Science.gov

Sample records for acid formation potential

  1. Trihalomethane formation potential of aquatic and terrestrial fulvic and humic acids: Sorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Mohamed Y Z; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-07-15

    Humic substances (HSs) are precursors for the formation of hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water. Various surrogate parameters have been used to investigate the generation of DBPs by HS precursors and the removal of these precursors by activated carbon treatment. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC)- and ultraviolet absorbance (UVA254)-based isotherms are commonly reported and presumed to be good predictors of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). However, THMFP-based isotherms are rarely published such that the three types of parameters have not been compared directly. Batch equilibrium experiments on activated carbon were used to generate constant-initial-concentration sorption isotherms for well-characterized samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). HSs representing type (fulvic acid [FA], humic acid [HA]), origin (aquatic, terrestrial), and geographical source (Nordic, Suwannee, Peat, Soil) were examined at pH6 and pH9. THMFP-based isotherms were generated and compared to determine if DOC- and UVA254-based isotherms were good predictors of the THMFP. The sorption process depended on the composition of the HSs and the chemical nature of the activated carbon, both of which were influenced by pH. Activated carbon removal of THM-precursors was pH- and HS-dependent. In some instances, the THMFP existed after UVA254 was depleted.

  2. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiDonato, Nicole; Chen, Hongmei; Waggoner, Derek; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2016-04-01

    Soil humic acids are the base soluble/acid insoluble organic components of soil organic matter. Most of what we know about humic acids comes from studies of their bulk molecular properties or analysis of individual fractions after extraction from soils. This work attempts to better define humic acids and explain similarities and differences for several soils varying in degrees of humification using advanced molecular level techniques. Our investigation using electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has given new insight into the distinctive molecular characteristics of humic acids which suggest a possible pathway for their formation. Humic acids from various ecosystems, climate regions and soil textural classes are distinguished by the presence of three predominant molecular components: lignin-like molecules, carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules and condensed aromatic molecules that bear similarity to black carbon. Results show that humification may be linked to the relative abundance of these three types of molecules as well as the relative abundance of carboxyl groups in each molecular type. This work also demonstrates evidence for lignin as the primary source of soil organic matter, particularly condensed aromatic molecules often categorized as black carbon and is the first report of the non-pyrogenic source for these compounds in soils. We also suggest that much of the carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules are sourced from lignin.

  3. Change in haloacetic acid formation potential during UV and UV/H2O2 treatment of model organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Autin, Olivier; Parsons, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products produced by the chlorination of organic matter, including amino acids. Advanced oxidation processes are expected to be effective for the destruction of HAA precursors; however, recent studies have reported the possible failure of these processes to reduce HAA formation potential. This study examined HAA formation potential during the course of UV or UV/H2O2 treatment of three organic compounds: leucine, serine, and resorcinol. HAA formation potential decreased in the treatment of resorcinol, while the potential increased slightly in the treatment of serine and greatly increased for leucine. The chemical structure required for HAA formation was assumed to be produced during the course of UV/H2O2 treatment of leucine and serine. Also, H abstraction from the δ carbon was assumed to result from the initial degradation of leucine by the hydroxyl radical during the UV/H2O2 treatment. The hydroxyl radical may have further reacted with leucine moiety to shorten its carbon chain. This would have produced a chemical structure capable of forming HAA, thus increasing HAA formation potential.

  4. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Patrick; DiDonato, Nicole; Waggoner, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Humification is defined as the process by which plant and microbial debris are transformed in to humic substances. Proposed pathways for the formation of humic substances, include the lignin and lignin decomposition theories, the lignin-polyphenol theory as well as the melanoidin pathway. It is generally accepted that a combination of several of these pathways with some modifications may be responsible for producing humic substances. The current study examines humic acids from numerous soil samples to demonstrate their molecular composition. In addition we provide an explanation for the formation of these molecules that introduces a new perspective of the humification process. Our work utilizes advanced analytical techniques such as ESI-FTICR-MS and solid state NMR to more completely characterize humic acids at the molecular level. Methods Humic acids were extracted from soils using 0.5 M NaOH followed by treatment with a Dowex™ ion-exchange resin to remove sodium ions. Solid State 13C NMR spectra were obtained on a Bruker 400 MHz Avance II spectrometer equipped with a 4 mm solid state MAS probe. ESI-FTICR-MS analysis was conducted in the negative ion mode on a Bruker Daltonics 12 Tesla Apex Qe FTICR-MS instrument equipped with an Apollo II ESI source. Results: Soil humic acids from numerous soils were investigated in this study. The molecular formulas calculated from ultrahigh resolution mass spectra of well humified soils fall clearly into two predominant regions consisting of condensed aromatic molecules as well as high H/C, low O/C carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules (CCAM). In contrast, the spectral data for humic acids from a poorly humified spodosol soil show a less dramatic separation of these regions, with relatively more molecular formula plotting in the lignin-like region and relatively fewer condensed aromatic molecules. From the mass spectral observations made for the humic acids, we can readily discern a relationship based on degree of

  5. Compound-Specific Isotopic Analysis of Meteoritic Amino Acids as a Tool for Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael C.; Charnley, Steven B.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) of organic compounds can reveal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may point towards the most likely of these proposed pathways. The technique of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry provides compound-specific structural and isotopic information from a single splitless injection, enhancing the amount of information gained from small amounts of precious samples such as carbonaceous chondrites. We have applied this technique to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites. We are using these measurements to evaluate predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways and environments, leading to a better understanding of the origin of these compounds.

  6. TiO2 photocatalysis of natural organic matter in surface water: impact on trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanly; Lim, May; Fabris, Rolando; Chow, Christopher; Drikas, Mary; Amal, Rose

    2008-08-15

    In this study, changes in the physical and structural properties of natural organic matter (NOM) during titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation process were investigated using several complementary analytical techniques. Potential of the treated water to form trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) was also studied. High-performance size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that NOM with apparent molecular weights of 1-4 kDa were preferentially degraded, leading to the formation of lower molecular weight organic compounds. Resin fractionation of the treated water demonstrated that the photocatalytic oxidation changed the affinity of the bulk organic character from predominantly hydrophobic to more hydrophilic. Short chain aldehydes and ketones were identified by mass spectroscopy as one of the key degradation products. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to photocatalysis was found to increase the degradation kinetics but did not affect the reaction pathway, thus producing similar degradation end products. The amount of THMs normalized per dissolved organic carbon (specific THM) formed upon chlorination of NOM treated with photocatalytic oxidation was reduced from 56 to 10 microg/mg. In contrast, the specific HAAs formation potential of the treated water remained relatively unchanged from the initial value of 38 microg/mg, which could be due to the presence of hydrophilic precursor compounds that were formed as a result of the photocatalytic oxidation process.

  7. Formation of carcinogens indoors by surface-mediated reactions of nicotine with nitrous acid, leading to potential thirdhand smoke hazards

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Gundel, Lara A.; Pankow, James F.; Jacob, Peyton; Singer, Brett C.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that residual nicotine from tobacco smoke sorbed to indoor surfaces reacts with ambient nitrous acid (HONO) to form carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). Substantial levels of TSNAs were measured on surfaces inside a smoker’s vehicle. Laboratory experiments using cellulose as a model indoor material yielded a > 10-fold increase of surface-bound TSNAs when sorbed secondhand smoke was exposed to 60 ppbv HONO for 3 hours. In both cases we identified 1-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-4-butanal, a TSNA absent in freshly emitted tobacco smoke, as the major product. The potent carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone and N-nitroso nornicotine were also detected. Time-course measurements revealed fast TSNA formation, with up to 0.4% conversion of nicotine. Given the rapid sorption and persistence of high levels of nicotine on indoor surfaces—including clothing and human skin—this recently identified process represents an unappreciated health hazard through dermal exposure, dust inhalation, and ingestion. These findings raise concerns about exposures to the tobacco smoke residue that has been recently dubbed “thirdhand smoke.” Our work highlights the importance of reactions at indoor interfaces, particularly those involving amines and NOx/HONO cycling, with potential health impacts. PMID:20142504

  8. Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids in CM and CR chondrites and their use in evaluating potential formation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-09-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (δD, δ13C, and δ15N) of organic compounds can reveal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1/2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CR2 Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CR2 Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing δ13C and increasing δD with increasing carbon number in the α-H, α-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light δ13C signatures for β-alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ω-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in α-methyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than in CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  9. Compound-Specific Carbon, Nitrogen, and Hydrogen Isotopic Ratios for Amino Acids in CM and CR Chondrites and their use in Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (oD, 013C, and olSN) of organic compounds can revcal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1I2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CRZ Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CRZ Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing ODC and increasing oD with increasing carbon number in the aH, (l-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Streckercyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light ODC signatures for -alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ro-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in amethyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  10. Alteration of Basaltic Glass to Mg/Fe-Smectite under Acidic Conditions: A Potential Smectite Formation Mechanism on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, Tanya; Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group including Mg- and Fe-saponite and Fe(III)-rich nontronite have been identified on Mars. Smectites are believed to be formed under neutral to alkaline conditions that prevailed on early Mars. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of smectite and carbonate deposits in Noachian terrain on Mars. However, smectite may have formed under mildly acidic conditions. Abundant smectite formations have been detected as layered deposits hundreds of meters thick in intracrater depositional fans and plains sediments, while no large deposits of carbonates are found. Development of mildly acidic conditions at early Mars might allow formation of smectite but inhibit widespread carbonate precipitation. Little is known regarding the mechanisms of smectite formation from basaltic glass under acidic conditions. The objective of this study was to test a hypothesis that Mars-analogue basaltic glass alters to smectite minerals under acidic conditions (pH 4). The effects of Mg and Fe concentrations and temperature on smectite formation from basaltic glass were evaluated. Phyllosilicate synthesis was performed in batch reactors (Parr acid digestion vessel) under reducing hydrothermal conditions at 200 C and 100 C. Synthetic basaltic glass with a composition similar to that of the Gusev crater rock Adirondack (Ground surface APXS measurement) was used in these experiments. Basaltic glass was prepared by melting and quenching procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the synthesized glass was composed of olivine, magnetite and X-ray amorphous phase. Samples were prepared by mixing 250 mg Adirondack with 0.1 M acetic acid (final pH 4). In order to study influence of Mg concentration on smectite formation, experiments were performed with addition of 0, 1 and 10 mM MgCl2. After 1, 7 and 14 day incubations the solution composition was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and the altered glass and formed

  11. Photodecomposition of humic acid and natural organic matter in swamp water using a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter: potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Mase, Akinori; Funatogawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Masaru; Aizawa, Kazuhiko; Kato, Shigekazu; Saito, Yoichi; Ito, Tsukasa; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the photodecomposition of aqueous humic acid (HA) by a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter (TCF) reactor and on the potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) upon chlorination of the photocatalytically treated solutions. This photocatalytic reactor can also be applied to the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in swamp waters. The proposed photocatalytic reaction system was operated as per standardized methodologies. First, the ability of the TCF to decompose HA (a representative compound of NOM) was evaluated from the changes in the total organic carbon (TOC) and UV(254) with the reaction time. Remarkably, TOC removal and UV(254) values ranging from 44% to 61% and from 60% to 83%, respectively, were achieved. The potential for the formation of DBPs (total trihalomethane and total haloacetic acid) by chlorination of the phototreated solution was strongly dependent on the TOC removal and UV(254) values in the solution. The degree of photodecomposition of NOMs in the swamp water samples and the DBP formation potential showed similar trends as in the case of the standard solutions containing HA. The method used in this study could be effectively used to evaluate the efficiency of TCF for reducing HA and NOM, while suppressing the formation of DBP products.

  12. Method of analysis at the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, Sacramento Laboratory - determination of haloacetic acid formation potential, method validation, and quality-control practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zazzi, Barbara C.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of haloacetic acid formation potential of water samples has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center Sacramento Laboratory. The haloacetic acid formation potential is measured by dosing water samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine. The haloacetic acids formed are bromochloroacetic acid, bromodichloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. They are extracted, methylated, and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Method validation experiments were performed to determine the method accuracy, precision, and detection limit for each of the compounds. Method detection limits for these nine haloacetic acids ranged from 0.11 to 0.45 microgram per liter. Quality-control practices include the use of blanks, quality-control samples, calibration verification standards, surrogate recovery, internal standard, matrix spikes, and duplicates.

  13. Sources and haloacetic acid/trihalomethane formation potentials of aquatic humic substances in the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake near Lawrence, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomes, M.L.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.; Green, W.R.; Orem, W.H.; Rostad, C.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Cutak, B.J.; Dixon, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) in drinking water. AHS from the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake originated from riparian forest vegetation, reflected respective effects of soil organic matter and aquatic algal/bacterial sources, and bore evidence of biological degradation and photodegradation. AHS from the Wakarusa River showed the effect of terrestrial sources, whereas Clinton Lake humicacid also reflected aquatic algal/bacterial sources. Greater amounts of carbon attributable to tannin-derived chemical structures may correspond with higher HAA5 and THM4 yields for Clinton Lake fulvic acid. Prior to appreciable leaf-fall from deciduous trees, the combined (humic and fulvic acid) THM4 formation potentials for the Wakarusa River approached the proposed EPA THM4 Stage I MCL of 80 ??g/L, and the combined THM4 formation potential for Clinton Lake slightly exceeded the proposed THM4 Stage II MCL of 40 ??g/L. Finally, AHS from Clinton Lake could account for most (>70%) of the THM4 concentrations in finished water from the Clinton Lake Water Treatment Plant based on September 23, 1996, THM4 results.Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U

  14. Effects of Ca(OH)2 assisted aluminum sulfate coagulation on the removal of humic acid and the formation potentials of tri-halomethanes and haloacetic acids in chlorination.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming; Cao, Xiaoting; Chen, Cheng; Shi, Dongrui; Li, Genmao; Mulcahy, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The effects of addition of calcium hydroxide on aluminum sulphate (or alum) coagulation for removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and its subsequent effect on the formation potentials of two major types of regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs), have been examined. The results revealed several noteworthy phenomena. At the optimal coagulation pH (i.e. 6), the coagulation behavior of NOM water solutions versus alum dose, showed large variation and a consequent great change in the formation potentials of the DBPs at certain coagulant doses. However, with addition of a relatively small amount of Ca(OH)2, although the zeta potential of coagulated flocs remained almost the same, NOM removal became more consistent with alum dose. Importantly, also the detrimental effect of charge reversal on NOM removal at the low coagulant dose disappeared. This resulted in a steady decrease in the formation potentials of DBPs as a function of the coagulant dose. Moreover, the addition of Ca(OH)2 broadened the pH range of alum coagulation and promoted further reduction of the formation potentials of the DBPs. The enhancement effects of Ca(OH)2 assisted alum coagulation are especially pronounced at pH 7 and 8. Finally, synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the reduction in DBPs formation potential by Ca(OH)2-assisted alum coagulation was connected to an enhanced removal of small hydrophobic and hydrophilic HA molecules. Ca(OH)2-assistance of alum coagulation appeared to increase substantially the removal of the hydrophilic HA fraction responsible for HAAs formation, prompting further reduction of HAA formation potentials.

  15. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  16. New Insights into Trihalomethane and Haloacetic Acid Formation Potentials: Correlation with the Molecular Composition of Natural Organic Matter in Source Water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yahe; Shi, Quan; Wang, Juan; Yu, Jianwei; Yang, Min

    2017-02-21

    Natural organic matter (NOM) represents the major source of precursors for disinfection byproducts (DBPs), such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), formed during disinfection of drinking water, but the molecular composition and reactivity of NOM remain not well understood. In this study, electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize the molecular composition of NOM of 20 source waters taken across China for the purpose of determining the major precursors of THMs and HAAs at molecular level. It was found that there is a core of NOM compositions that are ubiquitous in different source waters, which is supposed to be more relevant for NOM quality. Formation potentials (FP) of THMs and HAAs were determined for NOM from different source waters during chlorination. Spearman's rank correlation was used to link THMFP and HAAFP with the individual molecular composition of NOM. Significant correlation (P < 0.001) was found between DBPFP and the NOM molecules with a high O/C ratio and low H/C ratio, indicating these molecules could contribute greatly to the formation of THMs and HAAs during chlorination. The link of THMFP and HAAFP with individual NOM molecules may allow us to develop more effective treatment strategies to achieve the drinking water safety objective: effective disinfection of waterborne pathogens while minimizing toxic DBPs.

  17. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Natacha C; Ramiro, Juan M P; Quecan, Beatriz X V; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D G

    2016-01-01

    Use of probiotic biofilms can be an alternative approach for reducing the formation of pathogenic biofilms in food industries. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic (Lactococcus lactis VB69, L. lactis VB94, Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1, and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3) and non-bacteriocinogenic (L. lactis 368, Lactobacillus helveticus 354, Lactobacillus casei 40, and Weissela viridescens 113) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Brazilian's foods and (ii) to develop protective biofilms with these strains and test them for exclusion of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. LAB were tested for survival in acid and bile salt conditions, surface properties, biosurfactant production, β-galactosidase and gelatinase activity, antibiotic resistance and presence of virulence genes. Most strains survived exposure to pH 2 and 4% bile salts. The highest percentages of auto-aggregation were obtained after 24 h of incubation. Sixty-seven percentage auto-aggregation value was observed in W. viridescens 113 and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 exhibited the highest co-aggregation (69% with Listeria monocytogenes and 74.6% with E. coli O157:H7), while the lowest co-aggregation was exhibited by W. viridescens 113 (53.4% with Listeria monocytogenes and 38% with E. coli O157:H7). Tests for hemolytic activity, bacterial cell adherence with xylene, and drop collapse confirmed the biosurfactant-producing ability of most strains. Only one strain (L. lactis 368) produced β-galactosidase. All strains were negative for virulence genes cob, ccf, cylLL, cylLs, cyllM, cylB, cylA and efaAfs and gelatinase production. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the MIC for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin did not exceed the epidemiological cut-off suggested by the European Food Safety Authority. Some strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics and resistance

  18. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Natacha C.; Ramiro, Juan M. P.; Quecan, Beatriz X. V.; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Use of probiotic biofilms can be an alternative approach for reducing the formation of pathogenic biofilms in food industries. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic (Lactococcus lactis VB69, L. lactis VB94, Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1, and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3) and non-bacteriocinogenic (L. lactis 368, Lactobacillus helveticus 354, Lactobacillus casei 40, and Weissela viridescens 113) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Brazilian’s foods and (ii) to develop protective biofilms with these strains and test them for exclusion of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. LAB were tested for survival in acid and bile salt conditions, surface properties, biosurfactant production, β-galactosidase and gelatinase activity, antibiotic resistance and presence of virulence genes. Most strains survived exposure to pH 2 and 4% bile salts. The highest percentages of auto-aggregation were obtained after 24 h of incubation. Sixty-seven percentage auto-aggregation value was observed in W. viridescens 113 and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 exhibited the highest co-aggregation (69% with Listeria monocytogenes and 74.6% with E. coli O157:H7), while the lowest co-aggregation was exhibited by W. viridescens 113 (53.4% with Listeria monocytogenes and 38% with E. coli O157:H7). Tests for hemolytic activity, bacterial cell adherence with xylene, and drop collapse confirmed the biosurfactant-producing ability of most strains. Only one strain (L. lactis 368) produced β-galactosidase. All strains were negative for virulence genes cob, ccf, cylLL, cylLs, cyllM, cylB, cylA and efaAfs and gelatinase production. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the MIC for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin did not exceed the epidemiological cut-off suggested by the European Food Safety Authority. Some strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics and

  19. In situ gels improve formation acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, V.; Shuchart, C.

    1997-01-20

    Viscosity-controlled acid effectively improves acid placement, provides more uniform damage removal, improves surface etching, and controls acid fluid loss. Viscosity-controlled acid (VCA) contains gels that break back to original viscosity 1 day after being pumped. These acids have been used for: matrix-acidizing long horizontal and vertical well intervals; controlling fluid loss in fracture acidizing to obtain longer fractures and deeper live-acid penetration. Fluid pH controls gel formation and breaking. In one operator`s horizontal wells, viscosity-controlled acid increased production by 2.5--6 fold. In carbonate formation fracture-acidizing, these acids have shown production improvements of 170 to 375%. VCA acid can be used in both cased or open hole, in vertical or deviated/horizontal wells.

  20. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-05-05

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

  1. Sulfuric acid as autocatalyst in the formation of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2012-12-26

    Sulfuric acid can act as a catalyst of its own formation. We have carried out a computational investigation on the gas-phase formation of H(2)SO(4) by hydrolysis of SO(3) involving one and two water molecules, and also in the presence of sulfuric acid and its complexes with one and two water molecules. The hydrolysis of SO(3) requires the concurrence of two water molecules, one of them acting as a catalyzer, and our results predict an important catalytic effect, ranging between 3 and 11 kcal·mol(-1) when the catalytic water molecule is substituted by a sulfuric acid molecule or one of its hydrates. In these cases, the reaction products are either bare sulfuric acid dimer or sulfuric acid dimer complexed with a water molecule. There are broad implications from these new findings. The results of the present investigation show that the catalytic effect of sulfuric acid in the SO(3) hydrolysis can be important in the Earth's stratosphere, in the heterogeneous formation of sulfuric acid and in the formation of aerosols, in H(2)SO(4) formation by aircraft engines, and also in understanding the formation of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere of Venus.

  2. Chlorogenic acid increased acrylamide formation through promotion of HMF formation and 3-aminopropionamide deamination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yun; Zhang, Zhenhua; Jiang, Shanshan; Yu, Miao; Huang, Caihuan; Qiu, Ruixia; Zou, Yueyu; Zhang, Qirui; Ou, Shiyi; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Yong; Bai, Weibing; Li, Yiqun

    2014-03-15

    This research was aimed to investigate why chlorogenic acid, presents at high concentrations in some food raw material, influences acrylamide formation. In the asparagine/glucose Maillard reaction system (pH=6.8), addition of chlorogenic acid significantly increased acrylamide formation and inhibited its elimination. In contrast, the quinone derivative of chlorogenic acid decreased acrylamide formation. Three mechanisms may be involved for increasing acrylamide formation by chlorogenic acid. Firstly, it increased the formation of HMF, which acts as a more efficient precursor than glucose to form acrylamide. Secondly, it decreased activation energy for conversion of 3-aminopropionamide (3-APA) to acrylamide (from 173.2 to 136.6kJ/mol), and enhances deamination from 3-APA. And thirdly, it prevented attack of the produced acrylamide from free radicals by keeping high redox potential during the Maillard reaction.

  3. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Dickson, Todd Jay

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  4. Some factors affecting cyclopropane acid formation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Knivett, V. A.; Cullen, Julia

    1965-01-01

    1. The fatty acid composition of the extractable lipids of Escherichia coli varied with growth conditions. 2. The principal fatty acids were palmitic acid, hexadecenoic acid, octadecenoic acid and the cyclopropane acids, methylenehexadecanoic acid and methyleneoctadecanoic acid. 3. Cyclopropane acid formation from monoenoic acids was increased by acid media, poor oxygen supply, or high growth temperature. 4. Cyclopropane acid formation was decreased by alkaline media, well oxygenated conditions, the presence of citrate, or lack of Mg2+. PMID:5324304

  5. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  6. [Significance of hydrocyanic acid formation during fires].

    PubMed

    von Meyer, L; Drasch, G; Kauert, G

    1979-01-01

    Cyanide concentrations of blood samples from fire victims autopsied in the Institute of Legal Medicine, Munich, have been determined. In 25% of 48 analyzed cases cyanide concentrations from 0.52 microgram to 6.24 microgram Cyanide/ml blood have been detected. These results are compared to former studies and the higher mean level in our collective is emphasized. The importance of hydrocyanid acid in the toxicity of fire gases is evidently greater, than assumed. Hydrocyanic acid may be produced from nitrogen continaing polymers during combustion. The quote of these polymers in clothing, furniture, and also in equipment of cars is increasing. Therefore, it is necessary to take more notice of the formation of hydrocyanic acid during combustion, even though carbon monoxide is in general the main toxic agent in fire gases.

  7. Metal complex formation with 1,10-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid: an approach to potential lanthanide ion selective reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.A.; Rowland, M.E.

    1983-12-21

    The principles of designing lanthanide (Ln) ion selective macrocyclic reagents are discussed. Factors such as the size of the metal ion, the cavity size of the ligand, the stereochemical constraint imposed on the ligand, and the overall coordination number of the multidentate ligand are considered. On the basis of these principles, the macromonocyclic ligand 1,10-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (dacda) has been prepared and characterized. stability constants of dacda complexes of various metal ions are reported. Except for a few metal ions such as copper (II), lead (II), and cadmium (II), dacda shows unique selectivity toward lanthanide ions as a group. Also, for the first time in aqueous solution for a multidentate ligand, the stability constants for Ln-ligand complexes decrease with increasing atomic number for heavy lanthanides and remain roughly unchanged for the lighter lanthanides. These data are discussed, and the structures of the complexes are proposed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  8. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Tanya Y.; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G.

    2014-01-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936

  9. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tanya Y; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G

    2014-05-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue.

  10. Amino acids inhibit kynurenic acid formation via suppression of kynurenine uptake or kynurenic acid synthesis in rat brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Okamoto, Misaki; Kanatani, Yuka; Sano, Mitsue; Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increase of brain KYNA levels is involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. KYNA-producing enzymes have broad substrate specificity for amino acids, and brain uptake of kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is via large neutral amino acid transporters (LAT). In the present study, to find out amino acids with the potential to suppress KYNA production, we comprehensively investigated the effects of proteinogenic amino acids on KYNA formation and KYN uptake in rat brain in vitro. Cortical slices of rat brain were incubated for 2 h in Krebs-Ringer buffer containing a physiological concentration of KYN with individual amino acids. Ten out of 19 amino acids (specifically, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, methionine, tyrosine, alanine, cysteine, glutamine, glutamate, and aspartate) significantly reduced KYNA formation at 1 mmol/L. These amino acids showed inhibitory effects in a dose-dependent manner, and partially inhibited KYNA production at physiological concentrations. Leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, all LAT substrates, also reduced tissue KYN concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, with their inhibitory rates for KYN uptake significantly correlated with KYNA formation. These results suggest that five LAT substrates inhibit KYNA formation via blockade of KYN transport, while the other amino acids act via blockade of the KYNA synthesis reaction in brain. Amino acids can be a good tool to modulate brain function by manipulation of KYNA formation in the brain. This approach may be useful in the treatment and prevention of neurological and psychiatric diseases associated with increased KYNA levels.

  11. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.R.; Fine, J.M.; Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.

    1989-02-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and nitric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction.

  12. Natural abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soils: results from aromatic model compounds and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan G; Kotte, Karsten; Schöler, Heinz F

    2013-02-05

    Oxalic acid is the smallest dicarboxylic acid and plays an important role in soil processes (e.g., mineral weathering and metal detoxification in plants). We have first proven its abiotic formation in soils and investigated natural abiotic degradation processes based on the oxidation of soil organic matter, enhanced by Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) as hydroxyl radical suppliers. Experiments with the model compound catechol and further hydroxylated benzenes were performed to examine a common degradation pathway and to presume a general formation mechanism of oxalic acid. Two soil samples were tested for the release of oxalic acid and the potential effects of various soil parameters on oxalic acid formation. Additionally, the soil samples were treated with different soil sterilization methods to prove the oxalic acid formation under abiotic soil conditions. Different series of model experiments were conducted to determine a range of factors including Fe(3+), H(2)O(2), reaction time, pH, and chloride concentration on oxalic acid formation. Under certain conditions, catechol is degraded up to 65.6% to oxalic acid referring to carbon. In serial experiments with two soil samples, oxalic acid was produced, and the obtained results are suggestive of an abiotic degradation process. In conclusion, Fenton-like conditions with low Fe(3+) concentrations and an excess of H(2)O(2) as well as acidic conditions were required for an optimal oxalic acid formation. The presence of chloride reduced oxalic acid formation.

  13. Small molecule-mediated duplex formation of nucleic acids with 'incompatible' backbones.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Brian J; Musetti, Caterina; Kim, Keunsoo; Horowitz, Eric D; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-04-07

    Proflavine, a known intercalator of DNA and RNA, promotes duplex formation by nucleic acids with natural and non-natural backbones that otherwise form duplexes with low thermal stability, and even some that show no sign of duplex formation in the absence of proflavine. These findings demonstrate the potential for intercalators to be used as cofactors for the assembly of rationally designed nucleic acid structures, and could provide fundamental insights regarding intercalation of natural nucleic acid duplexes.

  14. Biomimetic formation of chicoric-acid-directed luminescent silver nanodendrites.

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Sarker, Nazmul H; Tsiola, Areti; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2012-07-27

    In this work, we report the formation of well-defined silver nanodendrites via biomineralization under mild conditions in a single step, in the presence of the plant phytohormone chicoric acid (CA), a well-known HIV-I integrase inhibitor. CA played a dual role as reductant as well as directed the growth of the nanodendrites, which were found to grow primarily in the [111] and [200] directions. In addition to the formation of highly ordered hierarchical structures, the formed Ag nanodendrites were found to exhibit luminescence, as observed by confocal microscopy. This study not only demonstrates a new method for the preparation of luminescent silver nanodendrites using a simple, environmentally friendly biological method, but also indicates the ability of CA, a potent HIV-integrase inhibitor, to interact with silver ions which may shed light on its potential for additional biomedical and biosensor applications.

  15. Biomimetic formation of chicoric-acid-directed luminescent silver nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaby, Stacey N.; Sarker, Nazmul H.; Tsiola, Areti; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we report the formation of well-defined silver nanodendrites via biomineralization under mild conditions in a single step, in the presence of the plant phytohormone chicoric acid (CA), a well-known HIV-I integrase inhibitor. CA played a dual role as reductant as well as directed the growth of the nanodendrites, which were found to grow primarily in the [111] and [200] directions. In addition to the formation of highly ordered hierarchical structures, the formed Ag nanodendrites were found to exhibit luminescence, as observed by confocal microscopy. This study not only demonstrates a new method for the preparation of luminescent silver nanodendrites using a simple, environmentally friendly biological method, but also indicates the ability of CA, a potent HIV-integrase inhibitor, to interact with silver ions which may shed light on its potential for additional biomedical and biosensor applications.

  16. Compositions for acid treating subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E. Jr.; Swanson, B.L.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a high viscosity acid composition. It comprises: an aqueous acid solution; one or more acrylamide polymers dissolved in the acid solution in an amount sufficient to increase the viscosity of the acid solution; a liquid hydrocarbon dispersed in the acid solution; and one or more nonionic surface active agents having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per molecule present in the composition in an amount sufficient to interact with the acrylamide polymer or polymers in the presence of the liquid hydrocarbon whereby the viscosity of the acid solution is further increased and stabilized.

  17. A diet high in meat protein and potential renal acid load increases fractional Ca absorption and urinary Ca excretion, without affecting markers of bone resorption or formation in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objective was to determine the effects of high dietary protein (mostly meat) and high potential renal acid load (PRAL) on calcium (Ca) balance and markers of bone metabolism. Methods: In a randomized crossover design, sixteen healthy postmenopausal women consumed two diets: one with l...

  18. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  19. Modeling Trihalomethane Formation Potential from Wastewater Chlorination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    built atop toxic waste dumps; our sewage dumping had turned many of our rivers and lakes into lifeless water unfit for recreational or drinking water...public sector to drastically improve the quality of our rivers and lakes. Yet, pollutdnts are still discharged on a daily basis. This research will...formation of trihalomethanes, as well as many other halogenated organics. Water in the natural environment is far from pure. Rivers , lakes and wetlands are

  20. HF acid blends based on formation conditions eliminate precipitation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gdanski, R.; Shuchart, C.

    1997-03-01

    Formulating HCl-HF acid blends based on the mineralogy and temperature of a formation can increase the success of hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatments. Sodium and potassium in the structures of formation minerals can cause precipitation and matrix plugging problems during acidizing. Slight modifications of the acid blend used in the treatment can help eliminate fluosilicate precipitation. Researchers recently conducted tests to determine how acid blends react in different formations under varying temperatures. The results of the tests indicate that the minimum HCl:HF ratio in an acid blend is 6-to-1, and the optimum ratio is 9-to-1. Regular mud acid (12% HCl-3% HF) has been used successfully for years to enhance production in sandstone formations. By the 1980s, operators began to vary the concentration of HF and HCl acids to solve excessive sanding problems in sandstone. The paper discusses treatment problems, formation characteristics, alumino-silicate scaling, research results, brine compatibility, optimum treatment, and acid volume guidelines.

  1. FORMATION AND ENANTIOSELECTIVE BIODEGRADATION OF THE ENANTIOMERS OF BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) is formed by chlorination of drinking waters containing naturally occurring bromide. This haloacetic acid is a concern to public health because of suspected carcinogenicity and toxicity, and is a potential target of disinfectant byproduct regulations...

  2. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibit biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Soichi; Akiyoshi, Yuko; O'Toole, George A; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2010-03-31

    Effects of food additives on biofilm formation by food-borne pathogenic bacteria were investigated. Thirty-three potential food additives and 3 related compounds were added to the culture medium at concentrations from 0.001 to 0.1% (w/w), followed by inoculation and cultivation of five biofilm-forming bacterial strains for the evaluation of biofilm formation. Among the tested food additives, 21 showed inhibitory effects of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and in particular, sugar fatty acid esters showed significant anti-biofilm activity. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) exerted their inhibitory effect at the concentration of 0.001% (w/w), but bacterial growth was not affected at this low concentration. Activities of the sugar fatty acid esters positively correlated with the increase of the chain length of the fatty acid residues. Sugar fatty acid esters inhibited the initial attachment of the S. aureus cells to the abiotic surface. Sugar fatty acid esters with long chain fatty acid residues (C14-16) also inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and Listeria monocytogenes at 0.01% (w/w), while the inhibition of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa required the addition of a far higher concentration (0.1% (w/w)) of the sugar fatty acid esters.

  3. Amino Acid Formation on Interstellar Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Barbier, B.; Brack, A.; Thiemann, W.; Goesmann, F.; Rosenbauer, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the dense interstellar medium dust particles accrete ice layers of known molecular composition. In the diffuse interstellar medium these ice layers are subjected to energetic UV-irradiation. Here, photoreactions form complex organic molecules. The interstellar processes were recently successfully simulated in two laboratories. At NASA Ames Research Center three amino acids were detected in interstellar ice analogues [1], contemporaneously, our European team reported on the identification of 16 amino acids therein [2]. Amino acids are the molecular building blocks of proteins in living organisms. The identification of amino acids on the simulated icy surface of interstellar dust particles strongly supports the assumption that the precursor molecules of life were delivered from interstellar and interplanetary space via (micro-) meteorites and/or comets to the earyl Earth. The results shall be verified by the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission Rosetta [3]. [1] M.P. Bernstein, J.P. Dworkin, S.A. Sandford, G.W. Cooper, L.J. Allamandola: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 401-403. [2] G.M. Muñoz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Sergovia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 403-406. [3] U. Meierhenrich, W.H.-P. Thiemann, H. Rosenbauer: itshape Chirality \\upshape 11 (1999), 575-582.

  4. Stimulation of acid formation in permeable gastric glands by valinomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, S.J.; Steiner, L. )

    1988-09-01

    Isolated gastric glands made permeable with digitonin treatment were employed to study the ionic requirements of acid formation. Acid formation was monitored by the accumulation of a novel weak base probe, ({sup 14}C)benzylamine. ATP-dependent acid formation was found to require K{sup +} in a concentration-dependent manner, with an apparent K{sub 0.5} = 7 mM. The anion dependence of acid formation gave a selectivity sequence of Cl = I > Br < NO{sub 3} > SO{sub 4} = isethionate, with isethionate being {approximately}50% as effective as Cl. The dependence of acid formation on (Cl) gave an apparent K{sub 0.5} = 6 mM. Addition of the K{sup +} ionophore, valinomycin, to resting glands (cimetidine pretreatment) resulted in a two- to threefold increase in ATP-dependent acid formation. In contrast, stimulated (forskolin pretreated) glands showed a greater accumulation of benzylamine with ATP but significantly less valinomycin stimulation. The valinomycin stimulation required both K{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} and was inhibited by omeprazole and Sch 28080. The results and interpreted to indicate that major events in the transition from a resting to a stimulated state include changes in both K{sup +} and anion permeability of the secretory membrane of parietal cells.

  5. Natural products as potential anticonvulsants: caffeoylquinic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2012-03-01

    Current anticonvulsant therapies are generally directed at symptomatic treatment by suppressing excitability within the brain. Consequently, they have adverse effects such as cognitive impairment, dependence, and abuse. The need for more effective and less toxic anticonvulsants has generated renewed interest in natural products for the treatment of convulsions. Caffeoylquinic acids (CQs) are naturally occurring phenolic acids that are distributed widely in plants. There has been increasing interest in the biological activities of CQs in diseases of the central nervous system. In this issue, Nugroho et al. give evidence for the anticonvulsive effect of a CQ-rich extract from Aster glehni Franchet et Sckmidt. They optimized the extract solvent conditions, resulting in high levels of CQs and peroxynitrite-scavenging activity. Then, they investigated the sedative and anticonvulsive effects in pentobarbital- and pentylenetetrazole-induced models in mice. The CQ-rich extract significantly inhibited tonic convulsions as assessed by onset time, tonic extent, and mortality. They suggested that the CQ-rich extract from A. glehni has potential for treating convulsions. This report provides preclinical data which may be used for the development of anticonvulsants from natural products.

  6. Formation kinetics of potential fermentation inhibitors in a steam explosion process of corn straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuzhen; Wang, Lan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2013-01-01

    The weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds formed during lignocellulose pretreatment are potential inhibitors of subsequent enzymatic and microbial processes. In this work, the effects of the steam explosion process on the formation of weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds were explored. The correlations of different steam explosion conditions and formation kinetics of degradation products showed that the formation of weak acids and furan derivatives was in the first-order reactions, which are expressed as [Formula: see text]. The formation of weak acids and furan derivatives increases with pretreatment temperature and time. On the other hand, the formation of phenolic compounds showed typical characteristics of continuous reaction, expressed as [Formula: see text]. The formation was affected by the active energies in two stages, temperature and time, and thus existed at extreme value. This work revealed the formation rules of weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds in a steam explosion process and provided theoretical guidelines for improving the process and limiting the production of certain inhibitors.

  7. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  8. Potential of furan formation in hazelnuts during heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, H Z; Gökmen, V

    2007-01-01

    The formation of furan as influenced by temperature and time of heating was studied in hazelnuts. Temperature was noted as the important processing parameter on the formation of furan in hazelnuts. The formation of furan was noticeably increased at temperatures exceeding 120 degrees C. Furan concentrations tended to increase linearly at 100 and 150 degrees C up to 60 min of heating. Detailed examination of the composition of different hazelnut varieties showed that certain precursors such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid), amino acids (threonine and alanine), and sugars (glucose) were present in hazelnut at amounts sufficient to generate significant amounts of furan upon heating. The composition of the lipid fraction in terms of relative percentages of fatty acids was relatively stable during heating at 150 degrees C for 30 min, but the concentrations of amino acids and sugars decreased significantly at the end of the heating period. This led to the conclusion that the Maillard reaction is possibly the primary mechanism responsible for the formation of furan in hazelnuts during heating.

  9. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  10. Nicotinamide metabolism in ferns: formation of nicotinic acid glucoside.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Yin, Yuling; Watanabe, Shin

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide was investigated in 9 fern species, Psilotum nudum, Angiopteris evecta, Lygodium japonicum, Acrostichum aureum, Asplenium antiquum, Diplazium subsinuatum, Thelypteris acuminate, Blechnum orientale and Crytomium fortune. All fern species produce a large quantity of nicotinic acid glucoside from [(14)C]nicotinamide, but trigonelline formation is very low. Increases in the release of (14)CO(2) with incubation time was accompanied by decreases in [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid glucoside. There was slight stimulation of nicotinic acid glucoside formation by 250 mM NaCl in mature leaves of the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum, but it is unlikely that this compound acts as a compatible solute. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid salvage for pyridine nucleotide synthesis was detected in all fern species, although this activity was always less than nicotinic acid glucoside synthesis. Predominant formation of nicotinic acid glucoside is characteristic of nicotinic acid metabolism in ferns. This reaction appears to act as a detoxication mechanism, removing excess nicotinic acid.

  11. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  12. Laser photocoagulation stops diabetic retinopathy by controlling lactic acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-08-01

    Many different types of proliferative retinopathy induced by various types of initial disorders have a common pathology in their mid and terminal stages. Thus, proper therapy is devoted toward elimination of the initial cause as well as alleviation of the proliferative processes. Vasodilatation, which is an initial symptom of diabetes, is itself destructive to the retinal capillary bed and appears to be a constant feature in all stages of diabetic retinopathy. In the mid and late stages, the vasodilatation seems very dependent upon capillary dropout, whereas the initial vasodilatation may derive from quite different causes. The efficacy of photocoagulation as a therapy for all stages seems to derive from decreasing the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer sufficiently to result in vasoconstriction of the retinal vessels. A model is proposed to show how diabetes, by altering the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer to produce excess lactic acid, causes the initial vasodilatation. The lactic acid also induces free radical (superoxide) formation; both act together to destroy the retinal capillary bed followed by vasoproliferation. Photocoagulation, thus, is even more appropriate for this particular syndrome than previously had been thought, as it not only reduces potentially destructive vasodilatation but also removes the metabolic cause of the free radical induced destruction of the capillary endothelium which is the initial step in capillary drop-out. A review of the present data indicates that the best type of pan- retinal photocoagulation is a very light type affecting the photoreceptors only with a minimal amount of damage to other parts of retina and the vessels in the choroid. The possible use of photochemical types of destruction of the photoreceptor as a therapeutic modality is attractive, but it is certainly too speculative to use until more detailed investigations have been completed. However, the basic therapeutic approach of choice may be to prevent the

  13. Acid-base metabolism: implications for kidney stones formation.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The physiology and pathophysiology of renal H+ ion excretion and urinary buffer systems are reviewed. The main focus is on the two major conditions related to acid-base metabolism that cause kidney stone formation, i.e., distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) and abnormally low urine pH with subsequent uric acid stone formation. Both the entities can be seen on the background of disturbances of the major urinary buffer system, NH3+ <--> NH4+. On the one hand, reduced distal tubular secretion of H+ ions results in an abnormally high urinary pH and either incomplete or complete dRTA. On the other hand, reduced production/availability of NH4+ is the cause of an abnormally low urinary pH, which predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Most recent research indicates that the latter abnormality may be a renal manifestation of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Despite opposite deviations from normal urinary pH values, both the dRTA and uric acid stone formation due to low urinary pH require the same treatment, i.e., alkali. In the dRTA, alkali is needed for improving the body's buffer capacity, whereas the goal of alkali treatment in uric acid stone formers is to increase the urinary pH to 6.2-6.8 in order to minimize uric acid crystallization.

