Science.gov

Sample records for acid fog effects

  1. ACID FOG EFFECTS ON CONIFER SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were performed to assess the effects of acid fog on foliar injury, biomass production, and nutrient leaching in selected conifers. ne-year old seedlings of Pseudotsuga menzieii, Pinus ponderosa, Tsuga heterophylla and Thuja plicata were exposed episodically to fog eve...

  2. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  3. Effects of acid fog and ozone on conifers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; McCool, P.M.; Musselman, R.C.

    1989-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acidic fog (pH 2.0, 3.0, or 4.0) on the physiological, biochemical, and growth responses of two coniferous tree species (Pinus ponderosa and Abies concolor), and determined if exposure to acidic fog predisposed the tree seedlings to the phytotoxic effects of ozone (O{sub 3}). Results provide evidence that the growth and metabolic responses of two coniferous tree species could be altered by multiple applications of acidic fog, and by exposure to ambient O{sub 3}. In general, the alterations were slight to modest, which may be attributed to the low degree of stress severity, and the slow rate of tree growth. The findings indicate that exposure to acidic fog followed by O{sub 3} does not cause detectable changes in conifer seedling growth within a single-growing season. Nevertheless, it is clear that acidic fog and O{sub 3} cause temporal alterations in seedling physiology and biochemistry.

  4. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  5. Effects of acid fog and dew on materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeld, F.; Henry, R.; Vijayakumar, R.

    1989-10-01

    Field exposure tests have been carried out in order to separate the effects of acidic fog on materials damage from those caused by rain, dew and natural weathering. The test sites were McKittrick and Visalia in the Central Valley and West Casitas Pass in Ventura County. The field tests have been supported by laboratory tests in which materials damage has been determined during exposure to carefully controlled fog water chemistry. Analysis of the field exposure results for galvanized steel and the paint samples shows that the corrosivity of the atmosphere at the three test sites have been very low. The result is confirmed by the ACRM data which show very low corrosion activity. Since corrosion rates were so low approaching those for natural weathering, it was not possible to determine the effects of acidic fog. Based on the aerometric data and the observed corrosion behavior, it is doubtful that acidic fog conditions prevailed for significant times during the exposure period of 1/87 - 3/88 at Visalia and McKittrick. The results of the laboratory tests show that exposure to HNO3 at low pH and to high pollutant concentration increased the corrosion rate of galvanized steel to over 10 micro m/year. Exposure to HNO3 caused serious corrosion damage to anodized aluminum and the paint.

  6. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  7. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  8. Acute exposure to realistic acid fog: Effects on respiratory function and airway responsiveness in asthmatics

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.; De Vuyst, P.; Yernault, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    The biological effects of acid fog composed primarily of ammonium ions and sulfate are described. Subjects with asthma were exposed for one hour to sulfuric acid aerosol. Significant changes were not observed. Other asthma subjects were exposed to acid fog containing sulfate and ammonium ions. Again, pulmonary and bronchial function were not modified after inhalation.

  9. Effects of acid fog on airway function in people with asthma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R.; Christian, D.

    1988-11-30

    The study was built on earlier work examining the effects of acidic fog on human subjects with asthma. Mouthpiece exposure studies on asthmatic subjects showed that both nitric and sulfuric acids potentiate the bronchoconstrictor effects of fog water, and that these acids appear to be similar in this respect. The work resulted in the exposure chamber at the University of California, San Francisco being extensively modified, based on improvements recommended in an earlier investigation, thus allowing human subjects to be exposed to rigorously controlled and monitored test fogs. The study used the chamber to first examine the effects of fog without acid, and then the effects of fog with acid, on exercising subjects with asthma.

  10. An assessment of acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Airborne particles have long been associated with adverse effects on public health, begin with the notorious air pollution disasters of several decades ago. Although H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was identified early on as a potential causal factors during these episodes (in part because of concern for potential health effects of particle acidity per se has intensified only recently. Most of the recent aerometric research in the US on acid fog has focused on the ability of clouds and fog to deliver acidity to vegetation and ecosystems. Strong acids are characterized chemically by their pH or H{sup +} concentration. For fog, concentrations are referred to the droplet liquid content; for other (i.e., ``clear air``) aerosols, to the volume of air sampled. A useful measure of the relationship between aerosol and fog is obtained by comparing their mass concentrations on the basis of the same volume of air, by multiplying fogwater concentrations by liquid water content (LWC). This paper reviews fog measurement capability, physical properties and chemistry, and presents a simple urban airshed model which is used to simulate the evolution of fog and aerosol concentrations under urban stagnation conditions.

  11. Chemical composition of acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Munger, J.W.; Jacob, D.J.; Flagan, R.C.; Morgan, J.J.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    1982-11-12

    Fog water collected at three sites in Los Angeles and Bakersfield, California, was found to have higher acidity and higher concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium than previously observed in atmospheric water droplets. The pH of the fog water was in the range of 2.2 to 4.0. the dominant processes controlling the fog water chemistry appear to be the condensation and evaporation of water vapor on preexisting aerosol and the scavenging of gas-phase nitric acid.

  12. The effects of sequential exposure to acidic fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, R.; Christian, D.; Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    In Southern California coastal regions, morning fog is often acidified by the presence of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). Peak exposure to ozone (O{sub 3}) usually occurs in the afternoon and evening, after the fog has dissipated. To determine whether fog containing HNO{sub 3} might enhance pulmonary responses to O{sub 3}, we studied a group of healthy, athletic subjects selected for lung function sensitivity to O{sub 3}. On 3 separate days, the subjects exercised for 2 h in atmospheres containing HNO{sub 3} fog (0.5 mg/ml), H{sub 2}O fog, or clean, filtered air. After a 1-h break, they exercised for an additional 3 h in an atmosphere containing 0.20 ppm O{sub 3}. Surprisingly, the mean O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 and FVC were smaller after exercise in each fog-containing atmosphere than they were after exercise in clean, filtered air. The mean (+/- SEM) O{sub 3}-induced decrements in FEV1 were 26.4 +/- 5.3% after air, 17.1 +/- 3.7% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 18.0 +/- 4.3% after HNO{sub 3} fog, and in FVC they were 19.9 +/- 4.7% after air, 13.6 +/- 2.8% after H{sub 2}O fog, and 13.6 +/- 4.2% after HNO{sub 3} fog.

  13. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog.

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, J R; Fine, J M; Gordon, T; Sheppard, D

    1989-01-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and niric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction. PMID:2539989

  14. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.R.; Fine, J.M.; Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.

    1989-02-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and nitric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction.

  15. Acidic fog and temperature effects on stigmatic receptivity in two birch species

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.N.; Cox, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    Factorial assays were performed to determine the effects of simulated acid fog (SAF) and temperature on stigmatic receptivity in two birch species. Excised reproductive branches were sampled from representative individuals of mountain paper birch (Betula cordifolia Regel.) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) in populations adjacent to the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada. Since 1979 these trees have exhibited branch dieback in association with abnormal foliar browning symptoms. This browning has been linked with acidity and nitrate deposited by fog, which is frequent in the area. In general, experimental results indicated that pollen germination increased with temperature, but pH effects were less obvious. Similarly, pollen tube growth responded positively to temperature and was little affected by fog acidity. ANOVA tests indicated a significant difference (P < 0.05) between species in their pollen germination response only at 12{degrees}C, and not at the other three temperatures tested. For pollen tube growth, significant differences between species (P < 0.05) were demonstrated at 12 and 22{degrees}C. A significant pH effect was demonstrated at 27{degrees}C for germination, while pH effects on tube growth were significant at 27 and 12{degrees}C (P < 0.01). A response surface regression analysis indicated that acidity significantly affected pollen germination in mountain paper birch (P < 0.001) but not in paper birch. Temperature was not a significant factor for in vivo pollen germination in either species. For pollen tube growth, however, temperature was more important than pH and produced highly significant effects in both species (P < 0.001). Acidity was also a significant factor in pollen tube growth for paper birch. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Short-term respiratory effects of sulfuric acid in fog: a laboratory study of healthy and asthmatic volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Avol, E.L.; Linn, W.S.; Wightman, L.H.; Whynot, J.D.; Anderson, K.R.; Hackney, J.D.

    1988-03-01

    To explore short-term respiratory health risks from acid-polluted fog, 22 normal and 22 asthmatic adult volunteers were exposed in an environmental control chamber to light fogs containing nominally 0, 500, 1000, and 2000 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ of sulfuric acid. Fog was produced by atomizing dilute acid solution into purified air humidified to near 100% by stem injection. Exposures were administered in random order at 1-week intervals, lasted 1 h, and included three 10-min periods of moderately heavy exercise. Responses were measured in terms of forced expiratory function, airway resistance, irritant symptoms, and bronchial reactivity to methacholine aerosol. Sulfuric acid per se showed no more than a slight effect on pulmonary function, even at the highest concentration. Asthmatics experienced bronchoconstriction, attributable to exercise, under all exposure conditions. Despite the lack of substantial function changes, modest statistically significant increases in respiratory symptoms occurred with increasing acid concentrations. This unusual response pattern suggests that acid fog effects occur via a mechanism somewhat different from those which govern responses to irritant gases like SO/sub 2/ or O/sub 3/. To the extent these results are relevant to ambient acid fog exposures, they predict that no pulmonary dysfunction, and only slight respiratory symptoms if any, are likely to occur.

  17. Acid fog: effects on respiratory function and symptoms in healthy and asthmatic volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, J.D.; Linn, W.S.; Avol, E.L.

    1989-02-01

    Acidic air pollutants generally are dissolved in water droplets. Mean droplet diameter may range from more than 10 microns in dense fog to less than 1 micron at low relative humidity. Droplet size influences the deposition of inhaled acid within the respiratory tract and thus may influence toxicity. To help assess health risks from acid pollution, we performed controlled exposures of normal and asthmatic volunteers to sulfuric acid aerosols at nominal concentrations of 0 (control), 500, 1000, and 2000 micrograms/m/sup 3/. Exposures lasted 1 hr with intermittent heavy exercise. Response was assessed by lung function tests and symptom questionnaires. Under foggy conditions (mean droplet size 10 microns, temperature 50 degrees F), no marked effects on lung function were found. However, both normal and asthmatic subjects showed statistically significant dose-related increases in respiratory symptoms. In a separate study, normal subjects exposed at 70 degrees F with mean droplet size 0.9 microns showed no marked effect on function or symptoms. Asthmatics showed dose-related decrements in forced expiratory performance and increases in symptoms, most obvious at 1000 and 2000 micrograms/m/sup 3/. The different results of the two studies probably reflect an influence of droplet size, but further investigation is needed to confirm this. The aggregate results suggest that only mild, if any, short-term respiratory irritant effects are likely at acid concentrations attained in ambient pollution.

  18. Foliar leaching and root uptake of Ca, Mg and K in relation to acid fog effects on Douglas Fir

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.P.; Tingey, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    The impact of acid fog on foliar leaching and root uptake of Ca, Mg, and K by Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings was examined. In a factorial experiment, 1-year old seedlings were grown in a solution culture at two levels of nutrient availability (low and moderate) and exposed twice a week (4 hr per event) for 12 weeks to fog at pH 5.6 or pH 3.1. Throughfall enrichment of Ca, Mg and K was determined from drip collectors at the base of each seedling and root uptake rates for trees under the moderate nutrient regime were evaluated by monitoring nutrient solution depletion. Throughfall enrichment was higher in the pH 3.1 fog than the pH 5.6 fog but much of the enrichment appeared to be wash off of precipitate from previous fogs. The amounts of nutrients coming off of the foliage with the low pH fog were small relative to the daily uptake rates. Foliar concentrations of K and Mg at the end of the exposures were lower under the low nutrient regime but were not affected by fog pH. Comparisons of wax weight and examinations of epicuticular wax by electron microscopy did not indicate a significant impact from exposure to the low pH fog.

  19. FOLIAR LEACHING AND ROOT UPTAKE OF CA, MG, AND K IN RELATION TO ACID FOG EFFECTS ON DOUGLAS-FIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of acid fog on foliar leaching and root uptake of Ca, Mg, and K by Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings was examined. n a factorial experiment, 1-year old seedlings were grown in solution culture at two levels of nutrient availability (low and moderate) and ex...

  20. Acid fog-induced bronchoconstriction. The role of hydroxymethanesulfonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, R.; Christian, D.; Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMSA), the bisulfite (HSO3-) adduct of formaldehyde (CH2O), is a common constituent of California acid fogs. HMSA, most stable in a fog pH range of 3 to 5, dissociates at 6.6, the pH of the fluid lining human airways. The dissociation of inhaled HMSA should theoretically generate sulfur dioxide and CH2O, both of which have bronchoconstrictor potential. Thus, we hypothesized that HMSA may have a specific bronchoconstrictor effect independent of its strength as an acid. To determine whether HMSA has such an effect, 19 subjects with mild to moderate asthma were studied using two different protocols. Initially, a mouthpiece study was performed in which 9 subjects, on 2 separate days, inhaled five aerosols containing either sequentially increasing concentrations (0, 30, 100, 300, and 1000 microM) of HMSA in 50 microM sulfuric acid (H2SO4) or 50 microM H2SO4 alone. The subjects inhaled each aerosol for 3 min during tidal breathing at rest. Specific airway resistance (SRaw) was measured before and after each 3-min exposure. There were no significant differences in the mean changes in SRaw among the various aerosol exposures. To confirm this lack of bronchoconstrictor effect of HMSA, we then performed a chamber study in which 10 freely breathing, intermittently exercising subjects were exposed to fog containing either 1 mM HMSA in 5 mM H2SO4 or 5 mM H2SO4 alone for 1 h. SRaw was measured before, during, and at the end of the 1-h exposure.

  1. Effects of prolonged, sequential exposure to acid fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising, normal subjects. Final report, 28 Feb 89-28 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-nine apparently healthy and asymptomatic subjects were selected for a study that screened for sensitivity to ozone. After three hours of ozone exposure (at 0.20 ppm), eighteen of the subjects (46 percent) experienced a 10 percent reduction in forced expiratory volume, an indicator of exhaling ability. After four hours of exposure, 62 percent of the subjects experienced a similar reduction in expiratory volume. Further, narrowing of airways among the sensitive subjects was suggested by results of the methacholine challenge test, a standard test for measuring airway resistance. The lung capacity of all subjects decreased progressively during ozone exposures. Capacity was unchanged during acidic fog and pollutant-free air exposures. No statistically significant differences in airway resistance, airway responsiveness and symptoms that could be attributed to acid fog exposure were observed. The study indicates that exposue to fog containing nitric acid followed by exposure to ozone does not have additive or synergistic acute effects. However, the study confirms earlier indications that many apparently healthy and asymptomatic individuals are susceptible to and adversely affected by ozone at relatively low concentrations.

  2. California's fog is far more polluted than acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1982-11-01

    In the Los Angeles area, measurements reveal that the fog has a pH between 2.5 and 3. Near congested areas, the fog is consistenly acidic and is laden with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium ion, lead, copper, nickel, vanadium and aldehydes. Acid fog formation involves a conversion of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ to sulfuric and nitric acids. Unlike acid rain, acid fog remains suspended in the air for hours and is a threat to human health as well as vegetation and materials. Fog forms close to the ground where concentrations of pollutants are higher than they are further aloft. Acid fog seems to be related to ground-based pollution sources, particularly power plant and automobile emissions. Samples were collected in locations far from major pollution sources and used to test the composition and acidity of normal fog. The pH values ranged from 3, near Los Angeles, to 7, near Morro Bay. Mathematical models are used to explain changes in acidity over time and to indicate a cyclical pattern.

  3. Acid fog deposition and the declining forest in Tanzawa mountains, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igawa, M.; Shigihara, A.; Goto, S.; Nanzai, B.

    2010-07-01

    Since 1988, we have investigated fog chemistry in Mt. Oyama, Tanzawa mountains, Japan, and acid fog has been frequently observed there. We have observed fog on Mt. Oyama by using a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain, by using a visibility meter at the top of the mountain, and by an active fog sampler at the mountainside. We have reported the fog frequency at the top of Mt. Oyama to be 46% measured by the video camera, but it was overestimated. The visibility measured at the top of the mountain is the most reliable index, and the top of the mountain is covered with fog for about 30%. The frequency of about 15% was added for the case of the visibility of a few km when it was measured by a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain (8.5 km far from the top). Fog-water deposition increases with the increasing altitude to be much larger than the rain-water deposition. The factors affecting on the occult precipitation intensity were investigated by the simultaneous measurement of the rainfall intensity under a canopy, the wind speed and direction, and the visibility at the top of the mountain. Air pollution has been improved recently in Japan, but acid fog is not improved and has been affecting the leaves of the trees. In Tanzawa mountains, many fir trees and beech trees are declining, while cedar trees show no decline symptoms. We have investigated the effect of acid fog on the trees of these species by exposing simulated acid fog on the seedlings of the species. Seedlings of fir and beech are much damaged by the long term exposure of pH 3 fog, while cedar seedlings are not affected by the acid fog. By the exposure of simulated acid fog, the epicuticle wax is eroded at first, then the cross linking polycation between sugar chains of cell wall is ion-exchanged with proton and the cell wall is swollen, and the membrane calcium is desorbed from the membrane, which lowers the tolerance of the trees to the climate change. Fir and beech

  4. Organic aerosol effects on fog droplet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Russell, Lynn M.

    2004-05-01

    Organic aerosol alters cloud and fog properties through surface tension and solubility effects. This study characterizes the role of organic compounds in affecting fog droplet number concentration by initializing and comparing detailed particle microphysical simulations with two field campaigns in the Po Valley. The size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol were based on the measurements made in the Po Valley Fog Experiments in 1989 and 1998-1999. Two types of aerosol with different hygroscopicity were considered: the less hygroscopic particles, composed mainly of organic compounds, and the more hygroscopic particles, composed mainly of inorganic salts. The organic fraction of aerosol mass was explicitly modeled as a mixture of seven soluble compounds [, 2001] by employing a functional group-based thermodynamic model [, 2002]. Condensable gases in the vapor phase included nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonia. The maximum supersaturation in the simulation is 0.030% and is comparable to the calculation by [1992] inferred from measured residual particle fractions. The minimum activation diameters of the less and more hygroscopic particles are 0.49 μm and 0.40 μm, respectively. The predicted residual particle fractions are in agreement with measurements. The organic components of aerosol account for 34% of the droplet residual particle mass and change the average droplet number concentration by -10-6%, depending on the lowering of droplet surface tension and the interactions among dissolving ions. The hygroscopic growth of particles due to the presence of water-soluble organic compounds enhances the condensation of nitric acid and ammonia due to the increased surface area, resulting in a 9% increase in the average droplet number concentration. Assuming ideal behavior of aqueous solutions of water-soluble organic compounds overestimates the hygroscopic growth of particles and increases droplet numbers by 6%. The results are sensitive to microphysical

  5. Respiratory responses to laboratory-generation acid fog in healthy and asthmatic volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Avol, E.L.; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss a program to provide a first step towards assessing acute health-related effects of acid fog exposure. Polluted ambient fog was simulated in a laboratory exposure chamber. Volunteer subjects were purposely exposed and studied during periods of exercise and rest while in the challenge atmosphere. Respiratory responses were measured by methods used to assess effects of irritant gases and dry'' respirable aerosols. When a pilot study showed no obvious unfavorable effects with ambient-like pollution conditions, the exposure concentrations for the present study were extended into the occupational range, well above ambient levels. Sulfuric acid was selected for use as the test pollutant, based upon previous research experience and the availability of fog data documenting its presence during ambient fog episodes.

  6. Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnzen, S.; Ekstroem, U.

    1994-11-01

    The report gives an account of results from an evaluation test of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) with the use of a recently modified gyro rate table of one-axis design. The gyro of single axis rate type is an Alcatel Standard Electrik Loren (SEL) design with designation PM1DE 90/00079. It is a first generation FOG from the German company SEL with all electronics collected on a separate so called European standard PCB card. The purpose of the test is to enhance our competence of knowledge within the field of modern gyros, where FOG's are of special interest as future sensors in weapon systems of different kinds. The results seem to be in good agreement with the SEL specifications for the most important parameters of bias uncertainty, scale factor, linearity, input range, and noise. Only concerning the variation of the scale factor with temperature, disagreement was noticeable at the high temperature end.

  7. Mathematical modeling of acid deposition due to radiation fog

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H. )

    1989-09-20

    A Lagrangian model has been developed to study acidic deposition due to radiation fog. The model couples submodels describing the development and dissipation of radiation fog, the gas-phase chemistry and transfer, and the aqueous-phase chemistry. The model is applied to a radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4--5 1985. Model predictions for temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas-phase concentrations of SO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and NH{sub 3}, {ital p}H, aqueous-phase concentrations of OS{sup 2{minus}}{sub 4}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}, and NO{sup {minus}}{sub 3}, and finally deposition rates of the above ions are compared with the observed values. The deposition rates of the major ions are predicted to increase significantly during the fog episode, the most notable being the increase of sulfate deposition. Pathways for sulfate production that are of secondary importance in a cloud environment may become signficant in a fog. Expressing the mean droplet settling velocity as a function of liquid water content is found to be quite influential in the model's predictions. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  8. The effect of aerosol on radiation fog life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, Sami; Maalick, Zubair; Tonttila, Juha; Kuhn, Thomas; Kokkola, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Radiation fog is formed during the night under clear skies when emission of long wave radiation cools the surface and air above it. After formation, the development of fog is further influenced by longwave cooling and turbulence entrainment-detrainment at the top of the fog layer, and microphysical processes through droplet activation and sedimentation. After sunrise, the fog is dissipated due heating of the surface and the air above it. Like in the case of clouds, atmospheric aerosol particles also affect the properties of fog and together with meteorological conditions determine their life cycle from formation to dissipation. To explore how aerosols are affecting radiation fog properties and lifetime, we have used a Large Eddy Model with explicit representation of aerosol particles and aerosol-fog droplet interactions. Our results show that the fog droplet concentration increases with increasing aerosol concentration. In the early stages of fog formation the radiative cooling at the top of the fog controls the maximum water supersaturation and droplet formation in a similar manner than the updraft velocity does at the base of a cloud. The liquid water content in the fog is mainly determined by the droplet concentration as large droplets are efficiently removed through sedimentation. Thus, with increasing aerosol particle concentration, the more numerous, but smaller fog droplets increase the fog's optical depth and thereby delay the fog dissipation after sunrise, because the surface warms more slowly. This effect is further enhanced if turbulence inside the fog leads to secondary activation of droplets. Overall, the radiation fog dissipation in polluted conditions can be delayed up to hours when compared to clean conditions.

  9. Exposure of two upland plant species to acidic fogs.

    PubMed

    Ashenden, T W; Rafarel, C R; Bell, S A

    1991-01-01

    A system is described for exposing large numbers of plants to acidic fogs. The system allows low volumes of treatment solutions to be provided at particle sizes chiefly in the 5-30 microm range (equivalent to fog/cloud droplets). Plants of Poa alpina L. and Epilobium brunnescens were propagated from material collected in Snowdonia, North Wales and exposed to fog treatments at pH values of 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.6. There were 3 x 4 h exposures per week which provided a total of 6 mm deposition. Supplementary watering was with pH 4.5 simulated acid rain (24 mm per week). After 21 weeks, there was increased lowering and a greater dry weight for plants of E. brunnescens exposed to the pH 2.5 fog in comparison with other treatments. Also, the plants used assimilated material to form shoots rather than roots. A similar increase in dry weight accumulation in the pH 2.5 treatment was found in P. alpina after 63 weeks but this was not associated with changes in assimilate partitioning. PMID:15092062

  10. Discrimination of ionic pollutants except condensation nuclei of acid fog using an ultrasonic humidifier.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Keiji; Kikuchi, Ryoei; Kimoto, Takashi; Ozeki, Toru; Imano, Kazuhiko; Kajikawa, Masahiro; Ogawa, Nobuaki

    2006-06-01

    Fog droplets in the atmosphere are first produced by the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which are originally some ionic compound. Subsequently, the nuclei grow by vapor diffusion. Fog droplets are polluted through the activation process and successive diffusion growth and residence (post activation). We cannot distinguish the effects of the two pollution processes of natural fog water samples. We found that fog droplets can be produced artificially without CCN using an ultrasonic humidifier. Because the artificial fog droplets are not polluted by CCN, the movement of the fog droplets in natural air will take up some pollutants in the air. Consequently, the two pollution processes of fog (the activation of CCN and the post activation process) can be discriminated using data from field experiments. This sampling analytical method is extremely important for further research regarding fog, clouds and environmental chemistry. PMID:16772683

  11. Evaluation of peracetic acid fog for the inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spore surrogates in a large decontamination chamber.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Calfee, Michael Worth; Clayton, Matthew; Griffin-Gatchalian, Nicole; Touati, Abderrahmane; Egler, Kim

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sporicidal (inactivation of bacterial spores) effectiveness and operation of a fogging device utilizing peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (PAA). Experiments were conducted in a pilot-scale 24 m(3) stainless steel chamber using either biological indicators (BIs) or bacterial spores deposited onto surfaces via aerosolization. Wipe sampling was used to recover aerosol-deposited spores from chamber surfaces and coupon materials before and after fogging to assess decontamination efficacy. Temperature, relative humidity, and hydrogen peroxide vapor levels were measured during testing to characterize the fog environment. The fog completely inactivated all BIs in a test using a 60 mL solution of PAA (22% hydrogen peroxide/4.5% peracetic acid). In tests using aerosol-deposited bacterial spores, the majority of the post-fogging spore levels per sample were less than 1 log colony forming units, with a number of samples having no detectable spores. In terms of decontamination efficacy, a 4.78 log reduction of viable spores was achieved on wood and stainless steel. Fogging of PAA solutions shows potential as a relatively easy to use decontamination technology in the event of contamination with Bacillus anthracis or other spore-forming infectious disease agents, although additional research is needed to enhance sporicidal efficacy. PMID:23434480

  12. Urbanization Effects on Fog in China: Field Research and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zi-hua; Yang, Jun; Shi, Chun-e.; Pu, Mei-juan

    2012-05-01

    Since the policy of "Reform and Open to the Outside World" was implemented from 1978, urbanization has been rapid in China, leading to the expansion of urban areas and population synchronous with swift advances in economy. With urban development underway, the urban heat island (UHI) and air pollution are being enhanced, together with vegetation coverage and relative humidity on the decrease. These changes lead to: (1) decline of annual fog days in cities (e.g. In Chongqing, so-called city of fog in China, the annual fog days have reduced from 100-145 in the 1950s to about 20-30 in the 2000s); (2) decrease in fog water content (FWC) and fog droplet size, but increase in fog droplets number concentration [e.g. Jinghong, a city in Yunnan province, the average FWC (the droplet diameter) during an extremely dense fog episode with drizzle was 0.74 g/m3 (28.6 μm) during the 1968/69 winter and 0.08 g/m3 (6.8 μm) in another extremely dense fog episode during the 1986/87 winter, correspondingly, the fog droplets number density had increased from 34.9 to 153 cm-3]; (3) decrease in fog water deposition (FWD) (e.g. the annual mean FWD measured in Jinghong had dropped from 17.3 mm in the 1950s to 4.4 mm in the 1970s and less than 1 mm in the 1980s, and no measurable FWD now.); (4) decrease in visibility in large cities (e.g. in Chongqing, the annual average visibility had decreased from 8.2-11.8 km in the 1960s to 4.9-6.5 km in the 1980s, and around 5 km in recent years); and (5) increase in the ion concentrations and acidity in fog water in urban areas [e.g. the average total ion concentration (TIC) in the center of Chongqing was 5.5 × 104 μmol/L, with mean pH value of 4.0, while the corresponding values are 9.7 × 103 μmol/L and over 5.5 in its rural area]. These changes endanger all kinds of transportation and human health. This paper summarized the authors' related studies, including observations and numerical simulations to confirm the above conclusions.

  13. Uptake and distribution of nitrogen from acidic fog within a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.)/litter/soil system

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.E.; Leininger, T.D.

    1995-11-01

    The magnitude and importance of wet deposition of N in forests of the South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin have not been well characterized. We exposed 3-yr-old ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) seedlings growing in native forest soil to acidic fog treatments (pH 3.1) simulating fog chemistry from a pine forest near Los Angeles, California. Fog solutions contained either {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +}, {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, or unlabeled N. The fog treatments were applied in open-top chambers in six 5-hr exposures. Soil treatments within each of the fog exposures were bare soil, soil overlain with L- and F-litter, and soil covered with plastic during the fog events to prevent fogwater from contacting soil. Seedlings were harvested and samples were collected 15 wk after the fog treatments. Uptake of {sup 15}N by roots was by far the dominant pathway for plant assimilation of fog-deposited {sup 15}N. Deposition of N in fog supplied 9.4% and 8.7% of the total N in current-year crown biomass in the litter-overlay and bare-soil treatments, respectively. Total N concentrations in every plant fraction except current-year stems were significantly higher in the bare-soil treatment than in the plastic-covered soil treatment. Less than 5% of the {sup 15}N deposited directly to the seedling crowns was retained by the plants in the covered-soil treatment, whereas 57% of the {sup 15}N deposited to the seedling/litter/soil systems was incorporated into plant biomass. The litter layers retained {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} more effectively than {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} more effectively than {sup 15}NO{sub 3}. Data from this study suggest that N deposited from fog may be an important source of N for plant growth in forests of the SCAB where fog occurrence and pollution exposure coincide. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Effects of Chinese Urban Development on the Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. H.; Yang, J.; Shi, C. E.; Pu, M. J.; Liu, D. Y.

    2010-07-01

    Since China adopted the reform and opening-up policy in late 1978, the national economy as well as urbanization have developed rapidly, causing urban growth and population growth. In consequence, the urban heat islands strengthen and air pollution increase but the vegetation cover decreases, leading to the relative humidity decreases. These changes led directly to the city's foggy day reduction, fog liquid water content (LWC) and droplet-scale decreases, droplet number concentration increases, visibility degradation sharply in fog, fog-ion concentration and acidity larger, which increase the traffic hazard and endanger human health seriously. In this paper, a large number of observations and numerical simulations have been done to demonstrate these conclusions. Suggestions that air pollution controlling, virescence and improving the urban ecological environment was given at the end of the particle.

  15. Evaluation of ionic pollutants of acid fog and rain using a factor analysis and back trajectories.

    PubMed

    Adzuhata, T; Inotsume, J; Okamura, T; Kikuchi, R; Ozeki, T; Kajikawa, M; Ogawa, N

    2001-01-01

    Fog and rain water samples were collected at the same time in the Akita Hachimantai mountain range in northern Japan from June to September in 1998 and 1999. The various ion concentrations in these samples were analyzed, and the fog droplet sizes were measured for each fog event. As the fog droplet size increased, the ion concentration decreased. The slope of log-log plots of the concentration versus the droplet size differed with the kind of ion. In order to characterize the air pollutant, moreover, these data were quantitatively analyzed by an oblique rotational factor analysis. We found that three factors were extracted as the air pollutant source: (NH4)2SO4, acids (HNO3 + H2SO4) and sea-salt. Combining the factor analysis with the 72 h back-trajectory at 850 hPa level, we found that the contribution of each factor varied with the transport pattern of air masses. PMID:11993680

  16. Effect of aerosol concentration and absorbing aerosol on the radiation fog life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalick, Z.; Kühn, T.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Analogous to cloud formation, the formation and life cycle of fogs is largely influenced by aerosol particles. The objective of this work is to analyze how changes in aerosol properties affect the fog life cycle, with special emphasis on how droplet concentrations change with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and on the effect that absorbing black carbon (BC) particles have on fog dissipation. For our simulation case study, we chose a typical fall time radiation fog at mid-latitudes (45° north) in fairly highly polluted conditions. Our results show that CCN concentrations have a strong influence on the fog lifetime. This is because the immediate effect of CCN on cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) is enhanced through two positive feedback loops: (1) Higher CDNC leads to more radiative cooling at the fog top, which leads to even stronger activation and (2) if CDNC is higher, the average droplet size is smaller, which slows down droplet removal through sedimentation. The effect that radiation fogs have on solar surface irradiation is large - the daily mean can change by 50% if CCN concentrations are doubled or halved (considering a reference CCN mixing ratio of 800 #/mg). With the same changes in CCN, the total fog lifetime increases 160 min or decreases 65 min, respectively. Although BC has a noticeable effect on fog height and dissipation time, its relative effect compared to CCN is small, even if BC concentrations are high. The fog formation is very sensitive to initial meteorological conditions which may be altered considerably if fog was present the previous day. This effect was neglected here, and future simulations, which span several days, may thus be a valuable extension of this study.

  17. Pulmonary effects due to subchronic exposure to oil fog

    SciTech Connect

    Selgrade, M.K.; Hatch, G.E.; Grose, E.C.; Stead, A.G.; Miller, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    Male rats were exposed to an oil fog generated by flash vaporization and subsequent condensation of lightweight lubricating oil. Exposures were for 3.5 h/d, 4d/wk for 13 wk, at concentrations of 1.5, 0.5, 0.2 or 0.0 mg/l (1500, 500, 200, and 0 mg/cu m) and a particle size of approximately 1 micro m (mass median aerodynamic diameter). A number of biologic endpoints were assessed the day after the last exposure and, in some cases, after a 4 wk recovery period. Effects of 1.5 mg/l on male and female rats were compared. Diffuse accumulation of macrophages in the alveoli was observed in all oil fog exposed groups. The degree of severity was concentration dependent. Histopathologic changes were more prominent in males than in females and represented the most notable gender-related differences. Histologic effects observed one day and 4 wk post exposure were similar. Minimal histopathologic changes and minimal increase in lavage fluid protein were the only effects observed at the 0.2 mg/l exposure level. There was a significant increase in lavage fluid protein, percent lavagable polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lung wet and dry weight following exposure to both 0.5 and 1.5 mg/l.

  18. Determining the sulfuric acid fog concentration in coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zin'kovskaya, S.I.; Okhrimenko, E.L.; Sobko, L.V.

    1982-11-06

    A volumetric method for the analysis of sulfuric acid aerosols at levels of acid greater (25-40 g/m/sup 3/) than those (1 g/m/sup 3/) analyzable by current methods is described. Coke oven gas after acid scrubbing and electrofiltration is passed through a Schott filter (pressure drop 100 mm Hg), the sulfuric acid aerosol being condensed on the filter which is washed with water and the washings filtered with NaOH (0.01 N after electrofilter, 1.0 N after the acid towers) to methyl orange end point. The error is +/- 2%.

  19. Fog dispersal technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in fog dispersal technology is briefly discussed. Fog is categorized as supercooled fog, occurring in air temperatures below freezing, and warm fog, occurring at above-freezing temperatures. Operational techniques are available to disperse supercooled fog in the airport area. It is much more difficult to cope with warm fog. Various known concepts to disperse warm fog are evaluated as to their operational merits. The most effective concept for immediate use involves heating the air to cause fog evaporation. Use of helicopter downwash has some application, possibly complementing the promising concept of seeding with sized hygroscopic particles. These latter two concepts appear to have future application, pending further research. The concept using polyelectrolytes is of uncertain value, lacking both a scientific explanation and a substantive evaluation of reported operational successes.

  20. [Effect of fog on diurnal changes in peak expiratory flow rates in an asthmatic].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Honma, S; Imada, A; Sugaya, F; Nishi, M; Abe, S

    1995-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of fog on asthmatics, we analyzed the symptoms of a 45-year-old female during the foggy season and the relation between diurnal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and fog and other meteorological factors. Her asthma attacks had been induced by specific smells: perfume, smoke from burning grass or industrial smoke. Two years previously, she had moved to the suburbs of Sapporo, where fog frequently occurs. From that time her asthmatic symptoms had been exacerbated, so it was suspected that the fog might have had some influence. We analyzed 251 measures of PEFR from June to August 1994. The average and standard deviation of PEFR in the absence of fog and specific smells was 403 +/- 40 L/min (n = 195). PEFR was significantly lower (p < 0.01) when it was foggy (347 +/- 60 L/min; n = 40), when specific smells were present (333 +/- 60 L/min; n = 5) and when there were both fog and specific smells (340 +/- 53 L/min: n = 11). On the other hand, there were no changes associated with other meteorological factors: barometric pressures, relative humidity, mean temperature, minimal temperature and most frequent wind direction. These results suggested that the inhalation of fog decreases PEFR and is an exacerbating factor in bronchial asthma. PMID:7726750

  1. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  2. Capillary gas chromatography determination of volatile organic acids in rain and fog samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    A fused silica capillary gas chromatography technique is described for the determination of volatile acids (C/sub 1/-C/sub 7/) in rain samples using p-bromophenacyl esters. As the sensitivity of this method is high (GC detection limit is ca. 10 pmol), a small volume of rain (25-50 mL) or fog (1-2 mL) is needed. Spiked experiments showed that the measured concentrations of volatile acids in the spiked rain samples linearly increased with a slope of approx.1 in proportion to the concentrations of volatile acids added in the rainwater. Repeated analyses of rain samples showed that relative standard deviations are less than or equal to 18% for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ acids, which are the major volatile acids.

  3. Evaluation of Liquid- and Fog-Based Application of Sterilox Hypochlorous Acid Solution for Surface Inactivation of Human Norovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun Woo; Boston, Deyanna M.; Kase, Julie A.; Sampson, Mark N.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    Noroviruses (NVs) are the most frequent cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in common settings, with surface-mediated transfer via contact with fecally contaminated surfaces implicated in exposure. NVs are environmentally stable and persistent and have a low infectious dose. Several disinfectants have been evaluated for efficacy to control viruses on surfaces, but the toxicity and potential damage to treated materials limits their applicability. Sterilox hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution (HAS) has shown broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity while being suitable for general use. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of HAS to reduce NV both in aqueous suspensions and on inanimate carriers. HOCl was further tested as a fog to decontaminate large spaces. HOCl effectiveness was evaluated using nonculturable human NV measured by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and two surrogate viruses, coliphage MS2 and murine NV, that were detected by both infectivity and RT-PCR. Exposing virus-contaminated carriers of ceramic tile (porous) and stainless steel (nonporous) to 20 to 200 ppm of HOCl solution resulted in ≥99.9% (≥3 log10) reductions of both infectivity and RNA titers of tested viruses within 10 min of exposure time. HOCl fogged in a confined space reduced the infectivity and RNA titers of NV, murine NV, and MS2 on these carriers by at least 99.9% (3 log10), regardless of carrier location and orientation. We conclude that HOCl solution as a liquid or fog is likely to be effective in disinfecting common settings to reduce NV exposures and thereby control virus spread via fomites. PMID:17483283

  4. Inactivation of stable viruses in cell culture facilities by peracetic acid fogging.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter; Roth, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Looking for a robust and simple method to replace formaldehyde fumigation for the disinfection of virus-handling laboratories and facilities, we tested peracetic acid fogging as a method to inactivate stable viruses under practical conditions. Peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (5.8%/27.5%, 2.0 mL/m³) was diluted in sufficient water to achieve ≥ 70% relative humidity and was vaporized as <10 μm droplets in a fully equipped 95 m³ laboratory unit. High titers of reovirus 3, MVM parvovirus and an avian polyomavirus were coated on frosted glass carriers and were exposed to the peracetic acid fog in various positions in the laboratory. After vaporization, a 60 min exposure time, and venting of the laboratory, no residual virus was detected on any of the carriers (detection limit <1 infectious unit/sample volume tested). The log reduction values were 9.0 for reovirus, 6.4 for MVM parvovirus, and 7.65 for the polyomavirus. After more than 10 disinfection runs within 12 months, no damage or functional impairment of electrical and electronic equipment was noted. PMID:22424718

  5. Effect of water fogs on the deliberate ignition of hydrogen. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zalosh, R.G.; Bajpai, S.N.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents an experimental evaluation of the effects of water fog density, droplet diameter, and temperature on the lower flammable limit (LFL) of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. The results show that the LFL for hydrogen in air at 20/sup 0/C is only marginally higher with fog than without. Most of the nozzles tested at 20/sup 0/C raised the hydrogen LFL from 4.0 vol % to about 4.8%, for the case of dense fogs with volume-average drop size in the range 45 to 90 microns. The lower flammable limit at 50/sup 0/C was typically 7.2% for dense fogs with drop size in the range 25 to 50 microns. The lower flammable limit at 70/sup 0/C was typically 7.6%. Typical fog concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 vol % at 20/sup 0/C and decreased with increasing fog temperature. 7 figures, 4 tables.

  6. CHEMISTRY OF FOG WATER IN CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY: 2. PHOTOCHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF AMINO ACIDS AND ALKYL AMINES. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although amino compounds are seemingly ubiquitous in atmospheric particles and deposition, little is known of their fate in the troposphere. We report here on the fate of 21 amino acids and alkyl amines in fog waters from Davis, California, illuminated with simulated sunlight ...

  7. Environmental effects of fog oil and CS usage at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Rosenblatt, D.H.; Snyder, C.T.

    1992-03-01

    In response to environmental concerns at the Combat Maneuver Training Center (CMTC), Hohenfels, Germany, the US Army 7th Army Training Command commissioned a scientific study by Argonne National Laboratory to investigate specific issues. The study involved three parts: (1) a field study to determine if fog oil and CS (a compound named after its discoverers, B.B. Carson and R.W. Stoughton) were accumulating in the CMTC environment, (2) a screening of selected soil samples for the presence of US Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutants, and (3) a literature review of the health effects of fog oil and CS, as well as a review of training practices at CMTC. No fog oil or fog oil degradation products were detected in any soil, sediment, or vegetation sample collected at CMTC. Trace quantities of one or more priority pollutants were tentatively detected in three of eight soil and sediment samples. However, the priority pollutant concentrations are so low that they pose no environmental or health hazards. No evidence of widespread or significant contamination in the training areas was found. Crucial data needed to fully evaluate both acute and chronic health effects of civilian exposures to CS at CMTC are not available. On the basis of the available literature, long-ten-n health effects in the civilian population near CMTC that could result from the use of fog oil and CS during training activities are believed to be negligible.

  8. PULMONARY EFFECTS DUE TO SUBCHRONIC EXPOSURE TO OIL FOG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male rats were exposed to an oil fog generated by flash vaporization and subsequent condensation of lightweight lubricating oil. Exposures were for 3.5 h/d, 4d/wk for 13 wk, at concentrations of 1.5, 0.5, 0.2 or 0.0 mg/l (1500, 500, 200, and 0 mg/m3) and a particle size of approx...

  9. Fog inerting effects on hydrogen combustion in a PWR ice condenser contaminant

    SciTech Connect

    Luangdilok, W.; Bennett, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A mechanistic fog inerting model has been developed to account for the effects of fog on the upward lean flammability limits of a combustible mixture based on the thermal theory of flame propagation. Benchmarking of this model with test data shows reasonably good agreement between the theory and the experiment. Applications of the model and available fog data to determine the upward lean flammability limits of the H{sub 2}-air-steam mixture in the ice condenser upper plenum region of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice condenser contaminant during postulated large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions indicate that combustion may be suppressed beyond the downward flammability limit (8 percent H{sub 2} by volume). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. The effect of surface fog on the transmittance of light

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, B.J.; Galvin, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that surface fog can reduce the transmittance of normally incident light through transparent materials from about 90% to nearly 50%. This result is also confirmed experimentally by reflectance measurements. The most important parameter is the contact angle which the droplets make with the surface. For contact angles less than about 40{degree}, there is almost no loss in transmission. For larger contact angles, there is a significant decrease in the transmittance, with the worst case occurring for a contact angle of 90{degree}.

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF A HIGH-PRESSURE, WATER FOGGING SYSTEM IN CONTROLLING DUST EMISSIONS AT GRAIN RECEIVING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain dust at the receiving area is a fire hazard, a health concern, and a sanitation problem and should be controlled. The effectiveness of a high-pressure, water-fog system in controlling grain dust emissions was evaluated with corn and wheat while spouting 2.1 m3 (60 bu) of grain into a test c...

  12. EFFECTS OF AERIAL THERMAL FOG APPLICATIONS OF FENTHION ON CAGED PINK SHRIMP, MYSIDS AND SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mosquito control applications of fenthion by aerial thermal fog equipment were studied at two sites in Collier County, FL, for sprays that occurred on 20 and 23 June 1984. Acute, lethal effects of fenthion deposited in these estuarine habitats were assessed for caged pink shrimp ...

  13. [Cool/Hot target effect of the water fog infrared stealth].

    PubMed

    Du, Yong-cheng; Yang, Li; Zhang, Shi-cheng; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Shuang-xi

    2012-08-01

    Artificial spray fog will come into being cool target because of the strong evaporation and convection but weak radiation heat flux, when it is used for defence of infrared imaging guided missile. Also, when it is the contrary condition, the water fog will come into being hot target. In order to open out the phenomenon particularly, a math model which can account for the cool/hot effect produced by water fog shielding the thermal radiation is established by coupling the calculation of radiation transfer equation and energy conversation equation, based on the Mie theory. This model is proved to be accurate in comparison with the Monte-Carlo method and Lambert-Beer' law. The water fog is seemed as absorbing, emitting and anisotropic scattering medium, and the medium radiation, multiple scattering, target radiation flux, and environment influence such as the conductivity, convection turbulent heat diffusion and evaporation is calculated. The phenomenon of cool/hot target effect can be shown in detail with this model. PMID:23156782

  14. Effects of pitch and shape for diffraction grating in LED fog lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Lin, Jun-Yu; Wu, Jih-Huah; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Yang, Chi-Hao

    2011-10-01

    The characteristics of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that make them energy-efficient and long-lasting light source for general illumination have attracted a great attention from the lighting industry and commercial market. As everyone know LEDs have the advantages of environmental protection, long lifetime, fast response time (μs), low voltage and good mechanical properties. Their high luminance and the wide region of the dominant wavelengths within the entire visible spectrum mean that people have high anticipations for the applications of LEDs. The output lighting from reflector in the traditional fog lamp was required to fit the standard of the ECE R19 F3 regulation. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of pitch and angle for a diffraction grating in LED fog lamp. The light pattern of fog lamp must be satisfied ECE regulations, so a design of diffraction grating to shift down the lighting was required. There are three LEDs (Cree XLamp XPE LEDs) as the light source in the fog lamp for the illumination efficiency. Then, an optimal simulation of diffraction grating was done for the pitch and angle of the diffraction grating at the test distance of 25 meters. The best pitch and angle was 2mm and 60 degree for the grating shape of wedge type.

  15. Rain, fog, and clouds for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental chamber creates realistic fog and rain effects in aircraft simulator. It reproduces clouds, homogeneous fog, patches of fog, rain and fog, and rain only. It is used with real time digital computer, color computer generated image display that simulates airport lights, or color television camera that produces moving display of airport runway as depicted on model terrain board.

  16. Processing of Atmospheric Organic Matter by California Radiation Fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L.; Youngster, S. B.; Lee, T.; Chang, H.; Herckes, P.

    2005-12-01

    In many environments, organic compounds account for a significant fraction of fine particle mass. Because the lifetimes of accumulation mode aerosol particles are governed largely by interactions with clouds, it is important to understand how organic aerosol particles are processed by clouds and fogs. Recently we have examined the organic composition of radiation fogs in central California as well as how these fogs process organic aerosol particles and soluble organic trace gases. Observations indicate that organic matter is a significant component of the fog droplets, comprising approximately one-third of the total solute mass concentration. Concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) range from approximately 2 to 41 ppmC. Approximately three-fourths of organic matter is typically found in solution as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). A variety of efforts have been made to characterize the composition of the fog organic matter, including analyses by GC/MS, HPLC, IC, NMR and IR. The most abundant species are typically low molecular weight carboxylic acids, small carbonyls and dicarbonyls, and sugar anhydrides. These species have been observed collectively to account for roughly 20-30 percent of the fog DOC. Dicarboxylic acids, frequently used as model compounds for organic CCN, typically account for only a few percent of the organic carbon, with oxalic acid the most important contributor. A significant portion of the fog DOC appears to be comprised of high molecular weight compounds (> 500 Da). Analyses also reveal the presence of organic molecular markers associated with particles produced by various combustion processes. Comparisons of pre-fog and interstitial aerosol samples reveal differences in the relative particle scavenging efficiencies of the fog drops between organic and elemental carbon and between different types of organic carbon. Measurements using a two-stage fog water collector reveal that organic matter tends to be enriched in smaller fog droplets

  17. Combined effects of organic aerosol loading and fog processing on organic aerosols oxidation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Tripathi, Sachchida; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-04-01

    Fog is a natural meteorological phenomenon that occurs throughout the world, it contains substantial quantity of liquid water and generally seen as a natural cleansing agent but it also has the potential to form highly oxidized secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous processing of ambient aerosols. On the other hand higher organic aerosols (OA) loading tend to decrease the overall oxidation level (O/C) of the particle phase organics, due to enhanced partitioning of less oxidized organics from gas to particle phase. However, combined impact of these two parameters; aqueous oxidation and OA loading, on the overall oxidation ratio (O/C) of ambient OA has never been studied. To assess this, real time ambient sampling using HR-ToF-AMS was carried out at Kanpur, India from 15 December 2014 - 10 February 2015. In first 3 weeks of this campaign, very high OA loading is (134 ± 42 μg/m3) observed (termed as high loading or HL period) while loading is substantially reduced from 2nd January, 2016 (56 ± 20 μg/m3, termed as low loading or LL period) . However, both the loading period was affected by several fog episodes (10 in HL and 7 in LL), thus providing the opportunity of studying the combined effects of fog and OA loading on OA oxidation. It is found that O/C ratio is very strongly anti-correlated with OA loading in both the loading period, however, slope of this ant-correlation is much steep during HL period than in LL period. Source apportionment of OA revealed that there is drastic change in the types of OA from HL to LL period, clearly indicating difference in OA composition from HL to LL period. During foggy night continuous oxidation of OA is observed from early evening to early morning with 15-20% enhancement in O/C ratio, while the same is absent during non-foggy period, clearly indicating the efficient fog processing of ambient OA. It is also found that night time fog aqueous oxidation can be as effective as daytime photo chemistry in oxidation of OA. Fog

  18. Microphysical characterization of free space optical link due to hydrometeor and fog effects.

    PubMed

    Mori, Saverio; Marzano, Frank S

    2015-08-01

    Free space optics (FSO) channel availability is affected by atmospheric water particles, which may introduce severe path attenuation. A unified microphysically oriented atmospheric particle scattering (MAPS) model is proposed and described to simulate particle scattering effects on FSO links. Atmospheric particles, such as raindrops, graupel particles, and snowflakes, together with fog droplets, are considered. Input data to characterize liquid and frozen water particle size distribution, density, and refractivity are derived from available literature data and measurements. Scattering, absorption, and extinction coefficients as well as the asymmetry factor are numerically simulated for each particle class and then parametrized with respect to particle water content, fall rate, and visibility, spanning from visible to infrared wavelengths. Both single- and multiple-scattering effects are discussed and quantified by using a radiative transfer model for small-angle approximation. MAPS simulations confirm that fog layers are those causing the largest power extinction on FSO links, but also several decibels of attenuation can be attributed to snow and rain conditions. Multiple-scattering effects, especially due to fog droplets, heavy rain, and dry snowflakes, typically tend to reduce the total attenuation by increasing the received power. An estimate of these effects, parameterized to single-scattering extinction, is proposed for near-infrared FSO link design. PMID:26368094

  19. Temperature and flow rate effects on mass median diameters of thermally generated malathion and naled fogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, J R; Chew, V; Melson, R O

    1993-06-01

    The effects of temperature and flow rate on mass median diameters (mmds) of thermally generated aerosol clouds were studied. Number 2 fuel oil alone, undiluted and diluted malathion 91, and undiluted naled were examined. There was a significant flow rate x temperature interaction on the mmds of diluted malathion fogs: i.e., differences among flow rates depended on temperature and vice versa. PMID:8350082

  20. Effects of synoptic-scale circulation pattern and local land surface condition on fog at Kushiro, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Sato, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2012-12-01

    NPH is a crucial factor for low FF because the northward moisture transport toward Kushiro changes in connection with moisture supply along the monsoon westerly. In other words, the recent decline in summer FF around Kushiro is chiefly caused by changes in the NPH behavior. According to the visibility observation at Kushiro, hourly FF increases in the midnight, has a maximum peak in early morning, and decreases from morning to noon. This diurnal variation, i.e. decrease of the fog/LC frequency from early morning to noon, was identified around Kushiro from the visible and infrared satellite images during 2007-2009 from May to September. The fog/LC frequency differs depending on the land use and is 5-7.5 % higher over the wetland than that over the city area. The sensitivity experiments changing land use from the wetland to the city shows that the migrated sea fog dissipates during nighttime due to a heating effect in the city caused by increase of sensible heat fluxes from surface. During early morning, fog dissipation is more enhanced by a dry atmospheric condition due to a reducing of latent heat fluxes. The heterogeneity of sea fog distribution around Kushiro is attributed to fog dissipation over the city and fog regeneration or recondensation over the wetland, which are induced by a condition of sensible and latent heat fluxes associated with land use.

  1. Radiation fog and urban climate

    SciTech Connect

    Sachweh, M.; Koepke, P.

    1995-05-01

    Fog data of Southern Germany from the period 1949-1990 indicate a significant urban influence on fog frequency. An increase of the urban building density is connected with a reduction in the average number of fog days, which is interpreted as an effect of the urban heat island and moisture deficit. Feedback mechanisms which intensify the urban-rural contrast are discussed. The results are transferable to large cities with relatively good air quality.

  2. Warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The charged particle generator was further tested after some design modification. The generator performance was measured with additional instrumentation and found to confirm previous measurements. Plans for a field testing were than developed. The overall status of the program and the field test plans were presented to a group of atmospheric scientists and electrostatic experts at the NASA/MSFC sponsored USRA Workshop on Electrostatic Fog Dispersal at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado discussed in previous sections. The recommendations from this workshop are being evaluated as to whether NASA should proceed with the field test or whether further theoretical research on the phenomenon of electrostatic fog dispersal and additional development of the charged particle generator should be carried out. Information obtained from the USRA Workshop clearly identified three physical mechanisms that could possibly influence the fog dispersal process, which heretofore have not been considered, and which may provide additional insight to the direction of further fog dispersal work. These mechanisms are: the effect of corona discharge on the electric field strength at the surface, the influx of fog into the cleared volume by turbulent diffusion, and the increase in supersaturation as liquid water is removed, activating haze particles, and thus generating more fog. Plans are being formulated to investigate these mechanisms.

  3. Investigation of the effects of acid deposition upon California crops. Final report, 8 January 1986-7 July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Musselman, R.C.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Takemoto, B.K.

    1987-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acidic fog on winter crops of the San Joaquin Valley (alfalfa, broccoli, carrot, onion, potato, and wheat), and spring crops of the South Coast Air Basin (alfalfa, celery, green pepper, strawberry, and tomato). The study also evaluated the interaction between acidic fog and ambient oxidants on the crops of the South Coast. For the spring study, fog at pH 1.68, 2.69, or 7.24 was applied twice weekly to potted plants grown in open top field chambers or air exclusion plots for seven weeks. Fog at pH 1.68 caused necrosis on leaves and fruit of all species. Season long exposure to pH 1.68 fog reduced yield in strawberry, tomato, green pepper, and alfalfa. Species differed widely in their sensitivity to acidic fog.

  4. Environmental effects of fog oil and CS usage at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany. [2-chlorophenylmethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, K.L.; Rosenblatt, D.H.; Snyder, C.T.

    1992-03-01

    In response to environmental concerns at the Combat Maneuver Training Center (CMTC), Hohenfels, Germany, the US Army 7th Army Training Command commissioned a scientific study by Argonne National Laboratory to investigate specific issues. The study involved three parts: (1) a field study to determine if fog oil and CS (a compound named after its discoverers, B.B. Carson and R.W. Stoughton) were accumulating in the CMTC environment, (2) a screening of selected soil samples for the presence of US Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutants, and (3) a literature review of the health effects of fog oil and CS, as well as a review of training practices at CMTC. No fog oil or fog oil degradation products were detected in any soil, sediment, or vegetation sample collected at CMTC. Trace quantities of one or more priority pollutants were tentatively detected in three of eight soil and sediment samples. However, the priority pollutant concentrations are so low that they pose no environmental or health hazards. No evidence of widespread or significant contamination in the training areas was found. Crucial data needed to fully evaluate both acute and chronic health effects of civilian exposures to CS at CMTC are not available. On the basis of the available literature, long-ten-n health effects in the civilian population near CMTC that could result from the use of fog oil and CS during training activities are believed to be negligible.

  5. Optimization of strawberry disinfection by fogging of a mixture of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide based on microbial reduction, color and phytochemicals retention.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Franco; Vaccari, María Celia; Piagentini, Andrea Marcela; Pirovani, María Élida

    2016-09-01

    The fogging of strawberries using a environmentally friendly sanitizer mixture of peracetic acid (5%) and hydrogen peroxide (20%) was performed in a model chamber and modeled as a function of the concentration (3.4, 20.0, 60.0, 100.0 and 116.6 µL sanitizer L(-) (1) air chamber) and the treatment time (5.7, 15.0, 37.5, 60.0 and 69.3 min). The sanitizer fogging was adequate for reducing total mesophilic microbial and yeasts and moulds counts of fruits until seven days of storage at 2℃. However, sanitizer oxidant properties adversely affected the content of total anthocyanins, total phenolics, vitamin C, and antioxidant capacity to various degrees, with some deleterious changes in the fruits color, depending on the fogging conditions. A multiple numeric response optimization was developed based on 2.0 log microbiological reduction, maximum phytochemicals and antioxidant capacity retentions, with no changes in the fruits color, being the optimal fogging conditions achieved: 10.1 µL sanitizer L(-1) air chamber and 29.6 min. The fogging of strawberries at these conditions may represent a promising postharvest treatment option for extending their shelf-life without affecting their sensory quality and bioactive properties. PMID:26769132

  6. Pulmonary effects due to short-term exposure to oil fog

    SciTech Connect

    Selgrade, M.K.; Hatch, G.E.; Grose, E.C.; Illing, J.W.; Snead, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Rats were exposed to an oil fog generated by flash vaporization and subsequent condensation of light-weight lubricating oil. Exposures were for 3.5 hrs/day, 4 days/wk, for 4 wks, at concentrations of 1.5, 0.5, or 0.1mg/1 and a particle size of approximately 1 micronole. Samples of respiratory tissues were taken for histopathologic analyses, lavage fluid samples were collected, and pulmonary function measurements were made the day after the last exposure. An accumulation of macrophages within the alveolar lumen, an increase in lavage fluid protein content, and an increase in total cell content in lavage fluid due to an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was noted in rats exposed at the 1.5 mg level. Also, for the exposure group there was an increase in lung wet and dry weight, and an increase in end expiratory volume, and pneumonitis was observed histopathologically in 4 of 10 male rats exposed. Pneumonitis was not observed among 6 female rats examined. Oil fog had no effect on total lung capacity, residual volume, vital capacity, lung compliance, or the distribution of ventilated air within the lung. Effects following exposure to 0.5 mg/1 were limited to slight accumulation of macrophages in the alveolar lumen and an increase in the total cells in lavage fluid which could not be attributed to an increase in any particular cell type.

  7. Pulmonary effects due to short-term exposure to oil fog

    SciTech Connect

    Selgrade, M.K.; Hatch, G.E.; Grose, E.C.; Illing, J.W.; Stead, A.G.; Miller, F.J.; Graham, J.A.; Stevens, M.A.; Hardisty, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Rats were exposed to an oil fog generated by flash vaporation and subsequent condensation of lightweight lubricating oil. Exposures were for 3.5 h/d, 4 d/wk, for 4 wk, at concentrations of 1.5, 0.5, or 0.0 mg/l and a particle size of approximately 1 micron. Samples of respiratory tissues were taken for histopathologic analyses, lavage fluid samples were collected, and pulmonary function measurements were made the day after the last exposure. An accumulation of macrophages within the alveolar lumen, an increase in lavage fluid protein content, and an increase in total cell content in lavage fluid due to an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was noted in rats exposed at the 1.5-mg level. Also, for this exposure group there was an increase in lung wet and dry weight and an increase in end-expiratory volume, and pneumonitis was observed histopathologically in 4 of 10 male rats exposed. Pneumonitis was not observed among six female rats examined. Oil fog had no effect on total lung capacity, residual volume, vital capacity, lung compliance, or the distribution of ventilated air within the lung. Effects following exposure to 0.5 mg/l were limited to slight accumulation of macrophages in the alveolar lumen and an increase in the total cells in lavage fluid, which could not be attributed to an increase in any particular cell type.

  8. Asymmetric ratchet effect for directional transport of fog drops on static and dynamic butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Ju, Jie; Zheng, Yongmei; Jiang, Lei

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by novel creatures, researchers have developed varieties of fog drop transport systems and made significant contributions to the fields of heat transferring, water collecting, antifogging, and so on. Up to now, most of the efforts in directional fog drop transport have been focused on static surfaces. Considering it is not practical to keep surfaces still all the time in reality, conducting investigations on surfaces that can transport fog drops in both static and dynamic states has become more and more important. Here we report the wings of Morpho deidamia butterflies can directionally transport fog drops in both static and dynamic states. This directional drop transport ability results from the micro/nano ratchet-like structure of butterfly wings: the surface of butterfly wings is composed of overlapped scales, and the scales are covered with porous asymmetric ridges. Influenced by this special structure, fog drops on static wings are transported directionally as a result of the fog drops' asymmetric growth and coalescence. Fog drops on vibrating wings are propelled directionally due to the fog drops' asymmetric dewetting from the wings. PMID:24397580

  9. Effects of various runway lighting parameters upon the relation between runway visual range and visual range of centerline and edge lights in fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thirty six students and 54 commercial airline pilots were tested in the fog chamber to determine the effect of runway edge and centerline light intensity and spacing, fog density, ambient luminance level, and lateral and vertical offset distance of the subject from the runway's centerline upon horizontal visual range. These data were obtained to evaluate the adequacy of a balanced lighting system to provide maximum visual range in fog viewing both centerline and runway edge lights. The daytime system was compared against two other candidate lighting systems; the nighttime system was compared against other candidate lighting systems. The second objective was to determine if visual range is affected by lights between the subject and the farthestmost light visible through the fog. The third objective was to determine if college student subjects differ from commercial airline pilots in their horizontal visual range through fog. Two studies were conducted.

  10. Fog water chemistry in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Li, Xiang; Yang, Chenyu; Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jianmin; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.

