category itself is not of special interest. The robustness of expertise effects in right FFA2 and the expertise effects driven by visual similarity both argue against attention being the sole determinant of expertise effects in extrastriate areas. PMID:25192631

  3. Kinetics of Non-Catalytic Esterification of Free Fatty Acids Present in Jatropha Oil.

    PubMed

    Prasanna Rani, Karna Narayana; Ramana Neeharika, Tulasi Sri Venkata; Kumar, Thella Prathap; Satyavathi, Bankupalli; Sailu, Chintha

    2016-05-01

    Non-catalytic esterfication of free fatty acids (FFA) present in vegetable oils is an alternative pretreatment process for the biodiesel production. Biodiesel, consists of long-chain fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and is obtained from renewable sources such as vegetable oils or animal fat. This study presents kinetics of thermal esterification of free fatty acids present in jatropha oil with methanol. The effect of process parameters like reaction time (1-5 h), temperature (170-190°C) and oil to methanol ratio (1:3-1:5) at constant pressure was investigated. The optimal conditions were found to be oil to methanol ratio of 1:4, 190°C, at 27.1 bar and 5 h which gave a maximum conversion of 95.1%. A second order kinetic model for both forward and backward reactions was proposed to study the reaction system. A good agreement was observed between the experimental data and the model values. The activation energy for forward reaction and the heat of reaction were found to be 36.364 Kcal/mol and 1.74 Kcal/mol respectively.

  4. Kinetics of Non-Catalytic Esterification of Free Fatty Acids Present in Jatropha Oil.

    PubMed

    Prasanna Rani, Karna Narayana; Ramana Neeharika, Tulasi Sri Venkata; Kumar, Thella Prathap; Satyavathi, Bankupalli; Sailu, Chintha

    2016-05-01

    Non-catalytic esterfication of free fatty acids (FFA) present in vegetable oils is an alternative pretreatment process for the biodiesel production. Biodiesel, consists of long-chain fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and is obtained from renewable sources such as vegetable oils or animal fat. This study presents kinetics of thermal esterification of free fatty acids present in jatropha oil with methanol. The effect of process parameters like reaction time (1-5 h), temperature (170-190°C) and oil to methanol ratio (1:3-1:5) at constant pressure was investigated. The optimal conditions were found to be oil to methanol ratio of 1:4, 190°C, at 27.1 bar and 5 h which gave a maximum conversion of 95.1%. A second order kinetic model for both forward and backward reactions was proposed to study the reaction system. A good agreement was observed between the experimental data and the model values. The activation energy for forward reaction and the heat of reaction were found to be 36.364 Kcal/mol and 1.74 Kcal/mol respectively. PMID:27086997

  5. Learn, Grow, Become. FFA Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains seven Future Farmers of America (FFA) units of study for secondary students. The units focus on developing students' potential for leadership, personal growth, and career success through agricultural education. Each of the instructional units includes some or all of the basic components of a unit of instruction:…

  6. Kinetic Trapping of Metastable Amino Acid Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald’s Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  7. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  8. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vishnu P.; Mukherjee, Rudra Palash; Bantraj, Kandi; Maity, Sunil K.

    2010-10-01

    The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

  10. Kinetic Modeling of Esterification of Ethylene Glycol with Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Vishnu P.; Maity, Sunil K.; Mukherjee, Rudra Palash; Bantraj, Kandi

    2010-10-26

    The reaction kinetics of the esterification of ethylene glycol with acetic acid in the presence of cation exchange resin has been studied and kinetic models based on empirical and Langmuir approach has been developed. The Langmuir based model involving eight kinetic parameters fits experimental data much better compared to empirical model involving four kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature and catalyst loading on the reaction system has been analyzed. Further, the activation energy and frequency factor of the rate constants for Langmuir based model has been estimated.

  11. Release kinetics of 5-aminosalicylic acid from halloysite.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, C; Viseras, C; Cerezo, P; Salcedo, I; Sánchez-Espejo, R; Valenzuela, C

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates desorption of 5-aminosalicilyc acid (5-ASA) adsorbed onto halloysite (HL). Desorption isotherms were fitted according to kinetic laws obtained considering release of 5-ASA from HL as the phase of desorption of the previously adsorbed drug molecules both inside the nanotubes of HL as onto the surface of clay particles and/or in the inter-particle spaces of their aggregates. Desorption isotherms has been also fitted with other equations frequently used in drug release kinetics studies. The best fitting corresponded to the kinetic model proposed; in agreement with the results of adsorption.

  12. Factors Influencing or Discouraging Secondary School Students' FFA Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Kirstin; Henry, Anna L.; Bird, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern adolescents are faced with a variety of choices regarding how to spend their free time. As recruitment and increased student participation continues to be a major priority of the National FFA Organization, it is essential to explore the reasons why students make the choice to become or not to become a member of FFA. This study was a part of…

  13. Relationship of FFA to the Total Instructional Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Along with instruction of vocational agricultural classes and programs of occupational experience, youth organizations such as FFA comprise a vital component of local agricultural education programs. The article is written especially for new agricultural education instructors with no previous background in FFA and includes self-help suggestions.…

  14. State FFA Officers' Confidence and Trustworthiness of Biotechnology Information Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingenbach, Gary J.; Rutherford, Tracy A.

    2007-01-01

    Are state FFA officers' awareness levels of agricultural topics reported in mass media superior to those who do not serve in leadership roles? The purpose of this study was to determine elected state FFA officers' awareness of biotechnology, and their confidence and trust of biotechnology information sources. Descriptive survey methods were used…

  15. An Examination of Middle School Agricultural Education and FFA Programs: Survey Results from State FFA Executive Secretaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Rosemarie; McCaslin, N. L.

    A study collected information from 52 of the 53 state Future Farmers of America (FFA) executive secretaries who were sent questionnaires on middle school student enrollment in agricultural education and membership in the national FFA organization. Results showed that 30 states have agricultural education programs in the middle school level, with a…

  16. The Contributions of E.M. Tiffany and the FFA Creed to Leadership Development within the FFA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, James J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    The FFA Creed by E.M. Tiffany has influenced the lives of countless FFA members. However, the creed has received little attention in terms of its origin. A creed is a foundational component for many organizations. It serves to establish collective vision and goals with the intent of providing purpose and direction to the individual as well as the…

  17. Kinetics of the catalytic esterification of diglycerin with capric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Trufanova, T.N.; Nechesnyuk, G.P.; Bumina, N.A.; Kruchinin, V.A.; Slapygina, O.L.

    1988-06-10

    The object of this investigation was a further study of the rate of esterification of polyglycerins with fatty acids in the presence of acids, organometallic compounds, and metal salts. The catalytic effects of the following substances were studied (in wt. % of the reaction mixture): potassium, magnesium, copper, and zinc sulfates (analytical grade) first dried by calcination, 1%; pure grade tetrabutoxytitanate, 0.5-1%; and pure grade p-toluenesulfonic acid, recrystallized from concentrated hydrochloric acid, 1.0-3%. Samples taken after measured time intervals were analyzed by titration with an alcoholic solution of potassium hydroxide. The investigation was carried out in the kinetic regime.

  18. Oleic acid exposure of cultured endothelial cells alters lipid mediator production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel, biodiesel, and other combustion sources contain free fatty acid (FFA) components capable of entering the body through particulate inhalation. FFA can also be endogenously released into circulation in response to stress. When in circulation, bioactive FFA may interact with...

  19. Effects of Acute Supramaximal Cycle Exercise on Plasma FFA Concentration in Obese Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study are 1) to evaluate the free fatty acid (FFA) profile and 2) to determine the relative anaerobic and aerobic contributions to total energy consumption during repeated supramaximal cycling bouts (SCE) in adolescent boys with different body weight statuses. Materials and Methods Normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB) adolescent boys (n =15 per group) completed a SCE sessions consisted of 6 x 6s maximal sprints with 2 min of passive rest between each repetition. Plasma FFA levels were determined at rest, immediately after a 10 min warm-up, and immediately at the end of SCE. The anaerobic and aerobic contributions (%) were measured via repeated SCE bouts. Insulin resistance was calculated using the homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) index. Results The FFA concentrations measured immediately after SCE were higher in the OB group than in the OW and NW (p<0.01 and p<0.01, respectively) groups. Moreover, the anaerobic contributions to SCE were significantly lower in obese adolescents (p<0.01) and decreased significantly during the 2nd, 3rd and 4th repetitions. The FFA levels were significantly associated with the HOMA-IR index and aerobic contribution among adolescent boys (r=0.83 and r=0.91, respectively, p<0.01). Conclusion In contrast to the NW and OW groups, there is an increase in lipid mobilization and sift to aerobic energy metabolism during SCE in the OB group. PMID:26076464

  20. Inhibitory kinetics of chlorocinnamic acids on mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Liu, Xuan; Jia, Yu-Long; Guo, Yun-Ji; Wang, Qin; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2014-02-01

    Tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) is the key enzyme of most food enzymatic oxidation. Tyrosinase inhibitors are important in food industry. In the present paper, 2-chlorcinnamic acid and 2,4-dichlorocinnamic acid were synthesized and the inhibitory kinetics on mushroom tyrosinase were investigated. The results showed that both compounds synthesized could inhibit tyrosinase activity. For monophenolase activity, both chlorocinnamic acids could extended the lag time and decrease the steady-state activities, 2-chlorcinnamic acid extended the lag time just by 5%, and 2,4-dichlorcinnamic acid extended the lag time more than by 30.4%. For diphenolase activity, the IC50 values of 2-chlorcinnamic acid and 2,4-dichlorocinnamic acid were determined to be 0.765 mM and 0.295 mM, respectively. The inhibition kinetics showed that 2-chlorcinnamic acid and 2,4-dichlorocinnamic acid displayed a reversible and uncompetitive mechanism. The inhibition constants were determined to be 0.348 mM and 0.159 mM, respectively. The research may supply the basis for designing new tyrosinase inhibitors.

  1. Methylene Blue-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Experiment in Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snehalatha, K. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise involving methylene blue and L-ascorbic acid in a simple clock reaction technique to illustrate the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. If stock solutions are supplied and each type of experiment takes no more than half an hour, the entire investigation can be completed in three practical sessions of three hours…

  2. Kinetics of inhibitory effect of isoferulic acid on mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shengzhao; Yin, Meijuan; Yun, Zhimian

    2013-01-01

    A study on the kinetics of inhibitory effect of isoferulic acid on the monophenolase and diphenolase activity of mushroom tyrosinase was carried out using enzymological kinetic analysis method in a Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution (pH = 6.8) at 30°C. It was found that isoferulic acid efficiently inhibits both monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase under experimental conditions. Concentrations of isoferulic acid leading to 50% rate inhibition (IC50) on monophenolase and diphenolase activity were calculated to be 0.13 mmol/L and 0.39 mmol/L, respectively, which are much lower than that of arbutin (IC50 = 5.3 mmol/L for diphenolase activity). The presence of isoferulic acid also prolongs the lag period in the oxidation process of l-tyrosine via tyrosinase-a 4.3-min lagging was observed with the presence of 0.20 mmol/L isoferulic acid-compared to a 1.1-min lagging in the absence of isoferulic acid. The Lineweaver-Burk plot demonstrates a competitive behavior of isoferulic acid in the tyrosinase oxidation of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, with maximum reaction rate (vm) and inhibition constant (KI) at 64.5 µM/min and 0.11 mmol/L, respectively.

  3. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Steen, Andrew D; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aa

    2013-01-01

    The ratios of d- versus l-amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic matter racemize abiotically between the d- and the l-forms. Based on a heating experiment, we report kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth below seafloor. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3°C suggests racemization rate constants of 0.50×10(-5)-11×10(-5) yr(-1). These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of d:l amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial populations.

  4. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  5. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  6. Kinetic and equilibrium lithium acidities of arenes: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Streitwieser, Andrew; Shah, Kamesh; Reyes, Julius R; Zhang, Xingyue; Davis, Nicole R; Wu, Eric C

    2010-08-26

    Kinetic acidities of arenes, ArH, measured some time ago by hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics with lithium cyclohexylamide (LiCHA) in cyclohexylamine (CHA) show a wide range of reactivities that involve several electronic mechanisms. These experimental reactivities give an excellent Brønsted correlation with equilibrium lithium ion pair acidities (pK(Li)) derived as shown recently from computations of ArLi.2E (E = dimethyl ether). The various electronic mechanisms are well modeled by ab initio HF calculations with modest basis sets. Additional calculations using NH(3) as a model for CHA further characterize the TS of the exchange reactions. The slopes of Brønsted correlations of ion pair systems can vary depending on the nature of the ion pairs.

  7. Dissolution kinetics of a three-component solid II: benzoic acid, salicylic acid, and salicylamide.

    PubMed

    Parrott, E L; Simpson, M; Flanagan, D R

    1983-07-01

    The dissolution rates of each component in compressed spheres consisting of three components were measured under sink conditions. The observed dissolution rates of benzoic acid, salicylic acid, and salicylamide compare favorably to the predicted dissolution rates according to a previously presented kinetic model.

  8. Winning the War: A Historical Analysis of the FFA during World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Connors, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The United States' participation in World War II affected millions of men, women, and children, both at home and around the world. The war effort also affected the Future Farmers of America (FFA). FFA members, agriculture teachers, and national FFA officers all volunteered to serve their country during the war. Local FFA chapters and individual…

  9. Simultaneous ozonation kinetics of phenolic acids present in wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, F.J.; Beltran-Heredia, J.; Acero, J.L.; Pinilla, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Among the several chemical processes conducted for the removal of organic matter present in wastewaters coming from some agro-industrial plants (wine distilleries, olive oil mills, etc), the oxidation by ozone has shown a great effectiveness in the destruction of specially refractory pollutants: it is demonstrated that the biodegradability of those wastewaters increases aflcer an ozonation pretreatment. Their great pollutant character is imputed to the presence of some organic compounds, like phenols and polyphenols, which are toxic and inhibit the latter biological treatments. In this research, a competitive kinetic procedure reported by Clurol and Nekouinaini is applied to determine the degradation rate constants by ozone of several phenolic acids which are present in the wastewaters from the olive oil obtaining process. The resulting kinetic expressions for the ozonation reactions are useful for the successful design and operation of ozone reactors in water and wastewaters treatment plants.

  10. Kinetic investigation of erucamide synthesis using fatty acid and urea.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Neeraj Praphulla; Upadhayay, Santosh K; Singh, R P

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid amides like erucamide are mainly used for lubrication and as slip agent to decrease friction in polymer and plastic industry. Erucamide is normally synthesized by ammonolysis of triglycerides or fatty acids at 200 degrees C and at high pressure (345-690 kPa.). However using urea in place of ammonia the economic synthesis of erucamide is possible at atmospheric pressure at approx 190 degrees C. In present investigation, the kinetics of synthesis of erucamide by ammonolysis of erucic acid has been investigated. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of erucamide have also been determined. 1:4 molar ratio of erucic acid to urea, 190 degrees C temperature and catalyst [P2O5 with (NH4)2H PO4, {(1:1) w/w }] concentration 3% (by wt. of erucic acid) were the optimum condition for synthesis of erucamide from erucic acid and can obtain a maximum yield of 92% of pure erucamide. Some other catalysts as titanium-iso -propoxide, phosphorus pent oxide were also tried but these catalysts were not economical. PMID:18685229

  11. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A N; Echarte, María M

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ') while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way.

  12. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A. N.; Echarte, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ′) while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way. PMID:27242809

  13. Kinetics of salicylic acid adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Polakovic, Milan; Gorner, Tatiana; Villiéras, Frédéric; de Donato, Philippe; Bersillon, Jean Luc

    2005-03-29

    The adsorption and desorption of salicylic acid from water solutions was investigated in HPLC microcolumns packed with activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by the step-up frontal analysis method in a concentration range of 0-400 mg/L and was well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The investigation of rate aspects of salicylic acid adsorption was based on adsorption/desorption column experiments where different inlet concentrations of salicylic acid were applied in the adsorption phase and desorption was conducted with pure water. The concentration profiles of individual adsorption/desorption cycles data were fitted using several single-parameter models of the fixed-bed adsorption to assess the influence of different phenomena on the column behavior. It was found that the effects of axial dispersion and extraparticle mass transfer were negligible. A rate-determining factor of fixed-bed column dynamics was the kinetics of pore surface adsorption. A bimodal kinetic model reflecting the heterogeneous character of adsorbent pores was verified by a simultaneous fit of the column outlet concentration in four adsorption/desorption cycles. The fitted parameters were the fraction of mesopores and the adsorption rate constants in micropores and mesopores, respectively. It was shown that the former rate constant was an intrinsic one whereas the latter one was an apparent value due to the effects of pore blocking and diffusional hindrances in the micropores. PMID:15779975

  14. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid.

  15. Kinetics of adsorption of uranium from seawater by humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, D. ); Wagener, K. )

    1990-04-01

    The kinetics of the adsorption of uranium from seawater by humic acids fixed onto a polymer matrix was measured in a fluidized bed as a function of the grain size of the adsorbent and the flow velocity of the seawater. The adsorption rate was found to be governed by the diffusion of the uranium ions through the hydrodynamic surface layer of the adsorbent which is always formed in laminar flows of liquids. The measured rate constants are interpreted in terms of effective diffusion coefficients of 3.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s for uranyl ions and 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s for tricarbonatouranate ions in the surface layer. As a consequence of this kinetic behavior, the geometry of the adsorbent as well as the velocity of the water flow are relevant parameters for the amount of adsorbent needed for a projected extraction rate. This conclusion applies to all adsorption processes where diffusion through the hydrodynamic layer is the rate-determining kinetic step.

  16. Kinetics of acid base catalyzed transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil.

    PubMed

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M P

    2010-10-01

    Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstock for biodiesel production in India. Limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high free fatty acids containing oil. The present study reports the results of kinetic study of two-step acid base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at an optimum temperature of 65 °C and 50 °C for esterification and transesterification respectively under the optimum methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H₂SO₄ and NaOH. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The results indicate that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min⁻¹ and 0.008 min⁻¹ respectively. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained.

  17. Effect of borax on the crystallization kinetics of boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ömer

    2002-03-01

    The effect of different borax concentrations on the growth and dissolution rates of boric acid crystals were measured in a fluidized bed crystallizer under well-established conditions of supersaturation and undersaturation and fluidization. It was found that the presence of borax in boric-acid solution decreases the mass-transfer coefficient, kd, the surface-reaction constant, kr and reaction order r pertaining to growth and dissolution rates of boric acid crystals. The effectiveness factors were estimated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitudes of the two resistances in series, diffusion and integration. The controlling mechanism is mainly by integration for the crystal growth of boric acid in the pure state and in the presence of borax in solution. The kinetic parameters ( kr, kd, r) were determined by a new method which is called trial and error under no assumption. This method gives a high accuracy of determination of the mass-transfer coefficient, kd, the surface-reaction constant, kr and surface-reaction order, r. The relative standard deviation between the equation Rg= kr(( ρα- ρeq)- Rg(1- wα)/ kd) r and those experimentally obtained and represented by the equation Rg= kg( ρα- ρeq) g do not exceed 0.013 for both the growth and dissolution regions.

  18. Identifying Quality Indicators of SAE and FFA: A Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Charles Cordell, III; Kitchel, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine quality indicators for SAE and FFA according to 36 experts across the United States. This is a part of a larger study looking at all components of the traditional three-circle model. The study utilized the Delphi technique to garner expert opinion about quality indicators in Agricultural Education. For…

  19. Occupational Aspirations of State FFA Contest and Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Blannie E.; Doerfert, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A study explored the occupational aspirations of 300 (of 503) students with high levels of participation in Future Farmers of America's (FFA) Computers in Agriculture (CIA), Proficiency Award (PA), and Prepared and Extemporaneous Speaking (PES) contests. CIA and PES winners aspired to professional occupations more than PA winners. PES winners…

  20. Bond energies in polyunsaturated acids and kinetics of co-oxidation of protiated and deuterated acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, Z. S.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Pliss, E. M.; Buchachenko, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational program specially designed to analyze co-oxidation of substances in mixtures is suggested. The rigorous kinetic scheme of 32 reactions describing co-oxidation of isotope differing polyunsaturated fatty acids was computed to enlighten experimentally detected enormously large H/D isotope effects. The latter were shown to depend on the kinetic chain length and exhibit two extreme regimes of short and long chains which characterize isotope effects on the initiation and propagation chain reactions of hydrogen (deuterium) atom abstraction. No protective effect of deuterated polyunsaturated acids on the oxidation of protiated acids was detected. Protective effect of the deuterated compounds on the biologically important processes seems to be induced by the low yield of products formed in the chain termination reactions due to the low rate of initiation by deuterated compounds.

  1. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. PMID:27363940

  2. Kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Watson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive study was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in a laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence system. A 266 nm laser was used to photolyze HNO3 in the temperature range 225-415 K at pressures of 20-300 torr. A temperature dependence was detected below room temperature, with a leveling off at 298 K and a wide spread in the rate constants. A pressure dependence was observed over the entire range and was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The results are noted to be in agreement with those of previous investigations. However, the wide range of rate constants are suggested to be a problem for stratospheric HO(x) modeling for anthropogenic effects. No explanation could be given of the varying results obtained by other investigators regarding the kinetics of the reactions.

  3. ADAPTING THE FFA TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE. RESEARCH SERIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KANTER, EARL F.; BENDER, RALPH E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONAL STUDY WAS TO SUGGEST WAYS OF ADAPTING THE FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA (FFA) TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE THROUGH IDENTIFYING NEW PURPOSES OF THE FFA AND EVALUATING SELECTED OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL AND STATE FFA ACTIVITIES. MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES OFFICE OF EDUCATION, HEAD STATE…

  4. Kinetics of non-isothermal decomposition of cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-rui; Qi, Zhen-li; Chen, Fei-xiong; Yue, Xia-xin

    2014-07-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of cinnamic acid were investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry at four heating rates. The activation energies of this process were calculated from analysis of TG curves by methods of Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, Distributed Activation Energy Model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger, respectively. There are only one stage of thermal decomposition process in TG and two endothermic peaks in DSC. For this decomposition process of cinnamic acid, E and log A[s-1] were determined to be 81.74 kJ mol-1 and 8.67, respectively. The mechanism was Mampel Power law (the reaction order, n = 1), with integral form G(α) = α (α = 0.1-0.9). Moreover, thermodynamic properties of Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ were 77.96 kJ mol-1, -90.71 J mol-1 K-1, 119.41 kJ mol-1.

  5. Cometary impact and amino acid survival - Chemical kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9?? above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometa??ry delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  6. Reduced plasma FFA availability increases net triacylglycerol degradation, but not GPAT or HSL activity, in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Watt, Matthew J; Holmes, Anna G; Steinberg, Gregory R; Mesa, Jose L; Kemp, Bruce E; Febbraio, Mark A

    2004-07-01

    Intramuscular triacylglycerols (IMTG) are proposed to be an important metabolic substrate for contracting muscle, although this remains controversial. To test the hypothesis that reduced plasma free fatty acid (FFA) availability would increase IMTG degradation during exercise, seven active men cycled for 180 min at 60% peak pulmonary O(2) uptake either without (CON) or with (NA) prior ingestion of nicotinic acid to suppress adipose tissue lipolysis. Skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsy samples were obtained before and at 90 and 180 min of exercise. NA ingestion decreased (P < 0.05) plasma FFA at rest and completely suppressed the exercise-induced increase in plasma FFA (180 min: CON, 1.42 +/- 0.07; NA, 0.10 +/- 0.01 mM). The decreased plasma FFA during NA was associated with decreased (P < 0.05) adipose tissue hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity (CON: 13.9 +/- 2.5, NA: 9.1 +/- 3.0 nmol.min(-1).mg protein(-1)). NA ingestion resulted in decreased whole body fat oxidation and increased carbohydrate oxidation. Despite the decreased whole body fat oxidation, net IMTG degradation was greater in NA compared with CON (net change: CON, 2.3 +/- 0.8; NA, 6.3 +/- 1.2 mmol/kg dry mass). The increased IMTG degradation did not appear to be due to reduced fatty acid esterification, because glycerol 3-phosphate activity was not different between trials and was unaffected by exercise (rest: 0.21 +/- 0.07; 180 min: 0.17 +/- 0.04 nmol.min(-1).mg protein(-1)). HSL activity was not increased from resting rates during exercise in either trial despite elevated plasma epinephrine, decreased plasma insulin, and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)alpha1 activity was not affected by exercise or NA, whereas AMPKalpha2 activity was increased (P < 0.05) from rest during exercise in NA and was greater (P < 0.05) than in CON at 180 min. These data suggest that plasma FFA availability is an important mediator of net IMTG degradation, and in the absence of

  7. Kinetic characterization of a novel acid ectophosphatase from Enterobacter asburiae.

    PubMed

    Sato, Vanessa Sayuri; Galdiano Júnior, Renato F; Rodrigues, Gisele Regina; Lemos, Eliana G M; Pizauro Junior, João Martins

    2016-02-01

    Expression of acid ectophosphatase by Enterobacter asburiae, isolated from Cattleya walkeriana (Orchidaceae) roots and identified by the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis, was strictly regulated by phosphorus ions, with its optimal activity being observed at an inorganic phosphate concentration of 7 mM. At the optimum pH 3.5, intact cells released p-nitrophenol at a rate of 350.76 ± 13.53 nmol of p-nitrophenolate (pNP)/min/10(8) cells. The membrane-bound enzyme was obtained by centrifugation at 100,000 × g for 1 h at 4 °C. p-Nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) hydrolysis by the enzyme follows "Michaelis-Menten" kinetics with V = 61.2 U/mg and K0.5 = 60 μM, while ATP hydrolysis showed V = 19.7 U/mg, K0.5 = 110 μM, and nH = 1.6 and pyrophosphate hydrolysis showed V = 29.7 U/mg, K0.5 = 84 μM, and nH = 2.3. Arsenate and phosphate were competitive inhibitors with K i = 0.6 mM and K i = 1.8 mM, respectively. p-Nitrophenyl phosphatase (pNPPase) activity was inhibited by vanadate, while p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, EDTA, calcium, copper, and cobalt had no inhibitory effects. Magnesium ions were stimulatory (K0.5 = 2.2 mM and nH = 0.5). Production of an acid ectophosphatase can be a mechanism for the solubilization of mineral phosphates by microorganisms such as Enterobacter asburiae that are versatile in the solubilization of insoluble minerals, which, in turn, increases the availability of nutrients for plants, particularly in soils that are poor in phosphorus. PMID:26832666

  8. Kinetic and process studies on free and solid acid catalyzed hydrolysis of biomass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Abasaeed, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was tested as a catalyst for cellulose hydrolysis. Eighty percent conversion of cellulose into glucose was obtained with concentrated TFA. The kinetics of TFA catalyzed cellulose hydrolysis was investigated. The reaction was found to follow first order kinetics for both hydrolysis and decomposition. The kinetic parameters were determined from experimental data covering conditions of 160-180 C, 10-30% acid, and 1:2 solid to liquid ratio. The hydrolysis reaction was found to be more sensitive to temperature than the decomposition reaction. Use of TFA was further investigated as a pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. A two-fold increase in sugar yields was obtained for TFA pretreated samples in comparison to untreated ones. The kinetics of hydrolysis of prehydrolyzed wood by sulfuric acid was investigated. The substrate was first treated with 0.75% acid at 184 C for 4 minutes to remove hemicellulose. The kinetic parameters were determined in the range of 198-215 C and 1-3% acid. A heterogeneous kinetic model was developed to study the effect of particle size on acid hydrolysis of cellulose. It was found that as the chip size increases, maximum glucose yield decreases and reaction time at which maximum yield occurs increases. Acidic zeolites (LZ-M-8) were investigated as catalysts for hydrolysis reaction of inulin into fructose. The hydrolysis reaction was found to follow first order kinetics. Products containing 96 and 75% fructose were obtained upon hydrolysis respectively from inulin and extract.

  9. Determination of SFC, FFA, and equivalent reaction time for enzymatically interestified oils using NIRS.

    PubMed

    Houmøller, Lars P; Kristensen, Dorthe; Rosager, Helle

    2007-02-15

    The use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for rapid determination of the degree of interesterification of blends of palm stearin, coconut oil, and rapeseed oil obtained using an immobilized Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase at 70 degrees C was investigated. Interesterification was carried out by applying both fixed bed and batch reactors. Calibrations were developed for quantitative determination of solid fat content (SFC) at 10, 20, 30, 35, and 40 degrees C and free fatty acid (FFA) resulting in root mean square errors of prediction of 1.0, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6, 1.7, and 0.19% (w/w), respectively. The data showed that NIRS could be used to replace the traditional methods for determining FFA and SFC in vegetable oils. It was possible to monitor the activity of the immobilized enzyme for interesterification of margarine oils by predicting the equivalent reaction time in a batch reactor from NIR spectra. Root mean square errors of prediction for two different oil blends interesterified for 300 and 170min were 21 and 12min, respectively. PMID:19071387

  10. [Degradation kinetics of chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, and neochlorogenic acid at neutral and alkaline pH values].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Miao, Xiao-lei; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The degradation kinetics of chlorogenic acid (5-CQA), cryptochlorogenic acid (4-CQA), and neochlorogenic acid (3-CQA) in aqueous solution at 37 degrees C and different pH values (7.05, 7.96, 9.25) were investigated in the present work. The results indicated that 3-, 4- and 5-CQA tended to remain stable in acidic pH circumstance, and unstable in neutral and alkaline pH circumstance. With the increase of the alkalinity, the degradation of 3-, 4- and 5-CQA was increased leading to a less amount of total CQA and was satisfactorily described by the Weibull equation. Meanwhile, caffeic acid was not detected after the degradation of CQA. Moreover, the degradation of 3-CQA and 5-CQA tended to be converted to 4-CQA, and the degradation of 4-CQA tended to be converted to 3-CQA rather than 5-CQA. The comparison of the degradation kinetics parameters of 3-, 4- and 5-CQA at neutral and alkaline pH values showed that the orders of the rate constant (k) values were 4-CQA > 3-CQA > 5-CQA, while the orders of the degradation half life (t½) values were 4-CQA < 3-CQA < 5-CQA, indicating the orders of the stabilities of 3-, 4- and 5-CQA at 37 degrees C and neutral and alkaline pH values were 4-CQA < 3-CQA < 5-CQA. PMID:27405173

  11. Kinetics of Acid Reactions: Making Sense of Associated Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In chemical kinetics, in addition to the concepts related to kinetics, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and the characteristics of the reactants are often involved when comparing the rates of different reactions, making such comparisons very challenging for students at all levels, as well as for pre-service science teachers. Consequently, four…

  12. Effect of temperature on the nucleation kinetics of α L-glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenberg, Christian; Mazzotti, Marco

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the nucleation kinetics of α L-glutamic acid is determined on the basis of induction time measurements. L-Glutamic acid is precipitated by pH-shift in a stirred batch reactor. The induction times are measured at different supersaturations using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), and applying a previously developed method [J. Schöll, L. Vicum, M. Müller, M. Mazzotti, Precipitation of L-glutamic acid: Determination of nucleation kinetics. Chemical Engineering & Technology 29(2) (2006) 257-264]. Moreover, the effect of temperature on the induction time is studied. Together with independently measured growth kinetics, the nucleation rates are determined. Finally, the nucleation kinetics is used to calculate the interfacial energies. The analysis of the estimated kinetics parameters and of the calculated interfacial energies indicates a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism.

  13. Ozonation kinetics of phenolic acids present in wastewaters from olive oil mills

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, F.J.; Beltran-Heredia, J.; Acero, J.L.; Pinilla, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A kinetic study of the degradation by ozone of eight phenolic acids present in wastewaters from olive oil mills has been performed by using a competition kinetic method. The selected phenolic acids are: caffeic, p-coumaric, syringic, vanillic, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic, veratric, p-hydroxy-benzoic, and protocatechuic. The influence of the operating variables (temperature, pH, and ozone partial pressure in the gas stream) is established, and the stoichiometric ratios for the individual direct reactions between ozone and each acid are determined. Once the reaction rate constants are evaluated, they are correlated as a function of temperature and pH into kinetic expressions which are provided for every phenolic acid. The global process occurs in the fast and pseudo-first-order kinetic regime of absorption, a condition required by the competition model to be used.

  14. Kinetic isotope effects in the oxidation of arachidonic acid by soybean lipoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Cyril; Peng, Sheng; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2008-11-15

    The reaction of soybean lipoxygenase-1 with linoleic acid has been extensively studied and displays very large kinetic isotope effects. In this work, substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects as well as the viscosity dependence of the oxidation of arachidonic acid were investigated. The hydrogen atom abstraction step was rate-determining at all temperatures, but was partially masked by a viscosity-dependent step at ambient temperatures. The observed KIEs on k(cat) were large ( approximately 100 at 25 degrees C).

  15. FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo is mediated by PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Park, Edward; Mori, Yusaku; Haber, C Andrew; Han, Ping; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Stavar, Laura; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Ivovic, Alexander; Yu, Zhiwen; Li, Deling; Bowman, Thomas A; Dewald, Jay; El-Benna, Jamel; Brindley, David N; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K T; Najjar, Sonia M; McKay, Robert A; Bhanot, Sanjay; Fantus, I George; Giacca, Adria

    2014-07-01

    Fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although PKC and inflammatory pathways have been implicated in fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance, the sequence of events leading to impaired insulin signaling is unknown. We used Wistar rats to investigate whether PKCδ and oxidative stress play causal roles in this process and whether this occurs via IKKβ- and JNK-dependent pathways. Rats received a 7-h infusion of Intralipid plus heparin (IH) to elevate circulating free fatty acids (FFA). During the last 2 h of the infusion, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with tracer was performed to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), prevented IH-induced hepatic insulin resistance in parallel with prevention of decreased IκBα content, increased JNK phosphorylation (markers of IKKβ and JNK activation, respectively), increased serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2, and impaired insulin signaling in the liver without affecting IH-induced hepatic PKCδ activation. Furthermore, an antisense oligonucleotide against PKCδ prevented IH-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) (marker of NADPH oxidase activation) and hepatic insulin resistance. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, prevented IH-induced hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance similarly to NAC. These results demonstrate that PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress play a causal role in FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo and suggest that the pathway of FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance is FFA → PKCδ → NADPH oxidase and oxidative stress → IKKβ/JNK → impaired hepatic insulin signaling.

  16. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  17. Monosaccharide production in an acid sulfite process: kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Rueda, C; Fernández-Rodríguez, J; Ruiz, G; Llano, T; Coz, A

    2015-02-13

    Spent sulfite liquor is a lignocellulosic waste obtained after the sulfite pulping process. It is mainly formed by sugars and lignosulfonates which are isolated from the pulp during the cooking process. The current work investigates the kinetic modeling of the sulfite process from a biorefinery point of view since monosaccharides present in the spent liquor can be used as a raw material in further biorefinery processes to produce other value-added products. Kinetic parameters of carbohydrate degradation have been determined following sugar and inhibitors from wood to spent liquor, using laboratory scale reactors and different temperatures, 130, 140 and 150 °C. Three types of reaction schemes were developed. Kinetic parameters were obtained for each one using first and n order reactions, using Aspen Custom Modeler. Results show that the best temperature to be used in the process is 130 °C, giving the maximum sugar conversion, 33.91 mol% and obtaining 13.81 mol% of decomposition products.

  18. Kinetics of levulinic acid and furfural production from Miscanthus × giganteus.

    PubMed

    Dussan, K; Girisuta, B; Haverty, D; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of acid hydrolysis of the cellulose and hemicellulose in Miscanthus to produce levulinic acid and furfural under mild temperature and high acid concentration. Experiments were carried out in an 8L-batch reactor with 9%-wt. biomass loading, acid concentrations between 0.10 and 0.53 M H2SO4, and at temperatures between 150 and 200°C. The concentrations of xylose, glucose, furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid were used in two mechanistic kinetic models for the prediction of the performance of ideal continuous reactors for the optimisation of levulinic acid and the concurrent production of furfural. A two-stage arrangement was found to maximise furfural in the first reactor (PFR - 185°C, 0.5M H2SO4, 27.3%-mol). A second stage leads to levulinic acid yields between 58% and 72%-mol at temperatures between 160 and 200°C.

  19. Kinetic study of oxalic acid inhibition on enzymatic browning.

    PubMed

    Son, S M; Moon, K D; Lee, C Y

    2000-06-01

    Oxalic acid has a strong antibrowning activity. The inhibitory pattern on catechol-PPO model system appeared to be competitive, with a K(i) value of 2.0 mM. When the PPO was incubated with oxalic acid, the activity was not recovered via dialysis, but the inactivated enzyme partially recovered its activity when cupric ion was added. Comparing the relative antibrowning effectiveness of oxalic acid with other common antibrowning agents, oxalic acid with I(50) value of 1.1 mM is as effective as kojic acid and more potent than cysteine and glutathione.

  20. Kinetics of the reduction of p-nitrobenzoic acid esters in nanoreactors on the basis of sulfonated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'tshuler, G. N.; Shkurenko, G. Yu.; Gorlov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of p-nitrobenzoic acid esters in nanoreactors based on sulfonated network polymers containing nanodispersed palladium was studied. The kinetic characteristics of the hydrogenation of aromatic nitro compounds were calculated.

  1. Kinetics of Reductive Acid Leaching of Cadmium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Mixture Using Hydrazine Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Jianqiang; Min, Xiaobo; Wang, Mi; Zhou, Bosheng; Shen, Chen

    2015-09-01

    The reductive acid leaching kinetics of synthetic cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite was investigated, and the influence of reaction temperature, sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate were studied. The results illustrated that an increase in the reaction temperature, initial sulfuric acid and hydrazine sulfate significantly enhanced the extraction efficiencies of cadmium, zinc and iron. The leaching kinetics were controlled by a surface chemical reaction based on a shrinking core model. The empirical equation applied was found to fit well with the kinetics analysis; the leaching processes of cadmium, zinc and iron were similar and the activation energies were 79.9 kJ/mol, 77.9 kJ/mol and 79.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The apparent orders of cadmium-bearing zinc ferrite dissolution with respect to sulfuric acid concentration were 0.83, 0.83 and 0.84 for Cd, Zn and Fe, respectively.

  2. Fitting Vo-Ag and FFA Together Best for Students and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, H. Leon

    1979-01-01

    The Future Farmers of America (FFA) is more than a leadership development organization and when used as an intracurricular activity, it can serve as a teaching tool. The FFA adds advantages to the program in areas such as supervised experience, award motivation, providing real world experience, public relations, travel, and competition. (LRA)

  3. Bridging Horizons. An Advisor's Guide to FFA Involvement for Members with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploss, Adrienne J.; Field, William E.; Frick, Martin J.

    This guide is designed to provide Future Farmers of America (FFA) advisors with information to assist them in their efforts to include all youth in FFA, including those with disabilities. It addresses benefits of involving youth with disabilities and federal, state, and local legislation and regulations concerning people with disabilities.…

  4. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, P<0.05). Batch tests showed carbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  5. Kinetics of interaction of vanillin with amino acids and peptides in model systems.

    PubMed

    Chobpattana, W; Jeon, I J; Smith, J S

    2000-09-01

    Model systems were used to study the reaction kinetics of vanillin and pentalysine, lysine, glutathione, cysteine, aspartame, or phenylalanine (molar ratio 1:1) in phosphate buffer. The buffer pH was adjusted to the pK(a)(2) of the available alpha-amino group of each amino acid or peptide. Reductions of vanillin followed first-order kinetics at 55, 65, and 75 degrees C in the presence of each of the amino acids or peptides used. The reaction rates were accelerated as the temperature increased. The rate constants were highest for pentalysine followed by lysine, phenylalanine, glutathione/cysteine, and aspartame. The reduction of phenylalanine followed first-order kinetics, whereas the formation of its reaction product followed zero-order kinetics. The activation energy (E(a)) for the reaction ranged from 5.6 to 14.5 kcal/mol.

  6. Transport of plasma free fatty acids and triglycerides in man: a theoretical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shames, David M.; Frank, Arthur; Steinberg, Daniel; Berman, Mones

    1970-01-01

    Three different multicompartmental models of free fatty acid (FFA) and very low density lipoprotein triglyceride fatty acid (VLDL-TGFA) transport in man are formulated from plasma FFA and VLDL-TGFA tracee and tracer data collected over a 24 hr interval after the injection of palmitate-14C. All modeling and data fitting were performed on a digital computer using the SAAM program. Structural differences in the three models relate to the position of the slowly turning over compartment required to generate the late portion of the plasma VLDL-TGFA tracer data. The positions of this slow compartment are along the hepatic pathway from FFA to VLDL-TGFA (model A) or in the distribution system of VLDL-TGFA (model B) or in the distribution system of FFA (model C). Although all three models are equally consistent with our experimental data and are supported by observations of others, each reveals inconsistency with some data obtained from the literature. Consequently, a combination model of FFA-TGFA transport, incorporating properties of models A, B, and C would be more consistent with all available data. Experiments that would help to determine the quantitative significance of each of the slow compartments in the combination model are suggested. Several other models suggesting recycling of plasma VLDL-TGFA through the plasma FFA pool, kinetic heterogencity of the plasma VLDL-TGFA pool, and contamination of plasma VLDL-TGFA radioactivity with low density lipoprotein (LDL) TGFA radioactivity were tested. The first model does not explain the late portion of the plasma VLDL-TGFA tracer data. The second and third models, while consistent with our tracee and tracer data, have steady-state implications with respect to the extent of kinetic heterogeneity and size of the LDL-TGFA contaminant that make them unlikely. Assumptions underlying other investigator's models of FFA and TGFA transport in man are reviewed within the logical framework of our models. Quantitative differences among

  7. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  8. Kinetics and Effects of Dichloroacetic Acid in Rainbow Trout

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halogenated acetic acids (HAAs) are continuously released to surface waters in municipal wastewater effluents. Very little is known, however, about their potential to adversely impact aquatic life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the uptake, distribution, elimination...

  9. A study on degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) during cooking.

    PubMed

    Nisha, P; Singhal, Rekha S; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of ascorbic acid degradation in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) as well as in pure ascorbic acid solutions at initial concentrations present in amla over a temperature range of 50-120 degrees C (steady-state temperature) has been studied. The ascorbic acid degradation followed first-order reaction kinetics where the rate constant increased with an increase in temperature. The temperature dependence of degradation was adequately modeled by the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were found to be 4.09 kcal/mole for amla and 4.49 kcal/mole for pure vitamin solution. The degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid was also evaluated in normal open pan cooking, pressure-cooking and a newly developed and patented fuel-efficient EcoCooker (unsteady state heating process). A mathematical model was developed using the steady-state kinetic parameters obtained to predict the losses of ascorbic acid from the time-temperature data of the unsteady state heating processing method. The results obtained indicate the ascorbic acid degradation is of a similar order of magnitude in all the methods of cooking.

  10. Fatty Acid Chain Length Dependence of Phase Separation Kinetics in Stratum Corneum Models by IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Rabie, Emann; Walters, Russel M; Flach, Carol R

    2015-07-30

    The main barrier to permeability in human skin resides in the stratum corneum (SC), a layered structure consisting of anucleated, flattened cells (corneocytes) embedded in a heterogeneous lamellar lipid matrix. While lipid structures and packing propensities in the SC and in SC models have been extensively investigated, only limited data are available concerning the kinetics and mechanism of formation of lamellar phases and particular lipid packing motifs. In our prior investigation, kinetic IR spectroscopy measurements probed the temporal sequence of phase separation leading to ordered structures in a three component SC model of equimolar structurally heterogeneous ceramide[NS], chain perdeuterated stearic acid, and cholesterol. In the current work, the phase separation kinetic effects of specific fatty acid chain lengths with a synthetic structurally homogeneous ceramide[NS] in similar ternary mixtures are examined. These are compared with a mixture containing ceramide[NS] with an unsaturated acid chain. The kinetic events are sensitive to the difference in chain lengths between the ceramide acid chain and the fatty acid as well as to the presence of unsaturation in the former. The observed kinetic behaviors span a wide range of phase separation times, ranging from the formation of a solid solution stable for at least 200 h, to a system in which an orthorhombic fatty acid structure is essentially completely formed within the time resolution of the experiment (15 min). The data seem to offer some features of a spinodal phase separation at relatively short times. Overall the approach offers a possible means for addressing several unanswered questions pertinent to skin pharmacology, such as the roles of a wide variety of ceramide and fatty acid species and the design of therapeutic interventions for repair of pathological conditions of the SC.

  11. Ozonolysis of Mixed Oleic-Acid/Stearic-Acid Particles: Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Katrib, Y.; Biskos, G.; Buseck, P. R.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Mochida, M.; Wise, M. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric particles directly and indirectly affect global climate and have a primary role in regional issues of air pollution, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric particles have a variety of shapes, dimensions, and chemical compositions, and these physicochemical properties evolve (i.e., "age") during transport of the particles through the atmosphere, in part because of the chemical reactions of particle-phase organic molecules with gas-phase atmospheric oxidants. As a global average, hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O3) are responsible quantitatively for most oxidant aging of atmospheric particles. The reactions of the hydroxyl radical occur in the surface region of a particle because of the nearly diffusion-limited bimolecular rate constant of OH with a variety of organic molecules. Ozone, on the other hand, is a selective agent for the unsaturated bonds of organic molecules and may diffuse a considerable distance into particles prior to reaction. The reaction of oleic acid with ozone has recently emerged as a model system to better understand the atmospheric chemical oxidation processes affecting organic particles. The ozonolysis of mixed oleic-acid/stearic-acid (OL/SA) aerosol particles from 0/100 to 100/0 weight percent composition is studied. The magnitude of the divergence of the particle beam inside an aerosol mass spectrometer shows that, in the concentration range 100/0 to 60/40, the mixed OL/SA particles are liquid prior to reaction. Upon ozonolysis, particles with SA composition greater than 25% change shape, indicating that they have solidified. Transmission electron micrographs show that SA(s) forms needles. For SA compositions greater than 10%, the reaction kinetics exhibit an initial fast decay of OL for low O3 exposure with no further loss of OL at higher O3 exposures. For compositions from 50/50 to 10/90, the residual OL concentration remains at 28+/-2% of its initial value. The initial reactive uptake coefficient for O3, as determined by

  12. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  13. Nucleation kinetics of urea succinic acid -ferroelectric single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhivya, R.; Vizhi, R. Ezhil; Babu, D. Rajan

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of Urea Succinic Acid (USA) were grown by slow cooling technique. The crystalline system was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. The metastable zonewidth were carried out for various temperatures i.e., 35°, 40°, 45° and 50°C. The induction period is experimentally determined and various nucleation parameters have been estimated.

  14. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Production by Bifidobacteria: Screening, Kinetic, and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Amaretti, Alberto; Leonardi, Alan; Quartieri, Andrea; Gozzoli, Caterina; Rossi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid involved in a number of health aspects. In humans, CLA production is performed by gut microbiota, including some species of potential probiotic bifidobacteria. 128 strains of 31 Bifidobacterium species were screened with a spectrophotometric assay to identify novel CLA producers. Most species were nonproducers, while producers belonged to B. breve and B. pseudocatenulatum. GC-MS revealed that CLA producer strains yielded 9cis,11trans-CLA and 9trans,11trans-CLA, without any production of other isomers. Hydroxylated forms of LA were absent in producer strains, suggesting that the myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein that exerts hydratase activity is not involved in LA isomerization. Moreover, both CLA producer and nonproducer species bear a MCRA homologue. The strain B. breve WC 0421 was the best CLA producer, converting LA into 68.8% 9cis,11trans-CLA and 25.1% 9trans,11trans-CLA. Production occurred mostly during the lag and the exponential phase. For the first time, production and incorporation of CLA in biomass were assessed. B. breve WC 0421 stored CLA in the form of free fatty acids, without changing the composition of the esterified fatty acids, which mainly occurred in the plasmatic membrane. PMID:27429985

  15. Kinetics of Hydrochloric Acid Leaching of Titanium from Titanium-Bearing Electric Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fuqiang; Chen, Feng; Guo, Yufeng; Jiang, Tao; Travyanov, Andrew Yakovlevich; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2016-05-01

    The hydrochloric acid leaching of titanium from titanium-bearing electric furnace slag was investigated under different experimental conditions. The results indicate that particle size, hydrochloric acid concentration and reaction temperature were of significance to the leaching kinetics. Specifically, reaction temperature was the most important factor followed by hydrochloric acid concentration and particle size. The shrinking core model was used to describe the leaching process which was controlled by surface chemical reaction. The kinetic equation was obtained and the activation energy was found to be 43.16 kJ/mol. Iron and calcium species were almost completely dissolved in the acid when the extraction degree of titanium reached 99.84%. MgO (19.34 wt.%) and Al2O3 (32.45 wt.%) in the spinel were still in the leaching residue and SiO2 (43.53 wt.%) in the form of quartz remained in the leaching residue.

  16. Adipose Tissue Free Fatty Acid Storage In Vivo: Effects of Insulin Versus Niacin as a Control for Suppression of Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asem H.; Mundi, Manpreet; Koutsari, Christina; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the translocation fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) to plasma membrane, and thus greater free fatty acid (FFA) uptake, in adipocyte cell models. Whether insulin stimulates greater FFA clearance into adipose tissue in vivo is unknown. We tested this hypothesis by comparing direct FFA storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue during insulin versus niacin-medicated suppression of lipolysis. We measured direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral subcutaneous fat in 10 and 11 adults, respectively, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia or after oral niacin to suppress FFA compared with 11 saline control experiments. Direct palmitate storage was assessed using a [U-13C]palmitate infusion to measure palmitate kinetics and an intravenous palmitate radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Plasma palmitate concentrations and flux were suppressed to 23 ± 3 and 26 ± 5 µmol ⋅ L−1 (P = 0.91) and 44 ± 4 and 39 ± 5 µmol ⋅ min−1 (P = 0.41) in the insulin and niacin groups, respectively, much less (P < 0.001) than the saline control group (102 ± 8 and 104 ± 12 µmol ⋅ min−1, respectively). In the insulin, niacin, and saline groups, abdominal palmitate storage rates were 0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.25 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively (P = NS), and femoral adipose storage rates were 0.19 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.05 vs. 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, insulin does not increase FFA storage in adipose tissue compared with niacin, which suppresses lipolysis via a different pathway. PMID:25883112

  17. Adipose Tissue Free Fatty Acid Storage In Vivo: Effects of Insulin Versus Niacin as a Control for Suppression of Lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asem H; Mundi, Manpreet; Koutsari, Christina; Bernlohr, David A; Jensen, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    Insulin stimulates the translocation fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) to plasma membrane, and thus greater free fatty acid (FFA) uptake, in adipocyte cell models. Whether insulin stimulates greater FFA clearance into adipose tissue in vivo is unknown. We tested this hypothesis by comparing direct FFA storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue during insulin versus niacin-medicated suppression of lipolysis. We measured direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral subcutaneous fat in 10 and 11 adults, respectively, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia or after oral niacin to suppress FFA compared with 11 saline control experiments. Direct palmitate storage was assessed using a [U-(13)C]palmitate infusion to measure palmitate kinetics and an intravenous palmitate radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Plasma palmitate concentrations and flux were suppressed to 23 ± 3 and 26 ± 5 µmol ⋅ L(-1) (P = 0.91) and 44 ± 4 and 39 ± 5 µmol ⋅ min(-1) (P = 0.41) in the insulin and niacin groups, respectively, much less (P < 0.001) than the saline control group (102 ± 8 and 104 ± 12 µmol ⋅ min(-1), respectively). In the insulin, niacin, and saline groups, abdominal palmitate storage rates were 0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.25 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid(-1) ⋅ min(-1), respectively (P = NS), and femoral adipose storage rates were 0.19 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.05 vs. 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid(-1) ⋅ min(-1), respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, insulin does not increase FFA storage in adipose tissue compared with niacin, which suppresses lipolysis via a different pathway.

  18. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  19. Oxidation kinetics of crystal violet by potassium permanganate in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sameera Razi; Ashfaq, Maria; Mubashir; Masood, Summyia

    2016-05-01

    The oxidation kinetics of crystal violet (a triphenylmethane dye) by potassium permanganate was focused in an acidic medium by the spectrophotometric method at 584 nm. The oxidation reaction of crystal violet by potassium permanganate is carried out in an acidic medium at different temperatures ranging within 298-318 K. The kinetic study was carried out to investigate the effect of the concentration, ionic strength and temperature. The reaction followed first order kinetics with respect to potassium permanganate and crystal violet and the overall rate of the reaction was found to be second order. Thermodynamic activation parameters like the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H*), free energy change (Δ G*), and entropy change (Δ S*) have also been evaluated.