  14. Therapeutic Potential of Dietary Phenolic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Saibabu, Venkata; Fatima, Zeeshan; Khan, Luqman Ahmad; Hameed, Saif

    2015-01-01

    Although modern lifestyle has eased the quality of human life, this lifestyle's related patterns have imparted negative effects on health to acquire multiple diseases. Many synthetic drugs are invented during the last millennium but most if not all of them possess several side effects and proved to be costly. Convincing evidences have established the premise that the phytotherapeutic potential of natural compounds and need of search for novel drugs from natural sources are of high priority. Phenolic acids (PAs) are a class of secondary metabolites spread throughout the plant kingdom and generally involved in plethora of cellular processes involved in plant growth and reproduction and also produced as defense mechanism to sustain various environmental stresses. Extensive research on PAs strongly suggests that consumption of these compounds hold promise to offer protection against various ailments in humans. This paper focuses on the naturally derived PAs and summarizes the action mechanisms of these compounds during disease conditions. Based on the available information in the literature, it is suggested that use of PAs as drugs is very promising; however more research and clinical trials are necessary before these bioactive molecules can be made for treatment. Finally this review provides greater awareness of the promise that natural PAs hold for use in the disease prevention and therapy. PMID:26442119

  15. Ammonia Catalyzed Formation of Sulfuric Acid in Troposphere: The Curious Case of A Base Promoting Acid Rain.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Biman; Kumar, Pradeep; Biswas, Partha

    2017-04-03

    Electronic structure calculations have been performed to investigate the role of ammonia in catalyzing the formation of sulfuric acid through hydrolysis of SO3 in Earth's atmosphere. The uncatalyzed process involves a high activation barrier and, till date, is mainly known to occur in Earth's atmosphere only when catalyzed by water and acids. Here we show that hydrolysis of SO3 can be very efficiently catalyzed by ammonia, the most abundant basic component in Earth's atmosphere. It was found, based on magnitude of relative potential energies as well as rate coefficients, that ammonia is the best among all the catalysts studied until now (water and acids) and could be a considerable factor in formation of sulfuric acid in troposphere. The calculated rate coefficient (at 298 K) of ammonia catalyzed reaction has been found to be ~10^5 - 10^7 times greater than that for water catalyzed ones. It was found, based on relative rates of ammonia and water catalyzed processes that in troposphere ammonia, together with water, could be the key factor in determining the rate of formation of sulfuric acid. In fact ammonia could surpass water in catalyzing formation of sulfuric acid via hydrolysis of SO3 at various altitudes in troposphere depending upon their relative concentrations.

  16. Smectite Formation in Acid Sulfate Environments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Niles, P. B.; Sutter, B.; Clark, J. V.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group detected in Noachian and early Hesperian terrains on Mars were hypothesized to form under aqueous conditions that were globally neutral to alkaline. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere should have been favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, large-scale carbonate deposits have not been detected on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits are consistent with perhaps widespread acidic aqueous conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. The objective of our work was to investigate smectite formation under acid sulfate conditions in order to provide insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for smectite formation on Mars. Hydrothermal batch incubation experiments were performed with Mars-analogue, glass-rich, basalt simulant in the presence of sulfuric acid of variable concentration.

  17. Prebiotic formation of polyamino acids in molten urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, H.; Nomoto, S.; Terasaki, M.; Shimoyama, A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2005-04-01

    It is important for research into the origins of life to elucidate polyamino acid formation under prebiotic conditions. Only a limited set of amino acids has been reported to polymerize thermally. In this paper we demonstrate a novel thermal polymerization mechanism in a molten urea of alkylamino acids (i.e. glycine, alanine, β-alanine, α-aminobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, leucine and norleucine), which had been thought to be incapable of undergoing thermal polymerization. Also, aspartic acid was found to polymerize in molten urea at a lower temperature than that at which aspartic acid alone had previously been thermally polymerized. Individual oligomers produced in heating experiments on urea-amino acid mixtures were analysed using a liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer. Major products in the reaction mixture were three different types of polyamino acid derivatives: N-carbamoylpolyamino acids, polyamino acids containing a hydantoin ring at the N-terminal position and unidentified derivatives with molecular weights that were greater by 78 than those of the corresponding peptide forms. The polymerization reaction occurred by taking advantage of the high polarity of molten urea as well as its dehydrating ability. Under the presumed prebiotic conditions employed here, many types of amino acids were thus revealed to undergo thermal polymerization.

  18. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  19. Optimal schooling formations using a potential flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchieu, Andrew; Gazzola, Mattia; de Brauer, Alexia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-11-01

    A self-propelled, two-dimensional, potential flow model for agent-based swimmers is used to examine how fluid coupling affects schooling formation. The potential flow model accounts for fluid-mediated interactions between swimmers. The model is extended to include individual agent actions by means of modifying the circulation of each swimmer. A reinforcement algorithm is applied to allow the swimmers to learn how to school in specified lattice formations. Lastly, schooling lattice configurations are optimized by combining reinforcement learning and evolutionary optimization to minimize total control effort and energy expenditure.

  20. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  1. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms.

  2. Characteristics and formation of amino acids and hydroxy acids of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Cooper, G. W.; Pizzarello, S.

    1995-01-01

    Eight characteristics of the unique suite of amino acids and hydroxy acids found in the Murchison meteorite can be recognized on the basis of detailed molecular and isotopic analyses. The marked structural correspondence between the alpha-amino acids and alpha-hydroxy acids and the high deuterium/hydrogen ratio argue persuasively for their formation by aqueous phase Strecker reactions in the meteorite parent body from presolar, i.e., interstellar, aldehydes, ketones, ammonia, and hydrogen cyanide. The characteristics of the meteoritic suite of amino acids and hydroxy acids are briefly enumerated and discussed with regard to their consonance with this interstellar-parent body formation hypothesis. The hypothesis has interesting implications for the organic composition of both the primitive parent body and the presolar nebula.

  3. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Andrews, William M.; Overfield, Bethany L.; Robertson, Heather; Wiggins, Amanda; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = 309) in Kentucky and geologic rock formation data from the Kentucky Geological Survey. Radon value locations were plotted on digital geologic maps using ArcGIS and linked to specific geologic map units. Each map unit represented a package of different types of rock (e.g., limestone and/or shale). Log-transformed radon values and geologic formation categories were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results Observed radon levels varied significantly by geologic formation category. Of the 14 geologic formation categories in north central Kentucky, four were associated with median radon levels, ranging from 8.10 to 2.75 pCi/L. Conclusion Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon. PMID:26844090

  4. Artefact formation during acid hydrolysis of saponins from Medicago spp.

    PubMed

    Tava, Aldo; Biazzi, Elisa; Mella, Mariella; Quadrelli, Paolo; Avato, Pinarosa

    2017-02-28

    Artefact compounds obtained during acid hydrolysis of saponins from Medicago spp. (Fabaceae), have been monitored and evaluated by GC-FID. Their identification has been performed by GC-MS and (1)H and (13)C NMR. Saponins with different substituents on the triterpenic pentacyclic aglycones were considered, and their hydrolysis products were detected and quantified during 10 h of time course reaction. From soyasapogenol B glycoside the well known soyasapogenols B, C, D and F were obtained together with a previously undescribed sapogenol artefact identified as 3β,22β,24-trihydroxyolean-18(19)-en and named soyasapogenol H. From a zanhic acid saponin two major artefact compounds identified as 2β,3β,16α-trihydroxyolean-13(18)-en-23,28-dioic acid and 2β,3β,16α-trihydroxyolean-28,13β-olide-23-oic acid were obtained, together with some zanhic acid. Other compounds, detected in very small amount in the reaction mixture, were also tentatively identified based on their GC-MS and UV spectra. The other most characteristic saponins in Medicago spp., hederagenin, bayogenin and medicagenic acid glycosides, under acidic condition of hydrolysis, released instead the correspondent aglycones and generated a negligible amount of artefacts. Nature of artefacts and mechanism of their formation, involving a stable tertiary carbocation, is here proposed and discussed for the first time.

  5. Natural organic matter and DBP formation potential in Alaskan water supplies.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel M; Garland, D Sarah; Narr, Jasprit; Woolard, Craig R

    2003-02-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) are formed when natural organic matter (NOM) in water reacts with a disinfectant, usually chlorine. DBPs are a health risk element and regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. A study was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of NOM that contribute to DBPs in 17 different drinking water systems in Alaska. In order to determine the nature of the organic matter contributing to DBPs, DBP formation potential was compared with standard water quality parameters such as UV-254, color and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), as well as pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results showed strong correlations between UV-254 and DBP formation potential for all waters studied. DOC, on the other hand, was less strongly correlated to DBP formation potential. Unlike previous studies, the total trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potentials were equal on a mass concentration basis for the waters studied. Pyrolysis-GC/MS indicated that NOM contributing to DBPs were primarily phenolic compounds. This finding was consistent with previous studies; however, unlike other studies, no correlation was found between aliphatic compounds in the raw waters and DBP formation potential.

  6. D‐amino acids do not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Mitchell; Gagnon, Patricia; Vogel, Joseph P.; Chole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a known biofilm‐forming organism, is an opportunistic pathogen that plays an important role in chronic otitis media, tracheitis, cholesteatoma, chronic wounds, and implant infections. Eradication of biofilm infections has been a challenge because the biofilm phenotype provides bacteria with a protective environment from the immune system and antibiotics; thus, there has been great interest in adjunctive molecules that may inhibit biofilm formation or cause biofilm dispersal. There are reports that D‐amino acids may inhibit biofilms. In this study, we test the ability of various D‐amino acids to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation in vitro. Study Design We evaluated the effect of D‐alanine (10 mM), D‐leucine (10 mM), D‐methionine (10 mM), D‐tryptophan (10 mM), and D‐tyrosine (10 uM and 1 mM) on biofilm formation in two commonly studied laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa: PAO1 and PA14. Methods Biofilms were grown in 24‐well and 96‐well tissue culture plates, documented photographically and stained with 0.1% crystal violet and solubilized in 33% glacial acetic acid for quantification. Results In strains PAO1 and PA14, the addition of D‐amino acids did not result in an inhibitory effect on biofilm growth in 24‐well plates. Repeating the study in 96‐well plates confirmed our findings that D‐amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion We conclude that D‐amino acids only slow the production of biofilms rather than completely prevent biofilm formation; therefore, D‐amino acids represent a poor option for potential clinically therapeutic interventions. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:28286870

  7. Processes and fluxes during the initial stage of acid sulfate soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, J.; Hamer, K.; Schulz, H. D.

    2009-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils occur over a wide range of climatic zones, mainly in coastal landscapes. In these soils, the release of sulfuric acid by the oxidation of pyrite generates a very acidic environment (e.g., DENT and PONS, 1995, PONS, 1973). Two major types of acid sulfate soils can be distinguished: In actual acid sulfate soils, the initially contained pyrite was at least partly oxidized. This resulted in a severe acidification of the soil. Potential acid sulfate soils are generally unoxidized and contain large amounts of pyrite. Upon oxidation, these soils will turn into actual acid sulfate soils. By excavation or lowering of the groundwater table, potential acid sulfate soils can be exposed to atmospheric oxygen. During oxidation the pH drops sharply to values below pH 4. This acidification promotes the release of various metals, e.g., alumina, iron and heavy metals. Additionally, large quantities of sulfate are released. In order to assess the effects of disturbances of potential acid sulfate soils, for example by excavations during construction works, several large scale column experiments were conducted with various types of potential acid sulfate soils from Northern Germany. In these experiments, the oxidation and initial profile development of pyritic fen peats and thionic fluvisols were studied over a period of 14 months. The study focused on leaching and the translocation of various metals in the soil profile. To study mobilization processes, element fluxes and the progress of acidification, soil water and leachate were analyzed for total element concentrations. Furthermore, several redox-sensitive parameters, e.g., Fe2+ and sulfide, were measured and changes to the initial solid phase composition were analyzed. Chemical equilibria calculations of the soil water were used to gain insights into precipitation processes of secondary products of pyrite oxidation and leaching products. The results of this study will support the assessment of risks deriving from

  8. Modeling dichloroacetic acid formation from the reaction of monochloramine with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Valentine, Richard L

    2006-08-01

    A kinetic model was developed to predict dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) formation in chloraminated systems. Equations describing DCAA formation were incorporated into an established comprehensive monochloramine-natural organic matter (NOM) reaction model. DCAA formation was theorized to be proportional to the amount of NOM oxidized by monochloramine and described by a single dimensionless DCAA formation coefficient, theta(DCAA) (M(DCAA)/M(DOC(ox)). The applicability of the model to describe DCAA formation in the presence of six different NOM sources was evaluated. DCAA formation could be described by considering a single NOM source-specific value for theta(DCAA) over a wide range of experimental conditions (i.e., pH, NOM, free ammonia, and monochloramine concentrations). DCAA formation appears to be directly proportional to the amount of active chlorine (monochloramine and free chlorine) that reacted with the NOM under these experimental conditions. Values of theta(DCAA) for all six NOM sources, determined by nonlinear regression analysis, varied from 6.51 x 10(-3) to 1.15 x 10(-2) and were linearly correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA(280)). The ability to model monochloramine loss and DCAA formation in the presence of NOM provides insight into disinfection by-product (DBP) formation pathways under chloramination conditions. The subsequent model and correlations to SUVA has the potential to aid the water treatment industry as a tool in developing strategies that minimize DBP formation while maintaining the microbial integrity of the water distribution system.

  9. Formation and control of plasma potentials in TMX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Porkolab, M.; Stallard, B.W.

    1981-05-06

    The methods to be employed to form and control plasma potentials in the TMX Upgrade tandem mirror with thermal barriers are described. ECRH-generated mirror -confined electron plasmas are used to establish a negative potential region to isolate the end-plug and central-cell celectrons. This thermal isolation will allow a higher end-plug electron temperature and an increased central-cell confining potential. Improved axial central-cell ion confinement results since higher temperature central-cell ions can be confined. This paper describes: (1) calculations of the sensitivity of barrier formation to vacuum conditions and to the presence of impurities in the neutral beams, (2) calculations of microwave penetration and absorption used to design the ECRH system, and (3) techniques to limit electron runaway to high energies by localized microwave beams and by relativistic detuning.

  10. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-06

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment.

  11. Potential effects of chlorogenic acids on platelet activiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coffee (Coffea sp) is a most consumed beverage world-wide. Chlorogenic acids (CHAs) are naturally occurring phenolic acid esters abundantly found in coffee. They are reported to have potential health effects on several chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). At...

  12. Potential of Different Coleus blumei Tissues for Rosmarinic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Vuković, Rosemary; Likić, Saša; Jelaska, Sibila

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rosmarinic acid is one of the main active components of Coleus blumei and is known to have numerous health benefits. The pharmacological significance of rosmarinic acid and its production through in vitro culture has been the subject of numerous studies. Here, the ability of different tissues to accumulate rosmarinic acid and sustainability in production over long cultivation have been tested. Calli, tumours, normal roots and hairy roots were established routinely by application of plant growth regulators or by transformation with agrobacteria. The differences among the established tumour lines were highly heterogeneous. Hairy root lines showed the highest mean growth rate and consistency in rosmarinic acid production. Although some tumour lines produced more rosmarinic acid than the hairy root lines, over a long cultivation period their productivity was unstable and decreased. Further, the effects of plant growth regulators on growth and rosmarinic acid accumulation were tested. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid significantly reduced tumour growth and rosmarinic acid production. 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid strongly stimulated hairy root growth whilst abscisic acid strongly enhanced rosmarinic acid production. Hairy roots cultured in an airlift bioreactor exhibited the highest potential for mass production of rosmarinic acid. PMID:27904326

  13. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  14. Parameters affecting the formation of perfluoroalkyl acids during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Kim, M; Kinsman, L; Ng, T; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2014-05-15

    This study examined the fate and behaviour of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in liquid and solid samples from five different wastewater treatment types: facultative and aerated lagoons, chemically assisted primary treatment, secondary aerobic biological treatment, and advanced biological nutrient removal treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest data set from a single study available in the literature to date for PFAAs monitoring study in wastewater treatment. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the predominant PFAA in wastewater with levels from 2.2 to 150ng/L (influent) and 1.9 to 140ng/L (effluent). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the predominant compound in primary sludge, waste biological sludge, and treated biosolids with concentrations from 6.4 to 2900ng/g dry weight (dw), 9.7 to 8200ng/gdw, and 2.1 to 17,000ng/gdw, respectively. PFAAs were formed during wastewater treatment and it was dependant on both process temperature and treatment type; with higher rates of formation in biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operating at longer hydraulic retention times and higher temperatures. PFAA removal by sorption was influenced by different sorption tendencies; median log values of the solid-liquid distribution coefficient estimated from wastewater biological sludge and final effluent were: PFOS (3.73)>PFDA (3.68)>PFNA (3.25)>PFOA (2.49)>PFHxA (1.93). Mass balances confirmed the formation of PFAAs, low PFAA removal by sorption, and high PFAA levels in effluents.

  15. Formation of chloroacetic acids from soil, humic acid and phenolic moieties.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, I J; Keppler, F; Schöler, H F

    2003-07-01

    The mechanism of formation of chloroacetates, which are important toxic environmental substances, has been controversial. Whereas the anthropogenic production has been well established, a natural formation has also been suggested. In this study the natural formation of chloroacetic acids from soil, as well as from humic material which is present in soil and from phenolic model substances has been investigated. It is shown that chloroacetates are formed from humic material with a linear relationship between the amount of humic acid used and chloroacetates found. More dichloroacetate (DCA) than trichloroacetate (TCA) is produced. The addition of Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) leads to an increased yield. NaCl was added as a source of chloride. We further examined the relationship between the structure and reactivity of phenolic substances, which can be considered as monomeric units of humic acids. Ethoxyphenol with built-in ethyl groups forms large amounts of DCA and TCA. The experiments with phenoxyacetic acid yielded large amounts of monochloroacetate (MCA). With other phenolic substances a ring cleavage was observed. Our investigations indicate that chloroacetates are formed abiotically from humic material and soils in addition to their known biotic mode of formation.

  16. Skin tumorigenic potential of benzanthrone: prevention by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neelam; Kumar, Sandeep; Ansari, Kausar M; Khanna, S K; Das, Mukul

    2013-09-01

    Benzanthrone (BA) exposed occupational workers have been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in the skin, thus it is quite likely that long term exposure may lead to skin tumorigenicity. Thus, attempts were made to elucidate the tumor initiating and promoting potentials of pure (PBA) and commercial benzanthrone (CBA). Additionally, the preventive role of ascorbic acid (AsA) was also assessed. PBA showed tumor initiating activity while CBA demonstrated tumor initiating as well as promoting activities in two-stage mouse skin tumor protocol. Further, prior treatment of AsA to PBA and CBA followed by twice weekly application of 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbal myristate acetate (TPA) resulted into delayed onset of tumor formation and similarly single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz [α] anthracene (DMBA) followed by twice weekly application of AsA and CBA showed an increase in the latency period. Thus, AsA showed a protective effect against CBA promoted skin tumor. Furthermore, the topical application of CBA significantly increased the levels of xenobiotic enzymes. The animals topically treated with AsA along with topical application of CBA, restored all the impairment observed in enzyme activities. Thus, this study suggested that AsA can be useful in preventing PBA and CBA induced skin tumorigenicity.

  17. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality.

  18. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in primitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds, compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these interesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photodecomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  19. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in piimitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these inteiesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photo-decomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  20. Smectite Formation from Basaltic Glass Under Acidic Conditions on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Massive deposits of phyllosilicates of the smectite group, including Mg/Fe-smectite, have been identified in Mars's ancient Noachian terrain. The observed smectite is hypothesized to form through aqueous alteration of basaltic crust under neutral to alkaline pH conditions. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere suggested for ancient Mars were favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, the detection of large-scale carbonate deposits is limited on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits may have formed under acidic conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. In this work we investigated formation of saponite at a pH of approximately 4 from Mars-analogue synthetic Adirondack basaltic glass of composition similar to Adirondack class rocks located at Gusev crater. Hydrothermal (200º Centigrade) 14 day experiments were performed with and without 10 millimoles Fe(II) or Mg under anoxic condition [hereafter denoted as anoxic_Fe, anoxic_Mg and anoxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)] and under oxic condition [hereafter denoted as oxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)]. Characterization and formation conditions of the synthesized saponite provided insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for saponite formation on Mars.

  1. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Luana T; Moreira, Daniel C; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-15

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  2. Ellagic acid inhibits iron-mediated free radical formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Luana T.; Moreira, Daniel C.; Andrade, Roberto; Ginani, Janini; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    Polyphenols are reported to have some health benefits, which are link to their antioxidant properties. In the case of ellagic acid (EA), there is evidence that it has free radical scavenger properties and that it is able to form complexes with metal ions. However, information on a possible link between the formation of iron-EA complexes and their interference in Haber-Weiss/Fenton reactions was not yet determined. Thus, the present study investigated the in vitro antioxidant mechanism of EA in a system containing ascorbate, Fe(III) and different iron ligands (EDTA, citrate and NTA). Iron-mediated oxidative degradation of 2-deoxyribose was poorly inhibited (by 12%) in the presence of EA (50 μM) and EDTA. When citrate or NTA - which form weak iron complexes - were used, the 2-deoxyribose protection increased to 89-97% and 45%, respectively. EA also presented equivalent inhibitory effects on iron-mediated oxygen uptake and ascorbyl radical formation. Spectral analyses of iron-EA complexes show that EA removes Fe(III) from EDTA within hours, and from citrate within 1 min. This difference in the rate of iron-EA complex formation may explain the antioxidant effects of EA. Furthermore, the EA antioxidant effectiveness was inversely proportional to the Fe(III) concentration, suggesting a competition with EDTA. In conclusion, the results indicate that EA may prevent in vitro free radical formation when it forms a complex with iron ions.

  3. Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate: Formation and Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated some thermodynamic properties (i.e., freezing/melting points) and heterogeneous chemistry of sulfuric acid monohydrate (SAM, H2SO4.H2O), using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The freezing point observations of thin liquid sulfuric acid films show that for acid contents between 75 and 85 wt % the monohydrate crystallizes readily at temperatures between 220 and 240 K on a glass substrate. Once formed, SAM can be thermodynamically stable in the H2O partial pressure range of (1-4) x 10(exp -4) torr and in the temperature range of 220-240 K. For a constant H2O partial pressure, lowering the temperature causes SAM to melt when the temperature and water partial pressure conditions are out of its stability regime. The reaction probability measurements indicate that the hydrolysis of N2O5 is significantly suppressed owing to the formation of crystalline SAM: The reaction probability on water-rich SAM (with higher relative humidity, or RH) is of the order of 10(exp -3) at 210 K and decreases by more than an order of magnitude for the acid-rich form (with lower RH). The hydrolysis rate of ClONO2 on water-rich SAM is even smaller, of the order of 10(exp -4) at 195 K. These reported values on crystalline SAM are much smaller than those on liquid solutions. No enhancement of these reactions is observed in the presence of HCl vapor at the stratospheric concentrations. In addition, Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller analysis of gas adsorption isotherms and photomicrography have been performed to characterize the surface roughness and porosities of the SAM substrate. The results suggest the possible formation of SAM in some regions of the middle- or low-latitude stratosphere and, consequently, much slower heterogeneous reactions on the frozen aerosols.

  4. SOA formation potential of emissions from soil and leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Faiola, Celia L; Vanderschelden, Graham S; Wen, Miao; Elloy, Farah C; Cobos, Douglas R; Watts, Richard J; Jobson, B Thomas; Vanreken, Timothy M

    2014-01-21

    Soil and leaf litter are significant global sources of small oxidized volatile organic compounds, VOCs (e.g., methanol and acetaldehyde). They may also be significant sources of larger VOCs that could act as precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. To investigate this, soil and leaf litter samples were collected from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest and transported to the laboratory. There, the VOC emissions were characterized and used to drive SOA formation via dark, ozone-initiated reactions. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates as high as 228 μg-C m(-2) h(-1). The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and α-pinene. Measured soil and litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest surface soil and litter monoterpene emissions could range from 12 to 136% of canopy emissions in spring and fall. Thus, emissions from leaf litter may potentially extend the biogenic emissions season, contributing to significant organic aerosol formation in the spring and fall when reduced solar radiation and temperatures reduce emissions from living vegetation.

  5. Method of preparing and using and composition for acidizing subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.

    1984-08-21

    A composition and method of acidizing or fracturing a subterranean formation comprises contacting the formation with a composition comprising an acid, urea, and a selected gelling agent. The urea is present in an amount sufficient to extend the viscous stability of the gelled acid composition in comparison to the acid and gelling agent alone.

  6. Photoenhanced nitrous acid formation upon NO2 uptake on tannic and gentisic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosedova, Yulia; Rouvière, Aurélie; Ammann, Markus

    2010-05-01

    The heterogeneous chemistry of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a potential source of nitrous acid (HONO). Hydroxy and methoxy substituted phenols may play a significant role in the aqueous-phase chemistry occurring on the ground or within aerosol particles in air masses affected by biomass burning. It is well established that electron transfer between phenols and NO2 in alkaline aqueous solutions is fast and could be a source of nitrite in the aqueous phase and HONO in the gas phase. However its kinetics is very slow under atmospheric conditions. The role of phenolic species as electron donors has also been suspected to be responsible for the photoenhanced transformation of NO2 to HONO over humic acids [1]. In this study we used tannic (TA) and gentisic (GA) as another proxy for atmospheric phenolic compounds. TA was shown to easily decompose under near UV light irradiation [2] resulting in oxidized products that might change the hygroscopic properties of the original material or have some potential photosensitizing effect. It was interesting to check the hypothesis that the presence of such products could lead to photoenhanced HONO formation upon NO2 uptake to aqueous surfaces containing TA. Experiments were performed in a horizontal coated wall flow tube (40 cm × 5.9 cm i.d.) circularly surrounded by 7 fluorescence lamps (UV: 300-420 nm, or visible: 400-750 nm), in an air cooled lamp housing. The inner surface coating was containing ~0.5 mg/cm-2 of either TA or GA, and was operated under RH 20-80%, 21-23 °C and ambient pressure. Concentration of HONO in the gas phase at the flow tube exit was measured with a LOPAP (Long Path Absorption Spectrometer). The uptake coefficient (γ) leading to NO2 to HONO conversion above aqueous films containing GA or TA in the dark was in the range 4×10-7 - 2×10-6. The photochemically enhanced HONO production was demonstrated by UV irradiation of the GA or TA coatings being in contact with gaseous NO2. In this case γ was 3-10 times

  7. Evolution of internal resistance during formation of flooded lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Chris; Deveau, Justin; Swan, Lukas G.

    2016-09-01

    This study employs experimental techniques to measure the changing internal resistance of flooded, flat-plate lead-acid batteries during container formation, revealing a novel indicator of formation completeness. In order to measure internal resistance during formation, d.c. current pulses are superimposed over the constant formation current at set intervals, while change in voltage is measured. The resulting "pulsed" internal resistance is divided into ohmic and interfacial components by measuring the ohmic resistance with short d.c. pulses as well as with a.c. injection. Various constant-current container formations are carried out using different current levels, plate thicknesses, and pulsing techniques, yielding an array of resistance trends which are explained using Butler-Volmer kinetic theory. Ohmic and interfacial resistance trends are shown both theoretically and experimentally to eventually decay to a predictable steady-state value as the formation proceeds, suggesting that this internal resistance method can be used to detect the completion of the formation. The same principles are shown to apply to recharge cycles as well, but with potentially limited practical implications in comparison to formation.

  8. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a donnan potential model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Ephraim, J.H.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 X 10-4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log ??app) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log ??app = 2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential corrrection term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log??= 1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, Mu??nchen.

  9. Reduced by-product formation and modified oxygen availability improve itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Li, An; Pfelzer, Nina; Zuijderwijk, Robbert; Brickwedde, Anja; van Zeijl, Cora; Punt, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Aspergillus niger has an extraordinary potential to produce organic acids as proven by its application in industrial citric acid production. Previously, it was shown that expression of the cis-aconitate decarboxylase gene (cadA) from Aspergillus terreus converted A. niger into an itaconic acid producer (Li et al., Fungal Genet Bio 48: 602-611, 2011). After some initial steps in production optimization in the previous research (Li et al., BMC biotechnol 12: 57, 2012), this research aims at modifying host strains and fermentation conditions to further improve itaconic acid production. Expression of two previously identified A. terreus genes encoding putative organic acid transporters (mttA, mfsA) increased itaconic acid production in an A. niger cis-aconitate decarboxylase expressing strain. Surprisingly, the production did not increase further when both transporters were expressed together. Meanwhile, oxalic acid was accumulated as a by-product in the culture of mfsA transformants. In order to further increase itaconic acid production and eliminate by-product formation, the non-acidifying strain D15#26 and the oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase (oahA) deletion strain AB 1.13 ∆oahA #76 have been analyzed for itaconic acid production. Whereas cadA expression in AB 1.13 ∆oahA #76 resulted in higher itaconic acid production than strain CAD 10.1, this was not the case in strain D15#26. As expected, oxalic acid production was eliminated in both strains. In a further attempt to increase itaconic acid levels, an improved basal citric acid-producing strain, N201, was used for cadA expression. A selected transformant (N201CAD) produced more itaconic acid than strain CAD 10.1, derived from A. niger strain AB1.13. Subsequently, we have focused on the influence of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) on itaconic acid production. Interestingly, reduced D.O. levels (10-25 %) increased itaconic acid production using strain N201 CAD. Similar results were obtained in strain AB 1.13 CAD + HBD2

  10. Methodology for assessing thioarsenic formation potential in sulfidic landfill environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianye; Kim, Hwidong; Townsend, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Arsenic leaching and speciation in landfills, especially those with arsenic bearing waste and drywall disposal (such as construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills), may be affected by high levels of sulfide through the formation of thioarsenic anions. A methodology using ion chromatography (IC) with a conductivity detector was developed for the assessment of thioarsenic formation potential in sulfidic landfill environments. Monothioarsenate (H2AsSO3(-)) and dithioarsenate (H2AsS2O2(-)) were confirmed in the IC fractions of thioarsenate synthesis mixture, consistent with previous literature results. However, the observation of AsSx(-) (x=5-8) in the supposed trithioarsenate (H2AsS3O(-)) and tetrathioarsenate (H2AsS4(-)) IC fractions suggested the presence of new arsenic polysulfide complexes. All thioarsenate anions, particularly trithioarsenate and tetrathioarsenate, were unstable upon air exposure. The method developed for thioarsenate analysis was validated and successfully used to analyze several landfill leachate samples. Thioarsenate anions were detected in the leachate of all of the C&D debris landfills tested, which accounted for approximately 8.5% of the total aqueous As in the leachate. Compared to arsenite or arsenate, thioarsenates have been reported in literature to have lower adsorption on iron oxide minerals. The presence of thioarsenates in C&D debris landfill leachate poses new concerns when evaluating the impact of arsenic mobilization in such environments.

  11. Ice Formation Potential of Field-Collected Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion-Matta, A.; Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Marine biogenic particles composed mainly of sea salt and organic material aerosolized from a mesocosm in laboratory experiments have recently been found to act as ice nuclei. How these particles relate to those collected from sea spray under ambient conditions in the field is unknown. This study reports on the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of particles collected during the marine aerosol characterization experiment (MACE) on the south shore of Long Island, New York. Ambient aerosol size distributions were measured and particles were collected on hydrophobically coated substrates and subsequently used for ice nucleation experiments using an ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope. This technique allows detection of ice formation for temperatures between 200 and 273 K and for relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) from 100% up to water saturation. Individual ice nucleating particles were identified for subsequent chemical and physical characterization using both X-ray and electron micro-spectroscopic techniques. Concentrations of bacteria, viruses, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in the bulk seawater, sea-surface microlayer (SML), and in sea spray were determined using established methods and related to airborne sea spray particles and their ice nucleation potential. Onshore aerosol size distribution measurements taken at 5 m height and 10 m away from the breaking waves, revealed a peak maximum at 100 nm and Ntot = 6.8 x 10^2 cm^-3. Bacterial, viral, and TEP were found to be enriched in the SML. Ambient particles collected during MACE were found to nucleate ice efficiently, e. g. at 215 K, ice nucleation occurred on average at 125% RHice. Results of aerosol size distributions and ice nucleation efficiencies are compared to laboratory bubble bursting experiments in which natural seawater was used. The goal of this study is to understand the connection between sea spray aerosolization and atmospheric ice cloud formation and to

  12. Geometric and potential driving formation and evolution of biomolecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bates, P W; Chen, Zhan; Sun, Yuhui; Wei, Guo-Wei; Zhao, Shan

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents new geometrical flow equations for the theoretical modeling of biomolecular surfaces in the context of multiscale implicit solvent models. To account for the local variations near the biomolecular surfaces due to interactions between solvent molecules, and between solvent and solute molecules, we propose potential driven geometric flows, which balance the intrinsic geometric forces that would occur for a surface separating two homogeneous materials with the potential forces induced by the atomic interactions. Stochastic geometric flows are introduced to account for the random fluctuation and dissipation in density and pressure near the solvent-solute interface. Physical properties, such as free energy minimization (area decreasing) and incompressibility (volume preserving), are realized by some of our geometric flow equations. The proposed approach for geometric and potential forces driving the formation and evolution of biological surfaces is illustrated by extensive numerical experiments and compared with established minimal molecular surfaces and molecular surfaces. Local modification of biomolecular surfaces is demonstrated with potential driven geometric flows. High order geometric flows are also considered and tested in the present work for surface generation. Biomolecular surfaces generated by these approaches are typically free of geometric singularities. As the speed of surface generation is crucial to implicit solvent model based molecular dynamics, four numerical algorithms, a semi-implicit scheme, a Crank-Nicolson scheme, and two alternating direction implicit (ADI) schemes, are constructed and tested. Being either stable or conditionally stable but admitting a large critical time step size, these schemes overcome the stability constraint of the earlier forward Euler scheme. Aided with the Thomas algorithm, one of the ADI schemes is found to be very efficient as it balances the speed and accuracy.

  13. Hydroxyl radical formation upon oxidation of reduced humic acids by oxygen in the dark.

    PubMed

    Page, Sarah E; Sander, Michael; Arnold, William A; McNeill, Kristopher

    2012-02-07

    Humic acids (HAs) accept and donate electrons in many biogeochemical redox reactions at oxic/anoxic interfaces. The products of oxidation of reduced HAs by O(2) are unknown but are expected to yield reactive oxygen species, potentially including hydroxyl radical (·OH). To quantify the formation of ·OH upon oxidation of reduced HAs by O(2), three HAs were reduced electrochemically to well-defined redox states and were subsequently oxidized by O(2) in the presence of the ·OH probe terephthalate. The formation of ·OH upon oxidation increased with increasing extent of HA reduction. The yield of ·OH ranged from 42 to 160 mmol per mole of electrons donated by the reduced HA. The intermediacy of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the formation of ·OH was supported by enhancement of ·OH formation upon addition of exogenous H(2)O(2) sources and by the suppression of ·OH formation upon addition of catalase as a quencher of endogenous H(2)O(2). The formation of ·OH in the dark during oxidation of reduced HA represents a previously unknown source of ·OH formation at oxic/anoxic interfaces and may affect the biogeochemical and pollutant redox dynamics at these interfaces.

  14. Nepheline Formation Potential in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)

    SciTech Connect

    PEELER, D

    2005-04-01

    The effect of crystallization on glass durability is complex and depends on several interrelated factors including the change in residual glass composition, the formation of internal stress or microcracks, and the preferential attack at the glass-crystal interface. Perhaps one of the most significant effects is the type and extent (or fraction) of crystallization and the resulting change to the residual glass composition. A strong increase in glass dissolution (or decrease in durability) has been observed in previous studies in glasses that formed aluminum-containing crystals, such as NaAlSiO{sub 4} (nepheline) and LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, and crystalline SiO{sub 2}. Although the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na{sup +}-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}). Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based glass (as a result of the use of a high Na{sub 2}O frit and/or a less washed sludge) to improve melt rate, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems is being assessed. Li et al. (2003) indicate that sodium alumino-borosilicate glasses are prone to nepheline crystallization if their compositions projected on the Na{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} ternary fall within the nepheline primary phase field. In particular, durable glasses with SiO{sub 2}/(SiO{sub 2}+Na{sub 2}O+ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) > 0.62, where the oxides are expressed as mass fractions in the glass, do not precipitate nepheline as their primary phase. Twelve SB4-based glasses have been identified or classified as ''prone to nepheline formation'' using a ''less conservative'' discriminator value of 0.65. Ten of the 12 glasses are Frit 320 based, and 8 of these 10 target a 40% WL-independent of the SB4

  15. Iron reduction potentiates hydroxyl radical formation only in flavonols.

    PubMed

    Macáková, Kateřina; Mladěnka, Přemysl; Filipský, Tomáš; Říha, Michal; Jahodář, Luděk; Trejtnar, František; Bovicelli, Paolo; Proietti Silvestri, Ilaria; Hrdina, Radomír; Saso, Luciano

    2012-12-15

    Flavonoids, substantial components of the human diet, are generally considered to be beneficial. However, they may possess possible pro-oxidative effects, which could be based on their reducing potential. The aims of this study were to evaluate the ability of 26 flavonoids to reduce ferric ions at relevant pH conditions and to find a possible relationship with potentiation of hydroxyl radical production. A substantial ferric ions reduction was achieved under acidic conditions, particularly by flavonols and flavanols with the catecholic ring B. Apparently corresponding bell-shaped curves displaying the pro-oxidant effect of flavonols quercetin and kaempferol on iron-based Fenton reaction were documented. Several flavonoids were efficient antioxidants at very low concentrations but rather inefficient or pro-oxidative at higher concentrations. Flavonols, morin and rutin were progressively pro-oxidant, while 7-hydroxyflavone and hesperetin were the only flavonoids with dose-dependent inhibition of hydroxyl radical production. Conclusively, administration of flavonoids may lead to unpredictable consequences with few exceptions.

  16. Potential anti-inflammatory actions of the elmiric (lipoamino) acids

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.; Adams, Jeffrey K.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Fraioli, Cristian; Rossetti, Ronald G.; Salmonsen, Rebecca A.; Shaw, John W.; Walker, J. Michael; Zipkin, Robert E.; Zurier, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    A library of amino acid-fatty acid conjugates (elmiric acids) was synthesized and evaluated for activity as potential anti-inflammatory agents. The compounds were tested in vitro for their effects on cell proliferation and prostaglandin production and compared with their effects on in vivo models of inflammation. LPS stimulated RAW 267.4 mouse macrophage cells was the in vitro model and phorbol ester-induced mouse ear edema served as the principal in vivo model. The prostaglandin responses were found to be strongly dependent on the nature of the fatty acid part of the molecule. Polyunsaturated acid conjugates produced a marked increase in media levels of i15-deoxy-PGJ2 with minimal effects on PGE production. It is reported in the literature that prostaglandin ratios in which the J series predominates over the E series promote the resolution of inflammatory conditions. Several of the elmiric acids tested here produced such favorable ratios suggesting that their potential anti-inflammatory activity occurs via a novel mechanism of action. The ear edema assay results were generally in agreement with the prostaglandin assay findings indicating a connection between them. PMID:17383881

  17. Raman and terahertz spectroscopical investigation of cocrystal formation process of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Zhang, Huili; Xue, Jiadan; Fang, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yi; Li, Yafang; Hong, Zhi

    2015-03-15

    Cocrystallization can improve physical and chemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredient, and this feature has great potential in pharmaceutical development. In this study, the cocrystal of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid under grinding condition has been characterized by Raman and terahertz spectroscopical techniques. The major vibrational modes of individual starting components and cocrystal are obtained and assigned. Spectral results show that the vibrational modes of the cocrystal are different from those of the corresponding parent materials. The dynamic process of such pharmaceutical cocrystal formation has also been monitored directly with Raman and THz spectra. The formation rate is pretty fast in first several 20 min grinding time, and then it becomes slow. After ∼35 min, such process has been almost completed. These results offer us the unique means and benchmark for characterizing the cocrystal conformation from molecule-level and also provide us rich information about the reaction dynamic during cocrystal formation process in pharmaceutical fields.