    2011-08-01

    With the aim of understanding the fog chemistry in a Chinese megacity, twenty-six fog water samples were collected in urban Shanghai from March 2009 to March 2010. The following parameters were measured: pH, electrical conductivity (EC), ten inorganic major ions ( SO42-, NO3-, NO2-, F -, Cl -, Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, NH4+) and four major organic acids (CH 3COO -, HCOO -, CO42-, MSA). The total ionic concentration (TIC) and EC of fog samples were one or two orders of magnitude higher than those often found in Europe, North America and other Asian countries. Pollutants were expected to be mainly from local sources, including factories, motor vehicle emissions and civil construction. Non-local sources such as moderate- and long-range transport of sea salt also contributed to pollution levels in fog events as indicated by back trajectory analysis. The pH of the fog water collected during the monitoring period varied from 4.68 to 6.58; acidic fogs represented about 30.8% of the total fog events during this period. The fog water was characterized by high concentrations of SO42- (20.0% of measured TIC), NO3- (17.1%), NH4+ (28.3%) and Ca 2+ (14.4%). SO42- and NO3-, the main precursors of fog acidity, were related to burning fossil fuels and vehicle emissions, respectively. NH4+, originating from the scavenging of gaseous ammonia and particulate ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, and Ca 2+, originating from the scavenging of coarse particles, acted as acid neutralizers and were the main cause for the relatively high pH of fogs in Shanghai. The ratio of ( SO42- + NO3-)/( NH4+ + Ca 2+) was lower than 1, indicating the alkaline nature of the fog water. A high ratio of NO3-/ SO42- and low ratio of HCOO -/CH 3COO - were consistent with large contributions from vehicular emissions that produce severe air pollution in megacities.

  11. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  12. Fog climatology in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avotniece, Zanita; Klavins, Maris; Lizuma, Lita

    2015-10-01

    Fog has been recognised as a hazardous weather phenomenon that can cause accidents and affect urban air quality negatively. Therefore, assessing the characteristics of fog formation, as well as the changes in fog frequency and intensity as a result of climate change is of high importance. This study covers a 52-year period and contains an analysis of the frequency of fog occurring, long-term changes in fog frequency and atmospheric conditions that favour the occurrence of fog events in Latvia. During the analysis, two inter-annual maxima of fog frequency were identified in the spring and autumn; the seasonal differences in the formation of fog were also confirmed using satellite observations of low-level cloudiness. However, the long-term changes of fog frequency showed a decrease tendency of fog to form, which may be associated with improvements in air quality since industrialization and the observed increase of air temperature.

  13. Hydrologic Effects and Biogeographic Impacts of Coastal Fog, Channel Islands, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D. T.; Still, C. J.; Williams, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    Fog has long been recognized as an important component of the hydrological cycle in many ecosystems, including coastal desert fog belts, tropical cloud forests, and montane areas worldwide. Fog drip can be a major source of water, particularly during the dry season, and there is evidence in some ecosystems of direct fogwater uptake by foliar absorption. Fog and low clouds can also increase availability of water by reducing evaporative water losses. In the California Channel Islands, fog and low stratus clouds dramatically affect the water budget of coastal vegetation, particularly during the long summer drought. This work focuses on a population of Bishop pine (Pinus muricata D. Don) on Santa Cruz Island. This is the southernmost large stand of this species, and tree growth and survival appears to be strongly limited by water availability. We have used parallel measurement and modeling approaches to quantify the importance of fogwater inputs and persistent cloud cover to Bishop pine growth. We have modeled drought stress over the last century based on local climate records, calibrated against a dense network of 12 weather stations on a 7km coastal-inland elevation gradient. Water availability is highly variable year to year, with episodic droughts that are associated with widespread tree mortality. Frequent cloud cover near the coast reduces evapotranspiration relative to the inland site (on the order of 25%), thereby delaying the onset of, and moderating the severity of the annual summer drought. Substantial summer fog drip at higher elevations provides additional water inputs that also reduce drought severity. Beyond the theoretical availability of extra water from fog drip, tree ring analysis and xylem water isotopic data suggest that significant amounts of fog water are actually taken up by these trees. Stand boundaries appear to be driven by spatial patterns of mortality related to water availability and frequency of severe drought. These results suggest that

  14. Effects of fog, driver experience and gender on driving behavior on S-curved road segments.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomeng; Yan, Xuedong; Wong, S C

    2015-04-01

    Driving on curved roads has been recognized as a significant safety issue for many years. However, driver behavior and the interactions among variables that affect driver performance on curves is complicated and not well understood. Previous studies have investigated various factors that influence driver performance on right- or left-turn curves, but have paid little attention to the effects of foggy weather, driver experience and gender on driver performance on complex curves. A driving simulator experiment was conducted in this study to evaluate the relationships between driving behavior on a continuous S-curve and foggy weather, driver experience and gender. The process of negotiating a curve was divided into three stages consisting of a straight segment, the transition from the straight segment to the S-curve and the S-curve. The experimental results indicated that drivers tended to drive more cautiously in heavy fog, but the driving risk was still increased, especially in the transition stage from the straight segment to the S-curve. The non-professional (NP) drivers were less sensitive to the impending change in the road geometry, and less skilled in both longitudinal and lateral vehicle control than the professional drivers. The NP female drivers in particular were found to be the most vulnerable group in S-curve driving. PMID:25700127

  15. Scavenging of urban air emissions by Fog at Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, P.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2015-12-01

    The present study focuses upon the understanding of fog water chemistry in Delhi city. Total seventy fog water samples were collected at two different sites in Delhi during December 2014 to March 2015. Selected parameters such as pH, major anions (Cl-, F-, NO3- and SO42-) and major cations (NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+) were determined in the samples. The pH of the fog water collected during the monitoring period at Site I (traffic intersection) varied from 4.68 to 5.58 indicating the acidic nature of fog water while at the site II (green cover area), it ranged from 6.11 to 6.88 having slightly lower acidity. At the Site I, the average concentration of Cl-, Na+, SO42-, NH4+ was recorded as 1.5 X 10-2, 8 X 10-3, 4 X 10-3 and 1 X 10-2 μEqu/L respectively. Such values of ionic species may be attributed to the local sources, including factories, motor vehicle emissions and civil construction etc. However, non-local sources such as moderate- and long-range transport of sea salt also had significant influence on ionic content of fog water. In general the Na+ ratio values were found to be higher side suggesting the influence of non-marine sources. Extremely high values of Cl-/ Na+ ratios indicated the contribution from combustion of organochlorine compounds. Hence, the higher ratios of inorganic ions and acidic pH revealed that fog is an effective mechanism for the scavenging of various pollutants emitted by different sources in the city.

  16. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  17. Fog/cloud and rain chemistry in northern coastal California

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, S.H.; Lemcke, S.

    1987-07-01

    Fog, clouds and rain were sampled for 2 years at Redwood National Park (RNP) and one year at Arcata and Oakland. Fog and cloud water samples were more acidic and contained higher concentrations of Ca, Mg, K, Na, NH4, SO4, NO3 and Cl, than rain samples at all sites. Cloud/fog water and rain sample chemistry was not different for RNP and Arcata; but Oakland samples were significantly more acid and had higher concentrations of all elements. RNP and Arcata cloud/fog samples were more acid and contained higher elemental concentrations than expected under pristine conditions. Average pH's were: RNP cloud/fog - 4.12, RNP rain - 4.63, Arcata cloud/fog - 4.00, Arcata rain - 4.66, Oakland cloud/fog - 3.87, Oakland rain - 4.37.

  18. PULMONARY EFFECTS DUE TO SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE TO OIL FOG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rats were exposed to an oil fog generated by flash vaporization and subsequent condensation of light weight lubricating oil. Exposures were for 3.5 hrs/day, 4 days/wk, for 4 wks, at concentrations of 1.5, 0.5, or 0.1mg/1 and a particle size of approximately 1 micronole. Samples o...

  19. Fog chemistry in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Suresh; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Chen, Jing; Kommalapati, Raghava R.; Murugesan, Karthik; Shen, Xinhua; Qingzhong, Yuan; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Fog samples were collected in two population centers of the US Gulf Coast (Houston, Texas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana) using Caltech active strand cloud collectors. A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected in Baton Rouge (November 2004-February 2005) and Houston (February 2006). These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved organic carbon, major inorganic ions, and a variety of organic compounds including organic acids, aromatics, carbonyls, and linear alkanes. Fogs in both environments were of moderate density, with typical fog liquid water contents <100 mg m -3. Fog samples collected in Houston reflect a clear influence of marine and anthropogenic inputs, while Baton Rouge samples also reflect agricultural inputs. The volume-weighted mean fog pH was somewhat more acidic (˜4.3) in Houston than in Baton Rouge (˜5.0). A wide pH range was observed in fog at both locations. Houston fog had higher concentrations of Cl -, NO 3-, Na +, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+. Sulfate to nitrate ratios were high in fogs at both locations, typical of many clouds in the eastern US. Total organic carbon concentrations were much higher in Houston fogs than in Baton Rouge fogs. Efforts to speciate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reveal large contributions from organic acids and carbonyls, with smaller contributions from other organic compound families including aromatics, alkanes, amides, and alcohols. Approximately 40% of the fog DOC was unspeciated in samples from both study locations.

  20. Long-term observation of fog chemistry and estimation of fog water and nitrogen input via fog water deposition at a mountainous site in Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Katata, Genki; Noguchi, Izumi; Sakai, Shigekatsu; Watanabe, Yoko; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Furutani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate water and nitrogen input via fog deposition, the fog water chemistry and deposition around a crater lake (Lake Mashu) in northern Japan were investigated in the growing seasons of trees (summer to autumn) in 2006-2012. The fog samples were collected using an active fog collector and droplet size distribution was measured with a droplet size spectrometer (FM-100). The visibility (VIS)-liquid water content of fog (LWC) relationship differed between summer and autumn. Large fog droplets decreased in autumn and the calculated LWC from FM-100 measurements (LWCobs) were lower than those in summer at the same VIS. Two empirical curves between LWCobs and VIS were obtained and used for better estimation of fog deposition. Fog deposition was calculated from LWC empirically derived from past VIS data and deposition velocity (Vd) estimated using wind speed and vegetation parameters. The mean pH of fog water was 4.6 and the percentage of samples of pH 4.0 or more was 93%. Compared to previous literature of exposure experiments of acid mist on plants, fog acidity in this study did not seem to injure plant leaves. The water input via fog deposition accumulated for each growing season was estimated at 107-140 mm, corresponding to 18-23% of the precipitation in the same period. Nitrogen deposition via fog deposition in a plant growing season was estimated at 26-30 meq m- 2 (3.6-4.2 kg N ha- 1). As a long-term trend, NO3- concentration in fog water decreased significantly. However, the long-term trends of fog and nitrogen depositions were not clear.

  1. Marine fog: a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koračin, Darko; Dorman, Clive E.; Lewis, John M.; Hudson, James G.; Wilcox, Eric M.; Torregrosa, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this review is to discuss physical processes over a wide range of spatial scales that govern the formation, evolution, and dissipation of marine fog. We consider marine fog as the collective combination of fog over the open sea along with coastal sea fog and coastal land fog. The review includes a history of sea fog research, field programs, forecasting methods, and detection of sea fog via satellite observations where similarity in radiative properties of fog top and the underlying sea induce further complexity. The main thrust of the study is to provide insight into causality of fog including its initiation, maintenance, and destruction. The interplay between the various physical processes behind the several stages of marine fog is among the most challenging aspects of the problem. An effort is made to identify this interplay between processes that include the microphysics of fog formation and maintenance, the influence of large-scale circulation and precipitation/clouds, radiation, turbulence (air-sea interaction), and advection. The environmental impact of marine fog is also addressed. The study concludes with an assessment of our current knowledge of the phenomenon, our principal areas of ignorance, and future lines of research that hold promise for advances in our understanding.

  2. Streamflow, Fog, and Fog-Drip in the California Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawaske, S. R.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    The onshore movement of marine fog from coastal waters is a common occurrence during summer months along much of the contiguous U.S. Pacific Coast. Because the fog-season tends to occur during the precipitation-free dry-season, any additional input of moisture or reduction in loss of moisture through evapotranspiration provided by marine layer can be an important factor in localized hydrologic systems. In an effort to quantify some of the effects of fog on the regional dry-season hydrology, a study site within the Santa Cruz Mountains of central California was established. The fog-laden coastside and predominately fog-free San Francisco Bay-side of the study area provided an excellent opportunity to assess the impacts of the presence and absence of fog on ecohydrological processes. Streamflow, fog-drip, soil moisture, and weather conditions were measured from May-September. Bayside streams were found to be almost all intermittent, with much higher rates of baseflow recession compared to the predominately perennial coastside streams. Fog-drip was essentially nonexistent on the bayside, while highly variable amounts were recorded on the coastside. Maximum rates and seasonal totals of drip were found within stands of mature conifers (Sequoia sempervirens and Pseudotsuga menziesii) along exposed, often windy ridgelines. Rates of up to 19 in (48 cm)/month of fog-drip were recorded. Consequently, frequent infiltration events to depths of at least 9 in (23 cm) were also documented. Over the course of the study soil moisture levels at high fog-drip locations either increased, or were roughly equivalent to initial spring conditions from the onset of data collection. Increases of flow in coastside streams, under otherwise receding conditions, were found to coincide with fog and fog-drip events. These results indicate that the presence of fog can significantly affect dry-season hydrologic conditions of some coastal locations.

  3. Arctic Coastal Fog over Greenland Glaciers using an Improved MODIS Fog Detection Method and Ground Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiskoot, H.; Harvey, T.; Gilson, G.

    2015-12-01

    Annual breakup of sea ice causes fog in Arctic coastal regions, which can both reduce and enhance glacier melt. With progressive sea ice loss and increasing temperatures and atmospheric moisture in the Arctic, it is essential to determine the frequency and spatial extent of fog in order to understand its present and future effects on glacier mass balance. Previously, we determined Greenland coastal fog to peak with 15-25% of days in July. Here, we present the spatial and vertical extent of significant melt-season fog events over Greenland coastal glaciers and the ice sheet. To this end, we modified a MODIS fog/low stratus detection method by Bendix et al. (2005), with verification by weather and radiosonde data, timelapse and Landsat imagery, and independent fog classifications. Our fog-detection method uses MODIS Levels 1b and 2, processed in an ENVI-ArcGIS environment as follows: 1) visual examination and application of vegetation and snow indices; 2) initial fog/low stratus discrimination with novel band thresholds and cloud products; 3) verification using cloud phase/temperature products; 4) cleaning misclassified pixels; 5) calculating fog/low stratus optical and geometrical thickness; 6) final differentiation of fog from low stratus using edge-pixel detection, trend-surface fitting, and DEM filling. The end product consists of 500 m fog-mask pixel maps over Greenland, with minimum and maximum possible extents based on classification of fog versus low stratus. Our results show that fog can cover extensive areas of the Greenland ice masses. Persistent fog events in early, mid, and late melt-season were extracted for East Greenland using fog rim detection overlain on the GIMP DEM, the Randolph Glacier Inventory, and a coast shapefile. E.g., a 4 July 2002 fog event covers 4300-5000 km2 of ice, with a maximum inland extent of 85 km to an elevation of 1250 m asl. Fog thickness over ice is 20-800 m, but can be underestimated by >50 m compared to radiosonde data.

  4. Combined effects of expectations and visual uncertainty upon detection and identification of a target in the fog.

    PubMed

    Quétard, Boris; Quinton, Jean-Charles; Colomb, Michèle; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Barca, Laura; Izaute, Marie; Appadoo, Owen Kevin; Mermillod, Martial

    2015-09-01

    Detecting a pedestrian while driving in the fog is one situation where the prior expectation about the target presence is integrated with the noisy visual input. We focus on how these sources of information influence the oculomotor behavior and are integrated within an underlying decision-making process. The participants had to judge whether high-/low-density fog scenes displayed on a computer screen contained a pedestrian or a deer by executing a mouse movement toward the response button (mouse-tracking). A variable road sign was added on the scene to manipulate expectations about target identity. We then analyzed the timing and amplitude of the deviation of mouse trajectories toward the incorrect response and, using an eye tracker, the detection time (before fixating the target) and the identification time (fixations on the target). Results revealed that expectation of the correct target results in earlier decisions with less deviation toward the alternative response, this effect being partially explained by the facilitation of target identification. PMID:26209302

  5. Phase-partitioning and chemical reactions of low molecular weight organic compounds in fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Lind, J. A.; Fierlinger-Oberlinninger, H.; Kalina, M.; Puxbaum, H.; Winiwarter, W.; Arends, B. G.; Wobrock, W.; Jaeschke, W.

    1992-11-01

    Concurrent gas and fog water measurements of formic, acetic and pyruvic acids and formaldehyde carried out during the Po Valley Fog Experiment 1989 are presented. The reaction between HCHO and S(IV) in fog water solution to form HMSA was studied. The effect of HMSA formation was found to increase HCHO solubility in fog water up to 100 times. 95 percent on average of HCHO is present as HMSA in fog water samples with pH greater than 4.5. At lower pH values, HMSA formation is limited by the availability of S(IV) in solution. A common feature of HCOOH, CH3COOH and HCHO gas/liquid distribution is represented by the large departures from theoretical predictions when fog water pH is in the region where a large fraction of these compounds is partitioned into the liquid phase. A limitation in mass transport across the air/droplet interface is a likely explanation for this behavior.

  6. An assessment of warm fog: Nucleation, control, and recommended research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrin, M. L.; Connell, J. R.; Gero, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A state-of-the-art survey is given of warm fog research which has been performed up to, and including, 1974. Topics covered are nucleation, growth, coalescence, fog structures and visibility, effects of surface films, drop size spectrum, optical properties, instrumentation, liquid water content, condensation nuclei. Included is a summary of all reported fog modification experiments. Additional data is provided on air flow, turbulence, a summary of recommendations on instruments to be developed for determining turbulence, air flow, etc., as well as recommendations of various fog research tasks which should be performed for a better understanding of fog microphysics.

  7. Effects of haze particles and fog droplets on NLOS ultraviolet communication channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changming; Zhang, Hongming; Cheng, Julian

    2015-09-01

    The performance of non-line-of-sight ultraviolet (UV) scattering communication depends largely on atmospheric parameters. In this paper, we consider haze, fog, two common types of aerosols, and introduce the density and size of aerosols as variables to study the channel path loss for the UV scattering communications. We modify a Monte-Carlo based multiple-scattering model and provide fitting functions to replace the complex calculations of Mie theory, which can be used to obtain the atmospheric coefficients and phase functions for the aerosols. Simulation results reveal that, given fixed elevation angles, the channel path loss is related to both communication range, the aerosol density, and size of aerosols. For a short communication range, an increase of aerosol density can reduce the path loss, which improves the performance of UV scattering communication. However, when the communication range is extended, the path loss will fall first and then rise with density of aerosols. This phenomenon also occurs for an increase of fog drop size. The density or size of aerosols that has the lowest path loss is inversely proportional to the communication range. PMID:26368427

  8. The effects of surface wettability on the fog and dew moisture harvesting performance on tubular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Choongyeop; Nam, Youngsuk

    2016-01-01

    The efficient water harvesting from air-laden moisture has been a subject of great interest to address world-wide water shortage issues. Recently, it has been shown that tailoring surface wettability can enhance the moisture harvesting performance. However, depending on the harvesting condition, a different conclusion has often been reported and it remains unclear what type of surface wettability would be desirable for the efficient water harvesting under the given condition. Here we compare the water harvesting performance of the surfaces with various wettability under two different harvesting conditions-dewing and fogging, and show that the different harvesting efficiency of each surface under these two conditions can be understood by considering the relative importance of the water capturing and removal efficiency of the surface. At fogging, the moisture harvesting performance is determined by the water removal efficiency of the surface with the oil-infused surfaces exhibiting the best performance. Meanwhile, at dewing, both the water capturing and removal efficiency are crucial to the harvesting performance. And well-wetting surfaces with a lower barrier to nucleation of condensates exhibit a better harvesting performance due to the increasing importance of the water capture efficiency over the water removal efficiency at dewing. PMID:27063149

  9. The effects of surface wettability on the fog and dew moisture harvesting performance on tubular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Choongyeop; Nam, Youngsuk

    2016-04-01

    The efficient water harvesting from air-laden moisture has been a subject of great interest to address world-wide water shortage issues. Recently, it has been shown that tailoring surface wettability can enhance the moisture harvesting performance. However, depending on the harvesting condition, a different conclusion has often been reported and it remains unclear what type of surface wettability would be desirable for the efficient water harvesting under the given condition. Here we compare the water harvesting performance of the surfaces with various wettability under two different harvesting conditions–dewing and fogging, and show that the different harvesting efficiency of each surface under these two conditions can be understood by considering the relative importance of the water capturing and removal efficiency of the surface. At fogging, the moisture harvesting performance is determined by the water removal efficiency of the surface with the oil-infused surfaces exhibiting the best performance. Meanwhile, at dewing, both the water capturing and removal efficiency are crucial to the harvesting performance. And well-wetting surfaces with a lower barrier to nucleation of condensates exhibit a better harvesting performance due to the increasing importance of the water capture efficiency over the water removal efficiency at dewing.

  10. The effects of surface wettability on the fog and dew moisture harvesting performance on tubular surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Donghyun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Choongyeop; Nam, Youngsuk

    2016-01-01

    The efficient water harvesting from air-laden moisture has been a subject of great interest to address world-wide water shortage issues. Recently, it has been shown that tailoring surface wettability can enhance the moisture harvesting performance. However, depending on the harvesting condition, a different conclusion has often been reported and it remains unclear what type of surface wettability would be desirable for the efficient water harvesting under the given condition. Here we compare the water harvesting performance of the surfaces with various wettability under two different harvesting conditions–dewing and fogging, and show that the different harvesting efficiency of each surface under these two conditions can be understood by considering the relative importance of the water capturing and removal efficiency of the surface. At fogging, the moisture harvesting performance is determined by the water removal efficiency of the surface with the oil-infused surfaces exhibiting the best performance. Meanwhile, at dewing, both the water capturing and removal efficiency are crucial to the harvesting performance. And well-wetting surfaces with a lower barrier to nucleation of condensates exhibit a better harvesting performance due to the increasing importance of the water capture efficiency over the water removal efficiency at dewing. PMID:27063149

  11. One-year delayed effect of fog on malaria transmission: a time-series analysis in the rain forest area of Mengla County, south-west China

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Linwei; Bi, Yan; Ho, Suzanne C; Liu, Wenjie; Liang, Song; Goggins, William B; Chan, Emily YY; Zhou, Shuisen; Sung, Joseph JY

    2008-01-01

    Background Malaria is a major public health burden in the tropics with the potential to significantly increase in response to climate change. Analyses of data from the recent past can elucidate how short-term variations in weather factors affect malaria transmission. This study explored the impact of climate variability on the transmission of malaria in the tropical rain forest area of Mengla County, south-west China. Methods Ecological time-series analysis was performed on data collected between 1971 and 1999. Auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were used to evaluate the relationship between weather factors and malaria incidence. Results At the time scale of months, the predictors for malaria incidence included: minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and fog day frequency. The effect of minimum temperature on malaria incidence was greater in the cool months than in the hot months. The fog day frequency in October had a positive effect on malaria incidence in May of the following year. At the time scale of years, the annual fog day frequency was the only weather predictor of the annual incidence of malaria. Conclusion Fog day frequency was for the first time found to be a predictor of malaria incidence in a rain forest area. The one-year delayed effect of fog on malaria transmission may involve providing water input and maintaining aquatic breeding sites for mosquitoes in vulnerable times when there is little rainfall in the 6-month dry seasons. These findings should be considered in the prediction of future patterns of malaria for similar tropical rain forest areas worldwide. PMID:18565224

  12. Fog composition in the Central Valley of California over three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckes, P.; Marcotte, A. R.; Wang, Y.; Collett, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous fog studies have been conducted in the Central Valley of California since the 1980s, making it one of the most studied locations in the world in terms of fog chemistry. The present work reviews observational fog studies in the area and discusses overall chemical composition as well as spatial variability and temporal variability. Regionally there is a clear gradient in fog occurrence with less fog and lower density (liquid water content, LWC) fog in the southern part of the Valley (Bakersfield) compared to more northern locations like Fresno or Davis. Chemically, fogs in the southern valley have higher solute loadings and lower pH compared to more northern locations (Davis and Fresno). Overall fog chemistry is dominated in the valley by the ammonia-nitric acid-ammonium nitrate system with sulfate being a rather minor component, especially at more northern locations and in more recent years. Fog pH in recent years is consistently higher than 5, showing an absence of acid in fogs in this region. LWC values appear to have decreased over recent years (less dense fogs). An airport visibility assessment of fog frequency reveals that overall dense fogs (visibility of less than 1/4 mile) have decreased by ~ 50% over the last 30 years.

  13. Fog chemistry at an urban midwestern site

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.S.; Wade, K.A.; Carter, B.H.; Armentano, T.V.; Pribush, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The Holcomb Research Institute is monitoring fog chemistry in Indianapolis, Indiana and at sites in and near the heavily industrialized Ohio River Valley. Results reported here indicate that fogs in this area can be strongly acidic, and that further studies are warranted. We report 1) the ionic composition of three fog events, samples collected in Indianapolis between December 1985 and February 1986, and 2) the pH of three additional events, samples collected between November 1985 and February 1986. (The volume of fog collected during the latter three events was insufficient for chemical analysis other than pH.) The pH of the fog samples ranged from 2.85 to 4.06; some of this fell within the range known to damage foliage and yield of some plant species. It has been demonstrated that even one exposure to highly acidic mists (pH par. delta 2.5) can damage certain crop species; hence, it is important to document the occurrence of any events having acidity near this level.

  14. Mechanisms of Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) Deposit Formation in Sewer Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FOG deposits in sewer systems recently have been shown to be metallic salts of fatty acids. However, the fate and transport of FOG deposit reactant constituents and the complex interactions during the FOG deposit formation process are still largely unknown. Batch tests were performed to elucidate ...

  15. Impact of Air Pollution on California Central Valley Fog Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the 20th century, trends in California Central Valley fog frequency have changed dramatically without explanation. While episodes of dense radiation fog, known regionally as Tule Fog, increased steadily from 1930-1970, analysis from both ground and remote sensing measurements confirm a 46-50% reduction in fog days in the last 30 years (Baldocchi and Waller, 2014, Herkes et al., 2014). The dominant hypotheses suggest that the recent decline in radiation fog can be explained by the rising temperatures associated with climate change or urban heat island effect. This assertion fails to explain the significant increase in Central Valley fog midcentury. Here we instead assert that changes in air pollution, rather than climate, better support this upward then downward temporal trend. Automobile use greatly increased emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) midcentury, followed by a large decrease in vehicle emissions due to statewide regulation from 1980 to present. In the Central Valley, NOx from automobile emissions contributes to the formation ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), the dominant hygroscopic aerosol in the valley's wintertime boundary layer that can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) necessary for fog droplet formation. Thus, changes in air pollution not only affect the number of CCN, but may also impact the density and persistence of fog episodes. Using NOAA meteorological records throughout the twentieth century, we will show the correlation between fog frequency, air pollution, and climatic drivers. We conclude that fog trends are closely correlated with changes in air pollution, rather than solely climate change.

  16. Fixation and chemical analysis of single fog and rain droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, M.; Akashi, S.; Ma, C.-J.; Tohno, S.

    Last decade, the importance of global environmental problems has been recognized worldwide. Acid rain is one of the most important global environmental problems as well as the global warming. The grasp of physical and chemical properties of fog and rain droplets is essential to make clear the physical and chemical processes of acid rain and also their effects on forests, materials and ecosystems. We examined the physical and chemical properties of single fog and raindrops by applying fixation technique. The sampling method and treatment procedure to fix the liquid droplets as a solid particle were investigated. Small liquid particles like fog droplet could be easily fixed within few minutes by exposure to cyanoacrylate vapor. The large liquid particles like raindrops were also fixed successively, but some of them were not perfect. Freezing method was applied to fix the large raindrops. Frozen liquid particles existed stably by exposure to cyanoacrylate vapor after freezing. The particle size measurement and the elemental analysis of the fixed particle were performed in individual base using microscope, and SEX-EDX, particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and micro-PIXE analyses, respectively. The concentration in raindrops was dependent upon the droplet size and the elapsed time from the beginning of rainfall.

  17. Processing of atmospheric organic matter by California radiation fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.; Herckes, Pierre; Youngster, Sarah; Lee, Taehyoung

    2008-03-01

    Considerable effort has been put into characterizing the ionic composition of fogs and clouds over the past twenty-five years. Recently it has become evident that clouds and fogs often contain large concentrations of organic material as well. Here we report findings from a series of studies examining the organic composition of radiation fogs in central California. Organic compounds in these fogs comprise a major fraction of total solute mass, with total organic carbon sometimes reaching levels of several tens of mg/L. This organic matter is comprised of a wide variety of compounds, ranging from low molecular weight organic acids to high molecular weight compounds with molecular masses approaching several hundred to a thousand g/mole. The most abundant individual compounds are typically formic acid, acetic acid, and formaldehyde. High concentrations are also observed of some dicarboxylic acids (e.g., oxalate) and dicarbonyls (e.g., glyoxal and methylglyoxal) and of levoglucosan, an anhydrosugar characteristically emitted by biomass combustion. Many other compounds have been identified in fog water by GC/MS, including long chain n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanes, PAH, and others, although these compounds typically comprise a total of only a few percent of fog TOC. Measurements of fog scavenging of organic and elemental carbon reveal preferential scavenging of organic carbon. Tracking of individual organic compounds utilized as source type markers suggests the fogs differentially scavenge carbonaceous particles from different source types, with more active processing of wood smoke than vehicle exhaust. Observations of high deposition velocities of fog-borne organic carbon, in excess of 1 cm/s, indicate that fogs in the region represent an important mechanism for cleansing the atmosphere of pollution.

  18. A New Passive Fog Collector Design for Measuring Fog Water Inputs and Isotopic Composition in Harsh and Remote Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D. T.; Still, C. J.

    2005-12-01

    We present a new design for a passive fog collector that has proven useful both for collecting fog quantity information, and for collecting samples for isotopic analysis. The new collector is more sensitive to short-duration and low-intensity fog events than other designs we examined. This collector was developed as part of a larger study of the role that fog and persistent stratus clouds play in ecological processes in the California Channel Islands. Our work is primarily focused on a population of Bishop Pines (Pinus muricata) on Santa Cruz Island. The study area is subject to frequent short-duration, low-intensity fog events, with peak occurrence during the rainless summer months. Fog water inputs are sufficient to wet the soil down below 25cm when surrounding soils are quite dry (water potentials less than -1.5MPa). Pines appear to be quite effective at harvesting fog drip from fog events that did not register on a prototype mesh collector. Harp-style collectors, that use only vertically-oriented strands for collection, generally respond more quickly to the beginning of fog events than do mesh collectors. However, existing harp collectors were judged too expensive to buy, and too complex to build and maintain to deploy in large numbers. The new harp-style collector was designed for efficient fog collection during short-duration, low-intensity fog events, while being inexpensive, durable, and easy to construct. The new design has reduced rain-water contamination compared to other designs examined. The reduced storage of fog water on the collection surface (compared to a mesh collector) also minimizes the risk of isotopic enrichment of samples during prolonged, intermittent fog events. Real-time comparisons with an active fog collector suggest minimal isotope fractionation. Nineteen fog collectors installed at eleven sites throughout the main stand have provided spatially distributed estimates of fog-water inputs to the ecosystem. Samples of fog-water from

  19. Problems, control, and treatment of fat, oil, and grease (FOG): a review.

    PubMed

    Husain, Iman A F; Alkhatib, Ma'an Fahmi; Jammi, Mohamed Saedi; Mirghani, Mohamed E S; Bin Zainudin, Zaki; Hoda, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Presence of fat, oil, and grease (FOG) in wastewater is an ever-growing concern to municipalities and solid-waste facility operators. FOG enters the sewer system from restaurants, residences, and industrial food facilities. Its release into the sewer system results in a continuous build-up that causes eventual blockage of sewer pipes. Several researchers have investigated FOG deposition based on the local conditions of sewers and lifestyle. This paper attempts to review the physical and chemical characteristics of FOG, sources of FOG, and potential chemical and biological reactions of FOG. The effect of the aforementioned factors on the FOG-deposition mechanism is also discussed. Moreover, insight into the current control and treatment methods and potential reuse of FOG is highlighted. It is expected that this review would provide scientists and the concerned authorities a holistic view of the recent researches on FOG control, treatment, and reuse. PMID:25007744

  20. AC fog withstand test on contaminated insulators by steam fog

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, J.N.

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation into how steam fog parameters affect the withstand voltage of artificially contaminated insulators by the fog withstand method. Established the correlation between the steam flow rate and liquid water content of the fog. The fog withstand voltage showed a lower value with little dispersion at about 3 to 10 g/m/sup 3/ of the maximum liquid water content. The minimum fog withstand voltage agreed well with the minimum flashover voltage obtained under natural conditions. The authors suggest that, for the fog withstand test using steam fog, the ideal fog condition would be about 3 to 7 g/m/sup 3/ of the maximum liquid water content of the fog.

  1. Fog interception by Ball moss (Tillandsia recurvata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Escobar, A.; Cervantes-Jiménez, M.; Suzán-Azpiri, H.; González-Sosa, E.; Hernández-Sandoval, L.; Malda-Barrera, G.; Martínez-Díaz, M.

    2011-08-01

    Interception losses are a major influence in the water yield of vegetated areas. For most storms, rain interception results in less water reaching the ground. However, fog interception can increase the overall water storage capacity of the vegetation and once the storage is exceeded, fog drip is a common hydrological input. Fog interception is disregarded in water budgets of semiarid regions, but for some plant communities, it could be a mechanism offsetting evaporation losses. Tillandsia recurvata is a cosmopolitan epiphyte adapted to arid habitats where fog may be an important water source. Therefore, the interception storage capacity by T. recurvata was measured in controlled conditions and applying simulated rain or fog. Juvenile, vegetative specimens were used to determine the potential upperbound storage capacities. The storage capacity was proportional to dry weight mass. Interception storage capacity (Cmin) was 0.19 and 0.56 mm for rainfall and fog respectively. The coefficients obtained in the laboratory were used together with biomass measurements for T. recurvata in a xeric scrub to calculate the depth of water intercepted by rain. T. recurvata contributed 20 % to the rain interception capacity of their shrub hosts: Acacia farnesiana and Prosopis laevigata and; also potentially intercepted 4.8 % of the annual rainfall. Nocturnal stomatic opening in T. recurvata is not only relevant for CO2 but for water vapor, as suggested by the higher weight change of specimens wetted with fog for 1 h at dark in comparison to those wetted during daylight (543 ± 77 vs. 325 ± 56 mg, p = 0.048). The storage capacity of T. recurvata leaf surfaces could increase the amount of water available for evaporation, but as this species colonise montane forests, the effect could be negative on water recharge, because potential storage capacity is very high, in the laboratory experiments it took up to 12 h at a rate of 0.26 l h-1 to reach saturation conditions when fog was applied.

  2. Anti-Fog Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tracer Chemical Corporation's TRX Anti-Fog Composition is an inexpensive product which prevents condensation on plastic and glass surfaces. It was the result from a Tech Briefs article detailing a Johnson Space Center compound.

  3. X-ray measurements of water fog density. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, A.L.

    1982-11-01

    Water-fog densities were measured in a laboratory experiment using x-ray diagnostics. Fog densities were measured, varying the flow rate, nozzle type, nozzle configuration, nozzle height above the x-ray beam, and water surface tension. Suspended water volume fractions between 0.0008 and 0.0074 percent were measured. The fog density increases approximately as the square root of the flow rate; the other parameters had little effect on the density.

  4. Effects of ultrasonic and thermo-chemical pre-treatments on methane production from fat, oil and grease (FOG) and synthetic kitchen waste (KW) in anaerobic co-digestion.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Champagne, Pascale; Anderson, Bruce C

    2013-02-01

    The effects of ultrasonic and thermo-chemical pre-treatments on the methane production potential of anaerobic co-digestion with synthetic kitchen waste (KW) or fat, oil and grease (FOG) were investigated. Non-linear regressions were fitted to accurately assess and compare the methane production from co-digestion under the various pre-treatment conditions and to achieve representative simulations and predictions. Ultrasonic pre-treatment was not found to improve methane production effectively from either FOG co-digestion or KW co-digestions. Thermo-chemical pre-treatment could increase methane production yields from both FOG and KW co-digestions. COD solubilization was found to effectively represent the effects of pre-treatment. A comprehensive evaluation indicated that the thermo-chemical pre-treatments of pH=10, 55°C and pH=8, 55°C provided the best conditions to increase methane production from FOG and KW co-digestions, respectively. The most effective enhancement of biogas production (288±0.85mLCH(4)/g TVS) was achieved from thermo-chemically pre-treated FOG co-digestion, which was 9.9±1.5% higher than FOG co-digestion without thermo-chemical pre-treatment. PMID:23306128

  5. Effects of ultra-low volume and thermal fog malathion, Scourge and naled applied against caged adult Culicoides furens and Culex quinquefasciatus in open and vegetated terrain.

    PubMed

    Linley, J R; Jordan, S

    1992-03-01

    The adulticidal effect of ULV and thermal fog malathion, Scourge and naled was tested at 2x label dosage (1.42, 0.22, 0.39 oz/acre, respectively) against caged Culicoides furens and Culex quinquefasciatus in open and vegetated (orange grove) terrain. Cages were at 122 cm elevation and positioned at 15.2, 45.7, 76.2, 106.7, 137.2 and 167.6 m from the line of insecticide release. Ultra-low volume applications of all 3 insecticides were markedly more effective than thermal fog under all conditions, especially in vegetated terrain. Of the 3 insecticides, malathion performed the poorest, especially against Cx. quinquefasciatus (in which there was some resistance) and particularly when applied as thermal fog. Scourge and naled were about equally effective. The best adulticide against C. furens was naled, which was clearly superior applied as ULV. It yielded 75% mortality out to 283 m in the open, and to 38 m in the presence of dense vegetation. PMID:1583493

  6. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence indicates that acid rain is a growing environmental phenomenon of potentially far reaching consequences and increasing geographical extent in North America. Acid rain is but one aspect of the broader problem of atmospheric deposition which includes snow, fog, and ...

  7. Hudson Valley Fog Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzjaprald, David R.; Garland Lala, G.

    1989-12-01

    Observations of 14 cases of radiation fog in the Hudson River valley in New York State are presented. Our emphasis is to connect the fog prediction problem to mechanisms in the nocturnal boundary layer that influence heat and moisture balances. Surface layer and boundary layer fogs are distinguished by the difference in dominant terms in the saturation specific humidity deficit budget. Fogs that persist longer than approximately 30 minutes are most frequently thicker than 50 m. The ultimate depth to which the fog grows is shown to be determined by initial conditions at sunset and by subsequent evolution of winds in the nocturnal boundary layer, as well as by surface transports and radiative cooling. Estimates of the surface and boundary layer heat budget are presented. Two new phenomena are identified: 1) A jump in specific humidity occurring during the early evening transition that shortens the time required to reach surface layer saturation; and 2) along-valley jetlike winds with maxima near 100 m altitude are shown to be frequent and their occurrence is associated with a threshold value of the along-valley surface pressure gradient. Such jets appear to have an important influence on deep fog, increasing or decreasing its likelihood depending on the sign of heat and moisture advection they associate with.

  8. Diagnosing Antarctic Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzara, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    Fog affects aviation and other logistical operations in the Antarctic; nevertheless limited studies have been conducted to understand fog behavior in this part of the world. A study has been conducted in the Ross Island region of Antarctica, the location of McMurdo Station and Scott Base - the main stations of the United States and New Zealand Antarctic programs, respectively. Using tools such as multi-channel satellites observations and supported by in situ radiosonde and ground-based automatic weather station observations, combined with back trajectory and mesoscale numerical models, discover that austral summer fog events are "advective" in temperament. The diagnosis finds a primary source region from the southeast over the Ross Ice Shelf (over 72% of the cases studied) while a minority of cases point toward a secondary fog source region to the north along the Scott Coast of the Ross Sea with influences from the East Antarctic Plateau. Part of this examination confirms existing anecdotes from forecasters and weather observers, while refuting others about fog and its behavior in this environment. This effort marks the beginning of our understanding of Antarctic fog behavior.

  9. Field Observations of the Processing of Organic Aerosol Particles and Trace Gases by Fogs and Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L.; Herckes, P.

    2003-12-01

    In many environments, organic compounds account for a significant fraction of fine particle mass. Because the lifetimes of accumulation mode aerosol particles are governed largely by interactions with clouds, it is important to understand how organic aerosol particles are processed by clouds and fogs. Recently we have examined the organic composition of clouds and fogs in a variety of environments as well as how these fogs and clouds process organic aerosol particles and soluble organic trace gases. The investigations, conducted in Europe, North America, Central America, and the Pacific region, have included studies of polluted radiation fogs, orographic clouds in clean and polluted environments, and marine stratocumulus. Our results show that organic matter is a significant component of fog and cloud droplets. In polluted California radiation fogs, we observed concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) ranging from 2 to 40 ppmC, with significantly lower concentrations measured in marine and continental clouds. An average of approximately 80 percent of organic matter was found in solution, while the remainder appears to be suspended material inside cloud and fog drops. Ultrafiltration measurements indicate that as much as half of the dissolved organic carbon is present in very large molecules with molecular weights in excess of 500 Daltons. Field measurements made using a two-stage cloud water collector reveal that organic matter tends to be enriched in smaller cloud or fog droplets. Consequently, removal of organic compounds by precipitating clouds or by direct cloud/fog drop deposition will be slowed due to the fact that small drops are incorporated less efficiently into precipitation and removed less efficiently by sedimentation or inertial impaction. Despite this trend, we have observed that sedimentation of droplets from long-lived radiation fogs provides a very effective mechanism for cleansing the atmosphere of carbonaceous aerosol particles, with organic

  10. Fog, cloud, and dew chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, M.R.

    1989-02-28

    The spatial and temporal variations of fog/cloud chemistry were determined in the San Joaquin Valley, in the Los Angeles Basin, and in the Santa Barbara Channel area using automated fog- and cloudwater collectors that were designed and constructed for the project. A significant correlation was observed between the average nighttime cloud- and fogwater loadings of H/sup +/ and NO/sub 3//sup /minus// and the maximum levels of O/sub 3//sup /minus//. Higher aldehydes, a series of dicarbonyls, and a variety of sulfonic acid salts formed by reaction of S(IV) and aldehydes were quantitatively determined in the droplet phase.

  11. Spray characterization of thermal fogging equipment typically used in vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The generation of insecticide laden fogs provides an effective method for controlling flying insects. One of the critical factors affecting the effectiveness of a thermal fogging application is the generation of droplets that will remain aloft in the fogging cloud and moves into the area where the ...

  12. Chemical composition of radiation for water at Albany, New York, and its relationship to Fog microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzzi, Sandro; Castillo, Raymond A.; Jiusto, James E.; Lala, G. Garland

    1984-08-01

    Radiation fog water samples collected at the Albany (NY) County airport show quite low acid content compared with previously published data on fog acidity: the pH ranges from 4.3 to 6.4. This fog water ionic concentration is indicative of low pollution in this area. The leading mechanism responsible for the variability in aqueous concentration of nonvolatile ionic constituents of these fogs is the growth and evaporation of droplets, as reflected by the variation of LWC during the fog evolution. For these reasons the origin and composition of aerosol on which fog droplet condensation takes place is of major importance. Droplet size spectra analysis show that there is a need for improving the collection methods of fog water in order to better describe the chemistry involved, especially to maximize the drop capture efficiency of the collectors and reduce the sampling time for better resolution.

  13. Size-dependent particle activation properties in fog during the ParisFog 2012/13 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, E.; Gysel, M.; Roberts, G. C.; Elias, T.; Hofer, J.; Hoyle, C. R.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dupont, J.-C.; Burnet, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2014-04-01

    Fog causes a variety of hazards in road traffic, maritime navigation, as well as in air traffic and railway traffic. There is a great demand, e.g. from airports, for more reliable fog forecasts to prevent fog related accidents. Improved fog forecasts require a better understanding of the numerous complex mechanisms during the fog life cycle. During winter 2012/13 a field campaign called ParisFog aiming at fog research took place at SIRTA (Instrumented Site for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research). SIRTA is located about 20 km southwest of the Paris city centre, France in a semi-urban environment. In situ activation properties of the prevailing fog were investigated by measuring: (1) total and interstitial (non-activated) dry particle number size distributions behind two different inlet systems; (2) interstitial hydrated aerosol and fog droplet size distributions at ambient conditions; (3) cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration at different supersaturations (SS) with a CCN counter. The aerosol particles were characterized regarding their hygroscopic properties, fog droplet activation behavior and contribution to light scattering for 17 developed fog events. Low particle hygroscopicity with an overall median of hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of 0.14 was found, likely caused by substantial influence from local traffic and wood burning emissions. Measurements of the aerosol size distribution at ambient RH revealed that the critical wet diameter, above which the hydrated aerosols activate to fog droplets, is rather large with a median value of 2.4 μm and is highly variable (ranging from 1 to 5 μm) between the different fog events. Thus, the number of activated fog droplets was very small and the non-activated hydrated particles were found to contribute siginificantly to the observed light scattering and thus to the reduction in visibility. Combining all experimental data, the effective peak supersaturation, SSpeak, a measure of the peak supersaturation

  14. Characterization of submicron aerosols and effect on visibility during a severe haze-fog episode in Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. J.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, L.; Che, H. C.; Ma, Q. L.; Yu, X. M.; Yue, Y.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2015-11-01

    Particle size, composition and optical properties were measured at a regional atmosphere background station in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) to understand the formation and evolution of haze-fog episodes in Jan. 2013. The peak of particle number size distribution was in the size range of 80-100 nm during the measurements. PM1 mass concentration contributed 84% to the total particle mass (PM10). Based on visibility and ambient relative humidity, three types of weather conditions (i.e., clear, haze and fog) were classified in this study. The extinction coefficients of PM1 and PM10 under dry conditions were simulated by the Mie model. Under dry conditions, PM1 was found to contribute approximately 91% to the light extinction coefficient of PM10. However, the PM1 with the assumption of dry state was found to contribute approximately 85% to the ambient extinction coefficient of PM10 during clear conditions, 58% during haze conditions and approximately 41% during fog conditions. The variation of the dry PM1 contribution was related to the water uptake of particles under different relative humidity conditions. A severe haze-fog event on Jan. 14-17 was discussed in more detail as a case study. Two episodes were chosen to show that nitrate and organics dominated the aerosol component during the severe haze-fog episode and were related to secondary aerosol formation and air mass origin. Nitrate played a more dominant role than sulfate in heavy haze formation in the YRD region, which was different from the North China Plain region.

  15. Anti-fogging surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouterde, Timothée; Checco, Antonio; Black, Charles; Rahman, Atikur; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2015-11-01

    Achieving an anti-fogging material is more challenging than achieving an anti-rain material. A relevant way to investigate the resistance to fog consists of depositing hot water on a cold surface. We show that classical superhydrophobic surfaces with micron-size microstructures lose their superhydrophobic behaviour due to vapour condensation. To understand this phenomenon, we measured the adhesion force of hot water drops on different substrates and propose a quantitative description of this force generated by condensation. Our main result is that reducing the scale of the structures can strongly promote antifogging properties.

  16. Winter Frost and Fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This somewhat oblique blue wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the 174 km (108 mi) diameter crater, Terby, and its vicinity in December 2004. Located north of Hellas, this region can be covered with seasonal frost and ground-hugging fog, even in the afternoon, despite being north of 30oS. The subtle, wavy pattern is a manifestation of fog.

    Location near: 28oS, 286oW Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  17. SENSITIVITY OF IMPORTANT WESTERN CONIFER SPECIES TO SO2 AND SEASONAL INTERACTION OF ACID FOG AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased concern for forest health and the role of anthropogenic deposition, including acidic/wet deposition and gaseous air pollutants, has led to the need to understand which forest species face the highest risk from atmospheric deposition. n order to address this issue fo...

  18. Dose-dependent control of proliferation and sperm specification by FOG-1/CPEB

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Beth E.; Bernstein, David S.; Bachorik, Jennifer L.; Petcherski, Andrei G.; Wickens, Marvin; Kimble, Judith

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY RNA-binding proteins control germline development in metazoans. This work focuses on control of the C. elegans germ line by two RNA-binding proteins: FOG-1, a CPEB homolog, and FBF, a PUF family member. Previous studies showed that FOG-1 specifies the sperm fate and that FBF promotes proliferation. Here we report that FOG-1 also promotes proliferation. Whereas fbf-1 fbf-2 double mutants make ∼120 germ cells, fog-1; fbf-1 fbf-2 triple mutants make only ∼10 germ cells. The triple mutant germ line divides normally until early L2, when germ cells prematurely enter meiosis and begin oogenesis. Importantly, fog-1/+; fbf-1 fbf-2 animals make more germ cells than fbf-1 fbf-2 double mutants, demonstrating that one dose of wild-type fog-1 promotes proliferation more effectively than two doses – at least in the absence of FBF. FOG-1 protein is barely detectable in proliferating germ cells, but abundant in germ cells destined for spermatogenesis. Based on fog-1 dosage effects together with the gradient of FOG-1 protein abundance, we suggest that low FOG-1 promotes proliferation and high FOG-1 specifies spermatogenesis. FBF binds specifically to regulatory elements in the fog-13′UTR, and FOG-1 increases in animals lacking FBF. Therefore, FBF represses fog-1 expression. We suggest that FBF promotes continued proliferation, at least in part, by maintaining FOG-1 at a low level appropriate for proliferation. The dose-dependent control of proliferation and cell fate by FOG-1 has striking parallels with Xenopus CPEB, suggesting a conserved mechanism in animal development. PMID:16000383

  19. Fog interception by Ball moss (Tillandsia recurvata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Escobar, A.; Cervantes-Jiménez, M.; Suzán-Azpiri, H.; González-Sosa, E.; Hernández-Sandoval, L.; Malda-Barrera, G.; Martínez-Díaz, M.

    2010-03-01

    Interception losses are a major influence in the water yield of vegetated areas. For most storms, interception results in less water reaching the ground. However, fog drip or occult precipitation can result in negative interception because small drops are deposited on all plant surfaces and subsequently fall to the ground once vegetation storage capacities are exceeded. Fog drip is normally disregarded, but for some plant communities, it could be a mechanism offsetting evaporation losses. Tillandsia recurvata is a cosmopolitan epiphyte adapted to arid habitats where fog may be an important water source. Therefore, the interception storage capacity by T. recurvata was measured in controlled conditions through applying simulated rain or fog. The storage capacity was proportional to dry weight mass. Nocturnal stomatic opening in T. recurvata is not only relevant for CO2 but for water vapor, as suggested by the higher weight change of specimens wetted with fog for 1 h at dark in comparison to those wetted during daylight (543±77 vs. 325±56 mg, p=0.048). The coefficients obtained in the laboratory were used together with biomass measurements for T. recurvata in a xeric scrub to calculate the depth of water intercepted. Interception storage capacity (Cmin) was 0.19 and 0.54 mm for rainfall and fog respectively. T. recurvata contributed 20% to the rain interception of their shrub hosts: Acacia farnesiana and Prosopis laevigata. Meteorological data registered during one year at Cadereyta, México showed that radiative fog formation was possible during the dry season. The results showed the potential role of T. recurvata in capturing fog, which probably is a main source of water during the dry season that supports their reproductive and physiological activity at that time. The storage capacity of T. recurvata leaf surfaces could increase the amount of water available for evaporation, but as this species colonise montane forests, the effect could be negative on water

  20. Size-dependent particle activation properties in fog during the ParisFog 2012/13 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, E.; Gysel, M.; Roberts, G. C.; Elias, T.; Hofer, J.; Hoyle, C. R.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dupont, J.-C.; Burnet, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2014-10-01

    Fog-induced visibility reduction is responsible for a variety of hazards in the transport sector. Therefore there is a large demand for an improved understanding of fog formation and thus improved forecasts. Improved fog forecasts require a better understanding of the numerous complex mechanisms during the fog life cycle. During winter 2012/13 a field campaign called ParisFog aiming at fog research took place at SIRTA (Instrumented Site for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research). SIRTA is located about 20 km southwest of the Paris city center, France, in a semi-urban environment. In situ activation properties of the prevailing fog were investigated by measuring (1) total and interstitial (non-activated) dry particle number size distributions behind two different inlet systems; (2) interstitial hydrated aerosol and fog droplet size distributions at ambient conditions; and (3) cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration at different supersaturations (SS) with a CCN counter. The aerosol particles were characterized regarding their hygroscopic properties, fog droplet activation behavior and contribution to light scattering for 17 developed fog events. Low particle hygroscopicity with an overall median of the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of 0.14 was found, likely caused by substantial influence from local traffic and wood burning emissions. Measurements of the aerosol size distribution at ambient RH revealed that the critical wet diameter, above which the hydrated aerosols activate to fog droplets, is rather large (with a median value of 2.6μm) and is highly variable (ranging from 1 to 5μm) between the different fog events. Thus, the number of activated fog droplets was very small and the non-activated hydrated particles were found to contribute significantly to the observed light scattering and thus to the reduction in visibility. Combining all experimental data, the effective peak supersaturation, SSpeak, a measure of the peak supersaturation during the fog

  1. Fog Research: A Review of Past Achievements and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, I.; Tardif, R.; Michaelides, S. C.; Cermak, J.; Bott, A.; Bendix, J.; Müller, M. D.; Pagowski, M.; Hansen, B.; Ellrod, G.; Jacobs, W.; Toth, G.; Cober, S. G.

    2007-06-01

    The scientific community that includes meteorologists, physical scientists, engineers, medical doctors, biologists, and environmentalists has shown interest in a better understanding of fog for years because of its effects on, directly or indirectly, the daily life of human beings. The total economic losses associated with the impact of the presence of fog on aviation, marine and land transportation can be comparable to those of tornadoes or, in some cases, winter storms and hurricanes. The number of articles including the word ``fog'' in Journals of American Meteorological Society alone was found to be about 4700, indicating that there is substantial interest in this subject. In spite of this extensive body of work, our ability to accurately forecast/nowcast fog remains limited due to our incomplete understanding of the fog processes over various time and space scales. Fog processes involve droplet microphysics, aerosol chemistry, radiation, turbulence, large/small-scale dynamics, and surface conditions (e.g., partaining to the presence of ice, snow, liquid, plants, and various types of soil). This review paper summarizes past achievements related to the understanding of fog formation, development and decay, and in this respect, the analysis of observations and the development of forecasting models and remote sensing methods are discussed in detail. Finally, future perspectives for fog-related research are highlighted.

  2. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  3. Large volume water sprays for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for dispersing of warm fogs which impede visibility and alter schedules is described. The method uses large volume recycled water sprays to create curtains of falling drops through which the fog is processed by the ambient wind and spray-induced air flow; the fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. The efficiency of this fog droplet removal process depends on the size spectra of the spray drops and optimum spray drop size is calculated as between 0.3-1.0 mm in diameter. Water spray tests were conducted in order to determine the drop size spectra and temperature response of sprays produced by commercially available fire-fighting nozzles, and nozzle array tests were utilized to study air flow patterns and the thermal properties of the overall system. The initial test data reveal that the fog-dispersal procedure is effective.

  4. Cloud, fog, and aerosol effect on the MTF of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dor, Baruch; Bruscaglioni, Piero; Devir, Adam D.; Donelli, P.; Ismaelli, A.

    1995-12-01

    A numerical code is used to examine the features of the effect of atmospheric turbidity on the modulation transfer function of an optical system operating on ground, on an airplane or a satellite. Models of size distributions and optical properties of particulate suspended in the atmosphere are considered. The relevant scattering phase functions are calculated by Mie theory and are later used by a code using both Monte Carlo and geometrical optics procedures to evaluate the contribution of atmospheric turbidity to the augmentation of the point spread function. Comparison of ours with other researchers procedures is shown. The effect of atmospheric turbidity is evaluated as due to the presence of scatterers (the secondary sources) whose defocused images are distributed on the plane of the image of the primary source. The positions of the scatterers are determined by a Monte Carlo procedure, while the contribution of each secondary source to the irradiance on the image plane is evaluated by means of geometrical optics. Cases of different aerosols types, geometry aspects of viewing through the atmosphere and atmospheric absorption effects on the MTF are shown.

  5. An Alternative Transcript of the FOG-2 Gene Encodes a FOG-2 Isoform lacking the FOG Repression Motif

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Rodney M.; Remo, Benjamin F.; Svensson, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    The FOG family of transcriptional co-factors is composed of two members in mammals: FOG-1 and FOG-2. Both have been shown to bind to GATA factors and function as transcriptional co-repressors in specific cell and promoter contexts. We have previously defined a novel repression domain localized to the N-terminus of each FOG family member, the FOG Repression Motif, which is necessary for FOG-mediated transcriptional repression. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel isoform of FOG-2 lacking the FOG Repression Motif. In contrast to full-length FOG-2, this isoform is expressed predominately in the embryonic and adult heart. It can bind GATA4 avidly, but is unable to repress GATA4-mediated activation of cardiac-restricted gene promoters. Together, these results suggest that FOG-2 repressive activity may be modulated by the generation of isoforms of FOG-2 lacking the FOG repression motif. PMID:17445768

  6. UAV applications for thermodynamic profiling: Emphasis on ice fog research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fernando, Harindra J. S.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Ware, Randolph

    2016-04-01

    Ice fog occurs often over the Arctic, cold climatic, and mountainous regions for about 30% of time where temperature (T) can go down to -10°C or below. Ice Nucleation (IN) and cooling processes play an important role by the controlling the intensity of ice fog conditions that affect aviation application, transportation, and local climate. Ice fog can also occur at T above -10°C but close to 0°C it occurs due to freezing of supercooled droplets that include an IN. To better document ice fog conditions, observations from the ice fog events of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol effects on Climate (ISDAC) project, Barrow, Alaska, Fog Remote Sensing And Modeling (FRAM) project Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, and the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) project, Heber City, Utah, were analyzed.. Measurements difficulties of small ice fog particles at cold temperatures and low-level flying restrictions prevent observations from aircraft within the surface boundary layer. However, unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be operated safely to measure IN number concentration, Relative Humidity with respect to ice (RHi), T, horizontal wind speed (Uh) and direction, and ice crystal spectra less than about 500 micron. Thermodynamic profiling by a Radiometrics Profiling Microwave Radiometer (PMWR) and Vaisala CL51 ceilometer was used to describe ice fog conditions in the vertical and its time development. In this presentation, ice fog characteristics and its thermodynamic environment will be presented using both ground-based and airborne platforms such as a UAV with new sensors. Some examples of measurements from the UAV for future research, and challenges related to both ice fog measurements and visibility parameterization will also be presented.

  7. Phosphorus input through fog deposition in a dry tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecar, Karen L.; Runyan, Christiane W.; D'Odorico, Paolo; Lawrence, Deborah; Schmook, Birgit; Das, Rishiraj

    2015-12-01

    In many tropical forests, where phosphorus (P) is considered a limiting nutrient, atmospheric deposition can contribute significantly to available P. Previous studies have shown that P inputs from atmospheric deposition are enhanced by plant canopies. This effect is explained as the result of increased deposition of P-rich aerosol particles (dry deposition) and fog droplets (fog or "occult" deposition) onto leaf surfaces. Here we studied the importance of fog as a source of P to a P-limited dry tropical forest. Throughout an 80 day period during the dry season when fog is most common, we sampled fog water and bulk precipitation in a clearing and measured leaf wetness and throughfall in an adjacent secondary and mature forest stand. During the study period, total P (PT) concentrations in fog water ranged from 0.15 to 6.40 mg/L, on average fourteenfold greater than PT concentrations in bulk precipitation (0.011 to 0.451 mg/L), and sixfold and sevenfold greater than throughfall PT concentrations in the secondary and mature forest stands, respectively (0.007 to 1.319 mg/L; 0.009 to 0.443 mg/L). Based on leaf area index, the frequency of fog deposition, and amount of water deposited per fog event, we estimate that fog delivers a maximum of 1.01 kg/ha/yr to secondary forest stands and 1.75 kg/ha/yr to mature forest stands, compared to 0.88 kg/ha/yr to secondary forest stands and 1.98 kg/ha/yr to mature forest stands via throughfall (wet + dry deposition) and stemflow. Thus, fog deposition may contribute substantially to available P in tropical dry forests.