  20. Protocol for the measurement of fatty acid and glycerol turnover in vivo in baboons[S

    PubMed Central

    Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Veron, Sonya M.; Vaidyanathan, Vidya; Garcia-Forey, Maggie; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Higgins, Paul B.; Parks, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the strength of nonhuman primate models in investigating metabolic disorders has resulted in an expanded need for in vivo research techniques. We studied adipose metabolism in 10 baboons (13.0 ± 4.2 years old, 29.5 ± 5.5 kg). Part 1 evaluated the effect of different sedatives on the rate of appearance of plasma free fatty acids (RaFFA), assessed using 13C4-labeled palmitate infusion (7 µmol/kg/min). Animals, were studied with no sedation, with complete isoflurane sedation, and with minimal midazolam infusion (0.04 mg/kg/h), with the last scheme allowing for the most consistent values and animals that were visually more calm. In Part 2, RaFFA and RaGlycerol (D5-glycerol, 5 mg/kg lean body mass/h) were measured. From midnight to 0300, flux fell and came to a steady state between 0500 and 0700 h (RaFFA, 39.4 ± 29.8 μmol/kg fat mass/min; and RaGlycerol, 26.9 ± 7.3 μmol/kg/min). The RaFFA-to-RaGlycerol ratio was 1.5 ± 0.8 (49% reesterification). The decline in turnover throughout the night reflects natural circadian processes and was mirrored by reductions in FFA and glycerol to 0.62 and ± 0.14 and 0.16 and ± 0.03 mmol/l, respectively. The concurrent changes in both FFA and glycerol kinetics indicate physiologic validity of the method. These techniques will support needed research to determine mechanisms by which treatments act upon the adipocyte in vivo. PMID:21415122

  1. Systemic Free Fatty Acid Disposal Into Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Koutsari, Christina; Mundi, Manpreet S.; Ali, Asem H.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Jensen, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the incorporation of systemic free fatty acids (FFA) into circulating very low-density lipoprotein triglycerides (VLDL-TGs) under postabsorptive, postprandial, and walking conditions in humans. Fifty-five men and 85 premenopausal women with BMI 18–24 (lean) and 27–36 kg/m2 (overweight/obese) received an intravenous bolus injection of [1,1,2,3,3-2H5]glycerol (to measure VLDL-TG kinetics) and either [1-14C]palmitate or [9,10-3H]palmitate to determine the proportion of systemic FFA that is converted to VLDL-TG. Experiments started at 0630 h after a 12-h overnight fast. In the postabsorptive protocol, participants rested and remained fasted until 1330 h. In the postprandial protocol, volunteers ingested frequent portions of a fat-free smoothie. In the walking protocol, participants walked on a treadmill for 5.5 h at ∼3× resting energy expenditure. Approximately 7% of circulating FFA was converted into VLDL-TG. VLDL-TG secretion rates (SRs) were not statistically different among protocols. Visceral fat mass was the only independent predictor of VLDL-TG secretion, explaining 33–57% of the variance. The small proportion of systemic FFA that is converted to VLDL-TG can confound the expected relationship between plasma FFA concentration and VLDL-TG SRs. Regulation of VLDL-TG secretion is complex in that, despite a broad spectrum of physiological FFA concentrations, VLDL-TG SRs did not vary based on different acute substrate availability. PMID:23434937

  2. Characterization of the esterification reaction in high free fatty acid oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altic, Lucas Eli Porter

    Energy and vegetable oil prices have caused many biodiesel producers to turn to waste cooking oils as feedstocks. These oils contain high levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) which make them difficult or impossible to convert to biodiesel by conventional production methods. Esterification is required for ultra-high FFA feedstocks such as Brown Grease. In addition, ultrasonic irradiation has the potential to improve the kinetics of the esterification reaction. 2-level, multi-factor DOE experiments were conducted to characterize the esterification reaction in ultra-high FFA oils as well as determine whether ultrasonic irradiation gives any benefit besides energy input. The study determined that sulfuric acid content had the greatest effect followed by temperature and water content (inhibited reaction). Methanol content had no effect in the range studied. A small interaction term existed between sulfuric acid and temperature. The study also concluded that sonication did not give any additional benefit over energy input.

  3. Degradation kinetic modelling of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Remini, Hocine; Mertz, Christian; Belbahi, Amine; Achir, Nawel; Dornier, Manuel; Madani, Khodir

    2015-04-15

    The stability of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) during one month of storage was investigated at 4-37 °C. The effects of ascorbic acid fortification (at 100, 200 mg L(-1)) and deaeration, temperature/time storage on the kinetic behaviour were determined. Ascorbic acid was monitored by HPLC-DAD and colour intensity by spectrophotometric measurements. Degradation kinetics were best fitted by first-order reaction models for both ascorbic acid and colour intensity. Three models (Arrhenius, Eyring and Ball) were used to assess the temperature-dependent degradation. Following the Arrhenius model, activation energies were ranged from 51 to 135 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid and from 49 to 99 kJ mol(-1) for colour intensity. The effect of storage temperature and deaeration are the most influent factors on kinetics degradation, while the fortification revealed no significant effect on ascorbic acid content and colour intensity.

  4. Kinetic Classroom: Acid-Base and Redox Demonstrations with Student Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomax, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    Describes classroom activities that involve student movement to demonstrate principles of kinetics. This classroom method can be used for any topic related to dynamic processes. The method used in this activity illustrates Brxnsted-Lowry acid-base theory and redox reactions. Takes advantage of analogies between proton and electron transfers. Use…

  5. Kinetics of acid-catalyzed degradation of cyclosporin A and its analogs in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Oliyai, R; Safadi, M; Meier, P G; Hu, M K; Rich, D H; Stella, V J

    1994-03-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the degradation of cyclosporin A have been studied under aqueous acidic conditions. The rate of degradation was found to be specific acid-catalyzed over the pH range studied (1-4), with isocyclosporin A as the predominant degradation product. Selective reduction of the olefinic bond of the amino acid 2-N-methyl-(R)-((E)-2-butenyl)-4-methyl-L-threonine (MeBmt) did not affect the overall degradation kinetics and product distribution of cyclosporin A. These observations indicate that the alternative degradation pathway involving intramolecular alkoxy addition to the olefinic bond of amino acid MeBmt apparently does not significantly contribute to the overall degradation kinetics of cyclosporin A in the pH range 1-4. The chemical reactivity of O-acetyl-cyclosporin A was examined to probe the governing mechanism for the isomerization of cyclosporin A. Under identical conditions, O-acetyl-cyclosporin A showed a much greater chemical stability than cyclosporin A, consistent with a mechanism involving the hydroxyoxazolidine intermediate. The chemical stability of cyclosporin C, which contains two beta-hydroxyl groups, was also examined. The rate and product distribution for the degradation of cyclosporin C suggest that under aqueous acidic conditions it undergoes N,O-acyl migration solely at the amino acid residue MeBmt. Additionally, the impact of side-chain bulkiness of amino acid MeBmt was examined by studying the degradation kinetics of a series of cyclosporin A analogs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. 4-Hydroxy cinnamic acid as mushroom preservation: Anti-tyrosinase activity kinetics and application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Chen, Qing-Xi; Cui, Yi; Gao, Huan-Juan; Xu, Lian; Yu, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Chong-Ling; Wang, Qin

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in post-harvest browning of fruit and vegetable. To control and inhibit its activity is the most effective method for delaying the browning and extend the shelf life. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on mushroom tyrosinase was investigated using the kinetics method of substrate reaction. The results showed that the inhibition of tyrosinase by 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid was a slow, reversible reaction with fractional remaining activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction on 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid with tyrosinase. Furthermore, the molecular docking was used to simulate 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid dock with tyrosinase. The results showed that 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid interacted with the enzyme active site mainly through the hydroxy competed with the substrate hydroxy group. The cytotoxicity study of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid indicated that it had no effects on the proliferation of normal liver cells. Moreover, the results of effects of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on the preservation of mushroom showed that it could delay the mushroom browning. These results provide a comprehensive underlying the inhibitory mechanisms of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and its delaying post-harvest browning, that is beneficial for the application of this compound.

  7. Kinetic study for copper adsorption onto soil minerals in the absence and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Komy, Zanaty R; Shaker, Ali M; Heggy, Said E M; El-Sayed, Mohamed E A

    2014-03-01

    Equilibrium and kinetics of Cu(2+) adsorption onto soil minerals (kaolinite and hematite) in the absence and presence of humic acid have been investigated under various conditions. The influences of ionic strength, pH and solution cations on the rate of the adsorption have been studied. The rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals in the absence or the presence of humic acid increased with decreasing ionic strength, increasing pH and in the presence of the background electrolyte K(+) rather than Ca(2+). Humic acid enhanced the rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals. The adsorption equilibrium data showed that adsorption behavior of Cu(2+) could be described more reasonably by Langmiur adsorption isotherm than Freundlich isotherm in the absence or presence of humic acid. Pseudo first and pseudo second order models were used to evaluate the kinetic data and the rate constants. The results indicated that the adsorption of Cu(2+) onto hematite and kaolinite in the absence and presence of humic acid is more conforming to pseudo second order kinetics.

  8. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  9. Kinetic resolution of acids in acylation reactions in the presence of chiral tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.M.; Dem'yanovich, V.M.; Khlebnikov, V.A.

    1988-07-10

    Asymmetric synthesis has now become an important method for the production of optically active compounds, and its most attractive form is asymmetric catalysis. This work was devoted to an investigation into asymmetric catalysis with chiral tertiary amines in acylation reactions. During the acylation of alcohols and amines by the action of racemic 2-phenylpropionic and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropionic acids in the presence of S-nicotine the initial acids are resolved kinetically. The (R)-2-phenylpropionic acid obtained in this way had an optical purity of 0.5-1.5%.

  10. Dilute acid hydrolysis of wheat straw hemicellulose at moderate temperature: a simplified kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, G.; Lopez-Santin, J.; Caminal, G.; Sola, C.

    1986-02-01

    Wheat straw has been hydrolized with sulfuric acid at 34 and 90 degrees C. The treatment at 90 degrees C yields complete solubilization of hemicellulose to xylose and arabinose without significant amounts of furfural. The influence of acid concentration was studied and the kinetics of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis has been modeled suggesting a two-consecutive reactions mechanism. This model is useful to explain the different behavior of the concentration of the two main sugars produced. The enhanced cellulose accessibility to enzymatic attack is also reported. 26 references.

  11. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    salicylic acid in water, in terms of transformation products, kinetic, mechanism, as well as degradation pathways. PMID:27031802

  12. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    salicylic acid in water, in terms of transformation products, kinetic, mechanism, as well as degradation pathways.

  13. Kinetic study of the complexation of gallic acid with Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li-li; Li, Ying-hua; Lu, Xiu-yang

    2009-10-01

    Kinetic study on the complexation of gallic acid with ferrous sulfate was performed using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Under the experimental conditions, the stoichiometric composition of the formed complex is 1:1. The complexation reaction was found to be a second-order one. The influences of temperature, ionic strength and solvents on the complexation reaction were investigated. According to the Arrhenius equation, the apparent activation energy of the complexation reaction was evaluated to be 71.64 kJ × mol -1. A three-step reaction mechanism was proposed, which can well explain the kinetic results obtained.

  14. Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Dicyanocobinamide and Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Dhiman; Ali, Iyad; Abdulridha, Rasha M.; Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl) from dicyanocobinamide ((CN)2-Cbi). Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl)(CN)-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl)2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM−1s−1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands. PMID:25375773

  15. Reduction of nitrobenzene with alkaline ascorbic acid: Kinetics and pathways.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Lin, Ya-Ting; Shiu, Jia-Wei

    2016-01-25

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) exhibits the potential to reductively degrade nitrobenzene (NB), which is the simplest of the nitroaromatic compounds. The nitro group (NO2(-)) of NB has a +III oxidation state of the N atom and tends to gain electrons. The effect of alkaline pH ranging from 9 to 13 was initially assessed and the results demonstrated that the solution pH, when approaching or above the pKa2 of AA (11.79), would increase reductive electron transfer to NB. The rate equation for the reactions between NB and AA at pH 12 can be described as r=((0.89±0.11)×10(-4) mM(1-(a+b))h(-1))×[NB](a=1.35±0.10)[AA](b=0.89±0.01). The GC/MS analytical method identified nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene, and azobenzene as NB reduction intermediates, and aniline (AN) as a final product. These experimental results indicate that the alkaline AA reduction of NB to AN mainly proceeds via the direct route, consisting of a series of two-electron or four-electron transfers, and the condensation reaction plays a minor route. Preliminary evaluation of the remediation of spiked NB contaminated soils revealed that maintenance of alkaline pH and a higher water to soil ratio are essential for a successful alkaline AA application.

  16. Kinetics of color development of melanoidins formed from fructose/amino acid model systems.

    PubMed

    Echavarría, A P; Pagán, J; Ibarz, A

    2014-03-01

    The formation of soluble melanoidins from a single combination of sugar (fructose) and amino acid model systems were evaluated kinetically. The selected amino acids, commonly found in apple juice and highly reactive in the Maillard reaction, were asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The effect of these reagents and the treatment at different temperatures (50 , 85 , and 100 ) during 96 h on the color intensity of the melanoidin formed was measured by absorbance at different wavelengths (280, 325, 405, and 420 nm). The absorbance of the melanoidin formed from all model systems was located on the wavelength of 405 nm, that is, the area of the visible spectrum close to the UV region. The color of the melanoidins was directly measured using the CIELAB color space system. A first-order kinetic model was applied to the evolution of the ΔE * (color difference) and L * (lightness) of the color. The fructose/aspartic acid model system values of a * (redness) and b * (yellowness) were found in the brown-red zone. Therefore, the color development of the melanoidins was influenced by the type of amino acid and temperature. Especially, it is thought that the a * and b * values can be used to explain the differences among the amino acids in the color development of melanoidins. PMID:23744115

  17. Tracking the oxidative kinetics of carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in the house sparrow using exhaled 13CO2.

    PubMed

    McCue, M D; Sivan, O; McWilliams, S R; Pinshow, B

    2010-03-01

    Clinicians commonly measure the (13)CO(2) in exhaled breath samples following administration of a metabolic tracer (breath testing) to diagnose certain infections and metabolic disorders. We believe that breath testing can become a powerful tool to investigate novel questions about the influence of ecological and physiological factors on the oxidative fates of exogenous nutrients. Here we examined several predictions regarding the oxidative kinetics of specific carbohydrates, amino acids and fatty acids in a dietary generalist, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). After administering postprandial birds with 20 mg of one of seven (13)C-labeled tracers, we measured rates of (13)CO(2) production every 15 min over 2 h. We found that sparrows oxidized exogenous amino acids far more rapidly than carbohydrates or fatty acids, and that different tracers belonging to the same class of physiological fuels had unique oxidative kinetics. Glycine had a mean maximum rate of oxidation (2021 nmol min(-1)) that was significantly higher than that of leucine (351 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that nonessential amino acids are oxidized more rapidly than essential amino acids. Exogenous glucose and fructose were oxidized to a similar extent (5.9% of dose), but the time required to reach maximum rates of oxidation was longer for fructose. The maximum rates of oxidation were significantly higher when exogenous glucose was administered as an aqueous solution (122 nmol min(-1)), rather than as an oil suspension (93 nmol min(-1)), supporting our prediction that exogenous lipids negatively influence rates of exogenous glucose oxidation. Dietary fatty acids had the lowest maximum rates of oxidation (2-6 nmol min(-1)), and differed significantly in the extent to which each was oxidized, with 0.73%, 0.63% and 0.21% of palmitic, oleic and stearic acid tracers oxidized, respectively.

  18. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase 2: Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M. B.; Isbell, R. E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions.

  19. Production of lactic acid from sucrose: strain selection, fermentation, and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Lunelli, Betânia H; Andrade, Rafael R; Atala, Daniel I P; Wolf Maciel, Maria Regina; Maugeri Filho, Francisco; Maciel Filho, Rubens

    2010-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important product arising from the anaerobic fermentation of sugars. It is used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, chemical, and food industries as well as for biodegradable polymer and green solvent production. In this work, several bacterial strains were isolated from industrial ethanol fermentation, and the most efficient strain for lactic acid production was selected. The fermentation was conducted in a batch system under anaerobic conditions for 50 h at a temperature of 34 degrees C, a pH value of 5.0, and an initial sucrose concentration of 12 g/L using diluted sugarcane molasses. Throughout the process, pulses of molasses were added in order to avoid the cell growth inhibition due to high sugar concentration as well as increased lactic acid concentrations. At the end of the fermentation, about 90% of sucrose was consumed to produce lactic acid and cells. A kinetic model has been developed to simulate the batch lactic acid fermentation results. The data obtained from the fermentation were used for determining the kinetic parameters of the model. The developed model for lactic acid production, growth cell, and sugar consumption simulates the experimental data well.

  20. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-01

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood.

  1. Hydrolysis of Sulfur Dioxide in Small Clusters of Sulfuric Acid: Mechanistic and Kinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Fang, Sheng; Wang, Zhixiu; Yi, Wencai; Tao, Fu-Ming; Liu, Jing-Yao

    2015-11-17

    The deposition and hydrolysis reaction of SO2 + H2O in small clusters of sulfuric acid and water are studied by theoretical calculations of the molecular clusters SO2-(H2SO4)n-(H2O)m (m = 1,2; n = 1,2). Sulfuric acid exhibits a dramatic catalytic effect on the hydrolysis reaction of SO2 as it lowers the energy barrier by over 20 kcal/mol. The reaction with monohydrated sulfuric acid (SO2 + H2O + H2SO4 - H2O) has the lowest energy barrier of 3.83 kcal/mol, in which the cluster H2SO4-(H2O)2 forms initially at the entrance channel. The energy barriers for the three hydrolysis reactions are in the order SO2 + (H2SO4)-H2O > SO2 + (H2SO4)2-H2O > SO2 + H2SO4-H2O. Furthermore, sulfurous acid is more strongly bonded to the hydrated sulfuric acid (or dimer) clusters than the corresponding reactant (monohydrated SO2). Consequently, sulfuric acid promotes the hydrolysis of SO2 both kinetically and thermodynamically. Kinetics simulations have been performed to study the importance of these reactions in the reduction of atmospheric SO2. The results will give a new insight on how the pre-existing aerosols catalyze the hydrolysis of SO2, leading to the formation and growth of new particles.

  2. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions.

  3. A hybrid SVM-FFA method for prediction of monthly mean global solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Mohammadi, Kasra; Tong, Chong Wen; Zamani, Mazdak; Motamedi, Shervin; Ch, Sudheer

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a hybrid support vector machine-firefly optimization algorithm (SVM-FFA) model is proposed to estimate monthly mean horizontal global solar radiation (HGSR). The merit of SVM-FFA is assessed statistically by comparing its performance with three previously used approaches. Using each approach and long-term measured HGSR, three models are calibrated by considering different sets of meteorological parameters measured for Bandar Abbass situated in Iran. It is found that the model (3) utilizing the combination of relative sunshine duration, difference between maximum and minimum temperatures, relative humidity, water vapor pressure, average temperature, and extraterrestrial solar radiation shows superior performance based upon all approaches. Moreover, the extraterrestrial radiation is introduced as a significant parameter to accurately estimate the global solar radiation. The survey results reveal that the developed SVM-FFA approach is greatly capable to provide favorable predictions with significantly higher precision than other examined techniques. For the SVM-FFA (3), the statistical indicators of mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), root mean square error (RMSE), relative root mean square error (RRMSE), and coefficient of determination ( R 2) are 3.3252 %, 0.1859 kWh/m2, 3.7350 %, and 0.9737, respectively which according to the RRMSE has an excellent performance. As a more evaluation of SVM-FFA (3), the ratio of estimated to measured values is computed and found that 47 out of 48 months considered as testing data fall between 0.90 and 1.10. Also, by performing a further verification, it is concluded that SVM-FFA (3) offers absolute superiority over the empirical models using relatively similar input parameters. In a nutshell, the hybrid SVM-FFA approach would be considered highly efficient to estimate the HGSR.

  4. A novel kinetic model for polysaccharide dissolution during atmospheric acetic acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuebing; Morikawa, Yuichi; Qi, Feng; Zeng, Jing; Liu, Dehua

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid (AcH) pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with the catalysis of sulfuric acid (SA) could greatly enhance the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. However, polysaccharide dissolution happened inevitably during the pretreatment. It was found that the simplest model, which assumes that the total polysaccharides were reactive to be dissolved, could not well describe the kinetic behavior of polysaccharide dissolution. A novel pseudo-homogenous kinetic model was thus developed by introducing a parameter termed as "potential dissolution degree" (δ(d)) based on the multilayered structure of cell wall. It was found that solid xylan and glucan dissolutions were a first-order reaction with respect to the dissolvable fraction. Due to the delignification action of AcH, polysaccharide dissolutions were enhanced in AcH media compared with those in aqueous system. Acetylizations of cellulose and sugars were also observed, and AcH concentration showed a significant influence on the degree of acetylization.

  5. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Tetrathionate-Hypochlorous Acid Reaction in Nearly Neutral Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dénes; Horváth, Attila K.

    2009-11-01

    The tetrathionate-hypochlorous acid reaction has been investigated in nearly neutral medium at I = 0.5 M ionic strength and T = 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in dihydrogen-phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate buffer by UV-vis spectrophotometry. In excess of hypochlorous acid, the stoichiometry was found to be S4O62- + 7HOCl + 3H2O → 4SO42- + 7Cl- + 13H+, but in excess of tetrathionate colloidal sulfur precipitates. On the basis of the simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, a nine-step kinetic model with four fitted and five fixed rate coefficients is proposed. Analogous oxidation reactions of tetrathionate are also compared and discussed.

  6. Acidic processing of hemicellulosic saccharides from pine wood: product distribution and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Sandra; González-Muñoz, María Jesús; Santos, Valentín; Parajó, Juan Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Water soluble compounds were removed from Pinus pinaster wood by a mild aqueous extraction, and the treated wood was subjected to hydrothermal processing to convert most hemicelluloses into soluble saccharides (including low molecular weight polymers, oligomers and monosaccharides). The liquid phase containing hemicellulose-derived saccharides was acidified with sulfuric acid and heated up to 130-250°C to obtain furans and levulinic acid as major products. The concentration profiles of the major compounds participating in the reactions were interpreted by a kinetic model. A maximum conversion of pentoses into furfural near 80% was predicted at high temperature and short time, conditions leading to 24% conversion of hexoses into HMF. Production of levulinic acid was favored at low temperatures. Maximum molar conversion of hexoses into levulinic acid (66.7% at 130°C) needed a long reaction time (235 h). A value of 53.0% can be achieved at 170°C after 5 h.

  7. Kinetics of gas phase formic acid decomposition on platinum single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Michael D.; Milligan, Cory A.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-06-01

    Formic acid dehydrogenation turnover rates (TORs) were measured on Pt(111), Pt(100), and polycrystalline Pt foil surfaces at a total pressure of 800 Torr between 413 and 513 K in a batch reactor connected to an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The TORs, apparent activation energies, and reaction orders are not sensitive to the structure of the Pt surface, within the precision of the measurements. CO introduced into the batch reactor depressed the formic acid dehydrogenation TOR and increased the reaction's apparent activation energies on Pt(111) and Pt(100), consistent with behavior predicted by the Temkin equation. Two reaction mechanisms were explored which explain the formic acid decomposition mechanism on Pt, both of which include dissociative adsorption of formic acid, rate limiting formate decomposition, and quasi-equilibrated hydrogen recombination and CO adsorption. No evidence was found that catalytic supports used in previous studies altered the reaction kinetics or mechanism.

  8. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  9. Predicting protein decomposition: the case of aspartic-acid racemization kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M J; Waite, E R; van Duin, A C

    1999-01-01

    The increase in proportion of the non-biological (D-) isomer of aspartic acid (Asp) relative to the L-isomer has been widely used in archaeology and geochemistry as a tool for dating. the method has proved controversial, particularly when used for bones. The non-linear kinetics of Asp racemization have prompted a number of suggestions as to the underlying mechanism(s) and have led to the use of mathematical transformations which linearize the increase in D-Asp with respect to time. Using one example, a suggestion that the initial rapid phase of Asp racemization is due to a contribution from asparagine (Asn), we demonstrate how a simple model of the degradation and racemization of Asn can be used to predict the observed kinetics. A more complex model of peptide bound Asx (Asn + Asp) racemization, which occurs via the formation of a cyclic succinimide (Asu), can be used to correctly predict Asx racemization kinetics in proteins at high temperatures (95-140 degrees C). The model fails to predict racemization kinetics in dentine collagen at 37 degrees C. The reason for this is that Asu formation is highly conformation dependent and is predicted to occur extremely slowly in triple helical collagen. As conformation strongly influences the rate of Asu formation and hence Asx racemization, the use of extrapolation from high temperatures to estimate racemization kinetics of Asx in proteins below their denaturation temperature is called into question. In the case of archaeological bone, we argue that the D:L ratio of Asx reflects the proportion of non-helical to helical collagen, overlain by the effects of leaching of more soluble (and conformationally unconstrained) peptides. Thus, racemization kinetics in bone are potentially unpredictable, and the proposed use of Asx racemization to estimate the extent of DNA depurination in archaeological bones is challenged. PMID:10091247

  10. A novel diffusion-biphasic hydrolysis coupled kinetic model for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longjian; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Junbao; Lu, Minsheng; Guo, Xiaomiao; Han, Lujia

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic experiments on the dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover were performed. A high xylan removal and a low inhibitor concentration were achieved by acid pretreatment. A novel diffusion-hydrolysis coupled kinetic model was proposed. The contribution to the xylose yield was analyzed by the kinetic model. Compared with the inhibitor furfural negatively affecting xylose yield, the fast and slow-hydrolyzing xylan significantly contributed to the xylose yield, however, their dominant roles were dependent on reaction temperature and time. The impact of particle size and acid concentration on the xylose yield were also investigated. The diffusion process may significantly influence the hydrolysis of large particles. Increasing the acid concentration from 0.15 M to 0.30 M significantly improved the xylose yield, whereas the extent of improvement decreased to near-quantitative when further increasing acid loading. These findings shed some light on the mechanism for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of corn stover.

  11. Kinetic Analysis of Lauric Acid Hydroxylation by Human Cytochrome P450 4A11

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 4A11 is the only functionally active subfamily 4A P450 in humans. P450 4A11 catalyzes mainly ω-hydroxylation of fatty acids in liver and kidney; this process is not a major degradative pathway, but at least one product, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, has important signaling properties. We studied catalysis by P450 4A11 and the issue of rate-limiting steps using lauric acid ω-hydroxylation, a prototypic substrate for this enzyme. Some individual reaction steps were studied using pre-steady-state kinetic approaches. Substrate and product binding and release were much faster than overall rates of catalysis. Reduction of ferric P450 4A11 (to ferrous) was rapid and not rate-limiting. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) experiments yielded low but reproducible values (1.2–2) for 12-hydroxylation with 12-2H-substituted lauric acid. However, considerable “metabolic switching” to 11-hydroxylation was observed with [12-2H3]lauric acid. Analysis of switching results [Jones, J. P., et al. (1986) J. Am. Chem. Soc.108, 7074–7078] and the use of tritium KIE analysis with [12-3H]lauric acid [Northrop, D. B. (1987) Methods Enzymol.87, 607–625] both indicated a high intrinsic KIE (>10). Cytochrome b5 (b5) stimulated steady-state lauric acid ω-hydroxylation ∼2-fold; the apoprotein was ineffective, indicating that electron transfer is involved in the b5 enhancement. The rate of b5 reoxidation was increased in the presence of ferrous P450 mixed with O2. Collectively, the results indicate that both the transfer of an electron to the ferrous·O2 complex and C–H bond-breaking limit the rate of P450 4A11 ω-oxidation. PMID:25203493

  12. Kinetics and reaction engineering of levulinic acid production from aqueous glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Ronen; Cho, Joungmo; Xing, Rong; Conner, William Curtis; Huber, George W

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a kinetic model for aqueous-phase production of levulinic acid from glucose using a homogeneous acid catalyst. The proposed model shows a good fit with experimental data collected in this study in a batch reactor. The model was also fitted to steady-state data obtained in a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The kinetic model consists of four key steps: (1) glucose dehydration to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF); (2) glucose reversion/degradation reactions to produce humins (highly polymerized insoluble carbonaceous species); (3) HMF rehydration to form levulinic acid and formic acid; and (4) HMF degradation to form humins. We use our model to predict the optimal reactor design and operating conditions for HMF and levulinic acid production in a continuous reactor system. Higher temperatures (180-200 °C) and shorter reaction times (less than 1 min) are essential to maximize the HMF content. In contrast, relatively low temperatures (140-160 °C) and longer residence times (above 100 min) are essential for maximum levulinic acid yield. We estimate that a maximum HMF carbon yield of 14% can be obtained in a PFR at 200 °C and a reaction time of 10 s. Levulinic acid can be produced at 57% carbon yield (68% of the theoretical yield) in a PFR at 149 °C and a residence time of 500 min. A system of two consecutive PFR reactors shows a higher performance than a PFR and CSTR combination. However, compared to a single PFR, there is no distinct advantage to implement a system of two consecutive reactors.

  13. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.6×10 -6 M and calibration rang is 8×10 -6-1.2×10 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 8×10 -6 and 2×10 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  14. Study of the kinetics and equilibria of the oligomerization reactions of 2-methylglyceric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Zentner, C. A.; Elrod, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    The presence of a variety of chemical species related to the gaseous precursor isoprene in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has stimulated investigations of the nature of SOA-phase chemical processing. Recent work has demonstrated that 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) is an important isoprene-derived ambient SOA component and atmospheric chamber experiments have suggested that 2-MG may exist in oligomeric form (as oligoesters) under conditions of low SOA water content. In order to better understand the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such oligomerization reactions, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the bulk phase acid-catalyzed aqueous reactions (Fischer esterification) of 2-MG. While the present results indicate that 2-MG oligoesters are formed in the bulk phase with similar water content equilibrium dependences as observed in atmospheric chamber SOA experiments, the acid-catalyzed rate of the Fischer esterification mechanism may be too slow to rationalize the 2-MG oligoester production timescales observed in the atmospheric chamber experiments. Furthermore, it appears that unrealistically high ambient SOA acidities would also be required for significant 2-MG oligoester content to arise via Fischer esterification. Therefore, the present results suggest that other, more kinetically facile, esterification mechanisms may be necessary to rationalize the existence of 2-MG oligomers in atmospheric chamber-generated and ambient SOA.

  15. Study of the kinetics and equilibria of the oligomerization reactions of 2-methylglyceric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Zentner, C. A.; Elrod, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of a variety of chemical species related to the gaseous precursor isoprene in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has stimulated investigations of the nature of SOA-phase chemical processing. Recent work has demonstrated that 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) is an important isoprene-derived ambient SOA component and atmospheric chamber experiments have suggested that 2-MG may exist in oligomeric form (as oligoesters) under conditions of low SOA water content. In order to better understand the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of such oligomerization reactions, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the bulk phase acid-catalyzed aqueous reactions (Fischer esterification) of 2-MG. While the present results indicate that 2-MG oligoesters are formed in the bulk phase with similar water content equilibrium dependences as observed in atmospheric chamber SOA experiments, the acid-catalyzed rate of the Fischer esterification mechanism may be too slow to rationalize the 2-MG oligoester production timescales observed in the atmospheric chamber experiments. Furthermore, it appears that unrealistically high ambient SOA acidities would also be required for significant 2-MG oligoester content to arise via Fischer esterification. Therefore, the present results suggest that other, more kinetically facile, esterification mechanisms may be necessary to rationalize the existence of 2-MG oligomers in atmospheric chamber-generated and ambient SOA.

  16. Decomposition of hydroxy amino acids in foraminiferal tests; kinetics, mechanism and geochronological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Shou, M.-Y.; Man, E.H.; Schroeder, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The diagenesis of the hydroxy amino acids serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests has been investigated. The decomposition pathways of these amino acids are complex; the principal reactions appear to be dehydration, aldol cleavage and decarboxylation. Stereochemical studies indicate that the ??-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) detected in foraminiferal tests is the end product of threonine dehydration pathway. Decomposition of serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests from two well-dated Caribbean deep-sea cores, P6304-8 and -9, has been found to follow irreversible first-order kinetics. Three empirical equations were derived for the disappearance of serine and threonine and the appearance of ABA. These equations can be used as a new geochronological method for dating foraminiferal tests from other deep-sea sediments. Preliminary results suggest that ages deduced from the ABA kinetics equation are most reliable because "species effect" and contamination problems are not important for this nonbiological amino acid. Because of the variable serine and threonine contents of modern foraminiferal species, it is likely that the accurate age estimates can be obtained from the serine and threonine decomposition equations only if a homogeneous species assemblage or single species sample isolated from mixed natural assemblages is used. ?? 1978.

  17. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors. PMID:26819382

  18. Kinetics of the thermal degradation of patulin in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidou, S; Floros, J D; LaBorde, L F

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of the mycotoxin patulin between 25 and 85 °C without and with added ascorbic acid was studied, and the effectiveness of linear and nonlinear models for predicting reaction rates was compared. In agreement with previous reports, ascorbic acid significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) the rate of patulin degradation at all temperatures studied. The data for patulin degradation in the absence of ascorbic acid were adequately modeled using a zero-order linear kinetic model. However, the predictive abilities of zero and higher-order linear models were not adequate to describe the more complex reactions that likely occurred when ascorbic acid was added. In contrast, the nonlinear Weibull model adequately described the patulin-ascorbic acid reaction throughout the temperature range studied. Zero-order rate constants and Weibull scale values for each of the respective reactions followed the Arrhenius law. Activation energies of 58.7 ± 3.9 and 29.6 ± 1.9 kJ mol⁻¹ for the reaction without and with ascorbic acid, respectively, confirmed decreased patulin stability in the presence of ascorbic acid and suggested that the mechanisms for the 2 degradation reactions were different.

  19. Effect of diet-induced obesity on kinetic parameters of amino acid uptake by rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Picó, C; Pons, A; Palou, A

    1992-11-01

    The effects of cafeteria diet-induced obesity upon in vitro uptake of L-Alanine, Glycine, L-Lysine, L-Glutamine, L-Glutamic acid, L-Phenylalanine and L-Leucine by isolated rat erythrocytes have been studied. The total Phe and Leu uptakes followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The Glu uptake was fitted to diffusion kinetics. The uptakes of Ala, Gly, Lys and Gln were best explained by a two-component transport: one saturable and one diffusion. Obesity increased the Km value for Ala, Gln and Leu, and the Vmax value for Ala, but decreased the Vmax for Lys. Kinetic parameters of Phe uptake were unaffected by obesity. In addition, the pseudo-first order rate constant (Vmax/Km) for Ala, Gly, Gln, Lys and Leu uptake decreased as a result of cafeteria diet-induced obesity. The Kd value for Ala, Gly, Gln and Glu decreased and that of Lys increased as result of obesity. These adaptations could, at least in part, explain alterations in amino acid distribution between blood cells and plasma related to overfeeding or obesity.

  20. Kinetics of CO2 Absorption into Aqueous Basic Amino Acid Salt: Potassium Salt of Lysine Solution.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shufeng; Yang, Ya-nan; Bian, Yangyang; Zhao, Yue

    2016-02-16

    Aqueous amino acid salts are considered as an attractive alternative to alkanolamine solvents (e.g., MEA) for carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption. The kinetics of CO2 into unloaded aqueous solutions of potassium lysinate (LysK) was studied using a wetted wall column at concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 M and temperatures from 298 to 333 K. Physicochemical properties of aqueous LysK solutions such as density, viscosity, and physical solubility of CO2 were measured to evaluate the reaction rate constants. The reaction pathway is described using zwitterion mechanism taking into account the effect of ionic strength on the reaction rate. Under the fast pseudo-first-order regime, the reaction rate parameters were obtained and correlated in a power-law reaction rate expression. LysK shows higher chemical reactivity toward CO2 than the industrial standard MEA and most of amino acid salts. Its reaction rate constants increase considerably with concentration and temperature. The reaction order is found to be an average value of 1.58 with respect to LysK. The forward second-order kinetic rate constant, k2 0 , are obtained as 31615 and 84822 m3 kmol−1 s−1 at 298 and 313 K, respectively with activation energy of 51.0 kJ mol−1. The contribution of water to the zwitterion deprotonation seems to be more significant than that of LysK for the above-mentioned kinetic conditions PMID:26751093

  1. A Kinetic Study of DDGS Hemicellulose Acid Hydrolysis and NMR Characterization of DDGS Hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchi; Liu, Shijie

    2015-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) extraction was used as a pretreatment method to separate the hemicellulose fraction from dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS) into liquid phase. Acid hydrolysis using 3.264 % w/w sulfuric acid at 130 °C was performed to convert polysaccharides in LHW extract to monosaccharides. The structure characterization of DDGS in anomeric carbon region based on proton NMR and heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) during acid hydrolysis was studied in this work. It reveals that the sugar units in DDGS hemicelluloses are constructed with (1-4)-β-D-xylopyranose and α-L-arabinofuranosyl residues. A kinetic model is included to explain the changing concentration of monomer, oligomer, and sugar units. The model was further tested based on the changing concentration of five carbon sugar units during hydrolysis. PMID:26198022

  2. First-order kinetics analysis of monomer composition dependent polyhydroxyalkanoic acid degradation in Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mun Hwan; Rho, Jong Kook; Lee, Ho-Joo; Song, Jae Jun; Yoon, Sung Chul; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2003-01-01

    The intracellular degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) in pseudomonads was investigated by first-order kinetics analysis using the initial rate method. One type of PHA was accumulated in five Pseudomonas spp., P. oleovorans, P. aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, P. citronellolis, and P. putida, by growing them on octanoic acid. The monomer compositions of the five PHA were not significantly different from one another: 85-90 mol % 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid (3HO), 7-12 mol % 3-hydorxycaproic acid (3HC), and 3-6 mol % 3-hydroxydecanoic acid (3HD). The first-order degradation rate constants (k(1)) for the octanoate-derived PHA (designated P(3HO)) in the five species were in a similar range between 0.060 and 0.088 h(-1). This may indicate the similar specificities of the five intracellular depolymerases. In addition, the similar k(1) among the different species may correlate with the high degree of amino acid sequence identities (over 85%) among the intracellular PHA depolymerase phaZ genes. Six other chemically different types of PHA were accumulated in P. putida from n-nonanoic acid, n-decanoic acid, 5-phenyvaleric acid, or 11-phenoxyundecanoic acid as a single or a mixed carbon source. The calculated k(1) values were characteristic to each PHA, reflecting their chemical structures. In comparison with P(3HO), an increase in the levels of the two minor monomers 3HC and 3HD as in P(21 mol % 3HC-co-56 mol % 3HO-co-23 mol % 3HD) significantly slowed the rate of intracellular degradation. From the comparison of k(1) values, it is suggested that the P. putida intracellular depolymerase is most active against P(3HO). PMID:12625741

  3. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-01

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood. PMID:26244445

  4. Kinetic isotope effects on the dissolution kinetics of solid salicylic acid in aqueous solution: evidence for solubilisation via a proton dissociation-recombination mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Shelley J; Coles, Barry A; Compton, Richard G

    2002-04-01

    Quantitative Atomic Force Microscopy measurements made on the dissolving surface of solid salicylic acid in H2O and D2O reveal a kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD = 2.3 +/- 0.6) on the dissolution rate consistent with a transition state in which the proton is dissociated from the dissolving molecule.

  5. The kinetics of iodide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, M. C.; Stanisavljev, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of the complex reaction between I- and H2O2 in acid media was investigated. The particular attention was focused on the determination of the rate constant of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 involved in the investigated complex process. The examination of the whole kinetics was performed by simultaneously monitoring the evolution of O2 pressure, I{3/-} and I- concentrations. We modeled the behavior of experimentally followed components based on Liebhafsky's research. Our preliminary results suggest a significantly higher rate constant (3.5 × 107 M-1 s-1) of the reaction between HIO and H2O2 as those proposed in the literature.

  6. Kinetic modeling of lactic acid production from batch submerged fermentation of cheese whey

    SciTech Connect

    Tango, M.S.A.; Ghaly, A.E.

    1999-12-01

    A kinetic model for the production of lactic acid through batch submerged fermentation of cheese whey using Lactobacillus helveticus was developed. The model accounts for the effect of substrate limitation, substrate inhibition, lactic acid inhibition, maintenance energy and cell death on the cell growth, substrate utilization, and lactic acid production during the fermentation process. The model was evaluated using experimental data from Tango and Ghaly (1999). The predicted results obtained from the model compared well with experimental (R{sup 2} = 0.92--0.98). The model was also used to investigate the effect of the initial substrate concentration on the lag period, fermentation time, specific growth rate, and cell productivity during batch fermentation. The maximum specific growth rate ({micro}{sub m}), the saturation constant (K{sub S}), the substrate inhibition constant (K{sub IS}), and the lactic acid inhibition constant (K{sub IP}) were found to be 0.25h{sup {minus}1}, 0.9 g/L, 250.0 g/L, and 60.0 g/L, respectively. High initial lactose concentration in cheese whey reduced both the specific growth rate and substrate utilization rate due to the substrate inhibition phenomenon. The maximum lactic acid production occurred at about 100 g/L initial lactose concentration after 40 h of fermentation. The maximum lactic acid concentration above which Lactobacillus helveticus did not grow was found to be 80.0 g/L.

  7. Palm fatty acid biodiesel: process optimization and study of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Praveen K S; Singh, Onkar; Singh, R P

    2010-01-01

    The relatively high cost of refined oils render the resulting fuels unable to compete with petroleum derived fuel. In this study, biodiesel is prepared from palm fatty acid (PFA) which is a by-product of palm oil refinery. The process conditions were optimized for production of palm fatty acid methyl esters. A maximum conversion of 94.4% was obtained using two step trans-esterification with 1:10 molar ratio of oil to methanol at 65°C. Sulfuric acid and Sodium hydroxide were used as acid and base catalyst respectively. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) obtained was similar to that of palm oil. The biodiesel produced met the established specifications of biodiesel of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The kinetics of the trans-esterification reaction was also studied and the data reveals that the reaction is of first order in fatty acid and methanol (MeOH) and over all the reaction is of second order. PMID:20972357

  8. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (II): Process simulation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Two groups of sequencing batch reactors were used to study the metabolism substrate transformation of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAO) and glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) fed with mixed acetic and propionic acids. Seven stoichiometry parameters and 24 kinetic parameters were contained in the PAO and GAO kinetic model, and stoichiometry parameters were deduced from the stoichiometry models, while kinetic parameters were determined by experimental results. The kinetic model parameters of stoichiometry and kinetics were determined according the experiments and the literature. Subsequently, the substrate transformations of PAO and GAO were calculated by the Matlab software. The model curves matched the SBR experimental data well, indicating that the kinetic model based on SCFAs metabolism could be used to simulate PAO and GAO in anaerobic-aerobic conditions.

  9. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the -OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  10. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  11. Leadership and Personal Development Abilities Possessed by High School Seniors Who Are FFA Members in Superior FFA Chapters, Non-Superior Chapters, and by Seniors Who Were Never Enrolled in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Samuel Clifton

    The purpose of this study was to describe the leadership and personal development abilities possessed by four groups of male high school seniors. These groups were those high school seniors who participated in high quality (superior) Future Farmers of America (FFA) chapters and low quality (non-superior) FFA chapters and those from schools with…

  12. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  13. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  14. Kinetics and quantitative structure-activity relationship study on the degradation reaction from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-08-14

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure-activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure-activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1-C2 (RC1-C2 and EC1-C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated.

  15. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  16. Origin of Kinetic Resolution of Hydroxy Esters through Catalytic Enantioselective Lactonization by Chiral Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Changotra, Avtar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-08-01

    Kinetic resolution is a widely used strategy for separation and enrichment of enantiomers. Using density functional theory computations, the origin of how a chiral BINOL-phosphoric acid catalyzes the selective lactonization of one of the enantiomers of α-methyl γ-hydroxy ester is identified. In a stepwise mechanism, the stereocontrolling transition state for the addition of the hydroxyl group to the si face of the ester carbonyl in the case of the S isomer exhibits a network of more effective noncovalent interactions between the substrate and the chiral catalyst. PMID:27463593

  17. Career Development, Supervised Agricultural Experience, and FFA. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannebach, Alfred J.; And Others

    This curriculum guide was developed to help teachers and administrators in Connecticut Regional Vocational Agriculture Centers to update and upgrade their vocational agriculture curriculum in the areas of career development, supervised agricultural experience (SAE), and Future Farmers of America (FFA). The curriculum incorporates the competencies…

  18. Nucleation kinetics of selenium (+4) precipitation from an acidic copper sulphate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangere, M.; Nathoo, J.; Lewis, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The removal of selenium from copper sulphate solution prior to the electrowinning of copper is desirable in order to minimise contamination of the copper cathodes by selenium and other impurities. The selenium removal is effected by a precipitation process that takes place under high supersaturation conditions, which favour nucleation over any other particle formation processes. There is currently no fundamental information on the nucleation kinetics of this important process. In this study, the nucleation kinetics of selenium (+4) precipitation from an acidic copper sulphate solution was determined using the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Experiments were carried out by varying the levels of supersaturation from 8.66×10 15 to 4.33×10 17 at a temperature of 95 °C under atmospheric pressure. The nucleation rates for four different levels of supersaturation, the nucleation work and the nucleus size were determined. The kinetic constant A was found to be 3.92×10 27 m -3 s -1, which shows that the nucleation process takes place through a homogeneous mechanism. The associated thermodynamic parameter ( B) was determined to be 8.98×10 04.

  19. Kinetics and thermodynamic studies for removal of acid blue 129 from aqueous solution by almond shell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency and performance of Almond shell (AS) adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Acid Blue 129 (AB129) from wastewater is presented in this report. The influence of variables including pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal have been investigated in batch method by one at a time optimization method. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by four widely used isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D–R). It was found that adsorption of AB129 on AS well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of dye molecules onto the surface of the adsorbent. More than 98% removal efficiency was obtained within 14 min at adsorbent dose of 0.4 g for initial dye concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 2. Kinetics of the adsorption process was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order model. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb’s free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of AB129 adsorption on all adsorbents. This work can be used in design of adsorption columns for dyes removal. PMID:24620822

  20. Kinetic and spectral parameters of interaction of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Morozova, E A; Bazhulina, N P; Anufrieva, N V; Mamaeva, D V; Tkachev, Y V; Streltsov, S A; Timofeev, V P; Faleev, N G; Demidkina, T V

    2010-10-01

    Kinetic parameters of Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase were determined with substrates in γ-elimination reactions as well as the inhibition of the enzyme in the γ-elimination of L-methionine by amino acids with different structure. The data indicate an important contribution of the sulfur atom and methylene groups to the efficiency of binding of substrates and inhibitors. The rate constants of the enzyme-catalyzed exchange of C-α- and C-β-protons with deuterium were determined, as well as the kinetic isotope effect of the deuterium label in the C-α-position of inhibitors on the rate of exchange of their β-protons. Neither stereoselectivity in the β-proton exchange nor noticeable α-isotope effect on the exchange rates of β-protons was found. The ionic and tautomeric composition of the external Schiff base of methionine γ-lyase was determined. Spectral characteristics (absorption and circular dichroism spectra) of complexes with substrates and inhibitors were determined. The spectral and kinetic data indicate that deamination of aminocrotonate should be the rate-determining stage of the enzymatic reaction.

  1. Kinetics of enzymatic synthesis of liquid wax ester from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Radzi, Salina Mat; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ariff, Arbakariya; Rahman, Mohammad Basyaruddin Abdul; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of wax ester synthesis from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol using immobilized lipase from Candida antartica as catalyst was studied with different types of impeller (Rushton turbine and AL-hydrofoil) to create different mixing conditions in 2l stirred tank reactor. The effects of catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, and impeller tip speed on the synthesis were also evaluated. Rushton turbine impeller exhibited highest conversion rate at lower impeller tip speed as compared to AL-hydrofoil impeller. A second-order reversible kinetic model from single progress curve for the prediction of fractional conversion at given reaction time was proposed and the corresponding kinetic parameter values were calculated by non-linear regression method. The results from the simulation using the proposed model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. Activation energy shows a value of 21.77 Kcal/mol. The thermodynamic parameters of the process, enthalpy and entropy, were 21.15 Kcal/mol and 52.07 cal/mol.K, respectively. PMID:20124754

  2. Kinetics of enzymatic synthesis of liquid wax ester from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Radzi, Salina Mat; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ariff, Arbakariya; Rahman, Mohammad Basyaruddin Abdul; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of wax ester synthesis from oleic acid and oleyl alcohol using immobilized lipase from Candida antartica as catalyst was studied with different types of impeller (Rushton turbine and AL-hydrofoil) to create different mixing conditions in 2l stirred tank reactor. The effects of catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, and impeller tip speed on the synthesis were also evaluated. Rushton turbine impeller exhibited highest conversion rate at lower impeller tip speed as compared to AL-hydrofoil impeller. A second-order reversible kinetic model from single progress curve for the prediction of fractional conversion at given reaction time was proposed and the corresponding kinetic parameter values were calculated by non-linear regression method. The results from the simulation using the proposed model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. Activation energy shows a value of 21.77 Kcal/mol. The thermodynamic parameters of the process, enthalpy and entropy, were 21.15 Kcal/mol and 52.07 cal/mol.K, respectively.

  3. Biodegradation kinetics of peptone and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid by acclimated dual microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Insel, Guclu; Katipoglu, Tugce; Orhon, Derin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the kinetics of simultaneous biodegradation of peptone mixture and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,6-DHBA) by an acclimated dual microbial culture under aerobic conditions. A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was sustained at steady-state with peptone mixture feeding. During the study period, peptone mixture feeding was continuously supplemented with 2,6-DHBA. Related experimental data were derived from three sets of parallel batch reactors, the first fed with the peptone mixture, the second with 2,6-DHBA and the third one with the two substrates, after acclimation of microbial culture and simultaneous biodegradation of both organics. A mechanistic model was developed for this purpose including the necessary model components and process kinetics for the model calibration of relevant experimental data. Model evaluation provided all biodegradation characteristics and kinetics for both peptone mixture and 2,6-DHBA. It also supported the development of a dual microbial community through acclimation, with the selective growth of a second group of microorganisms specifically capable of metabolizing 2,6-DHBA as an organic carbon source.

  4. Complexes between ovalbumin nanoparticles and linoleic acid: Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2016-11-15

    Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of complex formation between heat-induced aggregates of ovalbumin (ovalbumin nanoparticles, OVAn) and linoleic acid (LA) were evaluated. Extrinsic fluorescence data were fitted to modified Scatchard model yielding the following results: n: 49±2 LA molecules bound per OVA monomer unit and Ka: 9.80±2.53×10(5)M. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties were analyzed by turbidity measurements at different LA/OVA monomer molar ratios (21.5-172) and temperatures (20-40°C). An adsorption approach was used and a pseudo-second-order kinetics was found for LA-OVAn complex formation. This adsorption process took place within 1h. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that LA adsorption on OVAn was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropically-driven process, highlighting the hydrophobic nature of the LA and OVAn interaction. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed that both OVAn and LA-OVAn complexes have a roughly rounded form with size lower than 100nm.

  5. Complexes between ovalbumin nanoparticles and linoleic acid: Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos R; Santiago, Liliana G

    2016-11-15

    Stoichiometric, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of complex formation between heat-induced aggregates of ovalbumin (ovalbumin nanoparticles, OVAn) and linoleic acid (LA) were evaluated. Extrinsic fluorescence data were fitted to modified Scatchard model yielding the following results: n: 49±2 LA molecules bound per OVA monomer unit and Ka: 9.80±2.53×10(5)M. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties were analyzed by turbidity measurements at different LA/OVA monomer molar ratios (21.5-172) and temperatures (20-40°C). An adsorption approach was used and a pseudo-second-order kinetics was found for LA-OVAn complex formation. This adsorption process took place within 1h. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that LA adsorption on OVAn was a spontaneous, endothermic and entropically-driven process, highlighting the hydrophobic nature of the LA and OVAn interaction. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy imaging revealed that both OVAn and LA-OVAn complexes have a roughly rounded form with size lower than 100nm. PMID:27283701

  6. [Kinetic characteristics of Cd2+ desorption in minerals and soils under simulated acid rain].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dai-chang; Jiang, Xin; Bian, Yong-rong; Gao, Hong-jian; Jiao, Wen-tao

    2004-07-01

    The kinetic characteristics of Cd2+ desorption in minerals and soils under simulated acid rain were studied by using the flow-stirred method. It showed that Cd2+ desorption could be described by first-order kinetics. Percents of desorption amounts of Cd2+ calculated were 70%-100% in red soil and goethite, and 25%-50% in latosols and kaolinite. Parabolic diffusion could describe Cd2+ desorption kinetics in latosols and not suitable for red soil and goethite and kaolinite. Cd2+ desorption, regarded as a heterogeneous diffusion in minerals and soils, could be fitted by Elovich equation more than Parabolic diffusion and two-constant equation. Cd2+ desorption could be divided into fast reaction and slow reaction. Except for latosols, fast reaction would be over during 60 min and be close to quasi-equilibrium. Adsorption forms of Cd2+ in soil surface could be exchangeable and specific. Fast reaction was relative to easily desorbed Cd2+. The affinity of edge hydroxyl to Cd2+ would lead to the difference of Cd2+ desorption rate and amounts. Increase of pH value in effluent indicated H+ consumption in the processes of Cd2+ desorption.