  18. Raman and terahertz spectroscopical investigation of cocrystal formation process of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Zhang, Huili; Xue, Jiadan; Fang, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yi; Li, Yafang; Hong, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Cocrystallization can improve physical and chemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredient, and this feature has great potential in pharmaceutical development. In this study, the cocrystal of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid under grinding condition has been characterized by Raman and terahertz spectroscopical techniques. The major vibrational modes of individual starting components and cocrystal are obtained and assigned. Spectral results show that the vibrational modes of the cocrystal are different from those of the corresponding parent materials. The dynamic process of such pharmaceutical cocrystal formation has also been monitored directly with Raman and THz spectra. The formation rate is pretty fast in first several 20 min grinding time, and then it becomes slow. After ∼35 min, such process has been almost completed. These results offer us the unique means and benchmark for characterizing the cocrystal conformation from molecule-level and also provide us rich information about the reaction dynamic during cocrystal formation process in pharmaceutical fields.

  19. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation

    PubMed Central

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly.

  20. Perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCA) atmospheric formation and transport to the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike-thackray, C.; Selin, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) are highly persistent and toxic environmental contaminants that have been found in remote locations such as the Arctic, far from emission sources. These persistent organic pollutants are emitted directly to the atmosphere as well as being produced by the degradation of precursor compounds in the atmosphere, but recent trends towards increasing precursor emissions and decreasing direct emissions raise the importance of production in the atmosphere. Our work aims to improve understanding of the atmospheric degradation of fluorotelomer precursor compounds to form the long-chain PFCAs PFOA (C8) and PFNA (C9).Using the atmospheric chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, which uses assimilated meteorology to simulate the atmospheric transport of trace gas species, we investigate the interaction of the atmospheric formation of PFCAs and the atmospheric transport of their precursor species. Our simulations are a first application of the GEOS-Chem framework to PFCA chemistry. We highlight the importance of the spatial and temporal variability of background atmospheric chemical conditions experienced during transport. We find that yields and formation times of PFOA and PFNA respond differently and strongly to the photochemical conditions of the atmosphere, such as the abundance of NO, HO2, and other photochemical species.

  1. Fatty acids are potential endogenous regulators of aldosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Goodfriend, T L; Ball, D L; Elliott, M E; Morrison, A R; Evenson, M A

    1991-05-01

    Adrenal glomerulosa cells washed with delipidated albumin produced increased amounts of aldosterone in response to angiotensin-II (AII) or (Bu)2cAMP. Albumin treatment also increased binding of 125I-labeled AII to high affinity binding sites on adrenal cells. Lipid extracts of albumin solutions that were used to wash cells inhibited AII binding and aldosterone responses by washed glomerulosa cells. Chromatographic fractionation and mass spectroscopic analysis indicated that the inhibitors removed from cells by albumin were long chain fatty acids. Exogenous fatty acids not only inhibited AII binding, but they inhibited basal aldosterone production and increments in aldosterone caused by AII or dbcAMP, suggesting an effect on postreceptor steps in aldosteronogenesis. The most potent and most abundant fatty acids removed from adrenal cells were oleic, linoleic, and arachidonic. These fatty acids inhibited at micromolar concentrations in the absence of albumin and at somewhat higher concentrations in its presence. Cells that had been washed, then inhibited by exogenous oleic acid in vitro, were restored to their enhanced responsiveness by a second albumin wash, making it unlikely that cell damage is the mechanism of inhibition by fatty acids. Responses of fasciculata cells were not potentiated by albumin washes, and cortisol production was less sensitive than aldosterone production to exogenous fatty acids. Binding of ANP to glomerulosa cells was not affected by albumin or fatty acids. These results combined with clinical correlations make it plausible that unesterified fatty acids are naturally occurring regulators of the adrenal glomerulosa. Insulin's ability to lower plasma levels of fatty acids may be one way that it causes sodium retention.

  2. Biochemical and dietary factors of uric acid stone formation.

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-02-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of "pure" uric acid renal stone formers (UA-RSFs) with that of mixed uric acid/calcium oxalate stone formers (UC-RSFs) and to identify which urinary and dietary risk factors predispose to their formation. A total of 136 UA-RSFs and 115 UC-RSFs were extracted from our database of renal stone formers. A control group of 60 subjects without history of renal stones was considered for comparison. Data from serum chemistries, 24-h urine collections and 24-h dietary recalls were considered. UA-RSFs had a significantly (p = 0.001) higher body mass index (26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) than UC-RSFs, whereas body mass index of UA-RSFs was higher but not significantly than in controls (24.6 ± 4.7) (p = 0.108). The mean urinary pH was significantly lower in UA-RSFs (5.57 ± 0.58) and UC-RSFs (5.71 ± 0.56) compared with controls (5.83 ± 0.29) (p = 0.007). No difference of daily urinary uric acid excretion was observed in the three groups (p = 0.902). Daily urinary calcium excretion was significantly (p = 0.018) higher in UC-RSFs (224 ± 149 mg/day) than UA-RSFs (179 ± 115) whereas no significant difference was observed with controls (181 ± 89). UA-RSFs tend to have a lower uric acid fractional excretion (0.083 ± 0.045% vs 0.107+/-0.165; p = 0.120) and had significantly higher serum uric acid (5.33 ± 1.66 vs 4.78 ± 1.44 mg/dl; p = 0.007) than UC-RSFs. The mean energy, carbohydrate and vitamin C intakes were higher in UA-SFs (1987 ± 683 kcal, 272 ± 91 g, 112 ± 72 mg) and UC-SFs (1836 ± 74 kcal, 265 ± 117, 140 ± 118) with respect to controls (1474 ± 601, 188 ± 84, 76 ± 53) (p = 0.000). UA-RSFs should be differentiated from UC-RSFs as they present lower urinary pH, lower uric acid fractional excretion and higher serum uric acid. On the contrary, patients with UC-RSFs show urinary risk factors

  3. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  4. Reduced carbon sequestration potential of biochar in acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yaqi; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-12-01

    Biochar application in soil has been proposed as a promising method for carbon sequestration. While factors affecting its carbon sequestration potential have been widely investigated, the number of studies on the effect of soil pH is limited. To investigate the carbon sequestration potential of biochar across a series of soil pH levels, the total carbon emission, CO2 release from inorganic carbon, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) of six soils with various pH levels were compared after the addition of straw biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures. The results show that the acidic soils released more CO2 (1.5-3.5 times higher than the control) after the application of biochar compared with neutral and alkaline soils. The degradation of both native soil organic carbon (SOC) and biochar were accelerated. More inorganic CO2 release in acidic soil contributed to the increased degradation of biochar. Higher proportion of gram-positive bacteria in acidic soil (25%-36%) was responsible for the enhanced biochar degradation and simultaneously co-metabolism of SOC. In addition, lower substrate limitation for bacteria, indicated by higher C-O stretching after the biochar application in the acidic soil, also caused more CO2 release. In addition to the soil pH, other factors such as clay contents and experimental duration also affected the phsico-chemical and biotic processes of SOC dynamics. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria ratio was found to be negatively related to priming effects, and suggested to serve as an indicator for priming effect. In general, the carbon sequestration potential of rice-straw biochar in soil reduced along with the decrease of soil pH especially in a short-term. Given wide spread of acidic soils in China, carbon sequestration potential of biochar may be overestimated without taking into account the impact of soil pH.

  5. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations.

  6. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes.

  7. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    .9. Fe hydrolysis reactions on Mars is another source of protons that would have contributed to acidity. The presence of SO2 from volcanic processes could also have contributed to geochemical acidification. These sources of acidity competed with base-forming cations that resulted in mildly acidic solutions that were not favorable for carbonate formation but may have allowed for Fe/Mg smectite formation. Noachian to early Hesperian Mars could have been mildly acidic, allowing Fe/Mg smectite formation but preventing widespread carbonate deposition. This paradigm shift from an early Mars that was neutral-alkaline to mildly acidic may possibly explain why there is a disparity between the occurrence of carbonate and Fe/Mg smectites. Potential microbiological activity would not be eliminated under a mildly acidic Mars; however, there could be tighter constraints as to the type and species of microbiology that could exist.

  8. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    .9. Fe hydrolysis reactions on Mars is another source of protons that would have contributed to acidity. The presence of SO2 from volcanic processes could also have contributed to geochemical acidification. These sources of acidity competed with base-forming cations that resulted in mildly acidic solutions that were not favorable for carbonate formation but may have allowed for Fe/Mg smectite formation. Noachian to early Hesperian Mars could have been mildly acidic, allowing Fe/Mg smectite formation but preventing widespread carbonate deposition. This paradigm shift from an early Mars that was neutral-alkaline to mildly acidic may possibly explain why there is a disparity between the occurrence of carbonate and Fe/Mg smectites. Potential microbiological activity would not be eliminated under a mildly acidic Mars; however, there could be tighter constraints as to the type and species of microbiology that could exist.

  9. Isoprene suppression of new particle formation: Potential mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Uin, Janek; Guenther, Alex B.; Gouw, Joost A.; Yu, Fangqun; Nadykto, Alex B.; Herb, Jason; Ng, Nga L.; Koss, Abigail; Brune, William H.; Baumann, Karsten; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Nenes, Athanasios; Olsen, Kevin; Goldstein, Allen; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Secondary aerosols formed from anthropogenic pollutants and natural emissions have substantial impacts on human health, air quality, and the Earth's climate. New particle formation (NPF) contributes up to 70% of the global production of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but the effects of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and their oxidation products on NPF processes in forests are poorly understood. Observations show that isoprene, the most abundant BVOC, suppresses NPF in forests. But the previously proposed chemical mechanism underlying this suppression process contradicts atmospheric observations. By reviewing observations made in other forests, it is clear that NPF rarely takes place during the summer when emissions of isoprene are high, even though there are sufficient concentrations of monoterpenes. But at present it is not clear how isoprene and its oxidation products may change the oxidation chemistry of terpenes and how NOx and other atmospheric key species affect NPF in forest environments. Future laboratory experiments with chemical speciation of gas phase nucleation precursors and clusters and chemical composition of particles smaller than 10 nm are required to understand the role of isoprene in NPF. Our results show that climate models can overpredict aerosol's first indirect effect when not considering the absence of NPF in the southeastern U.S. forests during the summer using the current nucleation algorithm that includes only sulfuric acid and total concentrations of low-volatility organic compounds. This highlights the importance of understanding NPF processes as function of temperature, relative humidity, and BVOC compositions to make valid predictions of NPF and CCN at a wide range of atmospheric conditions.

  10. Granuloma formation by muramyl dipeptide associated with branched fatty acids, a structure probably essential for tubercle formation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Emori, K; Nagao, S; Shigematsu, N; Kotani, S; Tsujimoto, M; Shiba, T; Kusumoto, S; Tanaka, A

    1985-01-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, which does not induce epithelioid granuloma when injected alone dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, could induce extensive granulomas in guinea pigs when chemically conjugated with branched, but not linear, fatty acids. Peptidoglycan fragments of Staphylococcus epidermidis could evoke epithelioid granulomas when incorporated in a water-in-oil emulsion. These findings suggest the importance of a lipid bound to muramyl dipeptide for granuloma formation. In view of the fact that mycobacteria uniquely contain large amounts of branched fatty acids, it was proposed that the complex of muramyl dipeptide and branched fatty acids, mostly mycolic acids, is a structure in tubercle bacilli responsible for tubercle formation. Images PMID:3924828

  11. Chlorogenic acid increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation when heating fructose alone or with aspartic acid at two pH levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zou, Yueyu; Wu, Taigang; Huang, Caihuan; Pei, Kehan; Zhang, Guangwen; Lin, Xiaohua; Bai, Weibin; Ou, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic acid that ubiquitously exists in fruits. This work aims to investigate whether and how CGA influences HMF formation during heating fructose alone, or with an amino acid. The results showed that that CGA increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation. At pH 5.5 and 7.0, the addition of 5.0 μmol/ml CGA increased HMF formation by 49.4% and 25.2%, respectively when heating fructose alone, and by 9.0% and 16.7%, respectively when heating fructose with aspartic acid. CGA significantly increased HMF formation by promoting 3-deoxosone formation, and its conversion to HMF by inhibiting HMF elimination, especially in the Maillard reaction system. A comparison of the catalytic capacity of CGA with its six analogous compounds showed that both its di-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl groups function in increasing HMF formation.

  12. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential.

  13. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  14. Formation and accumulation of alpha-acids, beta-acids, desmethylxanthohumol, and xanthohumol during flowering of hops (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    De Keukeleire, Jelle; Ooms, Geert; Heyerick, Arne; Roldan-Ruiz, Isabel; Van Bockstaele, Erik; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2003-07-16

    Important secondary metabolites, present in hops (Humulus lupulus L.), include alpha-acids and beta-acids, which are essential for the brewing of beer, as well as the prenylated chalcones, desmethylxanthohumol, and xanthohumol, which exhibit interesting bioactive properties. Their formation and accumulation in five selected hop varieties, Wye Challenger, Wye Target, Golding, Admiral, and Whitbread Golding Variety, were quantitatively monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography using UV detection. All target compounds were present from the onset of flowering, not only in female hop cones but also in male inflorescences, albeit in low concentrations. During development from female inflorescences to cones, levels of alpha-acids, beta-acids, desmethylxanthohumol, and xanthohumol gradually increased, while each hop variety exhibited individual accumulation rates. Furthermore, these compounds were present in leaves of fully grown hops as well. The study demonstrated that key compounds for flavor and potential beneficial health effects associated with beer not only reside in the glandular lupulin structures but also are distributed over various parts of the hop plant.

  15. D-amino acid oxidase: its potential in the production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.

    PubMed

    Mujawar, S K

    1999-01-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) used in the preparation of alpha-keto acids, in the determination of D-amino acids and in the resolution of racemic mixture of amino acids is produced by a wide range of microorganisms. In the recent past this enzyme is being recognized for its potential in the commercial production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA), a starting material for various semisynthetic cephalosporins. Though this enzyme is widespread among microorganisms, very few microbial species have been explored for the production of 7-ACA; this is because cephalosporin C is quantitatively deaminated by limited microbial DAAOs. Comparison of physico-chemical properties of enzyme preparations indicate wide variations, however in general DAAOs are specific for D-configuration of amino acids. Both immobilized enzyme and cell preparations are developed for its various applications. The advantages of DAAO in the production of 7-ACA are discussed.

  16. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  17. Comparison of the formation of nicotinic acid conjugates in leaves of different plant species.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Yin, Yuling; Katahira, Riko; Watanabe, Shin; Mimura, Tetsuro; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2012-11-01

    There are three metabolic fates of nicotinic acid in plants: (1) nicotinic acid mononucleotide formation for NAD synthesis by the so-called salvage pathway of pyridine nucleotide biosynthesis; (2) nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; and (3) trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid) formation. In the present study, the metabolism of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide was investigated in leaves of 23 wild plant species. All species readily converted nicotinamide to nicotinic acid, and only a fraction of nicotinic acid was utilised for NAD and NADP synthesis. The remaining nicotinic acid is converted to the nicotinic acid conjugates. Only one plant species, Cycas revoluta, produced both nicotinic acid N-glucoside and trigonelline; the other 22 species produced one or other of the conjugates. The nicotinic acid N-glucoside-forming plants are Cyathea lepifera, Arenga trewmula var. englri, Barringtonia racemosa, Ilex paraguariensis, Angelica japonica, Scaevola taccada and Farfugium japonicum. In contrast, trigonelline is formed in C. lepifera, Ginkgo biloba, Pinus luchuensis, Casuarina equisetifolia, Alocasia odora, Pandanus odoratissimus, Hylocereus undatus, Kalanchoe pinnata, Kalanchoe tubiflora, Populus alba, Garcinia subelliptica, Oxalis corymbosa, Leucaena leucocephala, Vigna marina, Hibiscus tiliaceus and Melicope triphylla. The diversity of nicotinic acid conjugate formation in plants is discussed using these results and our previous investigation involving a few model plants, various crops and ferns. Nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation was restricted mostly to ferns and selected orders of angiosperms, whereas other plants produce trigonelline. In most cases the formation of both nicotinic acid conjugates is incompatible, but some exceptions have been found.

  18. Formation of degradation products from the pyrolysis of tall oil fatty acids with kraft lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Traitler, H.; Kratzl, K.

    1980-01-01

    Pyrolysis of tall oil fatty acids containing kraft lignin at 160-280 degrees with or without exclusion of O resulted in formation of alkylbenzenes, carboxylic acids, and hydrocarbons, as determined by gas chomatography. In the pyrolysis, ring cleavage of dehydroabietic acids could not be observed, and no cyclic fatty acids could be detected.

  19. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  20. Accumulation potentials of perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) in maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Krippner, Johanna; Falk, Sandy; Brunn, Hubertus; Georgii, Sebastian; Schubert, Sven; Stahl, Thorsten

    2015-04-15

    Uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) by maize represents a potential source of exposure for humans, either directly or indirectly via feed for animals raised for human consumption. The aim of the following study was, therefore, to determine the accumulation potential of perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) in maize (Zea mays). Two different concentrations of PFAAs were applied as aqueous solution to the soil to attain target concentrations of 0.25 mg or 1.00 mg of PFAA per kg of soil. Maize was grown in pots, and after harvesting, PFAA concentrations were measured in the straw and kernels of maize. PFCA and PFSA concentrations of straw decreased significantly with increasing chain length. In maize kernels, only PFCAs with a chain length ≤ C8 as well as perfluorobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS) were detected. The highest soil-to-plant transfer for both straw and kernels was determined for short-chained PFCAs and PFSAs.

  1. On Monolayer Formation of Pyrenebutyric Acid on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Hinnemo, Malkolm; Zhao, Jie; Ahlberg, Patrik; Hägglund, Carl; Djurberg, Viktor; Scheicher, Ralph H; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Bin

    2017-04-04

    As a two-dimensional material with high charge carrier mobility, graphene may offer ultrahigh sensitivity in biosensing. To realize this, the first step is to functionalize the graphene. This is commonly done by using 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) as a linker for biomolecules. However, the adsorption of PBA on graphene remains poorly understood despite reports of successful biosensors functionalized via this route. Here, the PBA adsorption on graphene is characterized through a combination of Raman spectroscopy, ab initio calculations, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The PBA molecules are found to form a self-assembled monolayer on graphene, the formation of which is self-limiting and Langmuirian. Intriguingly, in concentrated solutions, the PBA molecules are found to stand up and stack horizontally with their edges contacting the graphene surface. This morphology could facilitate a surface densely populated with carboxylic functional groups. Spectroscopic analyses show that the monolayer saturates at 5.3 PBA molecules per nm(2) and measures ∼0.7 nm in thickness. The morphology study of this PBA monolayer sheds light on the π-π stacking of small-molecule systems on graphene and provides an excellent base for optimizing functionalization procedures.

  2. The acidic and erosive potential of five sports drinks.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jeremy; Loyn, Theresa; McAndrew, Robert

    2005-12-01

    Sports drinks are becoming increasingly popular as we are all being encouraged to adopt a healthier lifestyle with regular exercise. However, many of these products are based on acidic fruits and may contribute to erosion. The aim of this study was to screen a number of these products for their potential to cause enamel erosion in vitro. The erosive potential of a number of readily available sports drinks was assessed in the laboratory by measuring their pH, neutralisable acidity and their ability to erode enamel. These were compared to a positive control, orange juice and a negative control, water. The pH of the sports drinks ranged from 3.16-3.70 with their neutralisable acidity ranging from 9.74-13.44 mls of 0.1M NaOH. The amount of enamel removed following 1-hour immersion in the sports drinks ranged from 1.18-5.36 microns. In comparison, the orange juice control had a pH of 3.68, a neutralisable acidity of 19.68 mls of 0.1 M NaOH and removed 3.24 microns of enamel. Many of the sports drinks tested were found to be erosive. This information will be of use to clinicians when counselling patients with tooth surface loss who use fruit based sports drinks regularly.

  3. Collaborative Learning through Formative Peer Review: Pedagogy, Programs and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondergaard, Harald; Mulder, Raoul A.

    2012-01-01

    We examine student peer review, with an emphasis on formative practice and collaborative learning, rather than peer grading. Opportunities to engage students in such formative peer assessment are growing, as a range of online tools become available to manage and simplify the process of administering student peer review. We consider whether…

  4. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  5. Haloacetic acid and trihalomethane formation from the chlorination and bromination of aliphatic beta-dicarbonyl acid model compounds.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Eric R V; Summers, R Scott; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Gallard, Hervé

    2008-05-01

    While it is known that resorcinol- and phenol-type aromatic structures within natural organic matter (NOM) react during drinking water chlorination to form trihalomethanes (THMs), limited studies have examined aliphatic-type structures as THM and haloacetic acid (HAA) precursors. A suite of aliphatic acid model compounds were chlorinated and brominated separately in controlled laboratory-scale batch experiments. Four and two beta-dicarbonyl acid compounds were found to be important precursors for the formation of THMs (chloroform and bromoform (71-91% mol/mol)), and dihaloacetic acids (DXAAs) (dichloroacetic acid and dibromoacetic acid (5-68% mol/mol)), respectively, after 24 h at pH 8. Based upon adsorbable organic halide formation, THMs and DXAAs, and to a lesser extent mono and trihaloacetic acids, were the majority (> 80%) of the byproducts produced for most of the aliphatic beta-dicarbonyl acid compounds. Aliphatic beta-diketone-acid-type and beta-keto-acid-type structures could be possible fast- and slow-reacting THM precursors, respectively, and aliphatic beta-keto-acid-type structures are possible slow-reacting DXAA precursors. Aliphatic beta-dicarbonyl acid moieties in natural organic matter, particularly in the hydrophilic fraction, could contribute to the significant formation of THMs and DXAAs observed after chlorination of natural waters.

  6. [Spectral Analysis about the Pharmaceutical Cocrystal Formation of Piracetam and 3-Hydroxybenzoic Acid].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-li; Xia, Yi; Hong, Zhi; Du, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystal can improve physical and chemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), meanwhile this feature has shown great potential in improving the pharmaceutical's properties and characteristics. In this study, cocrystal formation between piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid (3HBA) using grinding method has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and terahertz (THz) spectroscopical techniques. The vibrational modes of different motions are obtained by the assignment of the peaks in the spectra of the starting materials and the cocrystal components. FTIR, Raman and THz spectroscopical results show that the vibrational modes of the cocrystal are different from those of the starting materials. In addition, the dynamic process of the above cocrystal formation is investigated in-depth with Raman and THz spec- tra. Piracetam-3HBA cocrystal is formed pretty fast in first several minutes, and then the formation rate becomes slow. After 35 minutes, such formation process has been completed. The results offer the theoretical benchmark and unique means for real-time monitoring pharmaceutical cocrystal formation and also the corresponding quantitative analysis in the pharmaceutical field.

  7. Somite-Derived Retinoic Acid Regulates Zebrafish Hematopoietic Stem Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Laura M.; Mackowetzky, Kacey J.; Widen, Sonya A.; Waskiewicz, Andrew Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are multipotent progenitors that generate all vertebrate adult blood lineages. Recent analyses have highlighted the importance of somite-derived signaling factors in regulating HSC specification and emergence from dorsal aorta hemogenic endothelium. However, these factors remain largely uncharacterized. We provide evidence that the vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) functions as an essential regulator of zebrafish HSC formation. Temporal analyses indicate that RA is required for HSC gene expression prior to dorsal aorta formation, at a time when the predominant RA synthesis enzyme, aldh1a2, is strongly expressed within the paraxial mesoderm and somites. Previous research implicated the Cxcl12 chemokine and Notch signaling pathways in HSC formation. Consequently, to understand how RA regulates HSC gene expression, we surveyed the expression of components of these pathways in RA-depleted zebrafish embryos. During somitogenesis, RA-depleted embryos exhibit altered expression of jam1a and jam2a, which potentiate Notch signaling within nascent endothelial cells. RA-depleted embryos also exhibit a severe reduction in the expression of cxcr4a, the predominant Cxcl12b receptor. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis and Cxcr4 signaling act in concert to reduce HSC formation. Our analyses demonstrate that somite-derived RA functions to regulate components of the Notch and Cxcl12 chemokine signaling pathways during HSC formation. PMID:27861498

  8. Effect of rosmarinic acid and carnosic acid on AGEs formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ou, Juanying; Huang, Junqing; Wang, Mingfu; Ou, Shiyi

    2017-04-15

    This work aimed to investigate the effect of the two main components of rosemary extracts, namely rosmarinic acid (RA) and carnosic acid (CA), on the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in vitro. In the bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose model, addition of RA and CA at 400μg/mL inhibited fluorescent AGEs by more than 90%, and carboxymethyl lysine (CML) and carboxyethyl lysine (CEL) by 82.7% and 75.2%, and 71.4% and 64.2%, respectively. Moreover, the addition of RA and CA at 400μg/mL inhibited fluorescent AGEs by more than 90% both in the BSA/glyoxal (GO) and BSA/methylglyoxal (MGO) models, the formation of CML by 64.9% and 53.9% in BSA/GO model, and CEL by 28.9% and 24.3% in BSA/MGO model, respectively. RA and CA also significantly decreased the concentration of MGO and protein carbonylation.

  9. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  10. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil.

  11. The Role of Oxalic Acid in New Particle Formation from Methanesulfonic Acid, Methylamine, and Water.

    PubMed

    Arquero, Kristine D; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2017-02-21

    Atmospheric particles are notorious for their effects on human health and visibility and are known to influence climate. Though sulfuric acid and ammonia/amines are recognized as main contributors to new particle formation (NPF), models and observations have indicated that other species may be involved. It has been shown that nucleation from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines, which is enhanced with added water, can also contribute to NPF. While organics are ubiquitous in air and likely to be involved in NPF by stabilizing small clusters for further growth, their effects on the MSA-amine system are not known. This work investigates the effect of oxalic acid (OxA) on NPF from the reaction of MSA and methylamine (MA) at 1 atm and 294 K in the presence and absence of water vapor using an aerosol flow reactor. OxA and MA do not efficiently form particles even in the presence of water, but NPF is enhanced when adding MSA to OxA-MA with and without water. The addition of OxA to MSA-MA mixtures yields a modest NPF enhancement, whereas the addition of OxA to MSA-MA-H2O has no effect. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed.

  12. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-Weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed under neutral to alkaline conditions during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Gya). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Gya). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the geologic and aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era may have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that characterize the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products resulting from acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. This study focuses on two phyllosilicates commonly identified with sulfates on Mars: nontronite and saponite. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars to better understand the formation process of sulfates in close proximity to phyllosilicates on Mars and constrain the aqueous conditions of these regions on Mars.

  13. Effects of Fungicide Treatment on Free Amino Acid Concentration and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Tanya Y; Powers, Stephen J; Halford, Nigel G

    2016-12-28

    Acrylamide forms from free asparagine and reducing sugars during frying, baking, roasting, or high-temperature processing, and cereal products are major contributors to dietary acrylamide intake. Free asparagine concentration is the determining factor for acrylamide-forming potential in cereals, and this study investigated the effect of fungicide application on free asparagine accumulation in wheat grain. Free amino acid concentrations were measured in flour from 47 varieties of wheat grown in a field trial in 2011-2012. The wheat had been supplied with nitrogen and sulfur and treated with growth regulators and fungicides. Acrylamide formation was measured after the flour had been heated at 180 °C for 20 min. Flour was also analyzed from 24 (of the 47) varieties grown in adjacent plots that were treated in identical fashion except that no fungicide was applied, resulting in visible infection by Septoria tritici, yellow rust, and brown rust. Free asparagine concentration in the fungicide-treated wheat ranged from 1.596 to 3.987 mmol kg(-1), with a significant (p < 0.001 to p = 0.006, F test) effect of variety for not only free asparagine but all of the free amino acids apart from cysteine and ornithine. There was also a significant (p < 0.001, F test) effect of variety on acrylamide formation, which ranged from 134 to 992 μg kg(-1). There was a significant (p < 0.001, F test) correlation between free asparagine concentration and acrylamide formation. Both free asparagine concentration and acrylamide formation increased in response to a lack of fungicide treatment, the increases in acrylamide ranging from 2.7 to 370%. Free aspartic acid concentration also increased, whereas free glutamic acid concentration increased in some varieties but decreased in others, and free proline concentration decreased. The study showed disease control by fungicide application to be an important crop management measure for mitigating the problem of acrylamide formation in wheat

  14. The enthalpies of formation and sublimation of amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagadeev, E. V.; Gimadeev, A. A.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2010-02-01

    The experimental enthalpies of formation of L-amino acids and peptides were analyzed using the additive scheme and group contributions. Group contributions to the enthalpies of formation were calculated (increment denotations corresponded to the Benson-Buss symbols). The thermochemical characteristics of a wide range of amino acids and their derivatives were calculated.

  15. Technological and economic potential of poly(lactic acid) and lactic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.; Bonsignore, P.; Moon, S.H.; Frank, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}40,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food processing and industrial applications. lactic acid h,as the potential of becoming a very large volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from renewable carbohydrates for use as feedstocks for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, plant growth regulators, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and specially chemical intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from crude fermentation broths and the conversion of tactic acid to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. The development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis (ED) with bipolar membranes, extractive distillations integrated with fermentation, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The use of bipolar ED can virtually eliminate the salt or gypsum waste produced in the current lactic acid processes. In this paper, the recent technical advances in tactic and polylactic acid processes are discussed. The economic potential and manufacturing cost estimates of several products and process options are presented. The technical accomplishments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the future directions of this program at ANL are discussed.

  16. Pd/C synthesized with citric acid: an efficient catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H(2) mol(-1) catalyst h(-1), respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  17. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  18. Incorporated Fish Oil Fatty Acids Prevent Action Potential Shortening Induced by Circulating Fish Oil Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ruijter, Hester M. Den; Verkerk, Arie O.; Coronel, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs) reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long-term ω3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating ω3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated ω3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating ω3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated ω3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (ω3) or sunflower oil (ω9, as control) for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered ω3-PUFAs. Plasma of ω3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and isolated myocytes of ω3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, ω3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than ω9 myocytes. In the ω9 myocytes, but not in the ω3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA + DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated ω3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered ω3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac ω3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term ω3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:21423389

  19. Ilex paraguariensis and its main component chlorogenic acid inhibit fructose formation of advanced glycation endproducts with amino acids at conditions compatible with those in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Bains, Yasmin; Gugliucci, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    We have previously shown that Ilex paraguariensis extracts have potent antiglycation actions. Associations of excess free fructose consumption with inflammatory diseases have been proposed to be mediated through in situ enteral formation of fructose AGEs, which, after being absorbed may contribute to inflammatory diseases via engagement of RAGE. In this proof of principle investigation we show fluorescent AGE formation between amino acids (Arg, Lys, Gly at 10-50mM) and fructose (10-50mM) under time, temperature, pH and concentrations compatible with the digestive system lumen and its inhibition by Ilex paraguariensis extracts. Incubation of amino acids with fructose (but not glucose) leads to a time dependent formation of AGE fluorescence, already apparent after just 1h incubation, a time frame well compatible with the digestive process. Ilex paraguariensis (mate tea) inhibited AGE formation by 83% at 50μl/ml (p<0.001). Its main phenolics, caffeic acid and cholorogenic acid were as potent as aminoguanidine-a specific antiglycation agent: IC50 of 0.9mM (p<0.001). Our results suggest that AGE adducts form between fructose and amino acids at times and concentrations plausibly found in the intestines. The reaction is inhibited by mate tea and its individual phenolics (caffeic acid and chlorogenic acids). The study provides the first evidence for the proposed mechanism to explain epidemiological correlations between excess fructose consumption and inflammatory diseases. Enteral fructose-AGE formation would be inhibited by co-intake of Ilex paraguariensis, and potentially other beverages, fruits and vegetables that contain comparable concentrations of phenolics as in IP (mate tea).

  20. Chemical reactivity and skin sensitization potential for benzaldehydes: can Schiff base formation explain everything?

    PubMed

    Natsch, Andreas; Gfeller, Hans; Haupt, Tina; Brunner, Gerhard

    2012-10-15

    Skin sensitizers chemically modify skin proteins rendering them immunogenic. Sensitizing chemicals have been divided into applicability domains according to their suspected reaction mechanism. The widely accepted Schiff base applicability domain covers aldehydes and ketones, and detailed structure-activity-modeling for this chemical group was presented. While Schiff base formation is the obvious reaction pathway for these chemicals, the in silico work was followed up by limited experimental work. It remains unclear whether hydrolytically labile Schiff bases can form sufficiently stable epitopes to trigger an immune response in the living organism with an excess of water being present. Here, we performed experimental studies on benzaldehydes of highly differing skin sensitization potential. Schiff base formation toward butylamine was evaluated in acetonitrile, and a detailed SAR study is presented. o-Hydroxybenzaldehydes such as salicylaldehyde and the oakmoss allergens atranol and chloratranol have a high propensity to form Schiff bases. The reactivity is highly reduced in p-hydroxy benzaldehydes such as the nonsensitizing vanillin with an intermediate reactivity for p-alkyl and p-methoxy-benzaldehydes. The work was followed up under more physiological conditions in the peptide reactivity assay with a lysine-containing heptapeptide. Under these conditions, Schiff base formation was only observable for the strong sensitizers atranol and chloratranol and for salicylaldehyde. Trapping experiments with NaBH₃CN showed that Schiff base formation occurred under these conditions also for some less sensitizing aldehydes, but the reaction is not favored in the absence of in situ reduction. Surprisingly, the Schiff bases of some weaker sensitizers apparently may react further to form stable peptide adducts. These were identified as the amides between the lysine residues and the corresponding acids. Adduct formation was paralleled by oxidative deamination of the parent

  1. Multifunctional acid formation from the gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2008-10-28

    The gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene was studied in static chamber experiments, using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. A range of multifunctional organic acids-including pinic acid, norpinic acid, pinalic-3-acid, pinalic-4-acid, norpinalic acid and OH-pinalic acid-were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Formation yields for these products under systematically varying reaction conditions (by adding different OH radical scavengers and Criegee intermediate scavengers) were investigated and compared with those observed from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, allowing detailed information on product formation mechanisms to be elucidated. In addition, branching ratios for the initial steps of the reaction were inferred from quantitative measurements of primary carbonyl formation. Atmospheric implications of this work are discussed.

  2. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  3. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  4. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  5. Mechanism of carboxylic acid photooxidation in atmospheric aqueous phase: Formation, fate and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbouillot, Tiffany; Gorini, Sophie; Voyard, Guillaume; Parazols, Marius; Brigante, Marcello; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie; Mailhot, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    In the first part of the work, we investigated the reactivity toward photogenerated hydroxyl radicals (rad OH) of seven monocarboxylic acids and six dicarboxylic acids found in natural cloud water. This leads to the proposition of a schematic degradation pathway linking glutaric acid (C5) to complete mineralization into CO2. We report a detailed mechanism on the succinic acid reactivity toward rad OH leading to the formation of malonic, glyoxylic and consequently oxalic acids and a comparison with reported pathways proposed by the CAPRAM (Chemical Aqueous Phase RAdical Mechanism) is discussed. We also investigated the photooxidation of formic acid under atmospherically relevant conditions leading to the possible formation of oxalic acid via radical mediated recombination. The second part focuses on the polychromatic irradiation (closed to solar irradiation) of a collected cloud aqueous phase showing that irradiation of cloud water leads to the formation of both formic and acetic acids. Carboxylic acid formation increases in the presence of photogenerated hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide, showing that photooxidation could play a key role in the formation of carboxylic acids under atmospherically relevant conditions.

  6. Ultraviolet-induced effects on chloramine and cyanogen chloride formation from chlorination of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Weng, ShihChi; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2013-05-07

    Ultraviolet (UV)-based treatment is commonly used to augment chlorination in swimming pools. However, the effects of combined application of UV254/chlorine on disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation are incompletely defined. To examine this issue, experiments were conducted with amino acids (l-arginine, l-histidine, and glycine) that are representative of those introduced to swimming pools via human body fluids. For each precursor, stepwise experiments were conducted with chlorination and UV254 exposure, with/without post-chlorination. Net formation and decomposition of chloramines and cyanogen chloride (CNCl) were measured for a range of chlorine/precursor (Cl/P) molar ratios and UV254 doses. Substantial production of NH2Cl from l-arginine and l-histidine was observed at Cl/P = 1.0 and 2.0 when post-chlorination was applied to UV254-irradiated samples. These results suggested a mechanism of rapid N-chlorination, followed by cleavage of NH3 by UV254 irradiation. CNCl formation was observed from UV254-irradiated samples of l-arginine and l-histidine when Cl/P = 2.0 and 3.0, as well as from glycine for Cl/P ≤ 1. Structurally related precursor compounds were examined for CNCl formation potential in chlorination/UV experiments. CNCl formation was promoted by UV254 exposure of chlorinated imidazole and guanidine compounds, which suggested that these groups contributed to CNCl formation. The results have implications with respect to the application of chlorine and UV for water treatment in swimming pools and other settings, such as water reuse and advanced oxidation processes.

  7. Uranium potential of the Burro Canyon Formation in western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Burro Canyon Formation of Early Cretaceous age overlies the Morrison Formation (Late Jurassic) and underlies the Dakota Sandstone (Late Cretaceous) over most of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado. It consists mainly of alternating beds of fluvial sandstone and overbank mudstone with sandstone dominating in the lower part of the formation and mudstone in the upper part. At the outcrop, the sandstones in the formation exhibit almost all the characteristics that are considered favorable for the occurrence of sandstone-type uranium deposits, but only a few small deposits have been discovered in the Colorado-Utah area. The major deficiency of the Burro Canyon in these outcrop areas is the absence of a reductant such as carbonaceous debris, humic or humate materials, or pyrite. Reductants were probably removed during a period of extensive oxidation at the time of deposition and during a subsequent erosional episode prior to deposition of the Dakota Sandstone. The formation reaches a lobate, inexactly located eastern margin that extends from near Meeker, Colorado, southward through the Piceance basin to near Aztec, New Mexico, in the northwestern part of the San Juan Basin. Along much of this distance, the formation is in the subsurface and has been penetrated by only a few drill holes. Along this eastern margin, the lobes project eastward where fluvial distributary streams built minor alluvial fans of relatively high-energy deposits out from the main axis of Burro Canyon stream deposition. The lower and distal reaches of these lobes may have survived the period of post depositional erosion and oxidation in a reduced condition because of low relief and the protection of a high water table. If so, the peripheral and distal parts of these lobes may have retained the precipitants necessary to form a uranium deposit. Two of the lobes extend into the southwest margin of the Piceance Basin and are considered the possible location of uranium deposits. Two additional

  8. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Chi-Ping; Lin, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  9. Assessing the Potential for Nitrogen Bubble Formation in Diving Odontocetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    first compartment within which exchange occurs is the blood pool, and assuming that cetacean hematological factors do not inhibit bubble formation...relationship between “bubble-like” cavitary lesions reported in the portal system of some stranding cetaceans , and the accessibility of these vessels...Dorian Houser served as the PI on project and was responsible for facilities coordination, animal welfare issues, ultrasound inspections and blood

  10. Strecker Aldehyde Formation in Wine: New Insights into the Role of Gallic Acid, Glucose, and Metals in Phenylacetaldehyde Formation.

    PubMed

    Monforte, Ana Rita; Martins, Sara I F S; Silva Ferreira, Antonio C

    2017-03-09

    Strecker degradation (SD) leading to the formation of phenylacetaldehyde (PA) was studied in wine systems. New insights were gained by using two full factorial designs focusing on the effects of (1) pH and (2) temperature. In each design of experiments (DoE) three factors, glucose, gallic acid, and metals at two levels (present or absence), were varied while phenylalanine was kept constant. The obtained results gave a clear indication, with statistical significance, that in wine conditions, the SD occurs in the presence of metals preferentially via the phenolic oxidation independent of the temperature (40 or 80 °C). The reaction of the amino acid with the o-quinone formed by the oxidation of the gallic acid seems to be favored when compared with the SD promoted by the reaction with α-dicarbonyls formed by MR between glucose and phenylalanine. In fact, kinetics results showed that the presence of glucose had an inhibitory effect on PA rate of formation. PA formation was 4 times higher in the control wine when compared to the same wine with 10 g/L glucose added. By gallic acid quinone quantitation it is shown that glucose affects directly the concentration of the quinone. decreasing the rate of quinone formation. This highlights the role of sugar in o-quinone concentration and consequently in the impact on Strecker aldehyde formation, a promising new perspective regarding wine shelf-life understanding.

  11. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  12. Observation of nitrous acid (HONO) in Beijing, China: Seasonal variation, nocturnal formation and daytime budget.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Guo, Jia; Wang, Zhangwei; Zhang, Meigen

    2017-02-23

    Seasonal characteristics of atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO) were investigated with high time-resolution field measurements at an urban site of Beijing in four select months (representing four different seasons) from September 2015 to July 2016. The HONO concentrations displayed a pronounced seasonal profile with a maximum in autumn (2.27±1.82ppb) and a minimum in winter (1.05±0.89ppb). Significant diurnal cycles were also observed during the whole campaign. We found that the nighttime build-up of HONO was attributed to the heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on wet surface. The calculated NO2 to HONO conversion frequencies varied from 0.005h(-1) in spring to 0.010h(-1) in summer, with an average value of 0.008h(-1). The seasonality of these conversion frequencies was closely related to the RH levels in different seasons. During daytime, large additional HONO sources were calculated. The noontime additional source was the highest in autumn 3.82ppbh(-1), followed by summer 3.05ppbh(-1), spring 2.63ppbh(-1) and winter 1.30ppbh(-1). Correlation studies between the additional HONO source and related parameters demonstrated that the controlling processes responsible for HONO daytime formation varied in different seasons, and that the photo-enhanced formation on wet surface or the photolysis of adsorbed nitric acid and nitrate could be potential HONO sources in Beijing.