  8. Atmospheric and Fog Effects on Ultra-Wide Band Radar Operating at Extremely High Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Balal, Nezah; Pinhasi, Gad A.; Pinhasi, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The wide band at extremely high frequencies (EHF) above 30 GHz is applicable for high resolution directive radars, resolving the lack of free frequency bands within the lower part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Utilization of ultra-wideband signals in this EHF band is of interest, since it covers a relatively large spectrum, which is free of users, resulting in better resolution in both the longitudinal and transverse dimensions. Noting that frequencies in the millimeter band are subjected to high atmospheric attenuation and dispersion effects, a study of the degradation in the accuracy and resolution is presented. The fact that solid-state millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation sources are producing low power, the method of continuous-wave wideband frequency modulation becomes the natural technique for remote sensing and detection. Millimeter wave radars are used as complementary sensors for the detection of small radar cross-section objects under bad weather conditions, when small objects cannot be seen by optical cameras and infrared detectors. Theoretical analysis for the propagation of a wide “chirped” Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FMCW) radar signal in a dielectric medium is presented. It is shown that the frequency-dependent (complex) refractivity of the atmospheric medium causes distortions in the phase of the reflected signal, introducing noticeable errors in the longitudinal distance estimations, and at some frequencies may also degrade the resolution. PMID:27223286

  9. Atmospheric and Fog Effects on Ultra-Wide Band Radar Operating at Extremely High Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Balal, Nezah; Pinhasi, Gad A; Pinhasi, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The wide band at extremely high frequencies (EHF) above 30 GHz is applicable for high resolution directive radars, resolving the lack of free frequency bands within the lower part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Utilization of ultra-wideband signals in this EHF band is of interest, since it covers a relatively large spectrum, which is free of users, resulting in better resolution in both the longitudinal and transverse dimensions. Noting that frequencies in the millimeter band are subjected to high atmospheric attenuation and dispersion effects, a study of the degradation in the accuracy and resolution is presented. The fact that solid-state millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation sources are producing low power, the method of continuous-wave wideband frequency modulation becomes the natural technique for remote sensing and detection. Millimeter wave radars are used as complementary sensors for the detection of small radar cross-section objects under bad weather conditions, when small objects cannot be seen by optical cameras and infrared detectors. Theoretical analysis for the propagation of a wide "chirped" Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FMCW) radar signal in a dielectric medium is presented. It is shown that the frequency-dependent (complex) refractivity of the atmospheric medium causes distortions in the phase of the reflected signal, introducing noticeable errors in the longitudinal distance estimations, and at some frequencies may also degrade the resolution. PMID:27223286

  10. Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Cooperative Janus System for Enhancement of Fog Collection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Moyuan; Xiao, Jiasheng; Yu, Cunming; Li, Kan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Harvesting micro-droplets from fog is a promising method for solving global freshwater crisis. Different types of fog collectors have been extensively reported during the last decade. The improvement of fog collection can be attributed to the immediate transportation of harvested water, the effective regeneration of the fog gathering surface, etc. Through learning from the nature's strategy for water preservation, the hydrophobic/hydrophilic cooperative Janus system that achieved reinforced fog collection ability is reported here. Directional delivery of the surface water, decreased re-evaporation rate of the harvested water, and thinner boundary layer of the collecting surface contribute to the enhancement of collection efficiency. Further designed cylinder Janus collector can facilely achieve a continuous process of efficient collection, directional transportation, and spontaneous preservation of fog water. This Janus fog harvesting system should improve the understanding of micro-droplet collection system and offer ideas to solve water resource crisis. PMID:26088210

  11. Daily lifestyles in the fog and haze weather

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background China is being plagued by a large-scaled lasting fog and haze, under which people have to work and live. Therefore, it matters to do what we can to minimize the adverse impact of the fog and haze on individual health on a daily basis. Methods Relative literatures on the fog and haze have been searched and reviewed. Particular attention has been paid to the literatures on the adverse impact of the fog and haze on the people’s health and on the ways minimizing this impact. Results Coming across the weather of fog and haze, appropriate measures taken can minimize its adverse impact on individuals on a daily basis. The measures included vitamin intake, water drinking, air cleaning indoors, stay-at-home, and mask wearing outdoors. These measures are simple and proven effective. Conclusions Simple and effective measures seem to be sufficient to minimizing the adverse impact of the fog and haze on the individual’s health on a daily basis. Lifestyle changes, awareness of environment protection, energy conservation, and new and clean energy use are ultimate ways to curb the air pollution and reduce the occurrence of the fog and haze. PMID:26904256

  12. Hierarchical Surface Architecture of Plants as an Inspiration for Biomimetic Fog Collectors.

    PubMed

    Azad, M A K; Barthlott, W; Koch, K

    2015-12-01

    Fog collectors can enable us to alleviate the water crisis in certain arid regions of the world. A continuous fog-collection cycle consisting of a persistent capture of fog droplets and their fast transport to the target is a prerequisite for developing an efficient fog collector. In regard to this topic, a biological superior design has been found in the hierarchical surface architecture of barley (Hordeum vulgare) awns. We demonstrate here the highly wettable (advancing contact angle 16° ± 2.7 and receding contact angle 9° ± 2.6) barbed (barb = conical structure) awn as a model to develop optimized fog collectors with a high fog-capturing capability, an effective water transport, and above all an efficient fog collection. We compare the fog-collection efficiency of the model sample with other plant samples naturally grown in foggy habitats that are supposed to be very efficient fog collectors. The model sample, consisting of dry hydrophilized awns (DH awns), is found to be about twice as efficient (fog-collection rate 563.7 ± 23.2 μg/cm(2) over 10 min) as any other samples investigated under controlled experimental conditions. Finally, a design based on the hierarchical surface architecture of the model sample is proposed for the development of optimized biomimetic fog collectors. PMID:26561871

  13. Transcriptional cofactors of the FOG family interact with GATA proteins by means of multiple zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A H; Liew, C; Holmes, M; Kowalski, K; Mackay, J; Crossley, M

    1999-01-01

    Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) is a zinc finger protein that has been shown to interact physically with the erythroid DNA-binding protein GATA-1 and modulate its transcriptional activity. Recently, two new members of the FOG family have been identified: a mammalian protein, FOG-2, that also associates with GATA-1 and other mammalian GATA factors; and U-shaped, a Drosophila protein that interacts with the Drosophila GATA protein Pannier. FOG proteins contain multiple zinc fingers and it has been shown previously that the sixth finger of FOG-1 interacts specifically with the N-finger but not the C-finger of GATA-1. Here we show that fingers 1, 5 and 9 of FOG-1 also interact with the N-finger of GATA-1 and that FOG-2 and U-shaped also contain multiple GATA-interacting fingers. We define the key contact residues and show that these residues are highly conserved in GATA-interacting fingers. We examine the effect of selectively mutating the four interacting fingers of FOG-1 and show that each contributes to FOG-1's ability to modulate GATA-1 activity. Finally, we show that FOG-1 can repress GATA-1-mediated activation and present evidence that this ability involves the recently described CtBP co-repressor proteins that recognize all known FOG proteins. PMID:10329627

  14. Project Fog Drops. Part 1: Investigations of warm fog properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilie, R. J.; Eadie, W.; Mack, E. J.; Rogers, C.; Kocmond, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the micrometeorological and microphysical characteristics of eleven valley fogs occurring near Elmira, New York. Observations were made of temperature, dew point, wind speed and direction, dew deposition, vertical wind velocity, and net radiative flux. In fog, visibility was continuously recorded and periodic measurements were made of liquid water content and drop-size distribution. The observations were initiated in late evening and continued until the time of fog dissipation. The vertical distribution of temperature in the lowest 300 meters and cloud nucleus concentration at several heights were measured from an aircraft before fog nucleus concentrations at several heights were measured from an aircraft before fog formation. A numerical model was developed to investigate the life cycle of radiation fogs. The model predicts the temporal evolution of the vertical distributions of temperature, water vapor, and liquid water as determined by the turbulent transfer of heat and moisture. The model includes the nocturnal cooling of the earth's surface, dew formation, fog drop sedimentation, and the absorption of infrared radiation by fog.

  15. Coastal Fog Sustains Summer Baseflow in Northern Californian Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, M.; Dufour, A.; Leonardson, R.; Thompson, S. E.; Dawson, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Mediterranean climate of Northern California imposes significant water stress on ecosystems and water resources during the dry summer months. During summer, frequently the only water inputs occur as occult precipitation, in the form of fog and dew. In this study, we characterized the role of coastal fog, a dominant feature of Northern Californian coastal ecosystems and a widespread phenomenon associated with deep marine upwelling in west coast, arid, and Mediterranean climates worldwide. We monitored fog occurrence and intensity, throughfall following canopy interception of fog, soil moisture, streamflow, and meteorological variables, and made visual observations of the spatial extent of fog using time-lapse imagery in Upper Pilarcitos Creek Watershed (managed by San Francisco Public Utilities Commission as part of the San Francisco area water supply). We adopted a stratified sampling design that captured the watershed's elevation gradient, forest-edge versus interior locations, and different vegetation cover. The point-scale observations of throughfall inputs and transpiration suppression, estimated from the Penman equation, were upscaled using such watershed features and the observed fog "footprint" identified from the time-lapse images. When throughfall input and fog-induced transpiration suppression were incorporated into the operational watershed model, they improved estimates of summer baseflow, which remained persistently higher than could be explained without the fog effects. Fog, although providing relatively small volumetric inputs to the water balance, appears to offer significant relief of water stress throughout the terrestrial and aquatic components of the coastal Californian ecosystem and thus should be accounted for when assessing water stress availability in dry ecosystems.

  16. Alternative Agents to Prevent Fogging in Head and Neck Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2011-01-01

    Background: The essential factor for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in head and neck endoscopy is the visibility of the image. An anti-fogging agent can reduce this problem by minimizing surface tension to prevent the condensation of water in the form of small droplets on a surface. There is no report on the use of hibiscrub® or baby shampoo to reduce fogging in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy between commercial anti-fogging agent, hibiscrub® and baby shampoo to reduce fogging for the use in head and neck endoscopy. Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University in August 2010. Commercial anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® were applied on rigid endoscope lens before putting them into a mist generator. The images were taken at baseline, 15 seconds, 30 seconds and 1 minute. The images’ identifiers were removed before they were sent to two evaluators. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to rate the image quality from 0 to 10. Results: The difference in mean VAS score between anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® versus no agent were 5.46, 4.45 and 2.1 respectively. The commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo had most protective benefit and performed significantly better than no agent (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during head and neck endoscopy and compares favourably with commercial anti-fogging agent. PMID:24179399

  17. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, Rick L.; Fox, Don T.; Archiblad, Kip E.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  18. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

  19. Effects of Aridity and Fog Deposition on C3/CAM Photosynthesis and N-cycling in Welwitschia mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Henschel, J.; Macko, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental controls on photosynthesis and N-cycling in Welwitschia mirabilis are evaluated through δ13C and δ15N analyses of leaf material from 26 individuals in the southermost population of this long-lived gymnosperm, which is endemic to the Namib Desert. The coastal Namib Desert in southwestern Africa is hyperarid in terms of rainfall, but receives up to 100 days of fog each year. This climate regime leads to interesting water relations in the Namib flora and fauna. Among many enigmatic characteristics, photosynthesis in W. mirabilis has puzzled researchers since the 1970's. Although it is predominantly a C3 plant, δ13C ranges from -17.5 to -23.5‰ in natural habitats, and can be as enriched as -14.4‰ under artificial growing conditions. Recently the CAM pathway has been confirmed, but the driver for CAM utilization has not been identified. In this study we incorporate new δ13C compositions for plants in the middle of the 100 km aridity gradient which spans the natural distribution of W. mirabilis. Initial results show an enriched δ13C signal (-20‰) in the more exposed individuals compared with those in a sandy drainage depression (-22‰). In addition, the documented correlation between rainfall and δ15N found in Kalahari C3 plants (Swap et al. 2004) is used to interpret the δ15N values in this W. mirabilis population. Initial results indicate that the fog deposition may significantly affect the nutrition of these unusual plants from the Namib Desert.

  20. Cold Environment Fogs And Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiusto, James E.; Lala, G. Garland

    1983-09-01

    For several years radiation fog field programs have been conducted at Albany, NY, with an emphasis on understanding the basic mechanisms leading to dense fog formation. This past year a cooperative effort ("Fog Project-1982") involved nine university, federal and private research laboratories, including NCAR staff and their remote system of 25 portable automated mesonet (PAM) weather stations. A number of comprehensive data sets (boundary layer meteorology and cloud physics variables) during the 14-16 hour nocturnal evolution of fog have been obtained. In particular, the extinction of light in the visible and infrared (10.6 pm wavelength), associated visibility, drop size distributions, liquid water content, and vertical tethered-balloon soundings provided new insights into the structure of fog. A CO2 laser transmissometer was developed that yielded direct information on fog density. During October of 1981 and 1982, a number of radiation fogs occurred that were super-cooled in their lowest 20-50 m. This posed certain troublesome to critical measurement problems with several instruments. Cold environment techniques were devised to overcome some of these instrumentation difficulties.

  1. Effect of dilute acid on the accelerated weathering of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S.

    1988-02-01

    Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) specimens were soaked in acid solutions to determine the effect of acid conditions (such as low pH fog) on the weathering of wood. Daily 1-hour soaking in dilute sulfurous, sulfuric, or nitric acid (pH 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, or 4.0) increased the rate of accelerated (xenon arc) weathering of the specimens compared to controls soaked in distilled/deionized water. Weathering was manifested as the erosion rate of the wood surface and was determined gravimetrically be fitting the weight loss over time to a linear model. This method detected significant differences between acid-treated specimens and untreated controls within 300 hours of accelerated weathering. The erosion rate was dependent on the acid type and pH. Sulfurous acid treatment caused the fastest rate of erosion, followed by sulfuric then nitric acid. None of the acids affected the erosion rate at pH 3.5 or above. Below this threshold, the rate of erosion increased as the hydrogen ion concentration increased. Sugar analysis of residues from the acids and the distilled water used to soak the wood indicated acid-dependent degradation of polysaccharides.

  2. Summary of a 4-Year Fog Field Study in Northern Nanjing, Part 1: Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. Y.; Niu, S. J.; Yang, J.; Zhao, L. J.; Lü, J. J.; Lu, C. S.

    2012-05-01

    Comprehensive fog field observations were conducted during the winters of 2006-2009 at the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology to study the macro and micro-physical structures and the physical-chemical processes of dense fogs in the area. The observations included features of the fog boundary layer, characteristics of fog water, the particle spectrum, the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, radiation and heat components, turbulence, meteorological elements (air temperature, pressure, wind speed, wind direction), and environmental monitoring. The fogs observed were divided into four types: radiation fog, advection-radiation fog, advection fog, and precipitation fog, according to the mechanisms and primary factors of the fog processes. Fog boundary-layer structures of different types and their corresponding characteristics were then studied. Fog boundary-layer features, temperature structures, wind fields, and fog maintenance are discussed. The results show that radiation fog had remarkable diurnal variation and formed mostly at sunset or midnight, and lifted after sunrise or at noon, and that advection-radiation fog and advection fog were of very long duration. Extremely dense fogs occurred only in radiation-related cases. Inversion in radiation fog was short-lived, disappearing 1 or 2 hours after sunrise or at noon, faster than that in advection-radiation fog. When wind direction reversed from easterly to westerly or from southerly to northerly, the fog became an extremely dense fog. Low-level jet at times impeded fog development, whereas at other times it encouraged fog continuance. The deep inversion was merely an essential condition for a thick fog layer; sufficient vapor supply was advantageous to the formation and maintenance of a deep fog layer.

  3. Numerical modeling of cloud chemistry effects on isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M. C.; Cochran, A. K.; Fiddler, M. N.; Roberts, J. M.; Bililign, S.

    2013-08-01

    acid (HNCO), a product of some combustion processes, can potentially have negative human health effects. While gas phase HNCO loss processes are slow, HNCO loss in the aqueous phase is much faster. The fate of HNCO is studied for different cloud chemistry conditions using a zero-dimensional chemical box model. Exposure to clouds reduces HNCO concentrations substantially under typical cumulus cloud conditions, resulting in the chemical lifetime of HNCO dropping to ~2 h compared to clear-sky conditions of several years. The effect of clouds on HNCO is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature, with more HNCO hydrolyzed at lower pH (more acidic drops) and higher temperatures. Thus, HNCO is most efficiently removed by fog or low-level stratus clouds and least efficiently removed under middle to upper troposphere conditions where cumulonimbus and pyrocumulus clouds reside. Deliquesced aerosols may be highly efficient at reducing HNCO concentrations.

  4. Implementation of warm-cloud processes in a source-oriented WRF/Chem model to study the effect of aerosol mixing state on fog formation in the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.-H.; Chen, S.-H.; Kleeman, M. J.; Zhang, H.; DeNero, S. P.; Joe, D. K.

    2015-11-01

    The source-oriented Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry model (SOWC) was modified to include warm cloud processes and applied to investigate how aerosol mixing states influence fog formation and optical properties in the atmosphere. SOWC tracks a 6-dimensional chemical variable (X, Z, Y, Size Bins, Source Types, Species) through an explicit simulation of atmospheric chemistry and physics. A source-oriented cloud condensation nuclei module was implemented into the SOWC model to simulate warm clouds using the modified two-moment Purdue Lin microphysics scheme. The Goddard shortwave and longwave radiation schemes were modified to interact with source-oriented aerosols and cloud droplets so that aerosol direct and indirect effects could be studied. The enhanced SOWC model was applied to study a fog event that occurred on 17 January 2011, in the Central Valley of California. Tule fog occurred because an atmospheric river effectively advected high moisture into the Central Valley and nighttime drainage flow brought cold air from mountains into the valley. The SOWC model produced reasonable liquid water path, spatial distribution and duration of fog events. The inclusion of aerosol-radiation interaction only slightly modified simulation results since cloud optical thickness dominated the radiation budget in fog events. The source-oriented mixture representation of particles reduced cloud droplet number relative to the internal mixture approach that artificially coats hydrophobic particles with hygroscopic components. The fraction of aerosols activating into CCN at a supersaturation of 0.5 % in the Central Valley decreased from 94 % in the internal mixture model to 80 % in the source-oriented model. This increased surface energy flux by 3-5 W m-2 and surface temperature by as much as 0.25 K in the daytime.

  5. Implementation of warm-cloud processes in a source-oriented WRF/Chem model to study the effect of aerosol mixing state on fog formation in the Central Valley of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsiang-He; Chen, Shu-Hua; Kleeman, Michael J.; Zhang, Hongliang; DeNero, Steven P.; Joe, David K.

    2016-07-01

    The source-oriented Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry model (SOWC) was modified to include warm cloud processes and was applied to investigate how aerosol mixing states influence fog formation and optical properties in the atmosphere. SOWC tracks a 6-D chemical variable (X, Z, Y, size bins, source types, species) through an explicit simulation of atmospheric chemistry and physics. A source-oriented cloud condensation nuclei module was implemented into the SOWC model to simulate warm clouds using the modified two-moment Purdue Lin microphysics scheme. The Goddard shortwave and long-wave radiation schemes were modified to interact with source-oriented aerosols and cloud droplets so that aerosol direct and indirect effects could be studied. The enhanced SOWC model was applied to study a fog event that occurred on 17 January 2011, in the Central Valley of California. Tule fog occurred because an atmospheric river effectively advected high moisture into the Central Valley and nighttime drainage flow brought cold air from mountains into the valley. The SOWC model produced reasonable liquid water path, spatial distribution and duration of fog events. The inclusion of aerosol-radiation interaction only slightly modified simulation results since cloud optical thickness dominated the radiation budget in fog events. The source-oriented mixture representation of particles reduced cloud droplet number relative to the internal mixture approach that artificially coats hydrophobic particles with hygroscopic components. The fraction of aerosols activating into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at a supersaturation of 0.5 % in the Central Valley decreased from 94 % in the internal mixture model to 80 % in the source-oriented model. This increased surface energy flux by 3-5 W m-2 and surface temperature by as much as 0.25 K in the daytime.

  6. Acute toxicity of smoke screen materials to aquatic organisms, white phosphorus-felt, red phosphorus-butyl rubber and SGF No. 2 fog oil. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.; McFadden, K.M.; Bean, R.M.; Clark, M.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Killand, B.W.; Prohammer, L.A.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    The acute toxicity of three obscurants was determined for nine freshwater organisms. The materials tested were white phosphorus-felt smoke, red phosphorus-butyl rubber (RP-BR) smoke, and smoke generator fuel (SGF) No. 2 fog oil (bulk and vaporized). The chemistry of WP-F and RP-BR smoke in water and the resulting effects on aquatic organisms are similar. Combustion of these two obscurants and their deposition in water leads to the formation of many complex oxy-phosphoric acids. Rates of hydrolysis of these complex products to ortho-phosphate were inconsistent and unpredictable over time. These products acidify water and produce toxic effects after exhausting the buffering capacity of the water. Acute 96 hr tests using Daphnia magna with neutralized and nonneutralized exposure solutions indicated that the presence of unidentified toxic component(s) acted independently of pH. At pH levels of 6.0 to 7.0, phosphorus combustion products precipitated out of solution leading to a bimodal toxic response in extended 96-hr tests with Daphnia magna. Most components of fog oil had low solubility in water. Saturation was apparent at approximately 0.1 to 0.3 mg/L total oil. Vaporization had no demonstrable effect on the chemistry or toxicity of the fog oil. Neither the bulk fog oil nor the vaporized fog oil was acutely toxic to freshwater animals at concentrations less than 10 mg/L total oil. In oil-water mixes in excess of 1.0 mg/L total oil, fog oil quickly separated and floated to the surface. The primary hazard associated with vaporized and bulk fog oil was the physical effect of oil fouling the organisms. Photolysis increased the concentration of water-soluble components of the fog oil. Acute toxicity was demonstrated in oil-water mixes (approx.10 mg/L total oil) of photolyzed bulk and vaporized fog oil. No difference in toxicity was observed between photolyzed and non-photolyzed dilutions of OWM at comparable levels of total oil.

  7. Textbook Selection: Clearing the Fog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollabaugh, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Provides step-by-step procedures for developing an index which uses the Gunning Fog technique to evaluate the level of reading difficulty of textbooks. Cites examples, illustrations, and several warnings in the discussion. (RT)

  8. A Comparison of the Efficiency Between Fog Collecting Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eljenholm, C. M.; Coffey, E. M.; Fernandez, D.; Hernandez, C.; Mairs, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation is the most recognized source of water; however, significant amounts of water reside in the air in the form of fog. Standard fog collectors designed by Schemenauer (Schemenauer and Cereceda, 1993) utilize a 1.00 square meter of a specific polypropylene fabric called Coresa with a 35% Raschel shade coefficient to capture and coalesce tiny fog droplets into larger drops that fall into a trough and are measured by a tipping bucket rain gauge. In this study, we compare three different types of mesh; the Chilean Coresa mesh mentioned above, a German mesh called FogHa-Tin, and an optimized mesh designed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a POSS-PEMA dipped metallic mesh (Park et al, 2013). These meshes vary greatly in composition, as well as price. In order to determine which mesh is most optimal for fog collection in a variety of meteorological conditions, standard collectors of each type described above with a mesh area of 1.00 square meter have been placed at five locations around central California with accompanying meteorological instrumentation. This project will report on the effectiveness of each of these passive fog collectors in conjunction with accompanying meteorological data.

  9. On the widespread winter fog in northeastern Pakistan and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Sultan; Mirza, M. Ishaq; Ghauri, B. M.; Siddiqui, Z. R.; Javed, Rubina; Khan, A. R.; Rattigan, O. V.; Qureshi, Sumizah; Husain, Liaquat

    2000-07-01

    During the last two winters widespread fog frequently occurred in northeastern India and Pakistan, in a region extending over 1500 km. A particularly severe fog episode lasted from mid-December, 1998 to early January, 1999. The fog caused extensive economic damage and disruptions in transport. We determined concentrations of SO42-, NO3-, and selected trace elements at Lahore, Pakistan during and after the fog event by collecting aerosols on Whatman 41 filters every 12 h. SO42- concentrations of up to 100 µg/m³ were observed during fog. The SO42-/Se ratios and trace element data suggest a distant source of SO42- aerosols, hundreds of kms away. Lahore was downwind of coal-burning in India during the fog. The high concentrations of SO42- observed suggest a more extensive investigation of the chemistry and transport processes in this region is necessary to delineate emission sources and develop control strategies as there are serious likely effects on human health and economy in a region populated by hundreds of millions of people, and on global climate change through direct and indirect forcing.

  10. The structures of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Yellow Sea summer fog-a comparison study with the spring fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.-P.; Ren, Z.-P.; Yang, Y.-Q.; Wang, X.-G.; Xu, X.-L.

    2010-07-01

    at the fog top and the turbulence cooling, which is similar to the haar in the North Sea. The cooling effect can reach to the sea surface readily possibly due to the thin fog, the small amount of moisture, and the robust cooling at the top. (4) The turbulent layer in the summer fog is at 100 -300m high in the upper level of fog and the long wave radiation is weaker due to the inexistence of dry layer, thus the cooling effect at the fog top can hardly influence the bottom air; while in spring fog the long wave radiation cooling effect can quickly reach the bottom of the fog. These results are helpful for understanding the formation of the mechanism of the sea fogs.

  11. Investigating factors leading to fogging of glass vials in lyophilized drug products.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Oeschger, Richard; Roehl, Holger; Bauer Dauphin, Isabelle; Worgull, Martin; Kallmeyer, Georg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2013-10-01

    Vial "Fogging" is a phenomenon observed after lyophilization due to drug product creeping upwards along the inner vial surface. After the freeze-drying process, a haze of dried powder is visible inside the drug product vial, making it barely acceptable for commercial distribution from a cosmetic point of view. Development studies were performed to identify the root cause for fogging during manufacturing of a lyophilized monoclonal antibody drug product. The results of the studies indicate that drug product creeping occurs during the filling process, leading to vial fogging after lyophilization. Glass quality/inner surface, glass conversion/vial processing (vial "history") and formulation excipients, e.g., surfactants (three different surfactants were tested), all affect glass fogging to a certain degree. Results showed that the main factor to control fogging is primarily the inner vial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. While Duran vials were not capable of reliably improving the level of fogging, hydrophobic containers provided reliable means to improve the cosmetic appearance due to reduction in fogging. Varying vial depyrogenation treatment conditions did not lead to satisfying results in removal of the fogging effect. Processing conditions of the vial after filling with drug product had a strong impact on reducing but not eliminating fogging. PMID:23791681

  12. Impact of the Pacific-Japan teleconnection pattern on July sea fog over the northwestern Pacific: Interannual variations and global warming effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jingchao; Zhang, Suping; Chen, Yang; Liu, Jingwu; Han, Geng

    2016-04-01

    The northwestern Pacific (NWP) is a fog-prone area, especially the ocean east of the Kuril Islands. The present study analyzes how the Pacific-Japan (PJ) teleconnection pattern influences July sea fog in the fog-prone area using independent datasets. The covariation between the PJ index and sea fog frequency (SFF) index in July indicates a close correlation, with a coefficient of 0.62 exceeding the 99% confidence level. Composite analysis based on the PJ index, a case study, and model analysis based on GFDL-ESM2M, show that in high PJ index years the convection over the east of the Philippines strengthens and then triggers a Rossby wave, which propagates northward to maintain an anticyclonic anomaly in the midlatitudes, indicating a northeastward shift of the NWP subtropical high. The anticyclonic anomaly facilitates the formation of relatively stable atmospheric stratification or even an inversion layer in the lower level of the troposphere, and strengthens the horizontal southerly moisture transportation from the tropical-subtropical oceans to the fog-prone area. On the other hand, a greater meridional SST gradient over the cold flank of the Kuroshio Extension, due to ocean downwelling, is produced by the anticyclonic wind stress anomaly. Both of these two aspects are favorable for the warm and humid air to cool, condense, and form fog droplets, when air masses cross the SST front. The opposite circumstances occur in low PJ index years, which are not conducive to the formation of sea fog. Finally, a multi-model ensemble mean projection reveals a prominent downward trend of the PJ index after the 2030s, implying a possible decline of the SFF in this period.

  13. C. elegans FOG-3/Tob can either promote or inhibit germline proliferation, depending on gene dosage and genetic context

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Joshua J.; Lee, Myon-Hee; Verheyden, Jamie; Kroll-Conner, Peggy L.; Kimble, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate Tob/BTG proteins inhibit cell proliferation when overexpressed in tissue culture cells, and they can function as tumor suppressors in mice. The single Caenorhabditis elegans Tob/BTG ortholog, FOG-3, by contrast, was identified from its loss-of-function phenotype as a regulator of sperm fate specification. Here we report that FOG-3 also regulates proliferation in the germline tissue. We first demonstrate that FOG-3 is a positive regulator of germline proliferation. Thus, fog-3 null mutants possess fewer germ cells than normal, a modest but reproducible decrease observed for each of two distinct fog-3 null alleles. A similar decrease also occurred in fog-3/+ heterozygotes, again for both fog-3 alleles, revealing a haplo-insufficient effect on proliferation. Therefore, FOG-3 normally promotes proliferation, and two copies of the fog-3 gene are required for this function. We next overexpressed FOG-3 by removal of FBF, the collective term for FBF-1 and FBF-2, two nearly identical PUF RNA-binding proteins. We find that overexpressed FOG-3 blocks proliferation in fbf-1 fbf-2 mutants: whereas germ cells stop dividing and instead differentiate in fbf-1 fbf-2 double mutants, they continue to proliferate in fog-3; fbf-1 fbf-2 triple mutants. Therefore, like its vertebrate Tob/BTG cousins, overexpressed FOG-3 is “antiproliferative”. Indeed, some fog-3; fbf-1 fbf-2 mutants possess small tumors, suggesting that FOG-3 can act as a tumor suppressor. Finally, we show that FOG-3 and FBF work together to promote tumor formation in animals carrying oncogenic Notch mutations. A similar effect was not observed when germline tumors were induced by manipulation of other regulators; therefore this FOG-3 tumor-promoting effect is context-dependent. We conclude that FOG-3 can either promote or inhibit proliferation in a manner that is sensitive to both genetic context and gene dosage. The discovery of these FOG-3 effects on proliferation has implications for our understanding

  14. Phosphorylation state of a Tob/BTG protein, FOG-3, regulates initiation and maintenance of the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm fate program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myon-Hee; Won Kim, Kyung; Morgan, Clinton T.; Morgan, Dyan E.; Kimble, Judith

    2011-01-01

    FOG-3, the single Caenorhabditis elegans Tob/BTG protein, directs germ cells to adopt the sperm fate at the expense of oogenesis. Importantly, FOG-3 activity must be maintained for the continued production of sperm that is typical of the male sex. Vertebrate Tob proteins have antiproliferative activity and ERK phosphorylation of Tob proteins has been proposed to abrogate “antiproliferative” activity. Here we investigate FOG-3 phosphorylation and its effect on sperm fate specification. We found both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of FOG-3 in nematodes. We then interrogated the role of FOG-3 phosphorylation in sperm fate specification. Specifically, we assayed FOG-3 transgenes for rescue of a fog-3 null mutant. Wild-type FOG-3 rescued both initiation and maintenance of sperm fate specification. A FOG-3 mutant with its four consensus ERK phosphorylation sites substituted to alanines, called FOG-3(4A), rescued partially: sperm were made transiently but not continuously in both sexes. A different FOG-3 mutant with its sites substituted to glutamates, called FOG-3(4E), had no rescuing activity on its own, but together with FOG-3(4A) rescue was complete. Thus, when FOG-3(4A) and FOG-3(4E) were both introduced into the same animals, sperm fate specification was not only initiated but also maintained, resulting in continuous spermatogenesis in males. Our findings suggest that unphosphorylated FOG-3 initiates the sperm fate program and that phosphorylated FOG-3 maintains that program for continued sperm production typical of males. We discuss implications of our results for Tob/BTG proteins in vertebrates. PMID:21571637

  15. 33 CFR 118.130 - Fog signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fog signals. 118.130 Section 118... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.130 Fog signals. On waterways where visibility is frequently reduced due to fog or other causes, the District Commander may require or authorize the installation of one...

  16. 33 CFR 118.130 - Fog signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fog signals. 118.130 Section 118... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.130 Fog signals. On waterways where visibility is frequently reduced due to fog or other causes, the District Commander may require or authorize the installation of one...

  17. 33 CFR 118.130 - Fog signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fog signals. 118.130 Section 118... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.130 Fog signals. On waterways where visibility is frequently reduced due to fog or other causes, the District Commander may require or authorize the installation of one...

  18. 33 CFR 118.130 - Fog signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fog signals. 118.130 Section 118... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.130 Fog signals. On waterways where visibility is frequently reduced due to fog or other causes, the District Commander may require or authorize the installation of one...

  19. 33 CFR 118.130 - Fog signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fog signals. 118.130 Section 118... LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.130 Fog signals. On waterways where visibility is frequently reduced due to fog or other causes, the District Commander may require or authorize the installation of one...

  20. An automated fog monitoring system for the Indo-Gangetic Plains based on satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dinesh; Chourey, Reema; Rizvi, Sarwar; Singh, Manoj; Gautam, Ritesh

    2016-05-01

    Fog is a meteorological phenomenon that causes reduction in regional visibility and affects air quality, thus leading to various societal and economic implications, especially disrupting air and rail transportation. The persistent and widespread winter fog impacts the entire the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), as frequently observed in satellite imagery. The IGP is a densely populated region in south Asia, inhabiting about 1/6th of the world's population, with a strong upward pollution trend. In this study, we have used multi-spectral radiances and aerosol/cloud retrievals from Terra/Aqua MODIS data for developing an automated web-based fog monitoring system over the IGP. Using our previous and existing methodologies, and ongoing algorithm development for the detection of fog and retrieval of associated microphysical properties (e.g. fog droplet effective radius), we characterize the widespread fog detection during both daytime and nighttime. Specifically, for the night time fog detection, the algorithm employs a satellite-based bi-spectral brightness temperature difference technique between two spectral channels: MODIS band-22 (3.9μm) and band-31 (10.75μm). Further, we are extending our algorithm development to geostationary satellites, for providing continuous monitoring of the spatial-temporal variation of fog. We anticipate that the ongoing and future development of a fog monitoring system would be of assistance to air, rail and vehicular transportation management, as well as for dissemination of fog information to government agencies and general public. The outputs of fog detection algorithm and related aerosol/cloud parameters are operationally disseminated via http://fogsouthasia.com/.

  1. Fog collectors and collection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhler, I.; Suau, C.

    2010-07-01

    The earth sciences taught that due to the occurrence of water in three phases: gas, liquid and solid, solar energy keeps the hydrological cycle going, shaping the earth surface while regulating the climate and thus allowing smart technologies to interfere in the natural process by rerouting water and employing its yield for natural and human environments’ subsistence. This is the case of traditional fog collectors implemented by several researchers along the Atacama Desert since late ’50s such as vertical tensile mesh or macro-diamonds structures. Nevertheless, these basic prototypes require to be upgraded, mainly through new shapes, fabrics and frameworks’ types by following the principles of lightness, transformability, portability and polyvalence. The vertical canvas of conventional fog collectors contain too much stressed at each joints and as result it became vulnerable. Our study constitutes a research by design of two fog-trap devices along the Atacama Desert. Different climatic factors influence the efficiency of fog harvesting. In order to increase yield of collected fog water, we need to establish suitable placements that contain high rates of fog’s accumulation. As important as the location is also the building reliability of these collectors that will be installed. Their frames and skins have to be adjustable to the wind direction and resistant against strong winds and rust. Its fabric need to be more hydrophobic, elastic and with light colours to ease dripping/drainage and avoid ultra-violet deterioration. In addition, meshes should be well-tensed and frames well-embraced too. In doing so we have conceived two fog collectors: DropNet© (Höhler) and FogHive© (Suau). These designs explore climatic design parameters combined with the agile structural principles of Tensegrity and Geodesic widely developed by Bucky Fuller and Frei Otto. The research methods mainly consisted of literature review; fieldwork; comparative analysis of existing fog

  2. Cloud and fog interactions with coastal forests in the California Channel Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, C. J.; Baguskas, S. A.; Williams, P.; Fischer, D. T.; Carbone, M. S.; Rastogi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal forests in California are frequently covered by clouds or immersed in fog in the rain-free summer. Scientists have long surmised that fog might provide critical water inputs to these forests. However, until recently, there has been little ecophysiological research to support how or why plants should prefer foggy regions; similarly, there is very little work quantifying water delivered to ecosystems by fog drip except for a few notable sites along the California coast. However, without spatial datasets of summer cloudcover and fog inundation, combined with detailed process studies, questions regarding the roles of cloud shading and fog drip in dictating plant distributions and ecosystem physiology cannot be addressed effectively. The overall objective of this project is to better understand how cloudcover and fog influence forest metabolism, growth, and distribution. Across a range of sites in California's Channel Islands National Park we measured a wide variety of ecosystem processes and properties. We then related these to cloudcover and fog immersion maps created using satellite datasets and airport and radiosonde observations. We compiled a spatially continuous dataset of summertime cloudcover frequency of the Southern California bight using satellite imagery from the NOAA geostationary GOES-11 Imager. We also created map of summertime cloudcover frequency of this area using MODIS imagery. To assess the ability of our mapping approach to predict spatial and temporal fog inundation patterns, we compared our monthly average daytime fog maps for GOES pixels corresponding to stations where fog inputs were measured with fog collectors in a Bishop pine forest. We also compared our cloudcover maps to measurements of irradiance measurements. Our results demonstrate that cloudcover and fog strongly modulate radiation, water, and carbon budgets, as well as forest distributions, in this semi-arid environment. Measurements of summertime fog drip, pine sapflow and

  3. Low-visibility visual simulation with real fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    An environmental fog simulation (EFS) attachment was developed to aid in the study of natural low-visibility visual cues and subsequently used to examine the realism effect upon the aircraft simulator visual scene. A review of the basic fog equations indicated that two major factors must be accounted for in the simulation of low visibility - one due to atmospheric attenuation and one due to veiling luminance. These factors are compared systematically by (1) comparing actual measurements to those computed from the fog equations, and (2) comparing runway-visual-range-related visual-scene contrast values with the calculated values. These values are also compared with the simulated equivalent equations and with contrast measurements obtained from a current electronic fog synthesizer to help identify areas in which improvements are needed. These differences in technique, the measured values, the features of both systems, a pilot opinion survey of the EFS fog, and improvements (by combining features of both systems) that are expected to significantly increase the potential as well as flexibility for producing a very high-fidelity low-visibility visual simulation are discussed.

  4. Low-Visibility Visual Simulation with Real Fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Wendell D.

    1982-01-01

    An environmental fog simulation (EFS) attachment was developed to aid in the study of natural low-visibility visual cues and subsequently used to examine the realism effect upon the aircraft simulator visual scene. A review of the basic fog equations indicated that the two major factors must be accounted for in the simulation of low visibility-one due to atmospheric attenuation and one due to veiling luminance. These factors are compared systematically by: comparing actual measurements lo those computed from the Fog equations, and comparing runway-visual-range-related visual-scene contrast values with the calculated values. These values are also compared with the simulated equivalent equations and with contrast measurements obtained from a current electronic fog synthesizer to help identify areas in which improvements are needed. These differences in technique, the measured values, the Features of both systems, a pilot opinion survey of the EFS fog, and improvements (by combining features of both systems) that are expected to significantly increase the potential as well as flexibility for producing a very high-fidelity, low-visibility visual simulation are discussed.

  5. Coastal Fog, Climate Change, and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; O'Brien, Travis A.; Faloona, Ian C.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal marine fog, a characteristic feature of climates generated at the eastern boundaries of ocean basins worldwide, evokes different feelings in those who experience it (see Figure 1). Authors and poets use fog to represent mystery, bleakness, and confusion. Film directors seek out fog to shroud scenes in eerie gloominess. Tourists visiting beaches bemoan the cool and damp conditions that create a striking contrast to the sunny warm conditions typically found less than a few kilometers inland. Airline passengers delayed by fog impatiently wait for the skies to clear. Residents get used to the Sun "rising" in midday after fog dissipates.

  6. Coastal fog, climate change, and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torregrosa, Alicia; O'Brien, Travis A.; Faloona, Ian C.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine fog, a characteristic feature of climates generated at the eastern boundaries of ocean basins worldwide, evokes different feelings in those who experience it (see Figure 1). Authors and poets use fog to represent mystery, bleakness, and confusion. Film directors seek out fog to shroud scenes in eerie gloominess. Tourists visiting beaches bemoan the cool and damp conditions that create a striking contrast to the sunny warm conditions typically found less than a few kilometers inland. Airline passengers delayed by fog impatiently wait for the skies to clear. Residents get used to the Sun “rising” in midday after fog dissipates.

  7. Aerosol particles and the formation of advection fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the effects of concentration, particle size, mass of nuclei, and chemical composition on the dynamics of warm fog formation, particularly the formation of advection fog, is presented. This formation is associated with the aerosol particle characteristics, and both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content, and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution. It is shown that the aerosol particles with the higher number density, larger size nuclei, the heavier nuclei mass, and the higher ratio of the Van't Hoff factor to the molecular weight favor the formation of the lower visibility advection fogs with stronger vertical energy transfer during the nucleation and condensation time period.

  8. Observations of radiation fog chemistry in the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, D.; Hutchings, J.; Herckes, P.

    2010-07-01

    The chemical composition of radiation fog in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States has been the focus of an ongoing field campaign based in Selinsgrove, PA. This field study was established to provide a long term record that can be used to identify the effects of meteorology and air mass source regions on fog composition and to shed light on the role that fog can play in the production of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol mass. In the United States, studies that focus on radiation fog have been relatively rare. For the most part, they have been limited geographically to the Central Valley of California, though individual studies have also been conducted in the Central United States and along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. Sample collection for the current study began during the fall of 2007. Through 2009, samples from 25 radiation fog events have been obtained. A Caltech Heated Rod Cloudwater Collector (CHRCC) having a Dp50 of approximately 8 microns was used to collect one fog sample per event. Samples were typically collected between 2:00 AM and 7:00 AM under conditions of light winds, clear skies, and recent rainfall. Sample volumes ranged from 2.9 ml to 150 ml. Following collection, samples were analyzed for pH and then one of the following: major inorganic ions, dissolved total organic carbon, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), metals, or organic speciation. Through 2009, sample pH varied between 4.28 and 6.86 and averaged 5.03 based on H+ concentration. Ammonium and sulfate were found to be the most abundant ionic species in the fog samples. Sufficient ammonium was detected in nearly every sample to fully neutralize nitrate and sulfate. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium observed in this study were lower than values reported in the literature for most other cloud and fog studies conducted in the US. Due to significant ammonium input, pH in the current study was higher than most other studies. Concentrations of total organic carbon

  9. Climatology of fog in SW-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Aurelio; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2016-04-01

    The climatology of fog in Keflavik Airport in Southwest-Iceland has been investigated for the latter half of the 20th Century. Fog is twice as frequent in the late night than in the afternoon, suggesting important, but not dominating, impact of the diurnal cycle. There is large interannual variability in the frequency of fog, but no clear long-term trend. However, there is a clear shift in seasonal frequency; the period 1953-1977 had relatively frequent fog in the autumn, while 1978-1998, fog is relatively frequent in the spring and summer. This indicates sensitivity of the fog to mean sea surface temperatures. An attempt is made to assess frequency of fog in climate scenarii.

  10. Fibromyalgia, Fibro Fog, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Karper, William B; Letvak, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Fibro fog causes serious problems for those with fibromyalgia syndrome. The mechanisms that cause it have not been well identified. Since prescription medication and other conventional medical interventions have proven less than satisfactory, and while waiting for more investigational information, research suggests that exercise might be helpful. PMID:26086462

  11. Gene response in rice plants treated with continuous fog influenced by pH, was similar to that treated with biotic stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Throughout Asia, including Japan, rice plants are cultivated in a wide range of areas from lowlands to highlands and are frequently exposed to fog, including acid fog. Some physiological studies have shown that acid fog can be a stress factor for plants. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of rice plants treated with artificially prepared simulated acid fog (SiAF) or simulated neutral fog (SiNF) for 1 or 7 days. Results Microarray analysis results suggested that both the SiAF and the SiNF treatments induced the expression of genes involved in the defense and stress responses in rice plants. Induction of such genes was detected in plants treated with SiAF for 1 day, and the number of induced genes increased in plants treated with SiAF for 7 days. The genes for defense and stress responses were also induced by SiNF for 7 days, although they were not induced by SiNF for 1 day. The gene expression profiles of the SiAF-treated and the SiNF-treated plants were compared to those of plants treated with other stress factors. The comparison revealed that both SiAF and SiNF treatments have similar effects to biotic stresses and ozone stress. The genes encoding NADPH oxidase and germin, which function in apoplasts, were also induced by SiAF, SiNF and biotic stresses. Conclusions These findings suggest that both the SiAF and the SiNF treatments may result in oxidative stress through the apoplastic production of reactive oxygen species. PMID:24987489

  12. Mesoscale numerical simulation study of warm fog dissipation by salt particles seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hui; Guo, Xueliang; Liu, Xiang'e.; Gao, Qian; Jia, Xingcan

    2016-05-01

    Based on the dynamic framework of WRF and Morrison 2-moment explicit cloud scheme, a salt-seeding scheme was developed and used to simulate the dissipation of a warm fog event during 6-7 November 2009 in the Beijing and Tianjin area. The seeding effect and its physical mechanism were studied. The results indicate that when seeding fog with salt particles sized 80 µm and at a quantity of 6 g m-2 at the fog top, the seeding effect near the ground surface layer is negative in the beginning period, and then a positive seeding effect begins to appear at 18 min, with the best effect appearing at 21 min after seeding operation. The positive effect can last about 35 min. The microphysical mechanism of the warm fog dissipation is because of the evaporation due to the water vapor condensation on the salt particles and coalescence with salt particles. The process of fog water coalescence with salt particles contributed mostly to this warm fog dissipation. Furthermore, two series of sensitivity experiments were performed to study the seeding effect under different seeding amounts and salt particles sizes. The results show that seeding fog with salt particles sized of 80 µm can have the best seeding effect, and the seeding effect is negative when the salt particle size is less than 10 µm. For salt particles sized 80 µm, the best seeding effect, with corresponding visibility of 380 m, can be achieved when the seeding amount is 30 g m-2.

  13. Measurements of dew and fog chemical composition at a rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, D.; Sokoloff, R.; Ressler, D.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    Liquid water in the atmosphere has been shown to play an important role in the transport, transformation, and removal of aerosol particles and soluble gases. Dew and fog represent two forms of the atmospheric aqueous phase, both of which may enhance the deposition of trace species and enable fast aqueous phase reactions. Compared to precipitation, dews and fogs have longer residence times at ground level and therefore may be strongly influenced by local sources. Fog composition measurements in the United States have been limited to relatively few locations along the East and West coasts while only a handful of studies have focused on dew composition. To extend our knowledge of dew and fog composition, measurements have been made on the campus of Susquehanna University in central Pennsylvania. Fog samples have been collected since 2007 using an automated Caltech Heated Rod Cloudwater Collector (CHRCC). Dew sampling began during the summer of 2012 using a 90 cm by 90 cm Teflon sheet mounted on a polystyrene foam panel. All samples were analyzed for pH and one of more of the following: major inorganic ions, organic acids, total organic carbon (TOC), and trace metals. Dew and fog concentrations varied widely between samples, though concentrations of most species in fog generally exceeded those in dew. The median pH was approximately 6.0 for fog and 7.0 for dew, both of which are much higher than the median value of 4.6 for precipitation in this region. Ammonium was the most abundant ionic species in the fog samples, followed by sulfate, calcium, and nitrate. Dew samples were also dominated by ammonium, though calcium was significant in some samples. Sulfate and nitrate concentrations were substantially lower in the dew samples. Formate and acetate were the most abundant organic acids in both types of samples, although those species made up much larger fraction of the total solute in the dew samples. In addition, oxalate and propionate were observed in both types of

  14. Investigating the Seasonal and Diurnal Evolution of Fog and its Effect on the Hydrometeorological Regime in the Southern Appalachian Mountains Using a Mobile Observing Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. M.; Barros, A.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate, high resolution observations of fog and low clouds in regions of complex terrain are largely unavailable, due to a lack of existing in situ observations and obstacles to satellite observations such as ground clutter. For the past year, a mobile observing platform including a ground-based passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe (PCASP-X2), an optical disdrometer (PARSIVEL-2), a tipping bucket rain gauge, and a Vaisala weather station, collocated with a Micro Rain Radar, has been recording observations in valley locations in the inner mountain region of the Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM). In 2014, the SAM hosted a Global Precipitation Mission field campaign (the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment), and during this experiment the platform was also collocated at various times with a microwave radiometer, W- and X- band radars, a Pluvio weighing rain gauge, a 2D video disdrometer, among other instruments. These observations will be discussed in the context of previous findings based on observations and model results (stochastic column model and the Advanced Research Weather and Forecasting Model (WRF)). Specifically, in previous work, seeder-feeder processes have been found to govern the enhancement of light rainfall in the SAM through increased coalescence efficiency in stratiform rainfall due to the interactions with low level clouds and topography modulated fog. This presentation will focus on measurements made by the platform and collocated instruments, as well as observations made by fog collectors on ridges, with the aim of developing a process-based understanding of the characteristics of low cloud and fog through describing the diurnal cycle of microphysical and dynamical processes and properties in the region. The overarching goal is to employ observations of the formation and evolution of the "feeder" clouds and fog to further understand the magnitude and function of their contribution to the local hydrometeorological regime.

  15. Influence of fog parameters on withstand voltage of contaminated insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, K.; Ito, M.; Katsukawa, H.; Kawaguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    1983-03-01

    This paper describes the investigation results of fog parameters which affect the withstand voltage of contaminated insulators. As a result, the guideline is proposed on fog conditions such as density, droplet size distribution, temperature rise in the fog room, and so on, basing upon the comparison between natural and artificial fog conditions and the relation between fog condition and power-frequency withstand voltage.

  16. Coastal Fog As a System: Defining an Interdisciplinary Research Agenda (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    Fog is a graphic and charismatic phenomenon that is commonplace in coastal geographies around the globe. Some of the first concerns about fog and human health arose over 50 years ago in foggy cities around the world, such as London and Los Angeles, where thousands of excess deaths have been attributed to the presence of acidic fog particles. Further, the mere presence of fog also results in airplane, ship, and automobile traffic delays and accidents, especially in coastal areas. In many Pacific coastal systems, fog is the primary--sometimes the only--source of water, it is a fundamental moderator of local and regional climate, and it influences productivity of near-coast ecosystems. In recent years fog has been identified as a vector for limiting nutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus), pollutants (e.g., mercury), and microbes (including human pathogens), all of whose origin is thought to be biologically controlled in the ocean. Researchers have also started inquiring into the importance of fog in modulating weather as well as local, regional and, global climate dynamics. However, from its formation in marine systems to deposition in terrestrial systems, understanding the fog system is an intellectual and interdisciplinary challenge that, to date, has gone unmet. This is in part because the fog system is complex: it involves feedbacks and coupling between physical, chemical, and biological systems in the ocean, atmosphere, and near-coast terrestrial systems. In addition, its formation is the result of global processes, yet its distribution as well as its impacts are local, and extremely spatially and temporally heterogeneous within and across landscapes. Here we describe a systems approach and framework for understanding the controls on fog formation as well as feedbacks to its formation, dissipation, distribution, flows, and stocks or pools. In addition, an interdisciplinary research agenda for coastal fog as a system will be described based on the outcome of a

  17. Quantifying the micrometorological controls on fog deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, J. P.; Paw U, K. T.; Underwood, J.

    2014-12-01

    Fog deposition has been shown to be a significant water input into many arid ecosystems. However, deposition of fog onto foliage depends on many factors. Previously, characterizing fog droplet size distributions was labor intensive, but currently we can characterize changes in fog droplet composition in the 2-50 μm in 2 μm intervals in real time. Evaluating how droplet size and ambient micrometeorological conditions affect deposition rates will allowing tremendous new insight into fog formation and deposition processes. Previous work has characterized fog deposition as it alters with wind speed in natural systems, but extensively testing how droplet size, wind speed, angle of interception all co-vary would be impossible in a natural setting. We utilized a wind tunnel with artificial fog generating nebulizers to simulate fog events across micrometeorological conditions. Using a weighing lysimeter, we were able to quantify the differential rates of deposition on different theoretical leaf types as droplet size and micrometeorological conditions vary. We hope to inform fog collector designs with this information to ensure we are accurately quantifying the fluxes of fog-derived water into these systems.

  18. Fog water collection measurements along the Central California Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, D. M.; Hiatt, C.; Potter, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    For the past several years a number of standard fog collectors (SFC's) have been deployed at various locations in the Monterey Bay region to assess the volume and variation of Monterey area fog water deposition. SFC's contain a square meter of double thickness 50% shade Coresa mesh and are mounted with their base at a height of 2.0 meters. Each SFC is fitted with a tipping bucket rain gauge so as to accurately measure the water intercepted by each instrument. Collection of water deposition from each SFC provides a quantitative means to detect and measure the presence of ground fog and, coupled with vegetation type, to estimate the associated moisture flux to the soil. Since summer 2009, three SFC's have been deployed at locations near CSU Monterey Bay in the towns of Marina and Seaside and 3 others were deployed along an elevation gradient in the Big Sur region. The volume of water collected from each instrument is recorded at 15-minute intervals. Despite spacing of only 1-5 km between correspondent SFC's at a given location, we observe significant variations in the presence of and characteristics of coincident fog events. This presentation examines totals of fog water collected over the time period (which spans from July 2009 through 2012) as well as local gradients and diurnal and seasonal variations based upon the limited sample size. In addition, this presentation will explore the interdisciplinary connections to other regional research projects, including lizard species extinctions, assessment of the physical effects of climate change on fog, and mercury cycling.

  19. The Zinc Finger and C-terminal Domains of MTA Proteins are Required for FOG-2 Mediated Transcriptional Repression via the NuRD Complex

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Andrea E.; Bassett, Brett J.; Samant, Sadhana A.; Hong, Wei; Blobel, Gerd A.; Svensson, Eric C.

    2008-01-01

    FOG-2 is a transcriptional co-regulator that is required for cardiac morphogenesis as mice deficient in this factor die during mid-gestation of cardiac malformations. FOG-2 interacts with GATA4 to attenuate GATA4-dependent gene expression. The first 12 amino acids of FOG-2 (the FOG Repression Motif) are necessary to mediate this repression. To determine the mechanism by which the FOG Repression Motif functions, we identified 7 polypeptides from rat cardiac nuclear extracts that co-purified with a GST-FOG-2 fusion protein. All proteins identified are members of the NuRD nucleosome-remodeling complex. Using in vitro binding and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that Metastasis-Associated proteins (MTA)-1, 2 and 3 and Retinoblastoma binding proteins RbAp46 and RbAp48 interact with FOG-2, but not with a mutant form of FOG-2 that is unable to repress transcription. Further, we define a novel domain located in the C-terminal portion of MTA-1 that mediates the FOG-2/MTA-1 interaction. We also demonstrate that knockdown of MTA protein expression dramatically impairs the ability of FOG-2 to repress GATA4 activity. Finally, we show that the zinc finger domain of MTA-1 is required for FOG-2 mediated transcriptional repression and that this domain interacts with RbAp46 and RbAp48 subunits of the NuRD complex. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of FOG-2/MTA/RbAp interactions for FOG-2 mediated transcriptional repression and further define the molecular interactions between the FOG Repression Motif and the NuRD complex. PMID:18067919

  20. Enhanced fog collection with electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damak, Maher; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Varanasi, Kripa

    2015-11-01

    Fog harvesting is a promising source of fresh water in remote areas. However, the efficiency of current collectors, consisting in fine meshes standing perpendicularly to the wind, is dramatically low. Fog-laden flows generally have low Stokes numbers, which leads to the deviation of fog droplets in the vicinity of the mesh wires. Here, we propose to overcome this aerodynamic limitation using a combination of electric fields and specific collecting surfaces. We show that our system largely increases the fog collection efficiency. We study the trajectories of individual particles and use the results to derive a model to predict the collection efficiency of the system. We finally identify and quantify the mechanisms that can limit the collection of fog particles. The understanding of these mechanisms leads us to construct a design chart that can be used to determine the optimal design parameters that should be used in fog collection applications as a function of the field conditions.

  1. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  2. The cold-fog test

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.A.; Ringler, K.G.; Erven, C.C.

    1996-10-01

    The electrical performance of outdoor insulation degrades severely during combinations of factors that include surface contamination (C), ice (I), fog (F) and an ambient temperature that rises through 0 C (T{sub 0{degree}}). Failures at operating voltage on 115-kV, 230-kV and 500-kV systems occur with increasing probability under these conditions. A new CFT{sub 0{degree}} or cold-fog test method has been developed to reproduce the flashovers at all three voltage levels. Three options are identified for improving CFT{sub 0{degree}} performance: use of semi-conductive glazes, substitution of silicone for porcelain and use of silicone coatings on existing porcelain insulators.

  3. Applying GOES-derived fog frequency indices to water balance modeling for the Russian River Watershed, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torregrosa, A.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Peters, J.; Combs, C.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal fog modifies the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of California watersheds with the greatest impact to ecosystem functioning during arid summer months. Lowered maximum temperatures resulting from inland penetration of marine fog are probably adequate to capture fog effects on thermal land surface characteristics however the hydrologic impact from lowered rates of evapotranspiration due to shade, fog drip, increased relative humidity, and other factors associated with fog events are more difficult to gauge. Fog products, such as those derived from National Weather Service Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery, provide high frequency (up to 15 min) views of fog and low cloud cover and can potentially improve water balance models. Even slight improvements in water balance calculations can benefit urban water managers and agricultural irrigation. The high frequency of GOES output provides the opportunity to explore options for integrating fog frequency data into water balance models. This pilot project compares GOES-derived fog frequency intervals (6, 12 and 24 hour) to explore the most useful for water balance models and to develop model-relevant relationships between climatic and water balance variables. Seasonal diurnal thermal differences, plant ecophysiological processes, and phenology suggest that a day/night differentiation on a monthly basis may be adequate. To explore this hypothesis, we examined discharge data from stream gages and outputs from the USGS Basin Characterization Model for runoff, recharge, potential evapotranspiration, and actual evapotranspiration for the Russian River Watershed under low, medium, and high fog event conditions derived from hourly GOES imagery (1999-2009). We also differentiated fog events into daytime and nighttime versus a 24-hour compilation on a daily, monthly, and seasonal basis. Our data suggest that a daily time-step is required to adequately incorporate the hydrologic effect of

  4. Impact of fog-drip versus fog immersion on leaf-level function of Bishop pines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguskas, S. A.; Still, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fog-water is known to be an important water source to plants in coastal, Mediterranean climates because it augments plant available water several months after the last winter rain, when conditions are otherwise warm and dry. While fog-drip to the soil surface is the most obvious contribution of fog to the water budget of an ecosystem, recent studies provide convincing evidence that foliar absorption of fog water is also possible. The focus of our research was to assess the relative importance of fog-drip and fog immersion on the photosynthetic capacity and gas exchange rates of a coastal pine species, Bishop pine (Pinus muricata, D.Don), a drought sensitive species restricted to the fogbelt of coastal California and offshore islands. We conducted a greenhouse study where we manipulated fog water inputs to potted Bishop pine saplings during a three-week dry-down period. Fifteen saplings were randomly assigned one of three treatments: 1) fog-drip and fog-immersion, 2) fog immersion alone, and 3) no fog water inputs. We artificially generated nighttime fog events using an ultrasonic device, which produces fog droplets. Given that the canopy architecture varied between saplings, we standardized the amount of fog-drip plants received by preventing direct fog drip from the canopy, and instead added the average amount of fog water that would have fallen from each canopy. To detect changes in soil moisture, we installed volumetric soil moisture probes in each pot at 2 and 10 cm depth. The plant response variables measured were photosynthetic capacity and maximum gas exchange rates of sapling trees. Our results show that plants which received both fog-drip and fog immersion sustained higher gas exchange rates and photosynthetic capacity through the dry-down period compared to trees in other treatment groups. Trees that received only fog immersion had lower rates of gas exchange and lower photosynthetic capacity relative to trees that received both fog-drip and fog immersion

  5. Coastal Fog, South Peruvian Coast at Pisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Coastal fog commonly drapes the Peruvian coast. This image captures complex interactions between land, sea, and atmosphere along the southern Peruvian coast. When Shuttle astronauts took the image in February of 2002, the layers of coastal fog and stratus were being progressively scoured away by brisk south to southeast winds. Remnants of the cloud deck banked against the larger, obstructing headlands like Peninsula Paracas and Isla Sangayan, giving the prominent 'white comma' effect. Southerlies also produced ripples of internal gravity waves in the clouds offshore where warm, dry air aloft interacts with a thinning layer of cool, moist air near the sea surface on the outer edge of the remaining cloud bank. South of Peninsula Baracas, the small headlands channeled the clouds into streaks-local horizontal vortices caused by the headlands provided enough lift to give points of origin of the clouds in some bays. Besides the shelter of the peninsula, the Bahia de Pisco appears to be cloud-free due to a dry, offshore flow down the valley of the Rio Ica. The STS-109 crew took image STS109-730-80 in February 2002. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  6. Characterisation of polar organic compounds in fog water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gyula; Varga, Bálint; Gelencsér, András; Krivácsy, Zoltán; Molnár, Ágnes; Alsberg, Tomas; Persson, Linn; Hansson, Hans-Christen; Cristina Facchini, Maria

    In this paper the results of a systematic liquid chromatographic investigation are described to characterise water-soluble organic compounds in fog. A diode array detector is used to record the UV spectrum of the components during separation and a mass spectrometer is applied to obtain information on the ion masses of the constituents. The combination of UV and mass spectra reveal that the organic carbon content of fog water is distributed among a great number of acidic compounds which have polar functional groups and polyconjugated systems absorbing up to 500 nm. Due to the complexity of the organic fraction in fog water an unresolved hump of ions was recorded by the mass spectrometer from m/ z=100-600 the most intense peaks being detected around m/ z=200-250. Tannin and fulvic acid were also examined under the same conditions. In terms of complexity and ion distribution the mass spectrum of the organic fraction was similar to that of a fulvic acid reference material rather than to that of tannin.

  7. Fog collection and deposition modelling - EcoCatch Lunz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, M. W.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Leder, K.; Bauer, H.; Dorninger, M.; Hofhansl, F.; Wanek, W.; Kasper-Giebl, A.

    2010-07-01

    /GS. Between September 2008 and October 2009 roughly 560 hours of fog were observed and about 380 hours thereof were sampled. Duration, frequency as well as density of fog events showed strong seasonal variations. As expected, spring and autumn seasons exhibited the highest frequencies and durations of fog events. Concentrations of nitrate in fog samples during the cold season (Nov-Mar) were 10-fold higher than in rain, reaching monthly averages of 50 mg L-1 in January and February. With 15-25 mg L-1, sulphate was 11-fold higher in fog compared to rain. Ammonium reached on average 14 mg L-1 in fog samples and was thus 15-fold higher than in rain. 1)EcoCatch - Understanding the effects of global change on ecosystem processes and services at catchment scale (funded by Amt der Niederösterreichischen Landesregierung, and Clean Air Commission, Austrian Academy of Sciences).

  8. Filtering and analysis on the random drift of FOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yun-Peng; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Guo, Yun-Zeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyro (FOG) is an optical gyroscope which is based on the Sagnac effect and uses the optical fiber coil as light propagation channel. Gyro drift consists of two components: systemic drift and random drift. Systemic drift can be compensated by testing and calibrating. Random drift changes with time, so it becomes an important indicator to measure the precision of gyroscope, which has a great impact on the inertial navigation system. It can't be compensated by the simple method. Random drift is a main error of fiber optic gyro (FOG). The static output of FOG is a random project and it has more random noise when as the inertial navigation sensor, which will affect the measurement accuracy. It is an efficient method to reduce the random drift and improve the accuracy by modeling and compensation from the output of FOG. According to the characteristic of fiber optic gyro, the random drift model is studied. Using the time series method, the constant component of the random noise original data is extracted. After stationarity and normality tests, a normal random process is acquired. Based on this, the model is established using the recursive least squares, and then the model is applied to the normal Kalman and adaptive Kalman, finally the data is process with the filter. After experimental verification, the noise variance was reduced after filtering, and the effect is obvious.

  9. The Continued Reduction in Dense Fog in the Southern California Region: Possible Causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaDochy, S.; Witiw, M.