  7. Kinetic properties of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A A; Mezna, M; Summerhill, R J; Galione, A; Michelangeli, F

    1997-03-21

    Three endogenous molecules have now been shown to release Ca2+ in the sea urchin egg: inositol trisphosphate (InsP3), cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose (cADPR), and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a derivative of NADP. While the mechanism through which the first two molecules are able to release Ca2+ is established and well characterized with InsP3 and cADPR-activating InsP3 and ryanodine receptors, respectively, the newly described NAADP has been shown to release Ca2+ via an entirely different mechanism. The most striking feature of this novel Ca2+ release mechanism is its inactivation, since subthreshold concentrations of NAADP are able to fully and irreversibly desensitize the channel. In the present study we have investigated the fast kinetics of activation and inactivation of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release. NAADP was found to release Ca2+ in a biphasic manner, and such release was preceded by a pronounced latent period, which was inversely dependent on concentration. Moreover, the kinetic features of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release were not altered by pretreatment with low concentrations of NAADP, although the extent of Ca2+ release was greatly affected. Our data suggest that the inactivation of NAADP-induced Ca2+ release is an all-or-none phenomenon, and while some receptors have been fully inactivated, those that remain sensitive to NAADP do so without any change in kinetic features. PMID:9065423

  8. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  9. Reaction Kinetics for the Biocatalytic Conversion of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid to 2-Hydroxyphenazine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingmin; Cao, Hongxia; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2014-01-01

    The phenazine derivative 2-hydroxyphenazine (2-OH-PHZ) plays an important role in the biocontrol of plant diseases, and exhibits stronger bacteriostatic and fungistatic activity than phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) toward some pathogens. PhzO has been shown to be responsible for the conversion of PCA to 2-OH-PHZ, however the kinetics of the reaction have not been systematically studied. Further, the yield of 2-OH-PHZ in fermentation culture is quite low and enhancement in our understanding of the reaction kinetics may contribute to improvements in large-scale, high-yield production of 2-OH-PHZ for biological control and other applications. In this study we confirmed previous reports that free PCA is converted to 2-hydroxy-phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA) by the action of a single enzyme PhzO, and particularly demonstrate that this reaction is dependent on NADP(H) and Fe3+. Fe3+ enhanced the conversion from PCA to 2-OH-PHZ and 28°C was a optimum temperature for the conversion. However, PCA added in excess to the culture inhibited the production of 2-OH-PHZ. 2-OH-PCA was extracted and purified from the broth, and it was confirmed that the decarboxylation of 2-OH-PCA could occur without the involvement of any enzyme. A kinetic analysis of the conversion of 2-OH-PCA to 2-OH-PHZ in the absence of enzyme and under different temperatures and pHs in vitro, revealed that the conversion followed first-order reaction kinetics. In the fermentation, the concentration of 2-OH-PCA increased to about 90 mg/L within a red precipitate fraction, as compared to 37 mg/L within the supernatant. The results of this study elucidate the reaction kinetics involved in the biosynthesis of 2-OH-PHZ and provide insights into in vitro methods to enhance yields of 2-OH-PHZ. PMID:24905009

  10. Synthesis, modelling and kinetic assays of potent inhibitors of purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Pahmi, Siti Hajar; Hussein, Waleed M; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2011-05-15

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear metallohydrolases that have been isolated from various mammals, plants, fungi and bacteria. In mammals PAP activity is associated with bone resorption and can lead to bone metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis; thus human PAP is an attractive target to develop anti-osteoporotic drugs. Based on a previous lead compound and rational drug design, acyl derivatives of α-aminonaphthylmethylphosphonic acid were synthesised and tested as PAP inhibitors. Kinetic analysis showed that they are good PAP inhibitors whose potencies improve with increasing acyl chain length. Maximum potency is reached when the number of carbons in the acyl chain is between 12 and 14. The most potent inhibitor of red kidney bean PAP is the dodecyl-derivative with K(ic)=5 μM, while the most potent pig PAP inhibitor is the tetradecyl-derivative with K(ic)=8 μM, the most potent inhibitor of a mammalian PAP yet reported.

  11. Origin of fatty acid synthesis - Thermodynamics and kinetics of reaction pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1991-01-01

    The primitiveness of contemporary fatty acid biosynthesis was evaluated by using the thermodynamics and kinetics of its component reactions to estimate the extent of its dependence on powerful and selective catalysis by enzymes. Since this analysis indicated that the modern pathway is not primitive because it requires sophisticated enzymatic catalysis, an alternative pathway of primitive fatty acid synthesis is proposed that uses glycolaldehyde as a substrate. In contrast to the modern pathway, this primitive pathway is not dependent on an exogenous source of phosphoanhydride energy. Furthermore, the chemical spontaneity of its reactions suggests that it could have been readily catalyzed by the rudimentary biocatalysts available at an early stage in the origin of life.

  12. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  13. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  14. Investigation of thermal decomposition of ascorbic acid by TG-FTIR and thermal kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Jingyan, Shi; Yuwen, Liu; Zhiyong, Wang; Cunxin, Wang

    2013-04-15

    The thermal behavior of dry solid ascorbic acid in nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-800°C was investigated by TG-FTIR. During the thermal decomposition process, five evolved gaseous species, including H2O, CO2, CO, CH4 and HCOOH, were identified and monitored, in which HCOOH was detected for the first time. The results indicated that ascorbic acid began to decompose at 191°C. Its decomposition process consisted of three stages, and dehydration and decarboxylation to form furfural were the possible principal mechanism. The kinetic analysis for the first decomposition stage was also carried out by the isoconversional method and the master plots method. The results indicated that this process can be described by the model of 1st order reaction.

  15. Kinetics of ascorbic acid loss during hot water blanching of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ariahu, Charles C; Abashi, Diana K; Chinma, Chiemela Enyinnaya

    2011-08-01

    The kinetics of thermal degradation of ascorbic acid in fluted pumpkin leaves were investigated from 60 to 90°C (pH 5.0 to 6.5). Ascorbic acid degradation was modeled as a first order rate reaction with the rate constants increasing with increase in pH of the medium. The pH and temperature dependence of the rates of destruction gave highly significant correlations when analyzed by the thermal resistance and activated complex reaction rate methods. Activation energy (Ea) ranged from 41.2 to 18.2 kJ/mol while D-values ranged from 103.3 to 22.4 min. The changes in activation energy affected Ko values which ranged from 5.98 × 10(4) to 41.7 min(-1).

  16. Minimum protein intake for the preterm neonate determined by protein and amino acid kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zello, Gordon A; Menendez, Cesar E; Rafii, Mahroukh; Clarke, Ruth; Wykes, Linda J; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2003-02-01

    Lower limits of protein needs in prematurely born neonates have not been adequately studied, yet providing protein in amounts maximizing accretion without excess is a goal in these infants' nutritional care. We hypothesized that with the use of amino acid oxidation methodology, it would be possible to define minimum protein requirement. Our objective was to investigate protein kinetics during short-term changes in protein intake by measurement of nitrogen balance and amino acid flux and oxidation using [(15)N]glycine, [(13)C]phenylalanine, and [(13)C]leucine tracers. Protein kinetics were examined in 21 preterm infants (gestational age: 29 +/- 3 wk; birth weight: 1091 +/- 324 g) at five protein intakes (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) with 1 d of adaptation to the test intakes. From nitrogen balance data, a protein need of 0.74 g x kg(-1 x -1) was estimated to achieve zero balance. For all three amino acids, flux and oxidation estimates were not different across protein intakes. Whole-body protein synthesis and breakdown estimates from [(15)N]ammonia data were 14.6 +/- 3.4 and 14.4 +/- 4.1 g x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. Glycine flux (680 +/- 168 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)) was greater than leucine flux (323 +/- 115 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)), which was greater than phenylalanine flux (84.3 +/- 35.2 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)). Leucine oxidation (36.7 +/- 15.6 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)) was also greater than phenylalanine oxidation (6.64 +/- 4.41 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1)). Infants in our study were able to adapt to short-term changes in protein intake with little consequence to the overall whole-body protein economy, as measured by the three test amino acids.

  17. Amino acid supplementation does not alter whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in Arabian geldings.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Kristine L; Geor, Raymond J; Hanigan, Mark D; Harris, Pat A

    2012-03-01

    Stable isotope infusion methods have not been extensively used in horses to study protein metabolism. The objectives were to develop infusion and sampling methodologies for [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and apply these methods to determine whether the addition of supplemental amino acids to a control diet affected whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in mature horses. Arabian geldings were studied using a 6-h primed (9 μmol/kg), constant (6 μmol · kg(-1) · h(-1)) i.v. infusion of L-[1-(13)C] phenylalanine, with blood and breath sampled every 30 min, to measure whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in response to receiving the control diet (n = 12) or the control diet supplemented with equimolar amounts of glutamate (+Glu; 55 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), leucine (+Leu; 49 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), lysine (+Lys; 55 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), or phenylalanine (+Phe; 62 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 6). The plasma concentrations of the supplemented amino acid in horses receiving the +Leu, +Lys, and +Phe diets were 58, 53, and 36% greater, respectively, than for the control treatment (P < 0.05). Isotopic plateau was attained in blood [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and breath (13)CO(2) enrichments by 60 and 270 min, respectively. Phenylalanine flux (+20%) and oxidation (+110%) were greater (P < 0.05) in horses receiving the +Phe treatment than in those fed the control diet. There was no effect of treatment diet on nonoxidative phenylalanine disposal or phenylalanine release from protein breakdown. The developed methods are a valuable way to study protein metabolism and assess dietary amino acid adequacy in horses and will provide a useful tool for studying amino acid requirements in the future. PMID:22259192

  18. Amino acid supplementation does not alter whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in Arabian geldings.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Kristine L; Geor, Raymond J; Hanigan, Mark D; Harris, Pat A

    2012-03-01

    Stable isotope infusion methods have not been extensively used in horses to study protein metabolism. The objectives were to develop infusion and sampling methodologies for [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and apply these methods to determine whether the addition of supplemental amino acids to a control diet affected whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in mature horses. Arabian geldings were studied using a 6-h primed (9 μmol/kg), constant (6 μmol · kg(-1) · h(-1)) i.v. infusion of L-[1-(13)C] phenylalanine, with blood and breath sampled every 30 min, to measure whole-body phenylalanine kinetics in response to receiving the control diet (n = 12) or the control diet supplemented with equimolar amounts of glutamate (+Glu; 55 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), leucine (+Leu; 49 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), lysine (+Lys; 55 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 5), or phenylalanine (+Phe; 62 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 6). The plasma concentrations of the supplemented amino acid in horses receiving the +Leu, +Lys, and +Phe diets were 58, 53, and 36% greater, respectively, than for the control treatment (P < 0.05). Isotopic plateau was attained in blood [1-(13)C] phenylalanine and breath (13)CO(2) enrichments by 60 and 270 min, respectively. Phenylalanine flux (+20%) and oxidation (+110%) were greater (P < 0.05) in horses receiving the +Phe treatment than in those fed the control diet. There was no effect of treatment diet on nonoxidative phenylalanine disposal or phenylalanine release from protein breakdown. The developed methods are a valuable way to study protein metabolism and assess dietary amino acid adequacy in horses and will provide a useful tool for studying amino acid requirements in the future.

  19. Coal desulfurization in oxidative acid media using hydrogen peroxide and ozone: a kinetic and statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Carrillo-Pedroza; A. Davalos Sanchez; M. Soria-Aguilar; E.T. Pecina Trevino

    2009-07-15

    The removal of pyritic sulfur from a Mexican sub-bituminous coal in nitric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acid solutions was investigated. The effect of the type and concentration of acid, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone as oxidants, in a temperature range of 20-60{sup o}C, was studied. The relevant factors in pyrite dissolution were determined by means of the statistical analysis of variance and optimized by the response surface method. Kinetic models were also evaluated, showing that the dissolution of pyritic sulfur follows the kinetic model of the shrinking core model, with diffusion through the solid product of the reaction as the controlling stage. The results of statistical analysis indicate that the use of ozone as an oxidant improves the pyrite dissolution because, at 0.25 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 20{sup o}C and 0.33 g/h O{sub 3}, the obtained dissolution is similar to that of 1 M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 40{sup o}C. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Inhibition kinetics of acid and alkaline phosphatases by atrazine and methomyl pesticides.

    PubMed

    El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Badawy, Mohamed E I

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the kinetic characteristics of acid and alkaline phosphatases isolated from different sources and to study the effects of the herbicide atrazine and insecticide methomyl on the activity and kinetic properties of the enzymes. Acid phosphatase (ACP) was isolated from the tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. lycopersicum); alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was isolated from two sources, including mature earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) and larvae of the Egyptian cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). The specific activities of the enzymes were 33.31, 5.56 and 0.72 mmol substrate hydrolyzed per minute per milligram protein for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively. The inhibition kinetics indicated that atrazine and methomyl caused competitive-non-competitive inhibition of the enzymes. The relationships between estimates of K(m) and V(max) calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation have been explored. The extent of the inhibition was different, as estimated by the values of the inhibition constant Ki that were found to be 3.34 × 10(-3), 1.12 × 10(-2) and 1.07 × 10(-2) mM for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively, with methomyl. In the case of atrazine, K(i) were found to be 8.99 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-2) and 1.36 × 10(-2) mM for plant ACP, earthworms ALP and cotton leafworm ALP, respectively. PMID:25996812

  1. Equivalent absorption and in vivo kinetics of tritiated folic acid and 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolic acid in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, S.D.; Gregory, J.F. )

    1990-02-26

    The intestinal absorption and in vivo turnover kinetics of ({sup 3}H)folic acid (FA) and (6S)-5-formyl-({sup 3}H)tetrahydrofolate (5-CHO-THF) were examined to determine whether differences exist in the inherent bioavailability of these forms of the vitamin. Following oral administration of 2 {mu}Ci/100 g body weight (in 50 mM sodium ascorbate, pH 7), a biphasic pattern of urinary tritium excretion was observed for each labeled folate. The following kinetic results were obtained (n=9). Little tritium was found in the GI tract after 8 hours, which indicated nearly complete absorption of each folate. HPLC analysis of urine revealed similar excretory patterns over 0-8 days post-dose for each folate administered, and the patterns of hepatic ({sup 3}H)folates were equivalent when examined after 8 hours and 4 days post-dose. These findings indicate that the bioavailability FA and 5-formyl-THF is equivalent.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the thermooxidate destruction of polybutadiene rubber in perchloric acid vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Didikin, B.P.; Korobeinchev, O.P.; Orlov, V.N.

    1983-11-01

    This article examines the interaction of perchloric acid with films of polymer. The thermooxidative destruction of polybutadiene rubber was investigated with an apparatus which included a reactor with systems for dispensing the perchloric acid and inert diluent (argon) and for moving the rubber specimen in vacuum, a quartz microprobe joined to the ion source of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a system for recording the mass spectra, temperature, and pressure. Topics considered include the time dependence of the rates of formation of HC1, CO, O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O; the effects of perchloric acid partial pressure on the reaction rate; the effects of rubber film thickness on the reaction rate; the effects of temperature on the reaction rate; the effects of the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst on the reaction rate; and the application of the kinetic data to analyzing the pyrolysis of mixed systems. The rubber reaction rate was determined from the degree of conversion of the perchloric acid, which is related to that of the rubber.

  3. Shikimic acid ozonolysis kinetics of the transition from liquid aqueous solution to highly viscous glass.

    PubMed

    Steimer, Sarah S; Berkemeier, Thomas; Gilgen, Anina; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus

    2015-12-14

    Ageing of particulate organic matter affects the composition and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles. Driven by temperature and humidity, the organic fraction can vary its physical state between liquid and amorphous solid, or rarely even crystalline. These transitions can influence the reaction kinetics due to limitations of mass transport in such (semi-) solid states, which in turn may influence the chemical ageing of particles containing such compounds. We have used coated wall flow tube experiments to investigate the reaction kinetics of the ozonolysis of shikimic acid, which serves as a proxy for oxygenated, water-soluble organic matter and can form a glass at room temperature. Particular attention was paid to how the presence of water influences the reaction, since it acts a plasticiser and thereby induces changes in the physical state. We analysed the results by means of a traditional resistor model, which assumes steady-state conditions. The ozonolysis rate of shikimic acid is strongly increased in the presence of water, a fact we attribute to the increased transport of O3 and shikimic acid through the condensed phase at lower viscosities. The analysis using the resistor model suggests that the system undergoes both surface and bulk reaction. The second-order rate coefficient of the bulk reaction is 3.7 (+1.5/-3.2) × 10(3) L mol(-1) s(-1). At low humidity and long timescales, the resistor model fails to describe the measurements appropriately. The persistent O3 uptake at very low humidity suggests contribution of a self-reaction of O3 on the surface. PMID:26536455

  4. Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.) Attenuates FFA Induced Ceramide Accumulation in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes in an Adiponectin Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Obanda, Diana N.; Zhao, Peng; Richard, Allison J.; Ribnicky, David; Cefalu, William T.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Excess dietary lipids result in the accumulation of lipid metabolites including ceramides that can attenuate insulin signaling. There is evidence that a botanical extract of Urtica dioica L. (stinging nettle) improves insulin action, yet the precise mechanism(s) are not known. Hence, we examined the effects of Urtica dioica L. (UT) on adipocytes. Research Design We investigated the effects of an ethanolic extract of UT on free fatty acid (palmitic acid) induced inhibition of insulin-stimulated Akt serine phosphorylation and modulation of ceramidase expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Adipocytes were exposed to excess FFAs in the presence or absence of UT. Effects on adiponectin expression, ceramidase expression, ceramidase activity, ceramide accumulation and insulin signaling were determined. Results As expected, FFAs reduced adiponectin expression and increased the expression of ceramidase enzymes but not their activity. FFA also induced the accumulation of ceramides and reduced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in adipocytes. The effects of FFA were partially reversed by UT. UT enhanced adiponectin expression and ceramidase activity in the presence of excess FFAs. UT abated ceramide accumulation and increased insulin sensitivity via enhanced Akt phosphorylation. A siRNA knockdown of adiponectin expression prevented UT from exerting positive effects on ceramidase activity but not Akt phosphorylation. Conclusions In adipocytes, the ability of UT to antagonize the negative effects of FFA by modulating ceramidase activity and ceramide accumulation is dependent on the presence of adiponectin. However, the ability of UT to enhance Akt phosphorylation is independent of adiponectin expression. These studies demonstrate direct effects of UT on adipocytes and suggest this botanical extract is metabolically beneficial. PMID:26939068

  5. Kinetic characterization for dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of timber varieties and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Yat, Shu Chiang; Berger, Alan; Shonnard, David R

    2008-06-01

    Hydrolysis of four timber species (aspen, balsam fir, basswood, and red maple) and switchgrass was studied using dilute sulfuric acid at 50 g dry biomass/L under similar conditions previously described as acid pretreatment. The primary goal was to obtain detailed kinetic data of xylose formation and degradation from a match between a first order reaction model and the experimental data at various final reactor temperatures (160-190 degrees C), sulfuric acid concentrations (0.25-1.0% w/v), and particle sizes (28-10/20 mesh) in a glass-lined 1L well-mixed batch reactor. Reaction rates for the generation of xylose from hemicellulose and the generation of furfural from xylose were strongly dependent on both temperature and acid concentration. However, no effect was observed for the particle sizes studied. Oligomer sugars, representing incomplete products of hydrolysis, were observed early in the reaction period for all sugars (xylose, glucose, arabinose, mannose, and galactose), but were reduced to low concentrations at later times (higher hemicellulose conversions). Maximum yields for xylose ranged from 70% (balsam) to 94% (switchgrass), for glucose from 10.6% to 13.6%, and for other minor sugars from 8.6% to 58.9%. Xylose formation activation energies and the pre-exponential factors for the timber species and switchgrass were in a range of 49-180 kJ/mol and from 7.5 x 10(4) to 2.6 x 10(20)min(-1), respectively. In addition, for xylose degradation, the activation energies and the pre-exponential factors ranged from 130 to 170 kJ/mol and from 6.8 x 10(13) to 3.7 x 10(17)min(-1), respectively. There was a near linear dependence on acid concentration observed for xylose degradation. Our results suggest that mixtures of biomass species may be processed together and still achieve high yields for all species. PMID:17904838

  6. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  7. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed.

  8. Amino acid metabolism in the human fetus at term: leucine, valine, and methionine kinetics.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Chris H P; Schierbeek, Henk; Minderman, Gardi; Vermes, Andras; Schoonderwaldt, Ernst M; Duvekot, Johannes J; Steegers, Eric A P; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2011-12-01

    Human fetal metabolism is largely unexplored. Understanding how a healthy fetus achieves its fast growth rates could eventually play a pivotal role in improving future nutritional strategies for premature infants. To quantify specific fetal amino acid kinetics, eight healthy pregnant women received before elective cesarean section at term, continuous stable isotope infusions of the essential amino acids [1-13C,15N]leucine, [U-13C5]valine, and [1-13C]methionine. Umbilical blood was collected after birth and analyzed for enrichments and concentrations using mass spectrometry techniques. Fetuses showed considerable leucine, valine, and methionine uptake and high turnover rates. α-Ketoisocaproate, but not α-ketoisovalerate (the leucine and valine ketoacids, respectively), was transported at net rate from the fetus to the placenta. Especially, leucine and valine data suggested high oxidation rates, up to half of net uptake. This was supported by relatively low α-ketoisocaproate reamination rates to leucine. Our data suggest high protein breakdown and synthesis rates, comparable with, or even slightly higher than in premature infants. The relatively large uptakes of total leucine and valine carbon also suggest high fetal oxidation rates of these essential branched chain amino acids.

  9. Alkylation of nucleic acids by DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinolinium aniline mustards: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The rate of constant for hydrolysis of a series of 4-substituted aniline mustards Ar-X-pC6H4-N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is 4-anilinoquinolinium and X = O, CH2, CONH and CO, have been measured in water and 0.02 M imidazole buffer at 37 degrees C and in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C. The equilibrium binding constants of the compounds and their hydrolysis products to nucleic acids of differing base composition have been determined at varying ionic strengths, and the results are consistent with the compounds binding as expected in the DNA minor groove. The alkylating reactivity of the mustards towards these nucleic acids has been measured in water at 37 degrees C and in 0.01 M HEPES buffer over a range of temperatures from 25 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters for these kinetic and equilibrium studies suggests that the interaction with nucleic acids is via an internal SN2 mechanism involving an aziridinium ion.

  10. Dynamic modeling of in vitro lipid digestion: individual fatty acid release and bioaccessibility kinetics.

    PubMed

    Giang, T M; Gaucel, S; Brestaz, P; Anton, M; Meynier, A; Trelea, I C; Le Feunteun, S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the role of triacylglycerol (TAG) composition in fatty acids (FA) of o/w emulsions on both the pancreatic lipolysis kinetics and the bioaccessibility of released products (i.e. contained within the bile salt micellar phase). A mathematical model was developed and its predictions were compared to a set of experimental data obtained during an in vitro digestion of a whey protein stabilized emulsion. Modeling results show that FA residues of TAG were hydrolyzed at specific rates, inducing different bioaccessibility kinetics. The estimated lipolysis rate constants of the studied FA (C8:0, C10:0≫C18:1 n-9≫C12:0>C14:0>C16:0≈C16:1 n-7>C22:6 n-3) were in close agreement with the available literature on the substrate specificity of pancreatic lipase. Results also suggest that lipolysis products are very rapidly solubilized in the bile salt mixed micelles with no fractionation according to the FA carbon chain.

  11. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  12. Human Exposure and Elimination Kinetics of Chlorinated Polyfluoroalkyl Ether Sulfonic Acids (Cl-PFESAs).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Vestergren, Robin; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Zhen; Li, Chuangxiu; Liang, Yong; Cai, Yaqi

    2016-03-01

    The incomplete mass-balance of organic fluorine in human serum indicates the existence of unknown per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) with persistent and bioaccumulative properties. Here we characterized human exposure and elimination kinetics of chlorinated polyfluoroalkyl ether sulfonic acids (Cl-PFESAs) in metal plating workers (n = 19), high fish consumers (n = 45), and background controls (n = 8). Cl-PFESAs were detected in >98% of the sampled individuals with serum concentrations ranging <0.019-5040 ng/mL. Statistically higher median serum levels were observed in high fish consumers (93.7 ng/mL) and metal plating workers (51.5 ng/mL) compared to the background control group (4.78 ng/mL) (Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, p < 0.01). Cl-PFESAs could account for 0.269 to 93.3% of ∑PFASs in human serum indicating that this compound class may explain a substantial fraction of previously unidentified organic fluorine in the Chinese population. Estimated half-lives for renal clearance (median 280 years; range 7.1-4230 years) and total elimination (median 15.3 years; range 10.1-56.4 years) for the eight carbon Cl-PFESA suggest that this is the most biopersistent PFAS in humans reported to date. The apparent ubiquitous distribution and slow elimination kinetics in humans underscore the need for more research and regulatory actions on Cl-PFESAs and PFAS alternatives with similar chemical structures.

  13. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Begg, James D; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A; Wong, Jennifer C; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-03-01

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu-FA-mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. However, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings. PMID:25607800

  14. Formic Acid Decomposition on Au catalysts: DFT, Microkinetic Modeling, and Reaction Kinetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Suyash; Li, Sha; Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Alba-Rubio, Ana C.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach is presented that uses a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model, reaction kinetics experiments, and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging to unravel the reaction mechanism and provide insights into the nature of active sites for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Au/SiC catalysts. All input parameters for the microkinetic model are derived from periodic, self-consistent, generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PW91) density functional theory calculations on the Au(111), Au(100), and Au(211) surfaces and are subsequently adjusted to describe the experimental HCOOH decomposition rate and selectivity data. It is shown that the HCOOH decomposition follows the formate (HCOO) mediated path, with 100% selectivity toward the dehydrogenation products (CO21H2) under all reaction conditions. An analysis of the kinetic parameters suggests that an Au surface in which the coordination number of surface Au atoms is 4 may provide a better model for the active site of HCOOH decomposition on these specific supported Au catalysts.

  15. Dynamic modeling of in vitro lipid digestion: individual fatty acid release and bioaccessibility kinetics.

    PubMed

    Giang, T M; Gaucel, S; Brestaz, P; Anton, M; Meynier, A; Trelea, I C; Le Feunteun, S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the role of triacylglycerol (TAG) composition in fatty acids (FA) of o/w emulsions on both the pancreatic lipolysis kinetics and the bioaccessibility of released products (i.e. contained within the bile salt micellar phase). A mathematical model was developed and its predictions were compared to a set of experimental data obtained during an in vitro digestion of a whey protein stabilized emulsion. Modeling results show that FA residues of TAG were hydrolyzed at specific rates, inducing different bioaccessibility kinetics. The estimated lipolysis rate constants of the studied FA (C8:0, C10:0≫C18:1 n-9≫C12:0>C14:0>C16:0≈C16:1 n-7>C22:6 n-3) were in close agreement with the available literature on the substrate specificity of pancreatic lipase. Results also suggest that lipolysis products are very rapidly solubilized in the bile salt mixed micelles with no fractionation according to the FA carbon chain. PMID:26471670

  16. Kinetics of 3-chlorotyrosine formation and loss due to hypochlorous acid and chloramines.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Matthew P; Hicks, Andrew J; Neidigh, Jonathan W

    2011-03-21

    The persistent activation of innate immune cells in chronic inflammation is gaining recognition as a contributing factor in a number of human diseases. A distinguishing feature of activated leukocytes at sites of inflammation is their production of reactive species such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Investigating the role of reactive molecules such as HOCl in inflammation and human disease requires appropriate biomarkers. The preferred biomarker for HOCl, and by extension its synthesizing enzyme myeloperoxidase, is 3-chlorotyrosine. 3-Chlorotyrosine is a chemically stable product formed when HOCl, or an HOCl-generated chloramine, reacts with the tyrosine side chain and is readily measured by sensitive mass spectrometry methods. However, Whiteman and Spencer ((2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 371, 50 - 53.) noted that 3-chlorotyrosine is degraded by HOCl, calling into question its use as a biomarker. The kinetic rate constants for the reaction of 3-chlorotyrosine with HOCl, histidine chloramine, or lysine chloramine to form 3,5-dichlorotyrosine are reported. The kinetics of tyrosine chlorination in the context of a peptide with a nearby lysine residue was also determined and further supports the role of chloramines in the chlorination of protein-bound tyrosine residues. The likelihood of free and protein-bound 3,5-dichlorotyrosine occurring in vivo, given the reported rate constants, is discussed. PMID:21319831

  17. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Begg, James D.; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A.; Wong, Jennifer C.; Kersting, Annie B.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-01-21

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu–FA–mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. In conclusion, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.

  18. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite

    DOE PAGES

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Begg, James D.; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A.; Wong, Jennifer C.; Kersting, Annie B.; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-01-21

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presencemore » of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu–FA–mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. In conclusion, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.« less

  19. Phosphatidic acid stimulates cardiac KATP channels like phosphatidylinositols, but with novel gating kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Gao, Lizhi; Wang, Wenxia

    2003-01-01

    Membrane-bound anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositols have the capacity to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels through a mechanism involving long-range electrostatic interaction between the lipid headgroup and channel. However, it has not yet been determined whether the multiple effects of phosphatidylinositols reported in the literature all result from this general electrostatic interaction or require a specific headgroup structure. The present study investigated whether phosphatidic acid (PA), an anionic phospholipid substantially different in structure from phosphatidylinositols, evokes effects similar to phosphatidylinositols on native K(ATP) channels of rat heart and heterogeneous Kir6.2/SUR2A channels. Channels treated with PA (0.2-1 mg/ml applied to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane) exhibited higher activity, lower sensitivity to ATP inhibition, less Mg(2+)-dependent nucleotide stimulation, and poor sulfonylurea inhibition. These effects match the spectrum of phosphatidylinositols' effects, but, in addition, PA also induced a novel pattern in gating kinetics, represented by a decreased mean open time (from 12.2 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 0.7 ms). This impact on gating kinetics clearly distinguishes PA's effects from those of phosphatidylinositols. Results indicate that multiple effects of anionic phospholipids on K(ATP) channels are related phenomena and can likely be attributed to a common mechanism, but additional specific effects due to other mechanisms may also coincide.

  20. Effect of fulvic acid surface coatings on plutonium sorption and desorption kinetics on goethite.

    PubMed

    Tinnacher, Ruth M; Begg, James D; Mason, Harris; Ranville, James; Powell, Brian A; Wong, Jennifer C; Kersting, Annie B; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2015-03-01

    The rates and extent of plutonium (Pu) sorption and desorption onto mineral surfaces are important parameters for predicting Pu mobility in subsurface environments. The presence of natural organic matter, such as fulvic acid (FA), may influence these parameters. We investigated the effects of FA on Pu(IV) sorption/desorption onto goethite in two scenarios: when FA was (1) initially present in solution or (2) found as organic coatings on the mineral surface. A low pH was used to maximize FA coatings on goethite. Experiments were combined with kinetic modeling and speciation calculations to interpret variations in Pu sorption rates in the presence of FA. Our results indicate that FA can change the rates and extent of Pu sorption onto goethite at pH 4. Differences in the kinetics of Pu sorption were observed as a function of the concentration and initial form of FA. The fraction of desorbed Pu decreased in the presence of FA, indicating that organic matter can stabilize sorbed Pu on goethite. These results suggest that ternary Pu-FA-mineral complexes could enhance colloid-facilitated Pu transport. However, more representative natural conditions need to be investigated to quantify the relevance of these findings.

  1. Reaction kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of sulfosalicylic acid using TiO2 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Zhang, Xianghua; Liu, Hong; Li, Xiangzhong; Li, Wenzhao; Xu, Hengyong

    2009-04-30

    The photocatalytic (PC) degradation kinetics of sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) at different pH using TiO2 microspheres were elucidated by modeling. The resultant model had special consideration of adsorption and pH. The adsorption isotherms showed that the LC/MS(2)-identified intermediates were weakly adsorbed on the TiO2 microspheres, thus their adsorption was neglected in the modeling. By contrast, the SSA was significantly adsorbed, thus its adsorption retained as an item in the model. Consequently, a non-first-order model was obtained. Through the modeling, it was elucidated that the reaction rate increased non-linearly with the SSA adsorption equilibrium constant. Meanwhile, it was elucidated that a pH increase favored the hydroxyl radical production to accelerate the SSA degradation, while impeded the SSA adsorption to slower it, hence a neutral pH caused the fastest SSA degradation. PMID:18762374

  2. Growth kinetics of racemic heptahelicene-2-carboxylic acid nanowires on calcite (104)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einax, Mario; Richter, Tobias; Nimmrich, Markus; Rahe, Philipp; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo; Kühnle, Angelika; Maass, Philipp

    2016-10-01

    Molecular self-assembly of racemic heptahelicene-2-carboxylic acid on a dielectric substrate at room temperature can be used to generate wire-like organic nanostructures consisting of single and double molecular rows. By means of non-contact atomic force microscopy, we investigate the growth of the wire-like pattern after deposition by experimental and theoretical means. From analyzing the time dependence of the mean row length, two distinct regimes were found. At the early post-deposition stage, the mean length grows in time. Subsequently, a crossover to a second regime is observed, where the mean row length remains nearly constant. We explain these findings by a mean-field rate equation approach providing a comprehensive picture of the growth kinetics. As a result, we demonstrate that the crossover between the two distinct regimes is accomplished by vanishing of the homochiral single rows. At later stages only heterochiral double row structures remain.

  3. Kinetics of oxidation of pentavalent neptunium by pentavalent vanadium in solutions of nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2010-03-01

    Management of the oxidation state of neptunium in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by solvent extraction is very important. The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(V) by vanadium(V) in solutions of nitrate acid was investigated at constant ionic strength 4M. The reaction rate is first order with respect to Np(V) and V(V). The effects of proton concentration on the apparent second order rate constant k1" was determined for temperature 25°C as k1" = (0.99±0.03)·[H+]1.21M-1s-1. Activation parameters associated with the overall reaction have been calculated; the standard reaction enthalpy and entropy were 52.6±0.9 kJ/mol and -55.8±0.9 J/K/mol respectively.

  4. Adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of acid Bordeaux B from aqueous solution by graphene oxide/PAMAMs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; He, Shengfu; Zhang, Chen; Peng, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide/polyamidoamines dendrimers (GO/PAMAMs) composites were synthesized via modifying GO with 2.0 G PAMAM. The adsorption behavior of the GO/PAMAMs for acid Bordeaux B (ABB) was studied and the effects of media pH, adsorption time and initial ABB concentration on adsorption capacity of the adsorbent were investigated. The optimum pH value of the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs was 2.5. The maximum adsorption capacity increased from 325.78 to 520.83 mg/g with the increase in temperature from 298 to 328 K. The equilibrium data followed the Langmuir isotherm model better than the Freundlich model. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs fit the pseudo-second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was physisorption, and also an endothermic and spontaneous process. PMID:26398038

  5. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of a novel acid protease from Aspergillus foetidus.

    PubMed

    Souza, Paula Monteiro; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira; Junior, Adalberto Pessoa; Converti, Attilio; Perego, Patrizia

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of a thermostable extracellular acid protease produced by an Aspergillus foetidus strain was investigated at different pH, temperatures and substrate concentrations. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 5.0 and 55°C, and its irreversible deactivation was well described by first-order kinetics. When temperature was raised from 55 to 70°C, the deactivation rate constant increased from 0.018 to 5.06h(-1), while the half-life decreased from 37.6 to 0.13h. The results of activity collected at different temperatures were then used to estimate, the activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction (E*=19.03kJ/mol) and the standard enthalpy variation of reversible enzyme unfolding (ΔH°U=19.03kJ/mol). The results of residual activity tests carried out in the temperature range 55-70°C allowed estimating the activation energy (E(*)d=314.12kJ/mol), enthalpy (311.27≤(ΔH°d≤311.39kJ/mol), entropy (599.59≤ΔS(*)d≤610.49kJ/mol K) and Gibbs free energy (103.18≤ΔG(*)d≤113.87kJ/mol) of the enzyme irreversible denaturation. These thermodynamic parameters suggest that this new protease is highly thermostable and could be important for industrial applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on thermodynamic parameters of an acid protease produced by A. foetidus.

  6. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of acid-pretreated coconut coir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatmawati, Akbarningrum; Agustriyanto, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Biomass waste utilization for biofuel production such as bioethanol, has become more prominent currently. Coconut coir is one of lignocellulosic food wastes, which is abundant in Indonesia. Bioethanol production from such materials consists of more than one step. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis is crucial steps to produce sugar which can then be fermented into bioethanol. In this research, ground coconut coir was pretreated using dilute sulfuric acid at 121°C. This pretreatment had increased the cellulose content and decreased the lignin content of coconut coir. The pretreated coconut coir was hydrolyzed using a mix of two commercial cellulase enzymes at pH of 4.8 and temperature of 50°C. The enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted at several initial coconut coir slurry concentrations (0.1-2 g/100 mL) and reaction times (2-72 hours). The reducing sugar concentration profiles had been produced and can be used to obtain reaction rates. The highest reducing sugar concentration obtained was 1,152.567 mg/L, which was produced at initial slurry concentration of 2 g/100 mL and 72 hours reaction time. In this paper, the reducing sugar concentrations were empirically modeled as a function of reaction time using power equations. Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis reaction is adopted. The kinetic parameters of that model for sulfuric acid-pretreated coconut coir enzymatic hydrolysis had been obtained which are Vm of 3.587×104 mg/L.h, and KM of 130.6 mg/L.

  7. Kinetics of aluminum and sulfate release from forest soil by mono- and diprotic aliphatic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A. Jr.; Zelazny, L.W. )

    1990-06-01

    A batch equilibration study evaluated the influence of naturally occurring low-molecular-weight mono- and diprotic aliphatic acids on the rate of Al and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release in a Cecil soil (Typic Hapludult). The authors adjusted the pH of the organic acids (OAs) and of the soil suspension (3.8% w/w) to pH 4.0 and allowed them to equilibrate thermally before the experiment. After rapid addition of OAs to the soil suspension, they took solution samples at various time intervals and analyzed for Al, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and OA concentration. The initial concentration of OA in suspension was 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} mol liter{sup {minus}1}. Both Al and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, whereas OA adsorption obeyed simple first-order kinetics. The rate of Al release (k{sub 1}) was more rapid for the diprotic OA treatment (20.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mol s{sup {minus}1}), as was SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release (1.63 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mol s{sup {minus}1}), compared to the monoprotic OA treatment. The rate of Al release varied inversely with OA chain length and the distance between -COOH functional groups. The addition of substituent -OH groups between the -COOH groups further reduced K{sub 1}. A similar trend was observed for the rate of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} release (k{sub 1}) into solution. Monoprotic OAs were more rapidly adsorbed to the particle surfaces than were diprotic OAs. The authors postulate that removal of Al and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} from solution occurs via selective mineral precipitation.

  8. Effect of sepsis on VLDL kinetics: responses in basal state and during glucose infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Durkot, M.J.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of gram-negative sepsis on the kinetics and oxidation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acids was assessed in conscious dogs in the normal state and 24 h after infusion of live Escherichia coli. VLDL, labeled with (2-/sup 3/H)glycerol and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitic acid, was used to trace VLDL kinetics and oxidation, and (1-/sup 13/C)palmitic acid bound to albumin was infused simultaneously to quantify kinetics and oxidation of free fatty acid (FFA) in plasma. Sepsis caused a fivefold increase in the rate of VLDL production (RaVLDL). In the control dogs, the direct oxidation of VLDL-fatty acids was not an important contributor to their overall energy metabolism, but in dogs with sepsis, 17% of the total rate of CO2 production could be accounted for by VLDL-fatty acid oxidation. When glucose was infused into dogs with insulin and glucagon levels clamped at basal levels (by means of infusion of somatostatin and replacement of the hormones), RaVLDL increased significantly in the control dogs, but it did not increase further in dogs with sepsis. The authors conclude that the increase in triglyceride concentration in fasting dogs with gram-negative sepsis is the result of an increase in VLDL production and that the fatty acids in VLDL can serve as an important source of energy in sepsis.

  9. Optimization and kinetic modeling of esterification of the oil obtained from waste plum stones as a pretreatment step in biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Milan D; Veličković, Ana V; Joković, Nataša M; Stamenković, Olivera S; Veljković, Vlada B

    2016-02-01

    This study reports on the use of oil obtained from waste plum stones as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production. Because of high free fatty acid (FFA) level (15.8%), the oil was processed through the two-step process including esterification of FFA and methanolysis of the esterified oil catalyzed by H2SO4 and CaO, respectively. Esterification was optimized by response surface methodology combined with a central composite design. The second-order polynomial equation predicted the lowest acid value of 0.53mgKOH/g under the following optimal reaction conditions: the methanol:oil molar ratio of 8.5:1, the catalyst amount of 2% and the reaction temperature of 45°C. The predicted acid value agreed with the experimental acid value (0.47mgKOH/g). The kinetics of FFA esterification was described by the irreversible pseudo first-order reaction rate law. The apparent kinetic constant was correlated with the initial methanol and catalyst concentrations and reaction temperature. The activation energy of the esterification reaction slightly decreased from 13.23 to 11.55kJ/mol with increasing the catalyst concentration from 0.049 to 0.172mol/dm(3). In the second step, the esterified oil reacted with methanol (methanol:oil molar ratio of 9:1) in the presence of CaO (5% to the oil mass) at 60°C. The properties of the obtained biodiesel were within the EN 14214 standard limits. Hence, waste plum stones might be valuable raw material for obtaining fatty oil for the use as alternative feedstock in biodiesel production.

  10. Metabolic and Transcriptional Analysis of Acid Stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a Focus on the Kinetics of Lactic Acid Pools

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luís L.; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Voit, Eberhard O.; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H+-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by 13C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results. PMID:23844205

  11. Metabolic and transcriptional analysis of acid stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a focus on the kinetics of lactic acid pools.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P; Voit, Eberhard O; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H(+)-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by (13)C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results.

  12. A green recyclable SO(3)H-carbon catalyst derived from glycerol for the production of biodiesel from FFA-containing karanja (Pongamia glabra) oil in a single step.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathi Devi, B L A; Vijai Kumar Reddy, T; Vijaya Lakshmi, K; Prasad, R B N

    2014-02-01

    Simultaneous esterification and transesterification method is employed for the preparation of biodiesel from 7.5% free fatty acid (FFA) containing karanja (Pongamia glabra) oil using water resistant and reusable carbon-based solid acid catalyst derived from glycerol in a single step. The optimum reaction parameters for obtaining biodiesel in >99% yield by simultaneous esterification and transesterification are: methanol (1:45 mole ratio of oil), catalyst 20wt.% of oil, temperature 160°C and reaction time of 4h. After the reaction, the catalyst was easily recovered by filtration and reused for five times with out any deactivation under optimized conditions. This single-step process could be a potential route for biodiesel production from high FFA containing oils by simplifying the procedure and reducing costs and effluent generation.

  13. Fundamental study on kinetics and transport phenomena in low water dilute acid total hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Auburn University

    2004-04-07

    The overall objective of this research is to delineate the process of the dilute-acid hydrolysis of biomass and seek better understanding of the reactions involving dilute-acid treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Specifically the scope of the work entails the following two primary technical elements: Verification of the heterogeneous nature of the reaction mechanism in dilute-acid hydrolysis of cellulosic component of the biomass. Experimental investigation to identify the overall reaction pattern and the kinetic constants associated with dilute-acid hydrolysis of the cellulosic component of the agricultural residues.

  14. Kinetic study of esterification of sulfuric acid with alcohols in aerosol bulk phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Jang, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we hypothesize that the formation of organosulfates through the reactions between sulfuric acid and alcohols in the aerosol bulk phase is more efficient than that in solution chemistry. To prove this hypothesis, the kinetics of the organosulfate formation was investigated for both aliphatic alcohol with single OH group (e.g., 1-heptanol) and the multialcohols ranging from semivolatiles (e.g., hydrated-glyoxal and glycerol) to nonvolatiles (e.g., sucrose) using analytical techniques directly monitoring aerosol bulk phase. Both the forward (k1) and the backward (k-1) reaction rate constants of organosulfate formation via the particle phase esterification of 1-heptanol with sulfuric acid were estimated using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer equipped with a flow chamber under varying humidities. Both k1 and k-1 are in orders of 10-3 L mol-1 min-1, which are three orders of magnitude higher than the reported values obtained in solution chemistry. The formation of organosulfate in the H2SO4 aerosol internally mixed with multialcohols was studied by measuring the proton concentration of the aerosol collected on the filter using a newly developed Colorimetry integrated with a Reflectance UV-Visible spectrometer (C-RUV). The formation of organosulfate significantly decreases aerosol acidity due to the transformation of H2SO4 into dialkylsulfates. The forward reaction rate constants for the dialkylsulfate formation in the multialcohol-H2SO4 aerosols were also three orders of magnitude greater than the reported values in solution chemistry. The water content (MH2O) in the multialcohol-H2SO4 particle was monitored using the FTIR spectrometer. A large reduction of MH2O accords with the high yield of organosulfate in aerosol. Based on this study, we conclude that organosulfate formation in atmospheric aerosol, where both alcohols and sulfuric acid are found together, is significant.

  15. FFA-ROS-P53-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis contributes to reduction of osteoblastogenesis and bone mass in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; He, Wang; Liao, Bo; Yang, Jingyue

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between free fatty acid (FFA), ROS generation, mitochondrial dysfunction and bone mineral density (BMD) in type 2 diabetic patients and investigated the molecular mechanism. db/db and high fat (HF)-fed mice were treated by Etomoxir, an inhibitor of CPT1, MitoQ, and PFT-α, an inhibitor of P53. Bone metabolic factors were assessed and BMSCs were isolated and induced to osteogenic differentiation. FFA, lipid peroxidation and mtDNA copy number were correlated with BMD in T2DM patients. Etomoxir, MitoQ and PFT-α significantly inhibited the decrease of BMD and bone breaking strength in db/db and HF-fed mice and suppressed the reduction of BMSCs-differentiated osteoblasts. Etomoxir and MitoQ, but not PFT-α, inhibited the increase of mitochondrial ROS generation in db/db and HF-fed mice and osteoblasts. In addition, Etomoxir, MitoQ and PFT-α significantly inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction in osteoblasts. Moreover, mitochondrial apoptosis was activated in osteoblasts derived from db/db and HF-fed mice, which was inhibited by Etomoxir, MitoQ and PFT-α. Furthermore, mitochondrial accumulation of P53 recruited Bax and initiated molecular events of apoptotic events. These results demonstrated that fatty acid oxidation resulted in ROS generation, activating P53/Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis, leading to reduction of osteogenic differentiation and bone loss in T2DM. PMID:26226833

  16. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (I): Model constitution].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    Based on activated sludge model No. 2 (ASM2), the anaerobic/aerobic kinetic model of phosphorus-accumulating organisms (PAO) was established with mixed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as the base substance in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The characteristic of the PAO model was that the anaerobic metabolism rates of glycogen degradation, poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates synthesis and polyphosphate hydrolysis were expressed by SCFAs uptake equation, and the effects of anaerobic maintenance on kinetics and stoichiometry were considered. The PAO kinetic model was composed of 3 soluble components, 4 particulate components and a pH parameter, which constituted the matrix of stoichiometric coefficients. On the basis of PAO model, the GAO kinetic model was established, which included 7 processes, and phosphorus content influenced the aerobic metabolism only.

  17. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters. PMID:26852849

  18. The parsley plastocyanin-turnip cytochrome f complex: a structurally distorted but kinetically functional acidic patch.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Peter B; Hunter, David M; Sato, Katsuko; McFarlane, William; Dennison, Christopher

    2004-02-15

    In general, inter-protein electron transfer proceeds via the formation of transient complexes. The initial stage of the interaction between plastocyanin (PCu) and cytochrome f (cyt f ) from plants is mediated by complementary electrostatics. Given the diffuse nature of its acidic patch, parsley PCu is an atypical example of a plant PCu. The interaction of this PCu with turnip cyt f was investigated by stopped-flow kinetics, NMR spectroscopy and protein-docking simulations. We show that, despite the altered acidic patch, parsley PCu is as efficient as spinach PCu in accepting electrons from cyt f, over the physiological range of ionic strength. At high ionic strength, the rate constant for the reaction of cyt f with parsley PCu is twice that of the spinach protein. This difference in reactivity is attributed to variations in the hydrophobic patch of parsley PCu. The results of NMR studies and protein-docking simulations indicate that parsley PCu and its spinach analogue adopt different orientations in their complexes with cyt f.

  19. Kinetics of the reduction of vanadium(V) by sodium sulfite in an acidic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Khyarsing, I.V.; Filippov, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of vanadium(V) by sodium sulfite was studied by uv-visible spectrometry at 25/sup 0/C. The acidity of the solutions was controlled by the addition of calculated amounts of hydrochloric, sulfuric acids and sodium hydroxide. The pH of the medium varied from -0.45 to 3. The reagents were mixed, remained thermostated for 20 min; and the optical density vs time was recorded with a Specord uv vis spectrophotometer. Rate curves were measured in the absorption region of vanadium(V) and vanadium(IV). The light absorption followed the Lambert-Berr-Bouguer law. The effective rate constant was calculated from the change in optical density in the region of vanadium(IV) absorption. The most active species appear to be HSO/sub 3//sup -/ and VO/sub 2/SO/sub 4//sup -/. Above pH 3, the reaction is accompanied by a slow increase in optical density over the entire visible spectrum, and after a period of time these solutions deposit a green precipitate which is, apparently a polymeric vanadyl vanadate. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Approximate linear confidence and curvature of a kinetic model of dodecanedioic acid in humans.

    PubMed

    Panunzi, Simona; De Gaetano, Andrea; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2005-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acids with an even number of carbon atoms have been proposed as an alternate energy substrate for enteral or parenteral nutrition in the acutely ill patient, due to their water solubility and their yielding TCA cycle intermediates upon beta-oxidation. In the present work, a nonlinear compartmental model of the kinetics of dodecanedioic acid is developed, and its parameters are estimated from time concentration experimental observations obtained from six healthy volunteers undergoing a per os administration of 3 g of the substance. Although the model is linear in the transfer of the free substance from plasma to the tissues, the exchange between gut and plasma compartments is represented as a saturable function. Albumin binding is then incorporated to obtain the final model in terms of the measured total concentrations. Estimates of the model's structural parameters were computed for each experimental subject, and the usual single-subject approximate confidence regions for the parameters were derived by inversion of the Hessian at the optimum. To verify the applicability of this approximation, the nonlinearity of the expectation surface at the optimum was measured by computing the normal (intrinsic) component of curvature. Because the model curvature was excessive in all subjects, the usual approximation could not be trusted to provide acceptable approximations to the parameter confidence regions. A suitable Monte Carlo simulation yielded empirical joint parameter distributions from which the approximate parameter variances could finally be obtained.

  1. Oxidation of flavonoids by hypochlorous acid: reaction kinetics and antioxidant activity studies.

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Stawowska, Katarzyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2016-08-01

    Flavonoids, plant polyphenols, ubiquitous components of human diet, are excellent antioxidants. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by activated neutrophils, is highly reactive chlorinating and oxidizing species. It has been reported earlier that flavonoids are chlorinated by HOCl. Here we show that flavonoids from flavonol subclass are also oxidized by HOCl, but only if the latter is in a large molar excess (≥ 10). The kinetics of this reaction was studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, at different pH. We found that flavonols were oxidized by HOCl with the rate constants of the order of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.5. Antioxidant activity of HOCl-modified flavonoids was measured by 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) method. Slightly higher antioxidant activity, compared to parent compounds, was observed for flavonols after their reaction with equimolar or moderate excess of HOCl whereas flavonols treated with high molar excess of HOCl exhibited decrease in antioxidant activity. The mechanism of flavonoid reaction with HOCl at physiological pH is proposed, and biological consequences of this reaction are discussed. PMID:27225705

  2. Study of reaction parameters and kinetics of esterification of lauric acid with butanol by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sini; Agarwal, Madhu; Chaurasia, S P

    2013-12-01

    Esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol, catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase (CAL) in aqueous-organic biphasic solvent system was studied. Effects of various reaction parameters on esterification were investigated, such as type and amount of solvent, amount of buffer, pH, temperature, speed of agitation, amount of enzyme, butanol and lauric acid. The most suitable reaction conditions for esterification were observed at 50 degrees C and pH 7.0 using 5000 micromoles of lauric acid, 7000 pmoles of butanol, 0.25 ml phosphate buffer, 1 ml of isooctane as the solvent and 50 mg of immobilized enzyme in the reaction medium at agitation speed of 150 rpm. Maximum esterification of 96.36% was acheived in 600 min of reaction time at n-butanol to lauric acid molar ratio of 1: 0.7. Kinetic study for the esterification of lauric acid with n-butanol using immobilized CAL was carried out and the kinetic constants were estimated by using non-linear regression method. The estimated value of Michaelis kinetic constants for butanol (KmBt) and acid (KmAc) were 451.56 (M) and 4.7 x 10(-7)(M), respectively and the value of dissociation constant (KBt) of the butanol-lipase complex was 9.41 x 10(7)(M). The estimated constants agreed fairly well with literature data.

  3. Kinetics of photoirradiation-induced synthesis of soy oil-conjugated linoleic acid isomers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal P; Proctor, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    Photoirradiation of soy oil with UV/visible light has been shown to produce significant amounts of trans,trans conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers through conversion of various synthesized intermediate cis,trans isomers. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of CLA isomers synthesis to better understand the production of various isomers. Soy oil was irradiated with UV/visible light for 144 h in the presence of an iodine catalyst and CLA isomers analyzed by gas chromatography (GC). Arrhenius plots were developed for the conversion of soy oil linoleic acid (A) to form cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA (B), conversion of cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA to form trans,trans-CLA (C) with respect to B, and formation of trans,trans-CLA isomers with respect to C. The kinetics of consumption of linoleic acid (LA) to form cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA was found to be of second-order with a rate constant of 9.01 x 10-7 L/mol s. The rate of formation of cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA isomers depends on the rate of formation from LA and its rate of consumption to form trans,trans-CLA isomers. The conversion of cis-, trans/trans-, cis-CLA isomers to trans,trans-CLA isomers was found to be of first-order with a rate constant of 2.75 x 10-6 s-1. However, the formation of thermodynamically stable trans,trans-CLA isomers (C) with respect to C was found to be a zero-order reaction with a rate constant of 10.66 x 10-7 mol/L s. The consumption of LA was found to be the rate-determining step in the CLA isomers formation reaction mechanism. The findings provide a better understanding of the mechanism of CLA isomers synthesis by photoirradiation and the factors controlling the ratio of various isomers.