  13. Photochemical reactions of divalent mercury with thioglycolic acid: formation of mercuric sulfide particles.

    PubMed

    Si, Lin; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a key toxic global pollutant. Studies in aquatic environment have suggested that thiols could be important for mercury speciation. Thioglycolic acid has been detected in various natural water systems and used as a model compound to study the complicated interaction between mercury and polyfunctional dissolved organic matter (DOM). We herein presented the first evidence for mercury particle formation during kinetic and product studies on the photochemistry of divalent mercury (Hg(2+)) with thioglycolic acid at near environmental conditions. Mercuric sulfide (HgS) particles formed upon photolysis were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry and select area electron diffraction. Kinetic data were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometry and cold vapour atomic fluorescent spectrometry. The apparent first-order reaction rate constant under our experimental conditions was calculated to be (2.3±0.4)×10(-5) s(-1) at T=296±2 K and pH 4.0. It was found that (89±3)% of the reactants undergo photoreduction to generate elemental mercury (Hg(0)). The effects of ionic strengths, pH and potassium ion were also investigated. The formation of HgS particles pointed to the possible involvement of heterogeneous processes. Our kinetic results indicated the importance of weak binding sites on DOM to Hg in photoreduction of Hg(2+) to Hg(0). The potential implications of our data on environmental mercury transformation were discussed.

  14. Methane formation by oxidation of ascorbic acid using iron minerals and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Frederik; Jugold, Alke; Keppler, Frank

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of methane formation in an oxidative environment has been intensely debated, especially since the discovery of methane generation by living plants. However, recent studies with animal tissue suggested that under specific conditions aerobic methane formation is also possible. Here, we investigated the generation of methane in an abiotic model system using bioavailable substances. We show formation of methane in a highly oxidative media, using ascorbic acid, ferrihydrite and hydrogen peroxide as reagents. Methane production was shown to be related to reagent ratio, reaction volume and pH. A 2:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ascorbic acid, catalytic amounts of ferrihydrite and acidic conditions (pH 3) enhanced formation of methane. We further show that gaseous oxygen has a strong influence with higher levels found to inhibit methane formation. This study is a first step towards providing an insight for the reaction mechanism of methane formation that would be applicable to aerobic environments.

  15. Oleic Acid: Natural variation and potential enhancement in oilseed crops.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid is a monounsaturated omega 9 fatty acid (MUFA, C18:1) which can be found in various plant lipids and animal fats. Unlike omega 3 (a-linolenic acid, C18:3) and omega 6 (linoleic acid, C18:2) fatty acids which are essential because they cannot be synthesized by humans and must be obtained f...

  16. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  17. [Investigation on formation mechanism of secologanic acid sulfonates in sulfur-fumigated buds of Lonicera japonica].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ai-Li; Gao, Hui-Min; Chen, Liang-Mian; Zhang, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2014-05-01

    To investigate formation mechanism of secologanic acid sulfonates in sulfur-fumigated buds of Lonicera japonica, secologanic acid was enriched and purified from the sun-dried buds of L. japonica by various column chromatography on macroporus resin HPD-100, silica gel and ODS. The stimulation experiments of sulfur-fumigation process were carried out using secologanic acid reacted with SO2 in the aqueous solution. The reaction mechanism could be involved in the esterification or addition reaction. The present investigation provides substantial evidences for interpreting formation pathway of secologanic acid sulfonates in sulfur-fumigated buds of L. japonica.

  18. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eric H; Atreya, Sushil K; Kaiser, Ralf I; Mahaffy, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4(-)). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 10(7) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  19. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 107 molecules cm-2 s-1 sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  20. Optimized Jasmonic Acid Production by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Reveals Formation of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Felipe; Haroth, Sven; Feussner, Kirstin; Meldau, Dorothea; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ischebeck, Till; Brodhun, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is a plant hormone that can be produced by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae via submerged fermentation. From a biotechnological perspective jasmonic acid is a valuable feedstock as its derivatives serve as important ingredients in different cosmetic products and in the future it may be used for pharmaceutical applications. The objective of this work was to improve the production of jasmonic acid by L. theobromae strain 2334. We observed that jasmonic acid formation is dependent on the culture volume. Moreover, cultures grown in medium containing potassium nitrate as nitrogen source produced higher amounts of jasmonic acid than analogous cultures supplemented with ammonium nitrate. When cultivated under optimal conditions for jasmonic acid production, L. theobromae secreted several secondary metabolites known from plants into the medium. Among those we found 3-oxo-2-(pent-2-enyl)-cyclopentane-1-butanoic acid (OPC-4) and hydroxy-jasmonic acid derivatives, respectively, suggesting that fungal jasmonate metabolism may involve similar reaction steps as that of plants. To characterize fungal growth and jasmonic acid-formation, we established a mathematical model describing both processes. This model may form the basis of industrial upscaling attempts. Importantly, it showed that jasmonic acid-formation is not associated to fungal growth. Therefore, this finding suggests that jasmonic acid, despite its enormous amount being produced upon fungal development, serves merely as secondary metabolite. PMID:27907207

  1. Polyunsaturated lysophosphatidic acid as a potential asthma biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Steven J; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid mediator in biological fluids and tissues, is generated mainly by autotaxin that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine to LPA and choline. Total LPA levels are increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from asthmatic lung, and are strongly induced following subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen in subjects with allergic asthma. Polyunsaturated molecular species of LPA (C22:5 and C22:6) are selectively synthesized in the airways of asthma subjects following allergen challenge and in mouse models of allergic airway inflammation, having been identified and quantified by LC/MS/MS lipidomics. This review discusses current knowledge of LPA production in asthmatic lung and the potential utility of polyunsaturated LPA molecular species as novel biomarkers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate of asthma subjects. PMID:26808693

  2. Potential of lactic acid bacteria in aflatoxin risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, Sara H; Joutsjoki, Vesa; Korhonen, Hannu J

    2015-08-17

    Aflatoxins (AF) are ubiquitous mycotoxins contaminating food and feed. Consumption of contaminated food and feed can cause a severe health risk to humans and animals. A novel biological method could reduce the health risks of aflatoxins through inhibiting mold growth and binding aflatoxins. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in fermented food production. LAB are known to inhibit mold growth and, to some extent, to bind aflatoxins in different matrices. Reduced mold growth and aflatoxin production may be caused by competition for nutrients between bacterial cells and fungi. Most likely, binding of aflatoxins depends on environmental conditions and is strain-specific. Killed bacteria cells possess consistently better binding abilities for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) than viable cells. Lactobacilli especially are relatively well studied and provide noticeable possibilities in binding of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in food. It seems that binding is reversible and that bound aflatoxins are released later on (Haskard et al., 2001; Peltonen et al., 2001). This literature review suggests that novel biological methods, such as lactic acid bacteria, show potential in mitigating toxic effects of aflatoxins in food and feed.

  3. Formation of hierarchical molecular assemblies from poly(oxypropylene)-segmented amido acids under AFM tapping.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Chi-He

    2007-04-10

    Molecular self-aligning of amphiphilic molecules into bundles with a constant width of 7-13 nm was observed under tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The requisite amphiphile, a poly(oxypropylene)-trimellitic amido acid sodium salt, is constituted of a symmetric amido acid structure with potential noncovalent forces of ionic charges, hydrogen bonds, pi-pi aromatic stacking, and hydrophobic interactions for intermolecular interaction. The amphiphiles are able to self-align into orderly hierarchical assemblies after simply being dissolved in water and dried under spin-coated evaporation. Under the TM-AFM tapping process, the bundles increased their length from an initial 20 to 600 nm. A sequential TM-AFM scanning and interval heating process was designed to probe the morphological transformations from the molecular bundles to lengthy strips (nearly micrometer scale) and to columns (with 5-7 nm spacing between the parallel strips). The formation of hierarchical arrays via molecular stretching, aligning, and connecting to each other was simultaneously observed and accelerated under the TM-AFM vibration energy. The molecular self-alignment caused by vibrations is envisioned to be a potential methodology for manipulating molecules into assembled templates, sensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Effect of oxidoreduction potential on aroma biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria in nonfat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Martin, F; Cachon, R; Pernin, K; De Coninck, J; Gervais, P; Guichard, E; Cayot, N

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidoreduction potential (Eh) on the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria in non-fat yogurt. The study was done with yogurts fermented by Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The Eh was modified by the application of different gaseous conditions (air, nitrogen, and nitrogen/hydrogen). Acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, diacetyl, and pentane-2,3-dione, as the major endogenous odorant compounds of yogurt, were chosen as tracers for the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria. Oxidative conditions favored the production of acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, and diketones (diacetyl and pentane-2,3-dione). The Eh of the medium influences aroma production in yogurt by modifying the metabolic pathways of Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus. The use of Eh as a control parameter during yogurt production could permit the control of aroma formation.

  5. Perfluorinated acids in Arctic snow: new evidence for atmospheric formation.

    PubMed

    Young, Cora J; Furdui, Vasile I; Franklin, James; Koerner, Roy M; Muir, Derek C G; Mabury, Scott A

    2007-05-15

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) are ubiquitously found in water and biota, including remote regions such as the High Arctic. Under environmental conditions, PFAs exist mainly as anions and are not expected to be subject to long-range atmospheric transport in the gas phase. Fluorinated telomer alcohols (FTOHs) are volatile and can be atmospherically oxidized to form perfluorocarboxylic acids. Analogously, fluorosulfamido alcohols can be oxidized to form perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). High Arctic ice caps experience contamination solely from atmospheric sources. By examining concentrations of PFAs in ice cap samples, it is possible to determine atmospheric fluxes to the Arctic. Ice samples were collected from high Arctic ice caps in the spring of 2005 and 2006. Samples were concentrated using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by LC-MS-MS. PFAs were observed in all samples, dating from 1996 to 2005. Concentrations were in the low-mid pg L(-1) range and exhibited seasonality, with maximum concentrations in the spring-summer. The presence of perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA) on the ice cap was indicative of atmospheric oxidation as a source. Ratios of PFAs to sodium concentrations were highly variable, signifying PFA concentrations on the ice cap were unrelated to marine chemistry. Fluxes of the PFAs were estimated to the area north of 65 degrees N for the 2005 season, which ranged from 114 to 587 kg year(-1) for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), 73 to 860 kg year(-1) for perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), 16 to 84 kg year(-1) for PFDA, 26 to 62 kg year(-1) for PFUnA, and 18 to 48 kg year(-1) for PFOS. The PFOA and PFNA fluxes agreed with FTOH modeling estimations. A decrease in PFOS concentrations through time was observed, suggesting a fast response to changes in production. These data suggest that atmospheric oxidation of volatile precursors is a primary source of PFAs to the Arctic.

  6. Barrier formation: potential molecular mechanism of enamel fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Lyaruu, D M; Medina, J F; Sarvide, S; Bervoets, T J M; Everts, V; Denbesten, P; Smith, C E; Bronckers, A L J J

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl(-) for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b (-/-) mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b(-/-) mice and was strongly correlated with Cl(-). Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl(-) levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins.

  7. Formation of the imidazolides of dinucleotides under potentially prebiotic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, H. L.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Imidazolides of dinucleotides such as ImpApA can be formed from the corresponding dinucleotides in a two-stage process, which gives up to 15% yields under potentially prebiotic conditions. First a solution of the dinucleotide and sodium trimetaphosphate is dried out at constant temperature and humidity. This produces polyphosphates such as p(n)ApA in excellent yield (greater than or equal to 80%). The products are dissolved in water, imidazole is added, and the solution is dried out again. This yields the 5'-phosphorimidazolides.

  8. The standard enthalpies of formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid and its aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The energy of combustion of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (CMAA) was determined by bomb calorimetry in oxygen. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were calculated. The heat effects of solution of crystalline CMAA in water and a solution of sodium hydroxide were measured at 298.15 K by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of CMAA and its dissociation products in aqueous solution were determined.

  9. On the Formation of Benzoic Acid and Higher Order Benzene Carboxylic Acids in Interstellar Model Ices grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Brandon M.; Saito, Sean E. J.; Turner, Andrew M.; Chakravarty, Harish K.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-11-01

    With a binary ice mixture of benzene (C6H6) and carbon dioxide (CO2) at 10 K under contamination-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions, the formation of benzene carboxylic acids in interstellar ice grains was studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to probe for the formation of new species during the chemical processing of the ice mixture and during the following temperature-programmed desorption. Newly formed benzene carboxylic acid species, i.e., benzoic acid, as well as meta- and para-benzene dicarboxylic acid, were assigned using newly emerging bands in the infrared spectrum; a reaction mechanism, along with rate constants, was proposed utilizing the kinetic fitting of the coupled differential equations.

  10. Formation of Organic Tracers for Isoprene SOA under Acidic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical compositions of a series of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples, formed by irradiating mixtures of isoprene and NO in a smog chamber in the absence or presence of acidic aerosols, were analyzed using derivatization-based GC-MS methods. In addition to the known is...

  11. The effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yamin; Ma, Jimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid, exists in substantial (1-5%) amounts in edible plant seeds. In this study the effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide were investigated. Both phytic acid and phosphate enhanced browning in glucose/β-alanine system, but phytic acid was less effective than phosphate. Higher pH favoured the catalytic activities for both of them. The influence of the types of sugar and amino acid on the reaction was also examined. Browning was suppressed by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions, but an additive effect was observed for ferrous ions and phytic acid in glucose/β-alanine solution at pH 8.0. Both phytic acid and phosphate promoted the polymerisation of the reaction intermediates. The kinetics of Maillard reaction was first-ordered reaction in the presence of phytic acid. Phytic acid was less effective than phosphate in the formation of acrylamide. When potato slices were treated with sodium phytate and calcium chloride successively, the formation of acrylamide was greatly suppressed.

  12. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  14. Chiral BINOL-derived phosphoric acids: privileged Brønsted acid organocatalysts for C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Zamfir, Alexandru; Schenker, Sebastian; Freund, Matthias; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2010-12-07

    BINOL-derived phosphoric acids have emerged during the last five years as powerful chiral Brønsted acid catalysts in many enantioselective processes. The most successful transformations carried out with chiral BINOL phosphates include C-C bond formation reactions. The recent advances have been reviewed in this article with a focus being placed on hydrocyanations, aldol-type, Mannich, Friedel-Crafts, aza-ene-type, Diels-Alder, as well as cascade and multi-component reactions.

  15. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  16. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  17. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  18. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  19. 37 CFR 1.822 - Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. 1.822 Section 1.822 Patents, Trademarks, and... Amino Acid Sequences § 1.822 Symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data. (a) The symbols and format to be used for nucleotide and/or amino acid sequence data...

  20. SOA Formation Potential of Emissions from Soil and Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Vanderschelden, G. S.; Wen, M.; Cobos, D. R.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources exceed all anthropogenic sources combined. VOCs participate in oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere and impact the concentrations of ozone and particulate material. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is particularly complex and is frequently underestimated using state-of-the-art modeling techniques. We present findings that suggest emissions of important SOA precursors from soil and leaf litter are higher than current inventories would suggest, particularly under conditions typical of Fall and Spring. Soil and leaf litter samples were collected at Big Meadow Creek from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. The dominant tree species in this area of the forest are ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and western larch. Samples were transported to the laboratory and housed within a 0.9 cubic meter Teflon dynamic chamber where VOC emissions were continuously monitored with a GC-FID-MS and PTR-MS. Aerosol was generated from soil and leaf litter emissions by pumping the emissions into a 7 cubic meter Teflon aerosol growth chamber where they were oxidized with ozone in the absence of light. The evolution of particle microphysical and chemical characteristics was monitored over the following eight hours. Particle size distribution and chemical composition were measured with a SMPS and HR-ToF-AMS respectively. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates up to 283 micrograms carbon per meter squared per hour. The dominant monoterpenes emitted were beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, and delta-3-carene in descending order. The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and alpha-pinene. Measured soil/litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest that during fall and spring when tree emissions are lower, monoterpene emissions within forests may be

  1. Electron Donor Potential of Eastern North Dakota Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Klapperich, R. J.; Korom, S. F.

    2007-12-01

    We have a network of 16 in situ mesocosms (ISMs) used to study aquifer denitrification at 9 sites in North Dakota and Minnesota. The site in the Elk Valley aquifer in northeastern North Dakota has the highest denitrification rates and the greatest concentration of electron donors (organic carbon ~0.4%, pyrite as S ~0.4%, and ferrous iron ~0.3%) in the sediments. In contrast, denitrification rates at our other ISM sites are lower (or even below detection), as are the electron donor concentrations in the sediments. Knowing that the sediments at all of our ISM sites were placed as outwash during the last Wisconsinan glaciation (~12ka), we wonder what caused the variation in electron donor supplies in our aquifers. It has been suggested that variations is the electron donor concentrations in the various Late Cretaceous shale strata exposed during glaciation may help explain the variation in electron donor concentrations in overlying aquifers formed nearby. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amount of electron donors available in these bedrock units. Bedrock samples (n = 39) from 20 sites in eastern North Dakota were obtained by drilling during the summer of 2006 in conjunction with the North Dakota State Water Commission. Samples were frozen before analysis for bulk mineralogical content by X-ray diffraction, organic carbon, pyrite as inorganic S, and ferrous iron contents. It was hypothesized that the Pierre Shale would have the highest donor concentration, but it appears that other formations, such as the Carlile and Greenhorn contain higher concentrations of electron donors. Organic carbon concentrations in the Pierre (< 0.01% to 1.0%) are relatively low while concentrations in the Carlile (3.5% - 6.5%) and Greenhorn (~8.5%) are significantly higher. Pyrite as inorganic S concentrations in the Pierre (< 0.01% to 0.2%), Carlile (0.3% - 0.5%), and Greenhorn (~0.5%) are similarly distributed. In the future, it may be possible to create a qualitative index

  2. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site in June-July of 2010 during CalNex and a site in an oil and gas producing region in January-February of 2013 during UBWOS 2013 will be discussed. Although the VOC compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 ppb in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 8%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Inclusion of recent findings on additional precursors and formation pathways of formic acid in the box model increases modeled formic acid concentrations for UBWOS 2013 and CalNex by a factor of 6.4 and 4.5, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 21 and 47% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be -7 and 0-6% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that air-snow exchange processes and morning fog events may also contribute to ambient formic acid concentrations during UBWOS 2013 (∼20% in total). In total, 50-57% in UBWOS 2013 and 48-53% in CalNex of secondary formation of formic acid remains unexplained. More work on formic acid formation pathways is needed to reduce the uncertainties in the sources and budget of formic

  3. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  4. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp.

  5. Lipid and fatty acid composition of Gluconobacter oxydans before and after intracytoplasmic membrane formation.

    PubMed Central

    Heefner, D L; Claus, G W

    1978-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans differentiates by forming quantities of intracytoplasmic membranes at the end of exponential growth, and this formation occurs concurrently with a 60% increase in cellular lipid. The present study was initiated to determine whether this newly synthesized lipid differed from that extracted before intracytoplasmic membrane synthesis. Undifferentiated exponential-phase cells were found to contain 30% phosphatidylcholine, 27.1% caridolipin, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 12.5% phosphatidylglycerol, 0.4% phosphatidic acid, 0.2% phosphatidylserine, and four additional unidentified lipids totaling less than 5%. The only change detected after formation of intracytoplasmic membranes was a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a corresponding increase in phosphatidylcholine. An examination of lipid hydrolysates revealed 11 different fatty acids in the lipids from each cell type. Hexadecanoic acid and monounsaturated octadecenoic accounted for more than 75% of the total fatty acids for both cell types. Proportional changes were noted in all fatty acids except octadecenoate. Anteiso-pentadecanoate comprised less than 1% of the fatty acids from undifferentiated cells but more than 13% of the total fatty acids from cells containing intracytoplasmic membranes. These results suggest that anteiso-pentadecanoate formation closely parallels the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes. Increased concentrations of this fatty acid may contribute to the fluidity necessary for plasma membrane convolution during intracytoplasmic membrane development. PMID:649571

  6. Acid Gradient across Plasma Membrane Can Drive Phosphate Bond Synthesis in Cancer Cells: Acidic Tumor Milieu as a Potential Energy Source

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical formation of iron oxidation products on steel immersed in sour acid media.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Espejel, Antonio; Palomar-Pardavé, Manuel; Cabrera-Sierra, Román; Romero-Romo, Mario; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Arce-Estrada, Elsa M

    2011-03-03

    From electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, potential steps, and EIS), XRD, and SEM-EDX, the kinetics and mechanism of anodic film formation applying anodic potential steps on steel immersed in sour acid media was determined. It was found, from a thermodynamic analysis, based on equilibrium phase diagrams of the system considered in this work, that iron oxidation may produce different new solid phases, depending on the applied potential, the first being the iron oxidation associated with formation of FeS((c)) species, which in turn can be reoxidized to FeS(2(c)) or even to Fe(2)O(3(c)) at higher potential values. From analysis of the corresponding experimental potentiostatic current density transients, it was concluded that the electrochemical anodic film formation involves an E(1)CE(2) mechanism, whereby the first of the two simultaneous processes were the Fe electrochemical oxidation (E(1)) followed by FeS precipitation (C) that occurs by 3D nucleation and growth limited by mass transfer reaction and FeS oxidation (E(2)) forming a mix of different stoichiometry iron sulphides and oxides. From EIS measurements, it was revealed that the anodic film's charge transfer resistance diminishes as the potential applied for its formation becomes more anodic, thus behaving poorly against corrosion.

  8. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  9. Comparison of chlorination and chloramination in carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection byproduct formation potentials with prolonged contact time.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tokuhara, Shunsuke; Murakami, Michio; Kosaka, Koji; Oguma, Kumiko; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Due to decreasing water demands in Japan, hydraulic retention times of water in piped supply systems has been extended, resulting in a longer contact time with disinfectants. However, the effects of extended contact time on the formation of various disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including carbonaceous DBPs such as trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA), and nitrogenous DBPs such as nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and nitrosomorpholine (NMor), have not yet been investigated in detail. Herein, we compared the formation of these DBPs by chlorination and chloramination for five water samples collected from rivers and a dam in Japan, all of which represent municipal water supply sources. Water samples were treated by either filtration or a combination of coagulation and filtration. Treated samples were subjected to a DBP formation potential test by either chlorine or chloramine for contact times of 1 day or 4 days. Four THM species, nine HAA species, NDMA, and NMor were measured by GC-ECD or UPLC-MS/MS. Lifetime cancer risk was calculated based on the Integrated Risk Information System unit risk information. The experiment and analysis focused on (i) prolonged contact time from 1 day to 4 days, (ii) reduction efficiency by conventional treatment, (iii) correlations between DBP formation potentials and water quality parameters, and (iv) the contribution of each species to total risk. With an increased contact time from 1 day to 4 days, THM formation increased to 420% by chloramination. Coagulation-filtration treatment showed that brominated species in THMs are less likely to be reduced. With the highest unit risk among THM species, dibromochloromethane (DBCM) showed a high correlation with bromine, but not with organic matter parameters. NDMA contributed to lifetime cancer risk. The THM formation pathway should be revisited in terms of chloramination and bromine incorporation. It is also recommended to investigate nitrosamine formation potential by

  10. Comparison of the disinfection by-product formation potential of treated waters exposed to chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Bougeard, Cynthia M M; Goslan, Emma H; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A

    2010-02-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from chlorination and monochloramination of treated drinking waters was determined. Samples were collected after treatment at 11 water treatment works but before exposure to chlorine or monochloramine. Formation potential tests were carried out to determine the DBPs formed by chlorination and monochloramination. DBPs measured were trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), halonitromethanes (HNMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloaldehydes (HAs), haloketones (HKs) and iodo-THMs (i-THMs). All waters had the potential to form significant levels of all the DBPs measured. Compared to chlorine, monochloramination generally resulted in lower concentrations of DBPs with the exception of 1,1-dichloropropanone. The concentrations of THMs correlated well with the HAAs formed. The impact of bromine on the speciation of the DBPs was determined. The literature findings that higher bromide levels lead to higher concentrations of brominated DBPS were confirmed.

  11. On the origin of the electrostatic surface potential of Aspergillus niger spores in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Wargenau, Andreas; Fleissner, André; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Rohde, Manfred; Kampen, Ingo; Kwade, Arno

    2011-12-01

    The electrostatic surface potential of fungal spores is generally regarded as potentially influencing spore aggregation and pellet formation in submerged cultures of filamentous fungi. Spores of Aspergillus niger are typically characterized by negative zeta potentials over a wide range of pH values. In this study, this particular behavior is ascribed to the presence of an extensive melanin coating. It is proposed on the basis of zeta potential and pigment extraction experiments that this outermost layer affects the pH-dependent surface potential in two manners: (i) by the addition of negative charges to the spore surface and (ii) by the pH-dependent release of melanin pigment. Chemical analyses revealed that deprotonation of melanin-bound carboxyl groups is most probably responsible for pigment release under acidic conditions. These findings were incorporated into a simple model which has the ability to qualitatively explain the results of zeta potential experiments and, moreover, to provide the basis for quantitative investigations on the role of electrostatics in spore aggregation.

  12. Toward the formation of alkylphosphonic acids in phosphine ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Phosphorus is one of the elemental building blocks of life on Earth and is important for information storage (RNA/DNA), energy transfer (ATP), cell membranes (phospholipids), and structure (bones & teeth). Due to the poor bioavailability of highly oxidized phosphorus (P(V)) found in ubiquitous phosphate (PO43-) minerals, reduced oxidation state (P(III)) compounds have been proposed as a phosphorus source for early life on Earth. Among these, the alkylphosphonic acids, which are the only phosphorus-containing organic compounds discovered in the Murchison meteorite, are a suggested exogenous source of prebiotic phosphorus. Phosphine (PH3) is a known component of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and the confirmation of circumstellar phosphine in the carbon-rich envelop of IRC +10216 along with the recent detection of phosphorus in the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko provide an additional foundation for studying extraterrestrial phosphorus chemistry and the origins of the alkylphosphonic acids. In the present study, reactions of phosphine ices with water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS), and most notably, reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry using tunable photoionization (PI-ReTOF-MS). Experiments were conducted at ultra-high vacuum pressures and cryogenic temperatures to better understand reaction pathways and products of phosphorus-containing compounds under icy conditions found in comets or the interstellar medium. The results of this study can provide support to the hypothesis that the alkylphosphonic acids were formed from interstellar phosphine and incorporated into meteorites such as Murchison.

  13. Fatty acids profiling reveals potential candidate markers of semen quality.

    PubMed

    Zerbinati, C; Caponecchia, L; Rago, R; Leoncini, E; Bottaccioli, A G; Ciacciarelli, M; Pacelli, A; Salacone, P; Sebastianelli, A; Pastore, A; Palleschi, G; Boccia, S; Carbone, A; Iuliano, L

    2016-11-01

    Previous reports showed altered fatty acid content in subjects with altered sperm parameters compared to normozoospermic individuals. However, these studies focused on a limited number of fatty acids, included a short number of subjects and results varied widely. We conducted a case-control study involving 155 patients allocated into four groups, including normozoospermia (n = 33), oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (n = 32), asthenozoospermia (n = 25), and varicocoele (n = 44). Fatty acid profiling, including 30 species, was analyzed by a validated gas chromatography (GC) method on the whole seminal fluid sample. Multinomial logistic regression modeling was used to identify the associations between fatty acids and the four groups. Specimens from 15 normozoospermic subjects were also analyzed for fatty acids content in the seminal plasma and spermatozoa to study the distribution in the two compartments. Fatty acids lipidome varied markedly between the four groups. Multinomial logistic regression modeling revealed that high levels of palmitic acid, behenic acid, oleic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) confer a low risk to stay out of the normozoospermic group. In the whole population, seminal fluid stearic acid was negatively correlated (r = -0.53), and DHA was positively correlated (r = 0.65) with sperm motility. Some fatty acids were preferentially accumulated in spermatozoa and the highest difference was observed for DHA, which was 6.2 times higher in spermatozoa than in seminal plasma. The results of this study highlight complete fatty acids profile in patients with different semen parameters. Given the easy-to-follow and rapid method of analysis, fatty acid profiling by GC method can be used for therapeutic purposes and to measure compliance in infertility trials using fatty acids supplements.

  14. Thermodynamics of sodium dodecyl sulphate-salicylic acid based micellar systems and their potential use in fruits postharvest.

    PubMed

    Cid, A; Morales, J; Mejuto, J C; Briz-Cid, N; Rial-Otero, R; Simal-Gándara, J

    2014-05-15

    Micellar systems have excellent food applications due to their capability to solubilise a large range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances. In this work, the mixed micelle formation between the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and the phenolic acid salicylic acid have been studied at several temperatures in aqueous solution. The critical micelle concentration and the micellization degree were determined by conductometric techniques and the experimental data used to calculate several useful thermodynamic parameters, like standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy of micelle formation. Salicylic acid helps the micellization of SDS, both by increasing the additive concentration at a constant temperature and by increasing temperature at a constant concentration of additive. The formation of micelles of SDS in the presence of salicylic acid was a thermodynamically spontaneous process, and is also entropically controlled. Salicylic acid plays the role of a stabilizer, and gives a pathway to control the three-dimensional water matrix structure. The driving force of the micellization process is provided by the hydrophobic interactions. The isostructural temperature was found to be 307.5 K for the mixed micellar system. This article explores the use of SDS-salicylic acid based micellar systems for their potential use in fruits postharvest.

  15. Astatine standard redox potentials and speciation in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Champion, J; Alliot, C; Renault, E; Mokili, B M; Chérel, M; Galland, N; Montavon, G

    2010-01-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to define astatine (At) speciation in acidic aqueous solution and to answer the two main questions raised from literature data: does At(0) exist in aqueous solution and what is the chemical form of At(+III), if it exists. The experimental approach considers that a given species is characterized by its distribution coefficient (D) experimentally determined in a biphasic system. The change in speciation arising from a change in experimental conditions is observed by a change in D value. The theoretical approach involves quasi-relativistic quantum chemistry calculations. The results show that At at the oxidation state 0 cannot exist in aqueous solution. The three oxidation states present in the range of water stability are At(-I), At(+I), and At(+III) and exist as At(-), At(+), and AtO(+), respectively, in the 1-2 pH range. The standard redox potentials of the At(+)/At(-) and AtO(+)/At(+) couples have been determined, the respective values being 0.36 +/- 0.01 and 0.74 +/- 0.01 V vs NHE.

  16. Dietary potential renal Acid load in venezuelan children.

    PubMed

    López-Sayers, Mayerling; Bernal, Jennifer; López, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    Objetivo: Determinar y analizar la carga acida potencial renal de la dieta (Potential Renal Acid Load PRAL) y el patron de alimentacion de ninos entre 1 a 6 anos aparentemente sanos. Métodos: Se seleccionaron segun conveniencia a padres de 52 ninos asistentes a una consulta de ninos sanos. La calidad de la dieta y el patron de alimentacion se evaluo mediante un recordatorio de 24 horas y un cuestionario de frecuencia de alimentos. Se calculo la ingesta de macronutrientes y grupos de alimentos, como carnes, lacteos, frutas y verduras. La ingesta de nutrientes se comparo con las recomendaciones de energia y nutrientes. El PRAL se determino segun el metodo de Remer y Manz, para determinar la carga acida de la dieta. Se aplico estadistica descriptiva y correlaciones entre el PRAL, nutrientes y grupos de alimentos. Resultados: La ingesta de proteinas, de leche y de carnes fue elevada, mientras que la ingesta de rutas y hortalizas fue baja. El PRAL fue positivo en 92% de los ninos, se asocio con mayor ingesta de energia, proteinas, grasas, carne y lacteos. La ingesta de proteinas fue > 2,5 g/kg/ dia en 46,2% de los ninos. Los grupos de alimentos con mayor desequilibrio debido a exceso fueron la carne y los productos lacteos, mientras que por deficit fue el grupo de frutas y hortalizas. Conclusión: La dieta se caracteriza por una elevada carga de acido o PRAL, lo que aumenta el riesgo de acidosis sistemica y sus consecuencias metabolicas.

  17. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4

  18. Inhibition of Gallic Acid on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Tang, Ruihua; Liu, Liu; Shi, Junling; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for biofilm inhibition are becoming highly necessary because of the concerns to synthetic additives. As gallic acid (GA) is a hydrolysated natural product of tannin in Chinese gall, this research studied the effects of GA on the growth and biofilm formation of bacteria (Escherichia coli [Gram-negative] and Streptococcus mutans [Gram-positive]) under different conditions, such as nutrient levels, temperatures (25 and 37 °C) and incubation times (24 and 48 h). The minimum antimicrobial concentration of GA against the two pathogenic organisms was determined as 8 mg/mL. GA significantly affected the growth curves of both test strains at 25 and 37 °C. The nutrient level, temperature, and treatment time influenced the inhibition activity of GA on both growth and biofim formation of tested pathogens. The inhibition effect of GA on biofilm could be due to other factors in addition to the antibacterial effect. Overall, GA was most effective against cultures incubated at 37 °C for 24 h and at 25 °C for 48 h in various concentrations of nutrients and in vegetable wash waters, which indicated the potential of GA as emergent sources of biofilm control products.

  19. Divacancy binding energy, formation energy and surface energy of BCC transition metals using MEAM potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uniyal, Shweta; Chand, Manesh; Joshi, Subodh; Semalty, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    The modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential parameters have been employed to calculate the unrelaxed divacancy formation energy, binding energy and surface energies for low index planes in bcc transition metals. The calculated results of divacancy binding energy and vacancy formation energy compare well with experimental and other available calculated results.

  20. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  1. Antimicrobial potential of bioconverted products of omega-3 fatty acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioconverted omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (bEPA) and docosahexanoic acid (bDHA), obtained from the microbial conversion of non-bioconverted eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 were evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. bEPA and bDHA at 5 µl/...

  2. D-Amino acids inhibit biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis strains from ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Peréz, Miriam L; Diaz-Cedillo, Francisco; Ibarra, J Antonio; Torales-Cardeña, Azael; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sandra; Jan-Roblero, Janet; Cancino-Diaz, Mario E; Cancino-Diaz, Juan C

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm formation on medical and surgical devices is a major virulence determinant for Staphylococcus epidermidis. The bacterium S. epidermidis is able to produce biofilms on biotic and abiotic surfaces and is the cause of ocular infection (OI). Recent studies have shown that d-amino acids inhibit and disrupt biofilm formation in the prototype strains Bacillus subtilis NCBI3610 and Staphylococcus aureus SCO1. The effect of d-amino acids on S. epidermidis biofilm formation has yet to be tested for clinical or commensal isolates. S. epidermidis strains isolated from healthy skin (n = 3), conjunctiva (n = 9) and OI (n = 19) were treated with d-Leu, d-Tyr, d-Pro, d-Phe, d-Met or d-Ala and tested for biofilm formation. The presence of d-amino acids during biofilm formation resulted in a variety of patterns. Some strains were sensitive to all amino acids tested, while others were sensitive to one or more, and one strain was resistant to all of them when added individually; in this way d-Met inhibited most of the strains (26/31), followed by d-Phe (21/31). Additionally, the use of d-Met inhibited biofilm formation on a contact lens. The use of l-isomers caused no defect in biofilm formation in all strains tested. In contrast, when biofilms were already formed d-Met, d-Phe and d-Pro were able to disrupt it. In summary, here we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of d-amino acids on biofilm formation in S. epidermidis. Moreover, we showed, for the first time, that S. epidermidis clinical strains have a different sensitivity to these compounds during biofilm formation.

  3. Formation of mutagens following chlorination of humic acid. A model for mutagen formation during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Meier, J R; Lingg, R D; Bull, R J

    1983-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination of humic acids results in the formation of compounds with direct-acting mutagenic activity in the Ames/Salmonella plate assay for tester strains TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA1537 and TA1538. The addition of a rat-liver microsomal fraction (S9) plus cofactors causes a substantial decrease of activity, the extent of which is tester strain dependent. The non-chlorinated humic acids are not mutagenic either in the presence or absence of S9. Formation of mutagenic activity and of total organic halogen (TOX) is linearly related to humic concentration in the range of 0.2-1.6 mg/ml total organic carbon (TOC), and to chlorine concentration in the range of 0.1-1.0 chlorine equivalents per mole of carbon. The mutagenic activity is due predominantly to non-volatile compounds. Mutagenic activity is also detectable, after sample concentration by lyophilization, upon chlorination at a humic acid level of 0.02 mg/ml TOC. The specific mutagenic activities (per mg TOX), and also the degree of chlorine incorporation into humic acid, at 0.02 mg/ml TOC are similar to those present after chlorination at 1 mg/ml TOC. Production of mutagens is greatly dependent on the chlorination pH, with a pattern of decreasing mutagenic activity with increasing pH. This order of activity can be at least partially explained by the alkali liability of the compounds. Chlorination of commercial humic acids is proposed as a model for examination of mutagen formation during water chlorination.

  4. Influence of amine structural characteristics on N-nitrosamine formation potential relevant to postcombustion CO2 capture systems.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Mitch, William A

    2013-11-19

    Concerns have arisen for the possible contamination of air or drinking water supplies downwind of amine-based CO2 capture facilities by potentially carcinogenic N-nitrosamines formed from reactions between flue gas NOx and amine solvents. This study evaluated the influence of amine structure on the potential to form total N-nitrosamines within the absorber and washwater units of a laboratory-scale CO2 capture reactor, and in the solvent after a pressure-cooker treatment as a mimic of desorber conditions. Among 16 amines representing 3 amine classes (alkanolamines, straight-chain and cyclic diamines, and amino acids), the order of the amine was the primary determinant of total N-nitrosamine formation in the absorber unit, with total N-nitrosamine formation in the order: secondary amines ≈ tertiary amines ≫ primary amines. Similar results were observed upon pressure-cooker treatment, due to reactions between nitrite and amines at high temperature. For secondary and tertiary amines, total N-nitrosamine formation under these desorber-like conditions appeared to be more important than in the absorber, but for primary amines, significant formation of total N-nitrosamines was only observed in the absorber. For diamines and amino acids, total N-nitrosamine accumulation rates in washwaters were lowest for primary amines. For alkanolamines, however, total N-nitrosamine accumulation in the washwater was similar regardless of alkanolamine order, due to the combined effects of amine reactivity toward nitrosation and amine volatility. While total N-nitrosamine accumulation rates in washwaters were generally 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than in the absorber, they were comparable to absorber rates for several primary amines. Decarboxylation of the amino acid sarcosine resulted in the accumulation of significant concentrations of N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrodimethylamine in the washwater.

  5. Formation of linear polyenes in poly(vinyl alcohol) films catalyzed by phosphotungstic acid, aluminum chloride, and hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Malyi, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of linear polyenes-(CH=CH)n-via acid-catalyzed thermal dehydration of polyvinyl alcohol in 9- to 40-µm-thick films of this polymer containing hydrochloric acid, aluminum chloride, and phosphotungstic acid as dehydration catalysts was studied by electronic absorption spectroscopy. The concentration of long-chain ( n ≥ 8) polyenes in films containing phosphotungstic acid is found to monotonically increase with the duration of thermal treatment of films, although the kinetics of this process is independent of film thickness. In films containing hydrochloric acid and aluminum chloride, the formation rate of polyenes with n ≥ 8 rapidly drops as film thickness decreases and the annealing time increases. As a result, at a film thickness of less than 10-12 µm, long-chain polyenes are not formed at all in these films no matter how long thermal duration is. The reason for this behavior is that hydrochloric acid catalyzing polymer dehydration in these films evaporates from the films during thermal treatment, the evaporation rate inversely depending on film thickness.

  6. Abuse and therapeutic potential of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Galloway, G P; Frederick-Osborne, S L; Seymour, R; Contini, S E; Smith, D E

    2000-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxbutyric acid is a compound found in mammalian brain that is structurally related to the neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid effects dopaminergic systems in the brain and may be a neurotransmitter. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid was first reported as a drug of abuse in 1990 and continues to be abused by bodybuilders, participants of "rave" dance parties, and polydrug abusers. Physical dependence can develop after prolonged, high-dose use, and overdoses have been widely reported. Its use in sexual assaults as a "date rape" drug and availability on the internet have recently emerged. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid has established efficacy as an anesthetic agent, and preliminary evidence supports its utility in the treatment of alcohol dependence, opiate dependence, and narcolepsy.

  7. Conserved valproic-acid-induced lipid droplet formation in Dictyostelium and human hepatocytes identifies structurally active compounds.

    PubMed

    Elphick, Lucy M; Pawolleck, Nadine; Guschina, Irina A; Chaieb, Leila; Eikel, Daniel; Nau, Heinz; Harwood, John L; Plant, Nick J; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-03-01

    Lipid droplet formation and subsequent steatosis (the abnormal retention of lipids within a cell) has been reported to contribute to hepatotoxicity and is an adverse effect of many pharmacological agents including the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). In this study, we have developed a simple model system (Dictyostelium discoideum) to investigate the effects of VPA and related compounds in lipid droplet formation. In mammalian hepatocytes, VPA increases lipid droplet accumulation over a 24-hour period, giving rise to liver cell damage, and we show a similar effect in Dictyostelium following 30 minutes of VPA treatment. Using (3)H-labelled polyunsaturated (arachidonic) or saturated (palmitic) fatty acids, we shown that VPA treatment of Dictyostelium gives rise to an increased accumulation of both types of fatty acids in phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and non-polar lipids in this time period, with a similar trend observed in human hepatocytes (Huh7 cells) labelled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of β-oxidation in Dictyostelium phenocopies fatty acid accumulation, in agreement with data reported in mammalian systems. Using Dictyostelium, we then screened a range of VPA-related compounds to identify those with high and low lipid-accumulation potential, and validated these activities for effects on lipid droplet formation by using human hepatocytes. Structure-activity relationships for these VPA-related compounds suggest that lipid accumulation is independent of VPA-catalysed teratogenicity and inositol depletion. These results suggest that Dictyostelium could provide both a novel model system for the analysis of lipid droplet formation in human hepatocytes and a rapid method for identifying VPA-related compounds that show liver toxicology.