    2012-05-01

    Dense fog appears to be decreasing in many parts of the world, especially in western cities. Dense fog (visibility <400 m) is disappearing in the urban southern California area also. There the decrease in dense fog events can be explained mainly by declining particulate levels, Pacific sea surface temperatures (SST), and increased urban warming. Using hourly data from 1948 to the present, we looked at the relationship between fog events in the region and contributing factors and trends over time. Initially a strong relationship was suggested between the occurrence of dense fog and the phases of an atmosphere-ocean cycle: the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). However, closer analysis revealed the importance to fog variability of an increasing urban heat island and the amount of atmospheric suspended particulate matter. Results show a substantial decrease in the occurrence of very low visibilities (<400 m) at the two airport stations in close proximity to the Pacific Ocean, LAX (Los Angeles International) and LGB (Long Beach International). A downward trend in particulate concentrations, coupled with an upward trend in urban temperatures were associated with the decrease in dense fog occurrence at both LAX and LGB. LAX dense fog that reached over 300 h in 1950 dropped steadily, with 0 h recorded in 1997. Since 1997, there has been a slight recovery with both 2008 and 2009 recording over 30 h of dense fog at both locations. In this study we examine whether the upturn is a temporary reversal of the trend. To remove the urban effect, we also included fog data from Vandenberg Air Force Base (VBG), located in a relatively sparsely populated area approximately 200 km to the north of metropolitan Los Angeles. Particulates, urban heat island, and Pacific SSTs all seem to be contributing factors to the decrease in fog in southern California, along with large-scale atmosphere-ocean interaction cycles. Case studies of local and regional dense fog in southern California point

  10. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog~droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Gas-phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds; however the significance of direct photolysis of these compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived effective Henry's law constants, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will (or will not) have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations designed to estimate gas- and aqueous-phase extinction coefficients of unstudied atmospherically relevant compounds found in d-limonene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water-soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only two out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid and acetoacetic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α,β-conjugation that were investigated, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected under typical atmospheric conditions.

  11. An object-oriented based daytime over land fog detection approach using EOS/MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiongfei; Liu, Liangming; Li, Wei; Dong, Pei

    2009-09-01

    A new algorithm is presented for land fog detection from daytime image of Earth Observation System Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (EOS/MODIS) data. Due to its outstanding spatial and spectral resolutions, this image is an ideal data source for fog detection. The algorithm utilizes an object-oriented technique to separate fog from other cloud types. In this paper, MOD35 product is first introduced to exclude cloud-free areas, and high clouds are removed with MODIS 26 band, and then a parameter named Normalized Difference Fog Index (NDFI) is proposed based on Streamer radiative model and MODIS data for fog detection. Through segmenting NDFI image into regions of pixels, and computing attributes (e.g. mean value of brightness temperature) for each region to create objects, each object could be identified based on the attributes selected to determine whether belongs to fog or cloud. Algorithm's performance is evaluated against ground-based measurements over China in winter. The algorithm is proved to be effective in detecting fog accurately based on two different test cases.

  12. A Comparison Study Between Spring and Summer Fogs in the Yellow Sea-Observations and Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suping; Li, Man; Meng, Xiangui; Fu, Gang; Ren, Zhaopeng; Gao, Shanhong

    2012-05-01

    New observations from buoys and soundings reveal the discrepancies in air-sea interface and in vertical structures between spring (April to May) and summer (July) fogs in the Yellow Sea. Spring fogs are shallow with a robust temperature inversion, dry layer and cold phase (surface air temperature or SAT is lower than sea surface temperature or SST); summer fogs are deep with weaker stability, indistinct fog top and warm phase (SAT > SST). Along with numerical simulations, conceptual models for the mechanisms of temperature inversion are suggested. The land-sea contrast is responsible for the robust temperature inversion in spring, and the deep southerlies derived from the east Asian summer monsoon and the adiabatic sinking from the western Pacific subtropical high contributes to the weaker inversion in summer. The dry layer above the sea fog top intensifies the longwave radiative cooling effect to lead to the cold phase in spring fogs. The radiative cooling is weaker in summer fogs resulting in SAT > SST.

  13. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reviews of available data indicate that precipitation in a large region of North America is highly acidic when its pH is compared with the expected pH value of 5.65 for pure rain water in equilibrium with CO2. A growing body of evidence suggests that acid rain is responsib...

  14. Effusion of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from fog droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.M.; Tsay, C.

    1998-12-31

    In this study, the effects of surface-active substances, pH and salt on the effusion of HOCs from droplets were investigated. An HOCs-effusion reactor was established for experiments. N-octane was used for the HOCs and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) was selected as the surface-active substance. A correction factor to mass exchange constant, defined as the deviation of exchange constant of n-octane in fog phase from that in planar aqueous phase was used to quantify the effects of surface-active substance, pH, and salt concentration on the effusion rate of HOCs from fog droplets by a modified double-layer diffusion model. The results showed that surface-active substances, SDS cab decrease the effusion rate of n-octane from fog droplets by about 40%--62% and the values of were in the range of 0.382 to 0.609. The salt, sodium chloride, at the concentration of 1.00 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} [M] can further decrease the mass transfer rate of n-octane from fog droplets because the values changed from 0.590 to 0.368, so that the effusion rate was further decrease by salt. When pH values were between 5.60 and 2.00, values varied from 0.609 to 0.367 at SDS concentration of 1.00 x 10{sup 3}[M]. This indicated that the effusion rate of HOCs from fog droplets decreased with decreasing pH value.

  15. Inexpensive anti-fog coating for windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmin, D. L., Jr.; Morrison, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Coating applications include anti-fog protection for deep-sea diving equipment, fire protection helmets, and windows of vehicles used in hazardous environments. Basic coating composition includes liquid detergent, deionized water, and oxygen compatible fire-resistant oil. Composition prevents visor fogging under maximum metabolic load for 5 hours and longer.

  16. ICE FOG SUPPRESSION USING THIN CHEMICAL FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ice fog suppression experiments on the Fort Wainwright Power Plant cooling pond were conducted during the winters of 1974-76. Baseline information studies occupied a sizeable portion of the available ice fog weather in 1974-75. Hexadecanol was added to the pond and dramatically i...

  17. Fog Machines, Vapors, and Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitz, Ed

    2008-01-01

    A series of demonstrations is described that elucidate the operation of commercial fog machines by using common laboratory equipment and supplies. The formation of fogs, or "mixing clouds", is discussed in terms of the phase diagram for water and other chemical principles. The demonstrations can be adapted for presentation suitable for elementary…

  18. Fog Studies for University Students and High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witiw, M.; Ladochy, S.

    2010-07-01

    Over the past few years, fog studies have been introduced as part of courses in Earth system science for both university students and high school teachers at Seattle Pacific University. In the undergraduate course, about three hours are devoted to the study of fog starting with a discussion on sustainable water systems. This is followed by presentations on types of fog, the role of fog in the biosphere, biogeochemical cycles and fog, human influences on fog and fog intensity, and remote sensing of fog. We end with a description of fog collection. Fog education efforts increased for students when our campus was able to obtain fog collecting equipment from Richard Jagels at the University of Maine. The equipment included active and passive fog collectors as well as infrared-beam fog detectors. Two graduating students took on fog collection as their senior project. After setting up the newly acquired equipment, the students designed a fog collection project for the University’s Whidby Island location on Puget Sound, an area that experiences frequent advection fog. They built a passive fog detector and determined where to place it on the Island. Future projects planned include implementing a water system based upon fog collection on Whidby Island. We have also implemented a new module on fog for the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) - The Camanchaca: Fog in the Earth System (available at: http://essea.strategies.org/module.php?module_id=54). Aspects of fog in the Earth system are discussed and participants are led to see the important role fog has throughout the Earth system. This module was successfully piloted as part of an Earth system science course for teachers offered in June-July, 2009.

  19. Characterisation of FOGs in grease trap waste from the processing of chickens in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nitayapat, Nuttakan; Chitprasert, Pakamon

    2014-06-01

    Industrial firms that kill and process chickens generate wastewater that contains fat, oil, and grease (FOG). The FOGs are located in the fatty waste that is collected by floatation in grease traps. Chemical and physical characterisation of FOGs would provide useful information that would help in the development of methods designed to decrease the extent of pollution caused by disposal of the waste and to utilise commercially some of its lipid constituents. Employing these methods would enhance the profitability and competitive potential of these commercial organisations. Samples of grease trap waste from 14 firms in central Thailand have been examined. Due to the very different schemes of waste management employed by these firms, the physical appearance of their fatty wastes showed considerable variation. The chemical and physical properties of the FOGs present in these wastes showed considerable variation also. Large amounts of free fatty acids (10-70% as oleic acid) were detected in most of the 14 wastes and palmitic, cis-9-oleic, cis,cis-9,12-linoleic, stearic, and palmitoleic acids were the predominant species of free and esterified acids. Most of the FOGs were solid at temperatures below 40 °C. Many of them contained traces of heavy metals (Cu and Pb) and some contained traces of the pesticides dimethoate and cypermethrin. The content of these potentially hazardous substances would have to be considered very carefully before discarding the fatty wastes and during the development of methods designed to isolate their potentially profitable lipid constituents. PMID:24095036

  20. Factors that influence properties of FOG deposits and their formation in sewer collection systems.

    PubMed

    Iasmin, Mahbuba; Dean, Lisa O; Lappi, Simon E; Ducoste, Joel J

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the formation of Fat, Oil, and Grease (FOG) deposits in sewer systems is critical to the sustainability of sewer collection systems since they have been implicated in causing sewerage blockages that leads to sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). Recently, FOG deposits in sewer systems displayed strong similarities with calcium-based fatty acid salts as a result of a saponification reaction. The objective of this study was to quantify the factors that may affect the formation of FOG deposits and their chemical and rheological properties. These factors included the types of fats used in FSEs, environmental conditions (i.e. pH and temperature), and the source of calcium in sewer systems. The results of this study showed that calcium content in the calcium based salts seemed to depend on the solubility limit of the calcium source and influenced by pH and temperature conditions. The fatty acid profile of the calcium-based fatty acid salts produced under alkali driven hydrolysis were identical to the profile of the fat source and did not match the profile of field FOG deposits, which displayed a high fraction of palmitic, a long chain saturated fatty acid. It is hypothesized that selective microbial metabolism of fats and/or biologically induced hydrogenation may contribute to the FOG deposit makeup in sewer system. Therefore, selective removal of palmitic in pretreatment processes may be necessary prior to the discharge of FSE wastes into the sewer collection system. PMID:24317022

  1. Fog and rain water chemistry at Mt. Fuji: A case study during the September 2002 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Koichi; Takebe, Yusaku; Sode, Nobuhiro; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Dokiya, Yukiko

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of fog and rain water chemistry at the summit of Mt. Fuji, the highest peak in Japan, as well as at Tarobo, the ESE slope of Mt. Fuji in September 2002. The pH of fog and rain water sampled at Mt. Fuji varied over a range of 4.0-6.8. Acidic fogs (pH < 5.0) were observed at the summit when the air mass came from the industrial regions on the Asian continent. The ratio of [SO 42-]/[NO 3-] in the fog water was lower at Tarobo than at the summit. High concentrations of Na + and Cl - were determined in the rain water sampled at the summit, possibly because of the long-range transport of sea-salt particles raised by a typhoon through the middle troposphere. The vertical transport of sea-salt particles would influence the cloud microphysical properties in the middle troposphere. Significant loss of Mg 2+ was seen in the rain water at the summit. The concentrations of peroxides in the fog and rain water were relatively large (10-105 μM). The potential capacity for SO 2 oxidation seems to be strong from summer to early autumn at Mt. Fuji. The fog water peroxide concentrations displayed diurnal variability. The peroxide concentrations in the nighttime were significantly higher than those in the daytime.

  2. Fog composition at Baengnyeong Island in the Eastern Yellow Sea: detecting markers of aqueous atmospheric oxidations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, A. J.; Lee, T.; Park, T.; Choi, J.; Seo, S.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-09-01

    Samples of fog water were collected at Baengnyeong Island (BYI) in the Yellow Sea during the summer of 2014. The most abundant chemical species in the fog water were NH4+ (mean of 2220 μM), NO3- (1260 μM), SO4-2 (730 μM), and Na+ (551 μM), with substantial contributions from other ions consistent with marine and biomass burning influence on some dates. The pH of the samples ranged between 3.48 and 5.00, with a mean of 3.94, intermediate within pH values of fog/cloud water reported previously in Southeast Asia. Back trajectories (72 h) showed that high relative humidity (> 80 %) was encountered upwind of the sampling site by all but one of the sampled air masses, and that the fog composition at BYI can be impacted by several different source regions, including the Sea of Japan, Northeastern China, and the East China Sea. Sulfur in the collected fog was highly oxidized: low S(IV) concentrations were measured (mean of 2.36 μM) in contrast to SO4-2 and in contrast to fog/cloud S(IV) concentrations from pollutant source regions; organosulfate species were also observed and were most likely formed through aging of mainly biogenic volatile organic compounds. Low molecular mass organic acids were major contributors to total organic carbon (TOC; 36-69 %), comprising a fraction of TOC at the upper end of that seen in fogs and clouds in other polluted environments. Large contributions were observed from not only acetic and formic acids, but also oxalic, succinic, maleic, and other organic acids that can be produced in aqueous atmospheric organic processing (AAOP) reactions. These samples of East Asian fog water containing highly oxidized components represent fog downwind of pollutant sources and can provide new insight into the fate of regional emissions. In particular, these samples demonstrate the result of extensive photochemical aging during multiday transport, including oxidation within wet aerosols and fogs.

  3. Fog composition at Baengnyeong Island in the eastern Yellow Sea: detecting markers of aqueous atmospheric oxidations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, A. J.; Lee, T.; Park, T.; Choi, J.; Seo, S. J.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of fog water were collected at Baengnyeong Island (BYI) in the Yellow Sea during the summer of 2014. The most abundant chemical species in the fog water were NH4+ (mean of 2220 µM), NO3- (1260 µM), SO4-2 (730 µM), and Na+ (551 µM), with substantial contributions from other species consistent with marine and biomass burning influence on some dates. The pH of the samples ranged between 3.48 and 5.00, with a mean of 3.94, intermediate within pH values of fog/cloud water reported previously in Southeast Asia. Back trajectories (72 h) showed that high relative humidity ( > 80 %) was encountered upwind of the sampling site by all but one of the sampled air masses, and that the fog composition at BYI can be impacted by several different source regions, including the Sea of Japan, southeastern China, northeastern China, and the East China Sea. Sulfur in the collected fog was highly oxidized: low S(IV) concentrations were measured (mean of 2.36 µM) in contrast to SO4-2 and in contrast to fog/cloud S(IV) concentrations from pollutant source regions; organosulfate species were also observed and were most likely formed through aging of mainly biogenic volatile organic compounds. Low-molecular-mass organic acids were major contributors to total organic carbon (TOC; 36-69 %), comprising a fraction of TOC at the upper end of that seen in fogs and clouds in other polluted environments. Large contributions were observed from not only acetic and formic acids but also oxalic, succinic, maleic, and other organic acids that can be produced in aqueous atmospheric organic processing (AAOP) reactions. These samples of East Asian fog water containing highly oxidized components represent fog downwind of pollutant sources and can provide new insight into the fate of regional emissions. In particular, these samples demonstrate the result of extensive photochemical aging during multiday transport, including oxidation within wet aerosols and fogs.

  4. [Fog water absorption by the leaves of epiphytes and non - epiphytes in Xishuangbanna].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yulong; Feng, Yulong

    2006-06-01

    Xishuangbanna is located at the northern margin of tropics. Its climate is different from that of typical tropics, but the rainforest there is not very different from that of the typical tropics in Southeast Asia. The main problems in Xishuangbanna are seasonal drought and low temperature. Fog may contribute to the development of rainforest here, but related studies are few. This study is aimed to know whether the leaves of epiphytes and non - epiphytes in Xishuangbanna can directly absorb fog water and contribute to their water status recovery, and whether epiphytes are more competent than non - epiphytes in their leaf fog water absorption. The study was conducted in dry season, and four species of epiphytes and six species of non - epiphytes were investigated. The effect of fog was imitated by spraying leaves with distilled water. For epiphytes and non - epiphytes, their leaf water potential (phi), relative water content (RWC), and amount of absorbed water increased gradually with the time of spraying, but the phi of epiphytes increased more quickly than that of non - epiphytes. The leaves of epiphytes Bolbitis scandens and Rhaphidophora decursiva could absorb fog water more quickly, and increase their RWC more greatly than those of non - epiphytes, indicating that these epiphytes were more competent than non - epiphytes in their leaf fog water absorption. The fog water absorption capacity of the leaves in epiphytic orchid Coelogyne occultata and Staurochilus dawsonianus was lower than that in Amischotolype hispida and Mananthus patentflora, but higher than that in other four non - epiphytes. The phi of epiphytes at early evening when no fog was formed was significantly lower than that at early morning, suggesting that fog water was absorbed by epiphytes at night to improve their leaf water status. Non - epiphytes did not need to absorb fog water directly through leaves, and they could recover their leaf water status through absorbing soil water by root system

  5. Effect of La surface treatments on corrosion resistance of A3 xx. x/SiC p composites in salt fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M. C.; Arrabal, R.; Merino, S.; Viejo, F.; Coy, A. E.

    2006-02-01

    The influence of the SiC p proportion and the matrix concentration of four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) modified by lanthanum-based conversion or electrolysis coating was evaluated in neutral salt fog according to ASTM B 117. Lanthanum-based conversion coatings were obtained by immersion in 50 °C solution of La(III) salt and lanthanum electrolysis treatments were performed in ethylene glycol mono-butyl ether solution. These treatments preferentially covered cathodic areas such as intermetallic compounds, Si eutectic and SiC p. The kinetic of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. Both coating microstructure and nature of corrosion products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The corrosion process was more influenced by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiC p reinforcement. Both conversion and electrolysis surface treatments improved the behaviour to salt fog corrosion in comparison with original composites without treatment. Additionally, electrolysis provided a higher degree of protection than the conversion treatment because the coating was more extensive.

  6. Insights into Association of the NuRD Complex with FOG-1 from the Crystal Structure of an RbAp48·FOG-1 Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, Sara; Thong, Sock Yue; Murthy, Andal; AlQarni, Saad; Murzina, Natalia V.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Laue, Ernest D.; Mackay, Joel P.

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin-modifying complexes such as the NuRD complex are recruited to particular genomic sites by gene-specific nuclear factors. Overall, however, little is known about the molecular basis for these interactions. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the NuRD subunit RbAp48 bound to the 15 N-terminal amino acids of the GATA-1 cofactor FOG-1. The FOG-1 peptide contacts a negatively charged binding pocket on top of the RbAp48 β-propeller that is distinct from the binding surface used by RpAp48 to contact histone H4. We further show that RbAp48 interacts with the NuRD subunit MTA-1 via a surface that is distinct from its FOG-binding pocket, providing a first glimpse into the way in which NuRD assembly facilitates interactions with cofactors. Our RbAp48·FOG-1 structure provides insight into the molecular determinants of FOG-1-dependent association with the NuRD complex and into the links between transcription regulation and nucleosome remodeling. PMID:21047798

  7. Fog chemistry at three sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youliang; Zhang, Jinwei; Marcotte, Aurelie R.; Karl, Matthias; Dye, Christian; Herckes, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Fog composition was investigated at three sites in Norway, one in suburban Oslo and two coastal sites in the area of the Mongstad refinery. Overall fog frequency during the study periods was low. Fog pH was around 5 with slightly lower values at Hakadal, the suburban site, compared to the coastal sites, which were slightly above 5. Major ions at the coastal sites were sodium and chloride consistent with the marine environment. The ion chemistry at the suburban site was dominated by ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, consistent with fogs in anthropogenically impacted environments. Overall concentrations of major ions were very low, orders of magnitude lower than those in polluted urban fogs. Organic matter concentrations were also low (< 3 mgC/L) consistent with limited anthropogenic impact and little biogenic activity in the winter months. Selected amine concentrations were determined and ranged from nanomolar concentrations for ethylamines to several hundred nanomolar concentrations for dimethylamine, the most abundant amine investigated. While N-nitrosodimehylamine was detected in fog, the concentrations were very low in the fogs.

  8. Specific determination of ferbam residues in fog-water.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Smita; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Singh, Pahup

    2003-12-23

    A specific method for the determination of a fungicide, i.e. iron(III) dimethyldithiocarbamate (ferbam) in fog-water samples is described. The method is based on the releasing of equivalent amount of iron from the fungicide and subsequently determination by spectrophotometrically or by flame-atomic absorption spectrometrically (flame-AAS). The fungicide was extracted with chloroform/toluene from the samples and digested with nitric acid. For spectrophotometric determination, the solution was then treated with ammonium thiocyanate solution in presence of the surfactants and absorbance was measured at 475 nm. Whereas, the digested solution was directly applied for flame-AAS determination of ferbam. The molar absorptivity in terms of ferbam was determined to be (3.49)x10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1). The detection limits for spectrophotometric and flame-AAS methods were calculated to be 62 and 111 ppb ferbam (R.S.D. <1 and <3%), respectively. Whereas, the optimum concentration ranges for the analysis of ferbam are 4-120 and 1.5-55 mug in final volume, respectively. The methods are freed from interference of almost all ions [including Fe(II) and Fe(III)], which can commonly associate with ferbam in fog-water. The methods have been successfully applied to fog samples collected from agriculture sites of Raipur (central India). PMID:18969253

  9. The chemical composition of fogs and clouds in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The major inorganic species in cloud and fog water samples were NH{sub 4}{sup +}, H{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Concentrations in fog water samples were 1 - 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M; pH values ranged from {approx equal} 2 to 6. Nitrate usually exceeded sulfate. Acidity depended on the availability of NH{sub 3} from agricultural operations. Stratus cloudwater had somewhat lower concentrations; pH values were in the range 3-4. The major factors accounting for variation in fog- or cloudwater composition were the preexisting aerosol and gas concentrations and variations in liquid water content. Deposition and entrainment or advection of different air masses were also important during extended cloud or fog episodes. The droplet size dependence of cloudwater composition was investigated on one occasion in an intercepted coastal stratus clouds. Concentrations of S(IV) and CH{sub 2}O in the range 100-1000 {mu}M were observed in fogwater from urban sites in Southern California. Lower concentrations were observed in stratus clouds. The high levels of S(IV) and CH{sub 2}O were attributed to the formation of hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMSA), the S(IV) adduct of CH{sub 2}O. Direct measurements of HMSA in fogwater samples from Bakersfield, CA were made by ion-pairing chromatography. Glyoxal and methyglyoxal were observed at concentrations comparable to CH{sub 2}O in fogwater samples from Riverside, CA and in stratus cloudwater samples from sites along the Santa Barbara Channel.

  10. Fog Bank, Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Fog is the only source of moisture for desert dwelling animals and plants living in the Namib Desert sand dune field, Namibia (23.5N, 15.0E). Coastal stratus clouds provide most of the life supporting moisture as fog droplets in this arid land where the usual annual rainfall is less than a quarter of an inch for decades at a time. In this view, the stratus clouds over the coast conform to the dune pattern proving that the fog is in ground contact.

  11. Fog droplet distribution functions for lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, J.V.

    1982-04-15

    The interpretation of lidar data on fog has been limited by two obstacles: approximations in the form of the Mie scattering cross sections for water droplets, and droplet size distribution functions whose relationship to the experiment has not been clear. This paper develops a method for generating distribution functions from experimental data. These functions are then used with newly available Mie cross sections to obtain backscattering and extinction coefficients for singly scattered ruby laser pulses in fog. The results show what experimental lidar accuracies are needed to uniquely determine fog droplet size distribution.

  12. Applying fog climatology to water balance modeling for the Russian River watershed, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, L. E.; Torregrosa, A.; Flint, A. L.; Combs, C.; Peters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal fog modifies the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of California watersheds with the greatest impact on ecosystem functioning during arid summer months. Lowered maximum temperatures that result from inland penetration of marine fog are probably adequately captured by meteorological temperature measurements, however the hydrologic impacts of lowered rates of evapotranspiration due to fog drip, increased relative humidity, and other factors associated with fog events are more difficult to gage. Fog products, such as those derived from National Weather Service (NWS) satellite data streams provide high frequency (up to every 15 min) views of low cloud cover and have the potential to improve water balance models. Even slight improvements in water balance calculations can benefit urban water managers and agricultural irrigation. The high frequency of data output from the NWS Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) provides the opportunity to explore various strategies for data input. This pilot project sought to explore which time interval provided useful results and if empirical relationships with climate and water balance variables could be developed. Plant ecophysiological mechanisms of daytime photosynthesis suggest that a day/night differentiation on a monthly basis is adequate. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the output for the Russian River watershed from the USGS Basin Characterization Model to compare runoff, recharge, potential evapotranspiration, and actual evapotranspiration with stream gage data under low, medium, and high fog hour conditions over 10 years (1999-2009) and differentiating fog events into daytime and nighttime versus a 24-hour compilation on a daily, monthly, and seasonal basis. Our data suggest that a daily time-step is required to adequately incorporate the hydrologic effect of fog.

  13. Development of Satellite-based Climatology of Low-level Cloud and Fog in Mountain Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of orographic clouds and fog has major environmental and economic implications that the potential shift in the space-time distribution can effectively redistribute freshwater resources and threaten the sustainability of the ecology, geomorphology and hydrology of mountainous regions and adjacent basins. This includes the Southern Appalachian Mountains, which rely closely on the moisture input from fog, cap clouds and light rainfall, as well as cloud forests in the Andes with frequent occurrence of dense fog. However, the applicability of fog forecasting models becomes limited in regions of complex terrain. The motivation of this project is to develop a satellite-based hydroclimatology and physical parameterization of orographic low-level clouds and fog regimes in the Southern Appalachians using a general methodology that can be applied to mountainous regions elsewhere. An algorithm for the detection and extraction of stratus clouds and fog was developed using changes in vertical gradients of CPR reflectivity and liquid water products from almost 5-years of CLOUDSAT and SRTM terrain data. This population of low-level clouds and fog will be analyzed with GOES infrared and visible imagery, MODIS and CALIPSO products, and with airport cloud height and visibility records to expand the spatial coverage beyond narrow satellite sensor swaths. The climatology will be further developed through integration with results from WRF simulations for selected periods since the bulk of the PMM network has been in place (2008-present) to aid in defining meteorological and time-of-day constraints in the interpretation of simulated satellite radar reflectivity profiles. The overarching goal is to infer a representation of the diurnal cycle, seasonal and inter-annual variations of the vertical distribution of LWC and hydrometeors in orographic clouds and fog that vary spatially with landform toward developing a more general parameterization of seeder-feeder interactions in

  14. Warm fog suppression in large-scale laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Pilie, R J; Kocmond, W C; Jiusto, J E

    1967-09-15

    Visibility in warm fog produced in a 600-cubic-meter chamber was increased by factors of 3 to 10 by seeding with carefully sized sodium chloride particles. As little as 1.7 milligrams of salt per cubic meter was effective. Extrapolation of these results indicates that clearing a suitable landing zone for aircraft would not involve prohibitive amounts of seeding material. PMID:17737439

  15. Evaluation of hand applied naled thermal fog for Wyeomyia control.

    PubMed

    Curtis, G A; Carlson, D B

    1990-09-01

    Tests on the effect of hand applied naled thermal fog, both as a single treatment on one day/week and a single treatment on 3 successive days, did not control Wyeomyia vanduzeei and Wy. mitchellii. Five-min landing/biting counts in a native oak/palm woodland demonstrated that single applications produced an average landing rate decrease of 13%. Treatments 3 days in succession did not suppress the landing rate. PMID:1977876

  16. Fog and precipitation chemistry at a mid-land forest in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yang-Ling; Lin, Teng-Chiu; Hwong, Jeen-Liang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Chiao-Ping

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed fog and bulk precipitation chemistry at a cloud forest in central Taiwan where mountain agriculture activities are highest. There were 320 foggy days (visibility <1000 m) recorded between April 2005 and March 2006. Fog was most frequent between April 2005 and July 2005 and in March 2006 (153/153 d) and least frequent in January 2006 (21/31 d). The total fog duration was 2415 h, representing 28% of the sampling period. Compared with bulk precipitation, fog was disproportionally enriched in NO(3)(-) and SO(4)(2-) relative to K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and NH(4)(+), resulting in higher a content of nitric acid and sulfuric acid than weak acids or neutral salts and, therefore, higher acidity (median pH, 4.9) in fog than in bulk precipitation (median and mean pH, 5.5). The very high input of NH(4)(+) (47 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) through bulk precipitation suggests that the use of fertilizer (ammonium sulfate and animal manure) associated with mountain agriculture has a major impact on atmospheric deposition at the surrounding forest ecosystems. The input of inorganic N reached 125 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and likely exceeded the biological demand of the forest ecosystem. Sulfate is the most abundant anion in fog at Chi-tou and in precipitation at various forests throughout Taiwan, suggesting that the emission and transport of large quantities of SO(2,) the precursor of SO(4)(2-), is an island-wide environmental issue. PMID:19244483

  17. Centrifugation-Assisted Fog-Collecting Abilities of Metal-Foam Structures with Different Surface Wettabilities.

    PubMed

    Ji, Keju; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Jia; Meng, Guiyun; Ding, Yafei; Dai, Zhendong

    2016-04-20

    The collection of water from fog is a simple and sustainable means of obtaining freshwater for human and animal consumption. Herein, we address the use of metal foam in fog collection and present a novel fog-collecting device fabricated from copper foam. This device, which can also be used in other liquid-gas separation applications, is a 3D extension of biologically inspired 1D and 2D materials. The network structure of the 3D material effectively increased the contact area and interaction time of the skeleton structure and fog compared to those of traditional 2D fog-collecting materials. The main aspects investigated in this study were the influences of the inertial centrifugal force generated by rotating the metal-foam samples and the use of samples with different surface wettabilities on the fog-collecting performance. Superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic samples were found to have higher collection efficiencies at low and high rotational speeds, respectively, and a maximum efficiency of 86% was achieved for superhydrophobic copper foam (20 pores per inch) rotated at 1500 rpm. PMID:27065476

  18. The optical properties and chemical composition of Po Valley fog water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahl, L.; Hawkins, L. N.; Gilardoni, S.

    2013-12-01

    The chemical composition and solar radiation absorption properties of fog water are important because of the effects these properties can have on the climate. Fog samples contain compounds that may absorb light, and this radiative forcing may be significant. The Po Valley, located between the Apennine and Alps mountain ranges in Italy, has a high occurrence of fog events, which can be up to 30% of the time in the winter season. Absorption spectra of fog water samples from San Pietro Capofiume, Italy were taken in a Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Spectra were fitted and absorptions at different wavelengths were correlated to the organic carbon and organic nitrogen concentrations of the samples. Ion chromatography was also used to obtain the concentrations of several ions such as nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, acetate, ammonium, and various amines. A correlation was found between absorbance and organic carbon content, as well as between absorbance at less than 300 nm wavelengths and organic nitrogen content. Characteristic absorptivities at 365 nm were calculated from Beer's law with regard to the organic carbon content and revealed similar results to those calculated from Los Angeles fog water samples earlier this year. The absorption angstrom exponents of the samples imply that the likely source of the optically active species is from biomass burning, and this will later be confirmed by a tracer analysis. High organic nitrogen : organic carbon ratios in all samples suggest that compounds containing nitrogen have a large contribution to the light absorbing properties of fog water.

  19. Utility fog: A universal physical substance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. Storrs

    1993-01-01

    Active, polymorphic material ('Utility Fog') can be designed as a conglomeration of 100-micron robotic cells ('foglets'). Such robots could be built with the techniques of molecular nanotechnology. Controllers with processing capabilities of 1000 MIPS per cubic micron, and electric motors with power densities of one milliwatt per cubic micron are assumed. Utility Fog should be capable of simulating most everyday materials, dynamically changing its form and properties, and forms a substrate for an integrated virtual reality and telerobotics.

  20. Persistent and Widespread Winter Haze & Fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains: A climatological perspective from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, R.

    2014-12-01

    Each year during winter season (December-January), dense fog engulfs the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) in southern Asia, for more than a month, disrupting daily life of millions of people inhabiting the IGP. The widespread nature of the fog is frequently visible in satellite imagery, extending over a stretch of ~1500 km; that covers parts of Pakistan, northern India, Nepal and Bangladesh. Both, haze and fog are a tightly-coupled system over the IGP, during winter months, and have been a major environmental/climatic issue since the past several decades. Trends in poor visibility suggest a significant increase in worsening air quality and foggy days over the IGP. The persistent and widespread nature of the winter haze and fog is strongly influenced by the regional meteorology during wintertime, i.e. a stable boundary layer, low temperatures, high relative humidity and light winds. The valley-type topography of the IGP, adjacent to the towering Himalaya, and high concentrations of pollution aerosols, further favors the persistence of hazy/foggy conditions. A satellite-based observational portrayal will be presented, using various cloud, aerosol and radiation datasets, to characterize the widespread nature of winter haze and fog, based on a multi-sensor assessment from MODIS, CERES, AVHRR and CALIPSO datasets. More specifically, based on these observations, we will present results on: long-term trends/variability of winter haze and fog, vertical characterization of aerosol/fog/low-clouds, as well as assessment of the direct radiative effect of the region-wide haze/fog system. Results from this work are anticipated to shed light on the overall interactions within the highly persistent and tightly-coupled haze-fog phenomena. Additionally, against the backdrop of a changing climate scenario, possible linkages between the winter-time fog cover, regional meteorology and aerosol loading will also be discussed over the IGP.

  1. Measuring mercury in coastal fog water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-04-01

    Mercury, a heavy metal neurotoxin, accumulates in sea life, in some cases reaching levels that make seafood unsafe for humans to eat. How mercury gets into aquatic organisms is debated, but part of the pathway could include mercury carried in precipitation, including rain, snow, and fog. The contribution of mercury in fog water in particular is not well known, especially in foggy coastal areas such as coastal California. To learn more, Weiss-Penzias et al. measured total mercury and monomethyl mercury concentrations in fog water and rainwater samples taken from four locations around Monterey Bay, California, during spring and summer 2011. They found that the mean monomethyl mercury concentrations in their fog water samples were about 34 times higher than the mean concentrations in their rainwater samples. Therefore, the authors believe that fog is an important, previously unrecognized source of mercury to coastal ecosystems. They also explored potential sources of mercury, finding that biotically formed monomethyl mercury from oceanic upwelling may contribute to monomethyl mercury in fog. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL050324, 2012)

  2. Web Interface for Modeling Fog Oil Dispersion During Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozar, Robert C.

    2002-08-01

    Predicting the dispersion of military camouflage training materials-Smokes and Obscurants (SO)-is a rapidly improving science. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) developed the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC), a software package that allows the modeling of the dispersion of several potentially detrimental materials. ERDC/CERL characterized the most commonly used SO material, fog oil in HPAC terminology, to predict the SO dispersion characteristics in various training scenarios that might have an effect on Threatened and Endangered Species (TES) at DoD installations. To make the configuration more user friendly, the researchers implemented an initial web-interface version of HPAC with a modifiable fog-oil component that can be applied at any installation in the world. By this method, an installation SO trainer can plan the location and time of fog oil training activities and is able to predict the degree to which various areas will be effected, particularly important in ensuring the appropriate management of TES on a DoD installation.

  3. Charged fog technology. Part I. Theoretical background and instrumentation development

    SciTech Connect

    Mathai, C.V.

    1983-07-01

    Waters sprays, the most common method of controlling dust in mines and from fugitive emission sources, do not control inhalable particles very effectively. Since most industrial pollutants and naturally occurring fugitive dust particles acquire electric charges as they are dispersed into the air, the inhalable particle control efficiency of water sprays can be significantly improved if the water droplets are also electrically charged to the opposite polarity. This paper reviews the basic principles of charged fog technology and describes a new charged fog generator which overcomes the problems of commercial charged fog devices. In the charged fog generator (CFG), water from a reservoir is introduced into a rotating cup where the water forms a thin layer due to centrifugal forces. As the water moves towards the lip of the cup, high speed air from an axial fan strikes the thin water film, breaks it into fine droplets and projects the droplets forward. The droplets thus generated have a typical mass median diameter of about 200 ..mu..m and a concentration median diameter of about 100 ..mu..m. The droplets are electrically charged by contact charging the inflowing water, providing a typical charge to mass ratio of 1.2 X 10/sup -6/ C/g with an applied voltage of about 15 kV. The water flow rate in the CFG can be varied from 4-70 L/h and the spray pattern can be easily adjusted to conform to the size and shape of the dust source to be treated. Other advantages of this device are that it uses only about 1 kW power, it is portable, and it is easily adaptable for use at remote areas where commerical electrical power supply is not available.

  4. Anti-fogging and anti-frosting behaviors of layer-by-layer assembled cellulose derivative thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibraen, Mahmoud H. M. A.; Yagoub, Hajo; Zhang, Xuejian; Xu, Jian; Yang, Shuguang

    2016-05-01

    Two cellulose derivatives, quaternized cellulose (QC) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), were layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled to prepare a thin film. QC was also LbL assembled with two synthetic polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), separately. The anti-fogging and anti-frosting properties of the assembled films were studied. QC/CMC thin film exhibits anti-fogging and anti-frosting behaviors, whereas QC/PAA and QC/PSS films do not have capacity for anti-fogging and anti-frosting. The anti-fogging and anti-frosting properties of QC/CMC film are attributed to that water molecules can be quickly adsorbed into the matrix of the film. The water adsorption of QC/CMC film was illustrated by the optical thickness increment.

  5. Friend of GATA (FOG) Interacts with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex (NuRD) to Support Primitive Erythropoiesis in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Mimoto, Mizuho S.; Christian, Jan L.

    2012-01-01

    Friend of GATA (FOG) plays many diverse roles in adult and embryonic hematopoiesis, however the mechanisms by which it functions and the roles of potential interaction partners are not completely understood. Previous work has shown that overexpression of FOG in Xenopus laevis causes loss of blood suggesting that in contrast to its role in mammals, FOG might normally function to repress erythropoiesis in this species. Using loss-of-function analysis, we demonstrate that FOG is essential to support primitive red blood cell (RBC) development in Xenopus. Moreover, we show that it is specifically required to prevent excess apoptosis of circulating primitive RBCs and that in the absence of FOG, the pro-apoptotic gene Bim-1 is strongly upregulated. To identify domains of FOG that are essential for blood development and, conversely, to begin to understand the mechanism by which overexpressed FOG represses primitive erythropoiesis, we asked whether FOG mutants that are unable to interact with known co-factors retain their ability to rescue blood formation in FOG morphants and whether they repress erythropoiesis when overexpressed in wild type embryos. We find that interaction of FOG with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase complex (NuRD), but not with C-terminal Binding Protein, is essential for normal primitive RBC development. In contrast, overexpression of all mutant and wild type constructs causes a comparable repression of primitive erythropoiesis. Together, our data suggest that a requirement for FOG and its interaction with NuRD during primitive erythropoiesis are conserved in Xenopus and that loss of blood upon FOG overexpression is due to a dominant-interfering effect. PMID:22235346

  6. Secondary organic aerosol formation in cloud and fog droplets: a literature evaluation of plausibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blando, James D.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    This paper investigates the hypothesis that cloud and fog processes produce fine organic particulate matter in the atmosphere. The evidence provided suggests that cloud and fog processes could be important contributors to secondary organic aerosol formation, and the contribution of this formation pathway should be further investigated. This conclusion is based on the following observations: (1) many organic vapors present in the atmosphere are sorbed by suspended droplets and have been measured in cloud and fog water, (2) organics participate in aqueous-phase reactions, and (3) organic particulate matter is sometimes found in the size mode attributed to cloud processing (i.e. the droplet mode). Specific compounds identified as potential precursors include aldehydes (e.g. formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and propionaldehyde), acetone, alcohols (e.g. methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and phenol), monocarboxylic acids, and organic peroxides. Carboxylic acids (e.g. diacids and oxo-acids), glyoxal, esters, organosulfur compounds, polyols, amines and amino acids are potential products of cloud and fog processing.

  7. "Keratolytic" effect of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Huber, C; Christophers, E

    1977-01-31

    The "keratolytic" effect of salicylic acid was examined in guinea-pig skin. Using a fluorescent staining method the str. corneum cells could be seen to rapidly become detached. The cellular walls remained unchanged. This drug therefore appears to primarily reduce the intercellular cohesiveness of the horny cells. PMID:319767

  8. Urban Air Pollution from Ethanol (E85) in the Presence of Aqueous Aerosols and Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginnebaugh, D. L.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    This is a study to examine the effect of ethanol (E85) versus gasoline on urban air pollution in the presence of aqueous aerosols and fog. In previous work, we analyzed the temperature-dependence of ethanol and gasoline exhaust chemistry and its impact on urban air pollution considering only gas-phase chemistry. We used the near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.1, LEEDS University) with the SMVGEAR II chemical ordinary differential solver to provide the speed necessary to simulate explicit chemistry. The MCM has over 13,500 organic reactions and 4,600 species. SMVGEAR II is a sparse-matrix Gear solver that reduces the computation time significantly while maintaining any specified accuracy. We found that the average ozone concentrations through the range of temperatures tested could be higher with E85 than with gasoline by up to 8 parts per billion volume (ppbv) at room temperature but much higher at cold temperatures and low sunlight (winter conditions) for a region with a high nitrogen oxide (NOx) to non-methane organic gases (NMOG) ratio. We also found that the solution to chemistry in a 3-D urban airshed model was practical. We now extend our study to include aqueous chemistry in the presence of aerosols and fog. We combine the Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism, CAPRAM 3.0 with the MCM 3.1 and gas-particle transfer in box model calculations. CAPRAM treats aqueous phase chemistry among 390 species and 829 reactions (including 51 gas-to-aqueous phase reactions). We investigate the impact aqueous reactions have on unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde mixing ratios in the atmosphere in particular because acetaldehyde is an ozone precursor and carcinogen, and aqueous oxidation has potential to speed the conversion of unburned ethanol to acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde also forms acetic acid in aqueous solution. Acetic acid vapor is an eye, nose, and lung irritant, so both species contribute negatively to human health. We look at the impact of aerosol

  9. 7. Fog signal house and shed, view south, north and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Fog signal house and shed, view south, north and west sides of fog signal house, northeast and northwest sides of shed - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  10. Physical ecology of hypolithic communities in the central Namib Desert: The role of fog, rain, rock habitat, and light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Rhodes, Kimberley A.; McKay, Christopher P.; Boyle, Linda Ng; Wing, Michael R.; Kiekebusch, Elsita M.; Cowan, Don A.; Stomeo, Francesca; Pointing, Stephen B.; Kaseke, Kudzai F.; Eckardt, Frank; Henschel, Joh R.; Anisfeld, Ari; Seely, Mary; Rhodes, Kevin L.

    2013-12-01

    microbial communities are productive niches in deserts worldwide, but many facets of their basic ecology remain unknown. The Namib Desert is an important site for hypolith study because it has abundant quartz rocks suitable for colonization and extends west to east across a transition from fog- to rain-dominated moisture sources. We show that fog sustains and impacts hypolithic ecology in several ways, as follows: (1) fog effectively replaces rainfall in the western zone of the central Namib to enable high (≥95%) hypolithic abundance at landscape (1-10 km) and larger scales; and (2) high water availability, through fog (western zone) and/or rainfall (eastern zone), results in smaller size-class rocks being colonized (mean 6.3 ± 1.2 cm) at higher proportions (e.g., 98% versus approximately 3%) than in previously studied hyperarid deserts. We measured 0.1% of incident sunlight as the lower limit for hypolithic growth on quartz rocks in the Namib and found that uncolonized ventral rock surfaces were limited by light rather than moisture. In situ monitoring showed that although rainfall supplied more liquid water (36 h) per event than fog (mean 4 h), on an equivalent annual basis, fog provided nearly twice as much liquid water as rainfall to the hypolithic zone. Hypolithic abundance reaches 100% at a mean annual precipitation (MAP) of approximately 40-60 mm, but at a much lower MAP (approximately 25 mm) when moisture from fog is available.

  11. Evaluation of Visual Characteristic in Dense Fog using Landolt Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Takamatsu, Mamoru; Nakashima, Yoshio

    Our visual characteristics are affected by various visual environments. In this experiment, we examine how things look in a dense fog. Namely, 4 subjects evaluated their eyesight in a fog of four kinds of particle diameters using colored-landolt ring. Yellow color was given the best eyesight in a dense fog. In other words, under such visual environment, yellow visibility was the best. This tendency was remarkable as the diameter of a fog particle became small.

  12. Anti-fog composition. [for prevention of fogging on surfaces such as space helmet visors and windshields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, H. D.; Carmin, D. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An anti-fog composition is described for the prevention of fogging on surfaces such as space helmet visors, spacecraft windows, and windshields. It is composed of a surface active agent, water, and an oil time extender.

  13. Acid rain: effects on fish and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.S.; Multer, E.P.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The following questions concerning acid rain are discussed: what is acid rain; what causes acid rain; where do sulfur and nitrogen oxides originate; what areas in the U.S. are susceptible to acid rain; are there early warning signals of acidification to aquatic resources; how does acid rain affect fishery resources; does acid rain affect wildlife; and how can effects of acid rain be reduced.

  14. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  15. Mosquito flight failure in heavy fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Telljohann, Luke; Thornton, Lee-Ellen; Moyer, Caitlin; Hu, David

    2012-11-01

    Mosquitoes thrive during rainfall and high humidity. We previously found that mosquitoes are successful fliers through rainfall. Heavy fog, consisting of drops three orders of magnitude smaller in mass than raindrops, presents an environment in which mosquitoes cannot maintain flight. Through high-speed videography, we observe mosquitoes reduce wingbeat frequency in heavy fog, but retain the ability to generate sufficient force to lift their bodies, even after significant dew deposition. They are unable, however, to maintain an upright position required for sustainable flight. A mosquito's primary flight control mechanism is its halteres, small knobbed structures evolved from the hind wings, which flap anti-phase with the wings and provide gyroscopic feedback through Coriolis forces. Though the halteres are hydrophobic, repeated collisions with 10-micron fog particles hinders flight control, leading to flight failure.

  16. Advection fog formation in a polluted atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, R.J.; Liaw, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ have been detected in highly industrialized areas. The major portions of aerosol products are the results of energy related fuel combustion. Both microphysical and macrophysical processes are considered in investigating the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with both polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results show that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog with condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere for monodisperse distribution.

  17. Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Nitrate and Sulfate in Fog and River water in Podocarpus National Forest, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, L. A.; Fabian, P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    The eastern slopes of the Andean rainforests of Ecuador possess some of the highest plant biodiversity found on the planet; however, these ecosystems are in jeopardy because region is experiences one of the highest deforestation rates in South America. This rainforest characterized by high acidity and low nutrient soils and experiences natural process which are both destabilizing and stabilizing to biodiversity rendering this a unique, though sensitive environment. There is increased concern that anthropogenic activities are affecting rainforests and could lead to higher extinction rates, changes in the biodiversity and far reaching effects on the global troposphere. Measurements of nitrate and sulfate in rain and fog water have shown periods of elevated concentrations in the Podocarpus National Park near Loja, Ecuador. These high episodes contribute to annual deposition rates that are comparable to polluted central Europe. Significant anthropogenic sources near this region are lacking and it is believed that the majority of the nitrate and sulfate pollution can be attributed to biomass burning in the Amazon basin. Concentration measurements do not elucidate the source of high nitrate and sulfate pollution; however, by measuring all three stable isotopes of oxygen in nitrate and sulfate from fog and river water provides a new way to examine the impacts of biomass burning on the region. By using stable isotope techniques atmospheric nitrate and sulfate can be resolved from terrestrial sources. This provides an unique way to trace the contributions from the biomass burning and farming sources. Current research at the field station monitors sulfate and nitrate concentrations in rain and fog water by standard methods to investigate water and nutrient pathways along with data from satellite and ground based remote sensing, in-situ observations and numerical models.

  18. The wavelength dependent model of extinction in fog and haze for free space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Martin; Kvicera, Vaclav

    2011-02-14

    The wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient in fog and haze is investigated using Mie single scattering theory. It is shown that the effective radius of drop size distribution determines the slope of the log-log dependence of the extinction on wavelengths in the interval between 0.2 and 2 microns. The relation between the atmospheric visibility and the effective radius is derived from the empirical relationship of liquid water content and extinction. Based on these results, the model of the relationship between visibility and the extinction coefficient with different effective radii for fog and for haze conditions is proposed. PMID:21369160

  19. 20 years of KVH fiber optic gyro technology: the evolution from large, low performance FOGs to compact, precise FOGs and FOG-based inertial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are critical components for an array of platforms and applications ranging from stabilization and pointing orientation of payloads and platforms to navigation and control for unmanned and autonomous systems. In addition, FOG-based inertial systems provide extremely accurate data for geo-referencing systems. Significant improvements in the performance of FOGs and FOG-based inertial systems at KVH are due, in large part, to advancements in the design and manufacture of optical fiber, as well as in manufacturing operations and signal processing. Open loop FOGs, such as those developed and manufactured by KVH Industries, offer tactical-grade performance in a robust, small package. The success of KVH FOGs and FOG-based inertial systems is due to innovations in key fields, including the development of proprietary D-shaped fiber with an elliptical core, and KVH's unique ThinFiber. KVH continually improves its FOG manufacturing processes and signal processing, which result in improved accuracies across its entire FOG product line. KVH acquired its FOG capabilities, including its patented E•Core fiber, when the company purchased Andrew Corporation's Fiber Optic Group in 1997. E•Core fiber is unique in that the light-guiding core - critical to the FOG's performance - is elliptically shaped. The elliptical core produces a fiber that has low loss and high polarization-maintaining ability. In 2010, KVH developed its ThinFiber, a 170-micron diameter fiber that retains the full performance characteristics of E•Core fiber. ThinFiber has enabled the development of very compact, high-performance open-loop FOGs, which are also used in a line of FOG-based inertial measurement units and inertial navigation systems.

  20. Extreme haze pollution in Beijing during January 2013: chemical characteristics, formation mechanism and role of fog processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Q.; Fu, J. S.; Lin, Y.; Liu, T.; Han, L.; Deng, C.

    2014-03-01

    Severe haze hovered over large areas of China in January 2013 right after the public release of PM2.5 data of major cities in China at the very first time. This historical severe haze emerged over the northern China with monthly average concentrations of PM2.5, SO2, and NO2 exceeding 225, 200, and 80 μg m-3, respectively. Surface aerosol mean concentration of Beijing in January 2013 reached record high (only slightly lower than 2006) compared to historical data from 2003-2012, but with the largest daily fluctuation. Anomalous meteorological conditions in 2013 compared to the mean climatology from 2007-2012 were especially favorable for the formation of haze, such as higher humidity, lower temperature, lower PBL height, lower wind speed, and the high frequency of fog occurrences. The field campaign in Beijing showed an extremely high PM2.5 average concentration of 299.2 ± 79.1μg m-3 with extremely low visibility of 0.92 ± 0.82 km during an episode of high relative humidity with fog events. High AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) was observed during fog days but with relatively low Angstrom exponent (< 1.0), suggesting the modification of fog processing on the particle size. Major aerosol chemical species, such as SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+, and C2O42- presented an explicit exponential growth relationship with relative humidity, suggesting the significant impact of aerosol hygroscopicity on the visibility impairment. SO42- increased ∼5 folds while NO3-, NH4+, and C2O42- increased ∼3 folds in the fog days compared to the non-fog days. Aerosol in fog days was much more acidic than that in non-fog days. The in situ aerosol pH ranged from -0.78 to 0.14 in fog days based on the E-AIM model simulation. Bisulfate (HSO42-) accounted for 52% of the total sulfate and free hydrogen ion (H+Aq) accounted for 27% of the total acids in average. Enhanced coal combustion during the winter heating season along with traffic and industrial emissions were recognized to be the major

  1. The ac and dc performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S. ); Cherney, E.A. ); Hackam, R. )

    1988-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the dc performance of polymeric insulating materials in a fog chamber. The materials evaluated in fog produced from low (250 ..mu..S/cm) and high (1000 ..mu..S/cm) conductivity water include cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of either alumina trihydrate (ATH) or silica fillers, or both. Comparison is made of material performance obtained with ac which was reported in an earlier study. In both low and high conductivity fog, the time to failure with ac and +dc was very similar, but a reduction by a factor of about four was observed in the time to failure with -dc. For both ac and dc, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples in low conductivity fog, while the order of performance was reversed in high conductivity fog. A theoretical model to determine the effect of dry band discharges on material is presented. Good agreement of the predicted behavior of materials with the experimental findings is shown.

  2. Brain "fog," inflammation and obesity: key aspects of neuropsychiatric disorders improved by luteolin.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Stewart, Julia M; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Kolaitis, Gerasimos

    2015-01-01

    Brain "fog" is a constellation of symptoms that include reduced cognition, inability to concentrate and multitask, as well as loss of short and long term memory. Brain "fog" characterizes patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), celiac disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, mastocytosis, and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), as well as "minimal cognitive impairment," an early clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain "fog" may be due to inflammatory molecules, including adipocytokines and histamine released from mast cells (MCs) further stimulating microglia activation, and causing focal brain inflammation. Recent reviews have described the potential use of natural flavonoids for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. The flavone luteolin has numerous useful actions that include: anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, microglia inhibition, neuroprotection, and memory increase. A liposomal luteolin formulation in olive fruit extract improved attention in children with ASDs and brain "fog" in mastocytosis patients. Methylated luteolin analogs with increased activity and better bioavailability could be developed into effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders and brain "fog." PMID:26190965

  3. Experiment of polarization transmission characteristics and polarization imaging in simulation smoke/fog environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jin; Zhan, Juntong; Zhang, Su; Zhao, Changxia; Peng, Jie; Lei, Yi; Fu, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    In light transmission processing, light is effected by the fog/haze/smoke/dust environment usually. Thus reduce the capability of traditional photo-electric instrument in detection, transmission, imaging, because of the attenuation, scattering, absorbing of the atmosphere. Polarization transmission characteristics exist the potential possibility in observing object through fog and smoke, increasing observation distance, improve the environment adaptability of the photo-electric instrument. The influence of polarization transmission characteristics are analyzed by environment testing experiment in this paper, including light intensity, degree of polarization, angle of polarization etc. We research smoke and fog environment simulation technology, builds the process-controlled and parameter-measured indoor equipment to simulate smoke/fog environment. The experiments of the polarization characteristic are tested in two kinds of transmission mediums separately, which are water fog and oil smoke. The attenuation ratio is measured in different kinds of smoke concentrations. Polarization imaging experiment are tested separately in different kinds of illuminance lights, which are daylight lamp, LED lights and projector lights. The images are captured by imaging CCD with linearly polarized filters on degree 0, 60, 120. The polarization images on three directions are processed by image infuse algorithm. The experiment results are provided as the theory foundation and data reference in field of polarization transmission.

  4. Warm fog dissipation using large volume water sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Vernon W. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    To accomplish the removal of warm fog about an area such as an airport runway, a plurality of nozzles along a line adjacent the area propelled water jets through the fog to heights of approximately twenty-five meters. Each water jet breaks up forming a water drop size distribution that falls through the fog overtaking, colliding, and coalescing with individual fog droplets and thereby removes the fog. A water retrieval system is used to collect the water and return it to reservoirs for pumping it to the nozzles once again.

  5. Chemical composition of fog water in Nanjing area of China and its related fog microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunsong; Niu, Shengjie; Tang, Lili; Lv, Jingjing; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin

    2010-07-01

    Fog samples were collected at Pancheng in the Nanjing area of China during December 2006 and December 2007. Fog droplet spectra, surface meteorological elements and visibility were also measured during the same period. The data from PM 10, SO 2 and NO 2 measurements were obtained from the air quality monitoring networks of Nanjing. The total ionic concentration (TIC) and electrical conductivity (EC) in fog samples, and the local pollutant emissions were one or two orders of magnitude higher than those found in Europe or South America for instance. Pollutants were expected to be mainly from local sources, including factories, plants, freeways, soil sources, house construction, and biomass burning. Advection also contributed to pollution levels in radiation-advection fogs. The scavenging of NH 3 and coarse particles by fog droplets was the main cause for the high mean pH value of 5.9. In-phase temporal evolution of TIC, [SO 42-], [NO 3-], SO 2, NO 2, PM 10 and S/LWC (S: the surface area of fog droplets per unit volume of air; LWC: liquid water content) was found to be due to the interaction of air pollutants and fog droplets, change of air mass due to advection, and so on. S/LWC seemed to be a better indicator for describing the relationship between TIC and microphysics with respect to LWC. A formula between TIC and S/LWC was derived and the related parameters were discussed. Depositions of chemical species in fog cases were estimated and the result showed that deposition was efficient.

  6. FOG Random Drift Signal Denoising Based on the Improved AR Model and Modified Sage-Husa Adaptive Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Yiting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the influence of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) random drift error on inertial navigation systems, an improved auto regressive (AR) model is put forward in this paper. First, based on real-time observations at each restart of the gyroscope, the model of FOG random drift can be established online. In the improved AR model, the FOG measured signal is employed instead of the zero mean signals. Then, the modified Sage-Husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF) is introduced, which can directly carry out real-time filtering on the FOG signals. Finally, static and dynamic experiments are done to verify the effectiveness. The filtering results are analyzed with Allan variance. The analysis results show that the improved AR model has high fitting accuracy and strong adaptability, and the minimum fitting accuracy of single noise is 93.2%. Based on the improved AR(3) model, the denoising method of SHAKF is more effective than traditional methods, and its effect is better than 30%. The random drift error of FOG is reduced effectively, and the precision of the FOG is improved. PMID:27420062

  7. FOG Random Drift Signal Denoising Based on the Improved AR Model and Modified Sage-Husa Adaptive Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Yiting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce the influence of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) random drift error on inertial navigation systems, an improved auto regressive (AR) model is put forward in this paper. First, based on real-time observations at each restart of the gyroscope, the model of FOG random drift can be established online. In the improved AR model, the FOG measured signal is employed instead of the zero mean signals. Then, the modified Sage-Husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF) is introduced, which can directly carry out real-time filtering on the FOG signals. Finally, static and dynamic experiments are done to verify the effectiveness. The filtering results are analyzed with Allan variance. The analysis results show that the improved AR model has high fitting accuracy and strong adaptability, and the minimum fitting accuracy of single noise is 93.2%. Based on the improved AR(3) model, the denoising method of SHAKF is more effective than traditional methods, and its effect is better than 30%. The random drift error of FOG is reduced effectively, and the precision of the FOG is improved. PMID:27420062

  8. Observational Study and Parameterization of Aerosol-fog Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.; Guo, X.; Liu, Y.; Fang, C.; Su, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that human activities such as increased aerosols affect fog occurrence and properties significantly, and accurate numerical fog forecasting depends on, to a large extent, parameterization of fog microphysics and aerosol-fog interactions. Furthermore, fogs can be considered as clouds near the ground, and enjoy an advantage of permitting comprehensive long-term in-situ measurements that clouds do not. Knowledge learned from studying aerosol-fog interactions will provide useful insights into aerosol-cloud interactions. To serve the twofold objectives of understanding and improving parameterizations of aerosol-fog interactions and aerosol-cloud interactions, this study examines the data collected from fogs, with a focus but not limited to the data collected in Beijing, China. Data examined include aerosol particle size distributions measured by a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X), fog droplet size distributions measured by a Fog Monitor (FM-120), Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), liquid water path measured by radiometers and visibility sensors, along with meteorological variables measured by a Tethered Balloon Sounding System (XLS-Ⅱ) and Automatic Weather Station (AWS). The results will be compared with low-level clouds for similarities and differences between fogs and clouds.

  9. Demonstration of a new method for dispersing warm fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Burns, R. A.; Lala, G. G.; Meyer, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Low visibility due to warm fog has caused costly disruptions in the case of aircraft schedules, and fog-related difficulties can arise in connection with Space Shuttle flights. As current methods of fog elimination are not entirely satisfactory, Kelley (1983) has proposed a new brute force procedure for warm fog dispersal. This procedure makes use of recycled water sprays. Fog droplets are removed by coalescence/rainout. Details regarding the involved approaches are described, and a demonstration of the method is discussed. Attention is given to tests conducted in October 1984, visual range improvement in response of water spray fog dispersal, a systematic investigation concerning a selection of firefighting nozzles, and histograms of fog droplet number concentration measured in the spray curtain outflow with a forward scattering spectrometer probe.

  10. The Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling (FRAM) field project: visibility analysis and remote sensing of fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, I.; Minnis, P.; Milbrandt, J.; Cober, S. G.; Nguyen, L.; Flynn, C.; Hansen, B.

    2008-08-01

    The main objective of this work is to describe a research project on fog and visibility, and to summarize the results. The Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling (FRAM) project was designed to focus on 1) development of microphysical parameterizations for model applications, 2) development of remote sensing methods for fog nowcasting/forecasting, 3) understanding of issues related to instrument capabilities and improvement of the analysis, and 4) integration of model data with observations. The FRAM was conducted over three regions of Canada and US. These locations were: 1) Center for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE), Egbert, Ontario 2005-2006, 2) Lunenburg, Nova Scotia June of 2006 and 2007, and 3) U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) ARM Climate Research Facility at Barrow, Alaska, US during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) field program April of 2008; FRAM C, FRAM-L, and ISDAC-FRAM-B, respectively. FRAM-C was undertaken in a continental fog environment while FRAM-L was in a marine environment. The FRAM-B was undertaken to study ice fog conditions. During the project, numerous in-situ measurements were obtained, including droplet and aerosol spectra, precipitation, and visibility. Analysis of satellite microphysical retrievals and visibility parameterizations suggested that improved scientific understanding of fog formation can lead to better forecasting/nowcasting skills benefiting both aviation and public forecasting applications.

  11. Holographic Imaging In Dense Artificial Fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Marzwell, Neville

    1996-01-01

    Artificial fog serves as volume-projection medium for display of three-dimensional image. Projection technique enables display of images for variety of purposes, possibly including entertainment, indoor and outdoor advertising, medical diagnostics and image representations for surgical procedures, and education.