  4. Kinetic properties of two Rhizopus exo-polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic characteristics of two Rhizopus oryzae exo-polygalacturonases acting on galacturonic acid oligomers (GalpA) were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). RPG15 hydrolyzing (GalpA)2 demonstrated a Km of 55 uM and kcat of 10.3 s^-1^ while RPG16 was shown to have greater af...

  5. A comparative study of the kinetics of amino acid racemization/epimerization in fossil and modern mollusk shells

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfriend, G.A. Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington DC ); Meyer, V.R. )

    1991-11-01

    The present study examines the question of whether heating experiments on modern shell material accurately model the pattern of kinetics of racemization/epimerization in fossils. Using one modern sample and four fossil samples (dating to 9700-1700 yr B.P.) of a species of land snail from the Negev Desert, the kinetic behavior of the samples in laboratory heating experiments are compared. Results are then compared to the Holocene trend in kinetic patterns observed in a large series of radio-carbon-dated shells. For most amino acids (alanine, alloisoleucine/isoleucine, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid), the fossil material displays the same pattern of kinetics in relation to time as the modern shells; deviant patterns are observed for aspartic acid, proline, and methionine. Adherence to a first order kinetic pattern in heated shells occurs only in alloisoleucine/isoleucine (within the range of D/L ratios studied). Differences in the temperature dependence of racemization/epimerization rates are found between modern and fossil samples. In most cases this relationship when extrapolated to natural temperatures, does not agree well with observed rates of racemization/epimerization in the fossil series. However the pattern of change in rate of racemization/epimerization with time in heating experiments generally follows the trend observed in the fossil series rather well. The experiments indicate that heating experiment results for certain amino acids, such as the widely used alloisoleucine/isoleucine, do give good predictions of kinetic patterns in relation to time in fossils but that predictions of the temperature dependence of rates are less accurate.

  6. Photovoltage kinetics of the acid-blue and acid-purple forms of bacteriorhodopsin: evidence for no net charge transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Moltke, S; Heyn, M P

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved photovoltage measurements were performed with the acid-blue (bR605A) and acid-purple (bR565A) forms of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in the time range from 25 ns to 100 s. The bR605A and bR565A pigments were formed by titration with H2SO4 in the absence and presence of 150 mM KCI, respectively. Qualitatively the kinetics of the charge displacement in these two states are similar and consist of two fast phases in one direction (100 ns bandwidth limited and approximately 1 microsecond) followed by a decay in the opposite direction via one component for bR605A (4.4 +/- 0.6 ms) or two components for bR565A (33 +/- 8 microseconds and 3.6 +/- 0.5 ms). The transient photovoltage signal returns exactly to the initial value after several milliseconds, well before the passive discharge of the electrical measuring system at 2 s. We conclude that no net charge transfer occurs in either bR605A or bR565A. The direction of the fast components is opposite that of net proton translocation in bR at pH 7. So, if the charge that moves back and forth is due to a proton, it moves first in the direction of the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (< 1 microsecond) and returns to its initial position via the 4.4 ms (bR605A) or the 33 microseconds and 3.6 ms (bR565A) decay components. The amplitude of the charge motion in both low pH forms is too large to be due to isomerization alone and is comparable to one of the major components in bR at pH 7.2 PMID:8580350

  7. Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles for Cr(VI) adsorption: kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Tekin, Nalan; Osman, Bilgen; Beşirli, Necati

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles, poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate(EG)-vinylphenyl boronic acid(VPBA)) [m-poly(EG-VPBA)], produced by suspension polymerization and characterized, was found to be an efficient solid polymer for Cr(VI) adsorption. The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were prepared by copolymerizing of ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EG) with 4-vinyl phenyl boronic acid (VPBA). The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and swelling studies. The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were used at adsorbent/Cr(VI) ion ratios. The influence of pH, Cr(VI) initial concentration, temperature of the removal process was investigated. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 2. Langmuir isotherm and Dubinin-Radushkvich isotherm were found to better fit the experiment data rather than Fruendlich isotherm. The kinetics of the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were investigated using the pseudo first-order, pseudo-second-order, Ritch-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results. The thermodynamic parameters (free energy change, ΔG(0) enthalpy change, ΔH(0); and entropy change, ΔS(0)) for the adsorption have been evaluated. PMID:25666882

  8. Kinetic mechanism and structural requirements of the amine-catalyzed decarboxylation of oxaloacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Nabil K; Crowe, William E; Waldrop, Grover L

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic and chemical mechanism of amine-catalyzed decarboxylation of oxaloacetic acid at pH 8.0 has been reevaluated using a new and versatile assay. Amine-catalyzed decarboxylation of oxaloacetic acid proceeds via the formation of an imine intermediate, followed by decarboxylation of the intermediate and hydrolysis to yield pyruvate. The decrease in oxaloacetic acid was coupled to NADH formation by malate dehydrogenase, which allowed the rates of both initial carbinolamine formation (as part of the imination step) and decarboxylation to be determined. By comparing the rates observed for a variety of amines and, in particular, diamines, the structural and electronic requirements for diamine-catalyzed decarboxylation at pH 8.0 were identified. At pH 8.0, monoamines were found to be very poor catalysts, whereas some diamines, most notably ethylenediamine, were excellent catalysts. The results indicate that the second amino group of diamines enhances the rate of imine formation by acting as a proton shuttle during the carbinolamine formation step, which enables diamines to overcome high levels of solvation that would otherwise inhibit carbinolamine, and thus imine, formation. The presence of the second amino group may also enhance the rate of the carbinolamine dehydration step. In contrast to the findings of previous reports, the second amino group participates in the reaction by enhancing the rate of decarboxylation via hydrogen-bonding to the imine nitrogen to either stabilize the negative charge that develops on the imine during decarboxylation or preferentially stabilize the reactive imine over the unreactive enamine tautomer. These results provide insight into the precise catalytic mechanism of several enzymes whose reactions are known to proceed via an imine intermediate.

  9. The Kinetics and Mechanism of the Decomposition of Murexide in Acid Solution: An Experiment for Teaching Principles of Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Wilhelm; Rees, Norman H.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for an experiment on the decomposition of murexide in acid solution. The experiment, suitable for advanced courses, can be easily performed in a 6-hour laboratory period. (JN)

  10. Kinetics of the electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid on ultrananocrystalline boron doped conductive diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Fernández-González, Carolina; Gómez-Lavín, Sonia; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical degradation and mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Model aqueous solutions of PFOA (100mg/L) were electro-oxidized under galvanostatic conditions in a flow-by undivided cell provided with a tungsten cathode and an anode formed by a commercial ultrananocrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) coating on a niobium substrate. A systematic experimental study was conducted in order to analyze the influence of the following operation variables: (i) the supporting electrolyte, NaClO4 (1.4 and 8.4g/L) and Na2SO4 (5g/L); (ii) the applied current density, japp, in the range 50-200 A/m(2) and (iii) the hydrodynamic conditions, in terms of flowrate in the range 0.4×10(-4)-1.7×10(-4)m(3)/s and temperature in the range 293-313K. After 6h of treatment and at japp 200A/m(2), PFOA removal was higher than 93% and the mineralization ratio, obtained from the decrease of the total organic carbon (TOC) was 95%. The electrochemical generation of hydroxyl radicals in the supporting electrolyte was experimentally measured based on their reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The enhanced formation of hydroxyl radicals at higher japp was related to the faster kinetics of PFOA removal. The fitting of experimental data to the proposed kinetic model provided the first order rate constants of PFOA degradation, kc(1) that moved from 2.06×10(-4) to 15.58×10(-4)s(-1), when japp varied from 50 to 200A/m(2).

  11. Kinetics of the electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid on ultrananocrystalline boron doped conductive diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Fernández-González, Carolina; Gómez-Lavín, Sonia; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical degradation and mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Model aqueous solutions of PFOA (100mg/L) were electro-oxidized under galvanostatic conditions in a flow-by undivided cell provided with a tungsten cathode and an anode formed by a commercial ultrananocrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) coating on a niobium substrate. A systematic experimental study was conducted in order to analyze the influence of the following operation variables: (i) the supporting electrolyte, NaClO4 (1.4 and 8.4g/L) and Na2SO4 (5g/L); (ii) the applied current density, japp, in the range 50-200 A/m(2) and (iii) the hydrodynamic conditions, in terms of flowrate in the range 0.4×10(-4)-1.7×10(-4)m(3)/s and temperature in the range 293-313K. After 6h of treatment and at japp 200A/m(2), PFOA removal was higher than 93% and the mineralization ratio, obtained from the decrease of the total organic carbon (TOC) was 95%. The electrochemical generation of hydroxyl radicals in the supporting electrolyte was experimentally measured based on their reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The enhanced formation of hydroxyl radicals at higher japp was related to the faster kinetics of PFOA removal. The fitting of experimental data to the proposed kinetic model provided the first order rate constants of PFOA degradation, kc(1) that moved from 2.06×10(-4) to 15.58×10(-4)s(-1), when japp varied from 50 to 200A/m(2). PMID:24981910

  12. Plasma free amino acid kinetics in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using a bolus injection of 15N-labeled amino acids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jacob William; Yanke, Dan; Mirza, Jeff; Ballantyne, James Stuart

    2011-02-01

    To gain insight into the metabolic design of the amino acid carrier systems in fish, we injected a bolus of (15)N amino acids into the dorsal aorta in mature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The plasma kinetic parameters including concentration, pool size, rate of disappearance (R(d)), half-life and turnover rate were determined for 15 amino acids. When corrected for metabolic rate, the R(d) values obtained for trout for most amino acids were largely comparable to human values, with the exception of glutamine (which was lower) and threonine (which was higher). R(d) values ranged from 0.9 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1) (lysine) to 22.1 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1) (threonine) with most values falling between 2 and 6 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1). There was a significant correlation between R(d) and the molar proportion of amino acids in rainbow trout whole body protein hydrolysate. Other kinetic parameters did not correlate significantly with whole body amino acid composition. This indicates that an important design feature of the plasma-free amino acids system involves proportional delivery of amino acids to tissues for protein synthesis.

  13. Curcumin protects hearts from FFA-induced injury by activating Nrf2 and inactivating NF-κB both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Zhong, Peng; Zhao, Yunjie; Kanchana, Karvannan; Zhang, Yali; Khan, Zia A; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Wu, Lianpin; Wang, Jingying; Liang, Guang

    2015-02-01

    Obesity and increased free fatty acid (FFA) level are tightly linked, leading to the development of cardiovascular disorders. Curcumin is a natural product from Curcuma longa with multiple bioactivities and is known to have cardioprotective effects in several cellular and animal models. The current study was designed to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of curcumin and demonstrate the underlying mechanism in FFA-induced cardiac injury. Using cell culture studies and high fat in vivo model, we explored the mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of curcumin. We observed that palmitate (PA) treatment in cardiac derived H9C2 cells induced a marked increase in reactive oxygen species, inflammation, apoptosis and hypertrophy. All of these changes were effectively suppressed by curcumin treatment. In addition, oral administration of curcumin at 50mg/kg completely suppressed high fat diet-induced oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis, hypertrophy and tissue remodeling in mice. The beneficial actions of curcumin are closely associated with its ability to increase Nrf2 expression and inhibit NF-κB activation. Thus, both in vitro and in vivo studies showed a promising role of curcumin as a cardioprotective agent against palmitate and high fat diet mediated cardiac dysfunction. We indicated the regulatory roles of Nrf2 and NF-κB in obesity-induced heart injury, and suggested that they may be important therapeutic targets in the treatment of obesity-related disorders. PMID:25444713

  14. [Photocatalytic degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in TiO2 dispersion and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Jie; Yu, Ze-Bin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Liu, Qing; Liu, Yu-Xin; He, Li-Li

    2014-07-01

    Decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is of prime importance since it is recognized as a persistent organic pollutant and is widespread in the environment. Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA by TiO2 (P25) was investigated under 254 nm UV light. Experimental conditions including initial pH, TiO2 content and PFOA concentration, were varied to demonstrate their effects on the decomposition of PFOA. It was observed that the photocatalytic degradation kinetics of PFOA could be fitted to the quasi-first-order equation. The pH played a determinant role in the decomposition of PFOA and the presence of O2 increased the degradation rate. Optimal conditions for a complete removal were obtained using 1.5 g x L(-1) TiO2 at pH 3 in air atmosphere, with a rate constant of 0.420 6 h(-1). The contribution experiments of various reactive species produced during the photocatalysis were also investigated with the addition of different scavengers and it was found that photogenerated holes (h+) was the major reactive species which was responsible for 66.1% of the degradation rate, and the *OH was involved in PFOA degradation as well. In addition, the photocatalytic experiment with the addition of NaF indicated that the adsorption of PFOA was of primary importance for the photocatalytic decomposition. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length as intermediates and products were identified with UPLC-QTOF/MS, and a possible mechanism for PFOA decomposition was proposed.

  15. Kinetics of phenolic and phthalic acid esters biodegradation in membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The kinetic of phenolic and phthalic acid esters (PAEs) biodegradation in membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating municipal landfill leachate was investigated. Laboratory-scale MBR was fed with mixture of fresh and stabilized landfill leachate containing carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 10, 6, 3 and operated under different solid retention time (SRT) of 90, 15 and 5 d. Batch experiments using MBR sludge obtained from each steady-state operating condition revealed highest biodegradation rate constant (k) of 0.059-0.092 h(-1) of the phenolic and PAEs compounds at C/N of 6. Heterotrophic bacteria were the major group responsible for biodegradation of compounds whereas the presence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) helped accelerating their removals. Heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria found under high ammonia condition had an important role in enhancing the biodegradation of phenols and PAEs by releasing phenol hydroxylase (PH), esterase (EST) and phthalate dioxygenase (PDO) enzymes and the presence of AOB helped improving biodegradation of phenolic and PAEs compounds through their co-metabolism. PMID:26908045

  16. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  17. Influence of biomacromolecules and humic acid on the aggregation kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Navid B; Pfefferle, Lisa D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-04-01

    The initial aggregation kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied using time-resolved dynamic light scattering. Aggregation of SWNTs was evaluated in the presence of natural organic matter [Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)], polysaccharide (alginate), protein [bovine serum albumin (BSA)], and cell culture medium [Luria-Bertani (LB) broth] with varying solution concentrations of monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) salts. Increasing salt concentration and adding divalent calcium ions induced SWNT aggregation by screening electrostatic charge and thereby suppressing electrostatic repulsion, similar to observations with aquatic colloidal particles. The presence of biomacromolecules significantly retarded the SWNT aggregation rate. BSA protein molecules were most effective in reducing the rate of aggregation followed by SRHA, LB, and alginate. The slowing of the SWNT aggregation rate in the presence of the biomacromolecules and SRHA can be attributed to steric repulsion originating from the adsorbed macromolecular layer. The remarkably enhanced SWNT stability in the presence of BSA, compared to that with the other biomacromolecules and SRHA, is ascribed to the BSA globular molecular structure that enhances steric repulsion. The results have direct implications for the fate and behavior of SWNTs in aquatic environments and biological media.

  18. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  19. The Viability of a Nonenzymatic Reductive Citric Acid Cycle Kinetics and Thermochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David S.

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate → pyruvate → oxaloacetate → malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite magnetite quartz and pyrrhotite pyrite magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life.

  20. Combined kinetic studies and computational analysis on kojic acid analogous as tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lima, Carlyle Ribeiro; Silva, José Rogério A; de Tássia Carvalho Cardoso, Erica; Silva, Edilene O; Lameira, Jerônimo; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; do Socorro Barros Brasil, Davi; Alves, Cláudio N

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin synthesis and widely distributed in plants and animals tissues. In mammals, this enzyme is related to pigment production, involved in wound healing, primary immune response and it can also contribute to catecholamines synthesis in the brain. Consequently, tyrosinase enzyme represents an attractive and selective target in the field of the medicine, cosmetics and bio-insecticides. In this paper, experimental kinetics and computational analysis were used to study the inhibition of tyrosinase by analogous of Kojic acid. The main interactions occurring between inhibitors-tyrosinase complexes and the influence of divalent cation (Cu2+) in enzymatic inhibition were investigated by using molecular docking, molecular dynamic simulations and electrostatic binding free energy by using the Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method. The results showed that the electrostatic binding free energy are correlated with values of constant inhibition (r2 = 0.97).Thus, the model obtained here could contribute to future studies of this important system and, therefore, eventually facilitate development of tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:25004069

  1. The effect of thiobarbituric acid on tyrosinase: inhibition kinetics and computational simulation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shang-Jun; Si, Yue-Xiu; Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Wang, Su-Fang; Oh, Sangho; Lee, Sanghyuk; Sim, Seon-Mi; Yang, Jun-Mo; Qian, Guo-Ying; Lee, Jinhyuk; Park, Yong-Doo

    2011-12-01

    Tyrosinase plays various roles in organisms and much research has focused on the regulation of tyrosinase activity. We studied the inhibitory effect of thiobarbituric acid (TBA) on tyrosinase. Our kinetic study showed that TBA inhibited tyrosinase in a reversible noncompetitive manner (K(i) 5 14.0 ± 8.5 mM and IC₅₀ 5 8.0 ± 1.0 mM). Intrinsic and ANS-binding fluorescences studies were also performed to gain more information regarding the binding mechanism. The results showed that no tertiary structural changes were obviously observed. For further insight, we predicted the 3D structure of tyrosinase and simulated the docking between tyrosinase and TBA. The docking simulation was successful with significant scores (binding energy for AutoDock4: -5.52 kcal/mol) and suggested that TBA was located in the active site. The 11 ns molecular dynamics simulation convinced that the four HIS residues (residue numbers: 57, 90, 250, and 282) were commonly responsible for the interaction with TBA. Our results provide a new inhibition strategy that works using an antioxidant rather than targeting the copper ions within the tyrosinase active site. PMID:22066533

  2. Stability of HAMLET--a kinetically trapped alpha-lactalbumin oleic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Fast, Jonas; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina; Linse, Sara

    2005-02-01

    The stability toward thermal and urea denaturation was measured for HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) and alpha-lactalbumin, using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Under all conditions examined, HAMLET appears to have the same or lower stability than alpha-lactalbumin. The largest difference is seen for thermal denaturation of the calcium free (apo) forms, where the temperature at the transition midpoint is 15 degrees C lower for apo HAMLET than for apo alpha-lactalbumin. The difference becomes progressively smaller as the calcium concentration increases. Denaturation of HAMLET was found to be irreversible. Samples of HAMLET that have been renatured after denaturation have lost the specific biological activity toward tumor cells. Three lines of evidence indicate that HAMLET is a kinetic trap: (1) It has lower stability than alpha-lactalbumin, although it is a complex of alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid; (2) its denaturation is irreversible and HAMLET is lost after denaturation; (3) formation of HAMLET requires a specific conversion protocol.

  3. Formic acid dehydrogenation with bioinspired iridium complexes: a kinetic isotope effect study and mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Xu, Shaoan; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    Highly efficient hydrogen generation from dehydrogenation of formic acid is achieved by using bioinspired iridium complexes that have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions of the bipyridine or bipyrimidine ligand (i.e., OH in the second coordination sphere of the metal center). In particular, [Ir(Cp*)(TH4BPM)(H2 O)]SO4 (TH4BPM: 2,2',6,6'-tetrahydroxyl-4,4'-bipyrimidine; Cp*: pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) has a high turnover frequency of 39 500 h(-1) at 80 °C in a 1 M aqueous solution of HCO2 H/HCO2 Na and produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide without carbon monoxide contamination. The deuterium kinetic isotope effect study clearly indicates a different rate-determining step for complexes with hydroxyl groups at different positions of the ligands. The rate-limiting step is β-hydrogen elimination from the iridium-formate intermediate for complexes with hydroxyl groups at ortho positions, owing to a proton relay (i.e., pendent-base effect), which lowers the energy barrier of hydrogen generation. In contrast, the reaction of iridium hydride with a proton to liberate hydrogen is demonstrated to be the rate-determining step for complexes that do not have hydroxyl groups at the ortho positions.

  4. Kinetic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compound Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm the proposed mechanisms a kentic study of several possible intermediates was done under similar acidolysis conditions. Epoxystyrene and 1-phenyl-1,2-ethandiol were used as intermediates. 2-phenoxyvinylbenzene was synthesized and subsequently deconstructed in H2SO4. The kinetics and product distribution of these intermediates were then used in confirming our proposed mechanisms.

  5. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of tetracycline: Effect of humic acid on degradation kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-11-15

    The widespread occurrence of tetracycline (TC) in the aquatic environment poses a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem and human health. In this study, elimination of TC by photolysis and TiO2 photocatalysis were investigated by using mercury-free UVA-LED as an alternative light source. Particular emphasis was given to the effect of humic acid (HA) on the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of TC removal. Photolytic degradation of TC was slightly enhanced by HA due to its photosensitization effect, as evidenced by the increased steady-state concentrations of OH. The most abundant transformation product of TC, which was formed by the attack of OH radical, was enhanced during photolytic degradation. During photocatalytic experiments, HA dramatically inhibited TC loss due to the surface deactivation of TiO2 and OH quenching. The steady-state concentration of OH was dramatically decreased in the presence of HA. Identification of transformation products showed that HA could inhibit the oxidation pathways initiated by OH during photocatalysis of TC. These findings provide further insights into the assessment of photolysis and photocatalysis for antibiotics elimination in natural waters where HA exists ubiquitously. PMID:27420385

  6. Kinetic study of the oxidation and nitration of catechols in the presence of nitrous acid ionization equilibria.

    PubMed

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad

    2010-02-15

    Conversion of catechols to corresponding nitro derivatives in the presence of nitrous acid dissociation is studied using voltammetry and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the quinones derived from oxidation of catechols by nitrous acid participate in Michael addition reaction with nitrite ion in very mild acidic solutions. Rank annihilation factor analysis RAFA is applied to resolve the two-way kinetic spectra data measured from spectroscopic reactions. The rank of the original data matrix is reduced by one by annihilating the information of each component. It is shown that both reactions are drastically depends on pH and nitrous acid or nitrite ion percentage. The rate constants of oxidation and nitration reactions of catechol derivatives are obtained at the pHs around pK(a) of nitrous acid.

  7. Kinetic and equilibrium studies on the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto activated carbon cloth.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Numan; Bayram, Edip; Ayranci, Erol

    2006-09-01

    Removal of acid dyes Acid Blue 45, Acid Blue 92, Acid Blue 120 and Acid Blue 129 from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto high area activated carbon cloth (ACC) was investigated. Kinetics of adsorption was followed by in situ UV-spectroscopy and the data were treated according to pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that the adsorption process of these dyes onto ACC follows the pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms were derived at 25 degrees C on the basis of batch analysis. Isotherm data were treated according to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The fits of experimental data to these equations were examined. PMID:16563617

  8. Improved Free Fatty Acid Production in Cyanobacteria with Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as Host

    PubMed Central

    Ruffing, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial free fatty acids (FFAs) have been proposed as a potential feedstock for renewable energy. The ability to directly convert carbon dioxide into FFAs makes cyanobacteria ideal hosts for renewable FFA production. Previous metabolic engineering efforts using the cyanobacterial hosts Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have demonstrated this direct conversion of carbon dioxide into FFAs; however, FFA yields in these hosts are limited by the negative impact of FFA production on the host cell physiology. This work investigates the use of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as a cyanobacterial host for FFA production. In comparison to S. elongatus PCC 7942, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 strains produced and excreted FFAs at similar concentrations but without the detrimental effects on host physiology. The enhanced tolerance to FFA production with Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was found to be temperature-dependent, with physiological effects such as reduced photosynthetic yield and decreased photosynthetic pigments observed at higher temperatures. Additional genetic manipulations were targeted for increased FFA production, including thioesterases and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Overexpression of non-native RuBisCO subunits (rbcLS) from a psbAI promoter resulted in more than a threefold increase in FFA production, with excreted FFA concentrations reaching >130 mg/L. This work illustrates the importance of host strain selection for cyanobacterial biofuel production and demonstrates that the FFA tolerance of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 can allow for high yields of excreted FFA. PMID:25152890

  9. Improved Free Fatty Acid Production in Cyanobacteria with Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as Host.

    PubMed

    Ruffing, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Microbial free fatty acids (FFAs) have been proposed as a potential feedstock for renewable energy. The ability to directly convert carbon dioxide into FFAs makes cyanobacteria ideal hosts for renewable FFA production. Previous metabolic engineering efforts using the cyanobacterial hosts Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have demonstrated this direct conversion of carbon dioxide into FFAs; however, FFA yields in these hosts are limited by the negative impact of FFA production on the host cell physiology. This work investigates the use of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 as a cyanobacterial host for FFA production. In comparison to S. elongatus PCC 7942, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 strains produced and excreted FFAs at similar concentrations but without the detrimental effects on host physiology. The enhanced tolerance to FFA production with Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was found to be temperature-dependent, with physiological effects such as reduced photosynthetic yield and decreased photosynthetic pigments observed at higher temperatures. Additional genetic manipulations were targeted for increased FFA production, including thioesterases and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Overexpression of non-native RuBisCO subunits (rbcLS) from a psbAI promoter resulted in more than a threefold increase in FFA production, with excreted FFA concentrations reaching >130 mg/L. This work illustrates the importance of host strain selection for cyanobacterial biofuel production and demonstrates that the FFA tolerance of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 can allow for high yields of excreted FFA. PMID:25152890

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of permanganate oxidation of iota- and lambda-carrageenan polysaccharides as sulfated carbohydrates in acid perchlorate solutions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Refat M; Fawzy, Ahmed; Ahmed, Gamal A; Zaafarany, Ishaq A; Asghar, Basim H; Takagi, Hideo D; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2011-10-18

    The kinetics of oxidation of iota- and lambda-carrageenan as sulfated carbohydrates by permanganate ion in aqueous perchlorate solutions at a constant ionic strength of 2.0 mol dm(-3) have been investigated spectrophotometrically. The pseudo-first-order plots were found to be of inverted S-shape throughout the entire courses of reactions. The initial rates were found to be relatively slow in the early stages, followed by an increase in the oxidation rates over longer time periods. The experimental observations showed first-order dependences in permanganate and fractional first-order kinetics with respect to both carrageenans concentration for both the induction and autoacceleration periods. The results obtained at various hydrogen ion concentrations showed that the oxidation processes in these redox systems are acid-catalyzed throughout the two stages of oxidation reactions. The added salts lead to the prediction that Mn(III) is the reactive species throughout the autoacceleration periods. Kinetic evidence for the formation of 1:1 intermediate complexes was revealed. The kinetic parameters have been evaluated and tentative reaction mechanisms in good agreement with the kinetic results are discussed.

  11. Influence of microwaves on the leaching kinetics of uraninite from a low grade ore in dilute sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Madakkaruppan, V; Pius, Anitha; T, Sreenivas; Giri, Nitai; Sarbajna, Chanchal

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a study on microwave assisted leaching of uranium from a low-grade ore of Indian origin. The host rock for uranium mineralization is chlorite-biotite-muscovite-quartzo-feldspathic schist. The dominant presence of siliceous minerals determined leaching of uranium values in sulfuric acid medium under oxidizing conditions. Process parametric studies like the effect of sulfuric acid concentration (0.12-0.50M), redox potential (400-500mV), particle size (600-300μm) and temperature (35°-95°C) indicated that microwave assisted leaching is more efficient in terms of overall uranium dissolution, kinetics and provide relatively less impurities (Si, Al, Mg and Fe) in the leach liquor compared to conventional conductive leaching. The kinetics of leaching followed shrinking core model with product layer diffusion as controlling mechanism. PMID:27045621

  12. Influence of microwaves on the leaching kinetics of uraninite from a low grade ore in dilute sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Madakkaruppan, V; Pius, Anitha; T, Sreenivas; Giri, Nitai; Sarbajna, Chanchal

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a study on microwave assisted leaching of uranium from a low-grade ore of Indian origin. The host rock for uranium mineralization is chlorite-biotite-muscovite-quartzo-feldspathic schist. The dominant presence of siliceous minerals determined leaching of uranium values in sulfuric acid medium under oxidizing conditions. Process parametric studies like the effect of sulfuric acid concentration (0.12-0.50M), redox potential (400-500mV), particle size (600-300μm) and temperature (35°-95°C) indicated that microwave assisted leaching is more efficient in terms of overall uranium dissolution, kinetics and provide relatively less impurities (Si, Al, Mg and Fe) in the leach liquor compared to conventional conductive leaching. The kinetics of leaching followed shrinking core model with product layer diffusion as controlling mechanism.

  13. A Novel RSSI Prediction Using Imperialist Competition Algorithm (ICA), Radial Basis Function (RBF) and Firefly Algorithm (FFA) in Wireless Networks.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Shidrokh; Haslina Hassan, Wan; Abdalla Hashim, Aisha-Hassan; Soleymani, Seyed Ahmad; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Zakaria, Omar M

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to design a vertical handover prediction method to minimize unnecessary handovers for a mobile node (MN) during the vertical handover process. This relies on a novel method for the prediction of a received signal strength indicator (RSSI) referred to as IRBF-FFA, which is designed by utilizing the imperialist competition algorithm (ICA) to train the radial basis function (RBF), and by hybridizing with the firefly algorithm (FFA) to predict the optimal solution. The prediction accuracy of the proposed IRBF-FFA model was validated by comparing it to support vector machines (SVMs) and multilayer perceptron (MLP) models. In order to assess the model's performance, we measured the coefficient of determination (R2), correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The achieved results indicate that the IRBF-FFA model provides more precise predictions compared to different ANNs, namely, support vector machines (SVMs) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). The performance of the proposed model is analyzed through simulated and real-time RSSI measurements. The results also suggest that the IRBF-FFA model can be applied as an efficient technique for the accurate prediction of vertical handover. PMID:27438600

  14. A Novel RSSI Prediction Using Imperialist Competition Algorithm (ICA), Radial Basis Function (RBF) and Firefly Algorithm (FFA) in Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Shidrokh; Haslina Hassan, Wan; Abdalla Hashim, Aisha-Hassan; Soleymani, Seyed Ahmad; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Zakaria, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to design a vertical handover prediction method to minimize unnecessary handovers for a mobile node (MN) during the vertical handover process. This relies on a novel method for the prediction of a received signal strength indicator (RSSI) referred to as IRBF-FFA, which is designed by utilizing the imperialist competition algorithm (ICA) to train the radial basis function (RBF), and by hybridizing with the firefly algorithm (FFA) to predict the optimal solution. The prediction accuracy of the proposed IRBF–FFA model was validated by comparing it to support vector machines (SVMs) and multilayer perceptron (MLP) models. In order to assess the model’s performance, we measured the coefficient of determination (R2), correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The achieved results indicate that the IRBF–FFA model provides more precise predictions compared to different ANNs, namely, support vector machines (SVMs) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). The performance of the proposed model is analyzed through simulated and real-time RSSI measurements. The results also suggest that the IRBF–FFA model can be applied as an efficient technique for the accurate prediction of vertical handover. PMID:27438600

  15. TCF2 attenuates FFA-induced damage in islet β-cells by regulating production of insulin and ROS.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yingna; Liang, Chunlian

    2014-07-30

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are cytotoxic to pancreatic islet β-cells and play a crucial role in the diabetes disease process. A recent study revealed a down-regulation of transcription factor 2 (TCF2) levels during FFA-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells. However, its function during this process and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, treatment with palmitic acid (PA) at high levels (400 and 800 μM) decreased β-cell viability and TCF2 protein expression, along with the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Western and RT-PCR analysis confirmed the positive regulatory effect of TCF2 on GSIS through promotion of the key regulators pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) in β-cells. In addition, both PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK showed decreased expression in PA (800 μM)-treated β-cells. Overexpression of TCF2 could effectively restore the inhibitory effect of PA on the activation of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK as well as β-cell viability, simultaneously, inhibited PA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. After blocking the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK signals with their specific inhibitor, the effect of overexpressed TCF2 on β-cell viability and ROS production was obviously attenuated. Furthermore, a protective effect of TCF2 on GSIS by positive modulation of JNK-PDX1/GLUT2 signaling was also confirmed. Accordingly, our study has confirmed that TCF2 positively modulates insulin secretion and further inhibits ROS generation via the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Our work may provide a new therapeutic target to achieve prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  16. Kinetics of cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid via acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Bell-Parikh, L C; Guengerich, F P

    1999-08-20

    The P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde is characterized by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that increases K(m) with no effect on k(cat), and rate-limiting product release has been proposed to account for the lack of an isotope effect on k(cat) (Bell, L. C., and Guengerich, F. P. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29643-29651). Acetaldehyde is also a substrate for P450 2E1 oxidation to acetic acid, and k(cat)/K(m) for this reaction is at least 1 order of magnitude greater than that for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde. Acetic acid accounts for 90% of the products generated from ethanol in a 10-min reaction, and the contribution of this second oxidation has been overlooked in many previous studies. The noncompetitive intermolecular kinetic hydrogen isotope effects on acetaldehyde oxidation to acetic acid ((H)(k(cat)/K(m))/(D)(k(cat)/K(m)) = 4.5, and (D)k(cat) = 1.5) are comparable with the isotope effects typically observed for ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, and k(cat) is similar for both reactions, suggesting a possible common catalytic mechanism. Rapid quench kinetic experiments indicate that acetic acid is formed rapidly from added acetaldehyde (approximately 450 min(-1)) with burst kinetics. Pulse-chase experiments reveal that, at a subsaturating concentration of ethanol, approximately 90% of the acetaldehyde intermediate is directly converted to acetic acid without dissociation from the enzyme active site. Competition experiments suggest that P450 2E1 binds acetic acid and acetaldehyde with relatively high K(d) values, which preclude simple tight binding as an explanation for rate-limiting product release. The existence of a rate-determining step between product formation and release is postulated. Also proposed is a conformational change in P450 2E1 occurring during the course of oxidation and the discrimination of P450 2E1 between acetaldehyde and its hydrated form, the gem-diol. This multistep P450 reaction is characterized by kinetic

  17. Kinetic resolution of racemic mandelic acid esters by N,N'-dioxide-scandium-complex-catalyzed enantiomer-selective acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuheng; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Wangbin; Huang, Tianyu; Liao, Yuting; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2014-11-24

    A simple and efficient acylative kinetic resolution of racemic mandelic acid esters was accomplished with a chiral N,N'-dioxide-scandium(III) complex under mild and base-free reaction conditions. A variety of mandelic acid esters performed well in the reaction, obtaining both acylated products (up to 49% yield, 97% ee) and recovered substrates (up to 49% yield, 95% ee) in high enantioselectivities with perfect selectivity factors (up to 247). The enantioselective recognition and catalytic models were also proposed for the catalytic KR reaction.

  18. The Kinetic Aspects of the Interaction of Nitrite Ions with Sulfanilic Acid and 1-Naphthylamine in Aqueous and Micellar Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneeva, O. I.; Chernova, R. K.; Doronin, S. Yu.

    2008-04-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of nitrite ions with sulfanilic acid and 1-naphthylamine in aqueous and micellar (sodium dodecyl sulfate) media was studied step-by-step. The diazotization of sulfanilic acid with the nitrite ion was found to occur virtually instantaneously. Anionic surfactant micelles did not influence the rate of this reaction. The calculated effective rate constants and activation energies of the azo coupling reaction between synthesized sulfophenyldiazonium and 1-naphthylamine showed that the passage from water into the micellar medium decelerated the reaction. It was found that sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles played the role of a reagent separator.

  19. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of Lithospermic Acid under Low Oxygen Condition Using Quantitative 1H NMR with HPLC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianyang; Gong, Xingchu; Qu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    A novel quantitative 1H NMR (Q-NMR) combined with HPLC-MS method has been proposed for investigating the degradation process of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) components. Through this method, in-situ monitoring of dynamics degradation process of lithospermic acid (LA), one of the popular polyphenolic acids in TCM, was realized under low oxygen condition. Additionally, this methodology was proved to be simple, rapid and specific. Degradation kinetic runs have been carried out to systematically investigate the effects of two key environmental factors, initial pH values and temperatures. Eight main degradation products of LA were detected, seven of which were tentatively structural elucidated with the help of both NMR and LC-MS in this work and salvianolic acid A (Sal A) was the primary degradation product of LA. A possible degradation pathway of LA was proposed, subsequently. The results showed that the degradation of LA followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent degradation kinetic constants increased as the initial pH value of the phosphate buffer increased. Under the given conditions, the rate constants of overall degradation as a function of temperature obeyed the Arrhenius equation. Our results proved that the Q-NMR combined with HPLC-MS method can be one of the most promising techniques for investigating degradation process of active components in TCM. PMID:27776128

  20. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  1. Laboratory study on OH-initiated degradation kinetics of dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chengyue; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; Ma, Qingxin; He, Hong

    2015-04-28

    Dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a specific organic tracer for the pyrolysis of conifer resin. To understand its atmospheric stability, the degradation behavior of particulate DHAA in the presence of hydroxyl radicals (OH) was investigated under different environmental conditions using a stainless steel reactor with volume of 30 cm(3), in the dark. At 25 °C and 40% relative humidity (RH), the second-order rate constant (k2) of pure DHAA with OH was measured to be 5.72 ± 0.87 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The influence of temperature, RH and mixing state on the degradation kinetics of DHAA were also investigated. At 40% RH, k2 of pure DHAA increases with increasing temperature and follows the Arrhenius equation k2 = (8.9 ± 1.9) × 10(-10) exp[-(1508.2 ± 64.2)/T], while RH does not have significant impact on k2 at 25 °C. At 25 °C and 40% RH, compared with pure DHAA, the corresponding k2 for DHAA mixed with (NH4)2SO4 decreased to 4.58 ± 0.95 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), while the value was 3.30 ± 0.79 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) when mixed with soot. The atmospheric lifetime of DHAA varied from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 4.4 ± 0.8 days under different environmental conditions. This study indicates that degradation of DHAA by OH radicals is appreciable, and a significant error in source apportionment should be introduced if the contribution of degradation to DHAA concentration is not considered during air mass aging. PMID:25824374

  2. Acetate and other Volatile Fatty Acids - Key Intermediates in marine sediment metabolism - Thermodynamic and kinetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glombitza, C.; Jaussi, M.; Røy, H.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) play important roles as key intermediates in the anaerobic metabolism of subsurface microbial communities. Usually they are present in marine sediment pore water in low concentrations as a result of balanced production and consumption, both occurring in the same sediment zone. Thus their low concentrations represent a steady state condition regulated by either thermodynamics or kinetics. We have developed a novel analytical approach for the parallel measurement of several VFAs directly from marine pore water without any sample pretreatment by the use of a 2-dimensional ion chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. In a first study we analyzed acetate, formate, and propionate in pore water from sediment cores retrieved from 5 different stations within and offshore of the Godhåbsfjord (Greenland). The sediment cores represent different sedimentological conditions, ranging from a typical marine sedimentation site to a glacier/freshwater dominated site. In addition to VFA concentrations, we measured sulfate concentrations, sulfate reduction rates, and cell abundances. We calculated the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) available for sulfate reduction (SR), as well as the VFA turnover times by the in-situ SR rates. The turnover time for acetate by SR ranged from several hours to days in the top cm of sediment and increased to several hundred years at the bottom of the SR zone. From the associated cell abundances we calculated that the VFA turnover times were significantly longer than the diffusion times of the VFA between individual cells. This shows that VFA consumption in the SR zone, and concomitantly the observed pore water concentrations, are not constrained by diffusion. DG values for SR using acetate were >36 kJ/mol which is significantly above the lower limit for anaerobic microbial energy metabolism. It thus remains unclear what controls the VFA concentrations in the sediment.

  3. Quantitative study of solid-state acid-base reactions between polymorphs of flufenamic acid and magnesium oxide using X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Stowell, Joseph G; Morris, Kenneth R; Byrn, Stephen R

    2010-03-11

    The purpose of this study is to investigate solid-state acid-base reactions between polymorphs of flufenamic acid (FFA) and magnesium oxide (MgO) using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Polymorphs of FFA were blended with MgO and stored under conditions of 96.5% RH and 89% RH at 40 degrees C. The disappearance of FFA and production of magnesium flufenamate were monitored by XRPD. It was observed that the reactions between FFA and MgO proceeded following the Jander equation. Form I of FFA is more reactive with MgO than Form III. Differential accessibility of reactive groups is hypothesized as one of the reasons that Form I is more reactive than Form III. It was noted that the reaction between FFA and MgO could be mitigated by adding another acidic excipient such as polyacrylic acid to prevent the acid-base reaction with FFA. The effectiveness of polyacrylic acid was impacted by the mixing order of the tertiary mixture. Mixing polyacrylic acid and MgO first provided the most significant protection. In conclusion, solid-state acid-base reactions could be investigated using XRPD. Different forms may have distinct reactivity. Acid-base reactions in the solid state could be mitigated through the addition of another "shielding" excipient.

  4. Callus Growth Kinetics of Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) and Content of Fatty Acids from Crude Oil Obtained In Vitro.

    PubMed

    da Luz Costa, Jefferson; da Silva, André Luís Lopes; Bier, Mário César Jucoski; Brondani, Gilvano Ebling; Gollo, André Luiz; Letti, Luiz Alberto Junior; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The callus growth kinetics allows identifying the appropriate moment for callus pealing and monitoring the accumulation of primary and secondary metabolites. The physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a plant species used for biofuel production due to its high oil content; however, this plant presents a great amount of bioactive compounds which can be useful for industry. The aim of this research was to establish a calli growth curve and to evaluate the fatty acid profile of crude oil extracted from callus. The callus growth kinetics presented a sigmoid standard curve with six distinct phases: lag, exponential, linear, deceleration, stationary, and decline. Total soluble sugars were higher at the inoculation day. Reducing sugars were higher at the inoculation day and at the 80th day. The highest percentage of ethereal extract (oil content) was obtained at the 120th day of culture, reaching 18 % of crude oil from the callus. The calli produced medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids (from 10 to 18 carbon atoms). The palmitic acid was the fatty acid with the highest proportion in oil (55.4 %). The lipid profile obtained in callus oil was different from the seed oil profile. PMID:25917545

  5. Effect of Humic Acid on As Redox Transformation and Kinetic Adsorption onto Iron Oxide Based Adsorbent (IBA)

    PubMed Central

    Fakour, Hoda; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of arsenic (As) during the adsorption process, the present study elucidated natural organic matter (NOM) effects on As adsorption-desorption kinetics and speciation transformation. The experimental procedures were conducted by examining interactions of arsenate and arsenite with different concentrations of humic acid (HA) as a model representative of NOM, in the presence of iron oxide based adsorbent (IBA), as a model solid surface in three environmentally relevant conditions, including the simultaneous adsorption of both As and HA onto IBA, HA adsorption onto As-presorbed IBA, and As adsorption onto HA-presorbed IBA. Experimental adsorption-desorption data were all fitted by original and modified Lagergren pseudo-first and -second order adsorption kinetic models, respectively. Weber’s intraparticle diffusion was also used to gain insight into the mechanisms and rate controlling steps, which the results suggested that intraparticle diffusion of As species onto IBA is the main rate-controlling step. Different concentrations of HA mediated the redox transformation of As species, with a higher oxidation ability than reduction. The overall results indicated the significant effect of organic matter on the adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of As species, and consequently, the fate, transport and mobility of As in different environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:25325357

  6. Nutritional value of protein hydrolysis products (oligopeptides and free amino acids) as a consequence of absorption and metabolism kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerat, A.

    1995-01-01

    When pigs were submitted to duodenal infusion of solutions containing a large percentage of small peptides (PEP) or free amino acids with the same pattern (AAL) amino acids appear in the portal blood more rapidly and more uniformly after infusion of PEP then after infusion of AAL, with the notable exception of methionine for which the opposite was true. These differences were lowered when a carbohydrate (maltose dextrin) was present in the solution, but nevertheless remained significant for the first hour after the infusion. The long-term (8-hour) uptake of free amino acids into the liver and the peripheral tissues differed in profile according to the nature of the duodenal infusion. Peripheral uptake was appreciably less well balanced after infusion of free amino acids (deficiency of threonine and phenylalanine) than after infusion of small peptides (deficiency of methionine). Accordingly, in the rat, under conditions of discontinuous enteral nutrition the mixture of small peptides was of greater nutritive value than the mixture of free amino acids. It thus appears that the absorption kinetics which results in important variations in the temporal distribution of free amino acids in the tissues may be at the origin of transitory imbalances in tissue amino acid uptake, and as a result of a lower nutritive value.

  7. The Internal Anticipation of Sensory Action Effects: When Action Induces FFA and PPA Activity.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Seurinck, Ruth; Fias, Wim; Waszak, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary action - in particular the ability to produce desired effects in the environment - is fundamental to human existence. According to ideomotor theory we can achieve goals in the environment by means of anticipating their outcomes. We aimed at providing neurophysiological evidence for the assumption that performing actions calls for the activation of brain areas associated with the sensory effects usually evoked by the actions. We conducted an fMRI study in which right and left button presses lead to the presentation of face and house pictures. We compared a baseline phase with the same phase after participants experienced the association between button presses and pictures. We found an increase in the parahippocampal place area (PPA) for the response that has been associated with house pictures and fusiform face area (FFA) for the response that has been coupled with face pictures. This observation constitutes support for ideomotor theory.

  8. Beyond the FFA: The Role of the Ventral Anterior Temporal Lobes in Face Processing

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jessica A.; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has supported the existence of a specialized face-processing network that is distinct from the visual processing areas used for general object recognition. The majority of this work has been aimed at characterizing the response properties of the fusiform face area (FFA) and the occipital face area (OFA), which together are thought to constitute the core network of brain areas responsible for facial identification. Although accruing evidence has shown that face-selective patches in the ventral anterior temporal lobes (vATLs) are interconnected with the FFA and OFA, and that they play a role in facial identification, the relative contribution of these brain areas to the core face-processing network has remained unarticulated. Here we review recent research critically implicating the vATLs in face perception and memory. We propose that current models of face processing should be revised such that the ventral anterior temporal lobes serve a centralized role in the visual face-processing network. We speculate that a hierarchically organized system of face processing areas extends bilaterally from the inferior occipital gyri to the vATLs, with facial representations becoming increasingly complex and abstracted from low-level perceptual features as they move forward along this network. The anterior temporal face areas may serve as the apex of this hierarchy, instantiating the final stages of face recognition. We further argue that the anterior temporal face areas are ideally suited to serve as an interface between face perception and face memory, linking perceptual representations of individual identity with person-specific semantic knowledge. PMID:24937188

  9. Beyond the FFA: The role of the ventral anterior temporal lobes in face processing.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jessica A; Olson, Ingrid R

    2014-08-01

    Extensive research has supported the existence of a specialized face-processing network that is distinct from the visual processing areas used for general object recognition. The majority of this work has been aimed at characterizing the response properties of the fusiform face area (FFA) and the occipital face area (OFA), which together are thought to constitute the core network of brain areas responsible for facial identification. Although accruing evidence has shown that face-selective patches in the ventral anterior temporal lobes (vATLs) are interconnected with the FFA and OFA, and that they play a role in facial identification, the relative contribution of these brain areas to the core face-processing network has remained unarticulated. Here we review recent research critically implicating the vATLs in face perception and memory. We propose that current models of face processing should be revised such that the ventral anterior temporal lobes serve a centralized role in the visual face-processing network. We speculate that a hierarchically organized system of face processing areas extends bilaterally from the inferior occipital gyri to the vATLs, with facial representations becoming increasingly complex and abstracted from low-level perceptual features as they move forward along this network. The anterior temporal face areas may serve as the apex of this hierarchy, instantiating the final stages of face recognition. We further argue that the anterior temporal face areas are ideally suited to serve as an interface between face perception and face memory, linking perceptual representations of individual identity with person-specific semantic knowledge.

  10. Hydroxyalkylation of phenol to bisphenol F over heteropolyacid catalysts: The effect of catalyst acid strength on isomer distribution and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhang; Liu, Yutang; Liu, Ran; Wang, Longlu; Lu, Yanbing; Xia, Xinnian

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyalkylation of phenol with formaldehyde to bisphenol F over heteropolyacid impregnated on clay was investigated. These catalysts displayed excellent catalytic performance for this reaction, especially that the effects of acid sites on the isomer distribution are obvious. Various solid catalysts were prepared by impregnating heteropolyacid on different kind of clay matrices, and their chemical compositions, textural properties, and acid strength of the heteropolyacid catalysts were characterized by EDX, BET, NH3-TPD, XRD, and FT-IR. Moreover, the effects of acid sites and reaction temperature on the yield and 4,4'-isomer distribution were launched by comparing the data obtained from the two kinds of catalysts. Furthermore, the kinetics of the hydroxyalkylation of phenol to BPF was established.

  11. [Kinetic model of enhanced biological phosphorus removal with mixed acetic and propionic acids as carbon sources. (III): Model application].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yin-Guang

    2013-03-01

    The kinetic model based on SCFAs metabolism was applied for the prediction of phosphorus-and glycogen-accumulating organisms (PAO and GAO) competition with different carbon sources and m(P)/m(COD) ratios. When acetic acid was used as the sole carbon source, the biomass compositions were almost the same as those before cultivation, and neither PAO nor GAO could be out-competed from EBPR. However, increasing propionic acid in the influent helped PAO to be the predominance organism, and EBPR performance kept excellent when the ratio of propionate to mixed acids (acetate + propionate) was higher than 0.33. It also found that the m(P)/m(COD) ratio should be kept at 0.04-0.10 to avoid phosphorus became a limiting factor for PAO growth. This was because at low m(P)/m(COD) ratios, such as 0.01, GAO would take up 95% of the total (PAO + GAO) biomass.

  12. Hydroxyalkylation of phenol to bisphenol F over heteropolyacid catalysts: The effect of catalyst acid strength on isomer distribution and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhang; Liu, Yutang; Liu, Ran; Wang, Longlu; Lu, Yanbing; Xia, Xinnian

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyalkylation of phenol with formaldehyde to bisphenol F over heteropolyacid impregnated on clay was investigated. These catalysts displayed excellent catalytic performance for this reaction, especially that the effects of acid sites on the isomer distribution are obvious. Various solid catalysts were prepared by impregnating heteropolyacid on different kind of clay matrices, and their chemical compositions, textural properties, and acid strength of the heteropolyacid catalysts were characterized by EDX, BET, NH3-TPD, XRD, and FT-IR. Moreover, the effects of acid sites and reaction temperature on the yield and 4,4'-isomer distribution were launched by comparing the data obtained from the two kinds of catalysts. Furthermore, the kinetics of the hydroxyalkylation of phenol to BPF was established. PMID:27451037

  13. Adaptation of in vivo amino acid kinetics facilitates increased amino acid availability for fetal growth in adolescent and adult pregnancies alike.

    PubMed

    Thame, Minerva M; Hsu, Jean W; Gibson, Raquel; Baker, Tameka M; Tang, Grace J; Badaloo, Asha V; Fletcher, Horace M; Jackson, Alan A; Jahoor, Farook

    2014-12-14

    During pregnancy, adult women with a normal BMI synthesise extra amino acids after an overnight fast by increasing body protein breakdown and decreasing amino acid oxidation. It is not known whether adolescent girls can make these adaptations during pregnancy. The present study aimed to measure and compare the protein, glutamine and alanine kinetics of adult women and adolescent girls at early-, mid- and late-pregnancy. Kinetics were measured in the overnight fasted state using intravenous infusions of 13C-leucine, 15N-glutamine and 15N-alanine in ten adults and twenty adolescents aged 14-17 years in the first and second trimesters (phase 1 study) and infusions of 13C-leucine and 15N2-urea in ten adults and eleven adolescents aged 16-17 years in the first and third trimesters (phase 2 study). In phase 1 study, there were no significant differences between the groups with regard to any of the kinetic parameters measured. In both groups, leucine flux increased (P< 0.05), the percentage of leucine flux oxidised decreased (P< 0.05) and non-oxidative leucine disposal to protein synthesis increased (P< 0.05) from the first to the second trimester. In phase2 study, leucine flux was significantly slower (P< 0.05) in the adult group than in the adolescent group during both trimesters, and whole-body leucine flux and non-oxidative leucine disposal increased significantly in the adolescent group (P< 0.05, respectively) and were higher in the adult group from the first to the third trimester. These results suggest that similar to their adult counterparts after an overnight fast, adolescent girls with a normal BMI provide extra amino acids required for net protein deposition during pregnancy by increasing protein breakdown and decreasing amino acid oxidation.