  8. Cut-off net acid generation pH in predicting acid-forming potential in mine spoils.

    PubMed

    Liao, B; Huang, L N; Ye, Z H; Lan, C Y; Shu, W S

    2007-01-01

    Acidification of mine wastes can lead to a series of environmental problems, such as acid drainage, heavy metal mobilization, and ecosystem degradation. Prediction of acid-forming potential is one of the key steps in management of sulfide-bearing mine wastes. In this paper, the acid-forming potential of 180 mine waste samples collected from 17 mine sites in China were studied using a net acid generation (NAG) method. The samples contained different contents of total sulfur (ranging from 0.6 to 200 g kg(-1)), pyritic sulfur (ranging from 0 to 100 g kg(-1)), and acid neutralization capacity (ANC, ranging from -41 to 274 kg H2SO4 t(-1)). Samples with high acid-forming potential are generally due to their high sulfur content or low acid neutralization capacity. After the samples were oxidized by H2O2, the amounts of acid generation and the final NAG pH were measured. Results indicated that the final NAG pH gave a well-defined demarcation between acid-forming and non-acid-forming materials. Samples with final NAG pH >or= 5 could be classified as non-acid-forming materials, while those with NAG pH acid-forming materials. Materials with NAG pH > 2.5, but < 5, had low risk of being acid-forming. The confirmation of cut-off NAG pH will be used as a rapid and cost-effective operational monitoring tool for the in-pit prediction of acid-forming potential of mine wastes and classification of waste types.

  9. Formation of aqueous-phase α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHP): potential atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Soong, R.; Simpson, A. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this work is on quantifying the degree of the aqueous-phase formation of α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHPs) via reversible nucleophilic addition of H2O2 to aldehydes. Formation of this class of highly oxygenated organic hydroperoxides represents a poorly characterized aqueous-phase processing pathway that may lead to enhanced SOA formation and aerosol toxicity. Specifically, the equilibrium constants of α-HHP formation have been determined using proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Significant α-HHP formation was observed from formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic acid, and methylglyoxal, but not from methacrolein and ketones. Low temperatures enhanced the formation of α-HHPs but slowed their formation rates. High inorganic salt concentrations shifted the equilibria toward the hydrated form of the aldehydes and slightly suppressed α-HHP formation. Using the experimental equilibrium constants, we predict the equilibrium concentration of α-HHPs to be in the μM level in cloud water, but it may also be present in the mM level in aerosol liquid water (ALW), where the concentrations of H2O2 and aldehydes can be high. Formation of α-HHPs in ALW may significantly affect the effective Henry's law constants of H2O2 and aldehydes but may not affect their gas-phase levels. The photochemistry and reactivity of this class of atmospheric species have not been studied.

  10. Formation of aqueous-phase α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHP): potential atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Soong, R.; Simpson, A. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-02-01

    The focus of this work is on quantifying the degree of the aqueous-phase formation of α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHPs) via reversible nucleophilic addition of H2O2 to aldehydes. Formation of this class of highly oxygenated organic hydroperoxides represents a poorly characterized aqueous-phase processing pathway that may lead to enhanced SOA formation and aerosol toxicity. Specifically, the equilibrium constants of α-HHP formation have been determined using proton nuclear resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Significant α-HHP formation was observed from formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic acid, methylglyoxal, but not from methacrolein and ketones. Low temperatures enhanced the formation of α-HHPs but slowed their formation rates. High inorganic salt concentrations shifted the equilibria toward the hydrated form of the aldehydes and slightly suppressed α-HHP formation. Using the experimental equilibrium constants, we predict the equilibrium concentration of α-HHPs to be in the μM level in cloud water but may be present in the mM level in aerosol liquid water (ALW), where the concentrations of H2O2 and aldehydes can be high. Formation of α-HHPs in ALW may significantly affect the effective Henry's law constants of H2O2 and aldehydes but may not affect their gas-phase levels. The photochemistry and reactivity of this class of atmospheric species have not been studied.

  11. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  12. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  13. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; ...

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore » two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  14. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    A series of perhalocarbons are proposed as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production that involve direct contact of the fluid with sulfuric acid and vaporization of the acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids are described and the results of some preliminary high temperature test data are presented.

  15. Retinoic acid deficiency alters second heart field formation

    PubMed Central

    Ryckebusch, Lucile; Wang, Zengxin; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lin, Song-Chang; Chi, Xuan; Schwartz, Robert; Zaffran, Stéphane; Niederreither, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, has been implicated in various steps of cardiovascular development. The retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) enzyme catalyzes the second oxidative step in RA biosynthesis and its loss of function creates a severe embryonic RA deficiency. Raldh2−/− knockout embryos fail to undergo heart looping and have impaired atrial and sinus venosus development. To understand the mechanism(s) producing these changes, we examined the contribution of the second heart field (SHF) to pharyngeal mesoderm, atria, and outflow tract in Raldh2−/− embryos. RA deficiency alters SHF gene expression in two ways. First, Raldh2−/− embryos exhibited a posterior expansion of anterior markers of the SHF, including Tbx1, Fgf8, and the Mlc1v-nlacZ-24/Fgf10 reporter transgene as well as of Islet1. This occurred at early somite stages, when cardiac defects became irreversible in an avian vitamin A-deficiency model, indicating that endogenous RA is required to restrict the SHF posteriorly. Explant studies showed that this expanded progenitor population cannot differentiate properly. Second, RA up-regulated cardiac Bmp expression levels at the looping stage. The contribution of the SHF to both inflow and outflow poles was perturbed under RA deficiency, creating a disorganization of the heart tube. We also investigated genetic cross-talk between Nkx2.5 and RA signaling by generating double mutant mice. Strikingly, Nkx2.5 deficiency was able to rescue molecular defects in the posterior region of the Raldh2−/− mutant heart, in a gene dosage-dependent manner. PMID:18287057

  16. Ranolazine, a partial fatty acid oxidation inhibitor, its potential benefit in angina and other cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Bharti; Subramanian, L

    2007-01-01

    Chronic Angina resistant to medical treatment with hemodynamically acting agents is a major problem in clinical setup. For such patients, large number of clinical trials have documented the beneficial effect of Ranolazine. It acts as an anti-anginal agent that controls myocardial ischemia through intracellular metabolic changes. Ranolazine is a partial fatty acid oxidation inhibitor which shifts cardiac energy metabolism from fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation. Since the oxidation of glucose requires less oxygen than the oxidation of fatty acids, ranolazine can help maintain myocardial function in times of ischemia. In addition, ranolazine has minimal effect on blood pressure and heart rate. Ranolazine, by inhibiting cellular ionic channels, prolongs the corrected QT interval. However, ranolazine has not yet been associated with any incidences of ventricular arrhythmia. Other possible mechanism by which Ranolazine could act is by reducing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and improves reperfusion mechanical function. Ranolazine has been approved by US FDA for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris in combination with amlodipine, beta-blockers or nitrates in patients who do not show adequate response to other anti-anginals. Ranolazine is a metabolic modulator that is being developed by CV Therapeutics (CVT), under license from Roche (formerly Syntex), as a potential treatment for angina. Ranolazine is available as brand name 'Ranexa' as extended release oral tablets. This review focuses on the clinical effects, the mechanism of actions, drug interactions and beneficial effects of Ranolazine in chronic angina and other cardiometabolic disorders.

  17. Formation potentials of bromate and brominated disinfection by-products in bromide-containing water by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Wu, Shouke; Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The ozonation involved in drinking water treatment raises issues of water quality security when the raw water contains bromide (Br(-)). Br(-) ions may be converted to bromate (BrO3 (-)) during ozonation and some brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) in the following chlorination. In this study, the effects of ozone (O3) dosage, contact time, pH, and Br(-) and ammonia (NH3-N) concentrations on the formation of BrO3 (-) and Br-DBPs have been investigated. The results show that decreasing the initial Br(-) concentration is an effective means of controlling the formation of BrO3 (-). When the concentration of Br(-) was lower than 100 μg/L, by keeping the ratio of O3 dosage to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at less than 1, BrO3 (-) production was effectively suppressed. The concentration of BrO3 (-) steadily increased with increasing O3 dosage at high Br(-) concentration (>900 μg/L). Additionally, a longer ozonation time increased the concentrations of BrO3 (-) and total organic bromine (TOBr), while it had less impact on the formation potentials of brominated trihalomethanes (Br-THMFP) and haloacetic acids (Br-HAAFP). Higher pH value and the presence of ammonia may lead to an increase in the formation potential of BrO3 (-) and Br-DBPs.

  18. Direct measurements of the ozone formation potential from dairy cattle emissions using a transportable smog chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Cody J.; Yang, Wenli; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Malkina, Irina L.; Flocchini, Robert G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    Tropospheric ozone continues to be an air pollution problem in the United States, particularly in California, Texas, and across the eastern seaboard. The obvious sources of ozone precursors have been largely controlled over the past several decades, leading to the critical examination of secondary sources. In particular, California has new air quality rules addressing agricultural sources of ozone precursors, including dairy farms. Some recent estimates predict that dairy cattle are second only to on-road vehicles as a leading source of ozone precursor emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley. The objective of this work was to directly measure the ozone formation potential from dairy housing. A transportable "smog" chamber was constructed and validated using organic gases known to be present in dairy emissions. The ozone formation potential of emissions from eight non-lactating dairy cows and their fresh waste was then directly evaluated in the field at a completely enclosed cow corral on the campus of the University of California, Davis. The results demonstrate that the majority of the ozone formation is explained by ethanol (EtOH) in the emissions from the dairy cows, not by acetone as previously thought. Ozone formation potential is generally small, with <20 ppb of ozone produced under typical conditions when EtOH concentrations were ˜200 ppb and NO x concentrations were ˜50 ppb. The results match our current understanding of atmospheric ozone formation potential, ruling out the possibility of unknown organic compounds in dairy emissions with significant ozone formation potential. Simulations carried out with a modified form of the Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism verify that actual ozone formation from dairy emissions is much lower than what would be predicted using the current regulatory profiles. Based on these results, the ozone formation potential of emissions from dairy cattle in California seems to be lower than previously estimated.

  19. Asymptotic Representation of the Temperature Field in Injection Stages During the Cyclic Acidizing of the Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. I.; Akhmetova, O. V.; Koval‧skii, A. A.; Kabirov, I. F.

    2016-11-01

    The authors have obtained an asymptotic solution to the problem on the temperature fi eld appearing during the injection of a chemically active solvent into a layered inhomogeneous orthotropic formation with account taken of temperature disturbances due to the preceding technological processes. This makes it possible to use the obtained solution for calculations under the conditions of multiple cyclic action. The sources of temperature disturbances are the liberation of heat due to the chemical reaction and the change in the temperature of the acid solution injected into the formation. Therefore, the obtained solution also covers the range of thermal-acidizing processes. The implemented method of construction of the solution is an extension of an asymptotic method accurate in the mean, which has been proposed by the authors as applied to the problems with nonzero initial conditions. The results of calculations of space-time temperature distributions under the conditions of hydrochloric acid treatment of carbonaceous formations have been given.

  20. Inhibition by polyphenolic phytochemicals and sulfurous compounds of the formation of 8-chloroguanosine mediated by hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Toshinori; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) of activated neutrophils can react with nucleic acid bases to form chlorinated nucleosides such as 8-chloroguanosine (Cl-Guo). Chlorination is enhanced by nicotine. We investigated the effects of various natural antioxidants including polyphenolic phytochemicals on the formation of Cl-Guo by HOCl in the presence and the absence of nicotine. Polyphenols, including catechins, curcumin, resveratrol, silibinin, and sulfurous compound α-lipoic acid, were found to inhibit both HOCl- and human MPO-induced Cl-Guo formation dose-dependently. Among the test compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Cl-Guo formation, mediated by activated human neutrophils in the presence of nicotine, was inhibited by EGCG, silibinin, and α-lipoic acid. These results suggest that polyphenols and sulfurous compounds have the potential to inhibit the induction of nucleobase damage mediated by chlorination, with possible application to reducing DNA damage associated with inflammation and cigarette-smoke inhalation.

  1. Formation of catechols via removal of acid side chains from ibuprofen and related aromatic acids.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Robert W; Hay, Anthony G

    2005-10-01

    Although ibuprofen [2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-propionic acid] is one of the most widely consumed drugs in the world, little is known regarding its degradation by environmental bacteria. Sphingomonas sp. strain Ibu-2 was isolated from a wastewater treatment plant based on its ability to use ibuprofen as a sole carbon and energy source. A slight preference toward the R enantiomer was observed, though both ibuprofen enantiomers were metabolized. A yellow color, indicative of meta-cleavage, accumulated transiently in the culture supernatant when Ibu-2 was grown on ibuprofen. When and only when 3-flurocatechol was used to poison the meta-cleavage system, isobutylcatechol was identified in the culture supernatant via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Ibuprofen-induced washed-cell suspensions also metabolized phenylacetic acid and 2-phenylpropionic acid to catechol, while 3- and 4-tolylacetic acids and 2-(4-tolyl)-propionic acid were metabolized to the corresponding methyl catechols before ring cleavage. These data suggest that, in contrast to the widely distributed coenzyme A ligase, homogentisate, or homoprotocatechuate pathway for metabolism of phenylacetic acid and similar compounds, Ibu-2 removes the acidic side chain of ibuprofen and related compounds prior to ring cleavage.

  2. Influence of Oleic Acid on Rumen Fermentation and Fatty Acid Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaoxun; Guan, Leluo; He, Zhixiong; Guan, Yongjuan; Tan, Zhiliang; Han, Xuefeng; Zhou, Chuanshe; Kang, Jinhe; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A series of batch cultures were conducted to investigate the effects of oleic acid (OA) on in vitro ruminal dry matter degradability (IVDMD), gas production, methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) production, and proportion of fatty acids. Rumen fluid was collected from fistulated goats, diluted with incubation buffer, and then incubated with 500 mg Leymus chinensis meal supplemented with different amounts of OA (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg for the CON, OA20, OA40 and OA60 groups, respectively). Incubation was carried out anaerobically at 39°C for 48 h, and the samples were taken at 12, 24 and 48 h and subjected to laboratory analysis. Supplementation of OA decreased IVDMD, the cumulative gas production, theoretical maximum of gas production and CH4 production, but increased H2 production. However, no effect was observed on any parameters of rumen fermentation (pH, ammonia, production of acetate, propionate and butyrate and total volatile fatty acid production). The concentrations of some beneficial fatty acids, such as cis monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were higher (P < 0.05) from OA groups than those from the control group at 12 h incubation. In summary, these results suggest that the OA supplementation in diet can reduce methane production and increase the amount of some beneficial fatty acids in vitro. PMID:27299526

  3. Potential of chiral anion-exchangers operated in various subcritical fluid chromatography modes for resolution of chiral acids.

    PubMed

    Pell, Reinhard; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2012-07-06

    Anion-exchange-type chiral stationary phases (CSPs) derived from quinine or quinidine were applied in subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC) for the direct separation of chiral acidic compounds. Employing subcritical (sc) mobile phase modes (CO₂ + methanol as co-solvent and acids and bases as additives) first the influence of type and amount of acidic and basic additives on separation performance was investigated. Secondly, water was tested as a neutral additive and the influence of temperature variation on enantioselectivity was studied. Thirdly, we could chromatographically confirm that the often verbalized "inherent acidity" of sc CO₂ + methanol is manifested by the in situ formation of methylcarbonic acids in the sc mobile phase and thus functioning as acidic additive. Accordingly the dissociated methylcarbonic acid, acting as a counterion, enables an anion exchange mechanism between the cationic CSP and the corresponding acidic analyte. In the absence of a dissociable acid in the mobile phase such an ion exchange mode would not work following a stoichiometric displacement model. This finding is further corroborated by the use of ammonia in methanol as co-solvent thus generating in situ the ammonium salt of methylcarbonic acid. In summary, we report on ion-exchange mediated chromatographic separations in SFC modes by merely using (i) sc CO₂ and MeOH, (ii) sc CO₂ and ammonia in MeOH, and (iii) sc CO₂ and MeOH plus acids and bases as additives. Comparisons to HPLC mode have been undertaken to evaluate merits and limitations. This mode exhibits high potential for preparative chromatography of chiral acids combining pronounced enantioselectivity with high column loadability and avoiding possibly troublesome mobile phase additives, as the in situ formed methylcarbonic acid disintegrates to CO₂ and methanol upon pressure release.

  4. Molecular Structures, Acid-Base Properties, and Formation of Group 6 Transition Metal Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shenggang; Guenther, Courtney L.; Kelley, Matthew S.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)) were used to study the group 6 metal (M = Cr, Mo, W) hydroxides: MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3), M2O6-m(OH)2m (m = 1-5), M3O9-m(OH)2m (m = 1, 2), and M4O11(OH)2. The calculations were done up to the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the CCSD(T) method. Molecular structures of many low-energy conformers/isomers were located. Brønsted acidities in the gas phase and pKa values in aqueous solution were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) and MnO3n-1(OH)2 (n = 2-4). In addition, Brønsted basicities and Lewis acidities (fluoride affinities) were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) as well as the metal oxide clusters MnO3n (n = 1-3). The metal hydroxides were predicted to be strong Brønsted acids and weak to modest Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. The pKa values can have values as negative as -31. Potential energy surfaces for the hydrolysis of the MnO3n (n = 1-4) clusters were calculated. Heats of formation of the metal hydroxides were predicted from the calculated reaction energies, and the agreement with the limited available experimental data is good. The first hydrolysis step leading to the formation of MnO3n-1(OH)2 was predicted to be exothermic, with the exothermicity becoming less negative as n increases and essentially converged at n = 3. Reaction rate constants for the hydrogen transfer steps were calculated using transition state theory and RRKM theory. Further hydrolysis of MnO3n-1(OH)2 tends to be endothermic especially for M = Cr. Fifty-five DFT exchange-correlation functionals were benchmarked for the calculations of the reaction energies, complexation energies, and reaction barriers by comparing to our CCSD(T) results. Overall, the DFT results for the potential energy surfaces are semiquantitatively correct, but no single functional works for all processes and all three metals. Among the functionals benchmarked, the wB97, wB97X, B1B95, B97-1, mPW1LYP, and X3LYP functionals have the best

  5. New Functions and Potential Applications of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Uneyama, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Tonouchi, Naoto

    2016-11-22

    Currently, several types of amino acids are being produced and used worldwide. Nevertheless, several new functions of amino acids have been recently discovered that could result in other applications. For example, oral stimulation by glutamate triggers the cephalic phase response to prepare for food digestion. Further, the stomach and intestines have specific glutamate-recognizing systems in their epithelial mucosa. Regarding clinical applications, addition of monosodium glutamate to the medicinal diet has been shown to markedly enhance gastric secretion in a vagus-dependent manner. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are the major components of muscles, and ingestion of BCAAs has been found to be effective for decreasing muscle pain. BCAAs are expected to be a solution for the serious issue of aging. Further, ingestion of specific amino acids could be beneficial. Glycine can be ingested for good night's sleep: glycine ingestion before bedtime significantly improved subjective sleep quality. Ingestion of alanine and glutamine effectively accelerates alcohol metabolism, and ingestion of cystine and theanine effectively prevents colds. Finally, amino acids could be used in a novel clinical diagnostic method: the balance of amino acids in the blood could be an indicator of the risk of diseases such as cancer. These newly discovered functions of amino acids are expected to contribute to the resolution of various issues.

  6. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential. PMID:24031469

  7. Fe/Mg smectite formation under acidic conditions on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group detected in Noachian and early Hesperian terrains on Mars have been hypothesized to form under neutral to alkaline conditions. These pH conditions would also be favorable for formation of widespread carbonate deposits which have not been detected on Mars. We propose that smectite deposits on Mars formed under moderately acidic conditions inhibiting carbonate formation. We report here the first synthesis of Fe/Mg smectite in an acidic hydrothermal system [200 °C, pHRT ∼ 4 (pH measured at room temperature) buffered with acetic acid] from Mars-analogue, glass-rich, basalt simulant with and without aqueous Mg or Fe(II) addition under N2-purged anoxic and ambient oxic redox conditions. Synthesized Fe/Mg smectite was examined by X-ray-diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe to characterize mineralogy, morphology and chemical composition. Alteration of the glass phase of basalt simulant resulted in formation of the Fe/Mg smectite mineral saponite with some mineralogical and chemical properties similar to the properties reported for Fe/Mg smectite on Mars. Our experiments are evidence that neutral to alkaline conditions on early Mars are not necessary for Fe/Mg smectite formation as previously inferred. Phyllosilicate minerals could instead have formed under mildly acidic pH conditions. Volcanic SO2 emanation and sulfuric acid formation is proposed as the major source of acidity for the alteration of basaltic materials and subsequent formation of Fe/Mg smectite.

  8. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues Modulating Intracellular and In vitro Microcin E492 Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Paulina; Marcoleta, Andrés; Lobos-Ruiz, Pablo; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Microcin E492 (MccE492) is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril's morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well-characterized, however, it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in Escherichia coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophilic probes, 2-4'-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54-63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59), which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54-63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although with

  9. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues Modulating Intracellular and In vitro Microcin E492 Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Paulina; Marcoleta, Andrés; Lobos-Ruiz, Pablo; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M.; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Microcin E492 (MccE492) is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well-characterized, however, it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in Escherichia coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophilic probes, 2-4′-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54–63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59), which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54–63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  10. Insights into the formation mechanism of chloropropanol fatty acid esters under laboratory-scale deodorization conditions.

    PubMed

    Hori, Katsuhito; Hori-Koriyama, Natsuko; Tsumura, Kazunobu; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chloropropanol fatty acid esters (CPFAEs) are well-known contaminants in refined oils and fats, and several research groups have studied their formation. However, the results obtained in these studies were not satisfactory because the CPFAEs were not analyzed comprehensively. Thus, in the present study, a comprehensive analysis was performed to obtain new details about CPFAE formation. Each lipid (monopalmitin, dipalmitin, tripalmitin, monoolein, diolein, triolein, and crude palm oil) was heated at 250°C for 90 min, and the CPFAEs were analyzed using supercritical fluid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that CP fatty acid monoesters were formed from monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols after heating in the presence of a chlorine compound. In addition, CP fatty acid diesters were formed from diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols under the same conditions. In the case of crude palm oil, only CP fatty acid diesters were formed. Therefore, these results indicated that CPFAEs in refined palm oil were formed mainly from triacylglycerols.

  11. Potential of vancomycin for the enantiomeric resolution of FMOC-amino acids by capillary electrophoresis-ion-trap-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Domínguez-Vega, Elena; Montealegre, Cristina; Castro-Puyana, María; Marina, María Luisa; Crego, Antonio L

    2014-05-01

    The potential of the antibiotic vancomycin (VC) as chiral selector for the enantiomeric separation of amino acids by CE-ESI-MS/MS² was investigated for the first time in this work. Derivatization of amino acids with FMOC-Cl was carried out to enable their interaction with VC as well as the formation of precursor ions with larger m/z which were employed in MS² experiments. The partial filling of a coated capillary was employed to avoid the loss in MS sensitivity originated by the introduction of VC in the ionization source. Under optimized conditions, the simultaneous enantiomeric separation and unequivocal identification of 17 amino acids (two of them being nonprotein amino acids) took place in about 20 min with LODs in the micromolar range.

  12. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds - Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Hamill, Patrick; Goodman, Jindra K.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the PSC particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is the inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an Er-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 198 K as found for the Antarctic samples.

  13. Computational study of the hydration of sulfuric acid dimers: implications for acid dissociation and aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Temelso, Berhane; Phan, Thuong Ngoc; Shields, George C

    2012-10-04

    We have investigated the thermodynamics of sulfuric acid dimer hydration using ab initio quantum mechanical methods. For (H(2)SO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(n) where n = 0-6, we employed high-level ab initio calculations to locate the most stable minima for each cluster size. The results presented herein yield a detailed understanding of the first deprotonation of sulfuric acid as a function of temperature for a system consisting of two sulfuric acid molecules and up to six waters. At 0 K, a cluster of two sulfuric acid molecules and one water remains undissociated. Addition of a second water begins the deprotonation of the first sulfuric acid leading to the di-ionic species (the bisulfate anion HSO(4)(-), the hydronium cation H(3)O(+), an undissociated sulfuric acid molecule, and a water). Upon the addition of a third water molecule, the second sulfuric acid molecule begins to dissociate. For the (H(2)SO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(3) cluster, the di-ionic cluster is a few kcal mol(-1) more stable than the neutral cluster, which is just slightly more stable than the tetra-ionic cluster (two bisulfate anions, two hydronium cations, and one water). With four water molecules, the tetra-ionic cluster, (HSO(4)(-))(2)(H(3)O(+))(2)(H(2)O)(2), becomes as favorable as the di-ionic cluster H(2)SO(4)(HSO(4)(-))(H(3)O(+))(H(2)O)(3) at 0 K. Increasing the temperature favors the undissociated clusters, and at room temperature we predict that the di-ionic species is slightly more favorable than the neutral cluster once three waters have been added to the cluster. The tetra-ionic species competes with the di-ionic species once five waters have been added to the cluster. The thermodynamics of stepwise hydration of sulfuric acid dimer is similar to that of the monomer; it is favorable up to n = 4-5 at 298 K. A much more thermodynamically favorable pathway forming sulfuric acid dimer hydrates is through the combination of sulfuric acid monomer hydrates, but the low concentration of sulfuric acid relative to

  14. The electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to formate/formic acid: engineering and economic feasibility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Arun S; Zhai, Yumei; Hill, Davion; Sridhar, Narasi

    2011-09-19

    The engineering and economic feasibility of large-scale electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to formate salts and formic acid is the focus of this Full Paper. In our study we investigated the long-term performance of tin and other proprietary catalysts in the reduction of carbon dioxide to formate/formic acid at a gas/solid/liquid interface, using a flow-through reactor. The overall economics and energy consumption of the process are evaluated through a value chain analysis. The sensitivity of the net present value of the process to various process parameters is examined.

  15. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C.; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J.; Bray, Walter M.; Riener, Romina M.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Linington, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  16. Sulfate Formation From Acid-Weathered Phylosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Most phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed during the planet's earliest Noachian era, then Mars underwent a global change making the planet's surface more acidic [e.g. 1]. Prevailing acidic conditions may have affected the already existing phyllosilicates, resulting in the formation of sulfates. Both sulfates and phyllosilicates have been identified on Mars in a variety of geologic settings [2] but only in a handful of sites are these minerals found in close spatial proximity to each other, including Mawrth Vallis [3,4] and Gale Crater [5]. While sulfate formation from the acidic weathering of basalts is well documented in the literature [6,7], few experimental studies investigate sulfate formation from acid-weathered phyllosilicates [8-10]. The purpose of this study is to characterize the al-teration products of acid-weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. We focus on three commonly identified phyllosilicates on Mars: nontronite (Fe-smectite), saponite (Mg-smectite), and montmorillonite (Al-smectite) [1, and references therein]. This information will help constrain the formation processes of sulfates observed in close association with phyllosilicates on Mars and provide a better understanding of the aqueous history of such regions as well as the planet as a whole.

  17. Characterization and disinfection by-product formation potential of natural organic matter in surface and ground waters from Northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Katz, B.; Martin, B.S.; Noyes, T.I.

    2000-01-01

    Streamwaters in northern Florida have large concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), and commonly flow directly into the ground water system through karst features, such as sinkholes. In this study NOM from northern Florida stream and ground waters was fractionated, the fractions characterized by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and then chlorinated to investigate their disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential (FP). As the NOM character changed (as quantified by changes in NOM distribution in various fractions, such as hydrophilic acids or hydrophobic neutrals) due to migration through the aquifer, the total organic halide (TOX)-FP and trihalomethane (THM)-FP yield of each of these fractions varied also. In surface waters, the greatest DBP yields were produced by the colloid fraction. In ground waters, DBP yield of the hydrophobic acid fraction (the greatest in terms of mass) decreased during infiltration.

  18. A Review on Protocatechuic Acid and Its Pharmacological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Sahil; Bais, Souravh

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and polyphenols are heterocyclic molecules that have been associated with beneficial effects on human health, such as reducing the risk of various diseases like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular and brain diseases. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a type of widely distributed naturally occurring phenolic acid. PCA has structural similarity with gallic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid which are well-known antioxidant compounds. More than 500 plants contain PCA as active constituents imparting various pharmacological activity and these effects are due to their antioxidant activities, along with other possible mechanisms, such as anti-inflammatory properties and interaction with several enzymes. Over the past two decades, there have been an increasing number of publications on polyphenols and flavonoids, which demonstrate the importance of understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of both natural and synthesized compounds, considering the benefits from their dietary ingestion as well as pharmacological use. This work aims to review the pharmacological effects of PCA molecules in humans and the structural aspects that contribute to these effects. PMID:25006494

  19. Modulating weak intramolecular interactions through the formation of beryllium bonds: complexes between squaric acid and BeH2.

    PubMed

    Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    The electronic structure of the two most stable isomers of squaric acid and their complexes with BeH2 were investigated at the B3LYP/6-311 + G(3df,2p)// B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) level of theory. Squaric acid forms rather strong beryllium bonds with BeH2, with binding energies of the order of 60 kJ mol(-1). The preferential sites for BeH2 attachment are the carbonyl oxygen atoms, but the global minima of the potential energy surfaces of both EZ and ZZ isomers are extra-stabilized through the formation of a BeH···HO dihydrogen bond. More importantly, analysis of the electron density of these complexes shows the existence of significant cooperative effects between the beryllium bond and the dihydrogen bond, with both becoming significantly reinforced. The charge transfer involved in the formation of the beryllium bond induces a significant electron density redistribution within the squaric acid subunit, affecting not only the carbonyl group interacting with the BeH2 moiety but significantly increasing the electron delocalization within the four membered ring. Accordingly the intrinsic properties of squaric acid become perturbed, as reflected in its ability to self-associate.

  20. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  1. Properties of synthetic ferrihydrite as an amino acid adsorbent and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Matrajt, G; Blanot, D

    2004-03-01

    Ferrihydrite, an iron oxide hydroxide, is found in all kinds of environments, from hydrothermal hot springs to extraterrestrial materials. It has been shown that this material is nanoporous, and because of its high surface area, it has outstanding adsorption properties and in some cases catalysis properties. In this work we studied the adsorption properties of ferrihydrite with respect to amino acids. Samples of pure ferrihydrite were synthesised and exposed to solutions of amino acids including both proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous species. These experiments revealed important characteristics of this mineral as both an adsorbent of amino acids and a promoter of peptide bond formation.

  2. Monosilicic acid potential in phytoremediation of the contaminated areas.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xionghui; Liu, Saihua; Huang, Juan; Bocharnikova, Elena; Matichenkov, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The contamination of agricultural areas by heavy metals has a negative influence on food quality and human health. Various remediation techniques have been developed for the removal and/or immobilization of heavy metals (HM) in contaminated soils. Phytoremediation is innovative technology, which has advantages (low cost, easy monitoring, high selectivity) and limitations, including long time for procedure and negative impact of contaminants on used plants. Greenhouse investigations have shown that monosilicic acid can be used for regulation of the HM (Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn) mobility in the soil-plant system. If the concentration of monosilicic acid in soil was increased from 0 to 20 mg L(-1) of Si in soil solution, the HM bioavailability was increased by 30-150%. However, the negative influence on the barley by HM was reduced under monosilicic acid application. If the concentration of monosilicic acid was increased more than 20 mg L(-1), the HM mobility in the soil was decreased by 40-300% and heavy metal uptake by plants was reduced 2-3 times. The using of the monosilicic acid may increase the phytoremediation efficiency. However the technique adaptation will be necessary for phytoremediation on certain areas.

  3. Potential anticancer activity of lichen secondary metabolite physodic acid.

    PubMed

    Cardile, V; Graziano, A C E; Avola, R; Piovano, M; Russo, A

    2017-02-01

    Secondary metabolites present in lichens, which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic and terpenic compounds, are unique with respect to those of higher plants and show interesting biological and pharmacological activities. However, only a few of these compounds, have been assessed for their effectiveness against various in vitro cancer models. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of three lichen secondary metabolites (atranorin, gyrophoric acid and physodic acid) on A375 melanoma cancer cell line. The tested compounds arise from different lichen species collected in different areas of Continental and Antarctic Chile. The obtained results confirm the major efficiency of depsidones. In fact, depsides atranorin and gyrophoric acid, showed a lower activity inhibiting the melanoma cancer cells only at more high concentrations. Whereas the depsidone physodic acid, showed a dose-response relationship in the range of 6.25-50 μM concentrations in A375 cells, activating an apoptotic process, that probably involves the reduction of Hsp70 expression. Although the molecular mechanism, by which apoptosis is induced by physodic acid remains unclear, and of course further studies are needed, the results here reported confirm the promising biological properties of depsidone compounds, and may offer a further impulse to the development of analogues with more powerful efficiency against melanoma cells.

  4. Beta-glycerophosphate accelerates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Noh, A Long Sae Mi; Yim, Mijung

    2011-03-01

    Despite numerous reports of the synergistic effects of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid in inducing the differentiation of osteoblasts, little is known about their roles in osteoclastic differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of beta-glycerophosphate on osteoclastogenesis in the presence of ascorbic acid using primary mouse bone marrow cultures treated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Beta-Glycerophosphate dose-dependently increased RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid. This stimulatory effect was apparent when beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid were only added during the late stages of the culture period, indicating that they influence later events in osteoclastic differentiation. While the combination of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid inhibited RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK and p38, and degradation of IkappaB, it increased the induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. In addition, beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid together enhanced the induction of COX-2 following RANKL stimulation. Taken together, our data suggest that beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid have synergistic effects on osteoclast formation, increasing RANKL-mediated induction of c-Fos, NFATc1 and COX-2 in osteoclast precursors.

  5. Preactivated hyaluronic acid: A potential mucoadhesive polymer for vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jessika; Laffleur, Flavia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to develop mucoadhesive polymeric excipients for vaginal drug delivery systems. Hyaluronic acid was thiolated and subsequently preactivated with 6-mercaptonicotinamide (HA-CYS-MNA) to enhance stability and mucoadhesive properties on vaginal mucosa. After determination of the thiol group content, disintegration studies and in vitro mucoadhesion studies (rotating cylinder and tensile) were performed. Furthermore, swelling behavior and cytotoxicity studies were performed in comparison with corresponding polymers. Both, disintegration and in vitro mucoadhesive studies revealed that modifying HA-CYS with MNA resulted in higher stability (3.6-fold prolonged disintegration time compared to unmodified hyaluronic acid) and prolonged mucoadhesion time. MTT assay and LDH revealed no toxicity for the polymeric excipients and safe for their use. Disintegration and swelling results conducted more pronounced stability of the preactivated thiomers compared to corresponding unmodified ones. According to these results preactivated hyaluronic acid might be a useful tool for vaginal delivery systems.

  6. Studies on potential effects of fumaric acid on rumen microbial fermentation, methane production and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Riede, Susanne; Boguhn, Jeannette; Breves, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) contributes substantially to global climate change. As a potential approach to decrease ruminal methanogenesis, the effects of different dosages of fumaric acid (FA) on ruminal microbial metabolism and on the microbial community (archaea, bacteria) were studied using a rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC). FA acts as alternative hydrogen acceptor diverting 2H from methanogenesis of archaea towards propionate formation of bacteria. Three identical trials were conducted with 12 fermentation vessels over a period of 14 days. In each trial, four fermentation vessels were assigned to one of the three treatment groups differing in FA dosage: low fumaric acid (LFA), high fumaric acid (HFA) and without FA (control). FA was continuously infused with the buffer. Grass silage and concentrate served as substrate. FA led to decreases in pH and to higher production rates of total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) mediated by increases in propionate for LFA of 1.69 mmol d(-1) and in propionate and acetate production for HFA of 4.49 and 1.10 mmol d(-1), respectively. Concentrations of NH3-N, microbial crude protein synthesis, their efficiency, degradation of crude nutrients and detergent fibre fraction were unchanged. Total gas and CH4 production were not affected by FA. Effects of FA on structure of microbial community by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses could not be detected. Given the observed increase in propionate production and the unaffected CH4 production it can be supposed that the availability of reduction equivalents like 2H was not limited by the addition of FA in this study. It has to be concluded from the present study that the application of FA is not an appropriate approach to decrease the ruminal CH4 production.

  7. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation in the rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V.; Jetha, N. )

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid solution in preventing intraperitoneal (IP) adhesions. The study design was prospective, randomized and blinded and involved 83 rats. Measured serosal injury was inflicted using a CO2 laser on the right uterine horn of the rat. Animals randomized to groups 1 and 2 received either 0.4% hyaluronic acid or its diluent phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally before and after the injury. In groups 3 and 4, the same solutions were used only after the injury. Postoperative adhesions were assessed at second-look laparotomy. Histologic assessment of the fresh laser injury was carried out on uteri pretreated with hyaluronic acid, PBS, or nothing. Pretreatment with hyaluronic acid was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative adhesions and a significantly decreased crater depth. Hyaluronic acid appears to reduce postoperative IP adhesion formation by coating the serosal surfaces and decreasing the extent of initial tissue injury.

  8. Biofilm formation and indole-3-acetic acid production by two rhizospheric unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms that live in the rhizosphere play a pivotal role in the functioning and maintenance of soil ecosystems. The study of rhizospheric cyanobacteria has been hampered by the difficulty to culture and maintain them in the laboratory. The present work investigated the production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the potential of biofilm formation on the rhizoplane of pea plants by two cyanobacterial strains, isolated from rice rhizosphere. The unicellular cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 that were isolated from a rice rhizosphere, were investigated. Production of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 was measured under experimental conditions (pH and light). The bioactivity of the cyanobacterial auxin was demonstrated through the alteration of the rooting pattern of Pisum sativum seedlings. The increase in the concentration of L-tryptophan and the time that this amino acid was present in the medium resulted in a significant enhancement of the synthesis of IAA (r > 0.900 at p = 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between the concentration of IAA in the supernatant of the cyanobacteria cultures and the root length and number of the pea seedlings. Observations made by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of cyanobacteria on the surface of the roots and also provided evidence for the penetration of the cyanobacteria in the endorhizosphere. We show that the synthesis of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 occurs under different environmental conditions and that the auxin is important for the development of the seedling roots and for establishing an intimate symbiosis between cyanobacteria and host plants.

  9. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  10. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  11. Salicylic acid alleviates adverse effects of heat stress on photosynthesis through changes in proline production and ethylene formation.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Iqbal R; Iqbal, Noushina; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the potential of salicylic acid (SA) in alleviating the adverse effects of heat stress on photosynthesis in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv WH 711. Activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), photosynthetic-nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), and net photosynthesis decreased in plants subjected to heat stress (40 °C for 6 h), but proline metabolism increased. SA treatment (0.5 mM) alleviated heat stress by increasing proline production through the increase in γ-glutamyl kinase (GK) and decrease in proline oxidase (PROX) activity, resulting in promotion of osmotic potential and water potential necessary for maintaining photosynthetic activity. Together with this, SA treatment restricted the ethylene formation in heat-stressed plants to optimal range by inhibiting activity of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS). This resulted in improved proline metabolism, N assimilation and photosynthesis. The results suggest that SA interacts with proline metabolism and ethylene formation to alleviate the adverse effects of heat stress on photosynthesis in wheat.

  12. Acid-mediated formation of trifluoromethyl sulfonates from sulfonic acids and a hypervalent iodine trifluoromethylating agent.

    PubMed

    Koller, Raffael; Huchet, Quentin; Battaglia, Philip; Welch, Jan M; Togni, Antonio

    2009-10-28

    A variety of sulfonic acids have been trifluoromethylated using 1-trifluoromethyl-1,2-benziodoxol-3(1H)-one under mild conditions in good to excellent yields. Initial mechanistic investigations of this reaction show a clean second-order kinetics and only very weak substrate electronic effects.

  13. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Brandon R.; Reback, Matthew L.; Jain, Avijita; Appel, Aaron M.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of liquids have been screened as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles that involve the vaporization of sulfuric acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids is described with the results of some preliminary high temperature test data presented.

  15. On the formation of niacin (vitamin B3) and pyridine carboxylic acids in interstellar model ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Brandon M.; Turner, Andrew M.; Saito, Sean E. J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-06-01

    The formation of pyridine carboxylic acids in interstellar ice grains was simulated by electron exposures of binary pyridine (C5H5N)-carbon dioxide (CO2) ice mixtures at 10 K under contamination-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Chemical processing of the pristine ice and subsequent warm-up phase was monitored on line and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe for the formation of new radiation induced species. In the infrared spectra of the irradiated ice, bands assigned to nicotinic acid (niacin; vitamin B3; m-C5H4NCOOH) along with 2,3-, 2,5-, 3,4-, and 3,5-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (C5H3N(COOH)2) were unambiguously identified along with the hydroxycarbonyl (HOCO) radical. Our study suggests that the reactive pathway responsible for pyridine carboxylic acids formation involves a HOCO intermediate, which forms through the reaction of suprathermal hydrogen ejected from pyridine with carbon dioxide. The newly formed pyridinyl radical may then undergo radical-radical recombination with a hydroxycarbonyl radical to form a pyridine carboxylic acid.

  16. The chitosan-gelatin (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation in an acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Kuchina, Yuliya A; Sokolan, Nina I

    2016-03-15

    The interaction of cationic polysaccharide chitosan and gelatin accompanied by the stoichiometric (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation has been studied by the methods of capillary viscometry, UV and FTIR spectroscopy and dispersion of light scattering. Complexes were formed in the aqueous phase, with pH being less than the isoelectric point of gelatin (pIgel). The particle size of the disperse phase increases along with the growth of the relative viscosity in comparison with sols of the individual components-polysaccharide and gelatin. Possible models and mechanism of (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation have been discussed. It was shown that the complex formation takes place not only due to the hydrogen bonds, but also due to the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged amino-groups of chitosan and negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamic Glu and aspartic Asp acids) of gelatin.