  12. Tailored fog climatology for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leander, R.

    2010-07-01

    Like many airports, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is vulnerable to climate change. The airport is situated in a complex and fragile urban area where fundamental changes take place in design and use of the region. To maintain its competitive position, the airport is beginning to respond to changes in weather and climate by formulating adaptation strategies, based on tailored climate information. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (AAS) and Air Trafic Control the Netherlands (LVNL) are working together to provide just that type of information. Due to safety regulations, reduced horizontal visibility on airports can have an immediate impact on the availability of runways and hence the airport capacity. Fog is therefore one of the most relevant meteorological phenomena to airport operations. A study has started in which the statistics of fog occurrence and visibility at Amsterdam Airport are assessed. The aim is describing the current climate (from 1970 onward) as well as making projections into the future (up to 2040). For the latter, the identification and attribution of trends is relevant. Another point of interrest is the spatial pattern of fog potential over the airport, in particular the related questions whether some runways are more prone to fog occurrence than others and whether these runways require a separate forecast. To answer these questions it is crucial to distinguish between large-scale and local influences. The preliminary results of this study are presented here.

  13. Musings on Willower's "Fog": A Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick

    1998-01-01

    Professor Willower complains about the "fog" encountered in postmodernist literature and the author's two articles in "Journal of School Leadership." On closer examination, this miasma is simply the mildew on Willower's Cartesian glasses. Educational administration continues to substitute management and business fads for any real effort to create…

  14. Polymer insulator profiles evaluated in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Cherney, E.A. ); Hackam, R. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper presents the results of fog chamber experiments done to examine the tracking and erosion performance of polymer insulator profiles. The effect of weathershed material, construction, orientation, and ac and dc voltage are examined. Correlation between cylindrical rod specimens of materials and insulator profiles is shown. The protected leakage path provided by the weathershed is found to play a major role in the tracking and erosion performance of polymer insulators. The resistance to tracking and erosion of insulator profiles with dc is shown to be reduced in comparison to ac. Cylindrical rods of material yielded the same ranking of material performance as insulator profiles but in a shorter time.

  15. Exposure standard for fog oil. Technical report, Dec 89-Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, W.G.

    1990-11-15

    Effects of mineral oils in animals and humans are evaluated and serve as the basis for the development of an exposure standard for fog oil. Considered are health hazards associated with fog oil purchased before and after the Military Specification was amended in April 1986 to exclude carcinogens. While repeated exposure to conventionally-refined mineral oils may cause pulmonary disease as well as severe dermatoses and cancer of the skin and scrotum, lipoid pneumonia is the major health hazard associated with highly refined mineral oils such as fog oils purchased after April 1986. While the course of lipoid pneumonia can be asymptomatic in some individuals, in others its symptoms can range from occasional cough to severe, debilitating dyspnea and pulmonary illness, occasionally ending in death.

  16. Fog Events at Maceio Airport on the Northern Coast of Brazil During 2002-2005 and 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, Natalia; Levit, Vladimir; de Souza, José Leonaldo; Silva, Aliton Oliveira; Afonso, Joao M. Sousa; Teodoro, Iedo

    2015-10-01

    There were eight fog events in five years at Maceio international airport on the northern coast of Brazil, and all were analyzed. Fog duration was short and its intensity was weak or moderate. The principal objectives of the study were: (1) analysis of the physical processes of fog formation (synoptic and thermodynamic conditions and processes), (2) PAFOG model testing, and (3) estimation of the effect of vegetation on fog forecast. Cyclonic curvature and divergence of the air current over the ocean at low levels and anticyclonic curvature at high levels were associated with the fog. Weak lifting at low levels was identified by the NCEP/DOE II, ECMWF, and WRF models for all eight events. Sinking at high levels was dominant in the ECMWF and WRF models. Absence of thermal inversion and conditional instability at low levels was identified by the NCEP/DOE II and ECMWF models. According to the WRF model a typical temperature profile during fog comprises three layers: (1) a very thin layer (up to 166 m, 985 hPa) of temperature inversion with very high humidity; (2) a conditional layer of instability from 985-860 hPa; and (3) a dry and stable layer above 860 hPa. Moderate fog with visibility between 200 and 300 m was associated with ocean cooling whereas weak fog was associated with ocean warming. A warm oscillation on the sea surface near the Brazilian northeast was observed for all fog events. It was found there was colder air over the warmer water near the coast. Weak confluence in troughs at low levels contributes to weak lifting at low levels. This current creates conditions resulting in humidity increase. A warmer sea surface contributes to more evaporation and, as a consequence, increases the amount of water vapor in the surrounding air at low levels near the coast. The PAFOG model was used to forecast the fog for three events (i.e., for all cases possible), and was satisfactory for two cases. Satisfactory results for fog duration and intensity were obtained with 9

  17. Pulmonary epithelial permeability after inhaling saline, distilled water ''fog'' and cold air

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, C.; Chamberlain, A.; Barber, B.; Higenbottam, T.

    1985-03-01

    It is recognized that hyperventilation of cold air and the inhalation of fine mists of distilled water provoke significant bronchoconstriction in the asthmatic individual, yet little is known as to how these provocations affect the structural integrity of the alveolar epithelial membrane. In 11 normal subjects, the following effects have been studied: cold air hyperventilation for three minutes, inhalation of 80 L of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water ''fog,'' and 80 L of isotonic saline ''fog'' on the half time clearance (T1/2) from the alveoli of technetium 99m diethylene triamine pentaacetate (DTPA), inhaled as an aerosol. The DTPA T1/2 provided a measurement of pulmonary epithelial permeability.

  18. Gaseous and aerosol pollutants during fog and clear episodes in South Asian urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. F.; Ghauri, Badar M.; Husain, Liaquat

    We report the first measurements of acidic gases and ammonia (NH 3) during fog and clear episodes in Lahore, a highly polluted mega-city of South Asia, along with concentrations of PM 2.5 (particles of <2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) and ions. An annular denuder system was used to measure acidic gases, NH 3, and PM 2.5 from December 2005 to February 2006 in Lahore, a mega-city in Pakistan. The denuders yielded average concentrations (μg m -3) as follows: ammonia, 50; nitrous acid, 19.6; sulfur dioxide, 19.4; hydrochloric acid, 1.16; nitric acid, 1.00; and oxalic acid, 0.6. The filters yielded average concentrations (μg m -3): PM 2.5, 209; sulfate, 19.2; nitrate, 18.9; chloride, 7.43; oxalate, 0.97; ammonium, 16.1; potassium, 3.49; calcium, 0.89; sodium, 0.76; and magnesium, 0.08. Emissions from local sources, e.g., fossil fuel consumption by motorized transport and power plants, farming, burning of agricultural residues, industrial and construction activities contributed the major proportion of pollutants in Lahore. Concentrations of ionic species, e.g., NO 3-, SO 42-, Na +, NH 4+, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+, and gaseous species, e.g., HCl, HNO 3, SO 2 and (COOH) 2 showed a distinct diurnal variation. Mixing heights and photochemistry played major roles in defining the diurnal pattern. Fog appeared to profoundly enhance the oxidation of sulfur dioxide. High moisture content of fog resulted in uptake of the gases in fog droplets.

  19. Coalescence of fog droplets: Differential fog water deposition on wet and dry forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobón, C.; Barrero, J.

    2010-07-01

    The Páramo ecosystem is a high-altitude (2800 - 4500 masl), natural ecosystems which comprises approximately 42000 km2, extending across the Andes from north of Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and western part of Venezuela. Andean páramos are widely considered to be prime suppliers of large volumes of high-quality water for large cities and for hydropower production. As páramos tend to be subjected to persistent fog incidence, fog interception by the vegetation is a common process in these ecosystems, representing not only an extra input of water to the ecosystem but also to suppress evaporation. In this process, small drops of water, transported by the wind, are captured by the surfaces of the vegetation, acting as physical obstacles to the flow of fog. These drops condense in the exposed surfaces and drip towards the ground or evaporate from the surfaces. The quantification of the magnitude of these processes is important for the quantification of the water balance of river basins where these types of ecosystems exist. Although the great hydrological importance of fog in montane tropical ecosystems little is known about its physical principles related to the interception of fog by physical barriers as vegetation, notably the differential behaviour of a wet and dry vegetation in the efficiency of capturing water from the fog. To characterize and quantify this efficiency of páramo vegetation in capturing water from the fog, during wet and dry canopy conditions, an experimental design was set up at the Páramo de Chingaza (Colombia) where paired samples of espeletia branches (dry and wet) were exposed to different fog events, and at the same time Juvik cylinders were exposed by the side of the experimental site, to measured fog inputs. Cylinders were also paired (wet and dry) at the beginning of the experiments. Results indicated that exposed wet and dry samples have a significant difference on the magnitude of water intercepted from the fog, being, in average, the wet

  20. Effects of simulated acidic rain on one species each of Pseudoparmelia, Usunea, and umbilicaria

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, L.L.; Johnston, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The lichens Pseudoparmelia caperata (L.) Hale, Usnea of subfusca Stirt., and Umbilicaria mammulata (Ach.) Tuck. were exposed to simulated acidic rain with pH levels of 2.3, 3.0, 3.3, 4.3, or 5.6 and other ions in concentrations normally found in rain in the eastern United States. The pH levels of the most-acidic treatments (3.3, 3.0, 2.3) were similar to those found in fog, cloud water, and occasional rainfall events. The pH 4.3 and 5.6 treatments compared to average ambient conditions in the eastern and western United States, respectively, and caused no significant effects on photosynthesis. However, after the first week of treatment, significant effects of rain pH at the most-acidic treatments on gross photosynthesis were detected in P. caperata and U. mammulata, but not in U. of subfusca. Visible effects of injury were also observed and included bleaching, necrotic spots, and necrotic margins, which resembled damage seen in field populations of U. mammulata, the most-sensitive species.

  1. Referenceless Prediction of Perceptual Fog Density and Perceptual Image Defogging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Lark Kwon; You, Jaehee; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2015-11-01

    We propose a referenceless perceptual fog density prediction model based on natural scene statistics (NSS) and fog aware statistical features. The proposed model, called Fog Aware Density Evaluator (FADE), predicts the visibility of a foggy scene from a single image without reference to a corresponding fog-free image, without dependence on salient objects in a scene, without side geographical camera information, without estimating a depth-dependent transmission map, and without training on human-rated judgments. FADE only makes use of measurable deviations from statistical regularities observed in natural foggy and fog-free images. Fog aware statistical features that define the perceptual fog density index derive from a space domain NSS model and the observed characteristics of foggy images. FADE not only predicts perceptual fog density for the entire image, but also provides a local fog density index for each patch. The predicted fog density using FADE correlates well with human judgments of fog density taken in a subjective study on a large foggy image database. As applications, FADE not only accurately assesses the performance of defogging algorithms designed to enhance the visibility of foggy images, but also is well suited for image defogging. A new FADE-based referenceless perceptual image defogging, dubbed DEnsity of Fog Assessment-based DEfogger (DEFADE) achieves better results for darker, denser foggy images as well as on standard foggy images than the state of the art defogging methods. A software release of FADE and DEFADE is available online for public use: http://live.ece.utexas.edu/research/fog/index.html. PMID:26186784

  2. An analysis of fog events at Belgrade International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljović, Katarina; Vujović, Dragana; Lazić, Lazar; Vučković, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary study of the occurrence of fog at Belgrade "Nikola Tesla" Airport was carried out using a statistical approach. The highest frequency of fog has occurred in the winter months of December and January and far exceeded the number of fog days in the spring and the beginning of autumn. The exceptionally foggy months, those having an extreme number of foggy days, occurred in January 1989 (18 days), December 1998 (18 days), February 2005 (17 days) and October 2001 (15 days). During the winter months (December, January and February) from 1990 to 2005 (16 years), fog occurred most frequently between 0600 and 1000 hours, and in the autumn, between 0500 and 0800 hours. In summer, fog occurred most frequently between 0300 and 0600 hours. During the 11-year period from 1995 to 2005, it was found that there was a 13 % chance for fog to occur on two consecutive days and a 5 % chance that it would occur 3 days in a row. In October 2001, the fog was observed over nine consecutive days. During the winter half year, 52.3 % of fog events observed at 0700 hours were in the presence of stratus clouds and 41.4 % were without the presence of low clouds. The 6-h cooling observed at the surface preceding the occurrence of fog between 0000 and 0700 hours ranged mainly from 1 to 4 °C. A new method was applied to assess the probability of fog occurrence based on complex fog criteria. It was found that the highest probability of fog occurrence (51.2 %) takes place in the cases in which the relative humidity is above 97 %, the dew-point depression is 0 °C, the cloud base is lower than 50 m and the wind is calm or weak 1 h before the onset of fog.

  3. The effects of simulated fog and motion on simulator sickness in a driving simulator and the duration of after-effects.

    PubMed

    Dziuda, Lukasz; Biernacki, Marcin P; Baran, Paulina M; Truszczyński, Olaf E

    2014-05-01

    In the study, we checked: 1) how the simulator test conditions affect the severity of simulator sickness symptoms; 2) how the severity of simulator sickness symptoms changes over time; and 3) whether the conditions of the simulator test affect the severity of these symptoms in different ways, depending on the time that has elapsed since the performance of the task in the simulator. We studied 12 men aged 24-33 years (M = 28.8, SD = 3.26) using a truck simulator. The SSQ questionnaire was used to assess the severity of the symptoms of simulator sickness. Each of the subjects performed three 30-minute tasks running along the same route in a driving simulator. Each of these tasks was carried out in a different simulator configuration: A) fixed base platform with poor visibility; B) fixed base platform with good visibility; and C) motion base platform with good visibility. The measurement of the severity of the simulator sickness symptoms took place in five consecutive intervals. The results of the analysis showed that the simulator test conditions affect in different ways the severity of the simulator sickness symptoms, depending on the time which has elapsed since performing the task on the simulator. The simulator sickness symptoms persisted at the highest level for the test conditions involving the motion base platform. Also, when performing the tasks on the motion base platform, the severity of the simulator sickness symptoms varied depending on the time that had elapsed since performing the task. Specifically, the addition of motion to the simulation increased the oculomotor and disorientation symptoms reported as well as the duration of the after-effects. PMID:23726466

  4. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  5. Evaluation of trace elements contamination in cloud/fog water at an elevated mountain site in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-huan; Wai, Ka-ming; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jie; Li, Peng-hui; Guo, Jia; Xu, Peng-ju; Wang, Wen-xing

    2012-07-01

    Totally 117 cloud/fog water samples were collected at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534m a.s.l.)-the highest mountain in the Northern China Plain. The results were investigated by a combination of techniques including back trajectory model, regional air quality and dust storm models, satellite observations and Principal Component Analysis. Elemental concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, with stringent quality control measures. Higher elemental concentrations were found at Mt. Tai compared with those reported by other overseas studies. The larger proportions and higher concentrations of toxic elements such as Pb and As in cloud/fog water compared with those in rainwater at Mt. Tai suggests higher potential hazards of cloud/fog water as a source of contamination in polluted areas to the ecosystem. Peak concentrations of trace elements were frequently observed during the onset of cloud/fog events when liquid water contents of cloud/fog water were usually low and large amount of pollutants were accumulated in the ambient air. Inverse relationship between elemental concentrations and liquid water contents were only found in the samples with high electrical conductivities and liquid water contents lower than 0.3gm(-3). Affected mainly by the emissions of steel industries and mining activities, air masses transported from south/southwest of Mt. Tai were frequently associated with higher elemental concentrations. The element Mn is attributed to play an important role in the acidity of cloud/fog water. The composition of cloud/fog water influenced by an Asian dust storm event was reported, which was seldom found in the literature. PMID:22503636

  6. Extinction of Light during the Fog Life Cycle: a Result from the ParisFog Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, T.; Haeffelin, M.; Drobinski, P.

    2009-03-11

    Data set acquired by five particle-dedicated instruments set up on the SIRTA experimental site during the ParisFog field campaign are exploited to document microphysical properties of particles contributing to extinction of visible radiation in variable situations. The case study is a 48-hour period when atmospheric conditions are highly variable: relative humidity changes between 50 and 100%, visibility ranges between 35000 and 65 m, the site is either downwind Paris area either under maritime influence. A dense and homogeneous fog formed by radiative cooling during the 18-19 February night. In 7 hours, visibility decreases from 26 000 m to 65 m, because of transported pollution (factor 3 in visibility reduction), aerosol hydration (factor 20) and aerosol activation (factor 6). According to Mie theory, extinction in clear-sky polluted and unpolluted regimes is due equally to Aitken and accumulation modes. Extinction in haze is due to hydrated aerosols distributed in the accumulation mode, for diameter smaller than 2 {mu}m. Hydrated aerosols of the accumulation mode still contribute to 20-30% extinction in the fog. Measurements show that fog droplets, with diameter included between 2 and 10 {mu}m, contribute to 40% extinction during the first hours of the fog.

  7. Assessment of fogging resistance of anti-fog personal eye protection.

    PubMed

    Dain, S J; Hoskin, A K; Winder, C; Dingsdag, D P

    1999-07-01

    The propensity for occupational eye protectors to fog in warm and moist conditions is often offered as a reason by workers not to wear occupational eye protection even where mandatory eye protection areas have been specified. A study of eye protection practices in the New South Wales coal mining industry identified the number one issue in underground coal mine conditions as being fogging of eye safety wear. Conventional anti-fog treatments and cleaners were considered by the miners as completely inadequate in these conditions. At the time of the study claims were being made for a new generation of lens treatments. These merited evaluation. Spectacles and goggles claimed to be fog resistant were obtained from manufacturers and suppliers and subjected to the test set out in BS EN 168 and the compliance criterion of BS EN 166. Some lenses claimed to be fog resistant failed the requirement, some new technology lenses showed arguably superior performance but failed the criterion of the standard. Modifications to the test procedure of BS EN 168 and acceptance criteria of BS EN 166 are proposed. PMID:10645393

  8. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

    2011-09-01

    Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (< 2 m s-1) the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout) decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66% of all sequences. The microbial aerosol sequence library, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the viable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97% similarity cut-off, ocean surface and fog sequence libraries shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28%) and fog (21%) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were

  9. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

    2012-02-01

    Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (<2 m s-1) the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout) decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66 % of all sequences. The sequence library from microbial aerosol isolates, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28 %) and fog (21 %) libraries. The fog

  10. Effects of inhaled acids on lung biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.

    1989-02-01

    Effects of respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, and ammonium persulfate on lungs of rats are reviewed. The literature regarding interactions between ozone or nitrogen dioxide and acidic aerosols (ammonium sulfate, sulfuric acid) is discussed. An unexpected interaction between nitrogen dioxide and sodium chloride aerosol is also discussed. An attempt is made to identify bases for prediction of how and when acid aerosols might potentiate effects of inhaled gases.

  11. A climatological study of fog in Japan based on event data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Yuko; Kusaka, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A climatological study is carried out to understand the characteristics of fog in Japan. This study uniquely focuses on fog density and fog type using atmospheric visibility data from surface observations. The main results are summarized below, within the following three contexts: 1) the characteristics of fog and dense fog, 2) fog type, and 3) long-term change in the number of foggy days. Most of the foggy and densely foggy regions in Japan are inland mountainous areas, basin areas, and the Pacific coast of eastern and northern Japan. Fog density varies seasonally. Although the warmer seasons have the highest frequency of fog occurrence in Japan, the density of fog tends to be higher in the colder seasons. Land cover also affects the density of fog. In the urban area, fog rarely forms, with dense mist sometimes forming. The most common type of fog in Japan is radiation fog, which accounts for half of all fog events. The dominant fog types of the inland areas, the Pacific coast, and the western part of Japan are radiation fog, advection fog and rain fog, respectively. The numbers of foggy days decrease at many of the observation sites during a 40-year period from 1966 to 2005. Inland and basin sites showed the largest decrease. Urban areas were once affected by fogs, but now experience mist instead. In contrast, most coastal sites showed no clear trend of decrease and some sites even showed an increase in the numbers of foggy days.

  12. Environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators is described. The electronic elements of the system include a real time digital computer, a caligraphic color display which simulates landing lights of selective intensity, and a color television camera for producing a moving color display of the airport runway as depicted on a model terrain board. The mechanical simulation elements of the system include an environmental chamber which can produce natural fog, nonhomogeneous fog, rain and fog combined, or rain only. A pilot looking through the aircraft wind screen will look through the fog and/or rain generated in the environmental chamber onto a viewing screen with the simulated color image of the airport runway thereon, and observe a very real simulation of actual conditions of a runway as it would appear through actual fog and/or rain.

  13. Fog as a fresh-water resource: overview and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Otto; Schemenauer, Robert S; Lummerich, Anne; Cereceda, Pilar; Marzol, Victoria; Corell, David; van Heerden, Johan; Reinhard, Dirk; Gherezghiher, Tseggai; Olivier, Jana; Osses, Pablo; Sarsour, Jamal; Frost, Ernst; Estrela, María J; Valiente, José A; Fessehaye, Gebregiorgis Mussie

    2012-05-01

    The collection of fog water is a simple and sustainable technology to obtain fresh water for afforestation, gardening, and as a drinking water source for human and animal consumption. In regions where fresh water is sparse and fog frequently occurs, it is feasible to set up a passive mesh system for fog water collection. The mesh is directly exposed to the atmosphere, and the foggy air is pushed through the mesh by the wind. Fog droplets are deposited on the mesh, combine to form larger droplets, and run down passing into a storage tank. Fog water collection rates vary dramatically from site to site but yearly averages from 3 to 10 l m(-2) of mesh per day are typical of operational projects. The scope of this article is to review fog collection projects worldwide, to analyze factors of success, and to evaluate the prospects of this technology. PMID:22328161

  14. A review on ice fog measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, I.; Zhou, B.; Milbrandt, J.; Bott, A.; Li, Y.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Ferrier, B.; Ware, R.; Pavolonis, M.; Kuhn, T.; Gurka, J.; Liu, P.; Cermak, J.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of weather-related aviation accident occurrence in the northern latitudes is likely 25 times higher than the national rate of Canada. If only cases where reduced visibility was a factor are considered, the average rate of occurrence in the north is about 31 times higher than the Canadian national rate. Ice fog occurs about 25% of the time in the northern latitudes and is an important contributor to low visibility. This suggests that a better understanding of ice fog prediction and detection is required over the northern latitudes. The objectives of this review are the following: 1) to summarize the current knowledge of ice fog microphysics, as inferred from observations and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and 2) to describe the remaining challenges associated with measuring ice fog properties, remote sensing microphysical retrievals, and simulating/predicting ice fog within numerical models. Overall, future challenges related to ice fog microphysics and visibility are summarized and current knowledge is emphasized.

  15. The Pacific Coast Fog Project: A Multi-disciplinary Effort to Provide Web-based Climate Products for Ecologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torregrosa, A.; Combs, C.; Ellrod, G. P.; Faloona, I. C.; Gultepe, I.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific Coast Fog Project is an effort to pool the expertise from multiple science disciplines to provide regional and local climate information on the frequency and character of fog for effective management of coastal California natural resources. Marine stratocumulus (fog) is a major modifier of the climatic condition along the Pacific coast and has significant effects on the hydrologic cycle and thermodynamic balance in coastal ecological, biological, and economic systems. For example fog is the major source of moisture during summer months for redwood forests, a treasured natural resource. Fog also modulates shallow stream temperatures to reduce the mortality rate of young salmon during their freshwater life stages and adults returning from the ocean to spawn. Fog induced cooling reduces summer energy costs along the Pacific Coast and reduces sun burn on crops such as grapes that are important to the local economy. Furthermore, disruptions in fog distribution or frequency resulting from future climate change would change evapotranspiration rates impacting California water supply and use. Coastal fog is a complex phenomenon with many measurable parameters including extent, frequency, and duration of cloud cover; cloud deck thickness, liquid water content, base height above land, density, heterogeneity, and thermal properties. Variations in fog are a result of processes acting at multiple scales across ocean-land-atmosphere boundaries. Factors that drive the occurrence, duration, and type of fog events along the coast include dynamics of atmospheric summertime inversions, synoptic weather patterns, ocean upwelling, topography, aerosol-cloud dynamics, and differences in temperature between inland valleys and the littoral ocean areas. Estimating the distribution, frequency and characteristics of coastal fog and stratus and evaluating the resulting ecosystem responses require a diverse array of measurements and models that link processes at multiple scales. The

  16. Long-range polarimetric imaging through fog.

    PubMed

    Fade, Julien; Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Carré, Anthony; Frein, Ludovic; Hamel, Cyril; Bretenaker, Fabien; Ramachandran, Hema; Alouini, Mehdi

    2014-06-20

    We report an experimental implementation of long-range polarimetric imaging through fog over kilometric distance in real field atmospheric conditions. An incoherent polarized light source settled on a telecommunication tower is imaged at a distance of 1.3 km with a snapshot polarimetric camera including a birefringent Wollaston prism, allowing simultaneous acquisition of two images along orthogonal polarization directions. From a large number of acquisitions datasets and under various environmental conditions (clear sky/fog/haze, day/night), we compare the efficiency of using polarized light for source contrast increase with different signal representations (intensity, polarimetric difference, polarimetric contrast, etc.). With the limited-dynamics detector used, a maximum fourfold increase in contrast was demonstrated under bright background illumination using polarimetric difference image. PMID:24979415

  17. Fog and rain in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H

    2015-09-15

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents. PMID:26324902

  18. Project Fog Drops. Part 2: Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocmond, W. C.; Mack, E. J.; Katz, U.; Pilie, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the total nucleus concentration and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were acquired for several conditions representing both high normal and severe pollution levels for the Los Angeles Basin as well as clean filtered air. The data show that in filtered air there is a large photochemically induced increase in the total particle content within a few minutes after starting the lamp. The concentration of CCN remains near zero, until sufficient coagulation and condensation occurs on the smaller Aitken particles. The addition of gaseous pollutants to filtered air results in large increases in the photochemical production of both the cloud and Aitken nucleus concentration. Fogs were also generated under controlled, reproducible conditions in the cloud chamber and seeded with aerosols of various compounds which form monomolecular surface films at air-water interfaces. Visibility characteristics and droplet data were obtained. The data suggest that droplet growth on treated nuclei can be retarded but fog formation was not significantly altered by the chemical seeding.

  19. Status of warm fog dispersal research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.

    1985-01-01

    A new concept for dispersing warm fog is presented. This brute force technique uses large volume recycled water sprays. Energy requirements for this technique are an order of magnitude less than those to operate a thermo-kinetic system. An important side benefit is the considerable emergency fire extinguishing capability it provides along the runway. Tests conducted to provide drop spectra measurements and temperature response measurements of suitable water sprays are described. Three mobile firefighting modules capable of spraying up to 630 l/s (10,000 gpm) to a height in excess of 50 m were utilized. Periodic operation of two parallel rows of nozzles in a heavy fog resulted in downwind-correlated increases in the visual range measured with a forward scatter visibility meter.

  20. Fog and rain in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Anber, Usama; Gentine, Pierre; Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.

    2015-01-01

    The diurnal and seasonal water cycles in the Amazon remain poorly simulated in general circulation models, exhibiting peak evapotranspiration in the wrong season and rain too early in the day. We show that those biases are not present in cloud-resolving simulations with parameterized large-scale circulation. The difference is attributed to the representation of the morning fog layer, and to more accurate characterization of convection and its coupling with large-scale circulation. The morning fog layer, present in the wet season but absent in the dry season, dramatically increases cloud albedo, which reduces evapotranspiration through its modulation of the surface energy budget. These results highlight the importance of the coupling between the energy and hydrological cycles and the key role of cloud albedo feedback for climates over tropical continents. PMID:26324902

  1. Carbon speciation and surface tension of fog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Gunde, R.; Zurcher, F.; Giger, W.

    1990-01-01

    The speciation of carbon (dissolved/particulate, organic/inorganic) and surface tension of a number of radiation fogs from the urban area of Zurich, Switzerland, were measured. The carbon species were dominated by "dissolved" organic carbon (DOC; i.e., the fraction that passes through a filter), which was typically present at levels of 40-200 mg/L. Less than 10% of the DOC was identified as specific individual organic compounds. Particulate organic carbon (POC) accounted for 26-41% of the mass of the particles, but usually less than 10% of the total organic carbon mass. Inorganic carbon species were relatively minor. The surface tensions of all the measured samples were less than pure water and were correlated with their DOC concentrations. The combination of high DOC and POC and low surface tension suggests a mechanism for the concentration of hydrophobic organic contaminants in the fog droplet, which have been observed by numerous investigators. ?? 1990 American Chemical Society.

  2. Near-explicit Gas-phase Chemistry Coupled with Extensive Aqueous Mechanism: Looking at Ethanol (E85) Exhaust in a Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginnebaugh, D. L.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a near-explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism with an extensive aqueous mechanism in a chemical solver to examine the effects of ethanol (E85) versus gasoline on the fate of pollutants in the presence of a fog. We use the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.1, Leeds University) and the Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism, CAPRAM 3.0, with the SMVGEAR II chemical ordinary differential solver to provide the speed necessary to simulate complex chemistry. The MCM has over 13, 500 organic reactions and 4,600 species, while CAPRAM treats aqueous chemistry among 390 species and 829 reactions (including 51 gas-to-aqueous phase reactions). We validate a simplified version of the model against results from a comprehensive intercomparison by Barth et al (2003). In previous work on ethanol (E85), we analyzed the temperature-dependence of ethanol and gasoline exhaust chemistry and its impact on urban air pollution considering only gas-phase chemistry. In addition to the air pollution findings, we verified that using the MCM with SMVGEAR is practical in a 3-D model. Here, we extend our study to include aqueous chemistry in the presence of a fog. We investigate the impact aqueous reactions have on unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde mixing ratios in the atmosphere in particular because acetaldehyde is an ozone precursor and carcinogen, and aqueous oxidation has potential to speed the conversion of unburned ethanol to acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde also forms acetic acid in aqueous solution. Acetic acid vapor is an eye, nose, and lung irritant, so both species contribute negatively to human health. We look at the impact of fog liquid water content and temperature on the degradation of emitted aromatic and other species as well, from both gasoline and E85.

  3. The USRA workshop report: Electrostatic fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The Workshop was held at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, on February 1-2, 1983. The Workshop was attended by seventeen experts in the scientific fields of fog and cloud physics, charged-particle electrodynamics, atmospheric turbulence, atmospheric electricity, and electro-gasdynamics. The major objective of the Workshop was to assess the scientific merits and scientific basis of the proposed system and to assess its potential for operational application.

  4. Otoscope fogging: examination finding for perforated tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Jason F

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a recently recognised physical examination finding, otoscope fogging, for perforated tympanic membrane. Otoscope fogging is defined as condensation forming in the view field of the otoscope while inspecting the ear. In the setting of occult perforation secondary to the inability to visualise the entire tympanic membrane, otoscope fogging may provide the clinician with valuable information since medical management may differ if perforation is present. PMID:24879720

  5. Fog Plumes over the Great Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A southerly flow of unseasonably warm, moist air (temperatures of +20o to +26o C, dew points of +14o to +16o C) over the relatively cool (generally +2o to +5o C ) water of Lake Michigan and Lake Huron contributed to the development of large advection fog plumes (caused by the horizontal motion of air) during the day on April 16, 2002. These fog plumes moved northward during the day, eventually interacting with various land features to produce patterns of wave diffraction and packets of reflected waves (resembling 'shock waves') as the fog plumes impinged upon the rugged coastline of Wisconsin, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and Ontario. These waves remained trapped within the strong marine layer temperature inversion which was sustained by the continued flow of warm air across the cool water surface. The above image was acquired by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Red = .645um (red), green = 1.627um, (shortwave infrared), blue = 2.13um (shortwave infrared). Image courtesy Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin

  6. Efficient fog harvesting by Stipagrostis sabulicola (Namib dune bushman grass)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Ebner, M.; Miranda, T.

    2010-07-01

    Stipagrostis sabulicola is an endemic species of the central Namib Desert which settles on extremely arid dune fields. Due to its ability to persistence even during exceptionally dry years it is generally assumed that water supply of this species is substantially based on fog water. In this contribution, the results of a study investigating the capability of S. sabulicola for fog harvesting are presented. For this purpose, stem flow rates of S. sabulicola during fog events, spatial gradient of soil water content (SWC) close to mounds of S. sabulicola and its leaf water potential (LWP) before and after fog events were monitored together with climate parameters. According to the data obtained during this study, S. sabulicola is able to harvest substantial amounts of water by fog catchment from nocturnal fog events. Since culms of S. sabulicola are often stiff with an upright habitus, fog harvesting occurs via stemflow that conducts water directly towards the root zone of a plant. According to this mechanism, the stem runoff is concentrated within the area of the mound. A medium-sized mound of S. sabulicola is able to collect an amount of about 4 l per fog night. This fog harvesting leads to a considerable spatial gradient of soil water content with values decreasing with increasing distance from the mound. As a result of the water input by fog drip, SWC within the mound increases significantly, particularly close to the culm bases where SWC values increased to 2.2 % after a fog event. Due to the uneven distribution of water by stemflow, SWC within a mound shows high spatial heterogeneity which is also illustrated by the numerous outliers and extreme values of SWC within the mound region. This heterogeneity is also due to the fact that several sagging leaves are always present causing fog drip which more or less irregularly scatters moisture. For bare soil outside of a mound, the water content is not substantially increased, amounting to 0.78 % on average during dry

  7. The measurement of the size distribution of artificial fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Cliff, W. C.; Mcdonald, J. R.; Ozarski, R.; Thomson, J. A. L.; Huffaker, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The size-distribution of the fog droplets at various fog particle concentrations in fog chamber was determined by two methods: (1) the Stokes' velocity photographic method and (2) using the active scattering particle spectrometer. It is shown that the two techniques are accurate in two different ranges of particle size - the former in the radii range (0.1 micrometers to 10.0 micrometers), and the latter for radii greater than 10.0 micrometers. This was particularly true for high particle concentration, low visibility fogs.

  8. Animal or Plant: Which Is the Better Fog Water Collector?

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, Thomas; Ebner, Martin; Dacke, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Occasional fog is a critical water source utilised by plants and animals in the Namib Desert. Fog basking beetles (Onymacris unguicularis, Tenebrionidae) and Namib dune bushman grass (Stipagrostris sabulicola, Poaceae) collect water directly from the fog. While the beetles position themselves optimally for fog water collection on dune ridges, the grass occurs predominantly at the dune base where less fog water is available. Differences in the fog-water collecting abilities in animals and plants have never been addressed. Here we place beetles and grass side-by-side in a fog chamber and measure the amount of water they collect over time. Based on the accumulated amount of water over a two hour period, grass is the better fog collector. However, in contrast to the episodic cascading water run-off from the grass, the beetles obtain water in a steady flow from their elytra. This steady trickle from the beetles' elytra to their mouth could ensure that even short periods of fog basking – while exposed to predators – will yield water. Up to now there is no indication of specialised surface properties on the grass leafs, but the steady run-off from the beetles could point to specific property adaptations of their elytra surface. PMID:22509331

  9. Effect of propionic acid on fatty acid oxidation and ureagenesis.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, A M; Chase, H P

    1976-07-01

    Propionic acid significantly inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate at a concentration of 10 muM in control fibroblasts and 100 muM in methylmalonic fibroblasts. This inhibition was similar to that produced by 4-pentenoic acid. Methylmalonic acid also inhibited 14CO2 production from [1-14C] palmitate, but only at a concentration of 1 mM in control cells and 5 mM in methylmalonic cells. Propionic acid (5 mM) also inhibited ureagenesis in rat liver slices when ammonia was the substrate but not with aspartate and citrulline as substrates. Propionic acid had no direct effect on either carbamyl phosphate synthetase or ornithine transcarbamylase. These findings may explain the fatty degeneration of the liver and the hyperammonemia in propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. PMID:934734

  10. SO/sub 2/(g)-to-sulfate conversion rate in an oil-fired-power-plant plume in a fog bank

    SciTech Connect

    Eatough, D.J.; Arthur, R.J.; Eatough, N.L.; Hill, M.W.; Mangelson, N.F.; Richter, B.E.; Hansen, L.D.; Cooper, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    High acidity in rainfall, cloud droplets and fog droplets in areas influenced by anthropogenic sources of SO/sub 2/(g) and NO/sub x/(g) has been attributed to the formation of both H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and HNO/sub 3/. It has been suggested, based on the analysis of field data, that rapid conversion of SO/sub 2/(g) to sulfate must occur in cloud or fog droplets. Direct measurements of the rate of SO/sub 2/(g) to sulfate conversion in an oil-fired power plant plume as it passes through a fog bank are reported here. A conversion rate of 30+-4% SO/sub 2/(g) h/sup -1/ was found in the fog bank.

  11. The design of an optimal fog water collector: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalado, Carlos M.; Ritter, Axel

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the collection efficiency of different fog water catchers assemblies (mainly flat and cylindrical structures equipped with several screens of staggered filaments) by means of parametric equations which take into consideration both impaction and aerodynamic effects. We introduce different models that vary in complexity and range of applicability, and may be used to analyze the effect that geometry, number of screens, spacing and inclination of the filament strands have on the fog water yield of the collector. Increasing the number of impacting screens, nR, is shown to improve the collection efficiency up to an optimum for nR = 3-5; beyond nR > 5 impermeability to the airflow makes the fog catcher less efficient. Geometry of the collector is shown to be relatively important: unless wind direction varies widely, the rectangular flat design is preferred over the cylindrical one, because of its larger drag, i.e. increased aerodynamic efficiency, ηa. In fact ηa is shown to be limiting, such that values over ηa > 50% are difficult to attain. By contrast the impaction efficiency, ηimp, of fog water droplets onto multiple nR parallel screens of filaments may reach theoretical values of ηimp > 80%. Inclination of the impacting screens over the vertical may slightly reduce ηimp, but this may be compensated by a reduction in flow resistance, i.e. increased aerodynamic efficiency.

  12. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dalong; Zhang, Zhongdian; Li, Jianming; Chang, Yibo; Du, Qingjie; Pan, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1) without environment control and (2) with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR) of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR), and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR). Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season. PMID:26221726

  13. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dalong; Zhang, Zhongdian; Li, Jianming; Chang, Yibo; Du, Qingjie; Pan, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1) without environment control and (2) with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR) of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR), and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR). Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season. PMID:26221726

  14. Examination of the evolution of radiation and advection fogs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A literature study was done on radiation and advection fog evolution. For radiation fog, six stages of fog evolution have been identified -- (1) precursor, (2) sunset, (3) conditioning, (4) mature, (5) sunrise, and (6) dissipation. The evolution of advection fog models has been in parallel with radiation fog models, but no identified stages in the evolution of advection fog have been proposed: (1) precursor, (2) initiation, (3) mature, and (4) dissipation. Radiation and advection fog models will require greater sophistication in order to study fog spatial and temporal variability. Physical aspects that require further study are discussed.

  15. The miR-17-92 cluster regulates FOG-2 expression and inhibits proliferation of mouse embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Rui; Lei, Han; Chen, Mianzhi; Li, Qinwei; Sun, Huan; Ai, Jianzhong; Chen, Tielin; Wang, Honglian; Fang, Yin; Zhou, Qin

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have gradually been recognized as regulators of embryonic development; however, relatively few miRNAs have been identified that regulate cardiac development. A series of recent papers have established an essential role for the miRNA-17-92 (miR-17-92) cluster of miRNAs in the development of the heart. Previous research has shown that the Friend of Gata-2 (FOG-2) is critical for cardiac development. To investigate the possibility that the miR-17-92 cluster regulates FOG-2 expression and inhibits proliferation in mouse embryonic cardiomyocytes we initially used bioinformatics to analyze 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR) of FOG-2 to predict the potential of miR-17-92 to target it. We used luciferase assays to demonstrate that miR-17-5p and miR-20a of miR-17-92 interact with the predicted target sites in the 3′UTR of FOG-2. Furthermore, RT-PCR and Western blot were used to demonstrate the post-transcriptional regulation of FOG-2 by miR-17-92 in embryonic cardiomyocytes from E12.5-day pregnant C57BL/6J mice. Finally, EdU cell assays together with the FOG-2 rescue strategy were employed to evaluate the effect of proliferation on embryonic cardiomyocytes. We first found that the miR-17-5p and miR-20a of miR-17-92 directly target the 3′UTR of FOG-2 and post-transcriptionally repress the expression of FOG-2. Moreover, our findings demonstrated that over-expression of miR-17-92 may inhibit cell proliferation via post-transcriptional repression of FOG-2 in embryonic cardiomyocytes. These results indicate that the miR-17-92 cluster regulates the expression of FOG-2 protein and suggest that the miR-17-92 cluster might play an important role in heart development. PMID:22267003

  16. Satellite-based multi-spectral detection of the Widespread and Persistent Winter Fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, R.; Rizvi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), in the northern parts of south Asia, are subjected to dense haze/fog during winter months, on an annual basis. The thick fog prevalent during December/January months is both persistent and widespread in nature, often covering the entire IGP which stretches over 1500km in length. This study used multi-spectral imagery from MODIS data, to develop algorithms for daytime as well as nighttime detection of fog during winter 2000 to 2014 over the IGP. Specifically, our nighttime detection algorithm employs a bispectral thresholding technique, involving brightness temperature difference (BTD) between two spectral channels- 3.9 and 11.02μm. The theoretical basis for the detection using the 3.9 μm and 11.02 μm channels rely on the particular emissive properties of the two channels for fog droplets (Bendix and Bachmann, 1991). The small droplets found in fog are less emissive at 3.9 μm than at 11.02 μm. Brightness temperatures computed from corresponding radiance data (MODIS Level-1B) of band 22 (3.9 μm) and band 31 (11.02 μm), in conjunction with theoretical calculations from a radiative transfer (RT) model, were utilized to evaluate threshold value of BTD. Using theoretical RT calculations and automated analysis of hundreds of moderately high resolution satellite imagery (pixel resolution of 1km), our threshold cutoff for foggy pixels results in BTD value of 4 (deg) K. Additionally, to minimize contamination, we apply a spatial variability filter to discriminate the uniform texture of fog from other low-level clouds. A similar methodology based on BTD is also tested for daytime fog detection and separation from other cloud types. Furthermore, on the basis of operational multispectral retrievals of cloud properties (cloud effective radius, cloud top pressure, and cloud fraction) from MODIS, we have also processed spatial occurrences of fog climatology from 2000 to 2014. To validate our satellite retrieval algorithm of fog detection from

  17. The Impact of Sea Surface Temperature Front on Stratus-Sea Fog over the Yellow and East China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Li, M.; Liu, F.

    2013-12-01

    A stratus-sea fog event occurred on 3 June 2011 over the Yellow and East China Seas (as shown in figure) is investigated observationally and numerically. Emphasis is put on the influences of the sea surface temperature front (SSTF) and of the synoptic circulations on the transition of stratus to sea fog. The southerly winds from a synoptic high pressure transport water vapor from the East China Sea to the Yellow Sea, while the subsidence induced by the high contributes to the formation of the temperature inversion on the top of the stratus or stratocumulus that appears mainly over the warm flank of a sea surface temperature front in the East China Sea. Forced by the SSTF, there is a secondary cell within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), with a sinking branch on the cold flank and a rising one on the warm flank of the SSTF. This sinking branch, in phase with the synoptic subsidence, forces the stratus or stratocumulus to lower in the elevation getting close to the sea surface as these clouds move northward driven by the southerly winds. The cloud droplets can either reach to the sea surface directly or evaporate into water vapor that may condense again when coming close to the cold sea surface to form fog. In this later case, the stratus and fog may separate. The cooling effect of cold sea surface counteracts the adiabatic heating induced by the subsidence and thus helps the transition of stratus to sea fog in the southern Yellow Sea. By smoothing the SSTF in the numerical experiment, the secondary cell weakens and the sea fog patches shrink obviously over the cold flank of the SSTF though the synoptic subsidence and moist advection still exist. A conceptual model is suggested for the transition of stratus to sea fog in the Yellow and East China Seas, which is helpful for the forecast of sea fog over these areas. The satellite visible image of the stratus-fog event. The fog appears in the Yellow Sea and the stratocumulus in the East China Sea.

  18. Gene Conversion and DNA Sequence Polymorphism in the Sex-Determination Gene fog-2 and Its Paralog ftr-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S.; Smith, Jessica M.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2010-01-01

    Gene conversion, a form of concerted evolution, bears enormous potential to shape the trajectory of sequence and functional divergence of gene paralogs subsequent to duplication events. fog-2, a sex-determination gene unique to Caenorhabditis elegans and implicated in the origin of hermaphroditism in this species, resulted from the duplication of ftr-1, an upstream gene of unknown function. Synonymous sequence divergence in regions of fog-2 and ftr-1 (excluding recent gene conversion tracts) suggests that the duplication occurred 46 million generations ago. Gene conversion between fog-2 and ftr-1 was previously discovered in experimental fog-2 knockout lines of C. elegans, whereby hermaphroditism was restored in mutant obligately outcrossing male–female populations. We analyzed DNA-sequence variation in fog-2 and ftr-1 within 40 isolates of C. elegans from diverse geographic locations in order to evaluate the contribution of gene conversion to genetic variation in the two gene paralogs. The analysis shows that gene conversion contributes significantly to DNA-sequence diversity in fog-2 and ftr-1 (22% and 34%, respectively) and may have the potential to alter sexual phenotypes in natural populations. A radical amino acid change in a conserved region of the F-box domain of fog-2 was found in natural isolates of C. elegans with significantly lower fecundity. We hypothesize that the lowered fecundity is due to reduced masculinization and less sperm production and that amino acid replacement substitutions and gene conversion in fog-2 may contribute significantly to variation in the degree of inbreeding and outcrossing in natural populations. PMID:20133352

  19. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and thus modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~10 mg C L-1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i) the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g. photolysis of aldehydes) and (ii) the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g. dicarboxylic acids). We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds in a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada) and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA). Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions) in the aqueous phase comprises 1-~40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidized and thus more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC) increases by an order of magnitude from 7×103 M atm-1 to 7×104 M atm-1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. They suggest that the scavenging of aldehydes by the aqueous phase can reduce HO2 gas

  20. Modes in the size distributions and neutralization extent of fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols observed at Canadian rural locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, X. H.; Zhang, L.

    2012-02-01

    Among the 192 samples of size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at eight rural locations in Canada, ten samples were identified to have gone through fog processing. The supermicron particle modes of ammonium salt aerosols were found to be the fingerprint of fog processed aerosols. However, the patterns and the sizes of the supermicron modes varied with ambient temperature (T) and particle acidity and also differed between inland and coastal locations. Under T > 0 °C condition, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols were completely neutralized and had a dominant mode at 1-2 μm and a minor mode at 5-10 μm if particles were in neutral condition, and ammonium sulfate was incompletely neutralized and only had a 1-2 μm mode if particles were in acidic conditions. Under T < 0 °C at the coastal site, fog-processed aerosols exhibited a bi-modal size distribution with a dominant mode of incompletely-neutralized ammonium sulfate at about 3 μm and a minor mode of completely-neutralized ammonium sulfate at 8-9 μm. Under T < 0 °C condition at the inland sites, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols were sometimes completely neutralized and sometimes incompletely neutralized, and the size of the supermicron mode was in the range from 1 to 5 μm. Overall, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols under T < 0 °C condition were generally distributed at larger size (e.g., 2-5 μm) than those under T > 0 °C condition (e.g., 1-2 μm).

  1. The influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on fog oases along the Peruvian and Chilean coastal deserts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, R.; Ferrari, C.; Pezzi, G.

    2010-07-01

    Fog oases such as Lomas formation along the Chilean and Peruvian coasts are dependent on water inputs from oceanic fog. Vegetation is characterized by a marked seasonality which is often affected by climatic oscillations such as ENSO. Diversity and vegetation patterns are highly variable because of their fragmented spatial distribution. We hypothesized that ENSO could have influenced the spatial distribution of Lomas plant species along the South American coasts. In particular we focus on two aspects: 1. The climate variables related to ENSO event which likely have an effect on fog production and 2. The responses of Lomas vegetation regarding composition, structure, productivity, and conservation to climate patterns during an ENSO event.

  2. Analysis of Dynamical and Thermal Processes Driving Fog and Quasi-Fog Life Cycles Using the 2010-2013 ParisFog Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, J. C.; Haeffelin, M.; Stolaki, S.; Elias, T.

    2016-04-01

    The data from suite of in situ sensors, passive and active remote sensing instruments dedicated to document simultaneously radiative and thermo-dynamical processes driving the fog life cycle at the SIRTA Observatory (instrumented site for atmospheric remote sensing research) near Paris during two periods of 6 months are analysed. The study focuses on the analysis of the relative role of key physical processes and their interactions during fog formation, development and dissipation phases. This work presents, from analysis of detailed observations, the range of values that critical parameters have to take for fog and quasi-fog formation. In our study, we consider fog (horizontal visibility lower than 1 km, a dataset of 300 h) and quasi-fog (horizontal visibility ranging from 1 to 2 km, a dataset of 400 h) events induced by radiative cooling (53 events) and stratus lowering (64 events). For the radiative fog events, (with radiative cooling during prefog conditions), we note that the longwave net radiative flux (around -60 ± 5 W/m2) induces a cooling of the surface layer. The vertical structure of this cooling is controlled by dynamics, that is, wind shear and horizontal and vertical velocities. In case of very low mixing (wind speed below 0.6 m/s), the thermal stability is very strong with a temperature inversion around 3.5 °C for 10 m and a humidity gradient reaching 10 % preventing vertical development of the fog layer. For stratus-lowering fog events, the altitude of the stratus layer, the vertical mixing and the absolute value of humidity are driving parameters of the fog formation. Our statistical analysis shows that a stratus cloud with a cloud base around 170 m and with a small cloud-base subsidence rate of 50 m/h leads to fog, whereas a stratus cloud with a base around 800 m agl, with a larger cloud-base subsidence rate of 190 m/h conducts to quasi-fog situations with an important increase of the stratus liquid water path.

  3. O'Neill's Kurzdrama "Fog" im Englischunterricht (O'Neill's Short Drama "Fog" in English Teaching)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Juergen

    1977-01-01

    O'Neill's "Fog" is recommended as a discussion-stimulating work for English (as a second language) classes in grades 11-13. The content is discussed from an instructional point of view. Teaching goals are considered. Experiences with the play in grade 11 are described, and methodological hints are given. (Text is in German.) (IFS/WGA)

  4. Fog chemical composition and its feedback to fog water fluxes, water vapor fluxes, and microphysical evolution of two events near Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degefie, D. T.; El-Madany, T.-S.; Held, M.; Hejkal, J.; Hammer, E.; Dupont, J.-C.; Haeffelin, M.; Fleischer, E.; Klemm, O.

    2015-10-01

    The chemical composition of collected fog water and its temporal evolution was studied during the PARISFOG campaign in winter 2012/2013 at the SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphéric) atmospheric observatory outside Paris, France. A further development of the caltech active fog collector was applied, in which the collected fog water gets into contact with Teflon and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) material exclusively. The collector was operational whenever the visibility was below 1000 m. In addition, the turbulent and gravitational fluxes of fog water and water vapor flux were used to examine in detail the temporal evolution the chemical composition of two fogs. The technique was applied to two fog events, one representing a radiation fog and the other one representing a stratus lowering fog. The result revealed that the dominant inorganic species in the fog water were NH4+, NO3-, Ca2 + and SO42 -, which accounted for more than 85% of the ion balance. The pH ranged from 3.7 to 6.2. In the evolution the two fog events, the interaction among the turbulent fog water flux, gravitational fog water flux and water vapor flux controlled the major ion loads (amount of ions, dissolved in fog droplets per volume of air) and ion concentrations (amount dissolved per volume of liquid water) of the fog water. In the radiation fog event, an increase of ion loads and ion concentrations occurred when the direction of water vapor flux towards to the place where the condensation process occurred. A decrease of ion loads and ion concentrations mainly happened by gravitational fog water flux with a minor contribution from turbulent fog water flux. However, when the turbulent water vapor flux was oriented downward, it turned the turbulent fog water flux upward and offset the removal of ions in the fog. In the stratus lowering fog event, the turbulent fog water flux and the gravitational water flux together mainly contributed to the fog water deposition and

  5. Occurrence of anthropogenic fog and ice from Widows Creek Unit 8 wet scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.H.; Fagen, L.C.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the results of a modeling study of the effect of the Widows Creek Steam Plant Unit 8 scrubbed plume upon ambient ice and fog formation within 20 km of the plant. The effect of the scrubber on reducing ambient SO/sub 2/ near the plant is also investigated. All investigations are repeated for three levels of scrubber reheat: high, medium, and low. The level of plume reheat determines the final height of the scrubbed plume and strongly affects the concentration of water vapor at ground level. Thus, the level of plume reheat is strongly reflected in levels of anthropogenic fog and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) (i.e., environmental impact is always predicted to be greater at a low reheat level than at a high reheat level). Very little impact of anthropogenic ice is predicted under any reheat level. At the worst case (lowest reheat), only 2 percent of the area around the Widows Creek Steam Plant is predicted to be impacted once per year and none of the area is predicted to be impacted twice or more. Anthropogenic fog is predicted to have a low impact over a large area (55 percent of the area at one occurrence of fog per year, low reheat) and to have a higher impact over a small area (10 percent of the area at 10 occurrences of fog per year, low reheat). It is assumed the scrubber removed 88 percent of the SO/sub 2/ in the plume. Because of reduced plume rise, however, ambient SO/sub 2/ concentrations are often not reduced by 88 percent. Under low reheat, for example, nearly 25 percent of the area near Widows Creek Steam Plant is predicted to experience a reduction in annual averaged SO/sub 2/ concentrations of less than 75 percent. Under medium reheat, however, this area of impact is reduced from 25 percent to less than 2 percent.

  6. Marine Boundary Layer Structure for the Sea Fog Formation off the West Coast of the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Yum, Seong Soo

    2012-05-01

    Marine boundary layer (MBL) structure for the formation of sea fogs off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula are examined for the investigation period from January 2002 to August 2006, using the meteorological data measured at a buoy and the vertical sounding data measured at an island in this region. There is the total of 3,294 vertical soundings during the investigation period. Based on these vertical soundings, the MBL structure is classified as convective boundary layer (CBL; when inversion exists aloft but at altitudes lower than 3 km, 1,618 soundings), stable boundary layer (SBL; when inversion base is at the surface, 655 soundings) or near-neutral boundary layer (NNBL; when there is no inversion or inversion base is higher than 3 km altitude, 1,021 soundings). Under the CBL condition, the most frequently formed lower level cloud is stratocumulus but fogs do form in spring and summer months mostly as warm sea fogs [TSST (=T-SST) < 0]. Under the SBL condition, stratus and cold sea fogs (TSST > 0) are the most frequently found lower level clouds. The effects of turbulence, advection and radiation on sea fog formation vary with turbulence strength, represented by bulk Richardson number, R b. For cold sea fog cases, in the highly turbulent regime ( R b < 0.03), strong turbulent cooling and drying are canceled out by equally strong or even stronger warm and moist advection, and thus the additional radiative cooling turns out to be critical in the successful formation of fog. In the weak turbulent and non-turbulent ( R b > 0.30) regimes, the effects of turbulence decrease dramatically and so do the advection effects but radiative cooling is still strong, again making it the crucial reason for the successful formation of cold sea fogs. On the other hand, the turbulent moisture supply from the warmer sea surface is the crucial factor for the formation of warm sea fogs while turbulent warming and radiative cooling largely cancel each other out and the advection

  7. FUGITIVE AND FINE PARTICLE CONTROL USING ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED FOG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of fugitive and fine particle control using electrostatically charged fog. Most industrial pollutants acquire an electrostatic charge as they are dispersed into the air. Exposing this charged airborne material to an oppositely charged water fog...

  8. Fogging technique used to coat magnesium with plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mroz, T. S.

    1967-01-01

    Cleaning process and a fogging technique facilitate the application of a plastic coating to magnesium plates. The cleaning process removes general organic and inorganic surface impurities, oils and greases, and oxides and carbonates from the magnesium surfaces. The fogging technique produces a thin-filmlike coating in a clean room atmosphere.

  9. 12. Fuel house and fog signal house, view northeast, southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Fuel house and fog signal house, view northeast, southwest side of fuel house, west and south sides of fog signal house - Cape Elizabeth Light Station, Near Two Lights State Park at end of Two Lights Road, off State Highway 77, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, ME

  10. 7. Keeper's house, fog signal house and light tower, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Keeper's house, fog signal house and light tower, view north northeast, west and south sides of keeper's house and tower, southwest and southeast sides of fog signal house - West Quoddy Head Light Station, At eastern tip of West Quaddy Head, Lubec, Washington County, ME

  11. Multidecadal simulation of coastal fog with a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Sloan, Lisa C.; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Faloona, Ian C.; Johnstone, James A.

    2013-06-01

    In order to model stratocumulus clouds and coastal fog, we have coupled the University of Washington boundary layer model to the regional climate model, RegCM (RegCM-UW). By comparing fog occurrences observed at various coastal airports in the western United States, we show that RegCM-UW has success at modeling the spatial and temporal (diurnal, seasonal, and interannual) climatology of northern California coastal fog. The quality of the modeled fog estimate depends on whether coast-adjacent ocean or land grid cells are used; for the model runs shown here, the oceanic grid cells seem to be most appropriate. The interannual variability of oceanic northern California summertime fog, from a multi-decadal simulation, has a high and statistically significant correlation with the observed interannual variability ( r = 0.72), which indicates that RegCM-UW is capable of investigating the response of fog to long-term climatological forcing. While RegCM-UW has a number of aspects that would benefit from further investigation and development, RegCM-UW is a new tool for investigating the climatology of coastal fog and the physical processes that govern it. We expect that with appropriate physical parameterizations and moderate horizontal resolution, other climate models should be capable of simulating coastal fog. The source code for RegCM-UW is publicly available, under the GNU license, through the International Centre for Theoretical Physics.

  12. Clearing the Fog from the Undergraduate Course in Linear Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Damon

    2007-01-01

    For over a decade it has been a common observation that a "fog" passes over the course in linear algebra once abstract vector spaces are presented. See [2, 3]. We show how this fog may be cleared by having the students translate "abstract" vector-space problems to isomorphic "concrete" settings, solve the "concrete" problem either by hand or with…

  13. RESEARCH ON CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR ICE FOG FROM MOBILE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Automotive generated ice fog is a form of air pollution that results when exhaust water vapor freezes into minute particles which form a dense fog. The major control technique evaluated was cooling the exhaust gases to well below the dew point, thus condensing water vapor into a ...

  14. Polarimetric active imaging in dense fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Robert; Cao, Xiaoying; Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Operation under degraded visual environment (DVE) presents important strategic advantages. 3D mapping has been performed under DVE and good quality images have been obtained through DVE with active imaging systems. In these applications, the presence of fog clouds degrades the quality of the remotely sensed signal or even renders the operation totally impossible. In view of making the active imaging method more robust against dense fog, the use of polarimetry is herein studied. Spherical particles typical of fog do not depolarize incident polarized light in the backscattering (180°) direction. So, in principle, there should be less dazzling caused by aerosols for active imaging systems operating using the secondary polarization. However, strong depolarization still occurs at angles close to 180°. The greater the ratio of size to wavelength, the closer to 180° will the depolarization occur. When the cloud optical depth is small, the major scattering events seen by an active camera are the single backscattering events. However, when the optical depth of the cloud is higher than 1, multiple scattering becomes more important and causes depolarization due to the backscattering around 180°. The physics of this process will be discussed. Experimental results supporting the analysis will be presented. Those experimental results were obtained under controlled environment using the DRDC-Valcartier aerosol chamber. The experimental method herein proposed is based upon the use of ICCD range gated cameras wherein gate width and gate location may be varied on the fly. The optimal conditions for the use of these devices in view of obtaining the best image contrast are experimentally studied and reported in this paper.

  15. Pesticide occurrence and distribution in fog collected near Monterey, California

    SciTech Connect

    Schomburg, C.J.; Glotfelty, D.E. ); Seiber, J.N. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyzed pesticides in air and fog in several fog events sampled near Monterey, CA, to determine whether the uptake of pesticides in advected oceanic fog was different from uptake in fog forming under stagnant inversion conditions in California's Central Valley in the winter. Data for several pesticides common to both ares showed that the pesticide content and distribution were remarkable similar in the two locations. The conversion of organophosphorus insecticides to their corresponding oxons, and aqueous-phase enrichment factors, were also very similar. Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that enhanced pesticide concentration in fogwater is caused by strongly sorptive nonfilterable particles and colloids in the fog liquid that are derived from atmospheric particles.

  16. Internal combustion engine system with fog injection and heat exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, M.

    1987-10-27

    An improved turbine apparatus is described comprising: a turbine power generator, including a source of input air, and a source of fuel, a compressor which receives the input air, a combustion chamber which receives air from the output of the compressor and fuel from the source of fuel, a turbine which receives exhaust gases from the combustion chamber; and an electrical generator mechanically coupled with the turbine; a fogging device communicating with the input air. The fogging device is adapted to receive a fogger air supply and a fogger water supply, and to generate a fog in the input air, an adjustable heat exchanger for exchanging heat from the exhaust of the turbine to the input air to be fogged; and means for adjusting the level of heat exchange of the heat exchanger in accordance with properties of the input air and the level of fog being generated.

  17. Fog, plant leaves and deposition of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, W.; Ebner, M.; Traiser, C.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.