  14. Specific catalysis of asparaginyl deamidation by carboxylic acids: kinetic, thermodynamic, and quantitative structure-property relationship analyses.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Brian D; Tran, Benjamin; Moore, Jamie M R; Sharma, Vikas K; Kosky, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Asparaginyl (Asn) deamidation could lead to altered potency, safety, and/or pharmacokinetics of therapeutic protein drugs. In this study, we investigated the effects of several different carboxylic acids on Asn deamidation rates using an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb1*) and a model hexapeptide (peptide1) with the sequence YGKNGG. Thermodynamic analyses of the kinetics data revealed that higher deamidation rates are associated with predominantly more negative ΔS and, to a lesser extent, more positive ΔH. The observed differences in deamidation rates were attributed to the unique ability of each type of carboxylic acid to stabilize the energetically unfavorable transition-state conformations required for imide formation. Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) analysis using kinetic data demonstrated that molecular descriptors encoding for the geometric spatial distribution of atomic properties on various carboxylic acids are effective determinants for the deamidation reaction. Specifically, the number of O-O and O-H atom pairs on carboxyl and hydroxyl groups with interatomic distances of 4-5 Å on a carboxylic acid buffer appears to determine the rate of deamidation. Collectively, the results from structural and thermodynamic analyses indicate that carboxylic acids presumably form multiple hydrogen bonds and charge-charge interactions with the relevant deamidation site and provide alignment between the reactive atoms on the side chain and backbone. We propose that carboxylic acids catalyze deamidation by stabilizing a specific, energetically unfavorable transition-state conformation of l-asparaginyl intermediate II that readily facilitates bond formation between the γ-carbonyl carbon and the deprotonated backbone nitrogen for cyclic imide formation.

  15. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements.

    PubMed

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    An important area within clinical functional metabolomics is in vivo amino acid metabolism and protein turnover measurements for which accurate amino acid concentrations and stable isotopically labeled amino acid enrichments are mandatory not the least when tissue metabolomics is determined. The present study describes a new sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry method quantifying 20 amino acids and their tracer(s) ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) in human plasma and skeletal muscle specimens. Before analysis amino acids were extracted and purified via deprotonization/ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration curve correlations for amino acids were on average; r(2)=0.998. Interday accuracy for amino acids determined in spiked plasma was on average 97.3% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 2.6%. The ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) enrichment CV's for machine reproducibility in muscle tissue fluid and plasma were 4.4 and 0.8%, and the interday variability was 3.4% and the recovery was 90.5%, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a method for quantitative amino acid profiling that meets the requirements for systemic and tissue human in vivo amino acid and protein turnover kinetics measurements. Moreover, citrulline, ornithine, π-methyl-histidine, τ-methyl-l-histidine, hydroxy-proline and carnitine were analysed but when similar precision and accuray are required an additional stable istopically labeled internal standard for these meatablites should be be added.

  16. Catalytic synthesis of biodiesel from high free fatty acid-containing feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recyclable and reusable heterogeneous diarylammonium catalysts are highly effective in catalyzing the esterification of the free fatty acid (FFA) present in greases to methyl esters to reduce the FFA content from 12-40 wt% to 0.5 – 1 wt%. The resulting ester-glyceride mixture (pretreated grease) co...

  17. Enhancement of L-lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by kinetic optimization and citrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Qian, He; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Efficient L-lactic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by Lactobacillus casei G-02 using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) in fed-batch culture is demonstrated. The kinetic analysis in the SSF signified that the inulinase activity was subjected to product inhibition, while the fermentation activity of G-02 was subjected to substrate inhibition. It was also found that the intracellularly NOX activity was enhanced by the citrate metabolism, which increased the carbon flux of Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway dramatically, and resulted more ATP production. As a result, when the SSF was carried out at 40 degrees after the initial hydrolysis of 1 h with supplemented sodium citrate of 10g/L, L-lactic acid concentration of 141.5 g/L was obtained in 30 h with a volumetric productivity of 4.7 g/L/h. The conversion efficiency and product yield were 93.6% of the theoretical lactic acid yield and 52.4 g lactic acid/100 g Jerusalem artichoke flour, respectively. Such a high concentration of lactic acid with high productivity from Jerusalem artichoke has not been reported previously, and hence G-02 could be a potential candidate for economical production of L-lactic acid from Jerusalem artichoke at a commercial scale.

  18. Aerosol products, mechanisms, and kinetics of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with oleic acid in pure and mixed particles.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Reactions of O3 with pure and mixed oleic acid particles and bulk solutions were investigated using a thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometer. The results provide information on the effect of particle matrix on reaction products, mechanisms, and kinetics. The major aerosol products are alpha-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxides, secondary ozonides, alpha-alkoxyalkyl hydroperoxides, and oxocarboxylic acids formed primarily through reactions of Criegee intermediates with products or with particle matrix compounds. For example, it is estimated that for the reaction of pure oleic acid particles with O3 the aerosol products consist of approximately 68% organic peroxides, 28% 9-oxononanoic acid, and 4% azelaic acid. Although the reaction rate of pure oleic acid particles corresponds to an atmospheric lifetime of minutes, reactions in liquid/solid particle matrices can be orders of magnitude slower. The peroxide products are relatively stable when exposed to matrices typical of atmospheric particles, indicating that the lifetimes of these compounds in the atmosphere may be long enough to allow for long-range transport.

  19. Enhancement of L-lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by kinetic optimization and citrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Qian, He; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Efficient L-lactic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by Lactobacillus casei G-02 using simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) in fed-batch culture is demonstrated. The kinetic analysis in the SSF signified that the inulinase activity was subjected to product inhibition, while the fermentation activity of G-02 was subjected to substrate inhibition. It was also found that the intracellularly NOX activity was enhanced by the citrate metabolism, which increased the carbon flux of Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway dramatically, and resulted more ATP production. As a result, when the SSF was carried out at 40 degrees after the initial hydrolysis of 1 h with supplemented sodium citrate of 10g/L, L-lactic acid concentration of 141.5 g/L was obtained in 30 h with a volumetric productivity of 4.7 g/L/h. The conversion efficiency and product yield were 93.6% of the theoretical lactic acid yield and 52.4 g lactic acid/100 g Jerusalem artichoke flour, respectively. Such a high concentration of lactic acid with high productivity from Jerusalem artichoke has not been reported previously, and hence G-02 could be a potential candidate for economical production of L-lactic acid from Jerusalem artichoke at a commercial scale. PMID:20134240

  20. Kinetics of esterification of acidified oil with different alcohols by a cation ion-exchange resin/polyethersulfone hybrid catalytic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honglei; Ding, Jincheng; Qiu, Yanli; Zhao, Zengdian

    2012-05-01

    Hybrid catalytic membranes consisting of cation ion-exchange resin particles (CERP) and polyethersulfone (PES) were prepared by immersion phase inversion and used as heterogeneous catalysts for the esterification of acidified oil with methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol. The membranes were characterized by ion exchange capacity and swelling degree tests. The membranes were annealed at different temperatures to improve catalytic activity and membranes annealed at 393 K had the highest catalytic activity. Butanol allowed the highest free fatty acids (FFAs) conversion of 95.28% since it has better miscibility than the other alcohols which strengthened mass and heat transfer. Furthermore, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic models of the esterification of acidified oil with the four alcohols were established according to the experimental data. The kinetic models can well predict the FFA conversion. PMID:22424925

  1. Chromium(VI) reduction kinetics by zero-valent iron in moderately hard water with humic acid: iron dissolution and humic acid adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Tsang, Daniel C W; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-03-15

    In zerovalent iron treatment systems, the presence of multiple solution components may impose combined effects that differ from corresponding individual effects. The copresence of humic acid and hardness (Ca2+/Mg2+) was found to influence Cr(VI) reduction by Feo and iron dissolution in a way different from their respective presence in batch kinetics experiments with synthetic groundwater at initial pH 6 and 9.5. Cr(VI) reduction rate constants (k(obs)) were slightly inhibited by humic acid adsorption on iron filings (decreases of 7-9% and 10-12% in the presence of humic acid alone and together with hardness, respectively). The total amount of dissolved Fe steadily increased to 25 mg L(-1) in the presence of humic acid alone because the formation of soluble Fe-humate complexes appeared to suppress iron precipitation. Substantial amounts of soluble and colloidal Fe-humate complexes in groundwater may arouse aesthetic and safety concerns in groundwater use. In contrast, the coexistence of humic acid and Ca2+/Mg2+ significantly promoted aggregation of humic acid and metal hydrolyzed species, as indicated by XPS and TEM analyses, which remained nondissolved (>0.45 microm) in solution. These metal-humate aggregates may impose long-term impacts on PRBs in subsurface settings.

  2. Enzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of racemic N-formyl- and N-carbamoyl-amino acids using immobilized L-N-carbamoylase and N-succinyl-amino acid racemase.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Maldonado, Pablo; Las Heras-Vazquez, Francisco Javier; Clemente-Jimenez, Josefa María; Rodriguez-Vico, Felipe; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Taking advantage of the catalytic promiscuity of L-carbamoylase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT43 (BsLcar) and N-succinyl-amino acid racemase from Geobacillus kaustophilus CECT4264 (GkNSAAR), we have evaluated the production of different optically pure L-α-amino acids starting from different racemic N-formyl- and N-carbamoyl-amino acids using a dynamic kinetic resolution approach. The enzymes were immobilized on two different solid supports, resulting in improved stability of the enzymes in terms of thermostability and storage when compared to the enzymes in solution. The bienzymatic system retained up to 80% conversion efficiency after 20 weeks at 4 °C and up to 90% after 1 week at 45 °C. The immobilization process also resulted in a great enhancement of the activity of BsLcar toward N-formyl-tryptophan, showing for the first time that substrate specificity of L-carbamoylases can be influenced by this approach. The system was effective for the biosynthesis of natural and unnatural L-amino acids (enantiomeric excess (e.e.) >99.5%), such as L-methionine, L-alanine, L-tryptophan, L-homophenylalanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norleucine, with a higher performance toward N-formyl-α-amino acid substrates. Biocatalyst reuse was studied, and after 10 reaction cycles, over 75% activity remained. PMID:24993356

  3. A Mixed Method Study of Positional Leadership of North Dakota 4-H Ambassador and State FFA Officer Alumni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Nels Milan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to determine the positional leadership of North Dakota 4-H and FFA leadership alumni. This study determined the influence of youth development programs on statewide leadership alumni (those who served from 1970 to 2000) and community leadership roles as adults. Former North Dakota 4-H Ambassador Alumni…

  4. Conversion of hemicellulose sugars catalyzed by formic acid: kinetics of the dehydration of D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Dussan, Karla; Girisuta, Buana; Lopes, Marystela; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B

    2015-04-24

    The pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass produces a liquid stream of hemicellulose-based sugars, which can be further converted to high-value chemicals. Formosolv pulping and the Milox process use formic acid as the fractionating agent, which can be used as the catalyst for the valorisation of hemicellulose sugars to platform chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the reaction kinetics of major components in the hemicelluloses fraction of biomass, that is, D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-glucose. The kinetics experiments for each sugar were performed at temperatures between 130 and 170 °C in various formic acid concentrations (10-64 wt %). The implications of these kinetic models on the selectivity of each sugar to the desired products are discussed. The models were used to predict the reaction kinetics of solutions that resemble the liquid stream obtained from the fractionation process of biomass using formic acid. PMID:25821128

  5. Conversion of hemicellulose sugars catalyzed by formic acid: kinetics of the dehydration of D-xylose, L-arabinose, and D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Dussan, Karla; Girisuta, Buana; Lopes, Marystela; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B

    2015-04-24

    The pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass produces a liquid stream of hemicellulose-based sugars, which can be further converted to high-value chemicals. Formosolv pulping and the Milox process use formic acid as the fractionating agent, which can be used as the catalyst for the valorisation of hemicellulose sugars to platform chemicals. The objective of this study was to investigate the reaction kinetics of major components in the hemicelluloses fraction of biomass, that is, D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-glucose. The kinetics experiments for each sugar were performed at temperatures between 130 and 170 °C in various formic acid concentrations (10-64 wt %). The implications of these kinetic models on the selectivity of each sugar to the desired products are discussed. The models were used to predict the reaction kinetics of solutions that resemble the liquid stream obtained from the fractionation process of biomass using formic acid.

  6. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  7. Kinetics and methane gas yields of selected C1 to C5 organic acids in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Chen, Qian; Guo, Jialiang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2015-12-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and other short-chain organic acids such as lactic and pyruvic acids are intermediates in anaerobic organic degradation. In this study, anaerobic degradation of seven organic acids in salt form was investigated, including formate (C1), acetate (C2), propionate (C3), pyruvate (C3), lactate (C3), butyrate (C4), and valerate (C5). Microbial growth kinetics on these organic acids were determined individually at 37 °C through batch anaerobic digestion tests by varying substrate concentrations from 250 to 4000 mg COD/L. The cumulative methane generation volume was determined real-time by respirometry coupled with gas chromatographic analysis while methane yield and related kinetics were calculated. The methane gas yields (fe, mg CH4 COD/mg substrate COD) from anaerobic degradation of formate, acetate, propionate, pyruvate, lactate, butyrate, and valerate were 0.44 ± 0.27, 0.58 ± 0.05, 0.53 ± 0.18, 0.24 ± 0.05, 0.17 ± 0.05, 0.43 ± 0.15, 0.49 ± 0.11, respectively. Anaerobic degradation of formate showed self-substrate inhibition at the concentrations above 3250 mg COD/L. Acetate, propionate, pyruvate, butyrate, lactate, and valerate did not inhibit methane production at the highest concentrations tested (i.e., 4000 mg COD/L). Microbes growing on acetate had the highest overall specific growth rate (0.30 d(-1)) in methane production. For comparison, the specific microbial growth rates on formate, propionate, pyruvate, butyrate, lactate, and valerate for methane production were 0.10, 0.06, 0.08, 0.07, 0.05, 0.15 d(-1), respectively.

  8. Effects of toluene and benzoic acid on the kinetics of ferrous oxidation on Pt and nafion-coated Pt electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.H.; Fedkiw, P.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The electrochemical kinetics of Fe[sup 2+] oxidation to Fe[sup 3+] have been investigated by cyclic and ring disk electrode voltammetry in the absence and presence of the contaminants toluene (7 mM, saturated solution) or benzoic acid (16 mM) in 1M H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] electrolyte on (1) smooth Pt electrodes, (2) Nafion-coated smooth Pt electrodes, and (3) Pt electrodes electrodeposited within a Nafion film coated onto a glassy carbon (GC) substrate. On uncoated Pt, the kinetics are adversely affected by these two organics: both the anodic transfer coefficient and the apparent standard rate constant are decreased. A 3.7 [mu]m Nafion coating, however, effectively buffers the smooth Pt electrode from toluene, but, nevertheless, benzoic acid still affects the reaction rate. In contrast, the transfer coefficient and rate constant for Fe[sup 2+] oxidation on the Pt/Nafion/GC electrode are essentially unaffected by either toluene or benzoic acid. Qualitative features of the voltammograms also indicate that the Nafion film protects the Pt from contamination by these aromatics: two current plateaus are observed using an uncoated Pt electrode in the presence of toluene or benzoic acid with a ratio which increased with rotation rate; with the Nafion coating on a smooth Pt electrode and in the presence of toluene, however, there is only one current plateau; in the presence of benzoic acid, two current plateaus remain, but the ratio is nearer unity and less sensitive to rotation rate. In contrast, only a single plateau current is observed using the Pt/Nafion/GC electrode. The Nafion coating is apparently an effective buffer layer against these two aromatics, but concurrently affects a decrease in the mass-transfer limited current due to the diffusional resistance of the film.

  9. Plasma free fatty acid metabolism during storage of platelet concentrates for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J; DiMinno, G; Alam, I; Silver, M; Murphy, S

    1987-01-01

    New containers allow storage of platelet concentrates (PC) at 22 degrees C for up to 7 days, during which glycolytic and oxidative metabolism is vigorous. Recent evidence suggests that 85 percent of adenosine triphosphate regeneration is based on oxidative metabolism and that substrates other than glucose may be used. Because platelets can oxidize free fatty acids (FFA) as a possible source of energy during storage, the authors studied their availability, distribution, and turnover. Plasma FFA concentration was unchanged after 1 day of PC storage but significantly increased on Days 3, 5, and 7. Platelet-free plasma (PFP) stored under the same conditions as PC demonstrated a progressive increase in FFA, suggesting that some of the FFA accumulating in PC were derived from plasma rather than platelets. Indeed, during PC storage, plasma triglycerides decreased significantly, suggesting that they are a possible source of the increased levels of FFA found on Day 3 and thereafter. Thus, PC have a plasma FFA pool available continuously for oxidation during storage. Studies with radiolabeled palmitate suggested that FFA oxidation by platelets occurs during storage. The current findings show that plasma FFA could be a significant substrate for oxidative metabolism during storage of PC and that the oxidized FFA are replenished at least in part from plasma. These results may allow platelet storage to be improved, particularly in synthetic media. PMID:3629676

  10. Accumulating evidence supports a taste component for free fatty acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Richard D

    2011-09-26

    The requisite criteria for what constitutes a taste primary have not been established. Recent advances in understanding of the mechanisms and functions of taste have prompted suggestions for an expanded list of unique taste sensations, including fat, or more specifically, free fatty acids (FFA). A set of criteria are proposed here and the data related to FFA are reviewed on each point. It is concluded that the data are moderate to strong that there are: A) adaptive advantages to FFA detection in the oral cavity; B) adequate concentrations of FFA to serve as taste stimuli; C) multiple complimentary putative FFA receptors on taste cells; D) signals generated by FFA that are conveyed by gustatory nerves; E) sensations generated by FFA that can be detected and scaled by psychophysical methods in humans when non-gustatory cues are masked; and F) physiological responses to oral fat/FFA exposure. On no point is there strong evidence challenging these observations. The reviewed findings are suggestive, albeit not definitive, that there is a taste component for FFA.

  11. Accumulating Evidence Supports a Taste Component for Free Fatty Acids in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The requisite criteria for what constitutes a taste primary have not been established. Recent advances in understanding of the mechanisms and functions of taste have prompted suggestions for an expanded list of unique taste sensations, including fat, or more specifically, free fatty acids (FFA). A set of criteria are proposed here and the data related to FFA are reviewed on each point. It is concluded that the data are moderate to strong that there are: A) adaptive advantages to FFA detection in the oral cavity; B) adequate concentrations of FFA to serve as taste stimuli; C) multiple complimentary putative FFA receptors on taste cells; D) signals generated by FFA that are conveyed by gustatory nerves; E) sensations generated by FFA that can be detected and scaled by psychophysical methods in humans when non-gustatory cues are masked; and F) physiological responses to oral fat/FFA exposure. On no point is there strong evidence challenging these observations. The reviewed findings are suggestive, albeit not definitive, that there is a taste component for FFA. PMID:21557960

  12. Inter- versus intra-molecular cyclization of tripeptides containing tetrahydrofuran amino acids: a density functional theory study on kinetic control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N V Suresh; Priyakumar, U Deva; Singh, Harjinder; Roy, Saumya; Chakraborty, Tushar Kanti

    2012-07-01

    Density functional B3LYP method was used to investigate the preference of intra- and inter-molecular cyclizations of linear tripeptides containing tetrahydrofuran amino acids. Two distinct model pathways were conceived for the cyclization reaction, and all possible transition states and intermediates were located. Analysis of the energetics indicate intermolecular cyclization being favored by both thermodynamic and kinetic control. Geometric and NBO analyses were performed to explain the trends obtained along both the reaction pathways. Conceptual density functional theory-based reactive indices also show that reaction pathways leading to intermolecular cyclization of the tripeptides are relatively more facile compared to intramolecular cyclization.

  13. Structure and kinetics of formation of interphase layers of synthetic fatty acid aluminum soap at the water/oil interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chalykh, A.E.; Matveev, V.V.; Mityuk, D.Y.; Shal't, S.Y.; Tarasevich, B.N.

    1986-02-01

    The authors investigate the kinetics of formation of interphase layers (IL) at the interface between the phases: a 0.15% solution of aluminum soap of synthetic fatty acids (SFA) (fraction C/sub 17/-C/sub 21/) in n-decane/distilled water. The structure and the morphological properties of IL were investigated by transmission electron spectroscopy. The electron micrographs of the interphase layer of the soap at different stages of its formation show that the formation of a new phase starts with the appearance of small dispersed particles with spherical and fibrillar shapes. The results obtained supplement the authors' concepts about the mechanism of spontaneous microemulsification.

  14. Ferrate promoted oxidative cleavage of sulfonamides: Kinetics and product formation under acidic conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonamide-based antibiotics are often detected in surface waters and secondary wastewater effluents and pose an eminent threat for the development of antibiotic resistance bacteria and genes in aquatic environment. This paper presents the kinetics and stoichiometry of the oxid...

  15. The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

  16. Mechanistic and kinetic study on the reactions of coumaric acids with reactive oxygen species: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Andrés; Bravo, Iván; Barbero, Antonio J; Albaladejo, José

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of reactions between coumaric acids and a series of reactive oxygen species ((•)OX) was studied through the density functional theory (DFT). H atom abstraction from -OH and -COOH groups and addition to the nonaromatic double bond were the most representative reaction pathways chosen for which free energy barriers and rate constants were calculated within the transition state theory (TST) framework. From these calculations, it was estimated that (•)OH > (•)OCH3 > (•)OOH > (•)OOCH3 is the order of reactivity of (•)OX with any coumaric acid. The highest rate constant was estimated for p-coumaric acid + (•)OH reaction, whereas the rest of the (•)OX species are more reactive with o-coumaric acid. On the basis of the calculated rate constants, H abstraction from a -OH group should be the main mechanism for the reactions involving (•)OCH3, (•)OOH, and (•)OOCH3 radicals. Nevertheless, the addition mechanism, which sometimes is not considered in theoretical studies on reactions of phenolic compounds with electrophilic species, could play a relevant role in the global mechanism of coumaric acid + (•)OH reactions.

  17. Chemo-enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 4-methylcyclohexanone via kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids: direct access to enantioenriched lactone.

    PubMed

    Drożdż, Agnieszka; Chrobok, Anna

    2016-01-21

    A new method for the asymmetric chemo-enzymatic Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of prochiral 4-methylcyclohexanone to (R)-4-methylcaprolactone in the presence of (±)-4-methyloctanoic acid, Candida Antarctica lipase B and 30% aq. H2O2 has been developed. A mechanism for the asymmetric induction based on kinetic resolution of racemic carboxylic acids is proposed.

  18. Adsorption Kinetics of Acid Orange 7 on Nano-CeO2-TiO2 in Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaozhen; Zhao, Bin; Gu, Mingjie; Li, Ruixing

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the application of nano-CeO2-TiO2 as a sorbent in wastewater treatment, CeO2-TiO2 powder was prepared by the solvothermal method and then characterized. The adsorption kinetics of the adsorption of acid orange 7 (AO7) on CeO2-TiO2 were investigated under various conditions, such as initial concentration, temperature, and pH of the AO7 solution. Kinetic analyses were conducted with both Lagergren pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models. The results showed that the CeO2-TiO2 powder was composed of cubic CeO2 and anatase TiO2 with a specific surface area of 140.42 m2 x g(-1). The adsorption capacity of AO7 on CeO2-TiO2 increased with increasing starting concentration of AO7, but decreased with increasing temperature. The most favorable pH range of the A07 solution was 3-8 for the adsorption of AO7 on CeO2-TiO2. The results revealed that the adsorption kinetics of AO7 on CeO2-TiO2 matched the pseudo-second order model very well. The results indicate that CeO2-TiO2 has a potential application in the removal of AO7 from wastewater.

  19. Kinetics of the esterification of active pharmaceutical ingredients containing carboxylic acid functionality in polyethylene glycol: formulation implications.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Moesgaard, Birthe; Østergaard, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are attractive as excipients in the manufacture of drug products because they are water soluble and poorly immunogenic. They are used in various pharmaceutical preparations. However, because of their terminal hydroxyl groups, PEGs can participate in esterification reactions. In this study, kinetics of two active pharmaceutical ingredients, cetirizine and indomethacin possessing carboxylic acid functionality, has been studied in PEG 400 and PEG 1000 at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C, and 80 °C. HPLC-UV was applied for the determination of concentrations in the kinetic studies, whereas HPLC-MS was used to identify reaction products. The esterification reactions were observed to be reversible. A second-order reversible kinetic model was applied and rate constants were determined. The rate constants demonstrated that cetirizine was esterified about 240 times faster than indomethacin at 80 °C. The shelf-life for cetirizine in a PEG 400 formulation at 25 °C expressed as t(95%) was predicted to be only 30 h. Further, rate constants for esterification of cetirizine in PEG 1000 in relation to PEG 400 decreased by a factor of 10, probably related to increased viscosity. However, it is important to be aware of this drug-excipient interaction, as it can reduce the shelf-life of a low-average molecular weight PEG formulation considerably.

  20. Evaporation kinetics of aqueous acetic acid droplets: effects of soluble organic aerosol components on the mechanism of water evaporation.

    PubMed

    Duffey, Kaitlin C; Shih, Orion; Wong, Nolan L; Drisdell, Walter S; Saykally, Richard J; Cohen, Ronald C

    2013-07-28

    The presence of organic surfactants in atmospheric aerosol may lead to a depression of cloud droplet growth and evaporation rates affecting the radiative properties and lifetime of clouds. Both the magnitude and mechanism of this effect, however, remain poorly constrained. We have used Raman thermometry measurements of freely evaporating micro-droplets to determine evaporation coefficients for several concentrations of acetic acid, which is ubiquitous in atmospheric aerosol and has been shown to adsorb strongly to the air-water interface. We find no suppression of the evaporation kinetics over the concentration range studied (1-5 M). The evaporation coefficient determined for 2 M acetic acid is 0.53 ± 0.12, indistinguishable from that of pure water (0.62 ± 0.09).

  1. Enantiodivergent Atroposelective Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation: Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keiji; Itakura, Tsubasa; Akiyama, Takahiko

    2016-09-12

    Reported herein is an enantiodivergent synthesis of chiral biaryls by a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction. Upon treatment of biaryl lactols with aromatic amines and a Hantzsch ester in the presence of chiral phosphoric acid, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving a reductive amination reaction proceeded smoothly to furnish both R and S isomers of chiral biaryls with excellent enantioselectivities by proper choice of hydroxyaniline derivative. This trend was observed in wide variety of substrates, and various chiral biphenyl and phenyl naphthyl adducts were synthesized with satisfactory enantioselectivities in enantiodivergent fashion. The enantiodivergent synthesis of synthetically challenging, chiral o-tetrasubstituted biaryls were also accomplished, and suggests high synthetic potential of the present method. PMID:27491630

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed decomposition of omega-diazoacetophenones and their o-carbomethyoxy derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of the acid-catalyzed decomposition of omega-diazoacetophenones and their o-carbomethoxy derivatives have been studied and their rate constants and activation energies measured in dioxane-H/sub 2/O (D/sub 2/O) and aqueous (D/sub 2/O)-dioxane mixtures (40:60 by volume) in the presence of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (D/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), as well as in acetic and deuteroacetic acids, in the temperature range 290-328 K. Based on the results of k/sub H//k/sub D/ and ..delta..S not identical to measurements, assumptions have been made concerning the mechanism of the catalytic decomposition of the indicated diazoketones.

  3. Bioremoval of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 by Pseudomonas putida and its adsorption isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arunarani, A; Chandran, Preethy; Ranganathan, B V; Vasanthi, N S; Sudheer Khan, S

    2013-02-01

    Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 are the most important group of synthetic colourants extensively used in textile industries for dyeing cotton, wool, silk and nylon. Release of these dye pollutants in to the environment adversely affects the human health and aquatic organisms. The present study we used Pseudomonas putida MTCC 4910 for the adsorptive removal of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 from the aqueous solutions. The pH (4-9) and NaCl concentrations (1mM-1M) did not influence the adsorption process. The equilibrium adsorption process fitted well to Freundlich model than Langmuir model. The kinetics of adsorption fitted well by pseudo-second-order. Thus in the present study an attempt has been made to exploit the dye removal capability of P. putida MTCC 4910, and it was found to be an efficient microbe that could be used for bio removal of dyes from textile effluents.

  4. The influence of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and coumarin on flavonoid production by fungus Phellinus sp.: modeling of production kinetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Li, Le; Peterson, Eric Charles; Ruan, Tingting; Duan, Xiaoyi

    2015-11-01

    For the purpose of improving the fungal production of flavonoids, the influence of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and coumarin on flavonoid production by fungus Phellinus sp. P0988 was investigated by developing the corresponding kinetics of flavonoid production in a 7-L bioreactor. Phellinus sp. was confirmed to form flavonoids in pellets and broth when cultivated in basic medium, and the optimum concentration of NAA and coumarin in medium for flavonoid production were determined to be 0.03 and 0.02 g/L, respectively. The developed unstructured mathematical models were in good agreement with the experimental results with respect to flavonoid production kinetic profiles with NAA and coumarin supplementation at optimum levels and revealed significant accuracy in terms of statistical consistency and robustness. Analysis of these kinetic processes indicated that NAA and coumarin supplementations imposed a stronger positive influence on flavonoid production and substrate consumption compared to their effects on cell growth. The separate addition of NAA and coumarin resulted in enhancements in final product accumulation and productivity, achieving final flavonoid concentrations of 3.60 and 2.75 g/L, respectively, and glucose consumption showed a significant decrease compared to the non-supplemented control as well. Also, the separate presence of NAA and coumarin respectively decreased maintenance coefficients (M s) from 2.48 in the control to 1.39 and 0.22, representing decreases of 43.9 and 91.1 %, respectively. The current study is the first known application of mathematical kinetic models to explore the influence of medium components adding on flavonoid production by fungi.

  5. Kinetic modeling of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) degradation in soil slurry by anodic fenton treatment.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjun; Lemley, Ann T

    2006-05-31

    Anodic Fenton treatment (AFT) has been shown to be a promising technology in pesticide wastewater treatment. However, no research has been conducted on the AFT application to contaminated soils. In this study, the 2,4-D degradation kinetics of AFT in a silt loam soil slurry were investigated for the first time, and the effects of various experimental conditions including initial 2,4-D concentration, Fenton reagent delivery rate, amount of humic acid (HA) addition, and pH were examined. The 2,4-D degradation in soil slurry by AFT was found to follow a two-stage kinetic model. During the early stage of AFT (the first 4-5 min), the 2,4-D concentration profile followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. In the later stage (typically after 5 or 6 min), the AFT kinetic model provided a better fit. This result is most likely due to the existence of (*)OH scavengers and 2,4-D sorption on soil. The Fe(2+) delivery rate was shown to be a more significant factor in degradation rate than the H(2)O(2) delivery rate when the Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2) ratios were in the range of 1:2 to 1:10. The presence of HA in soil lowered the AFT rate, most probably due to the competition with 2,4-D for consumption of (*)OH and increased sorption of 2,4-D on soil. The optimal pH for 2,4-D degradation in soil slurry by AFT was observed to be in the range of pH 2-3.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanisms of the Acid-base Reaction Between NH3 and HCOOH in Interstellar Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Jennifer B.; Öberg, Karin I.; Rajappan, Mahesh; Fayolle, Edith C.

    2016-10-01

    Interstellar complex organic molecules are commonly observed during star formation, and are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Reactions between ions and neutral molecules in ices may provide an alternative cold channel to complexity, as ion-neutral reactions are thought to have low or even no-energy barriers. Here we present a study of the kinetics and mechanisms of a potential ion-generating, acid-base reaction between NH3 and HCOOH to form the salt NH{}4+HCOO-. We observe salt growth at temperatures as low as 15 K, indicating that this reaction is feasible in cold environments. The kinetics of salt growth are best fit by a two-step model involving a slow “pre-reaction” step followed by a fast reaction step. The reaction energy barrier is determined to be 70 ± 30 K with a pre-exponential factor 1.4 ± 0.4 × 10-3 s-1. The pre-reaction rate varies under different experimental conditions and likely represents a combination of diffusion and orientation of reactant molecules. For a diffusion-limited case, the pre-reaction barrier is 770 ± 110 K with a pre-exponential factor of ˜7.6 × 10-3 s-1. Acid-base chemistry of common ice constituents is thus a potential cold pathway to generating ions in interstellar ices.

  7. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26796668

  8. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  9. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  10. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  11. Insights into Kinetics of Agitation-Induced Aggregation of Hen Lysozyme under Heat and Acidic Conditions from Various Spectroscopic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Ali; Fahy, Christine; Chevillot-Biraud, Alexandre; Rholam, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and amyloid formation are an underlying pathological hallmark in a number of prevalent diseases of protein aggregation ranging from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases to systemic lysozyme amyloidosis. In this context, we have used complementary spectroscopic methods to undertake a systematic study of the self-assembly of hen egg-white lysozyme under agitation during a prolonged heating in acidic pH. The kinetics of lysozyme aggregation, monitored by Thioflavin T fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide, is described by a sigmoid curve typical of a nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Nevertheless, we observe significant differences between the values deduced for the kinetic parameters (lag time and aggregation rate). The fibrillation process of lysozyme, as assessed by the attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is accompanied by an increase in the β-sheet conformation at the expense of the α-helical conformation but the time-dependent variation of the content of these secondary structures does not evolve as a gradual transition. Moreover, the tryptophan fluorescence-monitored kinetics of lysozyme aggregation is described by three phases in which the temporal decrease of the tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield is of quasilinear nature. Finally, the generated lysozyme fibrils exhibit a typical amyloid morphology with various lengths (observed by atomic force microscopy) and contain exclusively the full-length protein (analyzed by highly performance liquid chromatography). Compared to the data obtained by other groups for the formation of lysozyme fibrils in acidic pH without agitation, this work provides new insights into the structural changes (local, secondary, oligomeric/fibrillar structures) undergone by the lysozyme during the agitation-induced formation of fibrils. PMID:26571264

  12. In-vitro bacterial killing kinetics of ticarcillin/clavulanic acid.

    PubMed

    Gould, I M; Dent, J; Wise, R

    1987-03-01

    An in-vitro model was developed to study the rates of killing by ticarcillin/clavulanic acid combinations of various beta-lactamase producing, ticarcillin resistant, logarithmic phase clinical isolates. Killing, defined as a 3 log reduction, was dependent on the organism, the concentration of clavulanic acid and the duration of exposure. For most isolates studied an optimum period of exposure to and concentration of clavulanic acid could be defined. Certain test strains showed optimum response to readily attainable in-vivo concentrations of clavulanic acid while other strains, although sensitive by MIC data showed a poor response. The clinical implications of this are discussed.

  13. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with [14C]taurocholate.

    PubMed

    Jazrawi, R P; Ferraris, R; Bridges, C; Northfield, T C

    1988-07-01

    The "apparent" fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ([14C]CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function.

  14. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with (/sup 14/C)taurocholate

    SciTech Connect

    Jazrawi, R.P.; Ferraris, R.; Bridges, C.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-07-01

    The apparent fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75-SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ((14C)CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75-SeHCAT than for (14C)CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75-SeHCAT than for (14C)CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function.

  15. Oxidation of psychotropic drugs by Chloramine-T in acid medium: a kinetic study using spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, R. J. D.; Ananda, S.; Venkatesha, B. M.; Made Gowda, N. M.

    2002-03-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of psychotropic drugs, chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPH) and fluphenazine dihydrochloride (FPH), by Chloramine-T (CAT) in pH 1.6 buffer medium has been studied spectrophotometrically at λmax=570 and 530 nm, respectively, at 30°C. The reaction rate shows a fractional-order dependence on [CAT] and first-order dependence on each [substrate]. The reaction rate also shows an inverse fractional-order in [H +]. Additions of halide ions and the reduction product of CAT, p-toluenesulfonamide, and variation of ionic strength and dielectric constant of the medium do not have any significant effect on the reaction rate. The activation parameters for the reaction were evaluated. The proposed general mechanism and the derived rate law are consistent with the observed kinetics.

  16. Improved kinetic model for the activity of industrial sulfuric acid catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Adlkofer, J.; Agar, D.W.; Hiller, K.H.; Kautz, G.; Lebert, U.; Schlimper, H.U.

    1986-01-01

    An industrial SO/sub 2/ oxidation reactor was simulated using an improved kinetic model developed by BASF. This Model is one of the few taking into account all the important physical processes occurring in the system, e.g. the diffusion with the SLPC-structure. As a result of this, it was also possible to use the model to compare the behavior of new and used catalyst in an industrial reactor.

  17. KINETIC ASPECTS OF CATION-ENHANCED AGGREGATION IN AQUEOUS HUMIC ACIDS. (R822832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cation-enhanced formation of hydrophobic domains in aqueous humic acids has been shown to be a slow process, consistent with the evolution and disintegration of humic acid configurations over periods lasting from days to weeks. After the addition of a magnesium salt to a humi...

  18. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of acid Orange 52 dye biosorption by Paulownia tomentosa Steud. leaf powder as a low-cost natural biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih; Saygideger, Saadet D

    2010-07-01

    The biosorption of Acid Orange 52 onto the leaf powder of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied in a batch adsorption system to estimate the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as a function of solution pH, biosorbent concentration, dye concentration, biosorbent size, temperature and contact time. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for modeling the biosorption equilibrium. The experimental equilibrium data could be well interpreted by the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms with maximum adsorption capacity of 10.5 mg g(-1). In order to state the sorption kinetics, the fits of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were investigated. It was obtained that the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second order rate kinetics. Thermodynamic studies indicated that this system was exothermic process. The results revealed that P. tomentosa leaf powder could be an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of wastewater containing Acid Orange 52. PMID:20194017

  19. Different Serum Free Fatty Acid Profiles in NAFLD Subjects and Healthy Controls after Oral Fat Load

    PubMed Central

    Gambino, Roberto; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Rosso, Chiara; Mezzabotta, Lavinia; Pinach, Silvia; Alemanno, Natalina; Saba, Francesca; Cassader, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism can impact on metabolic conditions, such as obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This work studied the increase in total FFA shown in NAFLD subjects to possibly characterize which fatty acids significantly accounted for the whole increase. Methods: 21 patients with NAFLD were selected according to specified criteria. The control group consisted of nine healthy subjects. All subjects underwent an oral standard fat load. Triglycerides; cholesterol; FFA; glucose and insulin were measured every 2 h with the determination of fatty acid composition of FFA. Results: higher serum FFA levels in NAFLD subjects are mainly due to levels of oleic, palmitic and linoleic acids at different times. Significant increases were shown for docosahexaenoic acid, linolenic acid, eicosatrienoic acid, and arachidonic acid, although this was just on one occasion. In the postprandial phase, homeostatic model assessment HOMA index positively correlated with the ω3/ω6 ratio in NAFLD patients. Conclusions: the higher serum levels of FFA in NAFLD subjects are mainly due to levels of oleic and palmitic acids which are the most abundant circulating free fatty acids. This is almost exactly corresponded with significant increases in linoleic acid. An imbalance in the n-3/n-6 fatty acids ratio could modulate postprandial responses with more pronounced effects in insulin-resistant subjects, such as NAFLD patients. PMID:27043543

  20. Synthesis of β- and γ-hydroxy α-amino acids via enzymatic kinetic resolution and cyanate-to-isocyanate rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Szcześniak, Piotr; Październiok-Holewa, Agnieszka; Klimczak, Urszula; Stecko, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    A new strategy for stereoselective preparation of all four isomers of β- and γ-hydroxy α-amino acids is presented. The developed procedure is based on enzymatic kinetic resolution and cyanate-to-isocyanate rearrangement as key steps. Stereocontrol is achieved by proper choice of the starting hydroxyacid, the course of kinetic resolution, and the stereospecific sigmatropic rearrangement step, which proceeds with full chirality transfer.

  1. Kinetic dissolution of carbonates and Mn oxides in acidic water: Measurement of in situ field rates and reactive transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of carbonate and Mn oxide dissolution under acidic conditions were examined through the in situ exposure of pure phase samples to acidic ground water in Pinal Creek Basin, Arizona. The average long-term calculated in situ dissolution rates for calcite and dolomite were 1.65??10-7 and 3.64??10-10 mmol/(cm2 s), respectively, which were about 3 orders of magnitude slower than rates derived in laboratory experiments by other investigators. Application of both in situ and lab-derived calcite and dolomite dissolution rates to equilibrium reactive transport simulations of a column experiment did not improve the fit to measured outflow chemistry: at the spatial and temporal scales of the column experiment, the use of an equilibrium model adequately simulated carbonate dissolution in the column. Pyrolusite (MnO2) exposed to acidic ground water for 595 days increased slightly in weight despite thermodynamic conditions that favored dissolution. This result might be related to a recent finding by another investigator that the reductive dissolution of pyrolusite is accompanied by the precipitation of a mixed Mn-Fe oxide species. In PHREEQC reactive transport simulations, the incorporation of Mn kinetics improved the fit between observed and simulated behavior at the column and field scales, although the column-fitted rate for Mn-oxide dissolution was about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the field-fitted rate. Remaining differences between observed and simulated contaminant transport trends at the Pinal Creek site were likely related to factors other than the Mn oxide dissolution rate, such as the concentration of Fe oxide surface sites available for adsorption, the effects of competition among dissolved species for available surface sites, or reactions not included in the model.

  2. Kinetic analysis of bifidobacterial metabolism reveals a minor role for succinic acid in the regeneration of NAD+ through its growth-associated production.

    PubMed

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Adriany, Tom; Verbrugghe, Kristof; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-08-01

    Several strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium were tested to determine their abilities to produce succinic acid. Bifidobacterium longum strain BB536 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strain Bb 12 were kinetically analyzed in detail using in vitro fermentations to obtain more insight into the metabolism and production of succinic acid by bifidobacteria. Changes in end product formation in strains of Bifidobacterium could be related to the specific rate of sugar consumption. When the specific sugar consumption rate increased, relatively more lactic acid and less acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol were produced, and vice versa. All Bifidobacterium strains tested produced small amounts of succinic acid; the concentrations were not more than a few millimolar. Succinic acid production was found to be associated with growth and stopped when the energy source was depleted. The production of succinic acid contributed to regeneration of a small part of the NAD+, in addition to the regeneration through the production of lactic acid and ethanol.

  3. A radioisotopic technique for analysis of free fatty acid reesterification in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Leibel, R L; Hirsch, J

    1985-01-01

    Reesterification rates of free fatty acids (FFA) formed by intracellular triglyceride hydrolysis in small fragments of human adipose tissue were measured. Subcutaneous gluteal adipose tissue, obtained by needle biopsy, was incubated in a buffered albumin medium containing [3H]palmitate and [14C]glucose, each of high specific activity. In triglycerides (TG) and diglycerides (DG) synthesized by the tissue, [14C]glucose is incorporated exclusively into the glyceride-glycerol moiety, and 3H appears solely in the esterified fatty acids. Since rates of TG and DG synthesis can be determined from 14C accumulation rates in these molecules, the total amounts of FFA esterified can also be calculated. The difference between this estimate of total FFA esterification and the moles of [3H]palmitate esterified to these molecules represents the amount of unlabeled FFA from ongoing TG hydrolysis that was reesterified during the incubation. FFA recycling by the reesterification pathway is an important mechanism for the control of the quantity and proportions of FFA and glycerol leaving the human adipocyte. Fasting and beta-adrenergic stimulation reduce the fraction of endogenously released FFA that are reesterified from resting values of 30-40% to 8-21%, thereby increasing the molar ratio of FFA to glycerol leaving the adipocyte. The technique described can be employed to monitor sequential changes in this important metabolic cycle in humans under a wide range of nutritional and clinical circumstances.

  4. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, June 1991--November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 {mu}M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 {mu}M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K{sub i} for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  5. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. McInerney

    1996-06-24

    The factors that affect the rate and extent of a model aromatic compound, benzoate, in methanogenic environments was studied. Benzoate is degraded to a threshold concentration below which no further substrate degradation occurs. The threshold concentration depended on the substrate concentration and the amount of acetate present. The threshold value was not a function of the kinetic ability of the organism or toxicity of the end products. Rather a minimal Gibb's free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. In addition, new bacterial species were isolated and described, that degrade benzoate or reduce iron, cobalt and other metals.

  6. Kinetics of oxidation of vanadium(IV) by alkyl hydroperoxides in acidic, aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rong; Bakac, A.; Espenson, J.H. )

    1992-05-13

    The title reactions produce VO[sub 2][sup +] and products derived from [beta]-scission of alkoxy radicals, largely acetone, ethane, and methane (tert-butyl hydroperoxide) or ethane, ethylene, and n-butane (tert-amyl hydroperoxide). The minor amounts of methane from the first reaction and the excess amount of ethane from the second suggest a small contribution from the oxidation of VO[sup 2+] by [sm bullet]CH[sub 3] and [sm bullet]C[sub 2]H[sub 5], respectively. The kinetic dependence of the main reaction upon [H[sup +

  7. THE KINETICS OF SAPONIFICATION OF IODOACETIC ACID BY SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND BY CERTAIN ALKALINE BUFFER SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    Brdicka, R

    1936-07-20

    1. The rate of the saponification of iodoacetic acid in sodium hydroxide and alkaline buffer solutions yielding glycollic acid was measured by means of Heyrovský's polarographic method. 2. From the bimolecular velocity constants, increasing with the ionic strength of the solution, the Brönsted factor, F, which characterizes the primary salt effect, was calculated. 3. In the borate buffer solutions the monomolecular constants of the saponification were determined which, at values above the pH of neutralization of boric acid, show a proportionality to the concentration of hydroxyl anions. Below the pH of neutralization of boric acid, they are proportional to the concentration of borate anions.

  8. Kinetic model for methanogenesis of acetic acid in a multireactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadra, A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.N.; Ghose, T.K.

    1984-01-01

    Bioconversion of acetic acid to methane by a crude culture of methanogens in a continuous multireactor system was investigateed. Culture of methanogens was drawn from an active cow-dung digester (12 days) and was grown in a semisynthetic medium (pH 6.3, 37/sup 0/C) with acetic acid as the sole carbon source. The solubilities of CO/sub 2/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ increased with the rise in pH and exercised considerable influence on the gas composition. Various mechanisms for methanogenesis of acetic acid based on the available pathways were considered. Experimental data were compared with these mechansims, the best fit was determined, and the corresponding rate expression was identified. This mechanism predicted that, of the total methane produced, 72% comes from acetic acid directly and 28% via the CO/sub 2/ reduction route.

  9. Study of UltraHigh Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatography to measure free fatty acids with out fatty acid ester preparation.

    PubMed

    Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Isaac, G; Rainville, P; Fountain, K; Taylor, L T

    2015-08-01

    Most lipids are best characterized by their fatty acids which may differ in (a) chain length, (b) degree of unsaturation, (c) configuration and position of the double bonds, and (d) the presence of other functionalities. Thus, a fast, simple, and quantitative analytical technique to determine naturally occurring free fatty acids (FFA) in different samples is very important. Just as for saponified acylglycerols, the determination of FFA's has generally been carried out by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC). The use of an open tubular capillary column coupled with a flame ionization or mass spectrometric detector provides for both high resolution and quantification of FFA's but only after conversion of all free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or pentafluorobenzyl esters. Unfortunately, volatilization of labile ester derivatives of mono- and poly-unsaturated FFA's can cause both thermal degradation and isomerization of the fatty acid during HRGC. The employment of a second generation instrument (here referred to as UltraHigh Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatograph, UHPSFC) with high precision for modified flow and repeated back pressure adjustment in conjunction with sub-2μm various bonded silica particles (coupled with evaporative light scattering, ELSD, and mass spectrometric, MS, detection) for separation and detection of the following mixtures is described: (a) 31 free fatty acids, (b) isomeric FFA's, and (c) lipophilic materials in two real world fish oil samples. Limits of detection for FFA's via UHPSFC/MS and UHPSFC/ELSD versus detection of FAME's via HRGC/MS are quantitatively compared.

  10. Differential effect of impaired renal function on the kinetics of clavulanic acid and amoxicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Horber, F F; Frey, F J; Descoeudres, C; Murray, A T; Reubi, F C

    1986-01-01

    Amoxicillin and clavulanic acid are prescribed as a fixed drug combination. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of various degrees of renal insufficiency (glomerular filtration rate [GFR], less than 5 to greater than 75 ml/min per 1.73 m2) on the pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid following oral (500 and 125 mg of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, respectively) and intravenous (1,000 and 200 mg, respectively) dosing. The volume of distribution and the systemic availability were independent of the renal function, while the total body clearance and the renal and the nonrenal clearance of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid decreased with decreasing renal function. The decrease in the total body clearance was more pronounced for amoxicillin than for clavulanic acid. This explains the increase in the ratio of the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve of amoxicillin to that of clavulanic acid with decreasing glomerular filtration rate after oral dosing; for example for a GFR of 75 ml/min, the ratio of amoxicillin to clavulanic acid was 4.9 +/- 1.2; for a GFR of 35 to 75 ml/min, 5.3 +/- 2.4; for a GFR of 10 to 35 ml/min, 11.9 +/- 5.8; for a GFR of 5 to 10 ml/min, 13.4 +/- 9.1; and for patients on hemodialysis, 14.7 +/- 5.3. Dosage recommendations are suggested which prevent undue accumulations of amoxicillin while maintaining adequate concentrations of clavulanic acid. PMID:3707111

  11. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of aquocobalt(III) complexes with some carboxylic acids in acid perchlorate solution.

    PubMed

    Davies, Geoffrey

    2007-06-21

    The rates of formation and dissociation of monocarboxylic complexes of aquocobalt(III) cations with propionic, malonic, and 2-ethylmalonic acids have been measured with the stopped-flow method over a range of concentrations and temperatures in acid perchlorate media at an ionic strength 3.0 M. Although the rate constants for reactions of CoOHaq2+ with neutral ligands cover only a small range, indicating a dissociative mechanism, the associated activation parameters change cooperatively. These variations are discussed in terms of differences in the structure, proton distribution, and rates of water loss in the ion-pair precursors for the different ligands. Similar activation enthalpies of dissociation indicate a common mode of coordination, and the positive activation entropies for dissociation are consistent with a neutral leaving group.

  12. A Highly Sensitive Kinetic Spectrophotometric Method for the Determination of Ascorbic Acid in Pharmaceutical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Shishehbore, Masoud Reza; Aghamiri, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new reaction system for quantitative determination of ascorbic acid was introduced. The developed method is based on inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid on the Orange G-bromate system. The change in absorbance was followed spectrophotometrically at 478 nm. The dependence of sensitivity on the reaction variables including reagents concentration, temperature and time was investigated. Under optimum experimental conditions, calibration curve was linear over the range 0.7 – 33.5 μg mL-1 of ascorbic acid including two linear segments and the relative standard deviations (n = 6) for 5.0 and 20.0 μg mL–1 of ascorbic acid were 1.08 and 1.02%, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.21 μg mL−1 of ascorbic acid. The effect of diverse species was also investigated. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceutical samples. The results were in a good agreement with those of reference method. PMID:25237333

  13. Kinetics of formation of green rust 2 in the steady acidic sulphated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olowe, A. A.; Genin, J. M. R.

    1990-07-01

    The kinetics of formation of green rust 2, 4Fe(OH)2.2FeOOH.FeSO4.nH2O, called “GR2, was followed by Mössbauer spectroscopy in the controlled aeration of a mixture of 0.4 M FeSO4 and 0.4 M NaOH. Mössbauer spectra run at 78 K of the reaction products taken at different time intervals display an average of seven doublets. The initial products of reaction consists of a badly crystallized ferrous hydroxide, FE(OH)2., called “FH”, which disappears first at about 1/3 of the total time of formation of GR2, and sulphated ferrous hydroxide, 4Fe(OH)2.FeSO4. nH2O, called “SFH”. The kinetics of oxidation of SFH into GR2 can be described by a linear growth reaction and the transformation is considered to be in situ.