  17. Thermochemistry for silicic acid formation reaction: Prediction of new reaction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2009-08-01

    Reaction between SiO 2 and water has been studied extensively using ab initio methods. The mechanism for formation of metasilicic acid SiO(OH) 2 and orthosilicic acid Si(OH) 4 has been explored and a new pathway for formation of Si(OH) 4 is predicted. Heats of reaction ( ΔrH298∘) and heats of formation ( ΔfH298∘) at 298 K for the related reactions and species calculated at two different theoretical levels G3B3 and G3MP2B3 agree well with the literature values. It is found that when SiO 2 reacts simultaneously with two water molecules, the thermodynamic as well as kinetic feasibility of the process is much greater than that when SiO 2 reacts with one molecule of water.

  18. Molecular and Therapeutic Potential and Toxicity of Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Morceau, Franck; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a branched short-chain fatty acid, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug and a mood stabilizer. Antiepileptic properties have been attributed to inhibition of Gamma Amino Butyrate (GABA) transaminobutyrate and of ion channels. VPA was recently classified among the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, acting directly at the level of gene transcription by inhibiting histone deacetylation and making transcription sites more accessible. VPA is a widely used drug, particularly for children suffering from epilepsy. Due to the increasing number of clinical trials involving VPA, and interesting results obtained, this molecule will be implicated in an increasing number of therapies. However side effects of VPA are substantially described in the literature whereas they are poorly discussed in articles focusing on its therapeutic use. This paper aims to give an overview of the different clinical-trials involving VPA and its side effects encountered during treatment as well as its molecular properties. PMID:20798865

  19. Formation of dopamine adducts derived from brain polyunsaturated fatty acids: mechanism for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuebo; Yamada, Naruomi; Maruyama, Wakako; Osawa, Toshihiko

    2008-12-12

    Oxidative stress appears to be directly involved in the pathogenesis of the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic systems in Parkinson disease. In this study, we formed four dopamine modification adducts derived from docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6/omega-3) and arachidonic acid (C18:4/omega-6), which are known as the major polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain. Upon incubation of dopamine with fatty acid hydroperoxides and an in vivo experiment using rat brain tissue, all four dopamine adducts were detected. Furthermore, hexanoyl dopamine (HED), an arachidonic acid-derived adduct, caused severe cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, whereas the other adducts were only slightly affected. The HED-induced cell death was found to include apoptosis, which also seems to be mediated by reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial abnormality. Additionally, the experiments using monoamine transporter inhibitor and mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells that lack the monoamine transporter indicate that the HED-induced cytotoxicity might specially occur in the neuronal cells. These data suggest that the formation of the docosahexaenoic acid- and arachidonic acid-derived dopamine adducts in vitro and in vivo, and HED, the arachidonic acid-derived dopamine modification adduct, which caused selective cytotoxicity of neuronal cells, may indicate a novel mechanism responsible for the pathogenesis in Parkinson disease.

  20. Formation of β-glucogallin, the precursor of ellagic acid in strawberry and raspberry

    PubMed Central

    Schulenburg, Katja; Feller, Antje; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schecker, Johannes H.; Martens, Stefan; Schwab, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Ellagic acid/ellagitannins are plant polyphenolic antioxidants that are synthesized from gallic acid and have been associated with a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the identification and characterization of five glycosyltransferases (GTs) from two genera of the Rosaceae family (Fragaria and Rubus; F.×ananassa FaGT2*, FaGT2, FaGT5, F. vesca FvGT2, and R. idaeus RiGT2) that catalyze the formation of 1-O-galloyl-β-d-glucopyranose (β-glucogallin) the precursor of ellagitannin biosynthesis. The enzymes showed substrate promiscuity as they formed glucose esters of a variety of (hydroxyl)benzoic and (hydroxyl)cinnamic acids. Determination of kinetic values and site-directed mutagenesis revealed amino acids that affected substrate preference and catalytic activity. Green immature strawberry fruits were identified as the main source of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and ellagic acid in accordance with the highest GT2 gene expression levels. Injection of isotopically labeled gallic acid into green fruits of stable transgenic antisense FaGT2 strawberry plants clearly confirmed the in planta function. Our results indicate that GT2 enzymes might contribute to the production of ellagic acid/ellagitannins in strawberry and raspberry, and are useful to develop strawberry fruit with additional health benefits and for the biotechnological production of bioactive polyphenols. PMID:26884604

  1. Formation of β-glucogallin, the precursor of ellagic acid in strawberry and raspberry.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Katja; Feller, Antje; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schecker, Johannes H; Martens, Stefan; Schwab, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    Ellagic acid/ellagitannins are plant polyphenolic antioxidants that are synthesized from gallic acid and have been associated with a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the identification and characterization of five glycosyltransferases (GTs) from two genera of the Rosaceae family (Fragaria and Rubus; F. × ananassa FaGT2*, FaGT2, FaGT5, F. vesca FvGT2, and R. idaeus RiGT2) that catalyze the formation of 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (β-glucogallin) the precursor of ellagitannin biosynthesis. The enzymes showed substrate promiscuity as they formed glucose esters of a variety of (hydroxyl)benzoic and (hydroxyl)cinnamic acids. Determination of kinetic values and site-directed mutagenesis revealed amino acids that affected substrate preference and catalytic activity. Green immature strawberry fruits were identified as the main source of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and ellagic acid in accordance with the highest GT2 gene expression levels. Injection of isotopically labeled gallic acid into green fruits of stable transgenic antisense FaGT2 strawberry plants clearly confirmed the in planta function. Our results indicate that GT2 enzymes might contribute to the production of ellagic acid/ellagitannins in strawberry and raspberry, and are useful to develop strawberry fruit with additional health benefits and for the biotechnological production of bioactive polyphenols.

  2. Effect of pH on complex formation between debranched waxy rice starch and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yotsawimonwat, Songwut; Sriroth, Klanarong; Kaewvichit, Sayam; Piyachomkwan, Kaukoon; Jane, Jay-Lin; Sirithunyalug, Jakkapan

    2008-08-15

    Complex formations between debranched waxy rice starch (DBS) and fatty acids (FA) of different hydrocarbon chain lengths (8:0, 10:0, 12:0, 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0) were studied in an aqueous solution by measuring the blue colour stained with iodine. The objective of this study was to understand the effects of the solubility and hydrophobicity of guest molecules (FA) on the complex formation with DBS. Lauric acid (12:0) displayed the greatest complex forming ability with DBS by showing the least blue colour developed with iodine. The effect of pH (3-7) on the DBS/FA complex formation was evaluated by measuring the iodine-scanning spectra of the mixture. Short-chain FA (8:0) displayed less complex formation at pH>or=5, above the pK(a) of fatty acid (approximately 4.8), which suggested that the charge formation of the short-chain FA caused a lower partitioning of the FA into the hydrophobic cavity of the DBS single helix. On the contrary, FA of 10:0-18:0 displayed an increased complex formation at pH>5, which could be attributed to increased solubility of these longer-chain FA at a dissociated and ionized form. The hydrocarbon chain length of the FA had an important impact on the extent of the complex formation. A FA that had a shorter hydrocarbon chain was more soluble in an aqueous solution and more readily formed a complex with DBS. At pH 6 and 7 (above the pK(a)), 10:0 formed less inclusion complexes with DBS than did 12:0. Iodine-scanning spectra showed that the absorbances of all iodine-stained DBS/FA solutions at higher wavelength were substantially lower than that of the iodine-stained DBS alone, suggesting that FA preferentially formed inclusion complexes with DBS of longer chains.

  3. Effects of ensiling treatments on lactic acid production and supplementary methane formation of maize and amaranth--an advanced green biorefining approach.

    PubMed

    Haag, Nicola Leonard; Nägele, Hans-Joachim; Fritz, Thomas; Oechsner, Hans

    2015-02-01

    A green biorefinery enables the material and energetic use of biomass via lactic acid and methane production. Different ensiling techniques were applied to maize and amaranth with the aim to increase the amount of lactic acid in the silage. In addition the methane formation potential of the ensiled samples and the remaining solid residues after separating the organic juice were assessed. Treating maize with homofermentative lactic acid bacteria in combination with carbonated lime increased the amount of lactic acid about 91.9%. For amaranth no additional lactic acid production was obtained by treating the raw material. Specific methane yields for the solid residues of amaranth were significantly lower in comparison to the corresponding silages. The most promising treatment resulted in a production of 127.9±4.1 g kg(-1) DM lactic acid and a specific methane yield for the solid residue of 349.5±6.6 lN kg(-1) ODM.

  4. Some polyphenols inhibit the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical in the reaction mixture of linoleic acid hydroperoxide with ferrous ions.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-01-01

    Effects of some polyphenols and their related compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, quinic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, o-dihydroxybenzene, m-dihydroxybenzene, and p-dihydroxybenzene) on the formation of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic (13-HPODE) acid-derived radicals (pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical) were examined. The ESR spin trapping showed that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, and o-dihydroxybenzene inhibited the overall formation of 13-HPODE acid-derived radicals in the reaction mixture of 13-HPODE with ferrous ions. The ESR peak heights of alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN)/13-HPODE-derived radical adducts decreased to 46+/-4% (chlorogenic acid), 54+/-2% (caffeic acid), 49+/-2% (gallic acid), 55+/-1% [D-(+)-catechin], 60+/-3% [D-(-)-catechin], 42+/-1% (L-dopa), 30+/-2% (dopamine), 49+/-2% (L-adrenaline), 24+/-2% (L-noradrenaline), and 54+/-5% (o-dihydroxybenzene) of the control, respectively. The high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance (HPLC-ESR) and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometries (HPLC-ESR-MS) showed that caffeic acid inhibited the formation of octanoic acid radical and pentyl radical to 42+/-2% and 52+/-7% of the control, respectively. On the other hand, the polyphenols and their related compounds had few inhibitory effects on the radical formation in the presence of EDTA. Visible absorbance measurement revealed that all the polyphenols exhibiting the inhibitory effect chelate ferrous ions. Above results indicated that the chelation of ferrous ion is essential to the inhibitory effects of the polyphenols. PMID:10677343

  5. Galantamine potentiates the protective effect of rofecoxib and caffeic acid against intrahippocampal Kainic acid-induced cognitive dysfunction in rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Atish; Pahwa, Deeksha

    2011-05-30

    Role of neuroinflammatory mediators particularly cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), have been well suggested in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Rofecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes belongs to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly called as coxibs. Whereas, caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is one of the natural phenolic compounds and reported to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity as one of mechanisms. Present study has been designed to investigate the effects of rofecoxib, caffeic acid and its potentiation by galantamine against intrahippocampal kainic acid-induced cognitive impairment, oxidative damage and mitochondrial respiratory enzyme alterations in rats. Kainic acid (KA) was administrated in the hippocampus region of rat brain. Various behavioral (locomotor activity and memory performances were assessed by using actophotometer and Morris water maze respectively) followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex were assessed. Intrahippocampal administration of KA significantly impaired locomotor activity, memory performance, mitochondrial enzyme complexes and caused oxidative stress as compared to sham treatment. Rofecoxib (5 and 10mg/kg), caffeic acid (5 and 10mg/kg), Gal (2.5 and 5mg/kg) treatment for 14 days significantly improved locomotor activity, memory retention and oxidative defense (as evidenced by decrease lipid peroxidation, nitrite, increased superoxide dismutase activity and redox ratio) in hippocampus. Besides, alterations in the levels of mitochondrial enzymes and acetylcholine esterase enzyme were significantly restored by rofecoxib and caffeic acid as compared to control. Further, combination of rofecoxib (5mg/kg) with caffeic acid (5mg/kg) and lower dose of gal (2.5mg/kg) with rofecoxib (5mg/kg) treatments significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. The results of the present study suggest that galantamine

  6. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikanto, Joonas; Duplissy, Jonathan; Määttänen, Anni; Henschel, Henning; Donahue, Neil M.; Brus, David; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We derive a version of Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by quantum chemical results on sulfuric acid-water hydration to describe neutral and ion-induced particle formation in the binary sulfuric acid-water system. The theory is extended to treat the kinetic regime where the nucleation free energy barrier vanishes at high sulfuric acid concentrations or low temperatures. In the kinetic regime particle formation rates become proportional to sulfuric acid concentration to second power in the neutral system or first power in the ion-induced system. We derive simple general expressions for the prefactors in kinetic-type and activation-type particle formation calculations applicable also to more complex systems stabilized by other species. The theory predicts that the binary water-sulfuric acid system can produce strong new particle formation in the free troposphere both through barrier crossing and through kinetic pathways. At cold stratospheric and upper free tropospheric temperatures neutral formation dominates the binary particle formation rates. At midtropospheric temperatures the ion-induced pathway becomes the dominant mechanism. However, even the ion-induced binary mechanism does not produce significant particle formation in warm boundary layer conditions, as it requires temperatures below 0°C to take place at atmospheric concentrations. The theory successfully reproduces the characteristics of measured charged and neutral binary particle formation in CERN CLOUD3 and CLOUD5 experiments, as discussed in a companion paper.

  7. Cognitive Association Formation in Episodic Memory: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Alice S. N.; Vallesi, Antonino; Picton, Terence W.; Tulving, Endel

    2009-01-01

    The present study focused on the processes underlying cognitive association formation by investigating subsequent memory effects. Event-related potentials were recorded as participants studied pairs of words, presented one word at a time, for later recall. The findings showed that a frontal-positive late wave (LW), which occurred 1-1.6 s after the…

  8. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  9. Rural School as a Resource for the Intellectual and Labour Potential Formation of the Rural Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasibullov, Ramis R.; Korshunova, Olga V.; Arshabekov, Nurgali R.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem is reasoned by the need to create conceptual grounds of life organization variants in the rural school as a resource of intellectual and labor potential formation of rural society taking into account the socio-economic realities of Russia's development in the beginning of the twenty-first century, as well as…

  10. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * PREFACE * INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE * LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AT TOHOKU UNIVERSITY * CHAPTER 1: DOUBLE LAYERS, SHEATHS, AND POTENTIAL STRUCTURES * 1.1 Double Layers * On Fluid Models of Stationary, Acoustic Double Layers (Invited) * Particle Simulation of Double Layer (Invited) * Space-Time Dependence of Non-Steady Double Layers * The Role of Low Energy Electrons for the Generation of Anode Double Layers in Glow Discharges * Arbitrary Amplitude Ion-Acoustic Double Layers in a Dusty Plasma * 1.2 Sheaths * Bounded Plasma Edge Physics as Observed from Simulations in 1D and 2D (Invited) * Control of RF Sheath Structure in RF Diode Discharge * Observation of Density Gradients with Fine Structures and Low Frequency Wave Excitation at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary * Double Sheath Associated with an Electron Emission to a Plasma Containing Negative Ions * Sheath Edge and Floating Potential for Multi-Species Plasmas Including Dust Particles * 1.3 Potential Structures and Oscillations * Potential Structure Formed at a Constriction of a DC He Positive Column and its Coupling with Ionization Wave * Potential Structure in a New RF Magnetron Device with a Hollow Electrode * Potential Disruption in a RF Afterglow Electronegative Plasma * Potential Oscillation in a Strongly Asymmetry RF Discharge Containing Negative Ions * Effects of External Potential Control on Coulomb Dust Behavior * Potential Structure of Carbon Arc Discharge for High-Yield Fullerenes Formation * Control of Axial and Radial Potential Profiles in Tandem Mirrors (Invited) * CHAPTER 2: FIELD-ALIGNED ELECTRIC FIELDS AND RELATED PARTICLE ACCELERATIONS * 2.1 Field-Aligned Potential Formation * Formation of Large Potential Difference in a Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines (Invited) * Presheath Formation in front of an Oblique End-Plate in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma * Plasma Potential Formation Due to ECRH in a Magnetic Well * Electrostatic

  11. Characterization of dissolved organic matter from surface waters with low to high dissolved organic carbon and the related disinfection byproduct formation potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Angzhen; Zhao, Xu; Mao, Ran; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-04-30

    In this study, the disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBPFP) of three surface waters with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content of 2.5, 5.2, and 7.9mg/L was investigated. The formation and distribution of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids were evaluated. Samples collected from three surface waters in China were fractionated based on molecular weight and hydrophobicity. The raw water containing more hydrophobic (Ho) fraction exhibited higher formation potentials of haloacetic acid and trihalomethane. The DBPFP of the surface waters did not correlate with the DOC value. The values of DBPFP per DOC were correlated with the specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) for Ho and Hi fractions. The obtained results suggested that SUVA cannot reveal the ability of reactive sites to form disinfection byproducts for waters with few aromatic structures. Combined with the analysis of FTIR and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the raw waters and the corresponding fractions, it was concluded that the Ho fraction with phenolic hydroxyl and conjugated double bonds was responsible for the production of trichloromethanes and trichloroacetic acids. The Hi fraction with amino and carboxyl groups had the potential to form dichloroacetic acids and chlorinated trihalomethanes.

  12. Hydrophobicity and haemolytic potential of oxo derivatives of cholic, deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids.

    PubMed

    Posa, Mihalj; Kuhajda, Ksenija

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of structure of bile acids on their membranolytic potential and extent of overlapping of the information about the membranolytic potential of bile acids and their physico-chemical parameters, namely: retention index R(M0) (as a measure of bile acid hydrophobicity, reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RPTLC)), lecithin solubilisation (measure of the interaction of bile acids with phospholipids) and critical micellar concentration (CMC). It was found that bile acid concentrations at 100% lysis of erythrocyte membranes is described best by their CMC values, whereas at 50% lysis the parameter used is lecithin solubilisation. This indicates that different mixed micelles are formed in the membrane lysis at lower and higher concentrations of bile acids. Replacement of the hydroxyl (OH) group in the bile acid molecule with an oxo group yields derivatives with lowered hydrophobicity, power of lecithin solubilisation, tendency for self-aggregation as well as the membranolytic activity.

  13. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  14. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions.

  15. Potential prodrugs of 6-acetylmethylenepenicillanic acid (Ro 15-1903).

    PubMed

    Adam, S; Then, R; Angehrn, P

    1986-06-01

    The synthesis and biological activities of a series of non-classical penicillins are described. These compounds were synthesized by treating the pivaloyloxymethyl ester of 6-acetylmethylenepenicillanic acid (Ro 15-1903) with various nucleophiles. They were found to be less active against the beta-lactamases from Proteus vulgaris 1028, Escherichia coli 1024, Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTC 418 and E. coli RTEM than the parent compound. Nevertheless, synergy with ampicillin against whole bacterial cells producing beta-lactamases was evident, although the single compounds did not exhibit antibacterial properties. With the compounds 2a and 2b, synergistic interaction with ampicillin could also be demonstrated in mice.

  16. Potential for amino acids supplementation during inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Coëffier, Moïse; Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is multifactorial and involves interactions of gut luminal content with mucosal barrier and especially immune cells. Malnutrition is a frequent issue during IBD flares, especially in Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and nutritional support is frequently used to treat malnutrition but also in an attempt to modulate intestinal inflammation. The use of oral or enteral nutrition intervention in IBDs may be effective, alone or in combination with drugs, to achieve and maintain remission. However, standard diets are less effective than new-generation biotherapies and could be improved by supplementation with specific immunomodulatory amino acids. Experimental studies evaluating glutamine, the preferential substrate for enterocytes, are promising. Some clinical studies with oral glutamine in CD are until now disappointing, but new formulations and targeting could enhance glutamine efficacy at the site of mucosal lesions. The role of arginine, involved in nitric oxide and polyamines synthesis, still remains debated. However, the effects of these amino acids in IBD have been poorly documented in humans. Other candidates like glycine, cysteine, histidine, or taurine should also be evaluated in the future.

  17. The effects of lactic acid bacteria inoculants and formic acid on the formation of biogenic amines in grass silages.

    PubMed

    Steidlová, S; Kalac, P

    2004-06-01

    Silages were prepared in six laboratory experiments from four direct-cut grassland swards and pure swards of perennial ryegrass and false oat with dry matter contents ranging between 180 and 325 g/kg. Grass was fermented at 22 degrees C and silages were stored at the same temperature for 4 months. Untreated silages (negative control) and silages preserved with 3 g/kg of formic acid (positive control) were compared with silages inoculated with commercial strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus buchneri and a mixed preparation Microsil. The inoculants were applied at a dose of 5.10(6) CFU/g of grass. Seven biogenic amines were extracted from silages with perchloric acid and determined as N-benzamides by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography. Common chemical quality parameters of silages were also determined. Tyramine, cadaverine and putrescine were the amines occurring at the highest concentration. As compared to untreated silages, formic acid was most effective to suppress formation of the main amines. Also the inoculants often decreased amine contents significantly (P < 0.05). The inoculants decreased levels of polyamine spermidine more efficiently than formic acid. Contents of histamine, tryptamine and polyamine spermine were very low, commonly below the detection limits.

  18. ACID-BASE ACCOUNT EFFECTIVENESS FOR DETERMINATION OF MINE WASTE POTENTIAL ACIDITY. (R825549C048)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of sulfide minerals in mine waste is a widespread source of resource degradation, often resulting in the generation of acidic water and mobilization of heavy metals. The quantity of acid forming minerals present in mine waste, dominantly as pyrite (FeS2

  19. Inhibition of acid formation by epidermal growth factor in the isolated rabbit gastric glands.

    PubMed Central

    Dembiński, A; Drozdowicz, D; Gregory, H; Konturek, S J; Warzecha, Z

    1986-01-01

    The effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on basal and stimulated (with histamine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, and high concentrations of K+) acid formation have been studied in isolated glands from the rabbit gastric mucosa. The changes in the accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine [14C]AP have been used as an indirect measurement of acid production in the glands. Unstimulated gastric glands accumulated [14C]AP indicating the existence of basal acid production in these glands, and EGF caused a small but significant reduction in basal [14C]AP uptake. A similar reduction of basal [14C]AP uptake was observed after exposure to omeprazole but not after ranitidine or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Histamine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP and K+ caused a strong and dose-dependent stimulation of acid formation by the glands. EGF, like omeprazole, reduced dose-dependently the [14C]AP accumulation stimulated by both histamine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, while ranitidine and PGE2 reduced histamine- but not dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP-stimulated accumulation of [14C]AP. In the absence of other external stimuli, an increased K+ concentration enhanced [14C]AP accumulation to levels similar to those produced by histamine and this effect was not changed by EGF, ranitidine or PGE2 but was inhibited by omeprazole. We conclude that EGF interferes with the final steps of acid production between cyclic nucleotides and proton pump of the parietal cells. PMID:3025433

  20. Nucleobase and amino acid formation through impacts of meteorites on the early ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks on the prebiotic Earth was the first crucial step for the origins of life. Extraterrestrial delivery of intact amino acids and nucleobases is the prevailing hypothesis for their availability on prebiotic Earth because of the difficulties associated with the production of these organics from terrestrial carbon and nitrogen sources under plausible prebiotic conditions. However, the variety and amounts of these intact organics delivered by meteorites would have been limited. Previous shock-recovery experiments have demonstrated that meteorite impact reactions could have generated organics on the prebiotic Earth. Here, we report on the simultaneous formation of nucleobases (cytosine and uracil) found in DNA and/or RNA, various proteinogenic amino acids (glycine, alanine, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, valine, leucine, isoleucine, and proline), non-proteinogenic amino acids, and aliphatic amines in experiments simulating reactions induced by extraterrestrial objects impacting on the early oceans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the formation of nucleobases from inorganic materials by shock conditions. In these experiments, bicarbonate was used as the carbon source. Bicarbonate, which is a common dissolved carbon species in CO2-rich atmospheric conditions, was presumably the most abundant carbon species in the early oceans and in post-impact plumes. Thus, the present results expand the possibility that impact-induced reactions generated various building blocks for life on prebiotic Earth in large quantities through the use of terrestrial carbon reservoirs.

  1. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic aerosols (BA), for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8) that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  2. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-07-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic (BA) aerosols, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2), malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols, whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8), which showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids controls their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  3. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  4. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Patricia; Ming, Douglas; Rampe, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are common in Noachian terrains whereas sulfates are found in the younger Hesperian terrains and suggest alteration under more acidic conditions. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era would have been exposed to the prevailing acidic conditions during the Hesperian. The purpose of this project is to characterize the effects of acid-weathering on phyllosilicates to better understand the aqueous history of Mars. Nontronite, montmorillonite, and saponite were exposed to H2SO4 solutions at water-rock (WR) ratios of 50 and 25.X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of all three acid-treated minerals showed progressive collapse of the phyllosilicate basal spacing with increasing acid concentration. Bassanite formed as an intermediate phase in weathered nontronite and montmorillonite from extracted interlayer Ca. The octahedral cation determined which sulfate formed at high acid concentration: rhomboclase from nontronite, alunogen from montmorillonite, hexahydrite and kieserite from saponite. Gypsum and anhydrite also formed as intermediate phases in nontronite treated at WR=25, showing a change in sulfate hydration state with changing acid concentration (i.e. water activity). Scanning electron microscopy analyses detected phases not identified by XRD. Al-sulfate was found in nontronite weathered at WR=25 and Ca-sulfate in weathered saponite. Near-infrared reflectance spectra of the weathered samples showed decreasing intensity of the hydration/hydroxylation bands and a change or disappearance of metal-OH bands indicating dehydration and dissociation of the interlayers and octahedral layers, respectively, with increased acid weathering.Sulfate mineral formation from acid-weathered phyllosilicates may explain the presence of phyllosilicates and sulfates in close proximity to each other on Mars, such as in Gale Crater. The CheMin XRD instrument on Curiosity may find evidence for acid-weathered phyllosilicates in Mt. Sharp by comparing the 001

  5. Butyric acid released during milk lipolysis triggers biofilm formation of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Pasvolsky, Ronit; Zakin, Varda; Ostrova, Ievgeniia; Shemesh, Moshe

    2014-07-02

    Bacillus species form biofilms within milking pipelines and on surfaces of equipment in the dairy industry which represent a continuous hygiene problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Although much is known about the mechanism by which the model organism Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in laboratory mediums in vitro, little is known of how these biofilms are formed in natural environments such as milk. Besides, little is known of the signaling pathways leading to biofilm formation in other Bacillus species, such as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus licheniformis, both of which are known to contaminate milk. In this study, we report that milk triggers the formation of biofilm-related structures, termed bundles. We show this to be a conserved phenomenon among all Bacillus members tested. Moreover, we demonstrate that the tasA gene, which encodes a major portion of the matrix which holds the biofilm together, is vital for this process. Furthermore, we show that the free fatty acid (FFA) - butyric acid (BA), which is released during lipolysis of milk fat and demonstrates antimicrobial activity, is the potent trigger for biofilm bundle formation. We finally show that BA-triggered biofilm bundle formation is mediated by the histidine kinase, KinD. Taken together, these observations indicate that BA, which is a major FFA within milk triggers biofilm formation in a conserved mechanism among members of the Bacillus genus.

  6. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  7. Protein oxidation: examination of potential lipid-independent mechanisms for protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, D P; Ryan, T P; Jolly, R A; Petry, T W

    1998-01-01

    Previous data indicated that diquat-mediated protein oxidation (protein carbonyl formation) occurs through multiple pathways, one of which is lipid dependent, and the other, lipid independent. Studies reported here investigated potential mechanisms of the lipid-independent pathway in greater detail, using bovine serum albumin as the target protein. One hypothesized mechanism of protein carbonyl formation involved diquat-dependent production of H2O2, which would then react with site-specifically bound ferrous iron as proposed by Stadtman and colleagues. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibitory effect of catalase on diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation. However, exogenous H2O2 alone did not induce protein carbonyl formation. Hydroxyl radical-generating reactions may result from the H2O2-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron, which normally is bound to protein in the ferric state. Therefore, the possible reduction of site-specifically bound Fe3+ to Fe2+ by the diquat cation radical (which could then react with H2O2) was also investigated. The combination of H2O2 and an iron reductant, ascorbate, however, also failed to induce significant protein carbonyl formation. In a phospholipid-containing system, an ADP:Fe2+ complex induced both lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation; both indices were largely inhibitable by antioxidants. There was no substantial ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation in the absence of phospholipid under otherwise identical conditions. Based on the lipid requirement and antioxidant sensitivity, these data suggest that ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation occurs through reaction of BSA with aldehydic lipid peroxidation products. The precise mechanism of diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation remains unclear, but it appears not to be a function of H2O2 generation or diquat cation radical-dependent reduction of bound Fe3+.

  8. Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation

    SciTech Connect

    Brunson, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5 to about 80/sup 0/ C.

  9. Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation

    SciTech Connect

    Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

  10. Formation potential of nine nitrosamines from corresponding secondary amines by chloramination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Cuiping; Lou, Linjie; Yang, Qi; Zhu, Lizhong

    2014-01-01

    Nitrosamines, a group of emerging disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water, have recently caused significant concern because of their higher carcinogenic potential than that of currently regulated DBPs. In this study, the formation of nine representative nitrosamines by chloramination of their corresponding secondary amines was investigated under various conditions. All nine nitrosamines were detected in the corresponding reaction solutions, which confirmed that all the investigated secondary amines were the potential precursors of corresponding nitrosamines. The molar yields of nitrosamines from the corresponding secondary amines were quite different, depending on the structural characteristics of the secondary amines. The maximum molar yields for the formation of all nine nitrosamines occurred in the pH range of 7.0-9.0 and at the Cl/N molar ratio of 0.7 for chloramines, suggesting that monochloramine and unprotonated secondary amines may play a major role in the formation of nitrosamines. The molar yields of nitrosamines also exhibited a moderate upward tendency with rising temperature, but no consistent correlation was observed between the formation of nitrosamine and the initial concentrations of secondary amines and chloramines. The results of this study could be useful for devising strategies for controlling the formation of nitrosamines during the disinfection processes of drinking water.

  11. Radiation- and photo-induced formation of salicylic acid from phenol and CO{sub 2} in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Krapfenbauer, K.; Getoff, N.

    1996-12-31

    The concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is steady increasing because of the combustion of fossil fuels and the industrial pollution. As a result, global warming has occurred. In the present study the formation of the salicylic acid and other products, originating from the carboxylation of phenol is investigated. It has been found that the formation of salicylic acid strongly depend on several experimental conditions: pH of the solution, concentration of phenol and CO{sub 2}, and absorbed dose. The formation of salicylic acid was also studied in the presence of catalysts. Photo-induced carboxylation of phenol to salicylic acid will be also reported. Probable reaction mechanisms for the salicylic acid formation are suggested. Finally, a comparison is made between the well known industrial Kolbe-Schmitt process for salicylic acid production and the aspects of the present new method for CO{sub 2} utilization.

  12. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  13. A mammalian fatty acid hydroxylase responsible for the formation of α-hydroxylated galactosylceramide in myelin

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, Matthias; Yaghootfam, Afshin; Fewou, Simon N.; Zöller, Inge; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxylation is an abundant modification of the ceramides in brain, skin, intestinal tract and kidney. Hydroxylation occurs at the sphingosine base at C-4 or within the amide-linked fatty acid. In myelin, hydroxylation of ceramide is exclusively found at the α-C atom of the fatty acid moiety. α-Hydroxylated cerebrosides are the most abundant lipids in the myelin sheath. The functional role of this modification, however, is not known. On the basis of sequence similarity to a yeast C26 fatty acid hydroxylase, we have identified a murine cDNA encoding FA2H (fatty acid 2-hydroxylase). Transfection of FA2H cDNA in CHO cells (Chinese-hamster ovary cells) led to the formation of α-hydroxylated fatty acid containing hexosylceramide. An EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein)–FA2H fusion protein co-localized with calnexin, indicating that the enzyme resides in the endoplasmic reticulum. FA2H is expressed in brain, stomach, skin, kidney and testis, i.e. in tissues known to synthesize fatty acid α-hydroxylated sphingolipids. The time course of its expression in brain closely follows the expression of myelin-specific genes, reaching a maximum at 2–3 weeks of age. This is in agreement with the reported time course of fatty acid α-hydroxylase activity in the developing brain. In situ hybridization of brain sections showed expression of FA2H in the white matter. Our results thus strongly suggest that FA2H is the enzyme responsible for the formation of α-hydroxylated ceramide in oligodendrocytes of the mammalian brain. Its further characterization will provide insight into the functional role of α-hydroxylation modification in myelin, skin and other organs. PMID:15658937

  14. Physicochemical consequences of amino acid variations that contribute to fibril formation by immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Raffen, R.; Dieckman, L. J.; Szpunar, M.; Wunschl, C.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Dave, P.; Wilkins Stevens, P.; Cai, X.; Schiffer, M.; Stevens, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    The most common form of systemic amyloidosis originates from antibody light chains. The large number of amino acid variations that distinguish amyloidogenic from nonamyloidogenic light chain proteins has impeded our understanding of the structural basis of light-chain fibril formation. Moreover, even among the subset of human light chains that are amyloidogenic, many primary structure differences are found. We compared the thermodynamic stabilities of two recombinant kappa4 light-chain variable domains (V(L)s) derived from amyloidogenic light chains with a V(L) from a benign light chain. The amyloidogenic V(L)s were significantly less stable than the benign V(L). Furthermore, only the amyloidogenic V(L)s formed fibrils under native conditions in an in vitro fibril formation assay. We used site-directed mutagenesis to examine the consequences of individual amino acid substitutions found in the amyloidogenic V(L)s on stability and fibril formation capability. Both stabilizing and destabilizing mutations were found; however, only destabilizing mutations induced fibril formation in vitro. We found that fibril formation by the benign V(L) could be induced by low concentrations of a denaturant. This indicates that there are no structural or sequence-specific features of the benign V(L) that are incompatible with fibril formation, other than its greater stability. These studies demonstrate that the V(L) beta-domain structure is vulnerable to destabilizing mutations at a number of sites, including complementarity determining regions (CDRs), and that loss of variable domain stability is a major driving force in fibril formation. PMID:10091653

  15. UV – INDUCED SYNTHESIS OF AMINO ACIDS FROM AQUEOUS STERILIZED SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM FORMATE AND AMMONIA UNDER HETROGENEOUS CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, G.; Bisht, L. S.

    1990-01-01

    Irradiation of sterilized aqueous solution of ammonium formate and ammonia with UV light in the presence and or absence of certain inorganic sensitizers for 25 hrs. gave six ninhydrin positive products in appreciable amounts. Out of the six products observed fiver were characterized as lysine, serine, glutemic acid, n-amino butyric acid and leucine. The sensitizing effect of additives on ammonium formate was observed in the order; uranium oxide > ammonium formate > ferric oxide > arsenic oxide. PMID:22556511

  16. Formation of the Q ball in the thermal logarithmic potential and its properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta

    2010-04-15

    We investigate the Q-ball formation in the thermal logarithmic potential by means of the lattice simulation, and reconfirm qualitatively the relation between Q-ball charge and the amplitude of the Affleck-Dine field at the onset of its oscillation. We find time dependence of some properties of the Q ball, such as its size and the field value at its center. Since the thermal logarithmic potential decreases as the temperature falls down, the gravity-mediation potential will affect the properties of the Q ball. Even in the case when the gravity-mediation potential alone does not allow Q-ball solution, we find the transformation from the thick-wall type of the Q ball to the thin-wall type, contrary to the naive expectation that the Q balls will be destroyed immediately when the gravity-mediation potential becomes dominant at the center of the Q ball.

  17. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions.

  18. Formation mechanism of a new carbamazepine/malonic acid cocrystal polymorph.

    PubMed

    Limwikrant, Waree; Nagai, Aiko; Hagiwara, Yumi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2012-07-15

    A new 2/1 carbamazepine (CBZ)/malonic acid (MA) cocrystal polymorph form C was formed using a vibrational rod mill, whereas the known cocrystal polymorph form A was prepared using a ball mill. IR measurements showed that the interaction between CBZ and MA in cocrystal form C was formed by amide-carboxylic acid heterosynthons, similar to that in cocrystal form A. However, NMR results showed that the molecular states of CBZ at the dibenzazepine ring appeared to be different, which could be due to variation in either the conjugation of the aromatic rings or the π-π interaction of CBZ. Factors affecting the formation of cocrystal polymorphs, such as heat and force, were investigated to clarify the formation mechanism.

  19. Formation of a seed germination promoter from carbohydrates and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Light, Marnie E; Burger, Barend V; van Staden, Johannes

    2005-07-27

    The ability of plant-derived smoke to act as a germination cue in many species has led to widespread interest in this aspect of seed biology. Recently, 3-methyl-2H-furo[2,3-c]pyran-2-one was identified as the main germination cue from smoke. Here, we report on the formation of this compound from reactions of sugars with amino acids. Heating proteins or amino acids with sugars at 180 degrees C for 30 min produces water soluble extracts that promote germination. High-performance liquid chromatography indicated that the active compound(s) derived from these reactions coeluted with the active fraction from a smoke solution. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the active constituent is identical to the germination cue from plant-derived smoke. The results presented in this paper provide evidence for the formation of the major germination cue found in smoke from ubiquitously occurring organic compounds.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases Regulate the Formation of Dendritic Spine Head Protrusions during Chemically Induced Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Szepesi, Zsuzsanna; Bijata, Monika; Ruszczycki, Blazej; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines are are small membranous protrusions that extend from neuronal dendrites and harbor the majority of excitatory synapses. Increasing evidence has shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of extracellularly acting and Zn2+-dependent endopeptidases, are able to rapidly modulate dendritic spine morphology. Spine head protrusions (SHPs) are filopodia-like processes that extend from the dendritic spine head, representing a form of postsynaptic structural remodeling in response to altered neuronal activity. Herein, we show that chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP) in dissociated hippocampal cultures upregulates MMP-9 activity that controls the formation of SHPs. Blocking of MMPs activity or microtubule dynamics abolishes the emergence of SHPs. In addition, autoactive recombinant MMP-9, promotes the formation of SHPs in organotypic hippocampal slices. Furthermore, spines with SHPs gained postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors upon cLTP and the synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors was controlled by MMPs. The present results strongly imply that MMP-9 is functionally involved in the formation of SHPs and the control of postsynaptic receptor distribution upon cLTP. PMID:23696812

  1. Assessment of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis potentialities to recover metals, sulfuric acid, and recycled water from acid gold mining effluent.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Bárbara C; Ferreira, Carolina D; Marques, Larissa S; Martins, Sofia S; Amaral, Míriam C S

    This work assessed the potential of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to treat acid streams contaminated with metals, such as effluent from the pressure oxidation process (POX) used in refractory gold ore processing. NF and RO were evaluated in terms of rejections of sulfuric acid and metals. Regarding NF, high sulfuric acid permeation (∼100%), was observed, while metals were retained with high efficiencies (∼90%), whereas RO led to high acid rejections (<88%) when conducted in pH values higher than 1. Thus, sequential use of NF and RO was proved to be a promising treatment for sulfuric acid solutions contaminated by metals, such as POX effluent. In this context, a purified acid stream could be recovered in NF permeate, which could be further concentrated in RO. Recovered acid stream could be reused in the gold ore processing or commercialized. A metal-enriched stream could be also recovered in NF retentate and transferred to a subsequent metal recovery stage. In addition, considering the high acid rejection obtained through the proposed system, RO permeate could be used as recycling water.

  2. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Tavafoghi, M; Brodusch, N; Gauvin, R; Cerruti, M

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca(2+) and PO4(3-) ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only.

  3. Hydroxyapatite formation on graphene oxide modified with amino acids: arginine versus glutamic acid

    PubMed Central

    Tavafoghi, M.; Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Cerruti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) is the main inorganic component of hard tissues, such as bone and dentine. HA nucleation involves a set of negatively charged phosphorylated proteins known as non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). These proteins attract Ca2+ and PO43− ions and increase the local supersaturation to a level required for HA precipitation. Polar and charged amino acids (AAs) are highly expressed in NCPs, and seem to be responsible for the mineralizing effect of NCPs; however, the individual effect of these AAs on HA mineralization is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the effect of a negatively charged (Glu) and positively charged (Arg) AA bound to carboxylated graphene oxide (CGO) on HA mineralization in simulated body fluids (SBF). Our results show that Arg induces HA precipitation faster and in larger amounts than Glu. We attribute this to the higher stability of the complexes formed between Arg and Ca2+ and PO43− ions, and also to the fact that Arg exposes both carboxyl and amino groups on the surface. These can electrostatically attract both Ca2+ and PO43− ions, thus increasing local supersaturation more than Glu, which exposes carboxyl groups only. PMID:26791001

  4. Evidence in the formation of conjugated linoleic acids from thermally induced 9t12t linoleic acid: a study by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Christy, Alfred A

    2009-10-01

    Thermally induced isomerisation leading to the formation of conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) has been observed for the first time during the thermal treatment of 9t12t fatty acid triacylglycerol, and methyl ester. Fifteen microlitre portions of the triacylglycerol sample containing 9t12t fatty acid (trilinoelaidin) were placed in micro glass ampoules and sealed under nitrogen, then subjected to thermal treatment at 250 degrees C. The glass ampoules were removed at regular time intervals, cut open, and the contents were analysed by infrared spectroscopy using a single reflectance attenuated total internal reflectance crystal accessory. The samples were then subjected to derivatisation into their methyl esters. The methyl esters of the isomerised fatty acids were analysed by gas chromatography. The same procedure was repeated with methyl ester samples containing 9t12t fatty acid (methyl linoelaidate). Each sample was subjected to infrared measurements and gas chromatographic analysis after appropriate dilution in heptane. The results show that the thermally induced isomerisation of 9t12t fatty acids from both triacylglycerol molecules and methyl esters give identical CLA profiles as those found for the thermally induced isomerisation of 9c12c fatty acids. The infrared spectrometry provides additional evidence confirming the formation of CLA acids during thermal treatment. A mechanism for the formation of the CLAs from 9t12t fatty acid molecules is also formulated for the first time. This mechanism complements the pathways of formation of CLAs from 9c12c fatty acids during thermal treatment.