    2010-07-01

    For various plants and animals, the accumulation of fog or dew droplets constitutes an essential part of their water supply. Understanding how water droplets deposited by fog or dew events interact with plant or animal surfaces is essential for gaining insight into the functionality of these surfaces. Besides being interesting within the realm of biology, this knowledge is indispensable for technical applications. Frequently, it is advantageous to know (i) the growth rate of a droplet attached by surface tension to a surface which grows due to a given influx of fog particles, (ii) the maximum volume and (iii) the "lifespan" of a droplet before it detaches from the surface or starts to slide down along the plant surface, driven by gravity. Starting from principles of physics, we calculate quantitative expressions addressing questions (i) to (iii) for droplets which are attached to surfaces characterised by a high degree of symmetry, such as horizontally oriented or inclined planes, sections of spheres, cones and rotationally symmetric crevices. Furthermore, we treat the behaviour of droplets attached to a surface of non-constant contact angle. Although real surfaces never meet their geometric idealisations, results based on these often represent suitable and useful approximations to reality. Finally, we apply our results to Stipagrostis sabulicola, a dune grass of the Namib desert which satisfies its water demand solely by capturing fog and dew droplets. Pictures taken with a scanning electron microscope show that the stem of S. sabulicola is longitudinally built up by alternating elevated and countersunk strips. Filling gaps in the experimental observation with theoretical speculation, the following picture emerges: Assuming that the elevated strips exhibit a higher contact angle than the countersunk strips, water droplets being deposited on the elevated strips are drawn towards the latter. The lower contact angle which prevails there increases the droplets

  18. Severe haze episodes and seriously polluted fog water in Ji'nan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Jianmin; Sun, Jianfeng; Li, Weijun; Yang, Lingxiao; Wen, Liang; Wang, Wenxing; Wang, Xinming; Collett, Jeffrey L; Shi, Yang; Zhang, Qingzhu; Hu, Jingtian; Yao, Lan; Zhu, Yanhong; Sui, Xiao; Sun, Xiaomin; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2014-09-15

    Haze episodes often hit urban cities in China recently. Here, we present several continuous haze episodes with extremely high PM2.5 levels that occurred over several weeks in early 2013 and extended across most parts of the northern and eastern China-far exceeding the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Particularly, the haze episode covered ~1 million km(2) on January 14, 2013 and the daily averaged PM2.5 concentration exceeded 360 μg m(-3) in Ji'nan. The observed maximum hourly PM2.5 concentration in urban Ji'nan reached 701 μg m(-3) at 7:00 am (local time) in January 30. During these haze episodes, several fog events happened and the concurrent fog water was found to be seriously polluted. For the fog water collected in Ji'nan from 10:00 pm in January 14 to 11:00 am in January 15, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were the major ions with concentrations of 1.54 × 10(6), 8.98 × 10(5), and 1.75 × 10(6) μeq L(-1), respectively, leading to a low in-situ pH of 3.30. The sulfate content in the fog sample was more than 544 times as high as those observed in other areas. With examination of the simultaneously observed data on PM2.5 and its chemical composition, the fog played a role in scavenging and removing fine particles from the atmosphere during haze episodes and thus was seriously contaminated. However, the effect was not sufficient to obviously cleanse air pollution and block haze episodes. PMID:24941027

  19. The role of coastal fog in increased viability of marine microbial aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. Despite the ubiquity of these bacteria (concentration estimates range from 1 x 10^4 to 6 x 10^5 cells m-3), much is still being learned about their source, viability, and interactions with climatic controls. They can be attached to ambient aerosol particles or exist singly in the air. They affect climate by serving as ice, cloud, and fog nucleators, and have the metabolic potential to alter atmospheric chemistry. Fog presence in particular has been shown to greatly increase the deposition of viable microbial aerosols in both urban and coastal environments, but the mechanisms behind this are not fully understood. To address this gap, we examined the diversity of culturable microbial aerosols from a relatively pristine coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of fog presence on viability and community composition of microbial aerosols. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and depositing microbial aerosols (under clear and foggy conditions) resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66% of all sequences. Seventy-five percent of the viable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. The fog and ocean surface sequence libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries. These findings support a dual role for fog in enhancing the fallout of viable marine microbial aerosols via increased gravitational settling rates and decreased aerosolization stress on the organisms. The dominant presence of marine bacteria in coastal microbial aerosols provides a strong case for

  20. High Resolution Mass Spectrometry of Organic Nitrogen Species in Atmospheric Fog and Cloud Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Mazzoleni, L.; Collett, J.; Anastasio, C.; Rowchowdhury, U.; Zhang, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Past studies have shown that organic nitrogen (ON) species are ubiquitous in atmospheric particles and water droplets and they are significant components of both wet and dry depositions. However, very little is known about the characteristics of this class of compounds and the roles that they play in atmospheric chemistry. To fill in this gap, we have developed a method that allows us to bulk-characterize and quantify organic nitrogen species in atmospheric aqueous phases using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). We evaluated this method by analyzing a suite of ON compounds including amino acids, amines, proteins, amides, and nitriles. The mass spectra of these compounds show similar structures to those in the NIST database, though with more fragmentation due to the higher vaporization/ionization temperature (~ 600 oC). The elemental compositions determined from the high resolution mass spectra agree well with the theoretical values. With this method, we analyzed a number of fog waters collected from the Central Valley of California and cloud waters from the Whiteface Mountain of New York. A large fraction of water soluble materials in both fog and cloud waters was identified to be organic, of which a significant portion contains nitrogen. On average, ON accounts for ~ 20% and 5%, respectively, of the total nitrogen (= NH4+ + NO3- + NO2- + ON) in the Central Valley fog and Whiteface Mountain cloud waters. Water soluble organic matter (WSOM) in the Central Valley fog and Whiteface Mountain cloud waters show highly oxygenated properties with mass spectra resemble those of highly aged organic aerosols sampled in rural areas and humic/fulvic acids. Finally, we will attempt to extend pertinent data analysis techniques to in-situ AMS data for ON characterization in ambient aerosols.

  1. On the water-soluble organic nitrogen concentration and mass size distribution during the fog season in the Po Valley, Italy.

    PubMed

    Montero-Martínez, Guillermo; Rinaldi, Matteo; Gilardoni, Stefania; Giulianelli, Lara; Paglione, Marco; Decesari, Stefano; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The study of organic nitrogen gained importance in recent decades due to its links with acid rain, pollution, and eutrophication. In this study, aerosol and fog water samples collected from two sites in Italy during November 2011 were analyzed to characterize their organic nitrogen content. Organic nitrogen contributed 19-25% of the total soluble nitrogen in the aerosol and around 13% in fog water. The largest water soluble organic nitrogen concentrations in the PM1.2 fraction occurred during the diurnal period with mean values of 2.03 and 2.16 μg-N m(-3) (154 and 145 nmol-N m(-3)) at Bologna and San Pietro Capofiume (SPC), respectively. The mean PM10 WSON concentration during diurnal periods at SPC was 2.30 μg-N m(-3) (164 nmol-N m(-3)) while it was 1.34 and 0.82 μg-N m(-3) (95.7 and 58.5 nmol-N m(-3)) in the night and fog water samples, respectively. Aerosol mass distribution profiles obtained during fog changed significantly with respect to those estimated in periods without fog periods due to fog scavenging, which proved to be over 80% efficient. Linear correlations suggested secondary processes related to combustion and, to a lesser extent, biomass burning, as plausible sources of WSON. Regarding the inorganic nitrogen fraction, the results showed that ammonium was the largest soluble inorganic nitrogen component in the samples. PMID:24704961

  2. Preliminary results of the PreViBOSS project: description of the fog life cycle by ground-based and satellite observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Jolivet, Dominique; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Burnet, Frédéric

    2012-11-01

    The instrument set-up designed by the PreViBOSS project for the ParisFog field campaign is suitable to sound microphysical properties of droplets and interstitial aerosols during developed fog in a semi-urban environment. Developed fog is defined as LWC < 7 mg m-3 and the temperature vertical gradient over 30 m, ΔT, smaller than 0.04 K/m. Visibility averaged over November 2011 is 385+/-340 m (with rare values larger than 1000 m), and month average of LWC is 60+/-60 mg m-3. The droplet effective radius decreases from 14 to 4 μm when the number concentration increases from less than 10 to 220 cm-3. Particle extinction coefficient is computed by Mie theory applied on size distribution observed during developed fog in ambient conditions by both PALAS WELAS and DMT FM100. Comparison with particle extinction coefficient directly measured by the Degreanne DF20 visibilimeter demonstrates satisfying agreement, within combined uncertainties. Ratio of computed over measured particle extinction coefficient is 1.15+/-0.35. Visibility smaller than 1000 m at 3 m above ground level is observed not only during developed fog but also during shallow fog, which presents a significant vertical gradient, as ΔT > 0.4 K/m. In this case, LWC is highly variable and may be observed below 7 mg m-3. The consequent month average of LWC is 30+/-80 mg m-3. The optical counters miss large droplets significantly contributing to extinction in shallow fogs. Consequently, it is not possible to reproduce with satisfaction the particle extinction coefficient in shallow fog. Fog type may be distinguished by association of groundbased visibilimeter and MSG/SEVIRI. When clear-sky is given by EUMETSAT/NWCSAF cloud type product while visibility is observed smaller than 1000 m at SIRTA, in 75% cases a shallow fog occurs, and in other cases, horizontal heterogeneity characterises the developed fog within the SIRTA pixel, as during the dissipation phase. Moreover, consistently, low and very low clouds are

  3. Fog harvesting on the verge of economic competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedemann, K. J.; Lummerich, A.

    2010-07-01

    Water scarcity is the bottleneck for agriculture and development of Peru’s coast and subject to aggravation due to climate change. Until present day, Peru’s coast in general and the Lima Metropolitan Area (LMA) in particular have enjoyed to a great extend the effect of the country’s high altitude glaciers that serve as a buffer for the capital’s water demand during the highland dry season. However, climate models predict the disappearance of this buffer system below 5.500 masl by 2015, leaving one of the driest places on earth with yet another decrease in freshwater supply (Zapata 2008). The deviation of water resources from the highlands has led already to allocation conflicts. Peru is in urgent need of new concepts for water management. Fog harvesting was introduced to South America in the 1980s and has since been implemented at various locations in North and Central America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. The Standard Fog Collector (SFC) as described by Schemenauer and Cereceda (1994) has proven to be a successful instrument for this purpose. Apart from a number of small scale investigations, the design of the collector has barely been changed over the past three decades (e.g. Gioda et al. 1993). Within the framework of the presented project, financed primarily by the Global Exploration Fund of the National Geographic Society and Bayer AG, new fog collectors were designed at pilot and full scale. Best results in terms of simplicity of construction and water yield were obtained by a metal frame structure called Eiffel. While covering the same amount of space as an SFC and using the same Raschel 65% shadow net, the Eiffel collector harvested up to 2.650 liters of water within a frame of 8x4m compared to up to 600 liters of water harvested by a SFC at the same location. In combination with a simplified maintenance concept, our collectors present an economically competitive alternative to water supply by truck delivery in a region that is not likely to

  4. Does fog chemistry in Switzerland change with altitude?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, Pavel; Werner, Roland A.; Eugster, Werner

    2015-01-01

    During two extended summer seasons in 2006 and 2007 we operated two battery driven versions of the Caltech active strand cloud water collector (MiniCASCC) at the Niesen mountain (2362 m a.s.l.) in the northern part of the Swiss Alps, and two devices at the Lägeren research tower (690 m a.s.l.) at the northern boundary of the Swiss Plateau. During these two field operation phases we gained weekly samples of fog water, where we analyzed the major anions and cations, and the isotope ratios of fog water (in form of δ2H and δ18O). Dominant ions in fog water at all sites were NH4+, NO3-, and SO42 -. Compared to precipitation, the enrichment factors in fog water were in the range 5-9 at the highest site, Niesen Kulm. We found considerably lower summertime ion loadings in fog water at the two Alpine sites than at lower elevations above the Swiss Plateau. The lowest ion concentrations were found at the Niesen Kulm site at 2300 m a.s.l., whereas the highest concentrations (a factor 7 compared to Niesen Kulm) were found in fog water at the Lägeren site. Occult nitrogen deposition was estimated from fog frequency and typical fog water flux rates. This pathway contributes 0.3-3.9 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1 to the total N deposition at the highest site on Niesen mountain, and 0.1-2.2 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1 at the lower site. These inputs are the reverse of ion concentrations measured in fog due to the 2.5 times higher frequency of fog occurrence at the mountain top (overall fog occurrence was 25% of the time) as compared to the lower Niesen Schwandegg site. Although fog water concentrations were on the lower range reported in earlier studies, fog water is likely to be an important N source for Northern Alpine ecosystems and might reach values up to 16% of the total N deposition and up to 75% of wet N deposition by precipitation.

  5. Size resolved fog water chemistry and its atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida; Ervens, Barbara; Bhattu, Deepika

    2015-04-01

    Fog is a natural meteorological phenomenon that occurs throughout the world. It usually contains substantial quantity of liquid water and results in severe visibility reduction leading to disruption of normal life. Fog is generally seen as a natural cleansing agent but it also has the potential to form Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) via aqueous processing of ambient aerosols. Size- resolved fog water chemistry for inorganics were reported in previous studies but processing of organics inside the fog water and quantification of aqSOA remained a challenge. To assess the organics processing via fog aqueous processing, size resolved fog water samples were collected in two consecutive winter seasons (2012-13, 2013-14) at Kanpur, a heavily polluted urban area of India. Caltech 3 stage fog collector was used to collect the fog droplets in 3 size fraction; coarse (droplet diameter > 22 µm), medium (22> droplet diameter >16 µm) and fine (16> droplet diameter >4 µm). Collected samples were atomized into various instruments such as Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNc), Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and a thermo denuder (TD) for the physico-chemical characterization of soluble constituents. Fine droplets are found to be more enriched with different aerosol species and interestingly contain more aged and less volatile organics compared to other coarser sizes. Organics inside fine droplets have an average O/C = 0.87 compared to O/C of 0.67 and 0.74 of coarse and medium droplets. Metal chemistry and higher residence time of fine droplets are seemed to be the two most likely reasons for this outcome from as the results of a comprehensive modeling carried out on the observed data indicate. CCN activities of the aerosols from fine droplets are also much higher than that of coarse or medium droplets. Fine droplets also contain light absorbing material as was obvious from their 'yellowish' solution. Source apportionment of fog water organics via

  6. A field investigation and numerical simulation of coastal fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, E. J.; Eadie, W. J.; Rogers, C. W.; Kocmond, W. C.; Pilie, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A field investigation of the microphysical and micrometeorological features of fogs occurring near Los Angeles and Vandenberg, California was conducted. Observations of wind speed and direction, temperature, dew point, vertical wind velocity, dew deposition, drop-size distribution, liquid water content, and haze and cloud nucleus concentration were obtained. These observations were initiated in late evening prior to fog formation and continued until the time of dissipation in both advection and radiation fogs. Data were also acquired in one valley fog and several dense haze situations. The behavior of these parameters prior to and during fog are discussed in detail. A two-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the formation and dissipation of advection fogs under the influence of horizontal variations in surface temperature. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical plane as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection. Results are discussed from preliminary numerical experiments on the formation of warm-air advection fog and dissipation by natural and artificial heating from the surface.

  7. Partitioning the relative contribution of dew and fog to total occult precipitation across a decreasing fog inundation gradient in the Pajaro Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, J. P.; Paw U, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, occult precipitation has been difficult to measure, especially given that it can take two predominant forms: fogs and dews. Recent studies have shown that estimates of fog deposition can be made using constructed fog collectors of various styles. Leaf-wetness sensors have also been deployed to try and estimate the relative wetness of leaves during fog events, but coastal systems can integrate both fog deposition and dew condensation, which cannot be differentiated with such sensors alone. We measured fog interception with Decagon Leaf Wetness Sensors (LWSs) outfitted with a 1m2 mesh passive fog collector in areas adjacent to the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) sites in the Pajaro Valley. The LWSs that were deployed were covered with a partial shield or left uncovered. Covering the LWS creates a microclimate that allows discrimination between fog events that horizontally advect droplets that impact individual leaves, and dew events, which condense once dew point temperature is reached. By measuring fog with a standard measurement device (mesh fog collector), and comparing it to LWSs that have either fog exposure or fog exclusion (covered LWSs), we can partition the relative contribution of dew to overall occult precipitation. This would be the first study quantifying the amount of water inputs (horizontally advecting fog) to the amount of recycled water (dew) to gain a greater understanding of the role of occult precipitation in catchment water balances across coastal California.

  8. New method for evaluating high-quality fog protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeremuszkin, Grzegorz; Latreche, Mohamed; Mendoza-Suarez, Guillermo

    2011-05-01

    Fogging is commonly observed when humid-warm air contacts the cold surface of a transparent substrate, i.e. eyewear lenses, making the observed image blurred and hazy. To protect from fogging, the lens inner surfaces are protected with Anti-Fog coatings, which render them hydrophilic and induce water vapor condensation as a smooth, thin and invisible film, which uniformly flows down on the lens as the condensation progresses. Coatings differ in protection level, aging kinetics, and susceptibility to contamination. Some perform acceptably in limited conditions, beyond which the condensing water film becomes unstable, nonuniform, and scatters light or shows refractory distortions, both affecting the observed image. Quantifying the performance of Anti-Fog coated lenses is difficult: they may not show classical fogging and the existing testing methods, based on fog detection, are therefore inapplicable. The presented method for evaluating and quantifying AF properties is based on characterizing light scattering on lenses exposed to controlled humidity and temperature. Changes in intensity of laser light scattered at low angles (1, 2 4 and 8 degrees), observed during condensation of water on lenses, provide information on the swelling of Anti-Fog coatings, formation of uniform water film, going from an unstable to a steady state, and on the coalescence of discontinuous films. Real time observations/measurements allow for better understanding of factors controlling fogging and fog preventing phenomena. The method is especially useful in the development of new coatings for military-, sport-, and industrial protective eyewear as well as for medical and automotive applications. It allows for differentiating between coatings showing acceptable, good, and excellent performance.

  9. Coastal Upwelling and Deep Fog: 50-year Worldwide Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koracin, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    An analysis is presented of the marine fog distribution based upon the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) ship observations taken during 1950-2007. Deep fog occurrence is reported in routine weather reports that are encoded in an ICOADS ship observation. Occurrence is estimated by the number of deep fog observations divided by the total present weather observations in a one-degree area centered on latitude and longitude grid point intersections. The mean fog occurrence for the summer (June-July-August) 1950-2007 was computed for each one degree point for the world. There are five major world locations with coastal SST minimums due to wind driven upwelling. Four of these are during the local summer on the eastern side of a semi-permanent anticyclone on eastern sides of northern and southern mid-latitudes of the Pacifica and the Atlantic. The fifth is during the SW monsoon in the Indian Ocean. For all five of these locations, the deep fog occurrence is at maximum during the upwelling season, with the greatest occurrences concentrated along the coast and isolated over the SST minimum. For the five coastal fog maxima, the greatest and longest duration occurrence along coast occurrence is associated with the coldest sea surface temperature and longest along coast occurrence, which is along N. California- S. Oregon. In contrast, the lowest occurrence of fog and the least along coast occurrence is associated with the warmest sea surface temperatures and least along coast occurrence along the SE Arabian Peninsula. The remaining three zones, Peru-Chile, NW Africa, and SW Africa are between the two extremes in fog occurrence, along coast coverage and sea surface temperature. Peru-Chile is more complex than the others as the Peru upwelling and fog appears the more dominant although ship observations are sparse along Chile.

  10. Numerical simulation of advection fog formation on multi-disperse aerosols due to combustion-related pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of multi-disperse distribution of the aerosol population are presented. Single component and multi-component aerosol species on the condensation/nucleation processes which affect the reduction in visibility are described. The aerosol population with a high particle concentration provided more favorable conditions for the formation of a denser fog than the aerosol population with a greater particle size distribution when the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols was kept constant. The results were used as numerical predictions of fog formation. Two dimensional observations in horizontal and vertical coordinates, together with time-dependent measurements were needed as initial values for the following physical parameters: (1)wind profiles; (2) temperature profiles; (3) humidity profiles; (4) mass concentration of aerosol particles; (5) particle size distribution of aerosols; and (6) chemical composition of aerosols. Formation and dissipation of advection fog, thus, can be forecasted numerically by introducing initial values obtained from the observations.

  11. Using Coastal Fog to Support Sustainable Water Use in a California Agricultural System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baguskas, S. A.; Loik, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Impacts of climate change threaten California farmers in a number of ways, most importantly through a decline in freshwater availability, concurrent with a rise in water demand. The future of California's multibillion-dollar agricultural industry depends on increasing water use efficiency on farms. In coastal California, the growing season of economically important crops overlaps with the occurrence of coastal fog, which buffers the summer dry season through shading effects and direct water inputs. While the impacts of coastal fog on plant biology have been extensively studied in natural ecosystems, very few studies have evaluated its direct effects on the water and energy budgets of agricultural systems. The objective of this study was to develop a mechanistic understanding of the relationships between coastal fog and the water and energy budgets of croplands in order to improve estimates of crop-scale evapotranspiration rates, which has potential to curtail groundwater use based on local cloud meteorology. We established three sites on strawberry farms along a coastal-inland gradient in the Salinas Valley, California. At each site, we installed a passive fog collector and a micrometeorological station to monitor variation in microclimate conditions. Flow meters were installed in drip lines to quantify irrigation amount and timing. To assess plant response to foggy and non-foggy conditions, we collected measurements of photosynthesis and transpiration rates at the leaf and canopy-scale between June-September 2015. We found that canopy-level transpiration rates on foggy days were reduced by half compared to sunny, clear days (1.5 and 3 mmol H2O m-2 s-1, respectively). Whereas the amount of direct fog water inputs to the soil did not differ significantly between foggy and clear days, average photosynthetically active radiation between 0900-1100 hr. was reduced from 1500 to 500 μmol photons m-2 s-1 between these sampling periods. Our results provide convincing

  12. The AC clean-fog test for contaminated insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, E.A.; Beausejour, Y.; Cheng, T.C.; Lloyd, K.J.; Marrone, G.; Moran, J.H.; Naito, K.; Pargamin, L.

    1983-03-01

    The paper summarizes the results of clean-fog tests conducted by eleven task force laboratories on a common suspension insulator, IEEE insulator. The test series done according to a specific set of guidelines, show considerable dispersion in the fifty per cent flashover voltage between the laboratories. The significant parameters of the clean-fog method that influence the fifty per cent flashover voltage are discussed. More controls in testing are needed before the formalization of the clean-fog method as a standard contamination test for high voltage ac insulators can be made.

  13. Combinatorial regulation of tissue specification by GATA and FOG factors

    PubMed Central

    Chlon, Timothy M.; Crispino, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The development of complex organisms requires the formation of diverse cell types from common stem and progenitor cells. GATA family transcriptional regulators and their dedicated co-factors, termed Friend of GATA (FOG) proteins, control cell fate and differentiation in multiple tissue types from Drosophila to man. FOGs can both facilitate and antagonize GATA factor transcriptional regulation depending on the factor, cell, and even the specific gene target. In this review, we highlight recent studies that have elucidated mechanisms by which FOGs regulate GATA factor function and discuss how these factors use these diverse modes of gene regulation to control cell lineage specification throughout metazoans. PMID:23048181

  14. Observational Research on Fog Physicochemical Properties in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, S.; Lu, C.; Zhao, L.; Lv, J.; Yang, J.

    2010-07-01

    A comprehensive fog in situ observation was carried out at Pancheng in Nanjing area of China during December 2006 and December 2007, including the measurement of fog droplet spectra, surface meteorological elements, boundary layer structure and visibility as well as the collection of fog water. Some new microphysical features and the reasons why low visibility (less than 50 m) lasts for around 40 h in an unusual fog event (12/24/2006-12/27/2006) are examined. The 5-min-average maximum value of liquid water content (LWC) is found extraordinarily higher than 0.5 g m-3. But it is reasonable partly because of high fog top, long-wave radiative cooling, and partly because of the significant positive correlations of number concentration (N) vs. average radius (ra) and droplet spectra standard deviation (SD) vs. ra. The possible causes for the positive correlation of N vs. ra are studied. In general, the development of collision and coalescence can consume small droplets, causing decrease of N and increase of ra. However, due to warm and moist air and sufficient cloud condensation nuclei in this site, small droplets are reproduced through nucleation and condensation. As a result, N is proportional to ra. Furthermore, the correlation between liquid water content (LWC) and N is also positive. Prolonged low visibility is directly caused by the synchronous high LWC and N, and essentially by stable boundary layer structure under the influence of warm advection, sufficient water vapor provided by moisture advection and substantial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the observation site. In addition, with the 37 fog water samples in 9 fog events, fog chemistry is analyzed. Total ionic concentration (TIC), electrical conductivity (EC) in fog samples and local emissions of pollutants are one or two orders of magnitude higher than those found in Europe or South America for instance. Scavenging of NH3 and coarse particles by fog droplets are the main causes for high mean pH value, 5

  15. Impact of sea surface temperature front on stratus-sea fog over the Yellow and East China Seas — a case study with implications for climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Zhang, Suping

    2013-06-01

    A stratus-sea fog event that occurred over the Yellow and East China Seas on 3 June 2011 is investigated using observations and a numerical model, with a focus on the effects of background circulation and Sea Surface Temperature Front (SSTF) on the transition of stratus into sea fog. Southerly winds of a synoptic high-pressure circulation transport water vapor to the Yellow Sea, creating conditions favorable for sea fog/stratus formation. The subsidence from the high-pressure contributes to the temperature inversion at the top of the stratus. The SSTF forces a secondary circulation within the ABL (Atmospheric Boundary Layer), the sinking branch of which on the cold flank of SSTF helps lower the stratus layer further to reach the sea surface. The cooling effect over the cold sea surface counteracts the adiabatic warming induced by subsidence. The secondary circulation becomes weak and the fog patches are shrunk heavily with the smoothed SSTF. A conceptual model is proposed for the transition of stratus into sea fog over the Yellow and East China Seas. Finally, the analyses suggest that sea fog frequency will probably decrease due to the weakened SSTF and the reduced subsidence of secondary circulation under global warming.

  16. Characterization of reactants, reaction mechanisms, and reaction products in atmospheric water droplets: fog, cloud, dew, and rain water chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Jacob, D.J.; Waldman, J.M.; Munger, J.W.; Flagan, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Analyses of ground-based fogwater collected by inertial impaction in the Los Angeles basin, the San Gabriel Mountains, and the San Joaquin Valley revealed very high concentrations of NO3 SO4 S, NH4 , and other ions, often coupled with very high acidities. Fogs and strata in the Los Angeles basin typically had pH values ranging from 2 to 4. Acidities were not as high in the San Joaquin Valley, mostly because of scavenging by the fogs of ammonia from agricultural sources. Deposition of fogwater was observed to be an important pollutant sink during stagnation episodes in the San Joaquin Valley, and may also be an important source of acid input to surfaces in some areas. Kinetic experiments showed that H2O2 is important in the oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) at low pH. Metal-catalyzed autoxidation could also be an important source of sulfate. However, the extreme acidities observed in fogs (below pH 3) require condensation on preexistent acidic nuclei and scavenging of gaseous nitric acid. Stabilization of S(IV) in the fog was observed, and this was attributed to the formation of S(IV)-aldehyde adducts.

  17. Charged particle concepts for fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Collins, F. G.; Koepf, D.

    1981-01-01

    Charged particle techniques hold promise for dispersing warm fog in the terminal area of commercial airports. This report focuses on features of the charged particle technique which require further study. The basic physical principles of the technique and the major verification experiments carried out in the past are described. The fundamentals of the nozzle operation are given. The nozzle characteristics and the theory of particle charging in the nozzle are discussed, including information from extensive literature on electrostatic precipitation relative to environmental pollution control and a description of some preliminary reported analyses on the jet characteristics and interaction with neighboring jets. The equation governing the transfer of water substances and of electrical charge is given together with a brief description of several semi-empirical, mathematical expressions necessary for the governing equations. The necessary ingredients of a field experiment to verify the system once a prototype is built are described.

  18. Clearing the Cosmic Fog - The Most Distant Galaxy Ever Measured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A European team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has measured the distance to the most remote galaxy so far. By carefully analysing the very faint glow of the galaxy they have found that they are seeing it when the Universe was only about 600 million years old (a redshift of 8.6). These are the first confirmed observations of a galaxy whose light is clearing the opaque hydrogen fog that filled the cosmos at this early time. The results were presented at an online press conference with the scientists on 19 October 2010, and will appear in the 21 October issue of the journal Nature. "Using the ESO Very Large Telescope we have confirmed that a galaxy spotted earlier using Hubble is the most remote object identified so far in the Universe" [1], says Matt Lehnert (Observatoire de Paris) who is lead author of the paper reporting the results. "The power of the VLT and its SINFONI spectrograph allows us to actually measure the distance to this very faint galaxy and we find that we are seeing it when the Universe was less than 600 million years old." Studying these first galaxies is extremely difficult. By the time that their initially brilliant light gets to Earth they appear very faint and small. Furthermore, this dim light falls mostly in the infrared part of the spectrum because its wavelength has been stretched by the expansion of the Universe - an effect known as redshift. To make matters worse, at this early time, less than a billion years after the Big Bang, the Universe was not fully transparent and much of it was filled with a hydrogen fog that absorbed the fierce ultraviolet light from young galaxies. The period when the fog was still being cleared by this ultraviolet light is known as the era of reionisation [2]. Despite these challenges the new Wide Field Camera 3 on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope discovered several robust candidate objects in 2009 [3] that were thought to be galaxies shining in the era of reionisation. Confirming the

  19. Machine Learning of Maritime Fog Forecast Rules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tag, Paul M.; Peak, James E.

    1996-05-01

    In recent years, the field of artificial intelligence has contributed significantly to the science of meteorology, most notably in the now familiar form of expert systems. Expert systems have focused on rules or heuristics by establishing, in computer code, the reasoning process of a weather forecaster predicting, for example, thunderstorms or fog. In addition to the years of effort that goes into developing such a knowledge base is the time-consuming task of extracting such knowledge and experience from experts. In this paper, the induction of rules directly from meteorological data is explored-a process called machine learning. A commercial machine learning program called C4.5, is applied to a meteorological problem, forecasting maritime fog, for which a reliable expert system has been previously developed. Two detasets are used: 1) weather ship observations originally used for testing and evaluating the expert system, and 2) buoy measurements taken off the coast of California. For both datasets, the rules produced by C4.5 are reasonable and make physical sense, thus demonstrating that an objective induction approach can reveal physical processes directly from data. For the ship database, the machine-generated rules are not as accurate as those from the expert system but are still significantly better than persistence forecasts. For the buoy data, the forecast accuracies are very high, but only slightly superior to persistence. The results indicate that the machine learning approach is a viable tool for developing meteorological expertise, but only when applied to reliable data with sufficient cases of known outcome. In those instances when such databases are available, the use of machine learning can provide useful insight that otherwise might take considerable human analysis to produce.

  20. Star Family Seen Through Dusty Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    Images made with ESO's New Technology Telescope at La Silla by a team of German astronomers reveal a rich circular cluster of stars in the inner parts of our Galaxy. Located 30,000 light-years away, this previously unknown closely-packed group of about 100,000 stars is most likely a new globular cluster. Star clusters provide us with unique laboratory conditions to investigate various aspects of astrophysics. They represent groups of stars with similar ages, chemical element abundances and distances. Globular clusters, in particular, are fossils in the Milky Way that provide useful information. With ages of about 10 billion years, they are among the oldest objects in our Galaxy - almost as old as the Universe itself. These massive, spherical shaped star clusters are therefore witnesses of the early, mysterious ages of the Universe. ESO PR Photo 12/07 ESO PR Photo 12/07 The Newly Identified Cluster "Moreover, the properties of globular clusters are deeply connected with the history of their host galaxy," says Dirk Froebrich from the University of Kent, and lead-author of the paper presenting the results. "We believe today that galaxy collisions, galaxy cannibalism, as well as galaxy mergers leave their imprint in the globular cluster population of any given galaxy. Thus, when investigating globular clusters we hope to be able to use them as an acid test for our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies," he adds. In our own Galaxy about 150 globular clusters are known, each containing many hundreds of thousands of stars. In contrast to their smaller and less regularly shaped siblings - open clusters - globular clusters are not concentrated in the galactic disc; rather they are spherically distributed in the galactic halo, with increasing concentration towards the centre of the Galaxy. Until the mid 1990s, globular clusters were identified mostly by eye - from visual inspection of photographic plates. However, these early searches are likely to have

  1. Fog scavenging of organic and inorganic aerosol in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardoni, S.; Massoli, P.; Giulianelli, L.; Rinaldi, M.; Paglione, M.; Pollini, F.; Lanconelli, C.; Poluzzi, V.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Russell, L. M.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.

    2014-07-01

    The interaction of aerosol with atmospheric water affects the processing and wet removal of atmospheric particles. Understanding such interaction is mandatory to improve model description of aerosol lifetime and ageing. We analyzed the aerosol-water interaction at high relative humidity during fog events in the Po Valley within the framework of the Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l'Ambiente (ARPA) - Emilia Romagna supersite project. For the first time in this area, the changes in particle chemical composition caused by fog are discussed along with changes in particle microphysics. During the experiment, 14 fog events were observed. The average mass scavenging efficiency was 70% for nitrate, 68% for ammonium, 61% for sulfate, 50% for organics, and 39% for black carbon. After fog formation, the interstitial aerosol was dominated by particles smaller than 200 nm Dva (vacuum aerodynamic diameter) and enriched in carbonaceous aerosol, mainly black carbon and water-insoluble organic aerosol. For each fog event, the size-segregated scavenging efficiency of nitrate and organic aerosol (OA) was calculated by comparing chemical species size distribution before and after fog formation. For both nitrate and OA, the size-segregated scavenging efficiency followed a sigmoidal curve, with values close to zero below 100 nm Dva and close to 1 above 700 nm Dva. OA was able to affect scavenging efficiency of nitrate in particles smaller than 300 nm Dva. A linear correlation between nitrate scavenging and particle hygroscopicity (κ) was observed, indicating that 44-51% of the variability of nitrate scavenging in smaller particles (below 300 nm Dva) was explained by changes in particle chemical composition. The size-segregated scavenging curves of OA followed those of nitrate, suggesting that organic scavenging was controlled by mixing with water-soluble species. In particular, functional group composition and OA elemental analysis indicated that more oxidized OA was scavenged

  2. Onshore Winds and Coastal Fog Enhance Bacterial Connections Between Water and Air In the Coastal Environment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Juhl, A. R.; Weathers, K. C.; Uriarte, M.

    2013-12-01

    Globally, bacteria suspended in the atmosphere, or microbial aerosols, can range in concentration from 10^4 to 10^5 cells m^-3. They can be either attached to ambient aerosol particles or exist singly in the air, and can serve as ice, cloud and fog nucleators. To better understand sources for bacterial aerosols in the coastal environment, we assessed the effect of onshore wind speed on bacterial aerosol production and fallout in urban and non-urban coastal settings. We found that the fallout rate of culturable (viable) bacterial aerosols increased with onshore wind speeds. Furthermore, molecular characterization of the 16S rRNA gene diversity of bacteria from aerosols and surface waters revealed a similar species-level bacterial composition. This bacterial connection between water and air quality was strengthened at wind speeds above 4 m s^-1, with similar temporal patterns for coarse aerosol concentrations, culturable bacterial fallout rates, and presence of aquatic bacteria in near-shore aerosols. The water-air connection created by onshore winds in the coastal environment may be further modulated by coastal fog. Previous work has shown that the deposition of viable microbial aerosols increases by several orders of magnitude when fog is present in the coastal environment. Also, molecular analyses of bacteria in fog provide evidence that coastal fog enhances the viability of aerosolized marine bacteria, potentially allowing these bacteria to be transported further inland in a viable state with onshore winds. Implications for the coupling of wind-based aerosol production from surface waters with fog presence in the coastal environment include bi-directional atmospheric feedbacks between terrestrial and coastal ocean systems and the potential for water quality to affect air quality at coastal sites.

  3. Interannual increase of regional haze-fog in North China Plain in summer by intensified easterly winds and orographic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ziqi; Sheng, Lifang; Liu, Qian; Yao, Xiaohong; Wang, Wencai

    2015-12-01

    Regional haze-fog events over the North China Plain (NCP) have attracted much attention in recent years. Their increase has been attributed to anthropogenic emissions of air pollutants and synoptic weather conditions. We investigated the influence of local meteorological conditions and large-scale circulation on the haze-fog events over the NCP during 2001-2012, and found a significant interannual increase in the number of summer regional haze-fog days. Analysis indicated that local meteorological conditions could partly explain the increase but failed to explain the spatial variation; meanwhile, regional circulation change induced by large-scale circulation and orographic forcing unveiled a possible spatiotemporal variation mechanism. In summer, the prevalent southerly winds over the NCP were obstructed by the Taihang and Yanshan mountains, steadying the outflow direction to the southeast, while different inflow direction controlled by large-scale circulation had different effects on regional circulation. In weak (strong) East Asian summer monsoon years, an intensified eastward (westward) zonal inflow wind component reinforced (weakened) the negative vorticity and formed an anomalous anticyclone (cyclone), which strengthened (weakened) the downward motion, so the dissipation capability was weakened (strengthened) and the wind speed decreased (increased), ultimately resulting in the increased (decreased) occurrence of haze-fog. We also found that the circulation anomaly had a good relationship with strong El Niño and La Niña events. There was more haze-fog over the NCP in the summers that followed a La Niña event, and less in summers that followed an El Niño event. This suggested the possibility that summer haze-fog phenomena could be predicted based on the phase of ENSO.

  4. PLAM - a meteorological pollution index for air quality and its applications in fog-haze forecasts in north China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Wang, J.; Gong, S.; Zhang, X.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Li, D.; Guo, J.

    2015-03-01

    Using surface meteorological observation and high resolution emission data, this paper discusses the application of PLAM/h Index (Parameter Linking Air-quality to Meteorological conditions/haze) in the prediction of large-scale low visibility and fog-haze events. Based on the two-dimensional probability density function diagnosis model for emissions, the study extends the diagnosis and prediction of the meteorological pollution index PLAM to the regional visibility fog-haze intensity. The results show that combining the influence of regular meteorological conditions and emission factors together in the PLAM/h parameterization scheme is very effective in improving the diagnostic identification ability of the fog-haze weather in North China. The correlation coefficients for four seasons (spring, summer, autumn and winter) between PLAM/h and visibility observation are 0.76, 0.80, 0.96 and 0.86 respectively and all their significance levels exceed 0.001, showing the ability of PLAM/h to predict the seasonal changes and differences of fog-haze weather in the North China region. The high-value correlation zones are respectively located in Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei), Bohai Bay rim and the southern Hebei-northern Henan, indicating that the PLAM/h index has relations with the distribution of frequent heavy fog-haze weather in North China and the distribution of emission high-value zone. Comparatively analyzing the heavy fog-haze events and large-scale fine weather processes in winter and summer, it is found that PLAM/h index 24 h forecast is highly correlated to the visibility observation. Therefore, PLAM/h index has better capability of doing identification, analysis and forecasting.

  5. PLAM - a meteorological pollution index for air quality and its applications in fog-haze forecasts in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. Q.; Wang, J. Z.; Gong, S. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, J.; Li, D.; Guo, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Using surface meteorological observation and high-resolution emission data, this paper discusses the application of the PLAM/h index (Parameter Linking Air-quality to Meteorological conditions/haze) in the prediction of large-scale low visibility and fog-haze events. Based on the two-dimensional probability density function diagnosis model for emissions, the study extends the diagnosis and prediction of the meteorological pollution index PLAM to the regional visibility fog-haze intensity. The results show that combining the influence of regular meteorological conditions and emission factors together in the PLAM/h parameterization scheme is very effective in improving the diagnostic identification ability of the fog-haze weather in North China. The determination coefficients for four seasons (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) between PLAM/h and visibility observation are 0.76, 0.80, 0.96, and 0.86, respectively, and all of their significance levels exceed 0.001, showing the ability of PLAM/h to predict the seasonal changes and differences of fog-haze weather in the North China region. The high-value correlation zones are located in Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei), Bohai Bay rim, and southern Hebei-northern Henan, indicating that the PLAM/h index is related to the distribution of frequent heavy fog-haze weather in North China and the distribution of emission high-value zone. Through comparative analysis of the heavy fog-haze events and large-scale clear-weather processes in winter and summer, it is found that PLAM/h index 24 h forecast is highly correlated with the visibility observation. Therefore, the PLAM/h index has good capability in identification, analysis, and forecasting.

  6. 2. Oil house, fog signal house and light tower, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oil house, fog signal house and light tower, view southwest, east and north sides - Great Duck Island Light Station, At southern tip of Great Duck Island southeast of Bass Harbor & northeast of Frenchboro, Frenchboro, Hancock County, ME

  7. 3. Light tower and fog signal house, view northeast, west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Light tower and fog signal house, view northeast, west and south sides - Great Duck Island Light Station, At southern tip of Great Duck Island southeast of Bass Harbor & northeast of Frenchboro, Frenchboro, Hancock County, ME

  8. 11. Fog signal house, view northnorthwest, east and south sides ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Fog signal house, view north-northwest, east and south sides - Cape Elizabeth Light Station, Near Two Lights State Park at end of Two Lights Road, off State Highway 77, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, ME

  9. 11. Fog signal tower, view southeast, northwest and southwest sides ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Fog signal tower, view southeast, northwest and southwest sides - Kennebec River Light Station, South side of Doubling Point Road, off State Highway 127, 1.8 miles south of U.S. Route 1, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  10. 28. Photograph of interior view of fog horn signal building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photograph of interior view of fog horn signal building with two lighthouse keepers by steam engine wheel, ca. 1920. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  11. Fog Collection and Sustainable Architecture in Atacama Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suau, C.

    2010-07-01

    It is imperative to integrate renewable energy and climate into zero-carbon buildings in arid lands, particularly when it is reinforced by natural and social science-based innovation in natural and built environs. The aim is twofold: On one hand, to establish potential natural and urban habitats and their yields required in different scales of intervention and, on another hand, augment rate and yield of fog collection used for drinking and irrigation in chosen locations. The purpose of this study is to integrate zero-carbon energy, landscape and sustainable architecture as a whole and thus envision potential inhabitation through self-sufficient space-frame configurations along the coast of Tarapacá Region in Chile. In a sequential way, this study distinguishes three scales of interventions: A. Territorial scale. It consists of rural and natural zones along the shore of Tarapacá Region: Fog oases, creeks or corridors. The strategic allocation of large fog collectors can bring local agriculture back and thus stop rural emigration; and also repair existing fragile ecosystems in several fog oases by harvesting and distributing mainly crop water. B. Local scale. The space-frame fog collectors are allocated in Alto Patache (fog oasis) and Iquique city (low-income sprawl of Alto Hospicio). These artefacts can supply both water and electricity to small communities through forestation, sustainable micro-agriculture and complementary electrification. C. Domestic scale. It consists of the design of autonomous housing configuration based in polygonal space-frames. This inhabitable unit is modular, deployable and lightweight; with an adjustable polyvalent membrane which performs as water repellent skin (facing South and SW winds) and shading device facing Equator. In addition, a domestic wind turbine is installed within the structural frame to provide autonomous electrification. Water collector, filtering (purification) and irrigation network is designed with available

  12. Inhalation toxicology of fog-oil obscurant. Final report, October 1981-February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Selgrade, M.J.; Davies, D.W.; Stead, A.J.

    1986-12-01

    Sixty-day-old, male and female rats were exposed by inhalation to fog-oil smoke. Mortality, LC50, subacute, and subchronic studies were performed. Mortality studies showed fog-oil smoke to be 100% lethal at 11.0 mg/L, 95% lethal at 5.0 mg/L, 20% lethal at 1.0 mg/L, and 0% lethal at 0.1 mg/L after a 6-hour exposure. The observed LC50 of fog-oil smoke after a 3.5-hr exposure was 5.2 mg/L. In the subacute and subchronic studies, rats were exposed to air, 0.2-, 0.5-, or 1.5-mg/L fog oil smoke for 3.5 hr/day, 4 days/wk for either 4 of 13 wk. Both pulmonary and systemic effects were investigated one day after the exposure ceased. For one 13-wk exposure group, animals were also examined 4 wk after the exposure. Following the subacute 4-exposure to 1.5 mg/L, a multifocal pneumonitis was observed. Lung lavage had an elevated number of polymorphonuclear leukoctes (PMNs), alveolar macrophages, and lung weights was observed after exposure to 0.5 mg/L. Pulmonary-function tests revealed an increase in end expiratory volume (EEV) after 1.5mg/L. Systemic effects after the subacute exposure were minimal. A decrease in zoxazolamine-induced paralysis time was observed following both 0.5 and 1.5 mg/L; however, no effect on pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was observed. Behavioral studies were negative, as were clinical chemistries and immune function tests.

  13. Measurements of fog composition at a rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Derek J.; Hutchings, James W.; Herckes, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Studies that focus on fog chemistry in the United States have been limited to relatively few locations. Apart from measurements along the East and West coasts and extensive analysis of radiation fog in the Central Valley of California, fog composition has been characterized in only a handful of other locations. To complement and expand the existing fog chemistry data that are currently available, a new field campaign was established at a rural location in Central Pennsylvania to produce a unique, long term record of fog composition. From 2007 to 2010, 41 fog events were sampled with an automated Caltech Heated Rod Cloudwater Collector (CHRCC). The collected samples were analyzed primarily for pH and major inorganic ions. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and trace metals were analyzed in selected samples and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was quantified in two samples. Sample composition varied widely during the study period. Sulfate concentrations ranged from 15 to 955 (median = 123) μN and pH varied between 3.08 and 7.41 (median = 5.77). In terms of volume weighted averages, ammonium was the most abundant ionic species followed by sulfate, calcium, and nitrate. For the subset of samples in which DOC was analyzed, concentrations ranged from 2.2 to 22.6 mgC l -1. Comparisons with regional precipitation chemistry measurements reveal the influence of local agricultural and soil sources on fog composition. The sum of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measured in the present study is considerably lower than the majority of radiation, precipitation, and coastal fogs collected in the United States although the ammonium/(nitrate + sulfate) ratio is similar to those found in the Central Valley of California.

  14. Vertical profile of fog microphysics : a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnet, Frédéric; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Mazoyer, Marie; Bourrianne, Thierry; Etcheberry, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Brigitte; Legain, Dominique; Tzanos, Diane; Barrié, Joel; Barrau, Sébastien; Defoy, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and development of fogs result from the non-linear interaction of competing radiative, thermodynamic, microphysical and dynamical processes and the forecasting of their life cycle still remains a challenging issue. Several field campaigns have been carried out at the SIRTA observatory in the Paris suburb area (France). These experiments have shown that fog events exhibit large differences of the microphysical properties and various evolutions during their life cycle. To better understand relationships between the different processes and to validate numerical simulations it is necessary however to document the vertical profile of the fog microphysics. A CDP (Cloud Droplet Spectrometer) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technology, Boulder, CO) has been modified to allow measurements of the droplet size distribution in fog layers with a tethered balloon. This instrumental set-up has been used during a field campaign during the winter 2013-214 in the Landes area in the South West of France. To validate the vertical profiles provided by the modified CDP, a mast was equipped with microphysical instruments at 2 altitude levels with an another CDP at 24 m and a Fog Monitor FM100 at 42 m. The instrumental set-up deployed during this campaign is presented. Data collected during a fog event that occurred during the night of 5-6 March 2014 are analysed. We show that microphysical properties such as droplet number concentration, LWC and mean droplet size, exhibit different time evolution during the fog life cycle depending on the altitude level. Droplet size distribution measurements are also investigated. They reveal sharp variations along the vertical close to the top of the fog layer. In addition it is shown that the shape of the size distributions at the top follows a time evolution typical of a quasi-adiabatic droplet growth.

  15. Relationship between optical extinction and liquid water content in fogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Dabas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Studies carried out in the late 1970s suggest that a simple linear relationship exists in practice between the optical extinction in the thermal IR and the liquid water content (LWC) in fogs. Such a relationship opens the possibility to monitor the vertical profile of the LWC in fogs with a rather simple backscatter lidar. Little is known on how the LWC varies as a function of height and during the fog life cycle, so the new measurement technique would help understand fog physics and provide valuable data for improving the quality of fog forecasts. In this paper, the validity of the linear relationship is revisited in the light of recent observations of fog droplet size distributions measured with a combination of sensors covering a large range of droplet radii. In particular, large droplets (radius above 15 μm) are now detected, which was not the case in the late 1970s. The results confirm that the linear relationship still holds, at least for the mostly radiative fogs observed during the campaign. The impact of the precise value of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index on the coefficient of the linear relationship is also studied. The usual practice considers that droplets are made of pure water. This assumption is probably valid for big drops, but it may be questioned for small ones since droplets are formed from condensation nuclei of highly variable chemical composition. The study suggests that the precise nature of condensation nuclei will primarily affect rather light fogs with small droplets and light liquid water contents.

  16. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yuan-Man; Hung, Yi-chih; Hu, Lihong; Lee, Yi-ju; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-12-01

    Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA) and rotundic acid (RA) were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice. MEA or RA intake decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels in plasma and liver. Histological data agreed that MEA or RA intake lowered hepatic lipid droplets, determined by ORO stain. MEA intake dose-dependently declined reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione levels, increased glutathione content and maintained the activity of glutathione reductase and catalase in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. MEA intake dose-dependently reduced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. RA intake at 0.1% declined cardiac and renal levels of these inflammatory factors. These data indicated that MEA improved glycemic control and hemostatic imbalance, lowered lipid accumulation, and attenuated oxidative and inflammatory stress in diabetic mice. Thus, madecassic acid could be considered as an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:26633490

  17. Comparison of antioxidant effectiveness of lipoic acid and dihydrolipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2011-01-01

    The abilities of dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) to scavenge peroxynitrite (ONOO(-) ), galvinoxyl radical, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) cation radical (ABTS(+•) ), and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) were higher than those of lipoic acid (LA). The effectiveness of DHLA to protect methyl linoleate against 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH)-induced oxidation was about 2.2-fold higher than that of LA, and DHLA can retard the autoxidation of linoleic acid (LH) in the β-carotene-bleaching test. DHLA can also trap ∼0.6 radicals in AAPH-induced oxidation of LH. Moreover, DHLA can scavenge ∼2.0 radicals in AAPH-induced oxidation of DNA and AAPH-induced hemolysis of erythrocytes, whereas LA can scavenge ∼1.5 radicals at the same experimental conditions. DHLA can protect erythrocytes against hemin-induced hemolysis, but accelerate the degradation of DNA in the presence of Cu(2+) . Therefore, the antioxidant capacity of -SH in DHLA is higher than S-S in LA. PMID:21812071

  18. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Man; Hung, Yi-chih; Hu, Lihong; Lee, Yi-ju; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-01-01

    Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA) and rotundic acid (RA) were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice. MEA or RA intake decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels in plasma and liver. Histological data agreed that MEA or RA intake lowered hepatic lipid droplets, determined by ORO stain. MEA intake dose-dependently declined reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione levels, increased glutathione content and maintained the activity of glutathione reductase and catalase in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. MEA intake dose-dependently reduced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. RA intake at 0.1% declined cardiac and renal levels of these inflammatory factors. These data indicated that MEA improved glycemic control and hemostatic imbalance, lowered lipid accumulation, and attenuated oxidative and inflammatory stress in diabetic mice. Thus, madecassic acid could be considered as an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:26633490

  19. Operational fog monitoring using FY-1D remotely sensed data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yonglan; Zhang, Guoping; Wang, Maoxin

    2006-12-01

    Fog is a disaster that troubles the people life especially the traffic safety and air quality. NOAA and EOS/MOSDIS data can both be used to monitor the fog disaster, but FY-1D data is the best in China for its timely acquirement that covers the local region. So fog monitoring using FY-1D in China can offer timely fog disaster information for traffic safety forecast and further weather trend analyses. Fog monitoring mainly uses visible and infrared bands which are not very good for fog mapping, however. The paper analyzed the image spectral properties of fog and low stratus to choose the best band combination for optimal fog mapping. The paper proposed the method of using FY-1D data to monitor daytime fog disaster in China.

  20. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and select aldehydes in cloud and fog water: the role of the aqueous phase in impacting trace gas budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Herckes, P.

    2013-05-01

    Cloud and fog droplets efficiently scavenge and process water-soluble compounds and, thus, modify the chemical composition of the gas and particle phases. The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aqueous phase reach concentrations on the order of ~ 10 mgC L-1 which is typically on the same order of magnitude as the sum of inorganic anions. Aldehydes and carboxylic acids typically comprise a large fraction of DOC because of their high solubility. The dissolution of species in the aqueous phase can lead to (i) the removal of species from the gas phase preventing their processing by gas phase reactions (e.g., photolysis of aldehydes) and (ii) the formation of unique products that do not have any efficient gas phase sources (e.g., dicarboxylic acids). We present measurements of DOC and select aldehydes in fog water at high elevation and intercepted clouds at a biogenically-impacted location (Whistler, Canada) and in fog water in a more polluted area (Davis, CA). Concentrations of formaldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal were in the micromolar range and comprised ≤ 2% each individually of the DOC. Comparison of the DOC and aldehyde concentrations to those at other locations shows good agreement and reveals highest levels for both in anthropogenically impacted regions. Based on this overview, we conclude that the fraction of organic carbon (dissolved and insoluble inclusions) in the aqueous phase of clouds or fogs, respectively, comprises 2-~ 40% of total organic carbon. Higher values are observed to be associated with aged air masses where organics are expected to be more highly oxidised and, thus, more soluble. Accordingly, the aqueous/gas partitioning ratio expressed here as an effective Henry's law constant for DOC (KH*DOC) increases by an order of magnitude from 7 × 103 M atm-1 to 7 × 104 M atm-1 during the ageing of air masses. The measurements are accompanied by photochemical box model simulations. These simulations are used to contrast two

  1. Distribution and long-term trends in various fog types over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belorid, Miloslav; Lee, Chong Bum; Kim, Jea-Chul; Cheon, Tae-Hun

    2015-11-01

    This study analyzed the spatial and temporal distributions of various fog types over South Korea. Six types of fogs were identified using a classification algorithm based on simple conceptual models of fog formation. The algorithm was applied to a 25-year record of meteorological observations. The most common fog types were radiation fog, prevailing at inland stations, and precipitation fog at coastal and island stations. Declining temporal trends in the frequency of fog events ranging between 2.1 and 10.9 fog events per decade were found at eight inland and two coastal stations. Long-term trends for each fog type show that the decrease in the frequency of fog events is mainly due to a decrease in the frequency of radiation fogs ranging between 1.1 and 8.5 fog events per decade. To identify the potential factors related to the decrease in radiation fog events, the temporal trends in annual mean nocturnal maximal cooling rates and annual mean nocturnal specific humidity during nights with clear sky and clam winds were examined. The results show that the decrease in the frequency of radiation fog events is associated mainly with the pattern of urbanization occurring during the past two decades.

  2. A field study of pollutant deposition in radiation fog

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Jacob, D.J.; Munger, J.W.; Hoffman, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    Deposition during fog episodes can make a significant contribution to the overall flux of pollutants in certain ecosystems. Furthermore, when atmospheric stagnation prevents normal ventilation in a region, fog deposition may become the main route of pollutant removal. Fogs can consequently exert dominant control over pollutant levels in certain atmospheres. The southern San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California is a region prone to wintertime episodes of atmospheric stagnation. These lead to elevated pollutant concentrations and/or dense, widespread fogs. Major oil-recovery operations plus widespread agricultural and livestock feeding activities are important sources of SO/sub 2/, NO/sub X/ and NH/sub 3/ in the valley. A multifaceted program of field monitoring was conducted in the SJV during the winter 1984-1985, focusing on aspects of pollutant scavenging and removal in the fog-laden atmosphere. Concentrations of major species were measured in gas, dry aerosol and fogwater phases. In addition, depositional fluxes were monitored by surrogate-surface methods. These measurements were employed to directly assess the magnitude of removal enhancement by fog.

  3. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  4. Climatology Study of Low-level Cloud and Fog in Mountain Terrain Using Satellite Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yajuan; Barros, Ana P.

    2015-04-01

    The presence of orographic clouds and fog has major environmental and economic implications that the potential shift in the space-time distribution can effectively redistribute freshwater resources and threaten the sustainability of the ecology, geomorphology and hydrology of mountainous regions and adjacent basins. This includes the Southern Appalachian Mountains, which rely closely on the moisture input from fog, cap clouds and light rainfall, as well as cloud forests in the Andes with frequent occurrence of dense fog. However, the applicability of fog forecasting models becomes limited in regions of complex terrain. The motivation of this project is to develop a satellite-based hydroclimatology and physical parameterization of orographic low-level clouds and fog regimes in the Southern Appalachians using a general methodology that can be applied to mountainous regions elsewhere. An algorithm for the detection and extraction of stratus clouds and fog was developed using cloud base height product from 8-years of CALIPSO and CloudSat observations, and evaluated against ground-based measurements from ceilometers. This population of low-level clouds and fog will be analyzed with GOES infrared and visible imagery, MODIS products, and with airport cloud height and visibility records to expand the spatial coverage beyond narrow satellite sensor swaths. The climatology will be further developed through integration with results from WRF high-solution simulations for selected periods since the bulk of the PMM network has been in place (2008-present) to aid in defining meteorological and time-of-day constraints in the interpretation of simulated satellite profiles through a satellite-sensor simulator. A 4-day WRF simulation is performed at Pegion Basin in the Southern Appalachian Mountains with increasing horizontal (0.25 km grid spacing) and vertical (up to 80 sigma levels) resolution and evaluated against observations collected during the Integrated Precipitation and

  5. Numerical forecasting of radiation fog. Part II: A comparison of model simulation with several observed fog events

    SciTech Connect

    Guedalia, D.; Bergot, T. )

    1994-06-01

    A 1D model adapted for forecasting the formation and development of fog, and forced with mesoscale parameters derived from a 3D limited-area model, was used to simulate three fog event observations made during the Lille 88 campaign. The model simulation correctly reproduced the time of fog formation and its vertical development when forcing terms derived from observations were used. It determined the influence of different physical processes and in particular that of dew deposition. The initial conditions deduced from the 3D model proved to be correct in two of the three events. On the other hand, the prediction of advection terms necessary for forecasting the vertical growth of fog was a more delicate matter. 15 refs., 21 figs.

  6. Mercury and Other Chemical Constituents in Pacific Marine Fog Water: Results from Two Summers of Sampling in FogNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahba, O.; Conrad, W. S.; Moranville, R.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Coale, K. H.; Heim, W. A.; Olson, A.; Chiswell, H.; Fernandez, D.; Oliphant, A. J.; Dodge, C.; Hoskins, D.; Farlin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The principle goal of FogNet is to make measurements of monomethylmercury (MMHg), total mercury (HgT) and major ions in Pacific Coast marine fog water samples taken from eight land stations from Big Sur to Trinidad, California in order to calculate the flux of MMHg and HgT to the terrestrial ecosystem, and observe their spatial and temporal patterns and relationships to major ion concentrations in fog water. During the summers of 2014 and 2015, fog water samples were analyzed and mean concentrations and standard deviations were found (number of samples shown in parentheses): MMHg = 1.9 +/- 2.4 ng L-1 (119), HgT = 28.7 +/- 26.8 ng L-1 (86), NH4+ = 2.5 +/- 2.0 mg L-1 (49), Cl- = 7.1 +/- 13.7 mg L-1 (52), SO42- = 15.3 +/- 26.0 mg L-1 (52), NO3- = 5.9 +/- 7.7 mg L-1 (48), and pH = 5.4 +/- 0.8 (38). For comparison, MMHg in rain is ~0.1 ng L-1 from previous studies. A temporal pattern in MMHg concentrations in fog was observed with monthly means of all samples for June, July, August and September 2014 (in ng L-1) of 4.2, 2.4, 1.4, and 0.8, respectively (see figure). No such temporal pattern was observed for HgT concentrations. The coastal site at Humboldt State University Marine Labs had fog water samples with the highest concentrations of MMHg (4.0 +/-4.3), whereas the inland site of Pepperwood had the lowest mean concentration of 0.7 +/- 0.5 ng L-1 among all sites. The temporal and spatial patterns observed in MMHg concentrations in fog water are consistent with a marine source. By combining the measured concentrations of analytes in fog water with an estimate of deposition from collocated 1 m2 passive fog collectors, the fluxes of MMHg and HgT for the summer of 2014 were 0.003-0.14 and 0.04-0.55 mg m-2 y-1, respectively. For MMHg, the mean fog water flux is about 4 times larger than that calculated for rain, and for HgT, the mean fog water flux is about 10% that calculated for rain.

  7. Microphysics and energy and water fluxes of various fog types at SIRTA, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degefie, D. T.; El-Madany, T.-S.; Hejkal, J.; Held, M.; Dupont, J.-C.; Haeffelin, M.; Klemm, O.

    2015-01-01

    During the PARISFOG campaign in winter 2012/2013, microphysical properties and turbulent fluxes of fog droplets (liquid water), water vapor, and energy were characterized and quantified during fog events of various types that occurred at the SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique) atmospheric observatory outside Paris. The eddy covariance technique was applied, employing a fast (10 Hz) fog droplet spectrometer, a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer, and a fast response gas analyzer, which were operated at an altitude of 2.5 m above ground. A visibility meter was used to detect the occurrence and density of fog. A total of twenty-one fog events were measured during the field campaign. After applying quality criteria, six events remained. For this study, two fog events out of the six, representing a radiation fog and stratus lowering fog, respectively, are analyzed in detail. The two fog events exhibited very distinct patterns in terms of fog droplet size distribution, fog number concentration, and liquid water content. The evolution of these microphysical properties is elucidated through combined analysis of the turbulent fluxes of fog droplets (liquid water), water vapor and energy as well as reasoning of microphysical processes like, condensation, collision-coalescence, and droplet evaporation. Downward droplet number fluxes and liquid water fluxes were mostly observed in stratus lowering fog, however, upward fluxes were also observed in response to downward water vapor fluxes. In radiation fog, both upward and downward droplet number fluxes and liquid water fluxes were observed depending on the position at which the microphysical process was observed with respect to the measurement height. Bi-directional fog droplet fluxes with different flux directions of smaller and larger droplets were observed. In both fog events, the downward water vapor fluxes were the major cause for (I) the broadening of the fog droplet size

  8. Effects of acid deposition on agricultural production

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Oden, N.L.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Coveney, E.A.; Jacobson, J.S.; Rosenthal, R.E.; Evans, L.S.; Lewin, K.F.; Allen, F.L.

    1985-09-01

    A preliminary assessment, both qualitative and quantitative, was carried out on the effects of acid deposition on agriculture. An inventory was made of US crops exposed to different acid deposition levels in 1982. Most crops (valued at more than $50 billion) were exposed to annual average acid deposition levels greater than pH 4.6, but crops worth more than $220 billion were exposed to even lower pH levels. Published results of experiments on crop response to acid deposition have not identified any single crop as being consistently sensitive, and suggest that present levels of acidic precipitation in the US are not significantly affecting growth and yield of crops. Because relatively few experiments appropriate to a quantitative acid deposition assessment have been conducted, the quantitative section is necessarily based on a restricted data set. Corn, potatoes, and soybeans have been studied in experimental environments which simulate agronomic conditions and which have adequate statistical power for yield estimates; only some varieties of soybeans have demonstrated statistically significant sensitivity to acid deposition.