  14. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  15. Dopamine modulates the kinetics of ion channels gated by excitatory amino acids in retinal horizontal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, A G; Schmidt, K F; Dowling, J E

    1990-01-01

    Upon exposure to dopamine, cultured teleost retinal horizontal cells become more responsive to the putative photoreceptor neurotransmitter L-glutamate and to its analog kainate. We have recorded unitary and whole-cell currents to determine the mechanism by which dopamine enhances ion channels activated by these agents. In single-channel recordings from cell-attached patches with agonist in the patch pipette, the frequency of 5- to 10-pS unitary events, but not their amplitude, increased by as much as 150% after application of dopamine to the rest of the cell. The duration of channel openings also increased somewhat, by 20-30%. In whole-cell experiments, agonists with and without dopamine were applied to voltage-clamped horizontal cells by slow superfusion. Analysis of whole-cell current variance as a function of mean current indicated that dopamine increased the probability of channel opening for a give agonist concentration without changing the amount of current passed by an individual channel. For kainate, noise analysis additionally demonstrated that dopamine did not alter the number of functional channels. Dopamine also increased a slow spectral component of whole-cell currents elicited by kainate or glutamate, suggesting a change in the open-time kinetics of the channels. This effect was more pronounced for currents induced by glutamate than for those induced by kainate. We conclude that dopamine potentiates the activity of horizontal cell glutamate receptors by altering the kinetics of the ion channel to favor the open state. PMID:1689053

  16. Theoretical Analysis of Kinetic Isotope Effects on Proton Transfer Reactions between Substituted α-Methoxystyrenes and Substituted Acetic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Yiu; Richard, John P.; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on a series of carboxylic acid-catalyzed protonation reactions of aryl-substituted α-methoxystyrenes (X-1) to form oxocarbenium ions have been computed using the Kleinert variational second-order perturbation theory (KP2) in the framework of Feynman path integrals (PI) along with the potential energy surface obtained at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained, demonstrating that this novel computational approach for computing KIEs of organic reactions is a viable alternative to the traditional method employing Bigeleisen equation and harmonic vibrational frequencies. Although tunneling makes relative small contributions to the lowering of the free energy barriers for the carboxylic acid catalyzed protonation reaction, it is necessary to include tunneling contributions to obtain quantitative estimates of the KIEs. Consideration of anharmonicity can further improve the calculated KIEs for the protonation of substituted α-methoxystyrenes by chloroacetic acid, but for the reactions of the parent and 4-NO2 substituted α-methoxystyrene with substituted carboxylic acids, the correction of anharmonicity overestimates the computed KIEs for strong acid catalysts. In agreement with experimental findings, the largest KIEs are found in nearly ergoneutral reactions, ΔGo ≈ 0, where the transition structures are nearly symmetric and the reaction barriers are relatively low. Furthermore, the optimized transition structures are strongly dependent on the free energy for the formation of the carbocation intermediate, i.e., the driving force ΔGo, along with a good correlation of Hammond shift in the transition state structure. PMID:19754046

  17. Comparative electrochemical degradation of salicylic and aminosalicylic acids: Influence of functional groups on decay kinetics and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Florenza, Xavier; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Centellas, Francesc; Brillas, Enric

    2016-07-01

    Solutions of 100 mL with 1.20 mM of salicylic acid (SA), 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA) or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) have been comparatively degraded by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Trials were carried out with a stirred tank reactor with a BDD anode and an air-diffusion cathode for continuous H2O2 production. A marked influence of the functional groups of the drugs was observed in their decay kinetics, increasing in the order SA < 5-ASA < 4-ASA in AO-H2O2 and 5-ASA < SA < 4-ASA in EF and PEF, due to the different attack of OH generated at the BDD surface and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction, respectively. This effect was clearly observed when varying the current density between 16.7 and 100 mA cm(-2). The relative mineralization power of the processes always followed the sequence: AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF. The three drugs underwent analogous mineralization abatement up to 88% by AO-H2O2 at 100 mA cm(-2). The mineralization rate in EF and PEF grew in the order: 4-ASA < 5-ASA < SA. The most powerful process was PEF, attaining >98% mineralization for all the drugs at 100 mA cm(-2). Oxalic and oxamic acids were detected as final short-linear aliphatic carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion HPLC, allowing the fast photolysis of their Fe(III) complexes by UVA light to justify the high power of PEF. PMID:27045634

  18. Theoretical analysis of kinetic isotope effects on proton transfer reactions between substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes and substituted acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Richard, John P; Gao, Jiali

    2009-10-01

    Primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on a series of carboxylic acid-catalyzed protonation reactions of aryl-substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes (X-1) to form oxocarbenium ions have been computed using the second-order Kleinert variational perturbation theory (KP2) in the framework of Feynman path integrals (PI) along with the potential energy surface obtained at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Good agreement with the experimental data was obtained, demonstrating that this novel computational approach for computing KIEs of organic reactions is a viable alternative to the traditional method employing Bigeleisen equation and harmonic vibrational frequencies. Although tunneling makes relatively small contributions to the lowering of the free energy barriers for the carboxylic acid catalyzed protonation reaction, it is necessary to include tunneling contributions to obtain quantitative estimates of the KIEs. Consideration of anharmonicity can further improve the calculated KIEs for the protonation of substituted alpha-methoxystyrenes by chloroacetic acid, but for the reactions of the parent and 4-NO(2) substituted alpha-methoxystyrene with substituted carboxylic acids, the correction of anharmonicity overestimates the computed KIEs for strong acid catalysts. In agreement with experimental findings, the largest KIEs are found in nearly ergoneutral reactions, DeltaG(o) approximately 0, where the transition structures are nearly symmetric and the reaction barriers are relatively low. Furthermore, the optimized transition structures are strongly dependent on the free energy for the formation of the carbocation intermediate, that is, the driving force DeltaG(o), along with a good correlation of Hammond shift in the transition state structure.

  19. The effect of oxygen supply on the dual growth kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under acidic conditions for biogas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-01-27

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%-6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration.

  20. The Effect of Oxygen Supply on the Dual Growth Kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under Acidic Conditions for Biogas Desulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%–6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration. PMID:25633028

  1. A kinetic study of plutonium dioxide dissolution in hydrochloric acid using iron (II) as an electron transfer catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Effective dissolution of plutonium dioxide has traditionally been accomplished by contact with strong nitric acid containing a small amount of fluoride at temperatures of {approximately} 100 C. In spite of these aggressive conditions, PuO{sub 2} dissolution is sometimes incomplete requiring additional contact with the solvent. This work focused on an alternative to conventional dissolution in nitric acid where an electron transfer catalyst, Fe(II), was used in hydrochloric acid. Cyclic voltammetry was employed as an in-situ analytical technique for monitoring the dissolution reaction rate. The plutonium oxide selected for this study was decomposed plutonium oxalate with > 95% of the material having a particle diameter (< 70 {micro}m) as determined by a scanning laser microscopy technique. Attempts to dry sieve the oxide into narrow size fractions prior to dissolution in the HCl-Fe(II) solvent system failed, apparently due to significant interparticle attractive forces. Although sieve splits were obtained, subsequent scanning laser microscopy analysis of the sieve fractions indicated that particle segregation was not accomplished and the individual sieve fractions retained a particle size distribution very similar to the original powder assemblage. This phenomena was confirmed through subsequent dissolution experiments on the various screen fractions which illustrated no difference in kinetic behavior between the original oxide assemblage and the sieve fractions.

  2. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal.

    PubMed

    Badescu, George O; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R; Thompson, Andrew J; Napier, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA.

  3. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal

    PubMed Central

    Badescu, George O.; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Napier, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA. PMID:27023768

  4. Study of photo-oxidative reactivity of sunscreening agents based on photo-oxidation of uric acid by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Moradmand Jalali, Hamed; Bashiri, Hadis; Rasa, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the mechanism of free radical production by light-reflective agents in sunscreens (TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2) was obtained by applying kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The values of the rate constants for each step of the suggested mechanism have been obtained by simulation. The effect of the initial concentration of mineral oxides and uric acid on the rate of uric acid photo-oxidation by irradiation of some sun care agents has been studied. The kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental data for the production of free radicals by sun care agents.

  5. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value. PMID:27295438

  6. Kinetics and microbial ecology of batch sulfidogenic bioreactors for co-treatment of municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongyang; Weidhaas, Jennifer L; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics and microbial ecology in sulfidogenic bioreactors used in a novel two-stage process for co-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) were investigated. Michaelis-Menten modeling of COD oxidation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) (Vmax=0.33mgL(-1)min(-1), Km=4.3mgL(-1)) suggested that the Vmax can be reasonably achieved given the typical COD values in MWW and anticipated mixing with AMD. Non-competitive inhibition modeling (Ki=6.55mgL(-1)) indicated that excessive iron level should be avoided to limit its effects on SRB. The COD oxidation rate was positively correlated to COD/sulfate ratio and SRB population, as evidenced by dsrA gene copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed diverse microbial communities dominated by sulfate reducing delta-proteobacteria. Microbial community and relative quantities of SRB showed significant differences under different COD/sulfate ratios (0.2, 1 and 2), and the highest dsrA gene concentration and most complex microbial diversity were observed under COD/sulfate ratio 2. Major species were associated with Desulfovirga, Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, and Syntrophus sp. The reported COD kinetics, SRB abundances and the phylogenetic profile provide insights into the co-treatment process and help identify the parameters of concerns for such technology development. PMID:26686479

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidative decolorization of Acid-Blue 92 using bimetallic metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-sharkawy, Rehab G.; El-din, Ahmed S. Badr; Etaiw, Safaa El-din H.

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics study of the oxidative decolorization of Acid-Blue 92 has been investigated by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with bimetallic metal-organic frameworks. The used metal-organic frameworks (MOF) are [Ph 3SnCu(CN) 2·L] where L = pyrazine (pyz) 1, methylpyrazine (mepyz) 2, 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) 3, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (tbpe) 4 or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpe) 5. The reaction was followed by conventional UV-Vis spectrophotometer at λmax = 571 nm. The reaction exhibited first-order kinetics with respect to [dye] and [H 2O 2]. The reactivity of the catalysts depends on the type of the medium and thereafter decreases in strong alkaline media. Addition of NaCl enhances the reaction rate. Also, the irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of AB-92 mineralization by about 86.9%. The reaction was entropy-controlled as confirmed by the isokinetic relationship. A reaction mechanism was proposed with the formation of free radicals as an oxidant.

  8. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  9. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. PMID:26657085

  10. Kinetics and microbial ecology of batch sulfidogenic bioreactors for co-treatment of municipal wastewater and acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dongyang; Weidhaas, Jennifer L; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics and microbial ecology in sulfidogenic bioreactors used in a novel two-stage process for co-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) and municipal wastewater (MWW) were investigated. Michaelis-Menten modeling of COD oxidation by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) (Vmax=0.33mgL(-1)min(-1), Km=4.3mgL(-1)) suggested that the Vmax can be reasonably achieved given the typical COD values in MWW and anticipated mixing with AMD. Non-competitive inhibition modeling (Ki=6.55mgL(-1)) indicated that excessive iron level should be avoided to limit its effects on SRB. The COD oxidation rate was positively correlated to COD/sulfate ratio and SRB population, as evidenced by dsrA gene copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed diverse microbial communities dominated by sulfate reducing delta-proteobacteria. Microbial community and relative quantities of SRB showed significant differences under different COD/sulfate ratios (0.2, 1 and 2), and the highest dsrA gene concentration and most complex microbial diversity were observed under COD/sulfate ratio 2. Major species were associated with Desulfovirga, Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, and Syntrophus sp. The reported COD kinetics, SRB abundances and the phylogenetic profile provide insights into the co-treatment process and help identify the parameters of concerns for such technology development.

  11. Impact of processing conditions on the kinetic of vitamin C degradation and 2-furoylmethyl amino acid formation in dried strawberries.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Soria, A Cristina; Olano, Agustín; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a study on the usefulness of the determination of vitamin C together with indicators of the initial steps of Maillard reaction (2-furoylmethyl amino acids, 2-FM-AA) during the convective drying of strawberries has been carried out for the first time, paying special attention to the kinetics of degradation and formation, respectively, of both parameters. Formation of 2-FM-AA of Lys, Arg and GABA and vitamin C loss increased with time and temperature following, respectively, a zero and first-order kinetics. As supported by its lower activation energy, 2-FM-GABA (55.9 kJ/mol) and 2-FM-Lys+2-FM-Arg (58.2 kJ/mol) were shown to be slightly more sensitive indicators than vitamin C (82.1 kJ/mol). The obtained results, together with a complementary study on the rehydration ability and sensorial attributes of samples, pointed out the suitability of the convective drying system to obtain dried strawberries of high nutritive quality and bioactivity and good consumer acceptance. PMID:24491716

  12. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters.

  13. The transfer of free fatty acids across the rabbit placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Elphick, M C; Hull, D

    1977-01-01

    1. The passage of fatty acids across the placenta was studied in 28 day pregnant rabbits (i) by comparing the fatty acid distribution in plasma free fatty acids (FFA) of umbilical cord artery and vein with that in maternal plasma and (ii) by infusing the doe at a constant rate with labelled palmitic, linoleic or arachidonic acids. During the infusion maternal and foetal plasma FFA specific activities were measured. 2. The mean levels of all the fatty acids studied (from twelve to twenty carbon atoms) were similar in both the umbilical vein plasma and maternal arterial plasma FFA, except for arachidonic acid, which was higher in foetal blood. The relative distribution of the fatty acids in umbilical arterial plasma similar to that in the vein, but at lower concentrations. The mean cord venous-arterial difference for each fatty acid correlated positively with the mean maternal arterial levels, with the exception of arachidonic acid. 3. During the constant infusion experiments the specific activities of the fatty acids in the maternal and foetal circulating FFA pools rose rapidly during the first 4 min then rose only slowly. Palmitic and linoleic acids were cleared from the maternal circulation in a similar manner and crossed the placenta at similar rates. 4. The average foetal specific activity in plasma FFA reached 15% of the maternal level for both palmitate and linoleate. The figure for arachidonic acid was half that for palmitic acid infused at the same time. 5. It is concluded that (i) all the major fatty acids present in foetal adipose tissue cross the placenta, (ii) the net transport of each fatty acid depends in part on maternal concentrations, (iii) the rate of metabolism of palmitic and linoleic acids is the same and both cross the placenta at the same rate. Proportionately less foetal arachidonic acid is derived from maternal FFA, and (iv) the results suggest a second placental source of arachidonic acid and possibly also of otherfatty acids. PMID:845822

  14. Kinetic Aspects of Leaching Zinc from Waste Galvanizing Zinc by Using Hydrochloric Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sminčáková, Emília; Trpčevská, Jarmila; Pirošková, Jana

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the results of acid leaching of flux skimmings coming from two plants are presented. Sample A contained two phases, Zn(OH)Cl and NH4Cl. In sample B, the presence of three phases, Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O, (NH4)2(ZnCl4) and ZnCl2(NH3)2, was proved. The aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and distilled water was used as the leaching medium. The effects of the leaching time, temperature and concentration of the leaching medium on the zinc extraction were investigated. The apparent activation energy, E a = 4.61 kJ mol-1, and apparent reaction order n = 0.18 for sample A, and the values E a = 6.28 kJ mol-1 and n = 0.33 for sample B were experimentally determined. Zinc leaching in acid medium is a diffusion-controlled process.

  15. Kinetics of sorption of Cu(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid chelated anions on cross-linked, polyaminated chitosan beads

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, R.S.; Ju, C.Y.

    1998-08-01

    Rates of sorption of Cu(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelated anions from aqueous solutions on cross-linked, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-modified chitosan beads were measured in a batch stirred vessel. All experiments were carried out in an equimolar solution of Cu(II) and EDTA (0.47--3.15 mol/m{sup 3}). It was shown that the rates of sorption increased with an increase in the initial concentration of Cu(II), pH, and temperature but decreased with an increase in the molecular weight of PEI introduced in the beads. The widely used homogeneous diffusion model based on Fick`s law and the shrinking core model cannot describe the sorption process. On the contrary, the kinetic data were well fit by the Elovich equation. The apparent activation energies evaluated (3.5--8.4 kcal/mol at pH 3) indicated the combined film and particle diffusion mechanism.

  16. Plasma and brain kinetics of large neutral amino acids and of striatum monoamines in rats given aspartame.

    PubMed

    Romano, M; Diomede, L; Guiso, G; Caccia, S; Perego, C; Salmona, M

    1990-05-01

    Two doses (250 and 1000 mg/kg body weight) of aspartame were administered orally to male rats, and plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine kinetic profiles were studied. In both plasma and brain the maximum increase in phenylalanine and tyrosine levels was reached 60 min after treatment. The changes in brain levels of phenylalanine or tyrosine 0, 60, 120 or 180 min after treatment with 1000 mg AMP/kg were directly correlated with the ratio of the plasma concentration of phenylalanine or tyrosine to the overall plasma concentration of the other large neutral amino acids. The time course of monoamine and metabolite concentrations, in the corpora striatum of the brain, was studied after an oral dose of 500 mg phenylalanine/kg. No significant modifications of monoamine levels were found at any of the times studied, up to 5 hr after dosing.

  17. Kinetics and thermodynamics of interaction between sulfonamide antibiotics and humic acids: Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration microcalorimetry analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-25

    The presence of sulfonamide antibiotics in the environments has been recognized as a crucial issue. Their migration and transformation in the environment is determined by natural organic matters that widely exist in natural water and soil. In this study, the kinetics and thermodynamics of interactions between humic acids (HA) and sulfamethazine (SMZ) were investigated by employing surface plasmon resonance (SPR) combined with isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) technologies. Results show that SMZ could be effectively bound with HA. The binding strength could be enhanced by increasing ionic strength and decreasing temperature. High pH was not favorable for the interaction. Hydrogen bond and electrostatic interaction may play important roles in driving the binding process, with auxiliary contribution from hydrophobic interaction. The results implied that HA existed in the environment may have a significant influence on the migration and transformation of organic pollutants through the binding process.

  18. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, November 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1993-11-12

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, in coculture with different sulfate reducers was studied with sulfate or nitrate as the electron acceptor. A threshold value for benzoate degradation dependent on the acetate concentration was observed with sulfate, but not nitrate, as the electron acceptor. No threshold was observed in tricultures containing an acetate-using sulfate reducer. The addition of the acetate-using sulfate reducer to cocultures that had degraded benzoate to its threshold value resulted in further degradation of benzoate to levels below the analytical detection limit (ca. 200 nM). These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and exclude the possibility that the threshold was the result of the inhibitory action of the undissociated form of acetate.

  19. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, November 1993--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1994-12-06

    Factors influencing the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Nonlinear regression analysis showed that the cause of the benzoate threshold was not a diminished benzoate degradation capacity. Analysis of cocultures with hydrogen users that differed in their hydrogen utilization capacities showed that the threshold did not depend on the kinetic properties of the syntrophic partner. These data support a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and exclude the possibility that a change in the affinity of the enzyme system due to acetate inhibition caused the threshold. Modeling studies showed that the threshold value could be predicted from the concentrations of the end products, assuming a critical Gibb`s free energy value. This work shows that interspecies acetate transfer is important in controlling the extent of metabolism by syntrophic organisms.

  20. RNA-Seq analysis and targeted mutagenesis for improved free fatty acid production in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-energy-density biofuels are typically derived from the fatty acid pathway, thus establishing free fatty acids (FFAs) as important fuel precursors. FFA production using photosynthetic microorganisms like cyanobacteria allows for direct conversion of carbon dioxide into fuel precursors. Recent studies investigating cyanobacterial FFA production have demonstrated the potential of this process, yet FFA production was also shown to have negative physiological effects on the cyanobacterial host, ultimately limiting high yields of FFAs. Results Cyanobacterial FFA production was shown to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lead to increased cell membrane permeability. To identify genetic targets that may mitigate these toxic effects, RNA-seq analysis was used to investigate the host response of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Stress response, nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis, and protein folding genes were up-regulated during FFA production while genes involved in carbon and hydrogen metabolisms were down-regulated. Select genes were targeted for mutagenesis to confirm their role in mitigating FFA toxicity. Gene knockout of two porins and the overexpression of ROS-degrading proteins and hypothetical proteins reduced the toxic effects of FFA production, allowing for improved growth, physiology, and FFA yields. Comparative transcriptomics, analyzing gene expression changes associated with FFA production and other stress conditions, identified additional key genes involved in cyanobacterial stress response. Conclusions A total of 15 gene targets were identified to reduce the toxic effects of FFA production. While single-gene targeted mutagenesis led to minor increases in FFA production, the combination of these targeted mutations may yield additional improvement, advancing the development of high-energy-density fuels derived from cyanobacteria. PMID:23919451

  1. Kinetics of end-to-end collision in short single-stranded nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Nau, Werner M

    2004-01-28

    A novel fluorescence-based method, which entails contact quenching of the long-lived fluorescent state of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-oct-2-ene (DBO), was employed to measure the kinetics of end-to-end collision in short single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides of the type 5'-DBO-(X)n-dG with X = dA, dC, dT, or dU and n = 2 or 4. The fluorophore was covalently attached to the 5' end and dG was introduced as an efficient intrinsic quencher at the 3' terminus. The end-to-end collision rates, which can be directly related to the efficiency of intramolecular fluorescence quenching, ranged from 0.1 to 9.0 x 10(6) s(-1). They were strongly dependent on the strand length, the base sequence, as well as the temperature. Oligonucleotides containing dA in the backbone displayed much slower collision rates and significantly higher positive activation energies than strands composed of pyrimidine bases, suggesting a higher intrinsic rigidity of oligoadenylate. Comparison of the measured collision rates in short single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides with the previously reported kinetics of hairpin formation indicates that the intramolecular collision is significantly faster than the nucleation step of hairpin closing. This is consistent with the configurational diffusion model suggested by Ansari et al. (Ansari, A.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Shen, Y. Proc.Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 7771-7776), in which the formation of misfolded loops is thought to slow hairpin formation.

  2. Kinetics of end-to-end collision in short single-stranded nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Nau, Werner M

    2004-01-28

    A novel fluorescence-based method, which entails contact quenching of the long-lived fluorescent state of 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-oct-2-ene (DBO), was employed to measure the kinetics of end-to-end collision in short single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides of the type 5'-DBO-(X)n-dG with X = dA, dC, dT, or dU and n = 2 or 4. The fluorophore was covalently attached to the 5' end and dG was introduced as an efficient intrinsic quencher at the 3' terminus. The end-to-end collision rates, which can be directly related to the efficiency of intramolecular fluorescence quenching, ranged from 0.1 to 9.0 x 10(6) s(-1). They were strongly dependent on the strand length, the base sequence, as well as the temperature. Oligonucleotides containing dA in the backbone displayed much slower collision rates and significantly higher positive activation energies than strands composed of pyrimidine bases, suggesting a higher intrinsic rigidity of oligoadenylate. Comparison of the measured collision rates in short single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides with the previously reported kinetics of hairpin formation indicates that the intramolecular collision is significantly faster than the nucleation step of hairpin closing. This is consistent with the configurational diffusion model suggested by Ansari et al. (Ansari, A.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Shen, Y. Proc.Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 7771-7776), in which the formation of misfolded loops is thought to slow hairpin formation. PMID:14733555

  3. Deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid: Monitoring the reaction kinetics via low-temperature optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Corval, A.; Casalegno, R.; Astilean, S.; Trommsdorff, H.P.

    1992-06-25

    In the deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid, this reaction is monitored via low-temperature optical spectroscopy to observe the proton-deuterium rate of exchange between the solvent and solute molecules. Of the 14 pentacene protons, 6 have an exchange rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining 8. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Kinetic characteristics of polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid chains found in pectin. Interest in polygalacturonase enzymes continues as they are useful in a number of industrial processes and conversely, detrimental, as they are involved in maceration of economically important crops. While a good...

  5. Kinetic flow-injection analysis of boron using 5-fluorosalicylaldehyde and H-acid.

    PubMed

    Sarenqiqige; Kodani, Takamasa; Kajiwara, Mari; Takehara, Kô; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Boric acid reacts with 5-fluorosalicylaldehyde (F-SA) and 8-amino-1-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid (HA) to form the boric acid-fluoroazomethine H complex (F-AzB) that is now being used for the flow-injection analysis (FIA) of boric acid. At pH 6.5, the F-AzB complexation proceeded fairly fast, whereas the fluoroazomethine H (F-AzH) formation was slow. Thus, highly sensitive measurement of F-AzB was possible if the reaction time was controlled using the FIA method to decrease the background absorbance of F-AzH at the analytical wavelength. The optimum conditions for the color developing reaction were investigated for single and dual channel systems. The former system was simple, applicable to the determination of boron in reversed osmosis (RO) desalination water with a detection limit (LOD) of 4 μg B dm(-3). For the latter system, the calibration range was 0.005 to 10 mg B dm(-3) with an LOD of 1 μg B dm(-3), which can be applicable to natural water analyses of boron. These methods could analyze 15 - 20 samples in one hour. The results of the boron concentration measurement for water samples from an RO desalination plant, industrial wastewater and river water were in fairly good agreement with those obtained by other methods.

  6. Kinetics, aggregation behavior and optimization of the fractionation of whey protein isolate with hydrochloric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated WPI solutions (10% (w/w)) containing approximately 30% alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) and 60% beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) were fractionated with HCl at acidic pH and moderate temperatures to denature alpha-LA and recover the alpha-LA aggregates via centrifugation. Aggregation behavior an...

  7. Nucleation kinetics of urea succinic acid –ferroelectric single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Dhivya, R.; Vizhi, R. Ezhil E-mail: revizhi@gmail.com; Babu, D. Rajan

    2015-06-24

    Single crystals of Urea Succinic Acid (USA) were grown by slow cooling technique. The crystalline system was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. The metastable zonewidth were carried out for various temperatures i.e., 35°, 40°, 45° and 50°C. The induction period is experimentally determined and various nucleation parameters have been estimated.

  8. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  9. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  10. Timing of acid weathering on Mars: A kinetic-thermodynamic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Y.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2007-07-01

    Weathering of olivine basalt by H2SO4-HCl aqueous solutions at the conditions of early Mars was investigated through numerical modeling in a system open with respect to CO2 and O2 only. The model includes dissolution rates of primary and secondary minerals and oxidation rate of aqueous Fe2+, as well as chemical equilibration among solutes, dissolved gases, and precipitates. The results reveal fast dissolution of Fe-Mg minerals at low pH, followed by preferential dissolution of plagioclase at higher pH. Correspondingly, solutions evolve from acidic, Mg-Ca-Fe2+-Fe3+-Al3+ compositions toward Na-rich alkaline fluids. The period over which neutralization and mineral precipitation may occur is shorter at higher initial pH, lower water to rock ratios, and larger mineral surface areas. Early stages of weathering are characterized by the formation of amorphous silica, goethite, and kaolinite, while zeolites and carbonates form considerably later at higher pH, where silica dissolves. Slow oxidation of Fe2+ causes precipitation of ferrous phyllosilicates. Comparison with Martian observations indicate that amorphous silica, Fe3+ oxyhydroxides, and Mg-, Ca-, and Fe-sulfates could have formed during multiple short-term episodes of acid weathering that were terminated by freezing and/or evaporation. Throughout history, impact generation of oxidants (e.g., O2, SO3, NO2) caused formation of strong acids and incremental Fe2+ oxidation, the processes that are not efficient during O2-deficient periods of volcanic degassing. Although impact-generated acid rainfalls could have caused intense weathering and erosion in Noachian time, dilution of acids and a prolonged existence of surface solutions favored local neutralization of solution, and formation, transport and deposition of clays.

  11. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This document is the fourth annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in 1992 as ES/ER-17&D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, this document lists FFA activities planned for FY 1997. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service.

  12. Seasonal changes in serum free fatty acid level in the migratory Canada goose.

    PubMed

    John, T M; George, J C

    1977-12-01

    The changes in the serum level of free fatty acids (FFA) in the migratory Canada goose (Branta canadensis interior) breeding in Ft. Churchill (Manitoba, Canada) and wintering in Swan Lake (Missouri, U.S.A.), were studied during the different periods of its yearly life cycle. The lowest serum FFA level was noted during the spring premigratory phase (early March) at Swan Lake, and the highest during moult (early August) at Ft. Churchill. Serum FFA level during the spring postmigratory period (early May at Ft. Churchill) was significantly higher than that during the spring premigratory period and the breeding period (early at Ft. Churchill). No signigicant difference in FFA levels was noted between the fall premigratory (early September at Ft. Churchill) and the fall postmigratory (mid-October at Swan Lake) periods. The significance of the seasonal variations in serum FFA level is discussed in relation to the cyclic physiological events taking place in the bird. PMID:79367

  13. Kinetic features of xylan de-polymerization in production of xylose monomer and furfural during acid pretreatment for kenaf, forage sorghums and sunn hemp feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kamireddy, Srinivas Reddy; Kozliak, Evguenii I.; Tucker, Melvin; Ji, Yun

    2014-08-01

    A kinetic study of acid pretreatment was conducted for sorghum non-brown mid rib (SNBMR) (Sorghum bicolor L Moench), sorghum-brown mid rib (SBMR), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L) and kenaf (Gossypiumhirsutum L), focusing on rates of xylose monomer and furfural formation. The kinetics was investigated using two independent variables, reaction temperature (150 and 160°C) and acid concentration (1 and 2 wt%), with a constant dry biomass loading of 10 wt% and a treatment time up to 20 min while sampling the mixture every 2 min. The experimental data were fitted using a two-step kinetic model based on irreversible pseudo first order kinetics at each step. Varied kinetic orders on the acid concentration, ranging from 0.2 to >3, were observed for both xylose and furfural formation, the values depending on the feedstock. The crystallinity index of raw biomass was shown to be a major factor influencing the rate of both xylose and furfural formation. As a result, a positive correlation was observed between the activation energy and biomass crystallinity index for xylose formation.

  14. Kinetic features of xylan de-polymerization in production of xylose monomer and furfural during acid pretreatment for kenaf, forage sorghums and sunn hemp feedstocks

    DOE PAGES

    Kamireddy, Srinivas Reddy; Kozliak, Evguenii I.; Tucker, Melvin; Ji, Yun

    2014-08-01

    A kinetic study of acid pretreatment was conducted for sorghum non-brown mid rib (SNBMR) (Sorghum bicolor L Moench), sorghum-brown mid rib (SBMR), sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L) and kenaf (Gossypiumhirsutum L), focusing on rates of xylose monomer and furfural formation. The kinetics was investigated using two independent variables, reaction temperature (150 and 160°C) and acid concentration (1 and 2 wt%), with a constant dry biomass loading of 10 wt% and a treatment time up to 20 min while sampling the mixture every 2 min. The experimental data were fitted using a two-step kinetic model based on irreversible pseudo first ordermore » kinetics at each step. Varied kinetic orders on the acid concentration, ranging from 0.2 to >3, were observed for both xylose and furfural formation, the values depending on the feedstock. The crystallinity index of raw biomass was shown to be a major factor influencing the rate of both xylose and furfural formation. As a result, a positive correlation was observed between the activation energy and biomass crystallinity index for xylose formation.« less

  15. Diurnal variations in leaf fluorescence induction kinetics: variable fluorescence in crassulacean Acid metabolism plants.

    PubMed

    Everson, G; Chen, S S; Black, C C

    1983-06-01

    The variable fluorescence of leaves from Kalanchoë daigremontiana and pineapple, Ananas comosus, both CAM plants, was found to change over a 24-hour cycle and to exhibit high temperature-dependent maxima during the night period. The time course of the induced fluorescence was correlated with malic acid accumulation but not with other aspects of CAM such as with the nature of the decarboxylation pathway or with stomatal movements. The variable fluorescences of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) leaves were compared with the CAM plants diurnally; both plants also exhibit high fluorescence maxima during the night period. We conclude that the assembly of the photosystems in the light is a primary process in photosynthesis induction and may be influenced by other cellular metabolic processes, specifically in the case of CAM leaves by malic acid accumulation. PMID:16663024

  16. Kinetics of trihalogenated acetic acid metabolism and isoform specificity in liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Shakil A; Ghanayem, Burhan I; Schultz, Irvin R

    2011-10-01

    This study determined the metabolism of 3 drinking water disinfection by-products (halogenated acetic acids [HAAs]), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), chlorodibromoacetic acid (CDBAA), and tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), using rat, mouse, human liver microsomes, and recombinant P450. Metabolism proceeded by reductive debromination forming a di-HAA; the highest under nitrogen >2% oxygen > atmospheric headspaces. V (max) for the loss of tri-HAA was 4 to 5 times higher under nitrogen than atmospheric headspace. Intrinsic metabolic clearance was TBAA>CDBAA>BDCAA. At the high substrate concentrations, tri-HAA consumption rate was 2 to 3 times higher than the formation of di-HAA. Liberation of Br(-) from TBAA corresponded to the expected amount produced after DBAA formation, indicating retention of Br(-) by additional metabolite/metabolites. Subsequent experiments with CDBAA detected negligible formation of chlorodibromomethane (CDBM) and failed to account for the missing tri-HAA. Carbon monoxide and especially diphenyleneiodonium ([DPI] P450 reductase inhibitor) blocked CDBAA metabolism. Other chemical inhibitors were only partially able to block CDBAA metabolism. Most effective were inhibitors of CYP 2E1 and CYP 3A4. Immunoinhibition studies using human liver microsomes and anti-human CYP 2E1 antibodies were successful in reducing CDBAA metabolism. However, CDBAA metabolism in wild-type (WT) and CYP 2E1 knockout (KO) mouse liver microsomes was similar, suggesting significant interspecies differences in CYP isoform in tri-HAA metabolism. Additional assessment of CYP isoform involvement was complicated by the finding that recombinantly expressed rat and human P450 reductase was able to metabolize CDBAA, which may be a contributing factor in interspecies differences in tri-HAA metabolism.

  17. Flufenamic acid prevents behavioral manifestations of salicylate-induced tinnitus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ustundag, Yasemin; Bulut, Funda; Demir, Caner Feyzi; Bal, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tinnitus is defined as a phantom auditory sensation, the perception of sound in the absence of external acoustic stimulation. Given that flufenamic acid (FFA) blocks TRPM2 cation channels, resulting in reduced neuronal excitability, we aimed to investigate whether FFA suppresses the behavioral manifestation of sodium salicylate (SSA)-induced tinnitus in rats. Material and methods Tinnitus was evaluated using a conditioned lick suppression model of behavioral testing. Thirty-one Wistar rats, randomly divided into four treatment groups, were trained and tested in the behavioral experiment: (1) control group: DMSO + saline (n = 6), (2) SSA group: DMSO + SSA (n = 6), (3) FFA group: FFA (66 mg/kg bw) + saline (n = 9), (4) FFA + SSA group: FFA (66 mg/kg bw) + SSA (400 mg/kg bw) (n = 10). Localization of TRPM2 to the plasma membrane of cochlear nucleus neurons was demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Results Pavlovian training resulted in strong suppression of licking, having a mean value of 0.05 ±0.03 on extinction day 1, which is below the suppression training criterion level of 0.20 in control tinnitus animals. The suppression rate for rats having both FFA (66 mg/kg bw) and SSA (400 mg/kg bw) injections was significantly lower than that for the rats having SSA injections (p < 0.01). Conclusions We suggest that SSA-induced tinnitus could possibly be prevented by administration of a TRPM2 ion channel antagonist, FFA at 66 mg/kg bw. PMID:26925138

  18. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, March 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney M.J.

    1995-06-23

    Factors affecting the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Cocultures of a syntrophic benzoate degrader, strain SB, with a hydrogen/formate-using sulfate reducer degraded benzoate to a threshold that depended on the amount of substrate and acetate present. The benzoate threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather, a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. A sensitive assay to detect low formate concentrations was developed to measure the formate levels when the benzoate threshold was reached. We showed that increased acetate concentrations, even when hydrogen and formate levels are low, affects the extent of benzoate degradation, implicating the importance of interspecies acetate transfer. In addition to benzoate, various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, 2-methylbutyrate, and methyl esters of fatty acids supported growth in coculture with a hydrogen-using partner. SB is the only syntrophic bacterium known to use both benzoate and fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SB clustered with sulfate reducers in the delta subclass of the Proteobacteria. SB grew well in coculture with Desulfoarculus baarsii, a sulfate reducer that uses formate but not hydrogen. This unequivocally shows that SB can grow by interspecies formate transfer.

  19. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-01

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  20. Reaction of chlorine dioxide with amino acids and peptides: kinetics and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, H K; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1987-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is currently being considered as an alternate to chlorine as a disinfectant for water treatment. Many organic compounds present in water and food treated with ClO2 are subject to oxidation. 21 amino acids and 3 peptides (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame), L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine) were studied for their reactivity with ClO2. Chlorine dioxide reacted only with 6 amino acids in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.0. The reaction with cysteine, tryptophan and tyrosine was too rapid to be monitored either iodometrically or spectrophotometrically. The reaction with histidine, hydroxyproline and proline was found to be pseudo-first order. ClO2 readily reacted with L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine but not with aspartame. Mutagenicity studies with the Salmonella microsome assay of the reaction mixtures of ClO2 with those 6 reactive amino acids and the 3 peptides indicated that the reaction products of the 3 peptides, hydroxyproline, and tyrosine exerted mutagenic activity toward both tester strains of TA98 and TA100 in the presence and absence of rat-liver S9 mix.

  1. Estimation of gene reiteration from hybridization kinetics in moderate deoxyribonucleic acid excess.

    PubMed Central

    Muto, M

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to clarify how the DNA/RNA or the DNA/cDNA (complementary DNA) ratio in the hybridization reaction mixture affects the kinetics of DNA-RNA or DNA-cDNA reassociation, and theoretical formulae were derived as a function of these ratios. From these formulae, it was found that the DNA/RNA of the DNA/cDNA ratio did not much affect the initial reaction rates of hybridization, but greatly affected the terminal value for the extent of hybrid formation. Therefore the results obtained when one normalizes the experimental data for hydridization and derives the reiteration frequency from a number called the 'half Cot' (Cot 1/2) are not accurate, especially in the presence of a moderate excess of DNA. A simple method for the estimation of gene reiteration was demonstrated that did not use the half Cot value in the determination. This simple method is useful even if DNA-RNA or DNA/cDNA hybridization are done with a moderate excess of DNA. With mouse myeloma cells as a model system, the gene reiteration of the 28S rRNA cristron was determined. PMID:889572

  2. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria, the combined approach: kinetic modelling, metabolic control and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoefnagel, Marcel H N; Starrenburg, Marjo J C; Martens, Dirk E; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Van Swam, Iris I; Bongers, Roger; Westerhoff, Hans V; Snoep, Jacky L

    2002-04-01

    Everyone who has ever tried to radically change metabolic fluxes knows that it is often harder to determine which enzymes have to be modified than it is to actually implement these changes. In the more traditional genetic engineering approaches 'bottle-necks' are pinpointed using qualitative, intuitive approaches, but the alleviation of suspected 'rate-limiting' steps has not often been successful. Here the authors demonstrate that a model of pyruvate distribution in Lactococcus lactis based on enzyme kinetics in combination with metabolic control analysis clearly indicates the key control points in the flux to acetoin and diacetyl, important flavour compounds. The model presented here (available at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za/wcfs.html) showed that the enzymes with the greatest effect on this flux resided outside the acetolactate synthase branch itself. Experiments confirmed the predictions of the model, i.e. knocking out lactate dehydrogenase and overexpressing NADH oxidase increased the flux through the acetolactate synthase branch from 0 to 75% of measured product formation rates.

  3. Lipid clustering in bilayers detected by the fluorescence kinetics and anisotropy of trans-parinaric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes Mateo, C; Brochon, J C; Pilar Lillo, M; Ulises Acuña, A

    1993-01-01

    Fluid heterogeneity in lipid bilayers and shows a simple and useful method to quantify this heterogeneity. Taking advantage of the maximum entropy method, we have resolved the probe fluorescence lifetime distributions in homogeneous solutions and in single and two-component lipid bilayers at different temperatures. A precise description of the emission kinetics was obtained as a function of viscosity in the homogeneous solution and as a function of the phase composition (gel/fluid) in the lipid bilayers. These data show, unambiguously, that the same distribution pattern, with two well resolved lifetime classes, is observed both in pure solvents and in fluid bilayers. This distribution is modified during the thermotropic phase transition, with the appearance of a long lifetime component. The anisotropy experiments confirm that the amplitude of this component is proportional to the fraction of probe located in the gel phase. From this fraction we have quantified the amount of gel phase in the binary bilayer system dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and determined the thermotropic phase diagram of the mixture. This phase diagram agrees well with that calculated assuming ideal mixing of the lipids (Marbrey, S., and J.M. Sturtevant. 1976. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 73:862-3866). PMID:8298047

  4. Mechanism and kinetics of aluminum dissolution during copper sorption by acidity paddy soil in South China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiya; Li, Yujiao; Wen, Qinliang; Dong, Changxun; Pan, Genxing

    2015-08-01

    Soil aggregates were prepared from a bulk soil collected from paddy soil in the Taihu Lake region and aluminum (Al) dissolution, solution pH changes during copper (Cu(2+)) sorption were investigated with static sorption and magnetic stirring. Kinetics of Cu(2+) sorption and Al dissolution were also studied by magnetic stirring method. No Al dissolution was observed until Cu(2+) sorption was greater than a certain value, which was 632, 450, 601 and 674 mg/kg for sand, clay, silt, and coarse silt fractions, respectively. Aluminum dissolution increased with increasing Cu(2+) sorption and decreasing solution pH. An amount of dissolved Al showed a significant positive correlation with non-specific sorption of Cu(2+) (R(2)>0.97), and it was still good under different pH values (R(2)>0.95). Copper sorption significantly decreased solution pH. The magnitude of solution pH decline increased as Cu(2+) sorption and Al dissolution increased. The sand and clay fraction had a less Al dissolution and pH drop due to the higher ferric oxide, Al oxide and organic matter contents. After sorption reaction for half an hour, the Cu(2+) sorption progress reached more than 90% while the Al dissolution progress was only 40%, and lagged behind the Cu(2+) sorption. It indicated that aluminum dissolution is associated with non-specific sorption.

  5. Microencapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins with different fatty acid composition: Kinetic stability of astaxanthin and alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Andrés; Masson, Lilia; Velasco, Joaquín; del Valle, José Manuel; Robert, Paz

    2016-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a natural source of astaxanthin (AX). However, AX loses its natural protection when extracted from this microalga. In this study, a supercritical fluid extract (SFE) of H. pluvialis was obtained and added to oils with different fatty acid compositions (sunflower oil (SO) or high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO)). The oleoresins of H. pluvialis ((SO+SFE) and (HOSO+SFE)) were encapsulated with Capsul by spray drying. The stability of the oleoresins and powders were studied at 40, 50 and 70° C. AX and alpha-tocopherol (AT) degradation followed a zero-order and first-order kinetic model, respectively, for all systems. The encapsulation of oleoresins improved the stability of AX and AT to a greater extent in oleoresins with a monounsaturated fatty acid profile, as shown by the significantly lowest degradation rate constants and longest half-lives. Therefore, the encapsulation of H. pluvialis oleoresins is an alternative to developing a functional ingredient for healthy food design. PMID:26213069

  6. Anti-tyrosinase kinetics and antibacterial process of caffeic acid N-nonyl ester in Chinese Olive (Canarium album) postharvest.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu-Long; Zheng, Jing; Yu, Feng; Cai, Yi-Xiang; Zhan, Xi-Lan; Wang, Hui-Fang; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2016-10-01

    Enzymatic browning and bacterial putrefaction are mainly responsible for quality losses of Chinese Olive (Canarium album) postharvest and lead to very short shelf life on average. Screening anti-browning and anti-bacterial agents is important for preservation of Chinese Olive. Caffeic acid N-nonyl ester (C-9) and caffeic acid N- Heptyl ester (C-7) was synthesized as inhibitors of tyrosinase, which is a key enzyme in browning process. The compound of C-9 could inhibit the activity of tyrosinase strongly and its IC50 value was determined to be 37.5μM, while the compound of C-7 had no inhibitory ability. Kinetic analyses showed that compound of C-9 has been a reversible inhibitory mechanism below 50μM and been irreversible mechanisms above 50μM. For the reversible inhibitory mechanism, the values of inhibitory constants (KI and KIS) were determined to be 24.6 and 37.4μM, respectively. The results of Chinese Olive fruit postharvest showed that the compound of C-9 could effectively anti-browning and anti-bacterial putrefaction. In addition, this compound had strong antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella. Therefore, C-9 could be a potential anti-browning and anti-bacterial reagent. PMID:27246378

  7. Removal of malachite green dye from wastewater by different organic acid-modified natural adsorbent: kinetics, equilibriums, mechanisms, practical application, and disposal of dye-loaded adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Zeng, Guangming; Leng, Lijian; Peng, Xin; Liao, Kailingli; Peng, Lijuan; Xiao, Zhihua

    2014-10-01

    Natural adsorbent (Cinnamomum camphora sawdust) modified by organic acid (oxalic acid, citric acid, and tartaric acid) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for the removal of hazardous malachite green (MG) dye in aqueous media in a batch process. The extent of MG adsorption onto modified sawdust increased with increasing organic acid concentrations, pH, contact time, and temperature but decreased with increasing adsorbent dosage and ionic strength. Kinetic study indicated that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model could best describe the adsorption kinetics of MG. Equilibrium data were found to fit well with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the three kinds of organic acid-modified sawdust was 280.3, 222.8, and 157.5 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the sorption of MG was an endothermic process. The adsorption mechanism, the application of adsorbents in practical wastewater, the prediction of single-stage batch adsorption system, and the disposal of depleted adsorbents were also discussed.

  8. In vitro gas production kinetics and short-chain fatty acid production from rumen incubation of diets supplemented with hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Lavrenčič, A; Levart, A; Košir, I J; Čerenak, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.) from two varieties Aurora and Dana, differing in their α- and β-acid contents, on rumen microbial activity measured with in vitro gas production kinetics and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production. Hop cones were added to the total mixed dairy cow ration (CONT) in concentrations simulating a cow's daily intake of 50, 100 and 200 g of hop cones - the concentrations of hop cones expressed on a substrate basis were 43, 82 and 153 mg/g of substrate. Substrates were anaerobically incubated in glass syringes, and gas production kinetic parameters were determined by fitting data with the Gompertz model. Gas produced after 24 h (Gas24), maximum fermentation rate (MFR) and time of maximum fermentation rate (TMFR) were calculated from the estimated gas production kinetic parameters. After 24 h of incubation, the fermentation liquids of each substrate were taken for the determination of SCFA. Increasing the hop cone concentration decreased the total potential gas production, Gas24, MFR and shortened TMFR. The highest hop cone concentration significantly decreased acetic and butyric acid productions and total SCFA production after 24 h of incubation, but not propionic acid production, resulting in a decreased ratio between acetic acid and propionic acid. PMID:25475691

  9. Theoretical Study on Free Fatty Acid Elimination Mechanism for Waste Cooking Oils to Biodiesel over Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xiaochao; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Caimei; Han, Peide

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical investigation on the esterification mechanism of free fatty acid (FFA) in waste cooking oils (WCOs) has been carried out using DMol(3) module based on the density functional theory (DFT). Three potential pathways of FFA esterification reaction are designed to achieve the formation of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), and calculated results show that the energy barrier can be efficiently reduced from 88.597kcal/mol to 15.318kcal/mol by acid catalyst. The molar enthalpy changes (ΔrHm°) of designed pathways are negative, indicating that FFA esterification reaction is an exothermic process. The obtained favorable energy pathway is: H(+) firstly activates FFA, then the intermediate combines with methanol to form a tetrahedral structure, and finally, producing FAME after removing a water molecule. The rate-determining step is the combination of the activated FFA with methanol, and the activation energy is about 11.513kcal/mol at 298.15K. Our results should provide basic and reliable theoretical data for further understanding the elimination mechanism of FFA over acid catalyst in the conversion of WCOs to biodiesel products. PMID:27023919

  10. Theoretical Study on Free Fatty Acid Elimination Mechanism for Waste Cooking Oils to Biodiesel over Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xiaochao; Zhang, Jilong; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Caimei; Han, Peide

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical investigation on the esterification mechanism of free fatty acid (FFA) in waste cooking oils (WCOs) has been carried out using DMol(3) module based on the density functional theory (DFT). Three potential pathways of FFA esterification reaction are designed to achieve the formation of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME), and calculated results show that the energy barrier can be efficiently reduced from 88.597kcal/mol to 15.318kcal/mol by acid catalyst. The molar enthalpy changes (ΔrHm°) of designed pathways are negative, indicating that FFA esterification reaction is an exothermic process. The obtained favorable energy pathway is: H(+) firstly activates FFA, then the intermediate combines with methanol to form a tetrahedral structure, and finally, producing FAME after removing a water molecule. The rate-determining step is the combination of the activated FFA with methanol, and the activation energy is about 11.513kcal/mol at 298.15K. Our results should provide basic and reliable theoretical data for further understanding the elimination mechanism of FFA over acid catalyst in the conversion of WCOs to biodiesel products.

  11. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization. PMID:27108970

  12. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  13. Spectrophotometric techniques to determine tranexamic acid: Kinetic studies using ninhydrin and direct measuring using ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arayne, M. Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed; Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Zuberi, M. Hashim

    2008-11-01

    Two simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods in ultraviolet and visible region are described for the determination of tranexamic acid in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with ninhydrin at boiling temperature and by measuring the increase in absorbance at 575 nm as a function of time. The initial rate, rate constant and fixed time (120 min) procedures were used for constructing the calibration graphs to determine the concentration of the drug, which showed a linear response over the concentration range 16-37 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, 0.996, 0.9999, LOQ 6.968, 7.138, 2.462 μgmL -1 and LOD 2.090, 2.141 and 0.739 μgmL -1, respectively. In second method tranexamic acid was reacted with ferric chloride solution, yellowish orange colored chromogen showed λ max at 375 nm showing linearity in the concentration range of 50-800 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, LOQ 6.227 μgmL -1 and LOD 1.868 μgmL -1. The variables affecting the development of the color were optimized and the developed methods were validated statistically and through recovery studies. These results were also verified by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The proposed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of tranexamic acid in commercial pharmaceutical formulation.

  14. Retinol kinetics in unsupplemented and vitamin A-retinoic acid supplemented neonatal rats: a preliminary model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Libo; Wray, Amanda E.; Green, Michael H.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA) metabolism in neonates is virtually uncharacterized. Our objective was to develop a compartmental model of VA metabolism in unsupplemented and VA-supplemented neonatal rats. On postnatal day 4, pups (n = 3/time) received 11,12-[3H]retinol orally, in either oil (control) or VA combined with retinoic acid (VARA) [VA (∼6 mg/kg body weight) + 10% retinoic acid]. Plasma and tissues were collected at 14 time points up to 14 days after dose administration. VARA supplementation rapidly, but transiently, increased total retinol mass in plasma, liver, and lung. It decreased the peak fraction of the dose in plasma. A multi-compartmental model developed to fit plasma [3H]retinol data predicted more extensive recycling of retinol between plasma and tissues in neonates compared with that reported in adults (144 vs. 12–13 times). In VARA pups, the recycling number for retinol between plasma and tissues (100 times) and the time that retinol spent in plasma were both lower compared with controls; VARA also stimulated the uptake of plasma VA into extravascular tissues. A VARA perturbation model indicated that the effect of VARA in stimulating VA uptake into tissues in neonates is both dramatic and transient. PMID:24711633

  15. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer.

  16. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer. PMID:27061365

  17. Dissolution kinetics of a lunar glass simulant at 25 degrees C: the effect of pH and organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eick, M. J.; Grossl, P. R.; Golden, D. C.; Sparks, D. L.; Ming, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    The dissolution kinetics of a simulated lunar glass were examined at pH 3, 5, and 7. Additionally, the pH 7 experiments were conducted in the presence of citric and oxalic acid at concentrations of 2 and 20 mM. The organic acids were buffered at pH 7 to examine the effect of each molecule in their dissociated form. At pH 3, 5, and 7, the dissolution of the synthetic lunar glass was observed to proceed via a two-stage process. The first stage involved the parabolic release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe, and the linear release of Si. Dissolution was incongruent, creating a leached layer rich in Si and Ti which was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During the second stage the release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe was linear. A coupled diffusion/surface dissolution model was proposed for dissolution of the simulated lunar glass at pH 3, 5, and 7. During the first stage the initial release of mobile cations (i.e., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe) was limited by diffusion through the surface leached layer of the glass (parabolic release), while Si release was controlled by the hydrolysis of the Si-O-Al bonds at the glass surface (linear release). As dissolution continued, the mobile cations diffused from greater depths within the glass surface. A steady-state was then reached where the diffusion rate across the increased path lengths equalled the Si release rate from the surface. In the presence of the organic acids, the dissolution of the synthetic lunar glass proceeded by a one stage process. The release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe followed a parabolic relationship, while the release of Si was linear. The relative reactivity of the organic acids used in the experiments was citrate > oxalate. A thinner leached layer rich in Si/Ti, as compared to the pH experiments, was observed using TEM. Rate data suggest that the chemisorption of the organic anion to the surface silanol groups was responsible for enhanced dissolution in the presence of the organic acids. It is proposed that the increased

  18. Dissolution kinetics of a lunar glass simulant at 25 degrees C: the effect of pH and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Eick, M J; Grossl, P R; Golden, D C; Sparks, D L; Ming, D W

    1996-01-01

    The dissolution kinetics of a simulated lunar glass were examined at pH 3, 5, and 7. Additionally, the pH 7 experiments were conducted in the presence of citric and oxalic acid at concentrations of 2 and 20 mM. The organic acids were buffered at pH 7 to examine the effect of each molecule in their dissociated form. At pH 3, 5, and 7, the dissolution of the synthetic lunar glass was observed to proceed via a two-stage process. The first stage involved the parabolic release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe, and the linear release of Si. Dissolution was incongruent, creating a leached layer rich in Si and Ti which was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During the second stage the release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe was linear. A coupled diffusion/surface dissolution model was proposed for dissolution of the simulated lunar glass at pH 3, 5, and 7. During the first stage the initial release of mobile cations (i.e., Ca, Mg, Al, Fe) was limited by diffusion through the surface leached layer of the glass (parabolic release), while Si release was controlled by the hydrolysis of the Si-O-Al bonds at the glass surface (linear release). As dissolution continued, the mobile cations diffused from greater depths within the glass surface. A steady-state was then reached where the diffusion rate across the increased path lengths equalled the Si release rate from the surface. In the presence of the organic acids, the dissolution of the synthetic lunar glass proceeded by a one stage process. The release of Ca, Mg, Al, and Fe followed a parabolic relationship, while the release of Si was linear. The relative reactivity of the organic acids used in the experiments was citrate > oxalate. A thinner leached layer rich in Si/Ti, as compared to the pH experiments, was observed using TEM. Rate data suggest that the chemisorption of the organic anion to the surface silanol groups was responsible for enhanced dissolution in the presence of the organic acids. It is proposed that the increased

  19. Effects of a pharmacological dose of cholecystokinin on bile acid kinetics and biliary cholesterol saturation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Jazrawi, R P; Northfield, T C

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms influencing bile acid pool size and cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder bile, eight obese volunteers were placed on a low calorie diet for six weeks, and given intramuscular injections of a pharmacological dose of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP, 5 micrograms) at mealtimes for half that period (alternating order). During CCK-OP administration, postprandial emptying of the gall bladder (mean +/- SEM) increased from 58 +/- 11% to 82 +/- 5% (p less than 0.005), and small intestinal transit time decreased from 205 +/- 27 to 178 +/- 26 minutes (NS). Bile acid pool size decreased from 4.6 +/- 0.3 to 3.1 +/- 0.3 mmol (p less than 0.001), while fractional turnover rate for chenodeoxycholic acid increased from 0.23 +/- 0.02 to 0.36 +/- 0.03 per day (p less than 0.005), suggesting an increase in recycling frequency of the pool. Synthesis rate was unchanged (0.43 +/- 0.08 vs 0.44 +/- 0.07 mmol/day), suggesting a new steady state. The cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder bile increased in all subjects from 1.3 +/- 0.1 to 1.6 +/- 0.1 (p less than 0.005). Fasting gall bladder volume was reduced from 29 +/- 4 to 20 +/- 7 ml (p less than 0.01). Fractional turnover rate on the two regimens correlated with gall bladder emptying (n = 16, r = 0.61, p less than 0.01), but not with small intestinal transit time (r = 0.07, NS). Bile acid pool size correlated with fractional turnover rate (r = -0.73, p less than 0.005) and with cholesterol saturation index (r = -0.56, p less than 0.025). These findings suggest that CCK influences bile acid kinetics and cholesterol saturation index of fasting gall bladder in man; and that these effects of CCK are mainly mediated via alterations in gall bladder emptying rather than through alterations in small intestinal transit rate. PMID:3957106

  20. Kinetics of amyloid aggregation of mammal apomyoglobins and correlation with their amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Vilasi, Silvia; Dosi, Roberta; Iannuzzi, Clara; Malmo, Clorinda; Parente, Augusto; Irace, Gaetano; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2006-03-01

    In protein deposition disorders, a normally soluble protein is deposited as insoluble aggregates, referred to as amyloid. The intrinsic effects of specific mutations on the rates of protein aggregation and amyloid formation of unfolded polypeptide chains can be correlated with changes in hydrophobicity, propensity to convert alpha-helical to beta sheet conformation and charge. In this paper, we report the aggregation rates of buffalo, horse and bovine apomyoglobins. The experimental values were compared with the theoretical ones evaluated considering the amino acid differences among the sequences. Our results show that the mutations which play critical roles in the rate-determining step of apomyoglobin aggregation are those located within the N-terminal region of the molecule.