  5. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing, Zin Z.; Milman, Brian D.; Vanscoy, Jennifer E.; Seidlits, Stephanie K.; Grill, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  6. Keto-Mycolic Acid-Dependent Pellicle Formation Confers Tolerance to Drug-Sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Dao, Dee N.; Weinrick, Brian C.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gurcha, Sudagar S.; Ojha, Anil; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chronic nature of tuberculosis (TB), its requirement of long duration of treatment, its ability to evade immune intervention, and its propensity to relapse after drug treatment is discontinued are reminiscent of other chronic, biofilm-associated bacterial diseases. Historically, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was grown as a pellicle, a biofilm-like structure, at the liquid-air interface in a variety of synthetic media. Notably, the most widely administered human vaccine, BCG, is grown as a pellicle for vaccine production. However, the molecular requirements for this growth remain ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that keto-mycolic acids (keto-MA) are essential for pellicle growth, and mutants lacking in or depleted of this MA species are unable to form a pellicle. We investigated the role of the pellicle biofilm in the reduction of antibiotic sensitivity known as drug tolerance using the pellicle-defective ΔmmaA4 mutant strain. We discovered that the ΔmmaA4 mutant, which is both pellicle defective and highly sensitive to rifampicin (RIF) under planktonic growth, when incorporated within the wild-type pellicle biofilm, was protected from the bactericidal activity of RIF. The observation that growth within the M. tuberculosis pellicle biofilm can confer drug tolerance to a drug-hypersensitive strain suggests that identifying molecular requirements for pellicle growth could lead to development of novel interventions against mycobacterial infections. Our findings also suggest that a class of drugs that can disrupt M. tuberculosis biofilm formation, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, has the potential to overcome drug tolerance. PMID:23653446

  7. Tunable Adsorption and Film Formation of Mussel Adhesive Protein by Potential Control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xie, Guoxin; Pan, Jinshan

    2017-01-23

    Mussel adhesive proteins are of great interest in many applications because of their outstanding adhesive property and film-forming ability. Understanding and controlling the film formation and its performance is crucial for the effective use of such proteins. In this study, we focus on the potential controlled film formation and compaction of one mussel adhesive protein, Mefp-1. The adsorption and film-forming behavior of Mefp-1 on a platinum (Pt) substrate under applied potentials were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, potential-controlled electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Moreover, microfriction measurements were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the Mefp-1 films formed at selected potentials. The results led to the conclusion that Mefp-1 adsorbs on the Pt substrate through both electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions and shows an effective blocking effect for the electroactive sites on the substrate. The properties of the adsorbed Mefp-1 film vary with the applied potential, and the compactness of the adsorbed Mefp-1 film can be reversibly tuned by the applied potential.

  8. Espresso coffees, caffeine and chlorogenic acid intake: potential health implications.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Thomas W M; Stalmach, Angelique; Lean, Michael E J; Crozier, Alan

    2012-01-01

    HPLC analysis of 20 commercial espresso coffees revealed 6-fold differences in caffeine levels, a 17-fold range of caffeoylquinic acid contents, and 4-fold differences in the caffeoylquinic acid : caffeine ratio. These variations reflect differences in batch-to-batch bean composition, possible blending of arabica with robusta beans, as well as roasting and grinding procedures, but the predominant factor is likely to be the amount of beans used in the coffee-making/barista processes. The most caffeine in a single espresso was 322 mg and a further three contained >200 mg, exceeding the 200 mg day(-1) upper limit recommended during pregnancy by the UK Food Standards Agency. This snap-shot of high-street expresso coffees suggests the published assumption that a cup of strong coffee contains 50 mg caffeine may be misleading. Consumers at risk of toxicity, including pregnant women, children and those with liver disease, may unknowingly ingest excessive caffeine from a single cup of espresso coffee. As many coffee houses prepare larger volume coffees, such as Latte and Cappuccino, by dilution of a single or double shot of expresso, further study on these products is warranted. New data are needed to provide informative labelling, with attention to bean variety, preparation, and barista methods.

  9. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  10. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  11. Studying Pellet Formation of a Filamentous Fungus Rhizopus oryzae to Enhance Organic Acid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan; Chen, Shulin

    Using pelletized fungal biomass can effectively improve the fermentation performance for most of fugal strains. This article studied the effects of inoculum and medium compositions such as potato dextrose broth (PDB) as carbon source, soybean peptone, calcium carbonate, and metal ions on pellet formation of Rhizopus oryzae. It has been found that metal ions had significantly negative effects on pellet formation whereas soybean peptone had positive effects. In addition PDB and calcium carbonate were beneficial to R. oryzae for growing small smooth pellets during the culture. The study also demonstrated that an inoculum size of less than 1.5×109 spores/L had no significant influence on pellet formation. Thus, a new approach to form pellets has been developed using only PDB, soybean peptone, and calcium carbonate. Meanwhile, palletized fungal fermentation significantly enhanced organic acid production. Lactic acid concentration reached 65.0 g/L in 30 h using pelletized R. oryzae NRRL 395, and fumeric acid concentration reached 31.0 g/L in 96 h using pelletized R. oryzae ATCC 20344.

  12. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  13. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; Martin-Uriz, Patxi San; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  14. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-04-23

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets.

  15. Understanding Particle Formation: Solubility of Free Fatty Acids as Polysorbate 20 Degradation Byproducts in Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Nidhi; Demeule, Barthélemy; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the aqueous solubilities at 2-8 °C of the major free fatty acids (FFAs) formed by polysorbate 20 (PS20) degradation and identify possible ways to predict, delay, or mitigate subsequent particle formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. The FFA solubility limits at 2-8 °C were determined by titrating known amounts of FFA in monoclonal antibody formulations and identifying the FFA concentration leading to visible and subvisible particle formation. The solubility limits of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids at 2-8 °C were 17 ± 1 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 1.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.04% (w/v) PS20 at pH 5.4 and >22 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 0.75 ± 0.25 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.02% (w/v) PS20 at pH 6.0. For the first time, a 3D correlation between FFA solubility, PS20 concentration, and pH has been reported providing a rational approach for the formulator to balance these with regard to potential particle formation. The results suggest that the lower solubilities of the longer chain FFAs, generated from degradation of the stearate, palmitate, and myristate fraction of PS20, is the primary cause of seeding and subsequent FFA precipitation rather than the most abundant lauric acid.

  16. Cluster Formation of Sulfuric Acid with Dimethylamine or Diamines and Detection with Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. N.; McMurry, P. H.; Hanson, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to chemically ionize clusters for detection. In this study, we compare measured cluster concentrations formed by reacting sulfuric acid vapor with dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine) using nitrate and acetate ions. We show from flow reactor measurements that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with weak acidities. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe the chemical ionization processes and lifetimes of ions composed of sulfuric acid and base molecules. We then model the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways, including chemical ionization, ion-induced clustering, and ion decomposition, to better identify which cluster types cannot be chemically ionized by nitrate. Our results show that sulfuric acid dimer with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimer with 2 or more base molecules cannot be chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that cluster concentrations measured with acetate CI gives a better representation of both cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  17. Formation of complex precursors of amino acids by irradiation of simulated interstellar media with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Suzuki, N.; Taniuchi, T.; Kaneko, T.; Yoshida, S.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in such extraterrestrial bodies as meteorites and comets Amino acids were identified in the extracts from Murchison meteorite and other carbonaceous chondrites It is hypothesized that these compounds are originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts ISDs in molecular clouds by cosmic rays and ultraviolet light UV Formation of amino acid precursors by high energy protons or UV irradiation of simulated ISDs was reported by several groups The amino acid precursors were however not well-characterized We irradiated a frozen mixture of methanol ammonia and water with heavy ions to study possible organic compounds abiotically formed in molecular clouds by cosmic rays A mixture of methanol ammonia and water was irradiated with carbon beams 290 MeV u from a heavy ion accelerator HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences Japan Irradiation was performed either at room temperature liquid phase or at 77 K solid phase The products were characterized by gel filtration chromatography GFC FT-IR pyrolysis PY -GC MS etc Amino acids were analyzed by HPLC and GC MS after acid hydrolysis or the products Amino acids such as glycine and alanine were identified in the products in both the cases of liquid phase and solid phase irradiation Energy yields G-values of glycine were 0 014 liquid phase and 0 007 solid phase respectively Average molecular weights of the products were estimated as to 2300 in both the case Aromatic hydrocarbons N-containing heterocyclic

  18. Synthesis of amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as Potential Radiation Protective Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    ation Management S SI ____ K> AD Synthesis of Amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as Potential Radiation Protective Agents * 0 Annual Report "TIi: o DTIC...Sftcuntiy Clatuftcatio") Synthesis of Amino Derivatives of Dithio Acids as PotentitI- Radiation Protective Agents 12l PERISONAL. Ak.TI4OR(S) * William...methyl- picoline derivatives was accomplished. Use of N-mthyl-2,6-dimethylpyridine also allowed the synthesis of a bis(dithioacetic acid) function not

  19. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  20. Oil shale potential of the Heath and Tyler formations, Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, W.E.; Cole, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The units in the middle of the Heath formation below the gypsum beds were found to have the highest oil yields. That interval was generally 25 to 50 ft (7.6 to 15.2 m) thick. The upper portion of the Heath formation yielded as much as 9.8 gal/ton in section 9, and 14.9 gal/ton in section 10. The Tyler formation was determined to have very low oil potential, with the maximum yield being 2.2 gal/ton. The instability of some of the Heath slopes could present problems in the mining of oil shale. Specific stratigraphic horizons in which zones of high and low oil and metal contents occur would be extremely difficult to map in areas where the units have been displaced by landslide movement.

  1. Light and acid dual-responsive organogel formation based on m-methyl red derivative.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinhua; Gao, Aiping; Lv, Haiting; Wu, Yan; Wang, Xiuxiu; Fan, Yang

    2013-12-07

    A new gelator 1 that included m-methyl red was synthesized and fully characterized. It was found that the organogel of 1 was stable in DMSO even if the organogel was stimulated by acid or light. The organogel was thoroughly characterized using various microscopic techniques including field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. The organogel exhibited tunable structures and optical properties under different stimulation. The regular nanoring structure was turned into microspheres after the organogel in DMSO was stimulated at 254 nm light or acid. At the same time, the color of molecule 1 in gel state and solution state was all changed after stimulation by light or acid. The hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking were found to be the main driving forces for gel formation. This dual-responsive gel held promise for soft materials application in upscale smart responsive materials.

  2. Highly efficient peptide formation from N-acetylaminoacyl-AMP anhydride and free amino acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of the N-blocked dipeptide, N-acetylglycylglycine, from N-acetylglycyl adenylate anhydride and glycine in aqueous solution at 25 C, and at various PH's are reported. The reaction is of interest in that over a physiologically relevant pH range (6-8), peptide synthesis proceeds more rapidly than hydrolysis, even at those pH's at which this compound becomes increasingly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Under similar conditions, the corresponding unblocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides are considerably more unstable, and undergo appreciable hydrlysis in the presence of free amino acid. Because N-blocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides serve as model compounds of peptidyl adenylate anhydrides, these results suggest that primitive amino acid polymerization systems may have operated by cyclic reactivation of the peptidyl carboxyl group, rather than that of the incoming amino acid.

  3. The formation of calcium lactate crystals is responsible for concentrated acid whey thickening.

    PubMed

    Mimouni, A; Bouhallab, S; Famelart, M H; Naegele, D; Schuck, P

    2007-01-01

    The use of spray drying for dehydration of acid whey is generally limited by the appearance of uncontrolled thickening and solidifying of the whey mass during the lactose crystallization step. The origin of this physical change is still unknown and probably linked to complex interactions between physical properties and chemical composition of these products. To understand this phenomenon, we simulated the thickening of concentrated acid whey on a laboratory scale by measuring the flow resistance changes as a function of time and whey composition. The thickening process was characterized by an amplitude of torque and a lag time (induction time). Thickening of lactic acid whey concentrate occurred regardless of the presence of whey proteins or lactose crystals. Moreover, this work clearly demonstrated that the thickening process was due to the formation of filamentous structures corresponding to calcium lactate crystals and showed a large dependence on calcium and lactate contents, pH, and phosphate concentration.

  4. Dissociative electron-ion recombination of the interstellar species protonated glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and methyl formate.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Patrick A; Osborne, David S; Adams, Nigel G

    2012-03-22

    Recently, methyl formate, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid have been detected in the Interstellar Medium, ISM. The rate constants, α(e), for dissociative electron-ion recombination of protonated gycolaldehyde, (HOCH(2)CHO)H(+), and protonated methyl formate, (HCOOCH(3))H(+), have been determined at 300 K in a variable temperature flowing afterglow using a Langmuir probe to obtain the electron density. The recombination rate constants at 300 K are 3.2 × 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) for protonated methyl formate and 7.5 × 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) for protonated glycolaldehyde. The recombination rate constant of protonated acetic acid could not be directly measured, but it appears to have a rate constant, α(e), on the 10(-7) cm(3) s(-1) scale. Several high- and low-temperature measurements for protonated methyl formate were made. In addition, an α(e) measurement at 220 K for protonated glycolaldehyde was performed. The astrochemical implications of the rates of recombination, α(e), and protonation routes are discussed.

  5. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela; Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-01

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO 4, by H 3PO 4 is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4)·2H 2O and Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H 3PO 4 concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H 3PO 4 is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O-SiO 2 composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO 4·2H 2O fertilizer.

  6. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Degradation Using UV-Persulfate Process: Modeling of the Degradation and Chlorate Formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Yalei; Peng, Yue; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Crittenden, John C

    2016-01-19

    In this study, we investigated the destruction and by-product formation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) using ultraviolet light and persulfate (UV-PS). Additionally, we developed a first-principles kinetic model to simulate both PFOA destruction and by-product and chlorate (ClO3(-)) formation in ultrapure water (UW), surface water (SW), and wastewater (WW). PFOA degradation was significantly suppressed in the presence of chloride and carbonate species and did not occur until all the chloride was converted to ClO3(-) in UW and for low DOC concentrations in SW. The model was able to simulate the PS decay, pH changes, radical concentrations, and ClO3(-) formation for UW and SW. However, our model was unable to simulate PFOA degradation well in WW, possibly from PS activation by NOM, which in turn produced sulfate radicals.

  7. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic acid protects colon cancer HCT116 cells from deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by inhibiting apoptosome formation.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tohru; Yui, Satoko; Hirai, Tadashi; Fujii, Takami; Okada, Sawami; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDC) requires prolonged (≥5 h) preincubation to exhibit effective protection of colon cancer HCT116 cells from deoxycholic acid (DC)-induced apoptosis. Although UDC diminished DC-mediated caspase-9 activation, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria was not inhibited, indicating that UDC acts on the steps of caspase-9 activation. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the effects of UDC on the factors involved in caspase-9 activation. We found that UDC had no significant effect on the expression of antiapoptotic XIAP. Furthermore, UDC did not affect the expression or release of proapoptotic Smac/DIABLO, or the association of XIAP and Smac/DIABLO. In contrast, association of Apaf-1 and caspase-9 stimulated by 500 μM DC was inhibited by UDC pretreatment. Although UDC caused remarkable activation of Akt/PKB, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor did not significantly reduce UDC-mediated cytoprotection. Furthermore, phosphorylation of threonine residues on caspase-9 after UDC pretreatment could not be detected. UDC-mediated cytoprotection was independent of the MAPK pathway, and cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogue did not inhibit DC-induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that UDC protects colon cancer cells from apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids, by inhibiting apoptosome formation independently of the survival signals mediated by the PI3K, MAPK, or cAMP pathways.

  9. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  10. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ˙CH2OO˙ concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  11. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  12. A meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain in Fujian Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi Yong; Lin, Chang Cheng; Liu, Jing Xiong; Wu, De Hui; Lian, Dong Ying; Chen, Bin Bin

    2010-05-01

    Based on the acid rain and concurrent meteorological observational data during the past 10 years in Fujian Province, China, the dependence of distribution characteristics of acid rain on season, rain rate, weather pattern and dominant airflow in four regions of Fujian Province is analyzed. On the annual average, the acid rain frequency is the highest (above 40%) in the southern and mid-eastern regions, and the lowest (16.2%) in the western region. The acid rain occurs most frequently in spring and winter, and least frequent in summer. The acid rain frequency in general increases with the increase of precipitation. It also depend on the direction of dominant airflows at 850 hPa. In the mid-eastern region, more than 40% acid rains appear when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW, S and SE. In the southern region, high acid rain occurrence happens when the dominant wind directions are NW, W, SW and S. In the northern region, 41.8% acid rains occur when the southwesterly is pronounced. In the western region, the southwesterly is associated with a 17% acid rain rate. The examination of meteorological sounding conditions over Fuzhou, Xiamen and Shaowu cities shows that the acid rain frequency increases with increased inversion thickness. Based on the results above, a meteorological potential forecast model for acid rain is established and tested in 2007. The result is encouraging. The model provides an objective basis for the development of acid rain forecasting operation in the province.

  13. Precipitate Formation Potential of Resin Regeneration Effluent in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-10-09

    Calculations performed as part of this study indicate that injection of treated groundwater containing treated regenerant solution has a high potential for precipitate formation that could lead to plugging of formation porosity surrounding the injection well. In the worst case scenario, substantial plugging could occur within a year of the initiation of injection. Some uncertainty is associated with respect to this conclusion. The uncertainty results from the fact that equilibrium with the most stable mineral assemblage cannot always be assumed and that slow precipitation rates could occur and reliable estimates of precipitation kinetics under Hanford aquifer conditions are not available. It is recommended that the potential of calcium phosphate precipitation be investigated further using a combination of laboratory and field investigations.

  14. Redox potentials of dopamine and its supramolecular complex with aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Han, Ling-Li; Du, Chun-Mei; Yu, Zhang-Yu

    2014-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) can be oxidized to dopamine quinone (DAquinone) through a one-step, two-electron redox reaction. The electron transfer property of DA and its supramolecular complex with aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated by the theoretical calculations. We calculated the standard redox potentials ( E o) of DA/DAquinone at the MP2/6-31G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G( d,p), MP2/6-31+G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G( d,p), MP2/6-31G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p), and MP2/6-311+G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels. Comparing the experimental value, the redox potentials of DA/DAquinone obtained at MP2//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p) and MP2//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels can be considered as the upper and lower estimates. DA can form supramolecular complex (DA-Asp) with Asp through hydrogen bond (H-bond). Therefore, the values of 0.631 and 0.628 V obtained at MP2//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p) and MP2//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels for DA-Asp/DAquinone-Asp can be proposed as the upper and lower estimates of a probable (about 0.630 V) value of the corresponding redox potential. The calculated E o values of DA-Asp/DAquinone-Asp at the four theoretical levels are upper than those of DA/DAquinone, which indicates that the formation of H-bonds weaken the electron-donating ability of DA.

  15. Wet weather impact on trihalomethane formation potential in tributaries to drinking water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Alkhatib, E; Peters, R

    2008-04-01

    During rain storm events, land surface runoff and resuspension of bottom sediments cause an increase in Trihalomethane (THM) precursors in rivers. These precursors, when chlorinated at water treatment facilities will lead to the formation of THMs and hence impact drinking water resources. In order to evaluate the wet weather impact on the potential formation of THMs, river samples were collected before, during and after three rain storms ranging from 15.2 to 24.9 mm precipitation. The samples were tested for THM formation potential and other indicators including UV254 absorbance, turbidity and volatile suspended solid (VSS). Average levels of THMs increased from 61 microg/l during dry weather to 131 microg/l during wet weather, and then went back to 81 microg/l after rain ended. Wet weather values of THM are well above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) 80 microg/l, set by EPA for drinking water. THM indicators also exhibited similar trends. Average levels increased from 0.6 to 1.8 abs; 2.6 to 6 ntu; and 7.5 to 15 mg/l respectively for UV254, turbidity and VSS. A positive correlation was observed between THM formation and THM indicators. The t-test of significance (p-value) was less than 0.05 for all indicators, and R values ranged from 0.85 to 0.92 between THMs and the indicators, and 0.72 to 0.9 among indicators themselves.

  16. Potential of Aerosol Liquid Water to Facilitate Organic Aerosol Formation: Assessing Knowledge Gaps about Precursors and Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Waxman, Eleanor M; Turpin, Barbara J; Volkamer, Rainer; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2017-03-06

    Isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX), glyoxal, and methylglyoxal are ubiquitous water-soluble organic gases (WSOGs) that partition to aerosol liquid water (ALW) and clouds to form aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Recent laboratory-derived Setschenow (or salting) coefficients suggest glyoxal's potential to form aqSOA is enhanced by high aerosol salt molality, or "salting-in". In the southeastern U.S., aqSOA is responsible for a significant fraction of ambient organic aerosol, and correlates with sulfate mass. However, the mechanistic explanation for this correlation remains elusive, and an assessment of the importance of different WSOGs to aqSOA is currently missing. We employ EPA's CMAQ model to the continental U.S. during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to compare the potential of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and IEPOX to partition to ALW, as the initial step toward aqSOA formation. Among these three studied compounds, IEPOX is a dominant contributor, ∼72% on average in the continental U.S., to potential aqSOA mass due to Henry's Law constants and molecular weights. Glyoxal contributes significantly, and application of the Setschenow coefficient leads to a greater than 3-fold model domain average increase in glyoxal's aqSOA mass potential. Methylglyoxal is predicted to be a minor contributor. Acid or ammonium - catalyzed ring-opening IEPOX chemistry as well as sulfate-driven ALW and the associated molality may explain positive correlations between SOA and sulfate during SOAS and illustrate ways in which anthropogenic sulfate could regulate biogenic aqSOA formation, ways not presently included in atmospheric models but relevant to development of effective control strategies.

  17. Analysis of the potential formation of a Breccia chimney beneath the WIPP repository

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegler, P.

    1982-05-01

    This report evaluates the potential formation of a Breccia pipe beginning at the Bell Canyon aquifer beneath the WIPP repository and the resulting release of radioactivity to the surface. Rock mechanics considerations indicate that the formation of a Breccia pipe by collapse of a cavern is not reasonable. Even if rock mechanics is ignored, the overlying strata act as a barrier and would prevent the release of radioactivity to the biosphere. Gradual formation of a Breccia pipe is so slow that the plutonium-239 in the waste (one of the most important long-lived components) would decay during formation. If Bell Lake and San Simon Sinks are the surface manifestation of a regional deep dissolution wedge, such a wedge is too far removed to represent pipe forming activity near the WIPP site. The formation of a Breccia pipe under the WIPP repository is highly unlikely. If it did occur, the concentration of plutonium-239 in brine reaching the surface would be less than the maximum permissible concentration in water specified in the Code of Federal Regulation Title 10, part 20.

  18. Sphygmomanometers and thermometers as potential fomites of Staphylococcus haemolyticus: biofilm formation in the presence of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Sued, Bruna Pinto Ribeiro; Pereira, Paula Marcele Afonso; Faria, Yuri Vieira; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Binatti, Vanessa Batista; dos Santos, Kátia Regina Netto; Seabra, Sérgio Henrique; Hirata, Raphael; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza; Pereira, José Augusto Adler

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The association between Staphylococcus haemolyticus and severe nosocomial infections is increasing. However, the extent to which fomites contribute to the dissemination of this pathogen through patients and hospital wards remains unknown. OBJECTIVES In the present study, sphygmomanometers and thermometers were evaluated as potential fomites of oxacillin-resistant S. haemolyticus (ORSH). The influence of oxacillin and vancomycin on biofilm formation by ORSH strains isolated from fomites was also investigated. METHODS The presence of ORSH on swabs taken from fomite surfaces in a Brazilian hospital was assessed using standard microbiological procedures. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles were determined by the disk diffusion method, and clonal distribution was assessed in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assays. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of oxacillin and vancomycin were evaluated via the broth microdilution method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were performed to detect the mecA and icaAD genes. ORSH strains grown in media containing 1/4 MIC of vancomycin or oxacillin were investigated for slime production and biofilm formation on glass, polystyrene and polyurethane catheter surfaces. FINDINGS ORSH strains comprising five distinct PFGE types were isolated from sphygmomanometers (n = 5) and a thermometer (n = 1) used in intensive care units and surgical wards. ORSH strains isolated from fomites showed susceptibility to only linezolid and vancomycin and were characterised as multi-drug resistant (MDR). Slime production, biofilm formation and the survival of sessile bacteria differed and were independent of the presence of the icaAD and mecA genes, PFGE type and subtype. Vancomycin and oxacillin did not inhibit biofilm formation by vancomycin-susceptible ORSH strains on abiotic surfaces, including on the catheter surface. Enhanced biofilm formation was observed in some situations. Moreover, a sub-lethal dose of vancomycin induced

  19. Revised Backbone-Virtual-Bond-Angle Potentials to Treat the l- and d-Amino Acid Residues in the Coarse-Grained United Residue (UNRES) Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Continuing our effort to introduce d-amino-acid residues in the united residue (UNRES) force field developed in our laboratory, in this work the Cα ··· Cα ··· Cα backbone-virtual-bond-valence-angle (θ) potentials for systems containing d-amino-acid residues have been developed. The potentials were determined by integrating the combined energy surfaces of all possible triplets of terminally blocked glycine, alanine, and proline obtained with ab initio molecular quantum mechanics at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level to calculate the corresponding potentials of mean force (PMFs). Subsequently, analytical expressions were fitted to the PMFs to give the virtual-bond-valence potentials to be used in UNRES. Alanine represented all types of amino-acid residues except glycine and proline. The blocking groups were either the N-acetyl and N′,N′-dimethyl or N-acetyl and pyrrolidyl group, depending on whether the residue next in sequence was an alanine-type or a proline residue. A total of 126 potentials (63 symmetry-unrelated potentials for each set of terminally blocking groups) were determined. Together with the torsional, double-torsional, and side-chain-rotamer potentials for polypeptide chains containing d-amino-acid residues determined in our earlier work (Sieradzan et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2012, 8, 4746), the new virtual-bond-angle (θ) potentials now constitute the complete set of physics-based potentials with which to run coarse-grained simulations of systems containing d-amino-acid residues. The ability of the extended UNRES force field to reproduce thermodynamics of polypeptide systems with d-amino-acid residues was tested by comparing the experimentally measured and the calculated free energies of helix formation of model KLALKLALxxLKLALKLA peptides, where x denotes any d- or l- amino-acid residue. The obtained results demonstrate that the UNRES force field with the new potentials reproduce the changes of free energies of helix formation upon d

  20. Effect of pH on conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) formation of linolenic acid biohydrogenation by ruminal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongjae

    2013-08-01

    Conventional beliefs surrounding the linolenic acid (LNA; cis-9 cis-12 cis-15 C18:3) biohydrogenation (BH) pathway propose that it converts to stearic acid (SA) without the formation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as intermediate isomers. However, an advanced study (Lee and Jenkins, 2011) verified that LNA BH yields multiple CLAs. This study utilized the stable isotope tracer to investigate the BH intermediates of (13)C-LNA with different pH conditions (5.5 and 6.5). The (13)C enrichment was calculated as a (13)C/(12)C ratio of labeled minus unlabeled. After 24 h, eight CLA isomers were significantly enriched on both pH treatment, this result verifies that these CLAs originated from (13)C-LNA BH which supports the results of Lee and Jenkins (2011). The enrichment of cis-cis double bond CLAs (cis-9 cis-11 and cis-10 cis-12 CLA) were significantly higher at low pH conditions. Furthermore, the concentration of cis-10 cis-12 CLA at low pH was four times higher than at high pH conditions after a 3 h incubation. These differences support the LNA BH pathways partial switch under different pH conditions, with a strong influence on the cis-cis CLA at low pH. Several mono-, di-, and tri-enoic fatty acid isomers were enriched during 24 h of incubation, but the enrichment was decreased or restricted at low pH treatment. Based on these results, it is proposed that low pH conditions may cause a changed or limited capacity of the isomerization and reduction steps in BH.

  1. Tribological properties of boric acid and boric-acid-forming surfaces: Part 2, Formation and self-lubrication mechanisms of boric acid films on boron- and boric-oxide-containing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A.; Busch, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the formation and self-lubricating mechanisms of boric acid films on boron- and boric oxide-containing surfaces. As reported in part I, boric acid, owing to a layered triclinic crystal structure and weak interlayer bonds, enjoys an unusual lubrication capability. RF-magnetron sputtering and vacuum evaporation techniques were used to produce thin coatings of boron and boric oxides on steel substrates. The results of tribological experiments indicate that the room temperature friction coefficient of tribosystems that include boron and/or boric oxide coatings ranges from 0.05 to 0.07, depending on the coating type. Laser-Raman spectroscopy of these surfaces revealed that this low friction is associated with a thin boric acid film that forms on the surfaces of these coatings. The fabrication and potential importance of boric acid and boric acid-forming surfaces for practical applications are enumerated. Surface engineering of tribomaterials, such as these demonstrated in this paper, is suggested as a new lubrication concept for use in present and future tribological industries. 16 refs.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G.; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P.N.; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs) underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is un-explored. The primary objectives of this investigation are to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (b) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemo-resistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were utilized for this study. While EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (a) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation and sphere-forming frequency, (b) increasing sphere disintegration, (c) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (d) decreasing pro-inflammatory metabolites in mice. Additionally, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for PTEN/Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring CRC. PMID:25193342

  3. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer, are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSC/CSLC), underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is unexplored. The primary objectives of this investigation are (i) to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (ii) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemoresistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were used for this study. Although EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (i) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation, and sphere-forming frequency, (ii) increasing sphere disintegration, (iii) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (iv) decreasing proinflammatory metabolites in mice. In addition, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization, and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for the PTEN-Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring colorectal cancer.

  4. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit phosphoinositide formation and chemotaxis in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, R I; Benincaso, A I; Knoell, C T; Larkin, J K; Austen, K F; Robinson, D R

    1993-01-01

    Earlier studies demonstrated that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation attenuates the chemotactic response of neutrophils and the generation of leukotriene (LT) B4 by neutrophils stimulated with calcium ionophore; however, the mechanisms and relationship of these effects were not examined. Neutrophils and monocytes from eight healthy individuals were examined before and after 3 and 10 wk of dietary supplementation with 20 g SuperEPA daily, which provides 9.4 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 5 g docosahexaenoic acid. The maximal neutrophil chemotactic response to LTB4, assessed in Boyden microchambers, decreased by 69% after 3 wk and by 93% after 10 wk from prediet values. The formation of [3H]inositol tris-phosphate (IP3) by [3H]inositol-labeled neutrophils stimulated by LTB4 decreased by 71% after 3 wk (0.033 +/- 0.013% [3H] release, mean +/- SEM) and by 90% after 10 wk (0.011 +/- 0.011%) from predict values (0.114 +/- 0.030%) as quantitated by beta-scintillation counting after resolution on HPLC. LTB4-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis and IP3 formation correlated significantly (P < 0.0001); each response correlated closely and negatively with the EPA content of the neutrophil phosphatidylinositol (PI) pool (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.0005, respectively). Neither the affinities and densities of the high and low affinity LTB4 receptors on neutrophils nor LTB4-mediated diglyceride formation changed appreciably during the study. Similar results were observed in neutrophils activated with platelet-activating factor (PAF). The summed formation of LTB4 plus LTB5 was selectively inhibited in calcium ionophore-stimulated neutrophils and was also inhibited in zymosan-stimulated neutrophils. The inhibition of the summed formation of LTB4 plus LTB5 in calcium ionophore-stimulated neutrophils and in zymosan-stimulated neutrophils did not correlate significantly with the EPA content of the PI pool. The data indicate that dietary omega-3 PUFA

  5. Unexpected Formation of Low Amounts of (R)-Configurated anteiso-Fatty Acids in Rumen Fluid Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Abdurahman, Halima; Ruoff, Tanja; Kaffarnik, Stefanie; Steingass, Herbert; Vetter, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Anteiso-fatty acids (aFA) with odd carbon number are a class of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA) mainly produced by bacteria. Bacterial sources are also made responsible for their occurrence in the low percent-range in lipids of ruminants (meat and milk) and fish. aFAs are chiral molecules and typically occur predominantly in form of (S)-enantiomers, and their primary precursor has been noted to be isoleucine. Yet, low proportions of (R)-aFAs were also detected in fish and cheese samples. Here we investigated the potential formation of (R)-aFAs by means of incubation experiments with rumen fluid from fistulated cows. Supplementation of rumen fluid with both L- and DL-isoleucine, resulted in a significant (α <0.05) increase of the aFA concentrations but in both cases enantiopure (S)-aFAs were observed. By contrast, incubations without addition of any isoleucine lead to a significant (α <0.05) formation of small proportions of (R)-aFAs similarly to those previously observed in fish and cheese. These results were consistently reproduced in three different years with rumen fluid from different cows fed different diets. All findings point to the existence of a further biosynthesis pathway of aFAs with different stereospecificity than the classic one using isoleucine as primer. PMID:28129363

  6. Gallstone formation in guinea pigs under different dietary conditions. Effect of vitamin C on bile acid pattern.

    PubMed

    Bergman, F; Curstedt, T; Eriksson, H; van der Linden, W; Sjövall, J

    1981-04-01

    Guinea pigs formed gallstones when fed chow supplemented with cholesterol and cholic acid. Although the stones contained little or no cholesterol the changes in biliary bile acid and lipid composition were similar to those observed in other rodents under conditions of cholesterol gallstone formation. Addition of cholestyramine to chow had a midly lithogenic effect. Hypovitaminosis C in animals given cholesterol and cholic acid resulted in an increase of the cholesterol content of the gallstones. The composition of biliary bile acids was markedly changed. Reductive formation of deoxycholic acid decreased and oxidative formation of ketonic bile acid increased. The results show that vitamin C may influence the redox state of the intestinal microorganisms microorganisms responsible for these conversions.

  7. Formation and growth of molecular clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ammonia, and dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Joseph W; Doren, Douglas J; Johnston, Murray V

    2014-07-24

    The structures and thermochemistry of molecular clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ammonia, and/or dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH or DMA) are explored using a combination of Monte Carlo configuration sampling, semiempirical calculations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Clusters are of the general form [(BH(+))n(HSO4(-))n(H2O)y], where B = NH3 or DMA, 2 ≤ n ≤ 8, and 0 ≤ y ≤ 10. Cluster formulas are written based on the computed structures, which uniformly show proton transfer from each sulfuric acid molecule to a base molecule while the water molecules remain un-ionized. Cluster formation is energetically favorable, owing to strong electrostatic attraction among the ions. Water has a minor effect on the energetics of cluster formation, lowering the free energy of formation by ∼ 10% depending on the cluster size and number of water molecules. Cluster growth (addition of one base molecule and one sulfuric acid molecule to a pre-existing cluster) and base substitution (substituting DMA for ammonia) are also energetically favorable processes for both anhydrous and hydrated clusters. However, the effect of water is different for different bases. Hydrated ammonium bisulfate clusters have a more favorable free energy for growth (i.e., incrementing n with fixed y) than anhydrous clusters, while the reverse is observed for dimethylammonium bisulfate clusters, where the free energy for growth is more favorable for anhydrous clusters. The substitution of DMA for ammonia in bisulfate clusters is favorable but exhibits a complex water dependence. Base substitution in smaller bisulfate clusters is enhanced by the presence of water, while base substitution in larger bisulfate clusters is less favorable for hydrated clusters than that for anhydrous clusters. While DMA substitution can stabilize small clusters containing one or a few sulfuric acid molecules, the free energy advantage of forming amine clusters relative to ammonia clusters becomes less

  8. Ketoprofen-induced formation of amino acid photoadducts: possible explanation for photocontact allergy to ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Isabella; Persson, Elin; Ekebergh, Andreas; Mårtensson, Jerker; Börje, Anna

    2014-07-21

    Photocontact allergy is a well-known side effect of topical preparations of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen. Photocontact allergy to ketoprofen appears to induce a large number of photocross allergies to both structurally similar and structurally unrelated compounds. Contact and photocontact allergies are explained by structural modification of skin proteins by the allergen. This complex is recognized by the immune system, which initiates an immune response. We have studied ketoprofen's interaction with amino acids to better understand ketoprofen's photoallergenic ability. Irradiation of ketoprofen and amino acid analogues resulted in four different ketoprofen photodecarboxylation products (6-9) together with a fifth photoproduct (5). Dihydroquinazoline 5 was shown to be a reaction product between the indole moiety of 3-methylindole (Trp analogue) and the primary amine benzylamine (Lys analogue). In presence of air, dihydroquinazoline 5 quickly degrades into stable quinazolinone 12. The corresponding quinazolinone (17) was formed upon irradiation of ketoprofen and the amino acids N-acetyl-l-Trp ethyl ester and l-Lys ethyl ester. The formation of these models of an immunogenic complex starts with the ketoprofen-sensitized formation of singlet oxygen, which reacts with the indole moiety of Trp. The formed intermediate subsequently reacts with the primary amino functionality of Lys, or its analogue, to form a Trp-Lys adduct or a mimic thereof. The formation of a specific immunogenic complex that does not contain the allergen but that can still induce photocontact allergy would explain the large number of photocross allergies with ketoprofen. These allergens do not have to be structurally similar as long as they can generate singlet oxygen. To the best of our knowledge, there is no other suggested explanation for ketoprofen's photoallergenic properties that can account for the observed photocross allergies. The formation of a specific immunogenic

  9. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3-1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  10. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-oleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2015-04-29

    The solubility of starch-inclusion complexes affects the digestibility and bioavailability of the included molecules. Acetylation with two degrees of substitution, 0.041 (low) and 0.091 (high), combined without or with a β-amylase treatment was employed to improve the yield and solubility of the inclusion complex between debranched potato starch and oleic acid. Both soluble and insoluble complexes were recovered and analyzed for their degree of acetylation, complexation yields, molecular size distributions, X-ray diffraction patterns, and thermal properties. Acetylation significantly increased the amount of recovered soluble complexes as well as the complexed oleic acid in both soluble and insoluble complexes. High-acetylated debranched-only starch complexed the highest amount of oleic acid (38.0 mg/g) in the soluble complexes; low-acetylated starch with or without the β-amylase treatment resulted in the highest complexed oleic acid in the insoluble complexes (37.6-42.9 mg/g). All acetylated starches displayed the V-type X-ray pattern, and the melting temperature generally decreased with acetylation. The results indicate that starch acetylation with or without the β-amylase treatment can improve the formation and solubility of the starch-oleic acid complex.

  11. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C F; Lin, S Y; Peir, J J; Liao, J W; Lin, Y C; Chou, F I

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 μg (10)B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg (10)B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4-6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  12. Therapeutic Potential of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mycolic Acid Transporter, MmpL3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Wallach, Joshua B.; North, E. Jeffrey; Lee, Richard E.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, whole-cell-based screens for novel small molecule inhibitors active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in culture followed by the whole-genome sequencing of spontaneous resistant mutants have identified multiple chemical scaffolds thought to kill the bacterium through the inactivation of the mycolic acid transporter, MmpL3. Consistent with the fact that MmpL3 is required for the formation of the mycobacterial outer membrane, we have conclusively shown in this study, using conditionally regulated knockdown mutants, that mmpL3 is required for the replication and viability of M. tuberculosis, both under standard laboratory growth conditions and during the acute and chronic phases of infection in mice. Speaking for the vulnerability of this target, silencing mmpL3 had a rapid bactericidal effect on actively replicating cells in vitro and reduced by 3 to 5 logs in less than 4 weeks the bacterial loads of acutely and chronically infected mouse lungs, respectively. Depletion of MmpL3 further rendered M. tuberculosis hypersusceptible to MmpL3 inhibitors. The exquisite vulnerability of MmpL3 at all stages of the infection establishes this transporter as an attractive new target with the potential to improve and shorten current drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis chemotherapies. PMID:27297488

  13. Antimicrobial Property of Lauric Acid Against Propionibacterium acnes: Its Therapeutic Potential for Inflammatory Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C.; Fang, Jia-You; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The strong bactericidal properties of lauric acid (C12:0), a middle chain-free fatty acid commonly found in natural products, have been shown in a number of studies. However, it has not been demonstrated whether lauric acid can be used for acne treatment as a natural antibiotic against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), which promotes follicular inflammation (inflammatory acne). This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of lauric acid against P. acnes both in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of the skin bacteria P. acnes, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) with lauric acid yielded minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against the bacterial growth over 15 times lower than those of benzoyl peroxide (BPO). The lower MIC values of lauric acid indicate stronger antimicrobial properties than that of BPO. The detected values of half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of lauric acid on P. acnes, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis growth indicate that P. acnes is the most sensitive to lauric acid among these bacteria. In addition, lauric acid did not induce cytotoxicity to human sebocytes. Notably, both intradermal injection and epicutaneous application of lauric acid effectively decreased the number of P. acnes colonized with mouse ears, thereby relieving P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. The obtained data highlight the potential of using lauric acid as an alternative treatment for antibiotic therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:19387482

  14. The formate channel FocA exports the products of mixed-acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Du, Juan; Schwarzer, Nikola J; Gerbig-Smentek, Elke; Einsle, Oliver; Andrade, Susana L A

    2012-08-14

    Formate is a major metabolite in the anaerobic fermentation of glucose by many enterobacteria. It is translocated across cellular membranes by the pentameric ion channel/transporter FocA that, together with the nitrite channel NirC, forms the formate/nitrite transporter (FNT) family of membrane transport proteins. Here we have carried out an electrophysiological analysis of FocA from Salmonella typhimurium to characterize the channel properties and assess its specificity toward formate and other possible permeating ions. Single-channel currents for formate, hypophosphite and nitrite revealed two mechanistically distinct modes of gating that reflect different types of structural rearrangements in the transport channel of each FocA protomer. Moreover, FocA did not conduct cations or divalent anions, but the chloride anion was identified as further transported species, along with acetate, lactate and pyruvate. Formate, acetate and lactate are major end products of anaerobic mixed-acid fermentation, the pathway where FocA is predominantly required, so that this channel is ideally adapted to act as a multifunctional export protein to prevent their intracellular accumulation. Because of the high degree of conservation in the residues forming the transport channel among FNT family members, the flexibility in conducting multiple molecules is most likely a general feature of these proteins.