  9. Fungal spores as potential ice nuclei in fog/cloud water and snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Goncalves, Fabio L. T.; Schueller, Elisabeth; Puxbaum, Hans

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In discussions about climate change and precipitation frequency biological ice nucleation has become an issue. While bacterial ice nucleation (IN) is already well characterized and even utilized in industrial processes such as the production of artificial snow or to improve freezing processes in food industry, less is known about the IN potential of fungal spores which are also ubiquitous in the atmosphere. A recent study performed at a mountain top in the Rocky Mountains suggests that fungal spores and/or pollen might play a role in increased IN abundance during periods of cloud cover (Bowers et al. 2009). In the present work concentrations of fungal spores in fog/cloud water and snow were determined. EXPERIMENTAL: Fog samples were taken with an active fog sampler in 2008 in a traffic dominated area and in a national park in São Paulo, Brazil. The number concentrations of fungal spores were determined by microscopic by direct enumeration by epifluorescence microscopy after staining with SYBR Gold nucleic acid gel stain (Bauer et al. 2008). RESULTS: In the fog water collected in the polluted area at a junction of two highly frequented highways around 22,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted. Fog in the national park contained 35,000 spores mL-1. These results were compared with cloud water and snow samples from Mt. Rax, situated at the eastern rim of the Austrian Alps. Clouds contained on average 5,900 fungal spores mL-1 cloud water (1,300 - 11,000) or 2,200 spores m-3 (304 - 5,000). In freshly fallen snow spore concentrations were lower than in cloud water, around 1,000 fungal spores mL-1 were counted (Bauer et al. 2002). In both sets of samples representatives of the ice nucleating genus Fusarium could be observed. REFERENCES: Bauer, H., Kasper-Giebl, A., Löflund, M., Giebl, H., Hitzenberger, R., Zibuschka, F., Puxbaum, H. (2002). The contribution of bacteria and fungal spores to the organic carbon content of cloud water, precipitation and aerosols

  10. ACIDIC DEPOSITION PHENOMENON AND ITS EFFECTS: CRITICAL ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Assessment Document (CAD) is a summary, integration, and interpretation of the current scientific understanding of acidic deposition. It is firmly based upon The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Asse...

  11. Coastal fog along subtropical western South America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garreaud, R.

    2013-12-01

    The coastal mountains of semiarid Chile, along the western coast of subtropical South America, are punctuated by patches of fog-dependent evergreen forests. Fog episodes often occur when the prominent coastal topography intercepts a well developed deck of stratocumulus (Sc) off north-central Chile. In this work we document the annual cycle and interannual variability of fog frequency in this region, based on a 22-year record of ground-based fog observations at Fray Jorge Biosphere Reserve (FJBR, 30°S), atmospheric reanalysis and satellite derived low cloud amount. The number of foggy days minimizes during austral winter and then increases rapidly to reach a maximum in spring (the growing season of FJBR trees). The comparison of the lifting condensation level and the inversion base height gives a useful framework to understand the fluctuations in cloud frequency at several time scales. The mean annual cycle of the fog-frequency follows closely the annual cycle of the nearby marine Sc amount and lower tropospheric stability (LTS). The springtime fog frequency, nearby marine cloud amount and LTS are also well correlated at interannual timescales. Colder than normal sea surface temperatures and warmer than normal air temperatures aloft near 30°S strengthen the temperature inversion and lead to a more persistent cloud deck and higher than normal fog frequency at FJBR. La Niña years produce temperature anomalies very similar to the pattern described before and consequently they are associated with higher than normal springtime fog frequency at FJBR. Conversely, El Niño years are associated with less foggy conditions at FJBR. Interestingly, ENSO-related rainfall anomalies in north-central Chile are opposite to ENSO-related anomalies in fog-frequency. We also discuss the overall impact of ENSO in FJBR ecosystems as well as the prospects of FJBR in future climate scenarios driven by increased greenhouse gases. Alongshore variations of rainfall, cloud frequency

  12. Pattern recognition applied to infrared images for early alerts in fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Vincent; Marchetti, Mario; Dumoulin, Jean; Cord, Aurélien

    2014-09-01

    Fog conditions are the cause of severe car accidents in western countries because of the poor induced visibility. Its forecast and intensity are still very difficult to predict by weather services. Infrared cameras allow to detect and to identify objects in fog while visibility is too low for eye detection. Over the past years, the implementation of cost effective infrared cameras on some vehicles has enabled such detection. On the other hand pattern recognition algorithms based on Canny filters and Hough transformation are a common tool applied to images. Based on these facts, a joint research program between IFSTTAR and Cerema has been developed to study the benefit of infrared images obtained in a fog tunnel during its natural dissipation. Pattern recognition algorithms have been applied, specifically on road signs which shape is usually associated to a specific meaning (circular for a speed limit, triangle for an alert, …). It has been shown that road signs were detected early enough in images, with respect to images in the visible spectrum, to trigger useful alerts for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems.

  13. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.; Alhomida, Abdullah S.; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the brain and a structural component of neuronal membranes. Changes in DHA content of neuronal membranes lead to functional changes in the activity of receptors and other proteins which might be associated with synaptic function. Accumulating evidence suggests the beneficial effects of dietary DHA supplementation on neurotransmission. This article reviews the beneficial effects of DHA on the brain; uptake, incorporation and release of DHA at synapses, effects of DHA on synapses, effects of DHA on neurotransmitters, DHA metabolites, and changes in DHA with age. Further studies to better understand the metabolome of DHA could result in more effective use of this molecule for treatment of neurodegenerative or neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24116288

  14. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2013-04-01

    Gas phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds, however the significance of direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived Henry's law parameters, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will not have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations of atmospherically relevant carbonyl compounds designed to estimate gas and aqueous phase extinction coefficients. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only three out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid, 3-oxobutanoic acid, and 3-oxopropanoic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α, β conjugation, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected.

  15. A Dynamic Model for the Production of H+, NO3-, and SO42- in Urban Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    1983-08-01

    The chemical composition of nighttime urban fog has been investigated using a hybrid kinetic and equilibrium model. Extremely high acidity may be imparted to the droplets by condensation and growth on acidic condensation nuclei or by in situ S(IV) oxidation. Important oxidants of S(IV) were found to be O2 as catalyzed by Fe(III) and Mn(II), H2O2, and O3. Formation of hydroxymethanesulfonate ion (HMSA) via the nucleophilic addition of HSO3- to CH2O(1) significantly increased the droplet capacity for S(IV) but did not slow down the net S(IV) oxidation rate leading to fog acidification. Gas phase nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrogen peroxide were scavenged efficiently, although aqueous phase hydrogen peroxide was depleted rapidly by reduction with S(IV). Nitrate production in the aqueous phase was found to be dominated by HNO3 gas phase scavenging. Major aqueous phase species concentrations were controlled primarily by condensation, evaporation, and pH.

  16. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  17. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines (Vitis labrusca, Bailey) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to pH 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, eight additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH 2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Only the cultivars de Chaunac and Ives had reduced berry soluble solids with chronic weekly sprays at pH 2.75. Reduction in soluble solids was not associated with increased oxidant stipple (ozone injury) in Concord and de Chaunac cultivars, but this association was observed in Ives. There was no evidence that acid rain in combination with ozone increased oxidant stipple as occurs when ozone and SO/sub 2/ are combined. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  18. Acidic Depositions: Effects on Wildlife and Habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of 'acid rain' is not new; it was recognized in the mid-1800s in industrialized Europe. In the 1960s a synthesis of information about acidification began in Europe, along with predictions of ecological effects. In the U.S. studies of acidification began in the 1920s. By the late 1970s research efforts in the U.S. and Canada were better coordinated and in 1980 a 10-year research program was undertaken through the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Plan (NAPAP) to determine the causes and consequences of acidic depositions. Much of the bedrock in the northeastern U.S. and Canada contains total alkalinity of 20 kg/ha/yr of wet sulphate depositions and are vulnerable to acidifying processes. Acidic depositions contribute directly to acidifying processes of soil and soil water. Soils must have sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity or acidity of soil will increase. Natural soil-forming processes that lead to acidification can be accelerated by acidic depositions. Long-term effects of acidification are predicted, which will reduce soil productivity mainly through reduced availability of nutrients and mobilization of toxic metals. Severe effects may lead to major alteration of soil chemistry, soil biota, and even loss of vegetation. Several species of earthworms and several other taxa of soil-inhabiting invertebrates, which are important food of many vertebrate wildlife species, are affected by low pH in soil. Loss of canopy in declining sugar maples results in loss of insects fed on by certain neotropical migrant bird species. No definitive studies categorically link atmospheric acidic depositions with direct or indirect effects on wild mammals. Researchers have concentrated on vegetative and aquatic effects. Circumstantial evidence suggests that effects are probable for certain species of aquatic-dependent mammals (water shrew, mink, and otter) and that these species are at risk from the loss of foods or contamination of these foods by metals

  19. The analysis of rapidly developing fog at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Mark M.; Atchison, Michael K.; Schumann, Robin; Taylor, Greg E.; Yersavich, Ann; Warburton, John D.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents fog precursors and fog climatology at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Florida from 1986 to 1990. The major emphasis of this report focuses on rapidly developing fog events that would affect the less than 7-statute mile visibility rule for End-Of-Mission (EOM) Shuttle landing at KSC (Rule 4-64(A)). The Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU's) work is to: develop a data base for study of fog associated weather conditions relating to violations of this landing constraint; develop forecast techniques or rules-of-thumb to determine whether or not current conditions are likely to result in an acceptable condition at landing; validate the forecast techniques; and transition techniques to operational use. As part of the analysis the fog events were categorized as either advection, pre-frontal or radiation. As a result of these analyses, the AMU developed a fog climatological data base, identified fog precursors and developed forecaster tools and decision trees. The fog climatological analysis indicates that during the fog season (October to April) there is a higher risk for a visibility violation at KSC during the early morning hours (0700 to 1200 UTC), while 95 percent of all fog events have dissipated by 1600 UTC. A high number of fog events are characterized by a westerly component to the surface wind at KSC (92 percent) and 83 percent of the fog events had fog develop west of KSC first (up to 2 hours). The AMU developed fog decision trees and forecaster tools that would help the forecaster identify fog precursors up to 12 hours in advance. Using the decision trees as process tools ensures the important meteorological data are not overlooked in the forecast process. With these tools and a better understanding of fog formation in the local KSC area, the Shuttle weather support forecaster should be able to give the Launch and Flight Directors a better KSC fog forecast with more confidence.

  20. Polymer matrix effects on acid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynyshyn, Theodore H.; Goodman, Russell B.; Roberts, Jeanette

    2008-03-01

    We have measured the acid generation efficiency with EUV exposure of a PAG in different polymer matrixes representing the main classes of resist polymers as well as some previously described fluoropolymers for lithographic applications. The polymer matrix was found to have a significant effect on the acid generation efficiency of the PAG studied. A linear relationship exists between the absorbance of the resist and the acid generation efficiency. A second inverse relationship exists between Dill C and aromatic content of the resist polymer. It was shown that polymer sensitization is important for acid generation with EUV exposure and the Dill C parameter can be increased by up to five times with highly absorbing non-aromatic polymers, such as non-aromatic fluoropolymers, over an ESCAP polymer. The increase in the Dill C value will lead to an up to five fold increase in resist sensitivity. It is our expectation that these insights into the nature of polymer matrix effects on acid generation could lead to increased sensitivity for EUV resists.

  1. Ocular Findings in Volcanic Fog Induced Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Lagunzad, John Kenneth D

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the ocular signs and symptoms of patients complaining of eye irritation due to volcanic fog (vog). Methods The study utilized a non-comparative, retrospective chart review of 30 patients who had a chief complaint of eye irritation, which the subjects attributed to vog. Ocular signs and symptoms are described and related to the ambient concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter sized 2.5 microns (PM2.5), and vog visibility in O‘ahu during the period of the study. Results Ocular signs noted were conjunctival injection (100%), clear mucous discharge (100%), papillary reaction (100%), punctal edema (80%), eyelid swelling (73.3%) and chemosis (63.3%). Ocular symptoms were itchiness (100%), foreign body sensation (100%), tearing (96.6%) and burning sensation (90%). All patients had concurrent respiratory symptoms. During the period of study, the highest 24-hour average concentration of particulate matter sized 2.5 microns (PM2.5) was 49.04 µg/m3 and vog was visually present. Conclusions Patients complaining of eye irritation due to vog have observable ocular signs and symptoms. PMID:22187513

  2. Fog as an ecosystem service: Quantifying fog-mediated reductions in maximum temperature across coastal to inland transects in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torregrosa, A.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Combs, C.; Peters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies have documented the human benefits of temperature cooling derived from coastal fog such as the reduction in the number of hospital visits/emergency response requests from heat stress-vulnerable population sectors or decreased energy consumption during periods when summer maximum temperatures are lower than normal. In this study we quantify the hourly, daily, monthly and seasonal thermal effect of fog and low clouds (FLC) hours on maximum summer temperatures across a northern California landscape. The FLC data summaries are calculated from the CIRA (Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere) 10 year archive that were derived from hourly night and day images using channels 1 (Visible), 2 (3.6 μm) and 4 (10.7 μm) NOAA GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite). The FLC summaries were analyzed with two sets of site based data, meteorological (met) station-based measurements and downscaled interpolated PRISM data for selected point locations spanning a range of coastal to inland geographic conditions and met station locations. In addition to finding a 0.4 degree C per hour of FLC effect, our results suggest variability related to site specific thermal response. For example, sites closest to the coast have less thermal variability between low cloud and sunny days than sites further from the coast suggesting a much stronger influence of ocean temperature than of FLC thermal dynamics. The thermal relief provided by summertime FLC is equivalent in magnitude to the temperature increase projected by the driest and hottest of regional downscaled climate models using the A2 ('worst') IPCC scenario. Extrapolating these thermal calculations can facilitate future quantifications of the ecosystem service provided by summertime low clouds and fog.

  3. Cardiovascular Effects of Salvianolic Acid B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang; Feng, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (SAB, Sal B) is the representative component of phenolic acids derived from the dried root and rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge (Labiatae) which has been used widely and successfully in Asian countries for clinical therapy of various vascular disturbance-related diseases for hundreds of years. However, its exact cardioprotective components and the underlying mechanism for therapeutic basis are still poorly understood. This paper discussed and elucidated the underlying biological mechanisms and pharmacology of Sal B and their potential cardioprotective effects. PMID:23840250

  4. Potential human health effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Adverse human health effects, namely acute and chronic respiratory effects, can occur from the pre-deposition phase of the acid rain phenomenon due to inhalation of acidic particles and gases. State-of-the-art methodology to evaluate these effects is just now being applied to this question. The major post-deposition effect of the acid rain phenomenon is to acidify water, increasing solubility and subsequent human exposure to mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, a highly toxic compound, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. Deficiencies in the identification of the contribution of pre-deposition of air pollutants and post-deposition mobilization of toxic metals to the recognized potential health effects of the involved toxic substances is due to the fact that scientists have not addressed these specific questions. 113 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Fog and Haze in California's San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration features images of southern California and southwestern Nevada acquired on January 3, 2001 (Terra orbit 5569), and includes data from three of MISR's nine cameras. The San Joaquin Valley, which comprises the southern extent of California's Central Valley, covers much of the viewed area. Also visible are several of the Channel Islands near the bottom, and Mono and Walker Lakes, which stand out as darker patches near the top center, especially in the vertical and backward oblique images. Near the lower right of each image is the Los Angeles Basin, with the distinctive chevron shape of the Mojave Desert to its north.

    The Central Valley is a well-irrigated and richly productive agricultural area situated between the Coast Range and the snow-capped Sierra Nevadas. During the winter, the region is noted for its hazy overcasts and a low, thick ground fog known as the Tule. Owing to the effects of the atmosphere on reflected sunlight, dramatic differences in the MISR images are apparent as the angle of view changes. An area of thick, white fog in the San Joaquin Valley is visible in all three of the images. However, the pervasive haze that fills most of the valley is only slightly visible in the vertical view. At the oblique angles, the haze is highly distinguishable against the land surface background, particularly in the forward-viewing direction. Just above image center, the forward view also reveals bluish-tinged plumes near Lava Butte in Sequoia National Forest, where the National Interagency Coordination Center reported an active forest fire.

    The changing surface visibility in the multi-angle data allows us to derive the amount of atmospheric haze. In the lower right quadrant is a map of haze amount determined from automated processing of the MISR imagery. Low amounts of haze are shown in blue, and a variation in hue through shades of green, yellow, and red indicates progressively larger amounts of airborne particulates. Due to the

  6. Elemental Carbon in Highly Polluted Urban Fog in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Khan, A. J.; Khan, A. R.; Ghauri, B. M.; Mirza, M. I.; Husain, L.

    2002-12-01

    Since 1998 severe winter fogs frequently occurred in Northeastern Pakistan and India. These fogs were closely related to the heavy load of aerosols and gases in the atmosphere due to the increasing emissions by the rapid industrialization in this region. In this study, aerosol data including elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), sulfate and trace element concentrations were determined during two particularly severe fog periods at Lahore, Pakistan. In the first episode, TSP samples were collected on Whatmann 41 filters with high-volume samplers every 12 hour during and after a heavy fog event from January 1 to 5, 1999. A technique had been developed to transfer EC to quartz filter without loss for analysis with thermal-optical method. High EC concentrations were found up to 25μg/m3. Extremely high sulfate concentration was found, up to 100μg/m3. The SO4/Se ratio and trace element factor analysis suggested sulfate were formed from a distant source of hundreds of kilometers away. In the second episode, TSP samples were collected on quartz filters in 6-hour (daytime) and 12-hour (nighttime) intervals for both EC and OC measurements during December 25-31, 1999 with different fog types (very light, light, medium and heavy) and without fog. High EC and OC concentrations ranging in 10 to 25μg/m3 and 100 to 300μg/m3 were observed. EC and OC had a high correlation with stable EC/OC ratios within 8 to 16%, which suggested EC and OC in aerosols were from the same source. High sulfate concentrations were also observed, 25 to 55μg/m3. The SO4/Se ratio and trace element factor analysis also suggested sulfate were formed during the fog period. Particularly, SO4/EC ratios had a very strong relation with fog types and sunlight strength. In daytime, the ratio obviously increased with sunlight strength, and significantly changed with and without fog. In nighttime, the ratio generally increased with fog density. Compared to sulfate profile, SO4/EC ratio could show photochemical

  7. Oxidation enhancement of submicron organic aerosols by fog processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Ge, X.; Collier, S.; Setyan, A.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.

    2011-12-01

    During 2010 wintertime, a measurement study was carried out at Fresno, California, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) combined with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Four fog events occurred during the first week of the campaign. While ambient aerosol was sampled into the HR-ToF-AMS, fog water samples were collected, and were later aerosolized and analyzed via HR-TOF-AMS in the laboratory. We performed Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) on the AMS ambient organic mass spectra, and identified four OA factors: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) likely from vehicle emissions, cooking influenced OA (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) representing residential wood combustion, and an oxygenated OA (OOA) that has an average O/C ratio of 0.42. The time series of the OOA factor correlates best with that of sulfate (R2 =0.54 ) during fog events, suggesting that aqueous phase processing may have strongly affected OOA production during wintertime in Fresno. We further investigate the OOA compositions and elemental ratios before, during, and after the fog events, as well as those of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fog waters to study the influence of aqueous phase processing on OA compositions. Results of fog sample analysis shows an enhancement of oxidation of DOM in 11 separate fog samples. Further factor analysis of the fog DOM data will elucidate the possible mechanisms by which fog processing enhances oxidation of aerosol. In addition, in order to investigate the influence of aqueous processing on OA, we used the Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php) to estimate aerosol phase water contents based on the AMS measured aerosol composition. The predicted water content has a good correlation with sulfate and OOA . We will further explore the correlations between particle phase water with organic aerosol characteristics to discuss the influence of aqueous phase processing on

  8. Distinct Domains of the GATA-1 Cofactor FOG-1 Differentially Influence Erythroid versus Megakaryocytic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Alan B.; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2002-01-01

    FOG family zinc finger proteins play essential roles in development through physical interaction with GATA factors. FOG-1, like its interacting partner GATA-1, is required for normal differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic cells. Here, we have developed a functional assay for FOG-1 based on its ability to rescue erythroid and megakaryocytic maturation of a genetically engineered FOG-1−/− cell line. We demonstrate that interaction through only one of FOG-1's four GATA-binding zinc fingers is sufficient for rescue, providing evidence against a model in which FOG-1 acts to bridge multiple GATA-binding DNA elements. Importantly, we find that distinct regions of FOG-1 differentially influence erythroid versus megakaryocyte maturation. As such, we propose that FOG-1 may modulate the fate of a bipotential erythroid/megakaryocytic precursor cell. PMID:12024038

  9. Relation Between Fog & Summer Stream Flow on the North Coast of California in Redwood National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, K.

    2012-12-01

    There are three common definitions of fog; visibility less than 800 meters (Dawson 1998), ceiling height less than 400 meters (Liepper 1995, Johnstone & Dawson 2010) or low level stratus that touches the ground. Regardless of the definition used the ecological importance of fog is evidenced by the commonly used term occult precipitation i.e. water that is not accounted for. Fog is most common on the coast of Northern California during summer, the time of least precipitation. The diurnal flux in stream flows is also most evident in the summer. Diurnal flux and seasonal trends in stream flow are thought to be controlled by precipitation and evapotranspiration. Fog impacts both precipitation and evapotranspiration. While changes in fog regimes are expected to occur as a result of climate change, the ability to measure fog and anticipate the implications are in nascent stages. Although, methods for detecting fog using satellite imagery have been developed they have not been perfected and they generally only give height info for the cloud deck (top of clouds). Although deck height is important for aviation and enables some inference of what is occurring on the ground the thickness and base height are important variables for developing a greater understanding of the impacts of fog. Fog harps will be used to detect fog on the ground. Fog harp data will be compared with the results of satellite imagery analysis for presence or absence of fog. After detrending, stream flow data will be divided into categories of fog and no fog. The two categories will be tested for a statistically significant difference. The results have the potential to help solve a piece of the climate change puzzle. The data will help with the anticipation of change in stream flows in areas with high levels of summer fog and Mediterranean climates as well as refine techniques for analyzing satellite imagery for presence or absence of fog.

  10. Assessing Middle School and College Students' Conceptions About Wind, Fog, and Tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, E.; Monteverdi, J. P.; Garcia, O.; Tanner, K. D.

    2008-12-01

    protocol utilized in Phase III. A subset of the population was interviewed, allowing us to probe deeper into students' conceptions about weather. This three-phase approach allowed us to identify and explore misconceptions concerning wind, fog, and tornadoes. Preliminary results from phase I and II probing student conceptions of wind show that over 54% of 6th grade students do not see any connection between the sun and wind, offering instead that the moon, clouds, and the ocean are key contributors to wind development. 13% of students observe that because there is wind at night, and conclude from this that the sun could not play a role in creating wind. By identifying students' misconceptions about wind, fog, and tornadoes, scientists and educators can create more effective learning experiences that address student misconceptions, promote conceptual change, and move students toward a more scientific viewpoint.

  11. Distinct Effects of Sorbic Acid and Acetic Acid on the Electrophysiology and Metabolism of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    van Beilen, J. W. A.; Teixeira de Mattos, M. J.; Hellingwerf, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sorbic acid and acetic acid are among the weak organic acid preservatives most commonly used to improve the microbiological stability of foods. They have similar pKa values, but sorbic acid is a far more potent preservative. Weak organic acids are most effective at low pH. Under these circumstances, they are assumed to diffuse across the membrane as neutral undissociated acids. We show here that the level of initial intracellular acidification depends on the concentration of undissociated acid and less on the nature of the acid. Recovery of the internal pH depends on the presence of an energy source, but acidification of the cytosol causes a decrease in glucose flux. Furthermore, sorbic acid is a more potent uncoupler of the membrane potential than acetic acid. Together these effects may also slow the rate of ATP synthesis significantly and may thus (partially) explain sorbic acid's effectiveness. PMID:25038097

  12. The Friend of GATA proteins U-shaped, FOG-1, and FOG-2 function as negative regulators of blood, heart, and eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fossett, Nancy; Tevosian, Sergei G.; Gajewski, Kathleen; Zhang, Qian; Orkin, Stuart H.; Schulz, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Friend of GATA (FOG) proteins regulate GATA factor-activated gene transcription. During vertebrate hematopoiesis, FOG and GATA proteins cooperate to promote erythrocyte and megakaryocyte differentiation. The Drosophila FOG homologue U-shaped (Ush) is expressed similarly in the blood cell anlage during embryogenesis. During hematopoiesis, the acute myeloid leukemia 1 homologue Lozenge and Glial cells missing are required for the production of crystal cells and plasmatocytes, respectively. However, additional factors have been predicted to control crystal cell proliferation. In this report, we show that Ush is expressed in hemocyte precursors and plasmatocytes throughout embryogenesis and larval development, and the GATA factor Serpent is essential for Ush embryonic expression. Furthermore, loss of ush function results in an overproduction of crystal cells, whereas forced expression of Ush reduces this cell population. Murine FOG-1 and FOG-2 also can repress crystal cell production, but a mutant version of FOG-2 lacking a conserved motif that binds the corepressor C-terminal binding protein fails to affect the cell lineage. The GATA factor Pannier (Pnr) is required for eye and heart development in Drosophila. When Ush, FOG-1, FOG-2, or mutant FOG-2 is coexpressed with Pnr during these developmental processes, severe eye and heart phenotypes result, consistent with a conserved negative regulation of Pnr function. These results indicate that the fly and mouse FOG proteins function similarly in three distinct cellular contexts in Drosophila, but may use different mechanisms to regulate genetic events in blood vs. cardial or eye cell lineages. PMID:11404479

  13. Infrared emission by fine water aerosols and fogs.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R

    1970-09-01

    Water aerosols, even when so finely divided as to be invisible, are capable of very strong absorption and emission in the infrared. This effect is pronounced in the 8-13-micro atmospheric window, owing to the 10(4) increase in the absorptivity of liquid water there over that for water vapor, and it contributes to the well known continuum in this spectral region. Water aerosol is found wherever suitable condensation nuclei exist and the relative humidity is above about 60%. Aerosol droplets increase in size and number with increasing relative humidity, affecting atmospheric radiance measurements accordingly. Trace quantities of aerosol can easily account for emission levels exceeding those of water vapor at 8-13 micro and are clearly indicated in cases where observed radiance levels cannot be accounted for by classical vapor band wing absorption theories. The aerosol emission mechanism is not associated with the formation or growth of the water droplets per se, but simply operates when droplets exist in the airborne state. Fog measurements are discussed and curves presented showing attenuation ratios between wavelengths in the visible and at 8-13 micro. Steam emission measurements leading to the formulation of an aerosol emission model are described briefly. PMID:20094188

  14. Fogs and Clouds are a Potential Indicator of a Local Water Source in Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Stillman, David E.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2016-04-01

    atmospheric origin of volatiles. If nocturnal clouds and fogs are present in Valles Marineris and not on the surrounding terrain, the modeled atmospheric thermal field points to an active source of water in the canyon. This source may be related to the water source for RSL and bolsters the hypothesis for a subsurface water reservoir. An atmospheric origin of water for RSL via deliquescence on salt requires an effective mechanism to trap water over small areas to support the estimated volumes of water in RSL. No such mechanism has been identified. However, there is evidence that the atmosphere still exerts control on the formation and activity of RSL through thermal effects. References: [1] McEwen, A. et al., (2011) Science, 333, 740-743. [2] McEwen, A. et al., (2014) Nature GeoSci, 7, 53-58. [3] Stillman, D. et al. (2016) Icarus, 265, 125-138. [4] McEwen, A. et al., (2015) EPSC, 786. [5] Wang., A. et al., 46th LPSC, #2483. [6] Möhlmann, D.T. et al. (2009) Planetary and Space Science, 57(14), 1987-1992. [7] Smith, M. (2008) AREPS 36, 191-219.

  15. Fog tests performed at Kennedy Space Center on Kodak film type 101-05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Based on the tests which were conducted, the fogging exhibited by the Kodak 101-05 glass plates when used in the Skylab S-183 experiment carrousels is a chemical fog caused by an outgassing within the carrousel. Testing has not yet been able to determine which chemical causes the fog or just what can be done to eliminate the problem.

  16. The structure and formation mechanism of a sea fog event over the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingtian; Li, Pengyuan; Fu, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Shanhong; Zhang, Suping

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a heavy sea fog event occurring over the Yellow Sea on 11 April 2004 was investigated based upon observational and modeling analyses. From the observational analyses, this sea fog event is a typical advection cooling case. Sea surface temperature (SST) and specific humidity (SH) show strong gradients from south to north, in which warm water is located in the south and consequently, moisture is larger in the south than in the north due to evaporation processes. After fog formation, evaporation process provides more moisture into the air and further contributes to fog evolution. The sea fog event was reproduced by the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) reasonably. The roles of important physical processes such as radiation, turbulence as well as atmospheric stratification in sea fog's structure and its formation mechanisms were analyzed using the model results. The roles of long wave radiation cooling, turbulence as well as atmospheric stratification were analyzed based on the modeling results. It is found that the long wave radiative cooling at the fog top plays an important role in cooling down the fog layer through turbulence mixing. The fog top cooling can overpower warming from the surface. Sea fog develops upward with the aid of turbulence. The buoyancy term, i.e., the unstable layer, contributes to the generation of TKE in the fog region. However, the temperature inversion layer prevents fog from growing upward.

  17. A Molecular Explanation of How the Fog Is Produced When Dry Ice Is Placed in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Ford, Nathan; No, Jin-Hwan; Ott, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Everyone enjoys seeing the cloudy white fog generated when solid carbon dioxide (dry ice) is placed in water. Have you ever wondered what physical and chemical processes occur to produce this fog? When asked this question, many chemical educators suggest that the fog is produced when atmospheric water vapor condenses on cold carbon dioxide gas…

  18. Heat transfer from a high temperature condensable mixture. II. Sedimentation of fog condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Condiff, D.W.; Cho, D.H.; Chan, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic wave analysis of fog sedimentation is employed to relate growth of a fog condensate deposit layer to radiation generated fog formation rates. The increase of surface radiation absorptivity with deposit layer thickness promotes a feedback mechanism for higher growth rates, which is evaluated in detail.

  19. Evidence for fat, oil and grease (FOG) deposit formation mechanisms in sewer lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of hardened and insoluble fats, oil, and grease (FOG) deposits in sewer lines is a major cause of line blockages leading to sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). Despite the central role that FOG deposits play in SSOs, little is known about the mechanisms of FOG deposit formation in sanitary...

  20. Standard Fog Collector Measurements Along the Central and Northern California Coast During the 2014 and 2015 Fog Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, D.; Torregrosa, A.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Mairs, A. A.; Wilson, S.; Bowman, M.; Barkley, T.; Gravelle, M.; Oliphant, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2014 an extensive network of standard fog collectors has been deployed along the coast of California, from as far south as southern Big Sur (36.1° N) to as far north as Arcata (40.8° N) at over a dozen sites that contain a total of several dozen of the fog collecting devices. This research is being done in conjunction with the Fognet Project that is looking at the levels of monomethyl mercury in fog water. Data collected reveal a fascinating variability in the amount of fog water collected across different scales of distance, elevation, time and location. In addition, a number of different types of mesh have been deployed and co-located to examine the variation in their fog water collecting capability in identical conditions. Mesh variations exhibit smaller variability across mesh type than had previously been expected. This study documents results found thus far across the network and also discusses the quantification of the errors associated with tipping bucket rain gauge measurements of water volumes and thus the importance of tipping bucket rain gauge calibration.

  1. Bioinspired plate-based fog collectors.

    PubMed

    Heng, Xin; Luo, Cheng

    2014-09-24

    In a recent work, we explored the feeding mechanism of a shorebird to transport liquid drops by repeatedly opening and closing its beak. In this work, we apply the corresponding results to develop a new artificial fog collector. The collector includes two nonparallel plates. It has three advantages in comparison with existing artificial collectors: (i) easy fabrication, (ii) simple design to scale up, and (iii) active transport of condensed water drops. Two collectors have been built. A small one with dimensions of 4.2 × 2.1 × 0.05 cm(3) (length × width × thickness) was first built and tested to examine (i) the time evolution of condensed drop sizes and (ii) the collection processes and efficiencies on the glass, SiO2, and SU-8 plates. Under similar experimental conditions, the amount of water collected per unit area on the small collector is about 9.0, 4.7, and 3.7 times, respectively, as much as the ones reported for beetles, grasses, and metal wires, and the total amount of water collected is around 33, 18, and 15 times. On the basis of the understanding gained from the tests on the small collector, a large collector with dimensions of 26 × 10 × 0.2 cm(3) was further built and tested, which was capable of collecting 15.8 mL of water during a period of 36 min. The amount of water collected, when it is scaled from 36 to 120 min, is about 878, 479, or 405 times more than what was collected by individual beetles, grasses, or metal wires. PMID:25192549

  2. Salt Fog Testing Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Day, S. Daniel; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are hard and highly corrosion resistant, which make them desirable for salt water and other applications. These alloys can be produced as powder and can be deposited as coatings on any surface that needs to be protected from the environment. It was of interest to examine the behavior of these amorphous alloys in the standard salt-fog testing ASTM B 117. Three different amorphous coating compositions were deposited on 316L SS coupons and exposed for many cycles of the salt fog test. Other common engineering alloys such as 1018 carbon steel, 316L SS and Hastelloy C-22 were also tested together with the amorphous coatings. Results show that amorphous coatings are resistant to rusting in salt fog. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated rust spots in one of the coatings. (authors)

  3. In vitro pollen responses of two birch species to acidity and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.N.; Cox, R.M.

    1993-10-01

    Paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) and mountain paper birch (Betula cordifolia Regel) near the Bay of Fundy coast frequently intercept acidic advection marine fogs. Chemical deposition by these fogs is thought to be a factor contributing to the observed foliar browning symptoms associated with a marked deterioration of these trees in the area. In vitro experiments were performed to test whether pollen germination in these two birch species would be affected by acidity at levels routinely found in the fog. The combined effect of temperature with acidity was also examined. Pollen germination in both species was inhibited below pH 5.6 (P < 0.0001) and the effect of incubation temperature was also significant (P < 0.01) in both species. There was no difference in in vitro pollen germination between species (P > 0.05) in response to acidity, based on combined data from 12 trees of each; the optimum germination temperature was 22{degrees}C for B. papyrifera and 21{degrees}C for B. cordifolia.

  4. Effects of acidic precipitation on field crops

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Gmur, N.F.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of acid rain on yields of field-grown soybeans has been investigated. Plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 4.1, 3,3 and 2.7 had decreased seed yields of 10.6, 16.8 and 23.9% below yields of plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 5.6. (ACR)

  5. Effects of acid rain on crops and trees

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.; Dochinger, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general treatment of the subject of acid rain and its effets are discussed along with sources of acid rain and its near-term (the last couple of decades). The effects of acid rain on terrestrial ecosystems are treated in some detail. Some treatment is given of the ecosystem-level effects of acid precipitation.

  6. The Climatology, Frequency, and Distribution of Cold Season Fog Events in Northern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Derek; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2015-10-01

    The distribution and frequency of fog events during the cold season in northern Utah is studied using surface Mesowest data from 2004 to 2014. Fog is identified using the reported weather conditions, relative humidity, and visibility. The length and time of each fog occurrence is calculated. Statistics are performed on daily, monthly, and seasonal timescales. To ensure representativeness of the data and to account for the relatively small sample size, "near-fog" conditions are included in some statistics. Results show that there is significant variability among the valleys in northern Utah in terms of both quantity and timing of fog events. Fog occurs more frequently in locations close to lakes such as the Great Salt Lake or Utah Lake than in locations farther away. It is also noted that small, enclosed valleys have higher amounts of fog than broader, open valleys. Throughout the region, there is a distinct peak in fog in late January for most stations. A strong peak in fog occurrences near dawn is also found for all cold season months. In addition, the influence of local, mesoscale conditions on the fog distribution is evident in many stations. It is found that the existence of fog at one location is a very poor predictor of fog at nearby locations on a daily timescale, which implies serious forecasting difficulties over complex terrain. However, it is also found that on an annual timescale the amount of fog at one location can be used to estimate the amount of fog at another location. The controlling factors that contribute to the variability of fog events over northern Utah (a mountainous region) are discussed.

  7. Analysis of atmospheric turbulence in the upper layers of sea fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongping; Zheng, Yunxia

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence plays a vital role in the formation and dissipation of fog. However, studies of such turbulence are typically limited to observations with ultrasonic anemometers less than 100 m above ground. Thus, the turbulence characteristics of upper fog layers are poorly known. In this paper, we present 4-layers of data, measured by ultrasonic anemometers on a wind tower about 400 m above the sea surface; we use these data to characterize atmospheric turbulence atop a heavy sea fog. Large differences in turbulence during the sea fog episode were recorded. Results showed that the kinetic energy, momentum flux, and sensible heat flux of turbulence increased rapidly during the onset of fog. After onset, high turbulence was observed within the uppermost fog layer. As long as this turbulence did not exceed a critical threshold, it was crucial to enhancing the cooling rate, and maintaining the fog. Vertical momentum flux and sensible heat flux generated by this turbulence weakened wind speed and decreased air temperature during the fog. Towards the end of the fog episode, the vertical distribution of sensible heat flux reversed, contributing to a downward momentum flux in all upper layers. Spatial and temporal scales of the turbulence eddy were greater before and after the fog, than during the fog episode. Turbulence energy was greatest in upper levels, around 430 m and 450 m above mean sea level (AMSL), than in lower levels of the fog (390 m and 410 m AMSL); turbulence energy peaked along the mean wind direction. Our results show that the status of turbulence was complicated within the fog; turbulence caused fluxes of momentum and sensible heat atop the fog layer, affecting the underlying fog by decreasing or increasing average wind speed, as well as promoting or demoting air temperature stratification.

  8. Project Fog Drops 5. Task 1: A numerical model of advection fog. Task 2: Recommendations for simplified individual zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. W.; Eadie, W. J.; Katz, U.; Kocmond, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model was used to investigate the formation of marine advection fog. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, horizontal wind, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical cross section of the atmosphere as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection, as well as radiative cooling and drop sedimentation. The model is designed to simulate the formation, development, or dissipation of advection fog in response to transfer of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and the surface as driven by advection over horizontal discontinuities in the surface temperature. Results from numerical simulations of advection fog formation are discussed with reference to observations of marine fog. A survey of candidate fog or cloud microphysics experiments which might be performed in the low gravity environment of a shuttle-type spacecraft in presented. Recommendations are given for relatively simple experiments which are relevent to fog modification problems.

  9. The theoretical analysis of the Fog removal in the LNG Ambient Vaporizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Lee, D.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    The fog removal process is one of the important process in LNG Ambient Vaporizer. In this study we carried out theoretical study of the fog removal process in LNG Ambient Vaporizer. The LNG Ambient Vaporizer in Incheon area was used in our study. The fog temperature and the required energy produced from air fan to remove fog in LNG Ambient Vaporizer were calculated using average temperature of Incheon area in 2012 by Psychometruc Chart method. As a result we can be remove fog in LNG Ambient Vaporizer using Enthalpy[kW] energy in summer season and Enthalpy[kW] in winter season respectively.

  10. The Fiberoptle Guided Missile (FOG-M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Paul L.

    1989-02-01

    The Fiberoptic Guided Missile (FOG-M) was developed in the U.S. Army's Research, Development, and Engineering Center (RDEC) as a demonstration system for killing armor in an infantry application. The RDEC design uses a television sensor in the nose of the missile for in-flight target acquisition, bringing the video signal down a fiberoptic link that pays out behind the missile as it flies, to a gunner securely hidden in a defiladed launch vehicle. The gunner is able to select the target on a video screen and lock on an autotracker or alternately manually track the target to impact. The system design would use a common warhead for either armor or helicopter targets. The system is currently mounted on the High Mobility, Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), containing the gunner's station, launcher, and flight missiles. The gunner's station includes the capability for detailed mission planning, digital map display based on the Defense Mapping Agency's digital map databases, and display of the air battle situation for the gunner. Automatic targeting, control of multiple missiles in the air simultaneously, navigation using a digital correlator, and autotracking of moving targets in cluttered backgrounds with gunner selectable offset tracking capability are also available. The system has a capability to train the gunner using a perspective view scene generator that mimics the video scene he would be presented during missile flight. The scene generator uses the same hardware that displays the digital map, while a simulation of the missile runs in one of the system's computer processors to accurately move the seeker presentation around the scene. All of the other hardware used in embedded training is the same as the actual firing hardware. The system concept has been chosen by the Army as the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) component of the Forward Area Air Defense System (FAADS). The initial design is being upgraded for the MIL SPEC environment to allow early operational

  11. Using Multi-Isotope Tracer Methods to Understand the Sources of Nitrate in Aerosols, Fog and River Water in Podocarpus National Forest, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, L. A.; Dominguez, G.; Fabian, P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    The eastern slopes of the Andean rainforests of Ecuador possess some of the highest plant biodiversity found on the planet; however, these ecosystems are in jeopardy because region is experiences one of the highest deforestation rates in South America. This rainforest characterized by high acidity and low nutrient soils and experiences natural process which are both destabilizing and stabilizing to biodiversity rendering this a unique, though sensitive environment. There is increased concern that anthropogenic activities especially biomass burning are affecting the rainforests and could lead to higher extinction rates, changes in the biodiversity and far reaching effects on the global troposphere. Measurements of nitrate and sulfate in rain and fog water have shown periods of elevated concentrations in the Podocarpus National Park near Loja, Ecuador. These high episodes contribute to annual deposition rates that are comparable to polluted regions of North America and Europe. Significant anthropogenic sources such as large scale industry or a major city, near this forest are lacking. It is believed that the majority of the nitrate and sulfate pollution is due to the large amount of biomass burning during the dry season in the Amazon Basin. In recent years it has been shown that large amount of dust is transported across the Atlantic from Africa which reaches South America. Concentration measurements do not elucidate the source of high nitrate and sulfate pollution; however, by measuring all three stable isotopes of oxygen in nitrate and sulfate from fog and river water provides a new way to examine the impacts of biomass burning on the region. By using stable isotope techniques atmospheric nitrate and sulfate can be resolved from terrestrial sources. This provides a unique way to trace the contributions from the biomass burning and farming sources. Current research at the field station, Estación Científica San Francisco in the Podocarpus National Forest monitors

  12. SUMOylation Regulates the Transcriptional Repression Activity of FOG-2 and Its Association with GATA-4

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, José; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Carter, Daniel R.; Khachigian, Levon M.; Chong, Beng H.

    2012-01-01

    Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2), a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6), is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K312, 471, 915, 955). Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE), while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2′s nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status. PMID:23226341

  13. Non-human primate FOG develops with advanced parkinsonism induced by MPTP Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Revuelta, Gonzalo J.; Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Wahlquist, Amy E.; Factor, Stewart A.; Papa, Stella M.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a debilitating feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other forms of parkinsonism. The anatomical or pathophysiological correlates are poorly understood largely due to the lack of a well-established animal model. Here we studied whether FOG is reproduced in the non-human primate (NHP) model of PD. 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys (Genus Macaca, n=29) were examined for the development of FOG, and the leg movements were recorded with accelerometry. The relationships between developing FOG and the animals’ characteristics, the MPTP treatments, and the modeled outcomes were determined. In parkinsonian monkeys FOG developed frequently (48%) manifesting similar characteristics to those seen in PD patients. In addition, FOG episodes in the monkey were accompanied by leg trembling with the typical duration (2–10 s) and frequency (~7 Hz). The development of NHP FOG was significantly associated with the severity of parkinsonism, as shown by high motor disability scores (≥20) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia scores (p=0.01 and p=0.04, respectively). Differences in demographics and MPTP treatments (doses, treatment duration, etc.) had no influence on NHP FOG occurrence, with the exception of gender that showed FOG predominance in males (p=0.03). The unique features of FOG in PD can be replicated in severely parkinsonian macaques, and this represents the first description of a FOG animal model. PMID:22967858

  14. Study of fog in Bulgaria by using the GNSS tropospheric products and large scale dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoycheva, A.; Guerova, G.

    2015-10-01

    The fog formation, development, and dissipation are studied by employing the synergy between surface observations and vertically Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Selected are three fog cases in February and November 2012 and the fog development in 4 locations in north Bulgaria is analysed. It is found that the IWV tends to decrease during fog formation, and densification. Increase of IWV leads to fog dispersion and can be a result of evaporation or advection of new humid air mass. The mixing ratio also decreases during the fog formation and increases during dissipation but has a distinct diurnal variability, which limits its short range forecasting potential. IWV is found to have a very high sensitivity to both air mass transformation and/or advection at altitude. In one case it is found that the arrival time of a new air mass at altitude is of key importance for further fog development or suppression. The change of the air mass leads to change of the diurnal cycle of surface parameters like temperature thus controlling the fog life cycle. Further complication of fog diagnosis is introduced by a dynamic component, reflecting the orography difference in west and east part of Bulgaria. The behaviour of the IWV and mixing ratio can be a valuable additional tool in decision making processes for very short range fog diagnosis and prognosis. For monitoring fog life cycle hourly or sub-hourly data-sets will be an advantage.

  15. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Transformations in an Urban Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsaraj, K.; Wornat, M. J.; Chen, J.; Ehrenhauser, F.

    2010-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are generated from incomplete combustion of fuels, coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic activities. These are ubiquitous in all environments, especially the atmosphere. PAHs generally are found in the gaseous form and associated with the particles in the atmosphere. They are also found in the atmospheric water present in the form of fog, mist, rain, snow and ice. Particles (aerosols) in the atmosphere invariably contain a thin film of water which tends to have a high affinity for the adsorption of gaseous PAHs. Molecular dynamic simulations clearly show that the air-water interface is a preferable surface for adsorption of large molecular weight PAHs and atmospheric oxidants (e.g., O3, OH, 1O2, NO3). Thus, photochemical transformation of adsorbed PAHs in fog droplets is a possibility in the atmosphere. This could lead to the formation of water-soluble oxy-PAHs which are potential precursors for secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Field work in Baton Rouge and Houston combined with laboratory work in thin film reactors have shown that this hypothesis is substantially correct. Field data on fog and aerosols (pre- and post-fog) will be enumerated. Laboratory work and their implications will be summarized. The thin film surface environment resulted in enhanced reaction kinetics compared to bulk phase kinetics. The influence of surface reactions on the product compositions is evaluated by performing experiments with different film thicknesses.

  16. NEW CHARGED FOG GENERATOR FOR INHALABLE PARTICLE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of a new charged fog generator (CFG) by modifying a commercial rotary atomizer. Extensive field tests of the CFG (at a bentonite ore unloading operation) were performed to determine the dependence of its inhalable particle control efficiency (...

  17. 1. Light tower and fog signal house, view south southeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Light tower and fog signal house, view south southeast, east and north sides of tower, northeast and northwest sides of signal house - Libby Island Light Station, At southern tip of Libby Island at entrance to Machias Bay, Machiasport, Washington County, ME

  18. DISCOVERY OF FOG AT THE SOUTH POLE OF TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Smith, A. L.; Chen, C.; Adamkovics, M.

    2009-11-20

    While Saturn's moon Titan appears to support an active methane hydrological cycle, no direct evidence for surface-atmosphere exchange has yet appeared. The indirect evidence, while compelling, could be misleading. It is possible, for example, that the identified lake features could be filled with ethane, an involatile long-term residue of atmospheric photolysis; the apparent stream and channel features could be ancient remnants of a previous climate; and the tropospheric methane clouds, while frequent, could cause no rain to reach the surface. We report here the detection of fog at the south pole of Titan during late summer using observations from the VIMS instrument on board the Cassini spacecraft. While terrestrial fog can form from a variety of causes, most of these processes are inoperable on Titan. Fog on Titan can only be caused by evaporation of nearly pure liquid methane; the detection of fog provides the first direct link between surface and atmospheric methane. Based on the detections presented here, liquid methane appears widespread at the south pole of Titan in late southern summer, and the hydrological cycle on Titan is currently active.

  19. 2. Fog signal house and light tower, view west southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Fog signal house and light tower, view west southwest, southeast and northeast sides of signal house, east and north sides of tower - Libby Island Light Station, At southern tip of Libby Island at entrance to Machias Bay, Machiasport, Washington County, ME

  20. Ecosystemic Complexity Theory of Conflict: Understanding the Fog of Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brack, Greg; Lassiter, Pamela S.; Hill, Michele B.; Moore, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Counselors often engage in conflict mediation in professional practice. A model for understanding the complex and subtle nature of conflict resolution is presented. The ecosystemic complexity theory of conflict is offered to assist practitioners in navigating the fog of conflict. Theoretical assumptions are discussed with implications for clinical…

  1. Design of prototype charged particle fog dispersal unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, F. G.; Frost, W.; Kessel, P.

    1981-01-01

    The unit was designed to be easily modified so that certain features that influence the output current and particle size distribution could be examined. An experimental program was designed to measure the performance of the unit. The program described includes measurements in a fog chamber and in the field. Features of the nozzle and estimated nozzle characteristics are presented.

  2. Dangerous Fog Analyses and Forecast in the Maceio Airport, Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, N.; Silva, A.; Levit, V.; Santos, E.

    2010-07-01

    A small airplane fatal accident has occurred near Maceio Airport, on the coastal region on 26 July 2007. Low visibility in the intensive fog has provoked this accident. Weather forecast analysis, published in the local and central Brazilian newspapers during 2007, showed fog forecast absence during whole year. A study of the fog formation causes was elaborated using the high and low resolution satellite data, radar data, different products of NCEP reanalysis data and high resolution regional MM5 model simulation. The trade winds with a weak cyclonic curvature at the low levels have generated the humidity convergence at the superficial layers up to 850hPa on the coastal region. An anticyclonic circulation existence at the middle and higher levels and weak ascendant motion (by NCEP data) have support a weak convection development. The low levels clouds development on the continental region and convection development over ocean were confirmed by the radar and satellite data. A thermal inversion near surface level (up to 150m) and descendent movement at the middle and high levels were identified by MM5 model. Fog formation was simulated by PAFOG model. The conventional airport observations have shown the minimal visibility of 200m between 4 and 7a.m. Moreover visibility less than 1000m between 1 and 8a.m. with the minimal visibility of 213m was simulated by PAFOG model.

  3. Readability and Audience Response: Unfogging the Fog Indexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Thomas L.

    Writers and writing teachers should be wary of depending on readability indexes as indicators of the difficulty of written messages. The Gunning Fog Index and the Damerst Clear Index, two readability formulas, were used to determine the readability of "A Statement of Editorial Policy" and two abstracts appearing in an issue of "PMLA." Although the…

  4. Hydrogen fuel reforming in a fog cooled fuel cell power plant assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.H.; Wertheim, R.J.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a high pressure phosphoric acid fuel cell stack assembly. The cell comprising: a stack of fuel cells for producing electricity. The stack including cathode means, anode means, and the stack being formed without a separate cooling system; means for delivering a pressurized air supply to the cathode means; means for delivering a hydrogen rich fuel gas to the anode means for electrochemically reacting with oxygen in the pressurized air to produce electricity and water; first exhaust means for removing a mixture of oxygen-depleted air and product water from the cathode means; means for delivering a water fog stream to the anode means for mixture with the hydrogen rich fuel gas. The water fog stream being evaporated in the anode means to cool the stack; means for exhausting a mixture of hydrogen-depleted gas and water vapor from the anode means; reformer means for reforming a raw hydrocarbon fuel to the hydrogen rich fuel gas; and means for delivering the mixture of hydrogen-depleted exhaust gas and water vapor to the reformer means to provide water for the reforming reaction.

  5. Studies of the effect of gibberellic acid on algal growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. K.; Sorokin, C.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid on exponential growth rate of four strains of Chlorella was investigated under variety of experimental conditions. In concentrations from 10 ppm to 100 ppm, gibberellic acid was shown to have no effect on Chlorella growth. In concentration of 200 ppm, gibberellic acid exerted some unfavorable effect on algal growth.

  6. The greenhouse effect and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxides and chlorofluorocarbons is increasing in the earth's atmosphere. Increased concentrations of these trace gases could lead to global warming, increased acid rain and increased UV radiation on the earth's surface; however, the actual impacts are still uncertain and are also the subject of great debate. Application of clean'' energy sources such as geothermal are obviously desirable for decreasing these effects and improving our overall general environment. This paper briefly summarizes the global environment concerns, providing a backdrop for the following papers which describe the geothermal role in future environmental considerations. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hygroscopic chemicals and the formation of advection warm fog: A numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of advection fog is closely associated with the characteristics of the aerosol particles, including the chemical composition, mass of the nuclei, particle size, and concentration. Both macrophysical and microphysical processes are considered. In the macrophysical model, the evolution of wind components, water vapor content, liquid water content and potential temperature under the influences of vertical turbulent diffusion, turbulent momentum, and turbulent energy transfers are taken into account. In the microphysical model, the supersaturation effect is incorporated with the surface tension and hygroscopic material solution.

  8. Scattering of optical radiation by bursting water particles in fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanov, V. I.; Nebolsin, M. F.; Chistyakova, L. K.

    1987-10-01

    An experimental study of optically thin fog interacting with radiation pulses from a CO2 laser was made with the aid of probing radiation from a He-Ne laser. Pulses of acting radiation, of microsecond duration and up to 10 J energy with the energy density varied over the 1 to 50 J/sq cm range by means of 60 micron thick 50 percent transmission dacron filters, were recorded by an FP-5 photoreceiver indicating their time distribution. Fog with an optical thickness tau sub 0.63 of the order of 10 to the -3 was generated by a machine ejecting it in the form of a jet 2.5 mm in diameter with a velocity of 8 m/s and with a 3.3 x 10 to the 4th/cu cm concentration of water drops having a mean cubic radius of 2.4 microns, perpendicularly to the acting laser beam and completely within the focusing region. The probing laser beam crossed the fog at a 45 deg angle to the acting one. Its scattering by water drops in the fog was recorded by an FEU-38 photomultiplier using optics with a 1-deg field of vision. The results of this probe reveal the dynamics of channel formation in a fog by passing laser radiation which causes bursting of water drops. The data yield the turbidization and transillumination as well as the dimensions of the explosion products and their degree of vaporization during the tail of an acting radiation pulse, all depending on its energy density. They also reveal appreciable scattering of visible radiation from a probing He-Ne laser by shock waves but only during the initial period of gas-dynamic bursting not longer than the characteristic time equal to the diameter of the laser beam divided by the speed of sound.

  9. Photoformation of Triplet Excited States and Other Oxidants in Fog Waters and Their Impact on Fog Processing of Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, R.; Anastasio, C.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Vempati, H. S.; Vaitilingom, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactions in fog and cloud drops are important for a number of processes, such as formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), cycling of organic carbon and nitrogen, and determining the lifetimes of pollutants. The rates of these processes depend upon the steady-state concentrations of the major photooxidants, namely, hydroxyl radical (.OH), singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) and triplet excited states of organic compounds (3C*). While there are some past measurements of .OH and 1O2* concentrations in fog and cloud drops, there are no data for the concentrations of triplet excited states. However, there is increasing evidence that triplets might be important for the processing of organics in a cloudy or foggy atmosphere. To address this question, we collected fog water samples from Davis, CA and Baton Rouge, LA, illuminated them with simulated sunlight, and measured the steady-state concentrations of .OH , 1O2* and 3C* . To understand the relative importance of these photooxidants, we also measured the photochemical loss of two added model organic compounds in the illuminated fog waters - syringol (a biomass burning phenol) and methyl jasmonate (a green leaf volatile). Our results show that triplet excited states can play a major role in oxidizing the model compounds, typically accounting for 30 - 90% of the loss of both model compounds. Given that atmospheric triplets are relatively less understood, our results highlight the importance of deeper investigation into their nature.

  10. Application of PIXE trace-element analysis to the study of rapid conversion of SO/sub 2/(g) to sulfate in a fog bank

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R.J.; Mangelson, N.F.; Hill, M.W.; Eatough, D.J.; Eatough, N.L.; Richter, B.E.; Hansen, L.D.; Cooper, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The conversion of gaseous sulfur dioxide to sulfate has been studied in the plume of an oil-fired power plant located on the Pacific Ocean coast. The plant's unique location makes it a nearly ideal sampling location for determining plume chemistry with a minimum of interference. The plant is often shrouded in the morning by a fog bank. Breezes from the ocean mix the plume of the power plant with large quantities of unpolluted ocean air. Sulfur dioxide generated by the plant is rapidly oxidized when the fog bank is present to produce secondary sulfate. The rate of conversion was estimated by sampling the plume inland both on days when the fog bank was present and when the fog bank was absent. Trace-element concentrations in particulates collected on Nuclepore filters were determined by Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis, while concentrations of soluble ions were determined from acid extracts of quartz-fiber filters using ion chromatography. Chemical mass-balance source apportionment techniques were used to assign the sources of particulate sulfate. 3 refs.

  11. A Study of the Physical Processes of an Advection Fog Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Duan Yang; Yan, Wen Lian; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei Juan; Niu, Sheng Jie; Li, Zi Hua

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of advection fog appeared in the Yangtze River delta region between 1 and 2 December 2009. Here, we detail the fog formation and dissipation processes and the background weather conditions. The fog boundary layer and its formation and dissipation mechanisms have also been analyzed using field data recorded in a northern suburb of Nanjing. The results showed the following: (1) This advection fog was generated by interaction between advection of a north-east cold ground layer and a south-east warm upper layer. The double-inversion structure generated by this interaction between the cold and warm advections and steady south-east vapour transport was the main cause of this long-lasting fog. The double-inversion structure provided good thermal conditions for the thick fog, and the south-east vapour transport was not only conducive to maintaining the thickness of the fog but also sustained its long duration. (2) The fog-top altitude was over 600 m for most of the time, and the fog reduced visibility to less than 100 m for approximately 12 h. (3) The low-level jet near the lower inversion layer also played a role in maintaining the thick fog system by promoting heat, momentum and south-east vapour transport.

  12. Analyzing the Temporal and Spatial Variation of Fog Days in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    In order to study the temporal and spatial variation of fog days in Iran, the data of 115 synoptic meteorological stations have been analyzed for years 1960-2005. The results revealed that different types of fogs form all over the country, apart from central areas of Iran that are located in the big dessert of Iran. Advection fogs are common in the south coast (Persian Gulf) and north coastal (Caspian Sea) regions. Upslope fogs form in the mountainous areas of the northwest and north parts of Iran. This study shows no height dependence relationship on fog days for all types of fogs in overall. The trend analysis of fog days during the last 20 years shows some significant negative and positive trends. The frequency of advection fogs shows positive trends and most upslope fogs show negative trends. The results show that there are suitable places for fog collection projects in the north and south coastal regions during the year, especially in cold months.

  13. An Observational Case Study of Persistent Fog and Comparison with an Ensemble Forecast Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jeremy; Porson, Aurore; Lock, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    We present a study of a persistent case of fog and use the observations to evaluate the UK Met Office ensemble model. The fog appeared to form initially in association with small patches of low-level stratus and spread rapidly across southern England during 11 December 2012, persisting for 24 h. The low visibility and occurrence of fog associated with the event was poorly forecast. Observations show that the surprisingly rapid spreading of the layer was due to a circulation at the fog edge, whereby cold cloudy air subsided into and mixed with warmer adjacent clear air. The resulting air was saturated, and hence the fog layer grew rapidly outwards from its edge. Measurements of fog-droplet deposition made overnight show that an average of 12 g m h was deposited but that the liquid water content remained almost constant, indicating that further liquid was condensing at a similar rate to the deposition, most likely due to the slow cooling. The circulation at the fog edge was also present during its dissipation, by which time the fog top had lowered by 150 m. During this period the continuing circulation at the fog edge, and increasing wind shear at fog top, acted to dissipate the fog by creating mixing with, by then, the drier adjacent and overlying air. Comparisons with a new, high resolution Met Office ensemble model show that this type of case remains challenging to simulate. Most ensemble members successfully simulated the formation and persistence of low stratus cloud in the region, but produced too much cloud initially overnight, which created a warm bias. During the daytime, ensemble predictions that had produced fog lifted it into low stratus, whilst in reality the fog remained present all day. Various aspects of the model performance are discussed further.

  14. Electrostatic effects on hyaluronic acid configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezney, John; Saleh, Omar

    2015-03-01

    In systems of polyelectrolytes, such as solutions of charged biopolymers, the electrostatic repulsion between charged monomers plays a dominant role in determining the molecular conformation. Altering the ionic strength of the solvent thus affects the structure of such a polymer. Capturing this electrostatically-driven structural dependence is important for understanding many biological systems. Here, we use single molecule manipulation experiments to collect force-extension behavior on hyaluronic acid (HA), a polyanion which is a major component of the extracellular matrix in all vertebrates. By measuring HA elasticity in a variety of salt conditions, we are able to directly assess the contribution of electrostatics to the chain's self-avoidance and local stiffness. Similar to recent results from our group on single-stranded nucleic acids, our data indicate that HA behaves as a swollen chain of electrostatic blobs, with blob size proportional to the solution Debye length. Our data indicate that the chain structure within the blob is not worm-like, likely due to long-range electrostatic interactions. We discuss potential models of this effect.