  1. Kinetics of amino acid and glucose absorption following pancreatic diversion in the pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerat, A.; Calmes, R.; Corring, T.; Vaissade, P.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in the pig to determine the consequences of deprivation of exocrine pancreatic secretion on the composition and quantity of nutrients absorbed after intake of a balanced diet. Five growing pigs (53.8 kg body weight) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein and the carotid artery and with an electromagnetic flow probe around the portal vein to measure the exchanges between the blood and the intestinal lumen. They were also fitted with a permanent catheter in the duct of Wirsung to educe the exocrine pancreatic secretion and another one in the duodenum in order to reintroduce it. In each animal, glucose, amino-N and amino acid absorption as well as insulin and glucagon production were measured over a period of 10 h after the meal (semi-purified diet based on purified starch and containing 180 g fish meal/kg, DM content of the meal 731 g), either in the presence of pancreatic juice (group C: immediate reintroduction), or in the absence of pancreatic juice (group D: deprivation). The deprivation of pancreatic juice provoked a marked depression in the absorption of glucose (D 67.9 (SEM 27.9) g/10 h, C 437.7 (SEM 39.5) g/10 h, P < 0.001), and of amino-N (D 7.55 (SEM 0.54) g/10 h, C 15.80 (SEM 0.79) g/10 h, P < 0.001). The composition of the mixture of amino acids in the portal blood was only slightly modified: only the levels of histidine (P < 0.05) and of valine (P < 0.06, NS) decreased in the absence of pancreatic juice. Insulin production was much lower (by 64%, P < 0.05) in the absence of pancreatic juice whereas that of glucagon was not affected.

  2. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  3. Cerebral lateralization of face-sensitive areas in left-handers: only the FFA does not get it right.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Henryk; Dricot, Laurence; Hanseeuw, Bernard; Rossion, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    Face perception is highly lateralized to the right hemisphere (RH) in humans, as supported originally by observations of face recognition impairment (prosopagnosia) following brain damage. Divided visual field presentations, neuroimaging and event-related potential studies have supported this view. While the latter studies are typically performed in right-handers, the few reported cases of prosopagnosia with unilateral left damage were left-handers, suggesting that handedness may shift or qualify the lateralization of face perception. We tested this hypothesis by recording the whole set of face-sensitive areas in 11 left-handers, using a face-localizer paradigm in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (faces, cars, and their phase-scrambled versions). All face-sensitive areas identified (superior temporal sulcus, inferior occipital cortex, anterior infero-temporal cortex, amygdala) were strongly right-lateralized in left-handers, this right lateralization bias being as large as in a population of right-handers (40) tested with the same paradigm (Rossion et al., 2012). The notable exception was the so-called 'Fusiform face area' (FFA), an area that was slightly left lateralized in the population of left-handers. Since the left FFA is localized closely to an area sensitive to word form in the human brain ('Visual Word Form Area' - VWFA), the enhanced left lateralization of the FFA in left-handers may be due to a decreased competition with the representation of words. The implications for the neural basis of face perception, aetiology of brain lateralization in general, and prosopagnosia are also discussed.

  4. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  5. Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction of ozone with linoleic acid and its dependence on temperature, physical state, RH, and ozone concentration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guang; Holladay, Sara; Langlois, Danielle; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-03-01

    Heterogeneous reaction between ozone and linoleic acid (LA) thin film was investigated by a flow reactor coupled to attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (FR-ATR-IR) over wide ranges of temperature, relative humidity (RH), and ozone concentration under atmospheric pressure condition. Pseudo-first-order rate constants kapp and overall reactive uptake coefficients γ were acquired on the basis of changes in absorbance from peaks located near 1743, 1710, 1172, and 1110 cm(-1), which can be assigned to C═O in ester, C═O in acid, and C-C and C-O stretching modes, respectively. Results showed that the kapp and γ increased nearly by a factor of 6 with increasing temperatures from 258 to 314 K. It was noted the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was much more pronounced at lower temperatures. Such behavior can be explained by a change in the physical state of LA at lower temperatures. In addition, kapp and γ were enhanced by 2-fold as the RH increased from 0 to 80%. Moreover, the effect of ozone concentration on the reaction kinetics was reported for the first time. kapp was found to display a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on ozone concentration with KO3 = (1.146 ± 0.017) × 10(-15) molecules cm(-3) and k[S] = 0.0522 ± 0.0004 s(-1), where KO3 is a parameter that describes the partitioning of ozone to the thin film surface, and k[S] is the maximum pseudo-first-order coefficient at high ozone concentration. Furthermore, yields and hygroscopic properties of reaction products were also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The intensity ratio of two C═O stretching bands, A1743/A1710, which was utilized as an indicator of the product yields, increased sharply with increasing temperatures in the lower temperature region (258-284 K), and then remained nearly constant in the higher temperature region (284-314 K). The product yields showed no significant variation with RH, for the intensity ratio of A1743/A1710 barely changed in the wide RH range 0

  6. Study on degradation kinetics of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid in aqueous solutions and identification of its major degradation product by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qili; Guan, Jiao; Rong, Rong; Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Zhiguo

    2015-08-10

    A RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the degradation kinetic study of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid (HPABA), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, which would provide a basis for further studies on HPABA. The effects of pH, temperature, buffer concentration and ionic strength on the degradation kinetics of HPABA were discussed. Experimental parameters such as degradation rate constants (k), activation energy (Ea), acid and alkali catalytic constants (k(ac), k(al)), shelf life (t1/2) and temperature coefficient (Q10) were calculated. The results indicated that degradation kinetics of HPABA followed zero-order reaction kinetics; degradation rate constants (k) of HPABA at different pH values demonstrated that HPABA was more stable in neutral and near-neutral conditions; the function of temperature on k obeyed the Arrhenius equation (r = 0.9933) and HPABA was more stable at lower temperature; with the increase of ionic strength and buffer concentration, the stability of HPABA was decreased. The major unknown degradation product of HPABA was identified by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS with positive electrospray ionization. Results demonstrated that the hydrolysis product was the primary degradation product of HPABA and it was deduced as anthranilic acid.

  7. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity.

  8. Probing the affinity of polyanions for acidic fibroblast growth factor by unfolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mach, H; Middaugh, C R

    1994-02-15

    The relationship between ligand-protein affinity and the extent of protein stabilization induced by such interactions has been investigated using the binding of polyanions to acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) as a model system. It was found that the experimentally observed unfolding rate constant of aFGF consists of two components: one equal to the unfolding rate constant of the aFGF-ligand complex and the other the product of the unfolding rate constant of free aFGF, the aFGF-ligand dissociation constant (Kd), and the reciprocal of the molar ligand concentration. This reflects the presence of two possible unfolding pathways: at high ligand excess dissociation is suppressed and slow unfolding of the aFGF-ligand complex itself prevails. When lower concentrations of ligand allows equilibrium-driven appearance of free aFGF, a more rapid unfolding of dissociated protein predominates. Existence of a steady state of dissociated aFGF undergoing unfolding was demonstrated by computer simulation of the elementary events, using experimentally determined rate constants. The potential applications of such simulations are outlined. An equation allowing estimation of dissociation constants from equilibrium denaturation curves obtained in the presence of a varying amount of ligand is also proposed. In addition, determination of initial unfolding rates in the presence of excess protein permits the the stoichiometry of the interaction to be determined.

  9. Release Kinetic in Yogurt from Gallic Acid Microparticles with Chemically Modified Inulin.

    PubMed

    García, Paula; Vergara, Cristina; Robert, Paz

    2015-10-01

    Gallic acid (GA) was encapsulated with native (NIn), cross-linked (CIn) and acetylated (AIn) inulin by spray-drying. Inulin microparticles were characterized by encapsulation efficiency (EE) and their release profile in yogurt. The EE was significantly higher for GA-CIn (98%) compared with GA-NIn (81%) and GA-AIn (77%) microparticles, showing the effect of the modification of inulin on interaction of GA-polymer. GA release profile data in yogurt for GA-CIn, GA-NIn and GA-AIn were fitted to Peppas and Higuchi models in order to obtain the GA release rate constant. Although the GA release rate constants were significantly different among systems, these differences were slight and the GA release was fast (80% < 2 h) in the three systems, showing that inulin-systems did not control GA release in yogurt. The mechanism of GA release followed a Fickian diffusion and relaxation of chains for all microparticles. According to the release profile, these microparticles would be best suited for use in instant foods. PMID:26305430

  10. Release Kinetic in Yogurt from Gallic Acid Microparticles with Chemically Modified Inulin.

    PubMed

    García, Paula; Vergara, Cristina; Robert, Paz

    2015-10-01

    Gallic acid (GA) was encapsulated with native (NIn), cross-linked (CIn) and acetylated (AIn) inulin by spray-drying. Inulin microparticles were characterized by encapsulation efficiency (EE) and their release profile in yogurt. The EE was significantly higher for GA-CIn (98%) compared with GA-NIn (81%) and GA-AIn (77%) microparticles, showing the effect of the modification of inulin on interaction of GA-polymer. GA release profile data in yogurt for GA-CIn, GA-NIn and GA-AIn were fitted to Peppas and Higuchi models in order to obtain the GA release rate constant. Although the GA release rate constants were significantly different among systems, these differences were slight and the GA release was fast (80% < 2 h) in the three systems, showing that inulin-systems did not control GA release in yogurt. The mechanism of GA release followed a Fickian diffusion and relaxation of chains for all microparticles. According to the release profile, these microparticles would be best suited for use in instant foods.

  11. Plasma Free Fatty Acids, Fatty Acid-binding Protein 4, and Mortality in Older Adults (From the Cardiovascular Health Study)

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Michael D.; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Ix, Joachim H.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Siscovick, David S.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Djousse, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Plasma free fatty acids (FFA) are largely derived from adipose tissue. Elevated levels of FFA and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), a key cytoplasmic chaperone of fatty acids, have been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes but limited data are available on the relation of these biomarkers with cardiovascular and total mortality. We studied 4,707 participants with a mean age of 75 years who had plasma FFA and FABP4 measured in 1992–1993 as part of the Cardiovascular Health Study, an observational cohort of community dwelling older adults. Over a median follow-up of 11.8 years, 3,555 participants died. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the association between FFA, FABP4, and mortality. In fully adjusted models, FFA were associated with dose-dependent significantly higher total mortality (hazard ratio (HR) per standard deviation (SD): 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09–1.18), but FABP4 levels were not (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.98–1.09). In a cause-specific mortality analysis, higher concentrations of FFA were associated with significantly higher risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, dementia, infection, and respiratory causes, but not cancer or trauma. We did not find evidence of an interaction between FFA and FABP4 (p=0.45), but FABP4 appeared to be associated with total mortality differentially among men and women (HR 1.17 (1.08–1.26) for men, HR 1.02 (0.96–1.07) for women, interaction p-value <0.001). In conclusion, in a cohort of community-dwelling older individuals, elevated plasma concentrations of FFA, but not FABP4, were associated with cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality. PMID:25073566

  12. Kinetic evaluation and process performance of an upflow anaerobic filter reactor degrading terephthalic acid.

    PubMed

    Davutluoglu, Orkun I; Seckin, Galip

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation of terephthalic acid (TA) as the sole organic carbon source was studied in an upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) reactor. The reactor was seeded with biomass obtained from a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor and was used to treat wastewater from a petrochemical facility producing dimethyl terephthalate. The UAF reactor was operated for 252 d with a constant hydraulic retention time of 24 h, and the organic loading rate (OLR) was gradually increased from 1 to 10 g-chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L d. After a lag period of approximately 40 d, the COD removal efficiency increased exponentially and high removal rate values (≈90%) were obtained, except for at highest OLR (10 g-COD/L d). The high removal rates and the robustness of the reactor performance could be attributed to the formation of biofilm as well as granular sludge. The methane production rates (0.22 to 2.15 L/d) correlated well with the removed OLRs (0.3 to 6.8 g-COD/L d) during the various phases of treatment, indicating that the main mechanism of TA degradation occurs via methanogenic reactions. The average methane content of the produced biogas was 70.3%. The modified Stover-Kincannon model was found to be applicable for the anaerobic degradation of TA in UAFs (Umax = 64.5, KB = 69.1 g-COD/L d and Ymax = 0.27 L-CH4/g-CODremoved). These results suggest that UAF reactors are among the most effective reactor configurations for the anaerobic degradation of TA.

  13. Effect of intake on whole body plasma amino acid kinetics in sheep.

    PubMed

    Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Hoskin, Simone O; Lobley, Gerald E

    2003-01-01

    While both the quantity and quality of food ingested are potent regulators of whole body protein metabolism in ruminants, little data are available on responses across a wide range of intakes. The current study examined the responses in whole body protein flux (PrF) to such intake changes and compared these with the responses across the hind-quarters (in a companion study). Six growing sheep (6-8 months, 30-35 kg) received each of four intakes of dried grass pellets (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.5 times maintenance energy; M) for a minimum of 7 days. At each intake, a mixture of U-13C amino-acids (AA) was infused intravenously for 10 h. Arterial plasma and blood were obtained over the last 4 h of infusion and the concentrations and the enrichments of thirteen 13C labelled AA were determined. The absolute values for plasma Irreversible Loss Rate (ILR) but also converted PrF varied between the AA. PrF values were lower for histidine, methionine, aspartate, glycine and proline (range 68 to 174 g x d(-1) at 1.5 M) than for isoleucine, leucine, valine and glutamate (range 275 to 400 g x d(-1) at 1.5 M). These discrepancies may be explained by (1) the differential AA removal by the splanchnic tissues, (2) the de novo synthesis of the non-essential AA, (3) the transfer of AA from the erythrocytes or plasma to the tissues. The first two assumptions require further investigation whereas recent work has shown a minor role for AA transfers between erythrocytes and tissues. For most AA, ILR and PrF responded linearly to intake but curvilinear responses were observed for phenylalanine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine and tyrosine. These differences were not due to hind-quarter metabolism and may involve the digestive tract and liver. PMID:12785454

  14. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  15. Kinetics study of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with erucic acid using an ATR-IR flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chunbo; Hiltner, Joseph; Pham, Hai; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-01

    The ozone initiated heterogeneous oxidation of erucic acid (EA) thin film was investigated using a flow system combined with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) over wide ranges of ozone concentrations (0.25-60 ppm), thin film thickness (0.1-1.0 μm), temperatures (263-298 K), and relative humidities (0-80% RH) for the first time. Pseudo-first-order rate constants, kapp, and overall reactive uptake coefficients, γ, were obtained through changes in the absorbance of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching bands at 1695 cm(-1), which is assigned to the carbonyl group in carboxylic acid. Results showed that the reaction followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and kapp was largely dominated by surface reaction over bulk phase reaction. In addition, both the kapp and the γ values showed very strong temperature dependences (∼two orders of magnitude) over the temperature range; in contrast, they only slightly increased with increasing RH values from 0-80%. According to the kapp values as a function of temperature, the activation energy for the heterogeneous reaction was estimated to be 80.6 kJ mol(-1). Our results have suggested that heterogeneous reactions between ozone and unsaturated solid surfaces likely have a substantially greater temperature dependence than liquid ones. Moreover, the hygroscopic properties of EA thin films before and after exposure to ozone were also studied by measurement of water uptake. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the insignificant RH effect on reaction kinetics was probably due to the relatively weak water uptake by the unreacted and reacted EA thin films.

  16. Ascorbic-acid-assisted growth of high quality M@ZnO: a growth mechanism and kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Han, Shuhua; Zhou, Guangju; Zhang, Lijie; Li, Xingliang; Zou, Chao; Huang, Shaoming

    2013-12-01

    We present a general route for synthesizing M@ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) by using ascorbic acid (AA) to induce deposition of ZnO on various shaped and structured cationic-surfactant-capped NP surfaces (noble, magnetic, semiconductor, rod-like, spherical, cubic, dendrite, alloy, core@shell). The results show that the complexing (AA and Zn(2+)) and cooperative effects (AA and CTAB) play important roles in the formation of polycrystalline ZnO shells. Besides, the growth kinetics of M@ZnO was systematically studied. It was found that the slow growth rate favors the successful formation of uniform core@ZnO NPs with relatively loose shells. An appropriate growth rate allows achieving high quality M@ZnO NPs with dense shells. However, very fast growth causes significant additional nucleation and the formation of pure ZnO NPs. This general method is suitable for preparing M@ZnO using seed NPs prepared in both water and organic phases. It might be an alternative route for functionalizing NPs for bioapplications (ZnO is biocompatible), modulating material properties as designed, or synthesizing template materials for building other nanostructures. PMID:24122007

  17. Palliative therapy with I-131 labeled bezylidenediphosphonic acid: In vivo kinetics and response to pain induced by bone metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhut, M.; Berberich, R.; Kimmig, B.; Oberhausen, E.; Georgi, P.; Zum Winkel, K.

    1985-05-01

    I-131 labeled ..cap alpha..-amino-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)diphosphonic acid (BDP3) was recently suggested as a palliative acting radiopharmaceutical against pain syndromes associated with disseminated bone metastases. Such an application was supported by the in vivo kinetics of I-131-BDP3 in rats. The authors investigated the palliative effectiveness of I-131-BDP3 in 18 patients with typical pain symptoms induced by bone metastases of various primary carcinoma. The blood clearance was rapid. More than 90% disappeared from the blood pool at 4 hr after injection. The excretion of the activity occured solely through the kidneys and the median total body retention at 48 hr was 51% (range 30-64%). The thyroid activity decreased during therapy indicating no cleavage reactions as long as I-131-BDP3 is bound to the bone tissue. The binding of I-131-BDP3 to bone is very long since the effective half life was in the order of magnitude of the physical half life. Additionally the effective half lifes in the metastatic ares (median 182 hr; range 177-205 hr) proved to be longer than in unaffected areas (145 hr; 140-165 hr). The palliative therapies were performed with doses of 6 - 48 mCi. The response amounted to 44% complete pain relief, 6% substantial pain relief, 22% minimal improvement and 28% no change. The duration of response ranged between 1 and 8 weeks.

  18. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Koller, Georg; Coclite, Anna Maria

    2016-04-01

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and water were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm-1. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.

  19. In vivo fluorescence kinetics and photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolaevulinic acid-induced porphyrin: increased damage after multiple irradiations.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, N; van Leengoed, H L; Star, W M

    1994-11-01

    The kinetics of fluorescence in tumour (TT) and subcutaneous tissue (ST) and the vascular effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) were studied using protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), endogenously generated after i.v. administration of 100 and 200 mg kg-1 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA). The experimental model was a rat skinfold observation chamber containing a thin layer of ST in which a small syngeneic mammary tumour grows in a sheet-like fashion. Maximum TT and ST fluorescence following 200 mg kg-1 ALA was twice the value after 100 mg kg-1 ALA, but the initial increase with time was the same for the two doses in both TT and ST. The fluorescence increase in ST was slower and the maximum fluorescence was less and appeared later than in TT. Photodynamic therapy was applied using green argon laser light (514.5 nm, 100 J cm-2). Three groups received a single light treatment at different intervals after administration of 100 or 200 mg kg-1 ALA. In these groups no correlation was found between the fluorescence intensities and the vascular damage following PDT. A fourth group was treated twice and before the second light treatment some fluorescence had reappeared after photobleaching due to the first treatment. Only with the double light treatment was lasting TT necrosis achieved, and for the first time with any photosensitiser in this model this was accomplished without complete ST necrosis.

  20. Kinetics and isotherm analysis of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyl acetic acid adsorption onto soil components under oxic and anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ololade, Isaac A; Alomaja, Folasade; Oladoja, Nurudeen A; Ololade, Oluwaranti O; Oloye, Femi F

    2015-01-01

    2,4-dichlorophenoxyl acetic acid (2,4-D, pKa = 2.8) is used extensively as a herbicide in agricultural practices. Its sorption behavior on both untreated and soils treated to significantly remove specific components (organic and iron and manganese [Fe-Mn] oxides and hydroxides phases) was investigated under oxic and anoxic conditions. The chemical and structural heterogeneity of the soil components were characterized by elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The coexistence of the various components seems to either mask sorption sites on the untreated soil surfaces or inhibit interlayer diffusion of 2,4-D. All sorption data conform to the Freundlich description and a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. There was a strong positive correlation between sorption capacity K(d), and surface area (r(2) ≤ 0.704), but a negative correlation was uncovered with both pH and organic carbon (r(2) ≤ -0.860). The results indicate that 2,4-D is preferably sorbed under oxic rather than anoxic conditions and it is greater on soils containing a high Fe content. There was incomplete 2,4-D sorption reversibility, with desorption occurring more rapidly under anoxic conditions. The study suggests that stimulation of Fe III reduction could be used for the bioremediation of a 2,4-D-contaminated site. PMID:25996813

  1. Kinetic modeling and scale up of lipoic acid (LA) production from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Shilpa S; Singhal, Rekha S

    2013-08-01

    Scale up studies for production of lipoic acid (LA) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported in this paper for the first time. LA production in batch mode was carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor at varying agitation and aeration with maximum LA production of 512 mg/L obtained at 350 rpm and 25 % dissolved oxygen in batch culture conditions. Thus, LA production increased from 352 mg/L in shake flask to 512 mg/L in batch mode in a 5 L stirred tank bioreactor. Biomass production under these conditions was mathematically explained using logistic equation and data obtained for LA production and substrate utilization were successfully fitted using Luedeking-Piret and Mercier's models. The kinetic studies showed LA production to be growth associated. Further enhancement of LA production was carried out using fed-batch (variable volume) and semi-continuous modes of fermentation. Semi-continuous fermentation with three feeding cycles of sucrose effectively increased the production of LA from 512 to 725 mg/L.

  2. Kinetics of Antibody Aggregation at Neutral pH and Ambient Temperatures Triggered by Temporal Exposure to Acid.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Honda, Shinya

    2016-09-15

    The purification process of an antibody in manufacturing involves temporal exposure of the molecules to low pH followed by neutralization-pH-shift stress-which causes aggregation. It remains unclear how aggregation triggered by pH-shift stress grows at neutral pH and how it depends on the temperature in an ambient range. We used static and dynamic light scattering to monitor the time-dependent evolution of the aggregate size of the pH-shift stressed antibody between 4.0 and 40.0 °C. A power-law relationship between the effective molecular weight and the effective hydrodynamic radius was found, indicating that the aggregates were fractal with a dimension of 1.98. We found that the aggregation kinetics in the lower-temperature range, 4.0-25.0 °C, were well described by the Smoluchowski aggregation equation. The temperature dependence of the effective aggregation rate constant gave 13 ± 1 kcal/mol of endothermic activation energy. Temporal acid exposure creates an enriched population of unfolded protein molecules that are competent of aggregating. Therefore, the energetically unfavorable unfolding step is not required and the aggregation proceeds faster. These findings provide a basis for predicting the growth of aggregates during storage under practical, ambient conditions. PMID:27537343

  3. Adsorption and photodegradation kinetics of herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid with MgFeTi layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong; Beak, Min-wook; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-01

    The calcined layered double hydroxides (cLDHs) Ti-doped and undoped MgFe for this study were prepared by co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) techniques and tested for adsorption and photodegradation (including photocatalytic and photo-Fenton-like) of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation. In the range of studied operating conditions, the as-prepared samples exhibited excellent photo-Fenton-like activity, leading to more than 80-95% degradation of 2,4,5-T at initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) with 4 g calcined LDHs per liter, was accomplished in 360 min, while 2,4,5-T half-life time was as short as 99-182 min. The kinetics of adsorption and photodegradation of 2,4,5-T were also discussed. These results offered a green, low cost and high efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical formation of iron oxidation products on steel immersed in sour acid media.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Espejel, Antonio; Palomar-Pardavé, Manuel; Cabrera-Sierra, Román; Romero-Romo, Mario; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Arce-Estrada, Elsa M

    2011-03-01

    From electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, potential steps, and EIS), XRD, and SEM-EDX, the kinetics and mechanism of anodic film formation applying anodic potential steps on steel immersed in sour acid media was determined. It was found, from a thermodynamic analysis, based on equilibrium phase diagrams of the system considered in this work, that iron oxidation may produce different new solid phases, depending on the applied potential, the first being the iron oxidation associated with formation of FeS((c)) species, which in turn can be reoxidized to FeS(2(c)) or even to Fe(2)O(3(c)) at higher potential values. From analysis of the corresponding experimental potentiostatic current density transients, it was concluded that the electrochemical anodic film formation involves an E(1)CE(2) mechanism, whereby the first of the two simultaneous processes were the Fe electrochemical oxidation (E(1)) followed by FeS precipitation (C) that occurs by 3D nucleation and growth limited by mass transfer reaction and FeS oxidation (E(2)) forming a mix of different stoichiometry iron sulphides and oxides. From EIS measurements, it was revealed that the anodic film's charge transfer resistance diminishes as the potential applied for its formation becomes more anodic, thus behaving poorly against corrosion.

  5. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate(III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Flow Injection Kinetic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, Joanquim A.; Rocha, Fabio R. P.

    1997-05-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) is a well recognized tool for solutions management. In spite of the use of this technique mainly for quantitative determination of analytes in solution, FIA systems can also be used for obtaining physical chemistry data. This work describes the use of a flow diagram to perform a kinetic experiment: the effect of ionic strength on the rate of reduction of hexacyanoferrate(III) by ascorbic acid. The rate determining step of this reaction involves the collision between two anionic species. The increase of the ionic strength of the medium alters the ionic atmosphere and changes the charge densities around the anions. Consequently, there is an increment of the rate constants for higher ionic strengths. In the proposed system, the flow is stopped by commutation when the center of the sample zone attained the flow cell and a gradual decrease in signal, related to the redox reaction, is registered as function of time. This allowed the determination of the rate constants as a function of the ionic strength. The product of the charges of the ions involved in the rate determining step was estimated in 3.2 that is close to the expected value considering the proposed mechanism.

  6. Omega-3 free fatty acids inhibit tamoxifen-induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shufan; Guo, Yang; Wu, Yikuan; Zhu, Shenglong; He, Zhao; Chen, Yong Q

    2015-04-01

    Fish oil, which contains omega-3 fatty acids mainly in the form of triglycerides, has benefits for reducing breast cancer risk, similar to tamoxifen action. However, it remains to be elucidated whether the combination of omega-3 free fatty acid (ω-3FFA) with tamoxifen leads to improved treatment in breast cancer. In this study, we observed that ω-3FFA induces MCF-7 cell apoptosis to suppress cell growth. The treatment of breast cancer cells with ω-3FFA attenuated tamoxifen-induced cell apoptosis. ω-3FFA and tamoxifen significantly increased Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation levels in a dose and time dependent manner. Compared to ω-3FFA alone, the combination of tamoxifen with ω-3FFA significantly increased Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation levels. Because Erk1/2 and Akt activation has been linked to tamoxifen-related anti-estrogen resistance in breast cancer patients, these results indicate that ω-3FFA may interfere with the effects of tamoxifen in the prevention of breast cancer risk.

  7. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated. PMID:26794772

  8. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated.

  9. Redox potentials and kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction and solubility of cerium sulfates in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulenova, A.; Creager, S. E.; Navratil, J. D.; Wei, Y.

    Experimental work was performed with the aim of evaluating the Ce 4+/Ce 3+ redox couple in sulfuric acid electrolyte for use in redox flow battery (RFB) technology. The solubility of cerium sulfates in 0.1-4.0 M sulfuric acid at 20-60 °C was studied. A synergistic effect of both sulfuric acid concentration and temperature on the solubility of cerous sulfate was observed. The solubility of cerous sulfate significantly decreased with rising concentration of sulfuric acid and rising temperature, while the solubility of ceric sulfate goes through a significant maximum at 40 °C. Redox potentials and the kinetics of the cerous/ceric redox reaction were also studied under the same temperature-concentration conditions. The redox potentials were measured using the combined redox electrode (Pt-Ag/AgCl) in equimolar Ce 4+/Ce 3+ solutions (i.e.[Ce 3+]=[Ce 4+]) in sulfuric acid electrolyte. The Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox potentials significantly decrease (i.e. shift to more negative values) with rising sulfuric acid concentration; a small maximum is observed at 40 °C. Cyclic voltammetric experiments confirmed slow electrochemical kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on carbon glassy electrodes (CGEs) in sulfuric acid solutions. The observed dependencies of solubilities, the redox potentials and the kinetics of Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction on sulfuric acid concentration are thought to be the result of inequivalent complexation of the two redox species by sulfate anions: the ceric ion is much more strongly bound to sulfate than is the cerous ion. The best temperature-concentration conditions for the RFB electrolytes appear to be 40 °C and 1 M sulfuric acid, where the relatively good solubility of both cerium species, the maximum of redox potentials, and the more or less satisfying stability of CGE s were found. Even so, the relatively low solubility of cerium salts in sulfuric acid media and slow redox kinetics of the Ce 3+/Ce 4+ redox reaction at carbon indicate that the Ce 3+/Ce

  10. Calibration of amino acid racemization (AAR) kinetics in United States mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain Quaternary mollusks using 87Sr/ 86Sr analyses: Evaluation of kinetic models and estimation of regional Late Pleistocene temperature history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wehmiller, J. F.; Harris, W.B.; Boutin, B.S.; Farrell, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of amino acid racemization (AAR) for estimating ages of Quaternary fossils usually requires a combination of kinetic and effective temperature modeling or independent age calibration of analyzed samples. Because of limited availability of calibration samples, age estimates are often based on model extrapolations from single calibration points over wide ranges of D/L values. Here we present paired AAR and 87Sr/ 86Sr results for Pleistocene mollusks from the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA. 87Sr/ 86Sr age estimates, derived from the lookup table of McArthur et al. [McArthur, J.M., Howarth, R.J., Bailey, T.R., 2001. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy: LOWESS version 3: best fit to the marine Sr-isotopic curve for 0-509 Ma and accompanying Look-up table for deriving numerical age. Journal of Geology 109, 155-169], provide independent age calibration over the full range of amino acid D/L values, thereby allowing comparisons of alternative kinetic models for seven amino acids. The often-used parabolic kinetic model is found to be insufficient to explain the pattern of racemization, although the kinetic pathways for valine racemization and isoleucine epimerization can be closely approximated with this function. Logarithmic and power law regressions more accurately represent the racemization pathways for all amino acids. The reliability of a non-linear model for leucine racemization, developed and refined over the past 20 years, is confirmed by the 87Sr/ 86Sr age results. This age model indicates that the subsurface record (up to 80m thick) of the North Carolina Coastal Plain spans the entire Quaternary, back to ???2.5Ma. The calibrated kinetics derived from this age model yield an estimate of the effective temperature for the study region of 11??2??C., from which we estimate full glacial (Last Glacial Maximum - LGM) temperatures for the region on the order of 7-10??C cooler than present. These temperatures compare favorably with independent paleoclimate information

  11. Kinetics and utilization of lipid sources during acute exercise and acipimox.

    PubMed

    Nellemann, Birgitte; Søndergaard, Esben; Jensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Nielsen, Søren

    2014-07-15

    Overweight is associated with abnormalities of lipid metabolism, many of which are reversed by exercise. We investigated the impact of experimental antilipolysis and acute exercise on lipid kinetics and oxidation from VLDL-TG, plasma FFA, and "residual lipids" in overweight men (n = 8) using VLDL-TG and palmitate tracers in combination with muscle biopsies in a randomized, placebo-controlled design. Participants received placebo or acipimox on each study day (4 h of rest, 90 min of exercise at 50% V(O(2 max))). Exercise suppressed VLDL-TG secretion significantly during placebo but not acipimox (placebo-rest: 64.2 ± 9.4; placebo-exercise: 48.3 ± 8.0; acipimox-rest: 55.2 ± 13.4; acipimox-exercise: 52.0 ± 10.9). Resting oxidation of VLDL-TG FA and FFA was significantly reduced during acipimox compared with placebo, whereas "residual lipid oxidation" increased significantly [VLDL-TG oxidation (placebo: 18 ± 3 kcal/h; acipimox: 11 ± 2 kcal/h), FFA oxidation (placebo: 14 ± 2 kcal/h; acipimox: 4 ± 0.5 kcal/h), and residual lipid oxidation (placebo: 3 ± 5 kcal/h; acipimox: 14 ± 5 kcal/h)]. Additionally, during exercise on both placebo and acipimox, oxidation of VLDL-TG and FFA increased, but the relative contribution to total lipid oxidation diminished, except for FFA, which remained unchanged during acipimox. Residual lipid oxidation increased significantly during exercise in both absolute and relative terms. Changes in selected cellular enzymes and proteins provided no explanations for kinetic changes. In conclusion, suppressed FFA availability blunts the effect of exercise on VLDL-TG secretion and modifies the contribution of lipid sources for oxidation.

  12. Production of lactobionic acid and sorbitol from lactose/fructose substrate using GFOR/GL enzymes from Zymomonas mobilis cells: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Pedruzzi, Israel; da Silva, Eduardo A Borges; Rodrigues, Alírio E

    2011-07-10

    In this work, we have investigated the kinetics of the biotechnological production of lactobionic acid (LBA) and sorbitol by the catalytic action of glucose-fructose oxidoreductase (GFOR) and glucono-δ-lactonase (GL) enzymes. The cells of bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ATCC 29191 containing this enzymatic complex were submitted to permeabilization and reticulation procedures. The effect of the concentration of substrates on the rate of product formation using a mobilized cell system was investigated. The application of higher fructose concentration seems to not affect the initial rate of formation of the bionic acid. Under conditions of low initial concentration of lactose, the experimental kinetic data of the bi-substrate reaction were modelled by assuming a rate equation of the classical ping-pong mechanism. The found kinetic parameters displayed a low affinity of the GFOR enzyme for both substrates. The enzymatic system did not exhibit normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics in response to a change of concentration of lactose, when fructose was held constant, presenting a sigmoid relationship between initial velocity and substrate concentration. A rate equation based on Hill kinetics was used to describe the kinetic behaviour of this enzyme-substituted reaction at higher lactose concentrations. The results from batch experiments using immobilized cells within Ca-alginate beads revealed that there is no pronounced occurrence of mass transfer limitations on LBA production for beads with 1.2 mm in average diameter. This discussion aids for defining the best operating conditions to maximize the productivity for LBA and sorbitol in this bioconversion and also for reducing the complexity of downstream separation processes.

  13. Effect of ascorbic acid on the degradation of cyanocobalamin and hydroxocobalamin in aqueous solution: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Qadeer, Kiran; Zahid, Saima; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ismail, Tehmina; Hussain, Waqar; Ansari, Izhar Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of 5 × 10(-5) M cyanocobalamin (B12) and hydroxocobalamin (B12b) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2) was studied in the pH range of 1.0-8.0. B12 is degraded to B12b which undergoes oxidation to corrin ring cleavage products. B12b alone is directly oxidized to the ring cleavage products. B12 and B12b in degraded solutions were simultaneously assayed by a two-component spectrometric method at 525 and 550 nm without interference from AH2. Both degrade by first-order kinetics and the values of the rate constants at pH 1.0-8.0 range from 0.08 to 1.05 × 10(-5) s(-1) and 0.22-7.62 × 10(-5) s(-1), respectively, in the presence of 0.25 × 10(-3) M AH2. The t 1/2 values of B12 and B12b range from 13.7 to 137.5 h and 2.5-87.5 h, respectively. The second-order rate constants for the interaction of AH2 with B12 and B12b are 0.05-0.28 × 10(-2) and 1.10-30.08 × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, indicating a greater effect of AH2 on B12b compared to that of B12. The k obs-pH profiles for both B12 and B12b show the highest rates of degradation around pH 5. The degradation of B12 and B12b by AH2 is affected by the catalytic effect of phosphate ions on the oxidation of AH2 in the pH range 6.0-8.0. PMID:24920523

  14. Effect of ascorbic acid on the degradation of cyanocobalamin and hydroxocobalamin in aqueous solution: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Qadeer, Kiran; Zahid, Saima; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ismail, Tehmina; Hussain, Waqar; Ansari, Izhar Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of 5 × 10(-5) M cyanocobalamin (B12) and hydroxocobalamin (B12b) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2) was studied in the pH range of 1.0-8.0. B12 is degraded to B12b which undergoes oxidation to corrin ring cleavage products. B12b alone is directly oxidized to the ring cleavage products. B12 and B12b in degraded solutions were simultaneously assayed by a two-component spectrometric method at 525 and 550 nm without interference from AH2. Both degrade by first-order kinetics and the values of the rate constants at pH 1.0-8.0 range from 0.08 to 1.05 × 10(-5) s(-1) and 0.22-7.62 × 10(-5) s(-1), respectively, in the presence of 0.25 × 10(-3) M AH2. The t 1/2 values of B12 and B12b range from 13.7 to 137.5 h and 2.5-87.5 h, respectively. The second-order rate constants for the interaction of AH2 with B12 and B12b are 0.05-0.28 × 10(-2) and 1.10-30.08 × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, indicating a greater effect of AH2 on B12b compared to that of B12. The k obs-pH profiles for both B12 and B12b show the highest rates of degradation around pH 5. The degradation of B12 and B12b by AH2 is affected by the catalytic effect of phosphate ions on the oxidation of AH2 in the pH range 6.0-8.0.

  15. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  16. Adsorption of methyl orange and salicylic acid on a nano-transition metal composite: Kinetics, thermodynamic and electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Arshadi, M; Mousavinia, F; Amiri, M J; Faraji, A R

    2016-12-01

    In this work synthesis of Mn-nanoparticles (MnNPs) supported on the Schiff base modified nano-sized SiO2Al2O3 mixed-oxides (Si/Al) and its implementation as an adsorbent for the removal of organic pollutions such as methyl orange (MO) and salicylic acid (SA) was investigated. Si/Al were functionalized by grafting Schiff base ligand and in the next step, MnNPs were prepared over the modified nano sol-gel Si/Al. Structures and adsorption characteristics of the obtained organometallic-modified SiO2/Al2O3 mixed oxide were studied by several methods such as elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). EPR data of the immobilized manganese ions resulted that the transition state of active sites in the nano-adsorbent are in the form of Mn(II) ions at the surface. The adsorption properties of heterogeneous Mn(II) ions showed that this nano-adsorbent has very good potential to remove MO and SA ions from aqueous solution. The removal efficiency of the SAPAS@MnNPs towards MO reached out to 89.3 and 29.1% and for SA approached to 54.6 and 18.9% at 150 and 500mg/dm(3) initial organic pollution concentrations, respectively. To investigate the adsorption kinetic of Mn(II) ions onto the nano-sized support, pseudo first and pseudo second order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models have also been applied to the equilibrium adsorption data. The contact time to obtain equilibrium for maximum adsorption capacity was 45min. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature and it was well explained with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. No remarkable loss of removal capacity even after 8th times regeneration

  17. A study of pH-dependent photodegradation of amiloride by a multivariate curve resolution approach to combined kinetic and acid-base titration UV data.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Michele; Ioele, Giuseppina; Mas, Sílvia; Tauler, Romà; Ragno, Gaetano

    2012-11-21

    Amiloride photostability at different pH values was studied in depth by applying Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) to the UV spectrophotometric data from drug solutions exposed to stressing irradiation. Resolution of all degradation photoproducts was possible by simultaneous spectrophotometric analysis of kinetic photodegradation and acid-base titration experiments. Amiloride photodegradation showed to be strongly dependent on pH. Two hard modelling constraints were sequentially used in MCR-ALS for the unambiguous resolution of all the species involved in the photodegradation process. An amiloride acid-base system was defined by using the equilibrium constraint, and the photodegradation pathway was modelled taking into account the kinetic constraint. The simultaneous analysis of photodegradation and titration experiments revealed the presence of eight different species, which were differently distributed according to pH and time. Concentration profiles of all the species as well as their pure spectra were resolved and kinetic rate constants were estimated. The values of rate constants changed with pH and under alkaline conditions the degradation pathway and photoproducts also changed. These results were compared to those obtained by LC-MS analysis from drug photodegradation experiments. MS analysis allowed the identification of up to five species and showed the simultaneous presence of more than one acid-base equilibrium.

  18. Effect of Span 60 on the Microstructure, Crystallization Kinetics, and Mechanical Properties of Stearic Acid Oleogels: An In-Depth Analysis.

    PubMed

    Uvanesh, K; Sagiri, S S; Senthilguru, K; Pramanik, K; Banerjee, I; Anis, Arfat; Al-Zahrani, S M; Pal, Kunal

    2016-02-01

    Modulation of crystallization of stearic acid and its derivatives is important for tuning the properties of stearate oleogels. The present study delineates the crystallization of stearic acid in stearate oleogels in the presence of Span 60. Microarchitecture analysis revealed that stearic acid crystals in the oleogels changed its shape from plate-like structure to a branched architecture in the presence of Span 60. Consequently, a significant variation in the mobility of the solute molecules inside the oleogel (Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies, FRAP analysis) was observed. Thermal analysis (gelation kinetics and DSC) revealed shortening of nucleation induction time and secondary crystallization with an increase in the Span 60 concentration. Furthermore, isosolid diagram suggested better physical stability of the formulations at higher proportions of Span 60. XRD analysis indicated that there was a decrease in the crystal size and the crystallinity of the stearic acid crystals with an increase in Span 60 concentration in the Span 60 containing oleogels. However, crystal growth orientation was unidirectional and found unaltered with Span 60 concentration (Avarmi analysis using DSC data). The mechanical study indicated a composition-dependent variation in the viscoelastic properties (instantaneous [τ1 ], intermediate [τ2 ], and delayed [τ3 ] relaxation times) of the formulations. In conclusion, Span 60 can be used to alter the kinetics of the crystallization, crystal habit and crystal structure of stearic acid. This study provides a number of clues that could be used further for developing oleogel based formulation.

  19. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for Fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA was January 1, 1992. Section IX and Appendix F of the agreement impose design and operating requirements on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tank systems and identify several plans, schedules, and assessments that must be submitted to EPA/TDEC for review of approval. The issue of ES/ER-17&D1 Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee in March 1992 transmitted to EPA/TDEC those plans and schedules that were required within 60 to 90 days of the FFA effective date. This document updates the plans, schedules, and strategy for achieving compliance with the FFA as presented in ES/ER-17&D I and summarizes the progress that has been made to date. This document supersedes all updates of ES/ER- 17&D 1. Chapter 1 describes the history and operation of the ORNL LLLW System and the objectives of the FFA. Chapters 2 through 5 contain the updated plans and schedules for meeting FFA requirements. This document will continue to be periodically reassessed and refined to reflect newly developed information and progress.

  20. Performance, kinetics, and equilibrium of methylene blue adsorption on biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Dongmei; Wan, Shungang; Yu, Zebin

    2015-12-01

    Biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids at low temperatures was utilized as adsorbent to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that the carboxyl group was introduced on the biochar surface. Adsorption experiment data indicated that eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric acid showed higher MB adsorption efficiency than that modified with tartaric and acetic acids. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing MB adsorption on biochar compared with pseudo-first-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The calculated values of ΔG(0) and ΔH(0) indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption process. MB adsorption on biochar followed the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities for eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids were 178.57, 99.01, and 29.94 mg g(-1), respectively, at 35°C.

  1. Ruthenium(III) catalyzed oxidation of sulfanilic acid by diperiodatocuprate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium. A kinetic and mechanistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munavalli, D. S.; Patil, R. K.; Chimatadar, S. A.; Nandibewoor, S. T.

    2009-12-01

    The kinetics of ruthenium(III) catalyzed oxidation of sulfanilic acid by diperiodatocuprate(III) (DPC) in alkaline medium at a constant ionic strength of (0.50 mol dm-3) has been studied spectrophoto-metrically. The reaction between sulfanilic acid and DPC in alkaline medium exhibits 1: 4 stoichiometry (sulfanilic acid: DPC). The reaction is first order with respect to [DPC] and [RuIII] and has less than unit order both in [sulfanilic acid] and [alkali]. The active species of catalyst and oxidant have been identified. Intervention of free radicals was observed in the reaction. The main products were identified by spot test and IR. Probable mechanism is proposed and discussed. The reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanism are calculated. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanism are computed and discussed. Thermodynamic quantities are also determined.

  2. Validated stability-indicating HPLC method for the determination of pridinol mesylate. Kinetics study of its degradation in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Romina M; Castellano, Patricia M; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2008-12-01

    The stability of pridinol mesylate (PRI) was investigated under different stress conditions, including hydrolytic, oxidative, photolytic and thermal, as recommended by the ICH guidelines. Relevant degradation was found to take place under acidic (0.1N HCl) and photolytic (visible and long-wavelength UV-light) conditions, both yielding the product resulting from water elimination (ELI), while submission to an oxidizing environment gave the N-oxidation derivative (NOX). The standards of these degradation products were synthesized and characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. A simple, sensitive and specific HPLC method was developed for the quantification of PRI, ELI and NOX in bulk drug, and the conditions were optimized by means of a statistical design strategy. The separation employs a C(18) column and a 51:9:40 (v/v/v) mixture of MeOH, 2-propanol and potassium phosphate solution (50mM, pH 6.0), as mobile phase, delivered at 1.0 ml min(-1); the analytes were detected and quantified at 220 nm. The method was validated, demonstrating to be accurate and precise (repeatability and intermediate precision levels) within the corresponding linear ranges of PRI (0.1-1.5 mg ml(-1); r=0.9983, n=18) and both impurities (0.1-1.3% relative to PRI, r=0.9996 and 0.9995 for ELI and NOX, respectively, n=18). Robustness against small modifications of pH and percentage of the aqueous mobile phase was ascertained and the limits of quantification of the analytes were also determined (0.4 and 0.5 microg ml(-1); 0.04% and 0.05% relative to PRI for ELI and NOX, respectively). Peak purity indices (>0.9997), obtained with the aid of diode-array detection, and satisfactory resolution (R(s)>2.0) between PRI and its impurities established the specificity of the determination, all these results proving the stability-indicating capability of the method. The kinetics of the degradation of PRI in acid medium was also studied, determining that this is a first-order process with regards

  3. Kinetic features of the radical species produced in gamma-irradiated dl-tartaric acid and the dosimetric potential of this acid.

    PubMed

    Tuner, H; Korkmaz, M

    2009-07-01

    The room-temperature and high-temperature kinetic features of the radical species produced in solid dl-tartaric acid (dl-TA) gamma-irradiated at room temperature and the dosimetric potential of this acid were investigated in a detailed ESR study. Irradiated dl-TA presents an ESR spectrum with many unresolved resonance lines even at the lowest radiation dose applied (100 Gy). The evolution of the signal intensities associated with induced radical species with microwave power, applied dose and temperature was followed. Three groups of resonance intensities originating from three different radicals exhibiting different spectroscopic features, stabilities at room and high temperatures, and radiation yields were found to take part in the formation of experimental ESR spectrum. These three species were calculated to exhibit spectroscopic features similar to those already reported for X- or gamma-irradiated deuterated single crystals of dl-TA and assigned as I, II and III. The same radical notation was adopted in the present work, and the intensities related to these species were denoted with the names of their corresponding species. Species III, which had the lowest radiation yield and the lowest stability, was observed as a species of four resonance lines. The two inner constituents of these four lines were partially obscured by the two central doublets originating from species I and II. The latter were relatively stable and had activation energies around 35 kJ/mol. The percentage concentrations of the involved species were estimated by comparing experimental and calculated spectra. The reasonably high radical yields of the dl-TA in the dose range of interest, the fairly good stabilities of the species produced (I and II) at room temperature, and the almost linear features of the constructed dose-response curves led us to conclude that the intensities associated with the stable species (I and II) could be used to estimate the applied dose in the dose range of 100 Gy-34

  4. Fatty acid compositions of triglycerides and free fatty acids in sebum depend on amount of triglycerides, and do not differ in presence or absence of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Numata, Shigeki; Matsusue, Miyuki; Mashima, Yasuo; Miyawaki, Masaaki; Yamada, Shunji; Yagami, Akiko; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    To clarify the influence of the fatty acid composition of sebum in acne vulgaris, we investigated the amounts and fatty acid compositions of triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA), and the amounts of cutaneous superficial Propionibacterium acnes in acne patients and healthy subjects. The foreheads of 18 female patients, 10 male patients, 10 healthy females and 10 healthy males were studied in a Japanese population. There were significant differences in the amounts of sebum, TG and cutaneous superficial P. acnes, as well as the fatty acid compositions of TG and FFA between acne patients and healthy subjects in females. Their fatty acid compositions were correlated with the amount of TG with or without acne. It was clarified that the fatty acid compositions of TG and FFA depended on the amount of TG, and there were no differences in the fatty acid composition in the presence and absence of acne.

  5. Influence of organic acids on kinetic release of chromium in soil contaminated with leather factory waste in the presence of some adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) (MgO, ZnO, TiO2) and clay minerals (bentonite, zeolite) on the release of chromium (Cr) from leather factory waste (LFW) and LFW treated soil using organic acids. Chromium release from all treatments was studied in the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and CaCl2 solutions. The results showed that, in all treatments, organic acids released more Cr than inorganic salt (CaCl2). The release of Cr by citric acid was higher than that by oxalic acid. In LFW treated soil and LFW, the release of Cr from the all treatments with NPs was less than that from the clay mineral treatments. On the other hand, in the presence of organic acids, Cr release by NPs and clay minerals decreased. Two kinetic models including pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order model were tested to describe the time dependent Cr release data. Among the kinetic models used, the pseudo-second-order model generally gave the best fits to experimental data. Before and after release experiments, Cr in LFW, treated LFW, control soil and LFW treated soils were fractionated. In all treatments, the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES). The organic acids were effective in reducing the exchangeable (EXC), bound to organic matter (OM) and bound to carbonate (CAR) fractions of Cr in all treatments, whereas, after release of Cr from treated soils, Cr remained mainly in the RES fraction. The application of NPs and clay minerals in soil led to a significant transformation of Cr from mobile fractions to the RES fraction. Therefore, organic ligands played a dominant role in mobility and bioavailability of Cr and the removal of Cr by adsorbents.

  6. Influence of organic acids on kinetic release of chromium in soil contaminated with leather factory waste in the presence of some adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) (MgO, ZnO, TiO2) and clay minerals (bentonite, zeolite) on the release of chromium (Cr) from leather factory waste (LFW) and LFW treated soil using organic acids. Chromium release from all treatments was studied in the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and CaCl2 solutions. The results showed that, in all treatments, organic acids released more Cr than inorganic salt (CaCl2). The release of Cr by citric acid was higher than that by oxalic acid. In LFW treated soil and LFW, the release of Cr from the all treatments with NPs was less than that from the clay mineral treatments. On the other hand, in the presence of organic acids, Cr release by NPs and clay minerals decreased. Two kinetic models including pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order model were tested to describe the time dependent Cr release data. Among the kinetic models used, the pseudo-second-order model generally gave the best fits to experimental data. Before and after release experiments, Cr in LFW, treated LFW, control soil and LFW treated soils were fractionated. In all treatments, the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES). The organic acids were effective in reducing the exchangeable (EXC), bound to organic matter (OM) and bound to carbonate (CAR) fractions of Cr in all treatments, whereas, after release of Cr from treated soils, Cr remained mainly in the RES fraction. The application of NPs and clay minerals in soil led to a significant transformation of Cr from mobile fractions to the RES fraction. Therefore, organic ligands played a dominant role in mobility and bioavailability of Cr and the removal of Cr by adsorbents. PMID:27139119

  7. Kinetic modeling of lipase-catalyzed esterification reaction between oleic acid and trimethylolpropane: a simplified model for multi-substrate multi-product ping-pong mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bornadel, Amin; Akerman, Cecilia Orellana; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Borg, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic models are among the tools that can be used for optimization of biocatalytic reactions as well as for facilitating process design and upscaling in order to improve productivity and economy of these processes. Mechanism pathways for multi-substrate multi-product enzyme-catalyzed reactions can become very complex and lead to kinetic models comprising several tens of terms. Hence the models comprise too many parameters, which are in general highly correlated and their estimations are often prone to huge errors. In this study, Novozym(®) 435 catalyzed esterification reaction between oleic acid (OA) and trimethylolpropane (TMP) with continuous removal of side-product (water) was carried out as an example for reactions that follow multi-substrate multi-product ping-pong mechanisms. A kinetic model was developed based on a simplified ping-pong mechanism proposed for the reaction. The model considered both enzymatic and spontaneous reactions involved and also the effect of product removal during the reaction. The kinetic model parameters were estimated using nonlinear curve fitting through unconstrained optimization methodology and the model was verified by using empirical data from different experiments and showed good predictability of the reaction under different conditions. This approach can be applied to similar biocatalytic processes to facilitate their optimization and design.

  8. Amyloid fibril formation by bovine α1-acid glycoprotein in a reducing environment: The role of disulfide bridges on the observed aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Maggiore, Beatrice; Scirè, Andrea; Tanfani, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Bovine α1-acid glycoprotein (bAGP), a thermostable counterpart of its human homologue, is a positive acute phase protein involved in binding and transportation of a large number of bio-active molecules and drugs across the body. We have investigated the effect of low pH and reducing conditions on the structure of the protein and found that it aggregates at high temperatures. The aggregates show a fibrillar structure when observed with electron microscopy. Aggregation assays using the amyloid-specific dye Thioflavin T show the presence of a lag phase which was neither abolished nor shortened when seeds were added. A priori reduction of the two disulfide bridges of bAGP, on the other hand, abolished the lag phase and reveals a connection between the kinetics of reduction and aggregation. We provide a kinetic interpretation and the corresponding rate laws allowing to model the process of fibril formation by bAGP under reducing conditions. Our interpretation allows to assess the role of disulfide bridges on the fibrillation kinetics of bAGP and can provide a more accurate interpretation of the fibrillation kinetics of other amyloidogenic proteins containing disulfide bridges.

  9. Minimizing adsorption of histidine-tagged proteins for the study of protein-deoxyribonucleic acid interactions by kinetic capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liyanage, Ruchi; Krylova, Svetlana M; Krylov, Sergey N

    2013-12-27

    Affinity interactions between DNA and proteins play a crucial role in many cellular processes. Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis is a highly efficient tool for kinetic and equilibrium studies of protein-DNA interactions. Recombinant proteins, which are typically used for in vitro studies of protein-DNA interactions, are often expressed with a His tag to aid in their purification. In this work, we study how His tags affect Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis analysis of protein-DNA interactions. We found that the addition of a His tag can increase or decrease protein adsorption to a bare-silica capillary wall, dependent on the protein. For Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis measurements, it is essential to have as little protein adsorption as possible. We screened a number of capillary coatings to reduce adsorption of the His-tagged DNA mismatch repair protein MutS to the capillary wall and found that UltraTrol LN was the most effective coating. The effectiveness of the coating was confirmed with the prevention of adsorption of His-tagged fat mass and obesity-associated protein. Under typical conditions, the coating reduced protein adsorption to a level at which accurate Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis analysis of protein-DNA interactions was possible. We further used Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis to study how the His tag affected Kd of protein-DNA interactions for the MutS protein. Using UltraTrol LN, we found that the effect of the His tag was insignificant.

  10. Phenylboronic Acid Solid Phase Extraction Cleanup and Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Determination of Florfenicol Amine in Fish Muscles.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della Wai-Mei; Ho, Clare; Wong, Yiu-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Florfenicol (FFC) residues in foods are regulated as the sum of florfenicol and its metabolites measured as florfenicol amine (FFA). An isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method utilizing phenylboronic acid (PBA) SPE cleanup is established for the accurate determination of FFA in fish muscles (i.e., salmon and tilapia) after acid catalyzed hydrolysis. Comparisons of the PBA SPE cleanup procedure with other cleanup procedures such as mixed-mode cationic (MCX) SPE and solid supported liquid-liquid extraction were performed. Quantification of FFA in fish muscles was accomplished by using matrix-matched calibration with FFA-D3 as the internal standard. The method was validated with FFA fortified fish muscles at three different levels (50, 100, and 200 μg/kg). Conversion of FFC to FFA by acid catalyzed hydrolysis was evaluated and found to be ≥88%. The recoveries of FFA in fish muscles at the three fortification levels ranged from 89 to 106%, and RSDs were ≤9% in all cases. The LOD values in salmon and tilapia muscles were 0.13 and 1.64 μg/kg, respectively. The LOQ values in salmon and tilapia muscles were 0.29 and 4.13 μg/kg, respectively. This method is suitable for the application in routine control of FFC in fishes according to its residue definition.

  11. Kinetic model-based feed-forward controlled fed-batch fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus for the production of lactic acid from Arabic date juice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minsung; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-06-01

    Arabic date is overproduced in Arabic countries such as Saudi Arabia and Iraq and is mostly composed of sugars (70-80 wt%). Here we developed a fed-batch fermentation process by using a kinetic model for the efficient production of lactic acid to a high concentration from Arabic date juice. First, a kinetic model of Lactobacillus rhamnosus grown on date juice in batch fermentation was constructed in EXCEL so that the estimation of parameters and simulation of the model can be easily performed. Then, several fed-batch fermentations were conducted by employing different feeding strategies including pulsed feeding, exponential feeding, and modified exponential feeding. Based on the results of fed-batch fermentations, the kinetic model for fed-batch fermentation was also developed. This new model was used to perform feed-forward controlled fed-batch fermentation, which resulted in the production of 171.79 g l(-1) of lactic acid with the productivity and yield of 1.58 and 0.87 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  12. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  13. Osmotic pressure, water kinetics and volatile fatty acid absorption in the rumen of sheep sustained by intragastric infusions.

    PubMed

    López, S; Hovell, F D; MacLeod, N A

    1994-02-01

    The effects of changing rumen osmotic pressure (OP) upon water kinetics and volatile fatty acid (VFA) absorption in the rumen of sheep were studied in two 4 x 4 Latin square experiments, each using four lambs with a rumen cannula and an abomasal catheter. In both experiments the lambs were sustained by the intragastric infusion of all nutrients (VFA, Ca, P, Mg and a buffer solution into the rumen, and casein, vitamins and trace elements into the abomasum). On experimental days, which were at least 1 week apart, drinking water and the casein infusion were withdrawn, and the ruminal OP was changed and held constant for 9.5 h, by incorporating NaCl at different concentrations in the buffer solution being infused. In Expt 1 the target OP values were 300, 340, 380 and 420 mosmol/kg, and in Expt 2 were 261 (no saline addition), 350, 420 and 490 mosmol/kg. Using soluble non-absorbable markers (PEG in continuous infusion and Cr-EDTA injected in pulse doses) rumen volume, liquid outflow rates, apparent water absorption through the rumen wall and VFA absorption rates were estimated at six sampling times corresponding to the 1.5 h intervals during the last 7.5 h following the change in rumen OP. Liquid outflow rate (F; ml/h) showed a significant and positive linear relationship with the rumen OP (mosmol/kg), resulting in the equation F = 1.24 OP (SE 0.096)-36.5 (SE 36.6) (r2 0.96). Similarly, water absorption rate (W; ml/h) was significantly affected by rumen OP, and this relationship was given by W = 395 (SE 39.9)-1.16 OP (SE 0.105) (r2 0.95), which means that for an OP of 341 mosmol/kg the net movement of water across the rumen wall would be zero, and either a net efflux or a net influx of water would be observed with lower or higher OP respectively. In Expt 2 there was a significant linear effect of OP on rumen volume (P < 0.01), with higher OP being associated with increases in rumen liquid contents of about 10-20%. As rumen OP was increased there was also a decline in

  14. Increased physical activity decreases hepatic free fatty acid uptake: a study in human monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Hannukainen, Jarna C; Nuutila, Pirjo; Ronald, Borra; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M; Janatuinen, Tuula; Heinonen, Olli J; Kapanen, Jukka; Viljanen, Tapio; Haaparanta, Merja; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Parkkola, Riitta; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2007-01-01

    Exercise is considered to be beneficial for free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism, although reports of the effects of increased physical activity on FFA uptake and oxidation in different tissues in vivo in humans have been inconsistent. To investigate the heredity-independent effects of physical activity and fitness on FFA uptake in skeletal muscle, the myocardium, and liver we used positron emission tomography (PET) in nine healthy young male monozygotic twin pairs discordant for physical activity and fitness. The cotwins with higher physical activity constituting the more active group had a similar body mass index but less body fat and 18 ± 10% higher V˙O2,max (P < 0.001) compared to the less active brothers with lower physical activity. Low-intensity knee-extension exercise increased skeletal muscle FFA and oxygen uptake six to 10 times compared to resting values but no differences were observed between the groups at rest or during exercise. At rest the more active group had lower hepatic FFA uptake compared to the less active group (5.5 ± 4.3 versus 9.0 ± 6.1 μmol (100 ml)−1 min−1, P = 0.04). Hepatic FFA uptake associated significantly with body fat percentage (P = 0.05). Myocardial FFA uptake was similar between the groups. In conclusion, in the absence of the confounding effects of genetic factors, moderately increased physical activity and aerobic fitness decrease body adiposity even in normal-weighted healthy young adult men. Further, increased physical activity together with decreased intra-abdominal adiposity seems to decrease hepatic FFA uptake but has no effects on skeletal muscle or myocardial FFA uptake. PMID:17053033

  15. Universal reaction mechanism of boronic acids with diols in aqueous solution: kinetics and the basic concept of a conditional formation constant.

    PubMed

    Furikado, Yuki; Nagahata, Tomomi; Okamoto, Takuya; Sugaya, Tomoaki; Iwatsuki, Satoshi; Inamo, Masahiko; Takagi, Hideo D; Odani, Akira; Ishihara, Koji

    2014-10-01

    To establish a detailed reaction mechanism for the condensation between a boronic acid, RB(OH)2, and a diol, H2L, in aqueous solution, the acid dissociation constants (Ka(BL)) of boronic acid diol esters (HBLs) were determined based on the well-established concept of conditional formation constants of metal complexes. The pKa values of HBLs were 2.30, 2.77, and 2.00 for the reaction systems, 2,4-difluorophenylboronic acid and chromotropic acid, 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and alizarin red S, and phenylboronic acid and alizarin red S, respectively. A general and precise reaction mechanism of RB(OH)2 with H2L in aqueous solution, which can serve as a universal reaction mechanism for RB(OH)2 and H2L, was proposed on the basis of (a) the relative kinetic reactivities of the RB(OH)2 and its conjugate base, that is, the boronate ion, toward H2L, and (b) the determined pKa values of HBLs. The use of the conditional formation constant, K', based on the main reaction: RB(OH)2 + H2L (K1)⇌ RB(L)(OH)(-) + H3O(+) instead of the binding constant has been proposed for the general reaction of uncomplexed boronic acid species (B') with uncomplexed diol species (L') to form boronic acid diol complex species (esters, BL') in aqueous solution at pH 5-11: B' + L' (K')⇌ BL'. The proposed reaction mechanism explains perfectly the formation of boronic acid diol ester in aqueous solution.

  16. An Internal Evaluation of the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event through Analysis of Individual and Team Scores from 1996-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Edward A.; Armbruster, James

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an internal evaluation of the National FFA Agricultural Mechanics Career Development Event (CDE) through analysis of individual and team scores from 1996-2006. Data were analyzed by overall and sub-event areas scores for individual contestants and team event. To facilitate the analysis process scores were…

  17. Perceptions of North Carolina High School Agricultural Educators regarding Students with Special Needs Participating in Supervised Agricultural Experience and FFA Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lendy; Wilson, Elizabeth; Flowers, Jim; Croom, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of North Carolina high school agricultural educators toward including students with special needs when implementing Supervised Agricultural Experience and participating in FFA activities. The population was all high school agricultural educators in North Carolina with 12 month employment (N…

  18. Leadership and Personal Development Abilities Possessed by High School Seniors Who Are Members in Superior and Non-Superior FFA Chapters, and by Seniors Who Were Never Enrolled in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, S. Clifton; Newcomb, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the leadership and personal development abilities of four groups of high school seniors, some of whom were members of Future Farmers of America (FFA) and some who were never enrolled in vocational agriculture, found that FFA involvement resulted in more leadership abilities. (JOW)

  19. Kinetics of Mo, Ni, V and Al leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha-Madeja, Anna

    2011-02-28

    The kinetics of molybdenum, nickel, vanadium and aluminium leaching from a spent hydrodesulphurization catalyst in a solution containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The effects of temperature and particle size were examined. In addition, the reaction mechanism for the dissolution of the spent catalyst was discussed. The results of the kinetic analysis for various experimental conditions indicated that the reaction rate of leaching process is controlled by chemical reaction at the particle surface. The values of the activation energies of 31±2, 36±4, 30±4 and 57±3 kJ mol(-1) for Mo, Ni, V and Al, respectively, are characteristic for mechanism controlled by chemical reaction. PMID:21167639

  20. Evaluation of zinc electrodeposition kinetics from acidic zinc sulfate solutions using a UPD-modified platinum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Eduard

    In general, underpotential deposition, UPD, describes the formation of a two-dimensional layer of metal onto a foreign substrate at a potential more positive than that for overpotential deposition, OPD, of the metal. Use of this phenomenon is proposed as a novel technique for generating smooth and reproducible electrode surfaces of reactive metals, using zinc UPD on platinum as a model case. The technique involves polarization of a polished platinum electrode to cause zinc UPD followed by a pulsed polarization step to grow a bulk zinc metal deposit on the electrode. The steady-state zinc deposition rate is recorded as a function of the applied potential. Mass transfer effects are controlled by the use of a rotating disc electrode. After each potential step, the electrode is polarized to a potential near the UPD potential, which dissolves the bulk zinc and regenerates the original smooth electrode. In this manner the voltage-current density relationship for the zinc deposition reaction may be mapped for a particular solution composition. Experiments were conducted to characterize UPD of zinc on platinum in magnesium sulphate and sulphuric acid supporting electrolytes. UPD of zinc on platinum occurs at a voltage approximately 1 V more positive than that of bulk zinc deposition with an estimated charge density of 260 +/- 30 muC cm-2, which is in the order of a monolayer of zinc. The UPD layer was determined to evolve into a Pt-Zn alloy which further inhibited hydrogen evolution, relative to the freshly deposited UPD layer. Bulk zinc deposition experiments were carried out in pure zinc sulphate solutions at 25°C, using the developed technique, and kinetic parameters were evaluated and compared to previously reported values. The Tafel slope for zinc deposition from pH neutral electrolytes was determined to be ca. 60 mV dec-1, while in highly acid electrolytes was ca. 30 mV dec-1, due to the inhibiting effect of hydrogen adsorption. The transition of zinc deposit

  1. Kranz and single-cell forms of C4 plants in the subfamily Suaedoideae show kinetic C4 convergence for PEPC and Rubisco with divergent amino acid substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosnow, Josh J.; Evans, Marc A.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Cousins, Asaph B.; Edwards, Gerald E.; Roalson, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    The two carboxylation reactions performed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) are vital in the fixation of inorganic carbon for C4 plants. The abundance of PEPC is substantially elevated in C4 leaves, while the location of Rubisco is restricted to one of two chloroplast types. These differences compared with C3 leaves have been shown to result in convergent enzyme optimization in some C4 species. Investigation into the kinetic properties of PEPC and Rubisco from Kranz C4, single cell C4, and C3 species in Chenopodiaceae s. s. subfamily Suaedoideae showed that these major carboxylases in C4 Suaedoideae species lack the same mutations found in other C4 systems which have been examined; but still have similar convergent kinetic properties. Positive selection analysis on the N-terminus of PEPC identified residues 364 and 368 to be under positive selection with a posterior probability >0.99 using Bayes empirical Bayes. Compared with previous analyses on other C4 species, PEPC from C4 Suaedoideae species have different convergent amino acids that result in a higher K m for PEP and malate tolerance compared with C3 species. Kinetic analysis of Rubisco showed that C4 species have a higher catalytic efficiency of Rubisco (k catc in mol CO2 mol–1 Rubisco active sites s–1), despite lacking convergent substitutions in the rbcL gene. The importance of kinetic changes to the two-carboxylation reactions in C4 leaves related to amino acid selection is discussed. PMID:26417023

  2. Effect of intravenous amino acids on glutamine and protein kinetics in low-birth-weight preterm infants during the immediate neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Kadrofske, Mark M; Parimi, Prabhu S; Gruca, Lourdes L; Kalhan, Satish C

    2006-04-01

    Glutamine may be a conditionally essential amino acid in low-birth-weight (LBW) preterm neonates. Exogenously administered amino acids, by providing anaplerotic carbon into the tricarboxylic acid cycle, could result in greater cataplerotic efflux and glutamine de novo synthesis. The effect of dose and duration of amino acid infusion on glutamine and nitrogen (N) kinetics was examined in LBW infants in the period immediately after birth. Preterm neonates (<32 weeks gestation, birth weights 809-1,755 g) were randomized to initially receive either 480 or 960 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1) of an intravenous amino acid solution for 19-24 hours, followed by a higher or lower amino acid load for either 5 h or 24 h. Glutamine de novo synthesis, leucine N, phenylalanine, and urea kinetics were determined using stable isotopic tracers. An increase in amino acid infusion from 480 to 960 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1) for 5 h resulted in decreased glutamine de novo synthesis in every neonate (384.4 +/- 38.0 to 368.9 +/- 38.2 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1), P < 0.01) and a lower whole body rate of proteolysis (P < 0.001) and urea synthesis (P < 0.001). However, when the increased amino acid infusion was extended for 24 h, glutamine de novo synthesis increased (369.7 +/- 92.6 to 483.4 +/- 97.5 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1), P < 0.001), whole body rate of proteolysis did not change, and urea production increased. Decreasing the amino acid load resulted in a decrease in glutamine rate of appearance (R(a)) and leucine N R(a), but had no effect on phenylalanine R(a). Acutely stressed LBW infants responded to an increase in amino acid load by transiently suppressing whole body rate of glutamine synthesis, proteolysis, and oxidation of protein. The mechanisms of this transient effect on whole body protein/nitrogen metabolism remain unknown.

  3. Association between serum free fatty acid levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanwen; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Chengfu; Hong, Yani; Lu, Huanle; Wu, Jianping; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    High serum free fatty acid (FFA) levels are associated with metabolic syndrome (MS). This study aimed to assess the association of fasting serum FFAs with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a Chinese population. A total of 840 subjects fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of NAFLD and 331 healthy control participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Fasting serum FFA levels and other clinical and laboratory parameters were measured. NAFLD patients had significantly higher serum FFA levels than controls (P < 0.001). Serum FFA levels were significantly and positively correlated with parameters of MS, inflammation indexes, and markers of hepatocellular damage. Elevated serum FFA levels were found in NAFLD subjects with individual components of MS (obesity, hypertriglyceridaemia, and hyperglycaemia). Stepwise regression showed that serum FFA levels were an independent factor predicting advanced fibrosis (FIB-4 ≥ 1.3) in NAFLD patients. Serum FFA levels correlated with NAFLD and could be used as an indicator for predicting advanced fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:25060337

  4. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite's production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis.

  5. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    SciTech Connect

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared to the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).

  6. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    DOE PAGES

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared tomore » the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH– than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).« less

  7. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite's production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis. PMID:26215764

  8. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite’s production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis. PMID:26215764

  9. A "Stationery" Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, L.; Goberdhansingh, A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple redox reaction that occurs between potassium permanganate and oxalic acid that can be used to prepare an interesting disappearing ink for demonstrating kinetics for introductory chemistry. Discusses laboratory procedures and factors that influence disappearance times. (CW)

  10. Synthesis of interpenetrating network hydrogel from poly(acrylic acid-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and sodium alginate: modeling and kinetics study for removal of synthetic dyes from water.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidyadhar; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2013-10-15

    Several interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were made by free radical in situ crosslink copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) and hydroxy ethyl methacrylate in aqueous solution of sodium alginate. N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) was used as comonomer crosslinker for making these crosslink hydrogels. All of these hydrogels were characterized by carboxylic content, FTIR, SEM, XRD, DTA-TGA and mechanical properties. Swelling, diffusion and network parameters of the hydrogels were studied. These hydrogels were used for adsorption of two important synthetic dyes, i.e. Congo red and methyl violet from water. Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics of dye adsorption by these hydrogels were also studied.

  11. Kinetic resolution of racemic 2-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactones by asymmetric esterification using diphenylacetic acid with pivalic anhydride and a chiral acyl-transfer catalyst.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kenya; Gotoh, Kouya; Ono, Keisuke; Futami, Kengo; Shiina, Isamu

    2013-03-15

    Various optically active 2-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone derivatives are produced via the kinetic resolution of racemic 2-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactones with diphenylacetic acid using pivalic anhydride and (R)-benzotetramisole ((R)-BTM), a chiral acyl-transfer catalyst. Importantly, the substrate scope of this novel protocol is fairly broad (12 examples, s-value; up to over 1000). In addition, we succeeded in disclosing the reaction mechanism to afford high enantioselectivity using theoretical calculations and expounded on the substituent effects at the C-3 positions in 2-hydroxylactones.

  12. Root-zone acidity and nitrogen source affects Typha latifolia L. growth and uptake kinetics of ammonium and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Brix, Hans; Dyhr-Jensen, Kirsten; Lorenzen, Bent

    2002-12-01

    The NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) uptake kinetics by Typha latifolia L. were studied after prolonged hydroponics growth at constant pH 3.5, 5.0, 6.5 or 7.0 and with NH(4)(+) or NO(3)(-) as the sole N-source. In addition, the effects of pH and N source on H(+) extrusion and adenine nucleotide content were examined. Typha latifolia was able to grow with both N sources at near neutral pH levels, but the plants had higher relative growth rates, higher tissue concentrations of the major nutrients, higher contents of adenine nucleotides, and higher affinity for uptake of inorganic nitrogen when grown on NH(4)(+). Growth almost completely stopped at pH 3.5, irrespective of N source, probably as a consequence of pH effects on plasma membrane integrity and H(+) influx into the root cells. Tissue concentrations of the major nutrients and adenine nucleotides were severely reduced at low pH, and the uptake capacity for inorganic nitrogen was low, and more so for NO(3)(-)-fed than for NH(4)(+)-fed plants. The maximum uptake rate, V(max), was highest for NH(4)(+) at pH 6.5 (30.9 micro mol h(-1) g(-1) root dry weight) and for NO(3)(-) at pH 5.0 (31.7 micro mol h(-1) g(-1) root dry weight), and less than 10% of these values at pH 3.5. The affinity for uptake as estimated by the half saturation constant, K((1/2)), was lowest at low pH for NH(4)(+) and at high pH for NO(3)(-). The changes in V(max) and K((1/2)) were thus consistent with the theory of increasing competition between cations and H(+) at low pH and between anions and OH(-) at high pH. C(min) was independent of pH, but slightly higher for NO(3)(-) than for NH(4)(+) (C(min)(NH(4)(+)) approximately 0.8 mmol m(-3); C(min)(NO(3)(-)) approximately 2.8 mmol m(-3)). The growth inhibition at low pH was probably due to a reduced nutrient uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by nutrient stress. Typha latifolia seems to be well adapted to growth in wetland soils where NH(4)(+) is the prevailing nitrogen compound, but very low p

  13. Changes in the physiological properties and kinetics of citric acid accumulation via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger *

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Liu, Jing; Song, Yuan; Wu, Qing-feng; Li, Wen-jian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain.

  14. Kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction (aspartame degradation) as affected by polyol-induced changes in buffer pH and pK values.

    PubMed

    Chuy, S; Bell, L N

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of an acid-base catalyzed reaction, aspartame degradation, were examined as affected by the changes in pH and pK(a) values caused by adding polyols (sucrose, glycerol) to phosphate buffer. Sucrose-containing phosphate buffer solutions had a lower pH than that of phosphate buffer alone, which contributed, in part, to reduced aspartame reactivity. A kinetic model was introduced for aspartame degradation that encompassed pH and buffer salt concentrations, both of which change with a shift in the apparent pK(a) value. Aspartame degradation rate constants in sucrose-containing solutions were successfully predicted using this model when corrections (that is, lower pH, lower apparent pK(a) value, buffer dilution from the polyol) were applied. The change in buffer properties (pH, pK(a)) from adding sucrose to phosphate buffer does impact food chemical stability. These effects can be successfully incorporated into predictive kinetic models. Therefore, pH and pK(a) changes from adding polyols to buffer should be considered during food product development.

  15. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover in pilot-scale reactor: investigation of yields, kinetics, and enzymatic digestibilities of solids.

    PubMed

    Schell, Daniel J; Farmer, Jody; Newman, Millie; McMillan, James D

    2003-01-01

    Corn stover is a domestic feedstock that has potential to produce significant quantities of fuel ethanol and other bioenergy and biobased products. However, comprehensive yield and carbon mass balance information and validated kinetic models for dilute-sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment of corn stover have not been available. This has hindered the estimation of process economics and also limited the ability to perform technoeconomic modeling to guide research. To better characterize pretreatment and assess its kinetics, we pretreated corn stover in a continuous 1 t/d reactor. Corn stover was pretreated at 20% (w/w) solids concentration over a range of conditions encompassing residence times of 3-12 min, temperatures of 165- 195 degrees C, and H2SO4 concentrations of 0.5-1.4% (w/w). Xylan conversion yield and carbon mass balance data were collected at each run condition. Performance results were used to estimate kinetic model parameters assuming biphasic hemicellulose hydrolysis and a hydrolysis mechanism incorporating formation of intermediate xylo-oligomers. In addition, some of the pretreated solids were tested in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process to measure the reactivity of their cellulose component to enzymatic digestion by cellulase enzymes. Monomeric xylose yields of 69-71% and total xylose yields (monomers and oligomers) of 70-77% were achieved with performance level depending on pretreatment severity. Cellulose conversion yields in SSF of 80-87% were obtained for some of the most digestible pretreated solids.

  16. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  17. Effect of pulsed electric field treatment on enzyme kinetics and thermostability of endogenous ascorbic acid oxidase in carrots (Daucus carota cv. Nantes).

    PubMed

    Leong, Sze Ying; Oey, Indrawati

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this research was to study the enzyme kinetics and thermostability of endogenous ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) in carrot purée (Daucus carota cv. Nantes) after being treated with pulsed electric field (PEF) processing. Various PEF treatments using electric field strength between 0.2 and 1.2kV/cm and pulsed electrical energy between 1 and 520kJ/kg were conducted. The enzyme kinetics and the kinetics of AAO thermal inactivation (55-70°C) were described using Michaelis-Menten model and first order reaction model, respectively. Overall, the estimated Vmax and KM values were situated in the same order of magnitude as the untreated carrot purée after being exposed to pulsed electrical energy between 1 and 400kJ/kg, but slightly changed at pulsed electrical energy above 500kJ/kg. However, AAO presented different thermostability depending on the electric field strength applied. After PEF treatment at the electric field strength between 0.2 and 0.5kV/cm, AAO became thermolabile (i.e. increase in inactivation rate (k value) at reference temperature) but the temperature dependence of k value (Ea value) for AAO inactivation in carrot purée decreased, indicating that the changes in k values were less temperature dependent. It is obvious that PEF treatment affects the temperature stability of endogenous AAO. The changes in enzyme kinetics and thermostability of AAO in carrot purée could be related to the resulting carrot purée composition, alteration in intracellular environment and the effective concentration of AAO released after being subjected to PEF treatment.

  18. A novel photochemical system of ferrous sulfite complex: kinetics and mechanisms of rapid decolorization of Acid Orange 7 in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Danna; Chen, Long; Zhang, Changbo; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Li; Wu, Feng

    2014-06-15

    We previously reported the decolorization of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by sulfate radical (SO4(-)) in the presence of iron(II) sulfite complex and oxygen under UV-vis irradiation (photo-iron(II) sulfite system). This system, however, achieves very limited mineralization of AO7 (in terms of total organic carbon (TOC) removal), which is not in accordance with literature reports on the oxidation of organic contaminants by SO4(-). In the present work, kinetics and products under irradiation of xenon lamp (350 W) were analyzed to reveal the reaction pathway of decolorization of AO7. Steady-state approximation (SSA) of SO4(-) radicals and apparent kinetics of AO7 were examined. The reaction between AO7 and SO4(-) was found to proceed in two steps, namely, electron transfer and SO4(-) addition. The second-order rate constant for the reaction between AO7 and SO4(-) was found to be 8.07 ± 1.07 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by SSA and 6.80 ± 0.68 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by competition kinetics method. The apparent kinetics of the decolorization of AO7 under irradiation closely fits the mechanism of radical chain reactions of various reactive sulfur species. By liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified the sulfate adduct AO7-SO4 and confirmed the two-step reaction between AO7 and SO4(-). This stable sulfate adduct provides a good explanation of the poor TOC removal during decolorization of AO7 by the photo-iron(II) sulfite system.

  19. Prediction of naphthenic acid species degradation by kinetic and surrogate models during the ozonation of oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Moreira, Jesús; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-09-15

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic contaminants, and suspended solids, generated by the oil sands industry during the bitumen extraction process. OSPW contains a large number of structurally diverse organic compounds, and due to variability of the water quality of different OSPW matrices, there is a need to select a group of easily measured surrogate parameters for monitoring and treatment process control. In this study, kinetic and surrogate correlation models were developed to predict the degradation of naphthenic acids (NAs) species during the ozonation of OSPW. Additionally, the speciation and distribution of classical and oxidized NA species in raw and ozonated OSPW were also examined. The structure-reactivity of NA species indicated that the reactivity of individual NA species increased as the carbon and hydrogen deficiency numbers increased. The kinetic parameters obtained in this study allowed calculating the evolution of the concentrations of the acid-extractable fraction (AEF), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and NA distributions for a given ozonation process. High correlations between the AEF and COD and NA species were found, suggesting that AEF and COD can be used as surrogate parameters to predict the degradation of NAs during the ozonation of OSPW.

  20. Defense Priming and Jasmonates: A Role for Free Fatty Acids in Insect Elicitor-Induced Long Distance Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Cofer, Tristan; Engelberth, Marie; Engelberth, Jurgen

    2016-01-08

    Green leaf volatiles (GLV) prime plants against insect herbivore attack resulting in stronger and faster signaling by jasmonic acid (JA). In maize this response is specifically linked to insect elicitor (IE)-induced signaling processes, which cause JA accumulation not only around the damage site, but also in distant tissues, presumably through the activation of electrical signals. Here, we present additional data further characterizing these distal signaling events in maize. Also, we describe how exposure to GLV increases free fatty acid (fFA) levels in maize seedlings, but also in other plants, and how increased fFA levels affect IE-induced JA accumulation. Increased fFA, in particular α-linolenic acid (LnA), caused a significant increase in JA accumulation after IE treatment, while JA induced by mechanical wounding (MW) alone was not affected. We also identified treatments that significantly decreased certain fFA level including simulated wind and rain. In such treated plants, IE-induced JA accumulation was significantly reduced when compared to un-moved control plants, while MW-induced JA accumulation was not significantly affected. Since only IE-induced JA accumulation was altered by changes in the fFA composition, we conclude that changing levels of fFA affect primarily IE-induced signaling processes rather than serving as a substrate for JA.

  1. Defense Priming and Jasmonates: A Role for Free Fatty Acids in Insect Elicitor-Induced Long Distance Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Cofer, Tristan; Engelberth, Marie; Engelberth, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLV) prime plants against insect herbivore attack resulting in stronger and faster signaling by jasmonic acid (JA). In maize this response is specifically linked to insect elicitor (IE)-induced signaling processes, which cause JA accumulation not only around the damage site, but also in distant tissues, presumably through the activation of electrical signals. Here, we present additional data further characterizing these distal signaling events in maize. Also, we describe how exposure to GLV increases free fatty acid (fFA) levels in maize seedlings, but also in other plants, and how increased fFA levels affect IE-induced JA accumulation. Increased fFA, in particular α-linolenic acid (LnA), caused a significant increase in JA accumulation after IE treatment, while JA induced by mechanical wounding (MW) alone was not affected. We also identified treatments that significantly decreased certain fFA level including simulated wind and rain. In such treated plants, IE-induced JA accumulation was significantly reduced when compared to un-moved control plants, while MW-induced JA accumulation was not significantly affected. Since only IE-induced JA accumulation was altered by changes in the fFA composition, we conclude that changing levels of fFA affect primarily IE-induced signaling processes rather than serving as a substrate for JA. PMID:27135225

  2. Defense Priming and Jasmonates: A Role for Free Fatty Acids in Insect Elicitor-Induced Long Distance Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Cofer, Tristan; Engelberth, Marie; Engelberth, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLV) prime plants against insect herbivore attack resulting in stronger and faster signaling by jasmonic acid (JA). In maize this response is specifically linked to insect elicitor (IE)-induced signaling processes, which cause JA accumulation not only around the damage site, but also in distant tissues, presumably through the activation of electrical signals. Here, we present additional data further characterizing these distal signaling events in maize. Also, we describe how exposure to GLV increases free fatty acid (fFA) levels in maize seedlings, but also in other plants, and how increased fFA levels affect IE-induced JA accumulation. Increased fFA, in particular α-linolenic acid (LnA), caused a significant increase in JA accumulation after IE treatment, while JA induced by mechanical wounding (MW) alone was not affected. We also identified treatments that significantly decreased certain fFA level including simulated wind and rain. In such treated plants, IE-induced JA accumulation was significantly reduced when compared to un-moved control plants, while MW-induced JA accumulation was not significantly affected. Since only IE-induced JA accumulation was altered by changes in the fFA composition, we conclude that changing levels of fFA affect primarily IE-induced signaling processes rather than serving as a substrate for JA. PMID:27135225

  3. An Introductory Level Kinetics Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, J. E. B.; Knipe, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Provides a list of the reactions commonly used for introductory kinetics studies. These reactions illustrate the kinetics concepts of rate law, rate constant, and reaction order. Describes a kinetic study of the hydrolysis of 3-bromo-3-phenylpropanoic acid which offers many educational advantages. (CS)

  4. Kinetic and mechanism of the oxidation of chromium(III) complex with anthranil- N, N-diacetic acid by periodate ion in acidic aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ismat H.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of [CrIII(atda)(H2O)2] (atda = anthranil- N, N-diacetato) complex by IO{4/-} was studied spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions with pH range 2.20-3.34, 0.30 M ionic strength and in 20.0-40.0°C temperature range. The rate law of the reaction exhibited saturation kinetics. Values of the rate constant for the electron transfer process, the equilibrium constant for dissociation of [CrIII (atda)(H2O)2] to [CrIII (atda) (H2O)OH]+ + H+ and the pre-equilibrium formation constant were calculated. The thermodynamic activation parameters are reported. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an inner-sphere mechanism via coordination of the IVII to chromium(III).

  5. Chemically engineering ligand selectivity at the free fatty acid receptor 2 based on pharmacological variation between species orthologs

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Grundmann, Manuel; Kostenis, Evi; Adams, David R.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    When it is difficult to develop selective ligands within a family of related G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), chemically engineered receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs) are useful alternatives for probing receptor function. In the present work, we explored whether a RASSL of the free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2) could be developed on the basis of pharmacological variation between species orthologs. For this, bovine FFA2 was characterized, revealing distinct ligand selectivity compared with human FFA2. Homology modeling and mutational analysis demonstrated a single mutation in human FFA2 of C4.57G resulted in a human FFA2 receptor with ligand selectivity similar to the bovine receptor. This was exploited to generate human FFA2-RASSL by the addition of a second mutation at a known orthosteric ligand interaction site, H6.55Q. The resulting FFA2-RASSL displayed a >100-fold loss of activity to endogenous ligands, while responding to the distinct ligand sorbic acid with pEC50 values for inhibition of cAMP, 5.83 ± 0.11; Ca2+ mobilization, 4.63 ± 0.05; ERK phosphorylation, 5.61 ± 0.06; and dynamic mass redistribution, 5.35 ± 0.06. This FFA2-RASSL will be useful in future studies on this receptor and demonstrates that exploitation of pharmacological variation between species orthologs is a powerful method to generate novel chemically engineered GPCRs.—Hudson, B. D., Christiansen, E., Tikhonova, I. G., Grundmann, M., Kostenis, E., Adams, D. R., Ulven, T., Milligan, G. Chemically engineering ligand selectivity at the free fatty acid receptor 2 based on pharmacological variation between species orthologs. PMID:22919070

  6. Adaptation of in vivo amino acid kinetics facilitates increased amino acid availability for fetal growth in adolescent and adult pregnancies alike

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During pregnancy, adult women with a normal BMI synthesize extra amino acids after an overnight fast by increasing body protein breakdown and decreasing amino acid oxidation. It is not known whether adolescent girls can make these adaptations during pregnancy. The present study aimed to measure and ...

  7. The dual role of free fatty acid signaling in inflammation and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Caroline M O; Nogueira-Machado, José A

    2013-09-01

    Obesity, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis have all been associated with high levels of free fatty acid (FFA). In the present review, we suggest that FFA may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory agents depending on the chemical structure. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) significantly differ in their contributions to inflammation. While SFAs have been shown to induce inflammation, PUFAs have anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating NF-kappaB, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 despite upregulating of IL-10. It is suggested that FFA may activate Toll Like Receptor-4 (TLR4) and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) activating signaling pathways that promote production and release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TFN-α). Fatty acid action on TLR4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and GPCRs are potential therapeutic targets for controlling FFA-induced inflammation. Approaches that downregulate the inflammatory properties of free fatty acid are discussed in this manuscript. In this review, some patents associated with controlling FFA effects are also reported.

  8. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation to Provide Design Guidelines for the NREL Dilute-Acid Process Aimed at Total Hydrolysis/Fractionation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. Y.; Iyer, P.; Xiang, Q.; Hayes, J.

    2004-08-01

    Following up on previous work, subcontractor investigated three aspects of using NREL ''pretreatment'' technology for total hydrolysis (cellulose as well as hemicellulose) of biomass. Whereas historic hydrolysis of biomass used either dilute acid or concentrated acid technology for hydrolysis of both hemicellulose and cellulose, NREL has been pursuing very dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. NREL's countercurrent shrinking-bed reactor design for hemicellulose hydrolysis (pretreatment) has, however, shown promise for total hydrolysis. For the first task, subcontractor developed a mathematical model of the countercurrent shrinking bed reactor operation and, using yellow poplar sawdust as a feedstock, analyzed the effect of: initial solid feeding rate, temperature, acid concentration, acid flow rate, Peclet number (a measure of backmixing in liquid flow), and bed shrinking. For the second task, subcontractor used laboratory trials, with yellow poplar sawdust and 0.07 wt% sulfuric acid at various temperatures, to verify the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose (desired) and decomposition of glucose (undesired) and determine appropriate parameters for use in kinetic models. Unlike cellulose and hemicellulose, lignins, the third major component of biomass, are not carbohydrates that can be broken down into component sugars. They are, however, aromatic complex amorphous phenolic polymers that can likely be converted into low-molecular weight compounds suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. Oxidative degradation is one pathway for such conversion and hydrogen peroxide would be an attractive reagent for this, as it would leave no residuals. For the third task, subcontractor reacted lignin with hydrogen peroxide under various conditions and analyzed the resulting product mix.

  9. The study of non-linear kinetics and adsorption isotherm models for Acid Red 18 from aqueous solutions by magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Berizi, Zohre; Hashemi, Seyed Yaser; Hadi, Mahdi; Azari, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in various industries. These substances produce toxic byproducts in aquatic environments in addition to their mutagenic and carcinogenic potential effects. In this study, the effect of magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate in batch systems and nonlinear kinetic and adsorption isotherm models were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and then modified and used as adsorbent to adsorb Acid Red 18. After determining the optimum pH and adsorbent dose, non-equilibrium models for kinetic adsorption were tested with concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and at eight different periods of time (1-15 min) and the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order non-linear models were used to describe the results. For adsorption isotherm, a contact time of 120 min was studied in different concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and the residual concentration of Acid Red 18 was obtained. The results are described by non-linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The optimum amounts of pH for magnetite nanoparticles and for modified ones were 3 and 5, respectively, the efficiencies were 0.75 and 0.2 g/L, respectively. According to the results sodium alginate has a high performance in adsorption of Acid Red 18. Adjusted correlation coefficients and chi-square test showed that Freundlich isotherm and then Langmuir isotherm can well describe the experimental results. In Freundlich, the value of (Kf) was 3.231 (L/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 21.615 (L/g) for modified adsorbent. In Langmuir, the value of (qm) was 16.259 (mg/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 73.464 (mg/g) for modified adsorbent. Comparing the Langmuir maximum calculated adsorption capacity indicated that modified adsorbent can adsorb the pollutants 6.5 times more than the other one.

  10. The study of non-linear kinetics and adsorption isotherm models for Acid Red 18 from aqueous solutions by magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Berizi, Zohre; Hashemi, Seyed Yaser; Hadi, Mahdi; Azari, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in various industries. These substances produce toxic byproducts in aquatic environments in addition to their mutagenic and carcinogenic potential effects. In this study, the effect of magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate in batch systems and nonlinear kinetic and adsorption isotherm models were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and then modified and used as adsorbent to adsorb Acid Red 18. After determining the optimum pH and adsorbent dose, non-equilibrium models for kinetic adsorption were tested with concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and at eight different periods of time (1-15 min) and the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order non-linear models were used to describe the results. For adsorption isotherm, a contact time of 120 min was studied in different concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and the residual concentration of Acid Red 18 was obtained. The results are described by non-linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The optimum amounts of pH for magnetite nanoparticles and for modified ones were 3 and 5, respectively, the efficiencies were 0.75 and 0.2 g/L, respectively. According to the results sodium alginate has a high performance in adsorption of Acid Red 18. Adjusted correlation coefficients and chi-square test showed that Freundlich isotherm and then Langmuir isotherm can well describe the experimental results. In Freundlich, the value of (Kf) was 3.231 (L/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 21.615 (L/g) for modified adsorbent. In Langmuir, the value of (qm) was 16.259 (mg/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 73.464 (mg/g) for modified adsorbent. Comparing the Langmuir maximum calculated adsorption capacity indicated that modified adsorbent can adsorb the pollutants 6.5 times more than the other one. PMID:27642843

  11. Influence of kinetics on the determination of the surface reactivity of oxide suspensions by acid-base titration.

    PubMed

    Duc, M; Adekola, F; Lefèvre, G; Fédoroff, M

    2006-11-01

    The effect of acid-base titration protocol and speed on pH measurement and surface charge calculation was studied on suspensions of gamma-alumina, hematite, goethite, and silica, whose size and porosity have been well characterized. The titration protocol has an important effect on surface charge calculation as well as on acid-base constants obtained by fitting of the titration curves. Variations of pH versus time after addition of acid or base to the suspension were interpreted as diffusion processes. Resulting apparent diffusion coefficients depend on the nature of the oxide and on its porosity.

  12. The Anterior Temporal Face Area Contains Invariant Representations of Face Identity That Can Persist Despite the Loss of Right FFA and OFA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley

    2016-03-01

    Macaque neurophysiology found image-invariant representations of face identity in a face-selective patch in anterior temporal cortex. A face-selective area in human anterior temporal lobe (fATL) has been reported, but has not been reliably identified, and its function and relationship with posterior face areas is poorly understood. Here, we used fMRI adaptation and neuropsychology to ask whether fATL contains image-invariant representations of face identity, and if so, whether these representations require normal functioning of fusiform face area (FFA) and occipital face area (OFA). We first used a dynamic localizer to demonstrate that 14 of 16 normal subjects exhibit a highly selective right fATL. Next, we found evidence that this area subserves image-invariant representation of identity: Right fATL showed repetition suppression to the same identity across different images, while other areas did not. Finally, to examine fATL's relationship with posterior areas, we used the same procedures with Galen, an acquired prosopagnosic who lost right FFA and OFA. Despite the absence of posterior face areas, Galen's right fATL preserved its face selectivity and showed repetition suppression comparable to that in controls. Our findings suggest that right fATL contains image-invariant face representations that can persist despite the absence of right FFA and OFA, but these representations are not sufficient for normal face recognition.

  13. Spectral and kinetic characterization of intermediates in the aromatization reaction catalyzed by NikD, an unusual amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Robert C; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2009-06-01

    The flavoenzyme nikD, a 2-electron acceptor, catalyzes a remarkable aromatization of piperideine-2-carboxylate (P2C) to picolinate, an essential component of nikkomycin antibiotics. Steady-state kinetic data are indicative of a sequential mechanism where oxygen reacts with a reduced enzyme.dihydropicolinate (DHP) complex. The kinetics observed for complex formation with competitive inhibitors are consistent with a one-step binding mechanism. The anaerobic reaction with P2C involves three steps. The first step yields an enzyme.substrate charge transfer complex likely to contain the electron-rich P2C enamine. Calculated rates of formation and dissociation of the nikD.P2C complex are similar to those observed for the enzyme.1-cyclohexenoate complex. Formation of a reduced enzyme.DHP complex, (EH(2).DHP)(ini), occurs in a second step that exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration. The limiting rate of nikD reduction is at least 10-fold faster than the turnover rate observed with unlabeled or [4,4,5,5,6,6-D(6)]-P2C and exhibits a kinetic isotope effect (KIE = 6.4). The observed KIE on K(d apparent) (4.7) indicates that P2C is a sticky substrate. Formation of a final reduced species, (EH(2).DHP)(fin), occurs in a third step that is independent of P2C concentration and equal to the observed turnover rate. The observed KIE (3.3) indicates that the final step involves cleavage of at least one C-H bond. Tautomerization, followed by isomerization, of the initial DHP intermediate can produce an isomer that could be oxidized to picolinate in a reaction that satisfies known steric constraints of flavoenzyme reactions without the need to reposition a covalently tethered flavin or tightly bound intermediate.

  14. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  15. Oxyhalogen-sulfur chemistry: kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of chemoprotectant, sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate, MESNA, by acidic bromate and aqueous bromine.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Risikat Ajibola; Mhike, Morgen; Mbiya, Wilbes; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2014-03-27

    The oxidation of a well-known chemoprotectant in anticancer therapies, sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate, MESNA, by acidic bromate and aqueous bromine was studied in acidic medium. Stoichiometry of the reaction is: BrO3(-) + HSCH2CH2SO3H → Br(-) + HO3SCH2CH2SO3H. In excess bromate conditions the stoichiometry was deduced to be: 6BrO3(-) + 5HSCH2CH2SO3H + 6H(+) → 3Br2 + 5HO3SCH2CH2SO3H + 3H2O. The direct reaction of bromine and MESNA gave a stoichiometric ratio of 3:1: 3Br2 + HSCH2CH2SO3H + 3H2O → HO3SCH2CH2SO3H + 6Br(-) + 6H(+). This direct reaction is very fast; within limits of the mixing time of the stopped-flow spectrophotometer and with a bimolecular rate constant of 1.95 ± 0.05 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Despite the strong oxidizing agents utilized, there is no cleavage of the C-S bond and no sulfate production was detected. The ESI-MS data show that the reaction proceeds via a predominantly nonradical pathway of three consecutive 2-electron transfers on the sulfur center to obtain the product 1,2-ethanedisulfonic acid, a well-known medium for the delivery of psychotic drugs. Thiyl radicals were detected but the absence of autocatalytic kinetics indicated that the radical pathway was a minor oxidation route. ESI-MS data showed that the S-oxide, contrary to known behavior of organosulfur compounds, is much more stable than the sulfinic acid. In conditions where the oxidizing equivalents are limited to a 4-electron transfer to only the sulfinic acid, the products obtained are a mixture of the S-oxide and the sulfonic acid with negligible amounts of the sulfinic acid. It appears the S-oxide is the preferred conformation over the sulfenic acid since no sulfenic acids have ever been stabilized without bulky substituent groups. The overall reaction scheme could be described and modeled by a minimal network of 18 reactions in which the major oxidants are HOBr and Br2(aq).

  16. Investigating the Influence of Polymers on Supersaturated Flufenamic Acid Cocrystal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Minshan; Wang, Ke; Hamill, Noel; Lorimer, Keith; Li, Mingzhong

    2016-09-01

    The development of enabling formulations is a key stage when demonstrating the effectiveness of pharmaceutical cocrystals to maximize the oral bioavailability for poorly water soluble drugs. Inhibition of drug crystallization from a supersaturated cocrystal solution through a fundamental understanding of the nucleation and crystal growth is important. In this study, the influence of the three polymers of polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and a copolymer of N-vinly-2-pyrrodidone (60%) and vinyl acetate (40%) (PVP-VA) on the flufenamic acid (FFA) crystallization from three different supersaturated solutions of the pure FFA and two cocrystals of FFA-NIC CO and FFA-TP CO has been investigated by measuring nucleation induction times and desupersaturation rates in the presence and absence of seed crystals. It was found that the competition of intermolecular hydrogen bonding among drug/coformer, drug/polymer, and coformer/polymer was a key factor responsible for maintaining supersaturation through nucleation inhibition and crystal growth modification in a cocrystal solution. The supersaturated cocrystal solutions with predissolved PEG demonstrated more effective stabilization in comparison to the pure FFA in the presence of the same polymer. In contrast, neither of the two cocrystal solutions, in the presence of PVP or PVP-VA, exhibited a better performance than the pure FFA with the same predissolved polymer. The study suggests that the selection of a polymeric excipient in a cocrystal formulation should not be solely dependent on the interplay of the parent drug and polymer without considering the coformer effects. PMID:27494289

  17. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  18. Dissolution kinetics and mechanism of Mg-Al layered double hydroxides: a simple approach to describe drug release in acid media.

    PubMed

    Parello, Mara L; Rojas, Ricardo; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2010-11-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) weathering in acidic media is one of the main features that affects their applications in drug delivery systems. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of biocompatible Mg-Al LDHs was studied at different initial pH values and solid concentrations using a simple and fast experimental method that coupled flow injection analysis and amperometric detection. A carbonate intercalated sample was used to determine the controlling step of the process and the dissolution mechanism. Finally, the study was extended to an ibuprofen intercalated LDH. The obtained results showed that the weathering process was mainly controlled by the exposed area and surface reactivity of LDHs particles. The dissolution mechanism at the particle surface was described in two steps: fast formation of surface reactive sites by hydroxyl group protonation and slow detachment of metal ions from surface. At strongly acidic conditions, the reaction rate was pH dependent due to the equilibrium between protonated (active) and deprotonated (inactive) hydroxyl groups. On the other hand, at mildly acidic conditions, the dissolution behavior was also ruled by the equilibrium attained between the particle surface reactive sites and the dissolved species. LDHs solubility and dissolution rate presented strong dependence with the interlayer anion. The ibuprofen intercalated sample was more soluble and more rapidly dissolved than the carbonate intercalated one in acetic/acetate buffer. On the other hand, the dissolution mechanism was invariant with the interlayer anion.

  19. Synthesis of no carrier added F-18 16-fluorohexadecanoic acid (FHDA) and investigation of its labeled metabolites and its kinetics in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrado, T.R.; Bernstein, D.R.; Gatley, S.J.; Ng, C.K.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    No carrier added FHDA was prepared via saponification of the product of silver oxide assisted reaction of near-anhydrous tetraethylammonium fluoride with methyl 16-iodohexadecanoate. The labeled fatty acid was injected into isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary perfusate was collected for 4-9 minutes, when hearts were chilled and homogenized. F-18 in perfusate was analysed by HPLC (NH column; 50mM amm. acetate in 50% acetonitrile). Material with the same retention time as F-18 fluoroacetate (prepared by F-for-I exchange with ethyl iodoacetate) was found. Some F-18 stuck permanently to the column and was assigned as fluoride since the same fraction of label in perfusate was retained on alumina columns eluted with water. Anion exchange HPLC (SAX column; 20mM pot. phosphate, pH 7) of homogenates gave peaks corresponding to fluoroacetate plus fluoride and minor peaks which could be fluoroacetylCoA and fluorocitrate. The authors interpret their data as follows. Beta-oxidation of FHDA results in fluoroacetylCoA which either undergoes ''lethal synthesis'' to fluorocitrate or is hydrolysed to fluoroacetate which diffuses out of the heart. The source of the fluoride is not yet clear, but could complicate interpretation of FHDA kinetics measured in vivo with positron tomography. Clearance of label from FHDA in isolated perfused hearts was faster than for labeled 16-iodohexadecanoic acid, indicating that the F-18 tracer may be a more sensitive probe of myocardial fatty acid metabolism.

  20. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: A kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K.; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.