  15. Comprehensive characterization of atmospheric organic matter in Fresno, California fog water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herckes, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Collett, J.L., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Fogwater collected during winter in Fresno (CA) was characterized by isolating several distinct fractions and characterizing them by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. More than 80% of the organic matter in the fogwater was recovered and characterized. The most abundant isolated fractions were those comprised of volatile acids (24% of isolated carbon) and hydrophilic acids plus neutrals (28%). Volatile acids, including formic and acetic acid, have been previously identified as among the most abundant individual species in fogwater. Recovered hydrophobic acids exhibited some properties similar to aquatic fulvic acids. An insoluble particulate organic matter fraction contained a substantial amount of biological material, while hydrophilic and transphilic fractions also contained material suggestive of biotic origin. Together, these fractions illustrate the important contribution biological sources make to organic matter in atmospheric fog droplets. The fogwater also was notable for containing a large amount of organic nitrogen present in a variety of species, including amines, nitrate esters, peptides, and nitroso compounds. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  16. Methylmercury and other chemical constituents in Pacific coastal fog water from seven sites in Central/Northern California (FogNet) during the summer of 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Heim, W. A.; Fernandez, D.; Coale, K. H.; Oliphant, A. J.; Dann, D.; Porter, M.; Hoskins, D.; Dodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    This project investigates the mercury content in summertime Pacific coastal fog in California and whether fog could be an important vector for ocean emissions of mercury to be deposited via fog drip to upland coastal ecosystems. Efforts began in early 2014 with the building of 7 active-strand fog collectors based on the Colorado State University Caltech CASCC design. The new UCSC CASCC includes doors sealing the collector which open under microcomputer control based on environmental sensing (relative humidity). Seven sites spanning from Trinidad in the north to Marina in the south have collected samples June-August 2014 under a project called FogNet. Fog conditions were favorable for collecting large water volumes (> 250 mL) at many sites. Fog samplers were cleaned with soap and deionized water daily and field blanks taken immediately following cleaning. Fog water samples were collected overnight, split into an aliquot for anion and DOC/DIC analysis and the remaining sample was acidified. Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) concentrations in samples and field blanks for 3 sites in FogNet are shown in the accompanying figure. The range of MMHg concentrations from 10 fog water samples > 100 mL in volume was 0.9-9.3 ng/L (4.5-46.4 pM). Elevated MMHg concentrations (> 5 ng/L, 25 pM) were observed at 2 sites: UC Santa Cruz and Bodega Bay. The field blanks produced MMHg concentrations of 0.08-0.4 ng/L (0.4-2.0 pM), which was on average < 10% of the sample concentration and suggests the artifact due to sampling was small. The observed MMHg concentrations in fog water observed is this study are 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than MMHg concentrations seen previously in rain water samples from the California coast suggesting an additional source of MMHg to fog. Shipboard measurements of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) in coastal California seawater during the time period of FogNet operations (summer 2014) reveal surface waters that were supersaturated in DMHg which represents a potential

  17. More on Effects Controlling Carboxylic Acidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lowell M.

    1981-01-01

    Gas phase acidity data shown are offered to writers of elementary organic chemistry texts for replacement of the aqueous phase data that are universally used. Relative acidities in the gas phase are controlled virtually exclusively by enthalpic factors. Structural-energetic explanations of acidic trends can therefore be used. (SK)

  18. Investigation of pitch and angle in the gradual-triangle lenticular lens for point-blank LED fog lamp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Yang, Chi-Hao

    2014-05-10

    The effects of different pitch and angle of gradual-triangle lenticular lens for the point-blank LED fog lamp were investigated under the standard of ECE R19. The novel LED fog lamp was assembled from a point-blank LED light source, a parabolic reflector, and a gradual-triangle lenticular lens. Light tracing analysis was used for the design of the gradual-triangle lenticular lens. The pitch, which varied from 1 to 6 mm, and the apex angle, which changed from 5 to 32 deg, were both investigated in regard to the gradual-triangle lenticular lens. The optimum pitch was 5 mm, and the efficiency of the lamp system and lenticular lens could reach 93% and 98.1% by simulation, respectively. The results of experiment had over 94%, which is similar to that of simulation by normalized cross correlation (NCC) for the light intensity. PMID:24922033

  19. Solvent effect on anthranilic acid spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Al-Busaidi, Badriya Y; Husband, John

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of anthranilic acid (AA) was examined in neat and binary solvents of varying polarity and hydrogen bonding strength in order to understand the role of water in solvating the polar sites of the molecule. With the exception of water, the Stokes shift of AA in different solvents was found to be linearly correlated with the normalized molar transition energy of solvent polarity (ETN), indicating the major role of the hydrogen bonding effect in solution. Analysis of the absorption and fluorescence spectra reveals that AA exists as an anion in neutral water. The pKa (4.50) and pKa* (4.44) values were estimated from the spectral shift in the absorption and fluorescence spectra measured in different pH solutions. The shortest fluorescence lifetime was measured in cyclohexane and is attributed to intramolecular hydrogen dislocation/transfer in the excited state. The lifetime values in polar solvents point to the dominant effect of the hydrogen-bond donating strength (α value) of the solvent. The number of water molecules solvating the polar region of the neutral form of AA was estimated to be three from the absorbance change in dioxane/buffer (pH 3.5) binary mixtures. The structures of AA:water complexes were calculated from density functional theory using the B3LYP method with a 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set. A stepwise addition of water molecules (1–3) to the polar region of AA leads to a preferential solvation of the COOH group of the molecule in a closed-cyclic geometry. It is worth noting that the spectral shift as a function of pH suggests the suitability of AA as a probe to estimate the local acidity of binding sites in macromolecules in the pH range 3.0–7.0. PMID:24102373

  20. Fog-basking behaviour and water collection efficiency in Namib Desert Darkling beetles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the Namib Desert fog represents an alternative water source. This is utilised by Darkling beetles (Tenebrionidae) that employ different strategies for obtaining the fog water. Some dig trenches in the sand, while others use their own bodies as fog collectors assuming a characteristic fog-basking stance. Two beetle species from the genus Onymacris have been observed to fog-bask on the ridges of the sand dunes. These beetles all have smooth elytra surfaces, while another species with elytra covered in bumps is reported to have specialised adaptations facilitating water capture by fog-basking. To resolve if these other beetles also fog-bask, and if an elytra covered in bumps is a more efficient fog water collector than a smooth one, we examined four Namib Desert beetles; the smooth Onymacris unguicularis and O. laeviceps and the bumpy Stenocara gracilipes and Physasterna cribripes. Here we describe the beetles' fog-basking behaviour, the details of their elytra structures, and determine how efficient their dorsal surface areas are at harvesting water from fog. Results The beetles differ greatly in size. The largest P. cribripes has a dorsal surface area that is 1.39, 1.56, and 2.52 times larger than O. unguicularis, O. laeviceps, and S. gracilipes, respectively. In accordance with earlier reports, we found that the second largest O. unguicularis is the only one of the four beetles that assumes the head standing fog-basking behaviour, and that fog is necessary to trigger this behaviour. No differences were seen in the absolute amounts of fog water collected on the dorsal surface areas of the different beetles. However, data corrected according to the sizes of the beetles revealed differences. The better fog water harvesters were S. gracilipes and O. unguicularis while the large P. cribripes was the poorest. Examination of the elytra microstructures showed clear structural differences, but the elytra of all beetles were found to be completely hydrophobic

  1. Temporal and spatial characteristics of fog occurrence over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong-Soon; Park, Seon Ki; Chang, Dong-Eon; Lee, Hee-Sang

    2010-07-01

    In this study, fogs are classified based on the spatial and temporal characteristics over South Korea using the visibility data and the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) and wavelet analyses. With fog defined in terms of visibility (<1 km), the EOF analysis is performed to extract spatial distribution characteristics via dimension reduction, whereas the space-time wavelet expansion is applied to the EOF time series to specify the fog characteristics in the space of time versus scale (i.e., period in this study). The first EOF mode occupies 48.9% of total variance and shows the fog distribution covering almost entire areas of South Korea with one sign (+), except at the eastern coast and western part of the southern coast. The wavelet analysis reveals that this fog occurs based on meteorological conditions of various scales from daily to seasonal, thus classified as mixed fog. The second EOF mode, which occupies 19.5% of total variance, shows distinct separation of spatial distribution of fog, with a negative (-) sign in winter over northwestern coastal/inland, western coastal, and south central mountain areas of South Korea and a positive (+) sign in other seasons elsewhere. With cycles of 1-2 weeks and 1-2 months being dominant in the wavelet analysis, this fog is considered to be strongly affected by synoptic scale weather systems and monsoon. Fog over the positive area is mostly affected by monsoon and/or cyclonic frontal systems, thus classified as frontal fog, whereas that over the negative area is affected by the cold-core anticyclones moving over warm sea surface in winter or by radiative cooling, thus classified as steam fog (coastal/sea) or radiation fog (inland), respectively. The mountain area may have upslope fog because of orographic lifting. The third EOF mode, occupying 6.7% of total variance, depicts distinct spatial separation of fog distribution around the coastal areas with a negative (-) sign and in the inland areas with a positive (+) sign

  2. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  3. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  4. Ethanol Effects On Physiological Retinoic Acid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) serves essential functions during embryogenesis and throughout post-natal vertebrate life. Insufficient or excess atRA causes teratogenic and/or toxic effects in the developing embryo: interference with atRA biosynthesis or signaling likely underlies some forms of cancer. Many symptoms of vitamin A (atRA precursor) deficiency and/or toxicity overlap with those of another pleiotropic agent—ethanol. These overlapping symptoms have prompted research to understand whether interference with atRA biosynthesis and/or action may explain (in part) pathology associated with excess ethanol consumption. Ethanol affects many aspects of retinoid metabolism and mechanisms of action site-specifically, but no robust data support inhibition of vitamin A metabolism, resulting in decreased atRA in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture. Actually, ethanol either has no effect on or increases atRA at select sites. Despite this realization, insight into whether interactions between ethanol and retinoids represent cause vs. effect requires additional research. PMID:21766417

  5. The Fog-oil anomaly confirmed in HELSMK-I tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.; Chitanvis, S.; Zardecki, A.; Wallace, J.; Gebhardt, F.; Dekinder, B.

    1988-05-01

    Modeling analyses of preliminary experimental data obtained from the High Energy Laser (HEL) beam propagation tests (HELSMK-I) through tactically significant smokes are presented for the case of Fog-oil (FO). Thermal imager data together with transmission measurements and other experimental evidence are used to reconstruct and model the interaction physics of the HEL beam with FO. An earlier theoretical model by Wallace (1983) predicted that the high energy beam would vaporize large (>10..mu..m) FO droplets, while the smaller droplets primarily conduct their energy to the ambient air, thereby enhancing thermal blooming in air. This behavior is categorized as an anomaly for the interaction of a HEL beam with aerosols because complete vaporization would normally have been expected. The HELSMK-I test together with computational results from our nonlinear beam propagation codes confirmed this prediction. Fog-oil can thus be classified as an effective smoke shield against a HEL threat in open air at infra-red wavelengths, at flux levels of a few tens of Kilowattscm/sup 2/. These results also validated our computer models which show that a punch-through effect is prevented in FO due to its enhanced blooming characteristics. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Oleic acid prevents detrimental effects of saturated fatty acids on bovine oocyte developmental competence.

    PubMed

    Aardema, Hilde; Vos, Peter L A M; Lolicato, Francesca; Roelen, Bernard A J; Knijn, Hiemke M; Vaandrager, Arie B; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2011-07-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress will increase the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and, thus, may affect oocyte quality. In this in vitro study, the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitic and stearic acid and unsaturated oleic acid) were presented to maturing oocytes to test whether fatty acids can affect lipid storage of the oocyte and developmental competence postfertilization. Palmitic and stearic acid had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the amount of fat stored in lipid droplets and a concomitant detrimental effect on oocyte developmental competence. Oleic acid, in contrast, had the opposite effect, causing an increase of lipid storage in lipid droplets and an improvement of oocyte developmental competence. Remarkably, the adverse effects of palmitic and stearic acid could be counteracted by oleic acid. These results suggest that the ratio and amount of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid is relevant for lipid storage in the maturing oocyte and that this relates to the developmental competence of maturing oocytes. PMID:21311036

  7. Effect of fatty acids on phase behavior of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer: saturated versus unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Yanagihara, S; Misono, Y; Suzuki, M

    2001-02-01

    The effect of some fatty acids on the phase behavior of hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer was investigated with special interest in possible difference between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The phase behavior of hydrated DPPC bilayer was followed by a differential scanning calorimetry and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The addition of palmitic acid (PA) increased the bilayer phase transition temperature with the increase of the PA content in the mixture. In addition, DPPC molecules in gel phase bilayer became more rigid in the presence of PA compared with those in the absence of PA. This effect of PA on the phase behavior of hydrated DPPC bilayer is common to other saturated fatty acids, stearic acid, myristic acid, and also to unsaturated fatty acid with trans double bond, elaidic acid. Contrary to these fatty acids, oleic acid (OA), the unsaturated fatty acid with cis double bond in the acyl chain, exhibited quite different behavior. The effect of OA on the bilayer phase transition temperature was rather small, although a slight decrease in the temperature was appreciable. Furthermore, the IR spectral results demonstrated that the perturbing effect of OA on the gel phase bilayer of DPPC was quite small. These results mean that OA does not disturb the hydrated DPPC bilayer significantly. PMID:11269932

  8. Ground ULV and thermal fog applications against Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania in a hot arid environment in western Kenya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania continue to threaten US military operations in Africa, Southwest Asia, and the Middle East. Ultra-low volume (ULV) and/or thermal fog pesticide dispersal are potentially effective against sand flies, but operational guidance is thinly based on mosquito con...

  9. Connections Between Cold Air Pools and Mountain Valley Fog Events in Salt Lake City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chachere, Catherine N.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the connection between cold air pools and fog events in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. Statistical analyses are conducted using soundings and reported automated surface observing system data from Salt Lake International Airport for the last eighteen cold seasons (October to March, during 1997-2015). A Chi-square test of independence is performed on identified cold air pool, and fog events to determine whether the two events are correlated. Conditional probabilities are then computed to investigate the occurrence of fog, given the presence of a cold pool. These probabilities are compared against that of random fog generation in the mid-winter. It is concluded that the dependence between cold air pools and fog events is statistically significant. The presence of a cold pool makes the formation of fog more likely than random generation.

  10. A kind of integrated method discuss of fOG signal processing circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Pan, Xin; Ying, Jiaju; Liu, Jie

    2014-12-01

    In view of the circuit miniaturization need in project application of fiber optic gyroscope(FOG), a new integrated technical scheme adopting system in package(SIP) for signal processing circuit of FOG was put forward. At first, the principle on signal processing circuit of FOG was analyzed, and the technical scheme adopting SIP based on low-temperature co-fired substrate technology was presented according to circuit characteristic and actual condition. Secondly, under the prerequisite of the concept introduction of SIP and LTCC, the SIP prototype of signal processing circuit of FOG was trialed produced,and it passed through the debug test. This SIP modular is an overall circuit complete integrated the signal processing circuit of FOG, and only a potentiometer and EPROM do not case outside. The testing results indicate that SIP is a kind of feasible scheme that carries out miniaturization for signal processing circuit of FOG.

  11. Study relating to the fog oil replacement program. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, W.W.; Wright, B.R.; Kanakia, M.D.

    1987-12-01

    The U.S. Army has made a commitment to replace smoke generator fog oil with diesel fuel and/or JP-8. This report discusses the work done to help solve this existing fog-oil substitution problem. Areas of research included: (a) modification of diesel fuel and JP-8 by removal of their lower boiling fractions. (b) design, construction, and development of a bench test for measuring obscuration. (c) running a computer-simulation program to assist in evaluating the engineering feasibility of designing, developing, and constructing a compact unit capable of fractionating diesel fuel and/or JP-8 should this be desired. (d) conducting a literature search to identify methods and/or compact equipment capable of fractionating diesel fuel and JP-8 to higher average molecular weight fractions. (e) production of test samples. (f) chemical analyses and obscurant evaluations.

  12. Laser Imaging Video Camera Sees Through Fire, Fog, Smoke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Under a series of SBIR contracts with Langley Research Center, inventor Richard Billmers refined a prototype for a laser imaging camera capable of seeing through fire, fog, smoke, and other obscurants. Now, Canton, Ohio-based Laser Imaging through Obscurants (LITO) Technologies Inc. is demonstrating the technology as a perimeter security system at Glenn Research Center and planning its future use in aviation, shipping, emergency response, and other fields.

  13. Large-scale Changes in Marine Fog in a Warmer Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, H.; Koshiro, T.; Endo, H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine fog especially over the mid-latitude ocean is an important target in climate simulation because it affects maritime traffic in human lives and the sky obscuring marine fog is a contributor to the earth radiation budget due to its significant coverage. The purpose of the present study is to reveal global-scale changes in marine fog in a warmer climate. The changes in marine fog with climate change are investigated using AMIP, AMIP4K (where a uniform +4 K SST is added to the AMIP SSTs), and AMIPfuture (where a patterned SST perturbation is added to the AMIP SSTs) experiment data simulated by the MRI-CGCM3 (Yukimoto et al. 2012), which was used for CMIP5 runs. First, the representation of the fog in the model was examined using ship observation data and cloud mask data retrieved from CALIPSO satellite data (Kawai et al. 2015). The comparison showed that the MRI-CGCM3 can represent the climatological global distribution of marine fog relatively well. Basically marine fog represented by the model is warm air advection fog, and it was found that the change in the horizontal temperature advection near the surface mostly determines the changes in marine fog in a warmer climate. Therefore, the changes in marine fog can be almost explained by the large-scale circulation changes. On the other hand, in-cloud LWC (liquid water content) of the fog is consistently increased in a warmer climate for the same horizontal surface temperature advection. The changes in mid-latitude marine fog in both the northern and southern hemispheres and for both summer and winter seasons are discussed in connection with the large-scale circulation changes.

  14. The Challenge of Forecasting the Onset and Development of Radiation Fog Using Mesoscale Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeneveld, G. J.; Ronda, R. J.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2015-02-01

    The numerical weather prediction of radiation fog is challenging, as many models typically show large biases for the timing of the onset and dispersal of the fog, as well as for its depth and liquid water content. To understand the role of physical processes, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land-surface coupling, and microphysics, we evaluate the HARMONIE and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale models for two contrasting warm fog episodes at the relatively flat terrain around the Cabauw tower facility in the Netherlands. One case involves a radiation fog that arose in calm anticyclonic conditions, and the second is a radiation fog that developed just after a cold front passage. The WRF model represents the radiation fog well, while the HARMONIE model forecasts a stratus lowering fog layer in the first case and hardly any fog in the second case. Permutations of parametrization schemes for boundary-layer mixing, radiation and microphysics, each for two levels of complexity, have been evaluated within the WRF model. It appears that the boundary-layer formulation is critical for forecasting the fog onset, while for fog dispersal the choice of the microphysical scheme is a key element, where a double-moment scheme outperforms any of the single-moment schemes. Finally, the WRF model results appear to be relatively insensitive to horizontal grid spacing, but nesting deteriorates the modelled fog formation. Increasing the domain size leads to a more scattered character of the simulated fog. Model results with one-way or two-way nesting show approximately comparable results.

  15. [Microphysics of atmospheric aerosols during winter haze/fog events in Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Niu, Zhong-qing; Shi, Chun-e; Liu, Duan-yang; Li, Zi-hua

    2010-07-01

    Intensive field observations of fog/haze events, including simultaneous measurements of aerosol particle and fog droplet size distributions, were conducted in Nanjing in November, 2007. Four weather conditions (fog, mist, wet haze and haze) were distinguished based on visibility and liquid water content firstly. Then, the microphysical characteristics of coarse and fine particles in each condition were investigated. The results showed the dominant sequence of the four weather conditions was haze<-->mist-->wet haze-->fog-->, wet haze-->mist<-->haze. The lasting time of pre-fog wet haze was longer than that of post-fog wet haze. The number, surface area and volume concentration of coarse particles with diameter larger than 2.0 micron in fog were much higher than those in the other three conditions, and the smallest concentrations were observed in haze. The size distributions of surface area and volume concentration exhibited multi-peak in fog droplets, while it showed single peak for coarse particles in haze, mist and wet haze. For the fine particles with diameter larger than 0.010 microm, the spectral shapes of surface area concentration are similar in fog (mist) and wet haze (haze) condition. The dominant size ranges of fine particle number concentration were in 0.04-0.13 microm and 0.02-0.14 microm for fog and wet haze, separately. The same dominant size ranges located in 0.02-0.06 microm for both mist and haze. During the transition processes from haze, mist and wet haze to fog, the concentration of smaller particles (less than 0.060-0.090 microm) reduced and vice versa for the corresponding larger particles. Temporal variation of aerosol number concentration correlated well with the root mean diameters negatively during the observation period. The number concentration of aerosol was the lowest and the mean diameter was the largest in fog periods. PMID:20825005

  16. Out of the fog: Catalyzing integrative capacity in interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Piso, Zachary; O'Rourke, Michael; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2016-04-01

    Social studies of interdisciplinary science investigate how scientific collaborations approach complex challenges that require multiple disciplinary perspectives. In order for collaborators to meet these complex challenges, interdisciplinary collaborations must develop and maintain integrative capacity, understood as the ability to anticipate and weigh tradeoffs in the employment of different disciplinary approaches. Here we provide an account of how one group of interdisciplinary fog scientists intentionally catalyzed integrative capacity. Through conversation, collaborators negotiated their commitments regarding the ontology of fog systems and the methodologies appropriate to studying fog systems, thereby enhancing capabilities which we take to constitute integrative capacity. On the ontological front, collaborators negotiated their commitments by setting boundaries to and within the system, layering different subsystems, focusing on key intersections of these subsystems, and agreeing on goals that would direct further investigation. On the methodological front, collaborators sequenced various methods, anchored methods at different scales, validated one method with another, standardized the outputs of related methods, and coordinated methods to fit a common model. By observing the process and form of collaborator conversations, this case study demonstrates that social studies of science can bring into critical focus how interdisciplinary collaborators work toward an integrated conceptualization of study systems. PMID:27083087

  17. Fog collecting biomimetic surfaces: Influence of microstructure and wettability.

    PubMed

    Azad, M A K; Ellerbrok, D; Barthlott, W; Koch, K

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the fog collection efficiency of three different sets of samples: replica (with and without microstructures), copper wire (smooth and microgrooved) and polyolefin mesh (hydrophilic, superhydrophilic and hydrophobic). The collection efficiency of the samples was compared in each set separately to investigate the influence of microstructures and/or the wettability of the surfaces on fog collection. Based on the controlled experimental conditions chosen here large differences in the efficiency were found. We found that microstructured plant replica samples collected 2-3 times higher amounts of water than that of unstructured (smooth) samples. Copper wire samples showed similar results. Moreover, microgrooved wires had a faster dripping of water droplets than that of smooth wires. The superhydrophilic mesh tested here was proved more efficient than any other mesh samples with different wettability. The amount of collected fog by superhydrophilic mesh was about 5 times higher than that of hydrophilic (untreated) mesh and was about 2 times higher than that of hydrophobic mesh. PMID:25599517

  18. Fog Chemistry at Different Altitudes in the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, P.; Eugster, W.; Wanner, H.

    2010-07-01

    During two extended summer seasons in 2006 and 2007, we installed two battery driven versions of the Caltech active strand cloud water collector (MiniCASCC) at the Niesen mountain in the northern Swiss Alps. Along, we measured air temperature, relative humidity, wind, and visibility. During these two field operation phases we gained weekly samples of fogwater, where we analysed the major anions and cations, and the stable water isotopes δD and δ18O. The fog collectors were installed at an altitude of 2300 and 1600 m asl to resolve altitudinal differences in fog chemistry. We found a large variability between the events, but no clear altitudinal gradient. At both sites, the most important ions were nitrate, ammonium, and sulphate. Higher concentrations occured preferably in late spring (start of sampling period) and in autumn (end of sampling). Compared to previous studies at lower elevations in the Swiss Plateau during wintertime, our measurements showed considerable lower ion loads in the fogwater. The combination of these results suggest that lowest ion loads are found in convective clouds with a short lifetime and that the highest ion loads occur during radiation fog events at lower elevations.

  19. Dense fog on the highway: Visual range monitoring in cars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, W.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, CH.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new sensor. Laser range-finders are currently installed in cars and trucks to measure the distance to a proceeding car (LEICA). A modification of such a sensor to measure visibility was made. The problems that had to be solved were: (1) choice of wavelength with relation to the human eye for visibility measurements; (2) dependency of the wavelength on atmospheric turbidity; (3) laser eye-safety; and (4) influence of multiple scattering at visibilities smaller than 200 m. The wavelength used for lidar sensors in the near infrared presents no real problems because the object to be sensed is fog appearing white which means that scattering from fog is wavelength independent. There are however differences in backscatter-to-extinction ratio for different fog and weather situations. The two solutions to these problems are polarization and multiple scattering. As known from airport operations of a laser ceilometer, one can use this multiple scattering contribution to determine the visibility.

  20. Dew, fog, drizzle and rain water in Baku (Azerbaijan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, D.; Beysens, D.

    2016-09-01

    Dwindling supplies of fresh water and climate changes have drawn attention to the need to find alternative sources of water globally. This study examines the potential of the semi-arid region of Baku (Azerbaijan) to exploit in particular dew, but also fog, drizzle and rain water. The Absheron Peninsular suffers from scarceness of water and non-hazardous water sources. Measurements were taken in this region on a 30° inclined plane passive condenser over a year (1/4/2010-31/3/2011) to determine the contribution and validity of using these alternative sources of water. The results show a significant relative contribution from these sources during this period (rain: 84 mm; dew: 15 mm; fog: 6 mm; drizzle: 13 mm). The fact that rain was measured within 23 km from the main station leads to uncertainties in its relative contribution. However, at least for the year under study, there are fair indications that collecting dew, fog and drizzle in addition to rain can significantly increase the collected atmospheric water with value estimated on order 40% ± 20%.

  1. Occult precipitation as an input to the small catchment: observation, evaluation and new technics of fog water collection in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, M.; Fisak, J.; M., Sir; Bartunkova, K.

    2010-07-01

    the 16-years period proved high acidity of fog water and high values of enrichment factors. The compounds NH4+, SO42- and NO3- are the dominant species both in fog water and in precipitation. In order to collect cloud water samples, the active and passive sample-taking devices were constructed. Besides the collectors, as described in literature, both passive and active fog water collectors of the new design were developed and installed at the selected localities.

  2. Hair and amino acids: the interactions and the effects.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Eiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Oota, Rina

    2007-01-01

    The interaction and the function of some amino acids in hair care applications are discussed. When amino acids are applied to hair in the form of simple aqueous solution, uptake of the amino acids is mainly controlled by ionic equilibrium. When amino acids were incorporated in a hair conditioner, the result was quite different, suggesting the importance of interaction between the amino acids and the cationic surfactants. Uptake of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), a derivative of glutamic acid, is enhanced by combining with arginine, an amino with strong affinity towards hair. Effects of some amino acids on bleached/dyed hair are described. A hair conditioner incorporated with alanine improves hair surface hydrophobicity of bleach-damaged hair. Histidine and phenylalanine improve tensile strength. PCA was proved to be effective to improve color-retention of dyed hair. PMID:17728935

  3. iPort-VIS: Site Specific Fog Forecasting for Munich Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohn, M.; Vogel, G.; Mohr, C.; Schneider, W.; Bott, A.; Beckmann, B. R.; Röhner, P.

    2010-07-01

    The German ministry for economy and technology is instigating improved effectiveness and competiveness of the german aviation industry by funding an aviation research program. This supports among other activities forecasting techniques for various weather related phenomena affecting airport management and traffic including poor visibility. DWD attempts in cooperation with University Bonn and the German Aviation Control (DFS) to implement a site specific fog forecasting system for Munich International Airport. The planned system aims at coupling the one-dimensional version of the fog forecasting model PAFOG with the high-resolution model COSMO-DE of DWD. Local observations will be integrated using a nudging approach in order to best determine the initial conditions. Therefore, additional instruments will be installed close to the runways to provide an observational data base for both model initialization and model diagnostics. The presentation provides an overview of the project and links to other presentations during this conference which focus on the instrumental setup at the airport as well as the scientific aspects of the PAFOG model development at University Bonn. The integration of all components within DWD is outlined which includes technical aspects necessary to ensure a stable prototype to be evaluated at the end of the project. Current work on generating a suitable visualization to support the operational aviation forecast work and model diagnostics will be outlined.

  4. Impact of haze-fog days to radon progeny equilibrium factor and discussion of related factors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Changsong; Shang, Bing; Zhang, Qingzhao; Cui, Hongxing; Wu, Yunyun; Deng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The equilibrium factor F between radon and its short-lived progenies is an important parameter to estimate radon exposure of humans. Therefore, indoor and outdoor concentrations of radon and its short-lived radon progeny were measured in Beijing area using a continuously measuring device, in an effort to obtain information on the F value. The results showed that the mean values of F were 0.58 ± 0.13 (0.25-0.95, n = 305) and 0.52 ± 0.12 (0.31-0.91, n = 64) for indoor and outdoor, respectively. The indoor F value during haze-fog days was higher than the typical value of 0.4 recommended by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and it was also higher than the values of 0.47 and 0.49 reported in the literature. A positive correlation was observed between indoor F values and PM2.5 concentrations (R (2) = 0.71). Since 2013, owing to frequent heavy haze-fog events in Beijing and surrounding areas, the number of the days with severe pollution remains at a high level. Future studies on the impact of the ambient fine particulate matter on indoor radon progeny equilibrium factor F could be important. PMID:26143065

  5. Real-time assessment of fog-related crashes using airport weather data: a feasibility analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed M; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Yu, Rongjie

    2014-11-01

    The effect of reduction of visibility on crash occurrence has recently been a major concern. Although visibility detection systems can help to mitigate the increased hazard of limited-visibility, such systems are not widely implemented and many locations with no systems are experiencing considerable number of fatal crashes due to reduction in visibility caused by fog and inclement weather. On the other hand, airports' weather stations continuously monitor all climate parameters in real-time, and the gathered data may be utilized to mitigate the increased risk for the adjacent roadways. This study aims to examine the viability of using airport weather information in real-time road crash risk assessment in locations with recurrent fog problems. Bayesian logistic regression was utilized to link six years (2005-2010) of historical crash data to real-time weather information collected from eight airports in the State of Florida, roadway characteristics and aggregate traffic parameters. The results from this research indicate that real-time weather data collected from adjacent airports are good predictors to assess increased risk on highways. PMID:25108899

  6. Understanding fog-plant interactions at the ecosystem scale using atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, M.; Stinecipher, J.; Zumkehr, A. L.; Berry, J. A.; Dawson, T. E.; Seibt, U.; Hilton, T. W.; Kulkarni, S.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Lu, Y.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem metabolism is thought to have powerful feedbacks with the climate system as well as direct impacts on individual taxa that rely on ecosystems for food, water, and shelter. Despite the importance of an ecosystem level understanding, climate change impacts on whole ecosystems remains highly uncertain. In particular, coastal fog-dominated regions are a blind spot for whole ecosystem measurements of the land-air-sea exchange of carbon, water, and energy. To address this critical knowledge gap, our inter-displicary team from the University of California's new Institute for the Study of Ecological Effects of Climate Impacts (ISEECI) has launched a next-generation monitoring program along a gradient of UC Natural Reserve System (NRS) sites. We leverage recent breakthroughs in atmospheric spectroscopy and mechanistic ecosystem models of carbonyl sulfide that provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore the sustainability of coastal systems. Here we present our next-generation monitoring and regional analysis across a North/South transect of UC-NRS sites that has the potential to provide a new window into fog-dominated ecosystems, both currently and under climate change scenarios.

  7. Elimination of Laparoscopic Lens Fogging Using Directional Flow of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Redan, Jay A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Surgeons constantly struggle with the formation of condensation on the lens of a laparoscope, which prolongs procedures and reduces visibility of the abdominal cavity. The goal of this project was to build a device that would direct a flow of carbon dioxide (CO2) into an open chamber surrounding the lens of a laparoscope, acting to keep moisture away from the lens and eliminate condensation. Methods: The device isolates the lens of the laparoscope from the humid environment of the intraperitoneal cavity by creating a microenvironment of dry CO2. This was accomplished by building a communicating sleeve that created an open chamber around the distal 2 to 3 cm of the scope. Into this cavity, dry cool CO2 was pumped in from an insufflator so that the path of the gas would surround the lens of the scope and escape through a single outlet location through which the scope views the intraperitoneal cavity. This chamber is proposed to isolate the lens with a high percentage of dry CO2 and low humidity. The device was tested in 7 different adverse conditions that were meant to challenge the ability of the device to maintain the viewing field with no perceptible obstruction. Results: In all of the conditions tested, 25 trials total, the device successfully prevented and/or eliminated laparoscopic lens fogging. Conclusions: The device designed for this project points to the potential of a simple and effective mechanical method for eliminating laparoscopic lens fogging. PMID:24680144

  8. [Combined effect of benzylpenicillin, furagin and bile acids on staphylococci].

    PubMed

    Sytnik, I A; Tkachuk, N I

    1982-11-01

    The results of the study of the effect of benzylpenicillin or furagin in combination with bile acids, such as cholic, glycocholic and desoxycholic on the collection cultures of staphylococci are presented. The study showed that the subbacteriostatic doses of the bile acids increased the bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects of benzylpenicillin and furagin by tens and hundreds times. The highest potentiation effect was attained with the use of the furagin combination and desoxycholic acid. PMID:7181465

  9. Canopy-atmosphere interactions under foggy condition—Size-resolved fog droplet fluxes and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Madany, T. S.; Walk, J. B.; Deventer, M. J.; Degefie, D. T.; Chang, S.-C.; Juang, J.-Y.; Griessbaum, F.; Klemm, O.

    2016-03-01

    Microphysical processes of fog and their spatial and temporal pattern are a challenge to study under natural conditions. This work focuses on the development of bidirectional fluxes of fog droplets above a forest canopy in northeastern Taiwan. Bidirectional fluxes occurred regularly, start from the smallest droplet class (<2.66 µm diameter), and subsequently extend to larger droplets up to 7.41 µm diameter. The development of the bidirectional fluxes with positive (upward) fluxes of smaller droplets and downward fluxes of larger fluxes is associated with a temperature gradient and with the activation of fog droplets according to the Köhler theory. Small fog droplets develop close to the canopy as result of evapotranspiration and subsequent condensation. The rapid growth of small fog droplets and the accelerated growth of activated droplets, a process which is more likely to occur at higher levels of the fog layer, lead to a sink of small droplets and a source of larger droplets within the fog. This is in accordance with the observation that positive droplet number fluxes of small fog droplets outnumber the negative fluxes from the larger fog droplets. For liquid water, the net flux is negative.

  10. 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study: Fog measurements in the Northern San Joaquin Valley - preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, J. Jr.; Bator, A.; Sherman, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical gradients in fog chemistry and physics were measured from a 430 m television broadcast tower in the northern San Joaquin Valley near Walnut Grove, California. Fog was collected on the ground and at two elevations on the tower using Caltech Active Strand Cloudwater Collectors Version 2 (CASCC2). Work was conducted as part of the 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study (IMS95). Results will be used to evaluate the need to make measurements aloft in future regional studies of fog processing of atmospheric particles and for testing whether vertically resolved fog models provide realistic simulations of fog physics and chemistry above the ground. Two fog/low cloud events were sampled during the tower study. Preliminary results show concentrations of major species in the fogwater typically decreasing with altitude, while liquid water contents increase. Fogwater loadings of major species, the total amount of a species in the aqueous phase per unit air volume, were observed to increase with altitude. Major species concentrations were typically quite stable at a given elevation, while significant decreases were observed over time in liquid water content. Fogwater concentrations of soluble hydroperoxides were highest near the surface and increased with time after sunrise and were observed to coexist in the high pH fog with S(IV). Time lapse video footage of the top of the fog/cloud layer revealed a very dynamic interface, suggesting entrainment of material from the clear air into the fog/cloud may be significant. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  11. FOG-1 recruits the NuRD repressor complex to mediate transcriptional repression by GATA-1

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Nakazawa, Minako; Chen, Ying-Yu; Kori, Rajashree; Vakoc, Christopher R; Rakowski, Carrie; Blobel, Gerd A

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA-1 and its cofactor FOG-1 coordinate erythroid cell maturation by activating erythroid-specific genes and repressing genes associated with the undifferentiated state. Here we show that FOG-1 binds to the NuRD corepressor complex in vitro and in vivo. The interaction is mediated by a small conserved domain at the extreme N-terminus of FOG-1 that is necessary and sufficient for NuRD binding. This domain defines a novel repression module found in diverse transcriptional repressors. NuRD is present at GATA-1/FOG-1-repressed genes in erythroid cells in vivo. Point mutations near the N-terminus of FOG-1 that abrogate NuRD binding block gene repression by FOG-1. Finally, the ability of GATA-1 to repress transcription was impaired in erythroid cells expressing mutant forms of FOG-1 that are defective for NuRD binding. Together, these studies show that FOG-1 and likely other FOG-like proteins are corepressors that link GATA factors to histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. PMID:15920470

  12. On Study of Sea Fog over the Yellow and Bohai Seas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G.; Gao, S.; Yang, Y.; Xu, X.; Wang, X.; Chen, Y.; Xue, D.; Shen, J.

    2010-07-01

    A ubiquitous feature of the Yellow and Bohai Sea (YBS) in the eastern Asian region is the frequent occurrence of the sea fog in spring and summer season. The pioneer work on sea fog over YBS can be traced back to Prof. Binhua Wang as early as 1940's. He investigated sea fog systematically and published his book Sea Fog in 1985 (by China Ocean Press and Springer-Verlag). Recently, a research group in the Department of Marine Meteorology at Ocean University of China (OUC) continued sea fog research collaborated with Shandong Meteorological Bureau and Qingdao Meteorological Bureau under the financial supports of National Natural Science Foundation of China and China Meteorological Administration. Their researches involved in both observation analyses and high-resolution modeling of sea fog over YBS. In this talk, the brief history of sea fog research in China will be reviewed firstly. Then, a typical heavy sea fog event over YBS occurred in the morning of 11 April 2004 will be documented by using all available observational data and high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) modeling results. Finally, the applications of a quasi-operational sea fog forecasting system which was mainly based on RAMS model will be introduced.

  13. Daytime sea fog retrieval based on GOCI data: a case study over the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yibo; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Sun, Deyong; Wang, Shengqiang; Yue, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-25

    In this paper, a new daytime sea fog detection algorithm has been developed by using Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) data. Based on spectral analysis, differences in spectral characteristics were found over different underlying surfaces, which include land, sea, middle/high level clouds, stratus clouds and sea fog. Statistical analysis showed that the Rrc (412 nm) (Rayleigh Corrected Reflectance) of sea fog pixels is approximately 0.1-0.6. Similarly, various band combinations could be used to separate different surfaces. Therefore, three indices (SLDI, MCDI and BSI) were set to discern land/sea, middle/high level clouds and fog/stratus clouds, respectively, from which it was generally easy to extract fog pixels. The remote sensing algorithm was verified using coastal sounding data, which demonstrated that the algorithm had the ability to detect sea fog. The algorithm was then used to monitor an 8-hour sea fog event and the results were consistent with observational data from buoys data deployed near the Sheyang coast (121°E, 34°N). The goal of this study was to establish a daytime sea fog detection algorithm based on GOCI data, which shows promise for detecting fog separately from stratus. PMID:26832463

  14. Two typical boundary layer structures in sea fog on the coast of southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Huang, J.; Mao, W.; Bi, X.

    2013-12-01

    Two kinds of sea fog exist on the coast of southern China according to our observations. The predominant one is advection fog. This kind of sea fog has the typical feature that the surface air temperature (SAT) is higher than the sea surface temperature (SST). The formation mechanism is that the eddy diffusion (mechanical turbulence) transports the upper saturation air and liquid water content to the sea surface. The maintain factor is the warm and moist transportation along the thermal turbulence interface. The other kind is the advection-radiative fog, is familiar to the sea fog on the west coast of USA and the Haar. In this kind of fog, the SAT is lower than the SST. This kind of sea fog is initially cooled by contact with the cold sea via advection, and then the mainly maintain mechanism is the radiation from the top of the sea fog and the evaporation from the sea. These two kinds of sea fog are interacted with the low cloud, and could transform from one to the other kind under certain conditions.

  15. Improvement of Initial Conditions of Sea Fog Modeling with Cycling 3DVAR-WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Fu, G.; Wu, W.; Xu, X.

    2010-07-01

    Among the seas of China, the Yellow Sea (YS) experiences sea fog most frequently, especially during the spring and summer seasons. Recent studies of sea fog modeling over YS have suggested that data assimilation is a key important issue for sea fog modeling, because simulation result is significantly sensitive to initial conditions. In this talk, a heavy sea fog over YS occurred from 6 to 7 March 2006 is carefully studied by using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The evolution of sea fog area is demonstrated by the Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT)-1R visible imagery and infrared data using dual channel difference method. A cycling 3DVAR scheme with 12-h assimilation window is designed and employed to generate the initial conditions for this sea fog simulation. The result shows that the simulated sea fog area is greatly improved compared to the result without cycling 3DVAR. Additionally, the initial conditions with cycling 3DVAR-WRF are also used to force the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) model to simulate this sea fog case. We find that the simulated sea fog coverage is much better than the result with RAMS original isentropic analysis.

  16. The influence of microclimates and fog on stable isotope signatures used in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Gingerich, S.B.; Tribble, G.W.

    2002-01-01

    Stable isotopes of precipitation, ground water and surface water measured on the windward side of East Maui from 0 to 3055 m altitude were used to determine recharge sources for stream flow and ground water. Correct interpretation of the hydrology using rainfall ??18O gradients with altitude required consideration of the influence of fog, as fog samples had isotopic signatures enriched by as much as 3??? in ??18O and 21??? in ??D compared to volume-weighted average precipitation at the same altitude. The isotopic analyses suggested that fog drip was a major component of stream flow and shallow ground water at higher altitudes in the watershed. 18O/altitude gradients in rainfall were comparable for similar microclimates on Maui (this study) and Hawaii Island (1990-1995 study), however, East Maui ??18O values for rain in trade-wind and high-altitude microclimates were enriched compared to those from Hawaii Island. Isotopes were used to interpret regional hydrology in this volcanic island aquifer system. In part of the study area, stable isotopes indicate discharge of ground water recharged at least 1000 m above the sample site. This deep-flowpath ground water was found in springs from sea level up to 240 m altitude, indicating saturation to altitudes much higher than a typical freshwater lens. These findings help in predicting the effects of ground water development on stream flow in the area. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  18. Local predictions of frost, fog, and low clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liechti, O.

    2010-09-01

    An operational chain of nested numerical weather prediction models has been extended with a two-dimensional boundary layer model in order to produce short-term and local predictions of frost and low visibility. For an experimental period of six months the topographical boundary layer model TBM has been coupled to the operational COSMO-2 model of MeteoSwiss for the hydrological catchment of the Glatt river (ZH, Switzerland). Eight daily COSMO-2 runs covering 24 hours each have been completed by hourly runs of the boundary layer model TBM which assimilates local observations. Verifications of the COSMO-2/TBM runs document a remarkable quality and level of sophistication in the simulation of nocturnal boundary layers for a substantial range of low visibility conditions caused by radiative mist developing into fog and low stratus. In the topographical boundary layer model TBM the subscale processes governing the nocturnal cooling (long wave radiative transfer, condensation, deposition, sedimentation, vertical mixing, and wind) have been tuned for a five day period with a variety of weather and visibility conditions. Simulations of numerous other nights with reduced visibility have successfully been verified with visibility, radiation, and temperature observed at Zurich airport. Apparently the subscale processes relevant for nocturnal cooling are represented in the topographical boundary layer model TBM and have been tuned for practical application. Calm nights after days with well mixed convective boundary layers have been simulated most precisely and consistently. With TBM the development of initially stable near ground layers into mist, fog, and finally mixed low stratus is obtained with remarkable temporal and spatial precision. Cases of marked low-level inversions with stratus, either persisting or hardly dissipating during the day, have been simulated less consistently. A sensitivity of the simulations to the external forcings from the COSMO-2 and the assimilated

  19. EFFECT OF MONOCHLORAMINE ON ISOLATED FULVIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine is interesting both as a selective oxidant of fulvic acid and as a drinking water disinfectant. In the study, the controlled reaction of aquatic fulvic acid with monochloramine did not result in products detectable by ether extraction-gas chromatography-flame ioniz...

  20. EFFECTS OF ACID RAIN ON GRAPEVINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid...

  1. Effect of cholestyramine on bile acid metabolism in normal man

    PubMed Central

    Garbutt, J. T.; Kenney, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of cholestyramine administration on the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids was studied in eight normal volunteers. In six subjects the metabolism of sodium taurocholate-14C was determined after its intravenous injection before and during the 6th wk of cholestyramine administration, 16 g/day. In two subjects, the metabolism of cholic acid-14C was observed before and during the 2nd wk of cholestyramine, 16 g/day. Bile acid sequestration resulted in a more rapid disappearance of the injected primary bile acid and its metabolic products. The composition of fasting bile acids was promptly altered by cholestyramine to predominantly glycine-conjugated trihydroxy bile acid. In four subjects, unconjugated bile acid-14C was administered during cholestyramine administration; the relative proportion of glycine-conjugated bile acid-14C before enterohepatic circulation was similar to the relative proportion of unlabeled glycine-conjugated bile acid present in duodenal contents after an overnight fast, indicating that a hepatic mechanism was responsible for the elevated ratios of glycine- to taurine-conjugated bile acid (G: T ratios) observed. The relative proportions of both dihydroxy bile acids, chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic, were significantly reduced. Steatorrhea did not occur, and the total bile acid pool size determined after an overnight fast was unaltered by cholestyramine. These findings suggest that in normal man bile acid sequestered from the enterohepatic circulation by cholestyramine is replaced by an increase in hepatic synthesis primarily via the pathway leading to production of glycocholic acid. PMID:5080408

  2. Fog-2, a Germ-Line-Specific Sex Determination Gene Required for Hermaphrodite Spermatogenesis in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, T.; Kimble, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation and characterization of 16 mutations in the germ-line sex determination gene fog-2 (fog for feminization of the germ line). In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans there are normally two sexes, self-fertilizing hermaphrodites (XX) and males (XO). Wild-type XX animals are hermaphrodite in the germ line (spermatogenesis followed by oogenesis), and female in the soma. fog-2 loss-of-function mutations transform XX animals into females while XO animals are unaffected. Thus, wild-type fog-2 is necessary for spermatogenesis in hermaphrodites but not males. The fem genes and fog-1 are each essential for specification of spermatogenesis in both XX and XO animals. fog-2 acts as a positive regulator of the fem genes and fog-1. The tra-2 and tra-3 genes act as negative regulators of the fem genes and fog-1 to allow oogenesis. Two models are discussed for how fog-2 might positively regulate the fem genes and fog-1 to permit spermatogenesis; fog-2 may act as a negative regulator of tra-2 and tra-3, or fog-2 may act positively on the fem genes and fog-1 rendering them insensitive to the negative action of tra-2 and tra-3. PMID:3396865

  3. The Effects of Acid Rain on Forest Nutrient Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale W.; Turner, John; Kelly, J. M.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of acidic atmospheric inputs on forest nutrient status must be assessed within the context of natural, internal acid production by carbonic and organic acids as well as the nutrient inputs and drains by management practices such as harvesting, fire, and fertilization. In all cases the anion associated with acid inputs must be mobile in the soil if leaching is to occur; immobilization of anions can effectively prevent cation leaching. Soil acidification will occur only if the often substantial buffering capacity of the soil in question is exceeded by acid inputs and if cation weathering from primary minerals is insufficient to offset cation losses by leaching. Such circumstances are rare but certainly could occur in theory, at least, given sufficiently large acid inputs on poorly buffered soils. Soils most sensitive to change are thought to be those of moderately acid pH and low cation exchange capacity. Neither very acid soils nor neutral, highly buffered soils are sensitive to acidification by acid rain. Given extremely high acid inputs, acid rain can cause temporary increases in nitrogen mineralization and nitritication as well as Al mobilization in soils. While temporary increases in N availability can cause increased forest growth in N-deficient forests, increased Al availability can cause toxic reactions in tree roots. Little is known about tree Al toxicity levels as yet, however. It must be emphasized that assessment of acid rain effects is a problem of quantification. Given sufficiently high inputs on sensitive sites, negative effects of acid rain must occur, as is true of inputs of any substance, including H2O. Acid rain inputs of sufficient magnitude to cause acute effects, such as growth increase due to N mobilization or growth decrease due to Al mobilization, are apparently very rare under ambient field conditions. Long-term effects on forest nutrient status can be either beneficial or adverse, depending on site nutrient status, silvicultural

  4. On the dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles. Effect of monocarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Maximiliano; Zanini, Graciela; Avena, Marcelo

    2008-05-01

    The dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles has been studied in batch experiments, and the effects of monocarboxylic (formic, acetic, and propionic) acids are reported. The dissolution rate of the particles is significantly affected by the presence of monocarboxylic acids in the pH range 4-10. At pH 7, for example, propionic acid increases 30 times this dissolution rate. The capacity of increasing the dissolution rate is in the order formic acidacidacid, and this dissolving capacity of carboxylics seems to be directly related to their affinity for HA molecules located at the surface of the solid particles. The results indicate that carboxylics and related compounds may affect markedly the mobility and transport of humic substances in the environment. PMID:18328533

  5. Observation of coastal fogs using a suite of ground based remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J. I.; Yum, S. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Cho, C. H.; Oh, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Fog is the cloud of which the base is at the earth surface. Because of severely reduced visibility when fog is present, on-road traffics, maritime transport and aircraft operations are often hampered by fog occurrence. Therefore, accurate prediction of fog has been of high priority in traffic safety. The first step towards the accurate prediction of fog would be to detect the fog formation and monitor the evolution of fog in a continuous manner so that we can better characterize the fog formation mechanism. However, observing the evolution of fog has been difficult due to its nature of local meteorological scale and the lack of proper measurement of such scale. In situ measurements can provide us the most accurate data, but these measurements are limited to a very small spatial coverage. Satellite remote sensing can cover a wider spatial scale but detailed structure cannot be detected, In contrast, ground based remote sensing has advantages in spatial and temporal coverages. Here we present the data measured using a suite of ground based remote sensing instruments at the National Center for Intensive Observation of severe weather (NCIO), located at a southern coastal rural town of Boseong, Korea (34.76 ̊ N, 127.16 ̊ E), which include a scanning Ka-band cloud radar, wind profiler, microwave radiometer, ceilometer and lidar. Analysis of these data will be complemented by the basic meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction) data measured at 11 different altitudes on a 300m meteorological observation tower installed at NCIO. With the sea to the south, the hilly topographical setting to the north, and the ragged coastal line in between, fog formation mechanisms in this region are expected to be very complex. Our eventual goal is to obtain an insight on the formation mechanisms of the coastal fogs in this region through the analysis of these comprehensive dataset. Some preliminary results from this effort will be presented at the

  6. Characterizing Spatial Patterns of Cloud Cover And Fog Inundation in the California Channel Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, B.; Fischer, D. T.; Williams, P.; Iacobellis, S.; McEachern, K.; Still, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal forests in Mediterranean climates are frequently covered by clouds or immersed in fog. Previous studies suggest that clouds strongly modulate forest distributions as well as carbon and water budgets in these semi-arid environments. Both low level stratocumulus cloud cover and fog can enhance the water status of vegetation along the Californian coast and the Channel Islands by reducing insolation and raising relative humidity and thus reducing evapotranspiration, while also potentially supplying water directly to the landscape from fog-drip during otherwise warm and rainless summers. While cloud cover and fog can ameliorate summer drought stress and enhance soil water budgets, they often have different spatial and temporal patterns. The resulting shifts in relative ecological importance of fog and stratus are largely unknown. The overall objective of this project was to map spatial and temporal distributions of daytime cloud cover frequency for the California Channel Islands, and to predict probabilities of surface cloud (fog) contact and immersion for these islands. Daytime cloud cover maps were generated for the northern Channel Islands using GOES satellite imagery for the years 1996-2012. To discriminate fog from stratus the base of the cloud height was constrained by using airport cloud ceiling data and topographic information. In order to observe variation in fog frequency at scales relevant to species distributions on the Channel Islands the native GOES resolution was downscaled by using radiosonde and reanalysis data. Satellite derived estimates of cloud cover and fog were correlated with field measurements of insolation, fog drip and leaf wetness on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz islands. This enabled spatial and temporal extrapolation to understand seasonal and inter-annual variations in cloud cover frequency and fog inundation and drip and will be important for future water balance modeling, studies of coastal vegetation distributions and for better

  7. The Influence of Asian Dust, Haze, Mist, and Fog on Hospital Visits for Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinkyeong; Lim, Myoung Nam; Hong, Yoonki

    2015-01-01

    Background Asian dust is known to have harmful effects on the respiratory system. Respiratory conditions are also influenced by environmental conditions regardless of the presence of pollutants. The same pollutant can have different effects on the airway when the air is dry compared with when it is humid. We investigated hospital visits for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in relation to the environmental conditions. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using the Korean National Health Insurance Service claims database of patients who visited hospitals in Chuncheon between January 2006 and April 2012. Asian dust, haze, mist, and fog days were determined using reports from the Korea Meteorological Administration. Hospital visits for asthma or COPD on the index days were compared with the comparison days. We used two-way case-crossover techniques with one to two matching. Results The mean hospital visits for asthma and COPD were 59.37 ± 34.01 and 10.04 ± 6.18 per day, respectively. Hospital visits for asthma significantly increased at lag0 and lag1 for Asian dust (relative risk [RR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.19; p<0.05) and haze (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06-1.22; p<0.05), but were significantly lower on misty (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-0.99; p<0.05) and foggy (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.84-0.93; p<0.05) days than on control days. The hospital visits for COPD also significantly increased on days with Asian dust (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05-1.59; p<0.05), and were significantly lower at lag4 for foggy days, compared with days without fog (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.97; p<0.05). Conclusion Asian dust showed an association with airway diseases and had effects for several days after the exposure. In contrast to Asian dust, mist and fog, which occur in humid air conditions, showed the opposite effects on airway diseases, after adjusting to the pollutants. It would require more research to investigate the effects of various air conditions on

  8. Effects of (+)-usnic acid and (+)-usnic acid-liposome on Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Si, Kaiwei; Wei, Linlin; Yu, Xiaozhuo; Wu, Feng; Li, Xiaoqi; Li, Chen; Cheng, Yanbin

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii pathogen is a threat to human health that results in economic burden. Unfortunately, there are very few high-efficiency and low-toxicity drugs for toxoplasmosis in the clinic. (+)-Usnic acid derived from lichen species has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-parasitology, and even anti-cancer activities. Herein, the systematic effect of (+)-usnic acid and (+)-usnic acid-liposome on toxoplasma were studied in vitro and in vivo. The viability of toxoplasma tachyzoite was assayed with trypan blue and Giemsa staining; while the invasive capability of tachyzoite to cardiofibroblasts was detected using Giemsa staining. The survival time of mice and the changes in tachyzoite ultrastructure were studied in vivo. The results showed that (+)-usnic acid inhibited the viability of tachyzoite; pretreatment with (+)-usnic acid significantly decreased the invasion of tachyzoite to cardiofibroblasts in vitro; (+)-usnic acid and (+)-usnic acid-liposome extensively prolonged the survival time of mice about 90.9% and 117%, respectively; and improved the ultrastructural changes of tachyzoite, especially in dense granules, rhoptries, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and other membrane organelles. In summary, these results demonstrate that (+)-usnic acid and (+)-usnic acid-liposome with low toxicity have an inhibitory effect on the viability of toxoplasma tachyzoite, and mainly destructed membrane organelles which are connected with the virulence of toxoplasma. These findings provide the basis for further study and development of usnic acid as a potential agent for treating toxoplasmosis. PMID:27004468

  9. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION ON PLANT DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most plant diseases consist of delicate interactions between higher plants and microorganisms. Acidic precipitation represents an environmental stress that has been shown to affect expected development of some diseases and similar phenomena under experimental conditions. From the...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms for Sweet-suppressing Effect of Gymnemic Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kusakabe, Yuko; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Seiji; Imoto, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2014-01-01

    Gymnemic acids are triterpene glycosides that selectively suppress taste responses to various sweet substances in humans but not in mice. This sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids is diminished by rinsing the tongue with γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids and the interaction between gymnemic acids versus sweet taste receptor and/or γ-CD. To investigate whether gymnemic acids directly interact with human (h) sweet receptor hT1R2 + hT1R3, we used the sweet receptor T1R2 + T1R3 assay in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Similar to previous studies in humans and mice, gymnemic acids (100 μg/ml) inhibited the [Ca2+]i responses to sweet compounds in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing hT1R2 + hT1R3 but not in those expressing the mouse (m) sweet receptor mT1R2 + mT1R3. The effect of gymnemic acids rapidly disappeared after rinsing the HEK293 cells with γ-CD. Using mixed species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits and chimeras, we determined that the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 was mainly required for the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids. Directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 revealed that the interaction site for gymnemic acids shared the amino acid residues that determined the sensitivity to another sweet antagonist, lactisole. Glucuronic acid, which is the common structure of gymnemic acids, also reduced sensitivity to sweet compounds. In our models, gymnemic acids were predicted to dock to a binding pocket within the transmembrane domain of hT1R3. PMID:25056955

  11. 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study: Fog measurements in the Southern San Joaquin Valley - preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, J. Jr.; Bator, A.; Sherman, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Fogs were sampled at three ground-based stations in the southern portion of California`s San Joaquin Valley as part of the winter component of the 1995 Integrated Monitoring Study (IMS95). The three sampling sites included two urban locations (Bakersfield and Fresno) and one rural location (near the Kern Wildlife Refuge). Both bulk and drop size-fractionated samples were collected at each site. Several fog events were sampled, with three periods of extensive fog coverage that included all three sampling sites. Results of preliminary data analysis are presented. Fog collected at the sites was generally quite basic. Most bulk fog samples had pH values above 6 reflecting strong inputs from ammonia. Occasional strong sulfur plumes at Bakersfield, however, tended to lower the fog pH. Aside from these periods, nitrate was generally present at much higher concentrations in the fog than sulfate. Decreases in fogwater loadings of major species over the course of one extended fog episode at Fresno suggest significant deposition was occurring to the surface, consistent with observations of substantial droplet fluxes to exposed surfaces during that period. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Sex Change by Gene Conversion in a Caenorhabditis elegans fog-2 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Katju, Vaishali; LaBeau, Elisa M.; Lipinski, Kendra J.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar

    2008-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans primarily reproduces as a hermaphrodite. Independent gene conversion events in mutant obligately outcrossing populations of C. elegans [fog-2(lf)] spontaneously repaired the loss-of-function mutation in the fog-2 locus, thereby reestablishing hermaphroditism as the primary means of reproduction for the populations. PMID:18757925

  13. Bioinspired conical copper wire with gradient wettability for continuous and efficient fog collection.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jie; Xiao, Kai; Yao, Xi; Bai, Hao; Jiang, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the efficient fog collection on cactus spines, conical copper wires with gradient wettability are fabricated through gradient electrochemical corrosion and subsequent gradient chemical modification. These dual-gradient copper wires' fog-collection ability is demonstrated to be higher than that of conical copper wires with pure hydrophobic surfaces or pure hydrophilic surfaces, and the underlying mechanism is also analyzed. PMID:24038211

  14. Drop size distributions and related properties of fog for five locations measured from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen

    1994-01-01

    Fog drop size distributions were collected from aircraft as part of the Synthetic Vision Technology Demonstration Program. Three west coast marine advection fogs, one frontal fog, and a radiation fog were sampled from the top of the cloud to the bottom as the aircraft descended on a 3-degree glideslope. Drop size versus altitude versus concentration are shown in three dimensional plots for each 10-meter altitude interval from 1-minute samples. Also shown are median volume radius and liquid water content. Advection fogs contained the largest drops with median volume radius of 5-8 micrometers, although the drop sizes in the radiation fog were also large just above the runway surface. Liquid water content increased with height, and the total number of drops generally increased with time. Multimodal variations in number density and particle size were noted in most samples where there was a peak concentration of small drops (2-5 micrometers) at low altitudes, midaltitude peak of drops 5-11 micrometers, and high-altitude peak of the larger drops (11-15 micrometers and above). These observations are compared with others and corroborate previous results in fog gross properties, although there is considerable variation with time and altitude even in the same type of fog.

  15. Climatic Controls on Summertime fog Patterns Along the U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. P.; Still, C.; Husak, G.; Michaelsen, J.

    2008-12-01

    Summertime fog and stratus overcast along the U.S. west coast significantly impact aviation, marine travel, agriculture, and biodiversity. However, an understanding of the climatic mechanisms that drive variability in fog formation and dissolution in this region, particularly on interannual time scales, is lacking, in part because fog data are collected at only a handful of coastal sites. Furthermore, fog is quite spatially variable and depends in part on local-scale features such as coastal topography and coastline orientation. As a result, accurate predictions of relative fogginess from one summer to the next have been elusive. This means that we do not know how coastal fogginess may change in response to global climate change. In this study, we treated all low stratus clouds as fog and used hourly records of summertime cloud height from 12 coastal stations along with daily satellite imagery to develop the first spatially continuous record of summertime fog occurrence along the California coast. Using statistical techniques to compare records of summer fog frequency to global gridded climate data, we created a statistical model that utilizes the organization of global sea surface temperatures and atmospheric pressures to estimate relative summer fogginess along California's coast. We then used GCM outputs based upon several climate change scenarios to predict how summer fog frequency may be expected to change during the 21st century. Finally, we used ecological niche modeling to predict how future changes in coastal fogginess might impact the range boundaries of several endemic plant species, including coast redwood.

  16. Chemical Composition of Sea Fog Water Along the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yanyu; Niu, Shengjie; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    The chemical and microphysical properties of sea fog were measured during a field experiment on Donghai Island, Zhanjiang of China from March 15 to April 18, 2010. The average pH and electrical conductivity (EC) value of the six sea fog cases during the experiment was 5.2 and 1,884 μS/cm. The observed total ion concentration of sea fog was four orders of magnitude higher than those in the North Pacific and other sea areas of China. The dominant anion and cation in all sea fog water samples were Cl- and Na+, respectively. From backward trajectory analysis and ion loading computation, it can be concluded that the ions in the samples were transported either from pollutants in distant industrial cities or from local ion deposition processes. The concentration of Ca2+ in the sea fog water samples in Case 2 suggested that a dust storm in the Inner Mongolia, a northern region of China several thousand kilometers away, could reach the South China Sea. The data also showed that the sea fog droplet spectrum over the South China Sea is unimodal. Through relationship analysis, it is illustrated that the evolution of microphysics (such as droplet concentration, diameter, and liquid water content) during fog process could affect the chemical properties of sea fog.

  17. Can we estimate the fog-top height from atmospheric turbulent measurements at surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Cascón, Carlos; Yagüe, Carlos; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Sastre, Mariano; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Maqueda, Gregorio

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of the fog-top height (fog thickness) can be very meaningful for aircraft maneuvers, data assimilation/validation of Numerical Weather Prediction models or nowcasting of fog dissipation. However, its value is usually difficult to determine and it is sometimes approximated with satellite data, ground remote-sensing instruments or atmospheric soundings. These instruments are expensive and their data not always available. In this work, we show how the fog-top height shows a linear correlation with atmospheric turbulent variables measured close to the surface. This relation is statistically calculated from observational data of several radiation-fog events at two research sites: The Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere (CIBA) in Spain and the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR) in The Netherlands. Thus, surface friction velocity and buoyancy heat flux are presented as potential indicators of fog thickness. These methods are also evaluated over a long-lasting radiation-fog event at CESAR. The proposed methods could be operationally implemented for providing a continuous estimation of fog-top height through the deployment of a sonic anemometer close to the surface.

  18. Fog simulation using a mesoscale model in and around the Yodo River Basin, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hikari, Shimadera; Kundan, Lal Shrestha; Aki