  15. Tsunami characteristics and formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit in Sanriku Coast: implications from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, D.; Haraguchi, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geological investigation of paleotsunami deposit is crucial for knowing the history and magnitude of tsunami events in the past. Among various kinds of grain sizes, sandy tsunami deposit has been best investigated by previous studies, because of its potential for identification in the sedimentary column. Many sandy tsunami deposits have been found from coastal plains, which have sandy beach and low-lying wetlands. However, sandy tsunami deposits in narrow valleys at rocky ria coast have rarely been found. It may be presumed that formation potential of sandy tsunami layer in the rocky coasts is generally lower than coastal plains, because of the absence of sandy beach, tsunami run-up on steeper slope and stronger return flow. In this presentation, characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake tsunami in Sanriku Coast, a continuous rocky ria coast located in the northeast Japan, is investigated based on numerical modeling. In addition, the formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit is also investigated based on numerical modeling of sediment transport. Preliminary result of tsunami hydrodynamics showed that the waveform and amplification of the tsunami are clearly affected by the local bathymetry, which is associated with submerged topography formed during the last glacial stage. Although the tsunami height in the offshore of each bay is around 8.0 m, the tsunami height at the bay head was increased in different way. The amplification factor at the bay head was typically 2.0 among most of V-shaped narrow embayments; meanwhile the amplification factor is much lower than 1.0 at some cases. The preliminary result of the modeling of sediment transport predicted huge amount of sediments may be suspended into the water column, given that sandy deposit is available there. Massive erosion and deposition of sea bottom sediments may commonly take place in the bays. However, formation of onshore tsunami deposit differs from each other. Whether the suspended sediments

  16. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3–6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNAPhe depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNAPro isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the “tRNA abundance” hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  17. Insights into the spontaneity of hydrogen bond formation between formic acid and phthalimide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Júnior, Rogério V A; Moura, Gustavo L C; Lima, Nathalia B D

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated a group of phthalimide derivatives, which comprise a convenient test set for the study of the multiple factors involved in the energetics of hydrogen bond formation. Accordingly, we carried out quantum chemical calculations on the hydrogen bonded complexes formed between a sample of phthalimide derivatives with formic acid with the intent of identifying the most important electronic and structural factors related to how their strength and spontaneity vary across the series. The geometries of all species considered were fully optimized at DFT B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), RM1, RM1-DH2, and RM1-D3H4 level, followed by frequency calculations to determine their Gibbs free energies of hydrogen bond formation using Gaussian 2009 and MOPAC 2012. Our results indicate that the phthalimide derivatives that form hydrogen bond complexes most favorably, have in their structures only one C=O group and at least one NH group. On the other hand, the phthalimide derivatives predicted to form hydrogen bonds least favorably, possess in their structures two carbonyl groups, C=O, and no NH group. The ability to donate electrons and simultaneously receive one acidic hydrogen is the most important property related to the spontaneity of hydrogen bond formation. We further chose two cyclic compounds, phthalimide and isoindolin-1-one, in which to study the main changes in molecular, structural and spectroscopic properties as related to the formation of hydrogen bonds. Thus, the greatest ability of the isoindolin-1-one compound in forming hydrogen bonds is evidenced by the larger effect on the structural, vibrational, and chemical shifts properties associated with the O-H group. In summary, the electron-donating ability of the hydrogen bond acceptor emerged as the most important property differentiating the spontaneity of hydrogen bond formation in this group of complexes.

  18. Do carboximide-carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Gautam, Raj; Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2015-05-01

    Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular inter-actions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations.

  19. Ethyl Formate: A Potential Disinfestation Treatment for Eucalyptus Weevil (Gonipterus platensis) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Apples.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manjree; Ren, Yonglin; Newman, James; Learmonth, Stewart

    2015-12-01

    Export of Pink Lady apples from Australia has been significantly affected by infestations of adult eucalyptus weevils (Gonipterus platensis Marelli). These weevils cling tenaciously to the pedicel of apple fruit when selecting overwintering sites. As a result, apples infested with live G. platensis adults lead to rejection for export. Since the Montreal Protocol restricted use of methyl bromide as postharvest treatment, it was necessary to consider alternative safer fumigants for disinfestation of eucalyptus weevil. Laboratory experiments were conducted using concentrations of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, and 80 mg/liter of ethyl formate. Complete control (100% mortality) was achieved at 25-30 mg/liter of ethyl formate at 22-24°C for 24-h exposure without apples. However, with 90-95% of the volume full of apples, complete control was achieved at 40 mg/liter of ethyl formate at 22-24°C for 24-h exposure. No phytotoxicity was observed and after one day aeration, residue of ethyl formate declined to natural levels (0.05-0.2 mg/kg). Five ethyl formate field trials were conducted in cool storages (capacity from 250-900 tons) and 100% kill of eucalyptus weevils were achieved at 50-55 mg/liter at 7-10°C for 24 h. Ethyl formate has great potential for preshipment treatment of apples. Its use is considerably cheaper and safer than already existing fumigants like methyl bromide and phosphine.

  20. THE ARDUOUS JOURNEY TO BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN POTENTIAL GAMMA-RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dessart, Luc; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: evanoc@tapir.caltech.edu

    2012-07-20

    We present a quantitative study on the properties at death of fast-rotating massive stars evolved at low-metallicity-objects that are proposed as likely progenitors of long-duration {gamma}-ray bursts (LGRBs). We perform one-dimensional+rotation stellar-collapse simulations on the progenitor models of Woosley and Heger, and critically assess their potential for the formation of a black hole and a Keplerian disk (namely, a collapsar) or a proto-magnetar. We note that theoretical uncertainties in the treatment of magnetic fields and the approximate handling of rotation compromise the accuracy of stellar-evolution models. We find that only the fastest rotating progenitors achieve sufficient compactness for black hole formation while the bulk of models possess a core density structure typical of garden-variety core-collapse supernova (SN) progenitors evolved without rotation and at solar metallicity. Of the models that do have sufficient compactness for black hole formation, most of them also retain a large amount of angular momentum in the core, making them prone to a magneto-rotational explosion, therefore preferentially leaving behind a proto-magnetar. A large progenitor angular-momentum budget is often the sole criterion invoked in the community today to assess the suitability for producing a collapsar. This simplification ignores equally important considerations such as the core compactness, which conditions black hole formation, the core angular momentum, which may foster a magneto-rotational explosion preventing black hole formation, or the metallicity and the residual envelope mass which must be compatible with inferences from observed LGRB/SNe. Our study suggests that black hole formation is non-trivial, that there is room for accommodating both collapsars and proto-magnetars as LGRB progenitors, although proto-magnetars seem much more easily produced by current stellar-evolutionary models.

  1. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-15

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-09-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation.

  5. Hyaluronic acid membrane for reducing adhesion formation and reformation in the rat uterine horn.

    PubMed

    Yarali, H; Zahradka, B F; Gomel, V

    1994-09-01

    The efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA) membrane in preventing or reducing intraperitoneal adhesion formation and reformation was evaluated in the rat uterine horn. Forty-seven Wistar rats were employed. Following a measured laser injury on the right uterine horn of each rat, HA membrane was applied to cover the site of injury in 20 (HA membrane group). No membrane was applied in another 20 (control group). The type and extent of adhesions were assessed at relaparotomy. Following microsurgical adhesiolysis at second-look laparotomy, the same animals were randomized to the HA membrane and control groups. The type and extent of adhesion reformation were evaluated at third-look laparotomy. Following a similar injury on the right uterine horn in another seven rats, HA membrane was applied on both uterine horns. A repeat laparotomy was performed three hours later to assess the status of the membrane. The type and extent of adhesion formation and reformation were comparable between the HA membrane and control groups. The HA membrane did not remain on the uterine horn and gelled rapidly. Hyaluronic acid membrane was ineffective in reducing adhesion formation and reformation in the rat uterine horn.

  6. Dissociative Electron-Ion Recombination of the Protonated Interstellar Species Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the prebiotic molecule and primitive sugar glycolaldehyde and its structural isomers acetic acid and the abundant methyl formate have been detected in the interstellar medium(ISM). Understanding the processes involving these molecules is vital to understand the ISM, where stars are formed. The rate constants, αe, for dissociative electron-ion recombination of protonated gycolaldehyde, (HOCH2CHO)H^+, and protonated methyl formate, (HCOOCH3)H^+, have been determined at 300K in a variable temperature flowing afterglow using a Langmuir probe to determine the electron density. The αe at 300K are 3.2 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 for protonated methyl formate and 7.5 x 10-7 cm^3 s-1 for protonated glycolaldehyde. The αe of protonated acetic acid could not be directly measured due to difficulty in producing the ion, but it appears to have a recombination rate constant, αe, on the ˜10-7 cm^3 s-1 scale. Additional temperature dependence information was obtained. The astrochemical implications of the αe measurements and protonation routes are also discussed.

  7. Effect of acetate formation pathway and long chain fatty acid CoA-ligase on the free fatty acid production in E. coli expressing acy-ACP thioesterase from Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mai; Zhang, Xiujun; Agrawal, Arpita; San, Ka-Yiu

    2012-07-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of fatty acid like chemicals from renewable carbon sources has attracted significant attention in recent years. Free fatty acids can be used as precursors for the production of fuels or chemicals. Wild type E. coli strains produce fatty acids mainly for the biosynthesis of lipids and cell membranes and do not accumulate free fatty acids as intermediates in lipid biosynthesis. However, free fatty acids can be produced by breaking the fatty acid elongation through the overexpression of an acyl-ACP thioesterase. Since acetyl-CoA might be an important factor for fatty acid synthesis (acetate formation pathways are the main competitive pathways in consuming acetyl-CoA or pyruvate, a precursor of acetyl-CoA), and the long chain fatty acid CoA-ligase (FadD) plays a pivotal role in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids prior to their subsequent degradation, we examined the composition and the secretion of the free fatty acids in four different strains including the wild type MG1655, a mutant strain with inactivation of the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway (fadD mutant (ML103)), and mutant strains with inactivation of the two major acetate production pathways (an ack-pta (acetate kinase/phosphotransacetylase), poxB (pyruvate oxidase) double mutant (ML112)) and a fadD, ack-pta, poxB triple mutant (ML115). The engineered E. coli cells expressing acyl-ACP thioesterase with glucose yield is higher than 40% of theoretical yield. Compared to MG1655(pXZ18) and ML103(pXZ18), acetate forming pathway deletion strains such as ML112(pXZ18) and ML115(pXZ18) produced similar quantity of total free fatty acids, which indicated that acetyl-CoA availability does not appear to be limiting factor for fatty acid production in these strains. However, these strains did show significant differences in the composition of free fatty acids. Different from MG1655(pXZ18) and ML103(pXZ18), acetate formation pathway deletion strains such as ML112(pXZ18) and ML115

  8. Bioanalytical and chemical assessment of the disinfection by-product formation potential: role of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Farré, Maria José; Day, Sophie; Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2013-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) formed from natural organic matter and disinfectants like chlorine and chloramine may cause adverse health effects. Here, we evaluate how the quantity and quality of natural organic matter and other precursors influence the formation of DBPs during chlorination and chloramination using a comprehensive approach including chemical analysis of regulated and emerging DBPs, total organic halogen quantification, organic matter characterisation and bioanalytical tools. In vitro bioassays allow us to assess the hazard potential of DBPs early in the chain of cellular events, when the DBPs react with their molecular target(s) and activate stress response and defence mechanisms. Given the reactive properties of known DBPs, a suite of bioassays targeting reactive modes of toxic action including genotoxicity and sensitive early warning endpoints such as protein damage and oxidative stress were evaluated in addition to cytotoxicity. Coagulated surface water was collected from three different drinking water treatment plants, along with reverse osmosis permeate from a desalination plant, and DBP formation potential was assessed after chlorination and chloramination. While effects were low or below the limit of detection before disinfection, the observed effects and DBP levels increased after disinfection and were generally higher after chlorination than after chloramination, indicating that chlorination forms higher concentrations of DBPs or more potent DBPs in the studied waters. Bacterial cytotoxicity, assessed using the bioluminescence inhibition assay, and induction of the oxidative stress response were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by genotoxicity. Source waters with higher dissolved organic carbon levels induced increased DBP formation and caused greater effects in the endpoints related to DNA damage repair, glutathione conjugation/protein damage and the Nrf2 oxidative stress response pathway after disinfection. Fractionation studies

  9. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  10. Mathematical modeling of thrombus formation in idealized models of aortic dissection: initial findings and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Menichini, Claudia; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2016-11-01

    Aortic dissection is a major aortic catastrophe with a high morbidity and mortality risk caused by the formation of a tear in the aortic wall. The development of a second blood filled region defined as the "false lumen" causes highly disturbed flow patterns and creates local hemodynamic conditions likely to promote the formation of thrombus in the false lumen. Previous research has shown that patient prognosis is influenced by the level of thrombosis in the false lumen, with false lumen patency and partial thrombosis being associated with late complications and complete thrombosis of the false lumen having beneficial effects on patient outcomes. In this paper, a new hemodynamics-based model is proposed to predict the formation of thrombus in Type B dissection. Shear rates, fluid residence time, and platelet distribution are employed to evaluate the likelihood for thrombosis and to simulate the growth of thrombus and its effects on blood flow over time. The model is applied to different idealized aortic dissections to investigate the effect of geometric features on thrombus formation. Our results are in qualitative agreement with in-vivo observations, and show the potential applicability of such a modeling approach to predict the progression of aortic dissection in anatomically realistic geometries.

  11. Resurgent sodium current and action potential formation in dissociated cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed

    Raman, I M; Bean, B P

    1997-06-15

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels were studied in dissociated cerebellar Purkinje neurons from rats. In whole-cell recordings, a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive inward current was elicited when the membrane was repolarized to voltages between -60 and -20 mV after depolarizations to +30 mV long enough to produce maximal inactivation. At -40 mV, this "resurgent" current peaked in 8 msec and decayed with a time constant of 30 msec. With 50 mM sodium as a charge carrier, the resurgent current was on average approximately 120 pA. CA3 pyramidal neurons had no such current. The current may reflect recovery of inactivated channels through open states, because in Purkinje neurons (but not CA3 neurons) there was partial recovery from inactivation at -40 mV, coinciding with the rise of resurgent current. In single-channel recordings, individual channels gave openings corresponding to resurgent and conventional transient current. Action potentials were recorded from dissociated neurons under current clamp to investigate the role of the resurgent current in action potential formation. Purkinje neurons fired spontaneously at approximately 30 Hz. Hyperpolarization to -85 mV prevented spontaneous firing, and brief depolarization then induced all-or-none firing of conglomerate action potentials comprising three to four spikes. When conglomerate action potentials were used as command voltages in voltage-clamp experiments, TTX-sensitive sodium current was elicited between spikes. The falling phase of an action potential is similar to voltage patterns that activate resurgent sodium current, and thus, resurgent sodium current likely contributes to the formation of conglomerate action potentials in Purkinje neurons.

  12. Potential Antifungal Targets against a Candida Biofilm Based on an Enzyme in the Arachidonic Acid Cascade—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinning; Wang, Decai; Yu, Cuixiang; Li, Tao; Liu, Jianqiao; Sun, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Candida is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, especially in biofilm associated infections. The formation of a Candida biofilm can decrease Candida sensitivity to antifungal drugs and cause drug resistance. Although many effective antifungal drugs are available, their applications are limited due to their high toxicity and cost. Seeking new antifungal agents that are effective against biofilm-associated infection is an urgent need. Many research efforts are underway, and some progress has been made in this field. It has been shown that the arachidonic acid cascade plays an important role in fungal morphogenesis and pathogenicity. Notably, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can promote the formation of a Candida biofilm. Recently, the inhibition of PGE2 has received much attention. Studies have shown that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and indomethacin, combined with fluconazole can significantly reduce Candida adhesion and biofilm development and increase fluconazole susceptibility; the MIC of fluconazole can be decrease from 64 to 2 μg/ml when used in combination with ibuprofen. In addition, in vivo studies have also confirmed the antifungal activities of these inhibitors. In this article, we mainly review the relationship between PGE2 and Candida biofilm, summarize the antifungal activities of COX inhibitors and analyze the possible antifungal activity of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (MPGES-1) inhibitors; additionally, other factors that influence PGE2 production are also discussed. Hopefully this review can disclose potential antifungal targets based on the arachidonic acid cascade and provide a prevailing strategy to alleviate Candida albicans biofilm formation. PMID:27999568

  13. Low phytic acid lentils (Lens culinaris L.): a potential solution for increased micronutrient bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Thavarajah, Dil; Vandenberg, Albert

    2009-10-14

    Phytic acid is an antinutrient present mainly in seeds of grain crops such as legumes and cereals. It has the potential to bind mineral micronutrients in food and reduce their bioavailability. This study analyzed the phytic acid concentration in seeds of 19 lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) genotypes grown at two locations for two years in Saskatchewan, Canada. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the levels of phytic acid in commercial lentil genotypes and (2) the impact of postharvest processing and (3) the effect of boiling on the stability of phytic aid in selected lentil genotypes. The phytic acid was analyzed by high-performance anion exchange separation followed by conductivity detection. The Saskatchewan-grown lentils were naturally low in phytic acid (phytic acid = 2.5-4.4 mg g(-1); phytic acid phosphorus = 0.7-1.2 mg g(-1)), with concentrations lower than those reported for low phytic acid mutants of corn, wheat, common bean, and soybean. Decortication prior to cooking further reduced total phytic acid by >50%. As lowering phytic acid intake can lead to increased mineral bioavailability, dietary inclusion of Canadian lentils may have significant benefits in regions with widespread micronutrient malnutrition.

  14. Use of simulated evaporation to assess the potential for scale formation during reverse osmosis desalination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    The tendency of solutes in input water to precipitate efficiency lowering scale deposits on the membranes of reverse osmosis (RO) desalination systems is an important factor in determining the suitability of input water for desalination. Simulated input water evaporation can be used as a technique to quantitatively assess the potential for scale formation in RO desalination systems. The technique was demonstrated by simulating the increase in solute concentrations required to form calcite, gypsum, and amorphous silica scales at 25??C and 40??C from 23 desalination input waters taken from the literature. Simulation results could be used to quantitatively assess the potential of a given input water to form scale or to compare the potential of a number of input waters to form scale during RO desalination. Simulated evaporation of input waters cannot accurately predict the conditions under which scale will form owing to the effects of potentially stable supersaturated solutions, solution velocity, and residence time inside RO systems. However, the simulated scale-forming potential of proposed input waters could be compared with the simulated scale-forming potentials and actual scale-forming properties of input waters having documented operational histories in RO systems. This may provide a technique to estimate the actual performance and suitability of proposed input waters during RO.

  15. Comparison of phenolic acids profile and antioxidant potential of six varieties of spelt (Triticum spelta L.).

    PubMed

    Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula; Świeca, Michał; Dziki, Dariusz

    2012-05-09

    Phenolic acids profile and antioxidant activity of six diverse varieties of spelt are reported. Antioxidant activity was assessed using eight methods based on different mechanism of action. Phenolic acids composition of spelt differed significantly between varieties and ranged from 506.6 to 1257.4 μg/g DW. Ferulic and sinapinic acids were the predominant phenolic acids found in spelt. Total ferulic acid content ranged from 144.2 to 691.5 μg/g DW. All analyzed spelt varieties possessed high antioxidant potential. In spite of the fact that bound phenolic acids possessed higher antioxidant activities, analysis of antioxidant potential and their relationship with phenolic acid content showed that free phenolics were more effective. Eight antioxidant methods were integrated to obtain a total antioxidant capacity index that may be used for comparison of total antioxidant capacity of spelt varieties. Total antioxidant potential of spelt cultivars were ordered as follows: Ceralio > Spelt INZ ≈ Ostro > Oberkulmer Rotkorn > Schwabenspelz > Schwabenkorn.

  16. Free asparagine and sugars profile of cereal species: the potential of cereals for acrylamide formation in foods.

    PubMed

    Žilić, Slađana; Dodig, Dejan; Basić, Zorica; Vančetović, Jelena; Titan, Primož; Đurić, Nenad; Tolimir, Nataša

    2017-02-20

    Cereals-based food is one of the major source of Maillard reaction products in the diet. Free amino acids and reducing sugars are considered to be the main precursors in the formation of these heat-induced compounds. In order to determine genetic resources with reduced potential for acrylamide formation, the content of sugars as well as free asparagine were analysed in a total of 30 cultivars of 10 varieties belonging to eight species (Triticum aestivum var. lutescens, T. aestivum var. alba, T. aestivum var. compactum, T. durum, T. spelta, T. dicoccum, Secale cereale, Hordeum vulgare var. nudum, Avena sativa var. nudum, and Zea mays var. indentata) grown at the same location in the 2015 growing season. Our results provide evidence of differences in the content of sugars and asparagine between and within species of small grain cereals and maize. The highest content of glucose, fructose and asparagine was found in cultivars of rye and hull-less oat. All maize varieties examined contained significantly higher amounts of non-reducing and total sugars (on average 1.25% and 2.36%, respectively) than small cereal grain species. Principal component analysis showed a high positive correlation between monoreducing sugars and asparagine in bread wheat, durum wheat and hull-less barley.

  17. Palmitic Acid Reduces Circulating Bone Formation Markers in Obese Animals and Impairs Osteoblast Activity via C16-Ceramide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Ahmad; Kiefhaber, Kathryn; Gold, Tziporah; Muluke, Munira; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and impaired lipid metabolism increase circulating and local fatty acid (FA) levels. Our previous studies showed that a high high-saturated -fat diet induced greater bone loss in mice than a high high-unsaturated-fat diet due to increased osteoclast numbers and activity. The impact of elevated FA levels on osteoblasts is not yet clear. We induced obesity in 4 week old male mice using a palmitic acid (PA)- or oleic acid (OA)-enriched high fat high-fat diet (HFD) (20 % of calories from FA), and compared them to mice on a normal (R) caloric diet (10 % of calories from FA). We collected serum to determine FA and bone metabolism marker levels. Primary osteoblasts were isolated; cultured in PA, OA, or control (C) medium; and assessed for mineralization activity, gene expression, and ceramide levels. Obese animals in the PA and OA groups had significantly lower serum levels of bone formation markers P1NP and OC compared to normal weight animals (*p < 0.001), with the lowest marker levels in animals on an PA-enriched HFD (*p < 0.001). Accordingly, elevated levels of PA significantly reduced osteoblast mineralization activity in vitro (*p < 0.05). Elevated PA intake significantly increased C16 ceramide accumulation. This accumulation was preventable through inhibition of SPT2 (serine palmitoyl transferase 2) using myriocin. Elevated levels of PA reduce osteoblast function in vitro and bone formation markers in vivo. Our findings suggest that saturated PA can compromise bone health by affecting osteoblasts, and identify a potential mechanism through which obesity promotes bone loss.

  18. Formation of Small Gas Phase Carbonyls from Heterogeneous Oxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Gao, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are emitted into the atmosphere from gas and diesel powered vehicles, cooking, plants, and marine biota. Field measurements have suggested that FAs, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), could make up an important contribution to the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols. Due to the existence of carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecules, PUFA are believed to be highly reactive towards atmospheric oxidants such as OH and NO3 radicals and ozone, which will contribute to aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity. Previous work from our group has shown that small carbonyls formed from the heterogeneous reaction of linoleic acid (LA) thin films with gas-phase O3. It is known that the formation of small carbonyls in the atmosphere is not only relevant to the atmospheric budget of volatile organic compounds but also to secondary organic aerosol formation. In the present study, using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) we again investigated carbonyl formation from the same reaction system, i.e. the heterogeneous ozonolysis of LA film. In addition to the previously reported carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA), a source of reactive oxygen species that is mutagenic, has been identified as a product for the first time. Small dicarbonyls, e.g. glyoxal, are expected to be formed from the further oxidation of MDA. In this presentation, the gas-phase chemistry of MDA with OH radicals using a newly built Teflon chamber in our group will also be presented.

  19. Formation of the carboxamidine precursor of cyanuric acid from guanine oxidative lesion dehydro-guanidinohydantoin.

    PubMed

    Irvoas, Joris; Trzcionka, Jérôme; Pratviel, Geneviève

    2014-09-01

    DNA damage under oxidative stress leads to oxidation of guanine base. The identification of the resulting guanine lesions in cellular DNA is difficult due to the sensitivity of the primary oxidation products to hydrolysis and/or further oxidation. We isolated dehydroguanidino-hydantoin (DGh) (or oxidized guanidinohydantoin), a secondary oxidation product of guanine, and showed that this lesion reacts readily with nucleophiles such as asymmetric peroxides and transforms to 2,4,6-trioxo-1,3,5-triazinane-1-carboxamidine residue. Further hydrolysis of this intermediate leads to cyanuric acid and finally to urea residue. This work demonstrates a new possible pathway for the formation of the well-known carboxamidine precursor of cyanuric acid lesion.

  20. Formation of an artifact of diclofenac during acidic extraction of environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Reddersen, K; Heberer, Th

    2003-09-05

    Solid-phase extraction at an acidic pH is used as a common sample preparation method for analyzing residues of the analgesic drug diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid) in environmental water samples. This paper describes the matrix-dependent formation of an artifact of diclofenac during sample preparation resulting in an up to 40% underestimation of diclofenac concentrations especially in matrix-prone samples such as sewage effluents or surface water. The artifact most likely being formed during acidification of the sample was unequivocally identified as 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)indolin-2-one by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To avoid an underestimation of the analytical results quantification of both diclofenac and its artifact is recommended.

  1. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  2. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-linoleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2017-02-15

    This study investigated the complexation yield and physicochemical properties of soluble and insoluble starch complexes with linoleic acid when a β-amylase treatment was applied to acetylated and debranched potato starch. The degree of acetylation was generally higher in the soluble complexes than in the insoluble ones. The insoluble complexes from the acetylated starch displayed the V-type pattern, whereas, the soluble complexes displayed a mixture of either the A-/V-type or the B-/V-type pattern. Acetylation decreased onset and peak melting temperatures for the insoluble complexes, whereas no melting endotherm was observed in the soluble complexes. Acetylation substantially increased the amount of complexed linoleic acid in the insoluble complexes, but had little positive effect on the formation of the soluble complexes. The β-amylase treatment significantly increased the complexed linoleic content in both soluble and insoluble complexes for the low acetylated starch, but not for the high acetylated starch.

  3. The formation of 2-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid from 1-halogenopropanes in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Barnsley, E. A.

    1966-01-01

    1. 2-Hydroxypropylmercapturic acid, i.e. N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxypropyl)-l-cysteine, has been isolated, as the dicyclohexylammonium salt, from the urine of rats dosed with 1-bromopropane. 2. The formation of the same metabolite from 1-chloropropane, 1-iodopropane, 1,2-epoxypropane and 1-chloropropan-2-ol has been demonstrated by chromatographic examination of the urine excreted by rats after they had been dosed with these compounds. 3. (+)- and (−)-Dicyclohexylammonium 2-hydroxypropylmercapturate have been prepared by fractional crystallization of the mixture of isomers obtained by two methods: the reaction of 1,2-epoxypropane with l-cysteine followed by acetylation, and the reduction of 2-oxopropylmercapturic acid. 4. The following compounds have also been prepared: S-(3-hydroxypropyl)-l-cysteine, (+)- and (−)-S-(2-hydroxypropyl)-l-cysteine, dicyclohexylammonium 3-hydroxypropylmercapturate, (+)- and (−)-dicyclohexylammonium 2-hydroxy-1-methylethylmercapturate, and (+)- and (−)-dicyclohexylammonium 1-(ethoxycarbonyl)ethylmercapturate. PMID:5968536

  4. Formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ ions from metal-cationized tetrapeptides containing beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid residues.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra M; Ochola, Sila O; Talaty, Erach R; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The presence and position of a single beta-alanine (betaA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (gammaABu) or epsilon-aminocaproic acid (Cap) residue has been shown to have a significant influence on the formation of b(n)+ and y(n)+ product ions from a series of model, protonated peptides. In this study, we examined the effect of the same residues on the formation of analogous [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products from metal (Li+, Na+ and Ag+)-cationized peptides. The larger amino acids suppress formation of b3+ from protonated peptides with general sequence AAXG (where X = beta-alanine, gamma-aminobutyric acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid), presumably because of the prohibitive effect of larger cyclic intermediates in the 'oxazolone' pathway. However, abundant [b3 - 1 + cat]+ products are generated from metal-cationized versions of AAXG. Using a group of deuterium-labeled and exchanged peptides, we found that formation of [b3 - 1 + cat]+ involves transfer of either amide or alpha-carbon position H atoms, and the tendency to transfer the atom from the alpha-carbon position increases with the size of the amino acid in position X. To account for the transfer of the H atom, a mechanism involving formation of a ketene product as [b3 - 1 + cat]+ is proposed.

  5. Enhancing Skin Permeation of Biphenylacetic Acid (BPA) Using Salt Formation with Organic and Alkali Metal Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Vijay; Naik, Prashant; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a series of organic and alkali metal salts of biphenylacetic acid (BPA) have been prepared and evaluated in vitro for percutaneous drug delivery. The physicochemical properties of BPA salts were determined using solubility measurements, DSC, and IR. The DSC thermogram and FTIR spectra confirmed the salt formation with organic and alkali metal bases. Among the series, salts with organic amines (ethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, and diethylamine) had lowered melting points while the alkali metal salt (sodium) had a higher melting point than BPA. The in vitro study showed that salt formation improves the physicochemical properties of BPA, leading to improved permeability through the skin. Amongst all the prepared salts, ethanolamine salt (1b) showed 7.2- and 5.4-fold higher skin permeation than the parent drug at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, using rat skin. PMID:26839810

  6. Formation of C21 bile acids from plant sterols in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Boberg, K.M.; Lund, E.; Olund, J.; Bjoerkhem, I. )

    1990-05-15

    Formation of bile acids from sitosterol in bile-fistulated female Wistar rats was studied with use of 4-14C-labeled sitosterol and sitosterol labeled with 3H in specific positions. The major part (about 75%) of the 14C radioactivity recovered as bile acids in bile after intravenous administration of (4-14C)sitosterol was found to be considerably more polar than cholic acid, and only trace amounts of radioactivity had chromatographic properties similar to those of cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid. It was shown that polar metabolites were formed by intermediate oxidation of the 3 beta-hydroxyl group (loss of 3H from 3 alpha-3H-labeled sitosterol) and that the most polar fraction did not contain a hydroxyl group at C7 (retention of 3H in 7 alpha,7 beta-3H2-labeled sitosterol). Furthermore, the polar metabolites had lost at least the terminal 6 or 7 carbon atoms of the side chain (loss of 3H from 22,23-3H2- and 24,28-3H2-labeled sitosterol). Experiments with 3H-labeled 7 alpha-hydroxysitosterol and 4-14C-labeled 26-hydroxysitosterol showed that none of these compounds was an efficient precursor to the polar metabolites. By analysis of purified most polar products of (4-14C) sitosterol by radio-gas chromatography and the same products of 7 alpha,7 beta-(2H2)sitosterol by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, two major metabolites could be identified as C21 bile acids. One metabolite had three hydroxyl groups (3 alpha, 15, and unknown), and one had two hydroxyl groups (3 alpha, 15) and one keto group. Considerably less C21 bile acids were formed from (4-14C)sitosterol in male than in female Wistar rats. The C21 bile acids formed in male rats did not contain a 15-hydroxyl group. Conversion of a (4-14C)sitosterol into C21 bile acids did also occur in adrenalectomized and ovariectomized rats, indicating that endocrine tissues are not involved.

  7. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  8. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-06-19

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco.

  9. Wnt signaling in bone formation and its therapeutic potential for bone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Liu, Xing; Wang, Jinhua; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Hongyu; Kim, Stephanie H.; Cui, Jing; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Kong, Yuhan; Zhang, Jiye; Shui, Wei; Lamplot, Joseph; Rogers, Mary Rose; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Ning; Rajan, Prashant; Tomal, Justin; Statz, Joseph; Wu, Ningning; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role not only in embryonic development but also in the maintenance and differentiation of the stem cells in adulthood. In particular, Wnt signaling has been shown as an important regulatory pathway in the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Induction of the Wnt signaling pathway promotes bone formation while inactivation of the pathway leads to osteopenic states. Our current understanding of Wnt signaling in osteogenesis elucidates the molecular mechanisms of classic osteogenic pathologies. Activating and inactivating aberrations of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in osteogenesis results in sclerosteosis and osteoporosis respectively. Recent studies have sought to target the Wnt signaling pathway to treat osteogenic disorders. Potential therapeutic approaches attempt to stimulate the Wnt signaling pathway by upregulating the intracellular mediators of the Wnt signaling cascade and inhibiting the endogenous antagonists of the pathway. Antibodies against endogenous antagonists, such as sclerostin and dickkopf-1, have demonstrated promising results in promoting bone formation and fracture healing. Lithium, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, has also been reported to stimulate osteogenesis by stabilizing β catenin. Although manipulating the Wnt signaling pathway has abundant therapeutic potential, it requires cautious approach due to risks of tumorigenesis. The present review discusses the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in osteogenesis and examines its targeted therapeutic potential. PMID:23514963

  10. Investigation into the oxidative potential generated by the formation of particulate matter from incense combustion.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; BéruBé, Kelly; Lung, Shih-Chun C; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Jones, Tim

    2013-01-15

    The formation of aerosols during combustion plays an important role in allowing released products to interreact, leading to an increase in particulate matter oxidative potential. This study investigated the physicochemistry of incense combustion-derived pollutants, which were emitted into the ambient air as solid and gas phases, followed by the determination of their oxidative potential. Upon combustion of a joss stick, approximately 60% of the mass of incense raw ingredients was released into the ambient air as combustion products including 349.51 mg/g PM(10), 145.48 mg/g CO and 0.16 mg/g NOx. Furthermore, incense combustion produced significant number of primary particles (<50 nm) at 0.99×10(5) 1/h. The NOx generated during incense combustion was able to react with CaCO(3) to produce the final product of Ca(NO(3))(2) in the ambient air. Moreover, coagulation could be a vital process for the growth of primary incense combustion particles through the intermixing with volatile organics. The incense particle's reactions with other combustion-derived products could be responsible for their significant oxidative capacity of 33.1-43.4% oxidative DNA damage. This study demonstrated that the oxidative potential of incense particles appeared to be related to the process of particle formation, and also provided novel data for the respiratory exposure assessment.

  11. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. XAS and RIXS study of acetic acid and methyl formate in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.; Nishida, N.; Kanai, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tokushima, T.

    2016-05-01

    Structure of acetic acid (AA) and methyl formate (MF) in the liquid phase is studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct XES spectra are observed by tuning photon energy for both molecules. Model structure in the liquid phase is constructed using the classical and first principle molecular dynamics simulations, and XES spectra are calculated using density functional theory. Calculated XES spectra are consistent with experimental ones. The effect of core-hole induced excited state molecular dynamics are discussed.

  13. Effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on bone formation in the expanded inter-premaxillary suture

    PubMed Central

    Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Aksakalli, Sertac; Ezirganli, Seref; Birlik, Muhammet; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Background Narrow maxilla is a common problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. To solve this problem, a procedure called rapid maxillary expansion (RME) has been used. However, relapse tendency is a major problem of RME. Although relapse tendency is not clearly understood, various treatment procedures and new applications have been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the possible effectiveness of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on new bone formation in rat midpalatal suture after RME. Materials and methods Twenty male Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study. The animals were randomly divided into two groups as control and CAPE group. In the CAPE group, CAPE was administered systemically via intraperitoneal injection. RME procedure was performed on all animals. For this purpose, the springs were placed on the maxillary incisors of rats and activated for 5 days. After then, the springs were removed and replaced with short lengths of rectangular retaining wire for consolidation period of 15 days. At the end of the study, histomorphometric analysis was carried out to assess new bone formation. Results New bone formation was significantly greater in the CAPE group than the control group (P<0.05). CAPE enhances new bone formation in midpalatal suture after RME. Conclusion These results show that CAPE may decrease the time needed for retention. PMID:26730181

  14. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF).

  15. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  16. Dimeric rare-earth BINOLate complexes: activation of 1,4-benzoquinone through Lewis acid promoted potential shifts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jerome R; Booth, Corwin H; Carroll, Patrick J; Walsh, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-05-03

    Reaction of p-benzoquinone (BQ) with a series of rare-earth metal/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) complexes (RE: La, Ce, Pr, Nd; M: Li) results in the largest recorded shift in reduction potential observed for BQ upon complexation. In the case of cerium, the formation of a 2:1 Ce/BQ complex shifts the two-electron reduction of BQ by greater than or equal to 1.6 V to a more favorable potential. Reactivity investigations were extended to other RE(III) (RE = La, Pr, Nd) complexes where the resulting highly electron-deficient quinone ligands afforded isolation of the first lanthanide quinhydrone-type charge-transfer complexes. The large reduction-potential shift associated with the formation of 2:1 Ce/BQ complexes illustrate the potential of Ce complexes to function both as a Lewis acid and an electron source in redox chemistry and organic-substrate activation.

  17. Formation and fate of haloacetic acids (HAAs) within the water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Manuel J; Serodes, Jean; Roy, Danielle

    2007-10-01

    Most research on the occurrence of chlorinated disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has focused on trihalomethane (THM) formation and evolution, in particular within distribution systems. In this research, we investigated the variability of the occurrence of haloacetic acids (HAAs) during the treatment process in two facilities where surface water is pre-chlorinated before being treated by conventional physico-chemical processes. The investigation focused on both seasonal and point-to-point fluctuations of HAAs. In both facilities, samples were collected weekly during 1 complete year at four points in order to generate robust data on HAAs and on complementary parameters. The results showed that the initial formation of HAAs was the highest and the most variable in the plant where levels of DBP precursor indicators and the pre-chlorination dose were both higher and more variable. Subsequent formation of HAAs from the pre-chlorination point until the settled water occurred due to remaining levels of residual chlorine and DBP precursors. However, HAA levels and in particular dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) (the preponderant HAA species in the waters under study) decreased dramatically during filtration, very probably because of biodegradation within the filter. The effect of filtration on DCAA fate was season-dependant, with the highest degradation in warm water periods and practically no variation during winter. Statistical modeling was applied to empirically identify the operational factors responsible for HAA formation and fate. Model performance to identify HAA variability in waters following pre-chlorination was much better than for water following filtration, which is due to the lack of information on mechanisms and conditions favoring DCAA degradation.

  18. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-15

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO{sub 4}, by H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}).2H{sub 2}O and Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O fertilizer. - Graphical abstract: A new synthesis scheme for preparation of composite titanium phosphate (TiP) ion-exchangers upon one-stage decomposition process of natural sphene with phosphoric acid is presented. Syntheses of {alpha}-TiP-silica composites proceed via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases. The concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} determines the porosity of final products and their sorption affinities.

  19. Sonic horizon formation for oscillating Bose-Einstein condensates in isotropic harmonic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Shuyu

    2016-01-01

    We study the sonic horizon phenomena of the oscillating Bose-Einstein condensates in isotropic harmonic potential. Based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation model and variational method, we derive the original analytical formula for the criteria and lifetime of the formation of the sonic horizon, demonstrating pictorially the interaction parameter dependence for the occur- rence of the sonic horizon and damping effect of the system distribution width. Our analytical results corroborate quantitatively the particular features of the sonic horizon reported in previous numerical study. PMID:27922129

  20. Sonic horizon formation for oscillating Bose-Einstein condensates in isotropic harmonic potential.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Shuyu

    2016-12-06

    We study the sonic horizon phenomena of the oscillating Bose-Einstein condensates in isotropic harmonic potential. Based on the Gross-Pitaevskii equation model and variational method, we derive the original analytical formula for the criteria and lifetime of the formation of the sonic horizon, demonstrating pictorially the interaction parameter dependence for the occur- rence of the sonic horizon and damping effect of the system distribution width. Our analytical results corroborate quantitatively the particular features of the sonic horizon reported in previous numerical study.

  1. Potential for deep basin-centered gas accumulation in Travis Peak (Hosston) Formation, Gulf Coastal Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of Lower Cretaceous sandstones of the Travis Peak Formation in the northern Gulf Coast Basin to harbor a basin-centered gas accumulation was evaluated by examining (1) the depositional and diagenetic history and reservoir properties of Travis Peak sandstones, (2) the presence and quality of source rocks for generating gas, (3) the burial and thermal history of source rocks and time of gas generation and migration relative to tectonic development of Travis Peak traps, (4) gas and water recoveries from drill-stem and formation tests, (5) the distribution of abnormal pressures based on shut-in-pressure data, and (6) the presence or absence of gas-water contacts associated with gas accumulations in Travis Peak sandstones. The Travis Peak Formation (and correlative Hosston Formation) is a basinward-thickening wedge of terrigenous clastic sedimentary rocks that underlies the northern Gulf Coast Basin from eastern Texas across northern Louisiana to southern Mississippi. Clastic infl ux was focused in two main fl uvial-deltaic depocenters?one located in northeastern Texas and the other in southeastern Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana. Across the main hydrocarbon-productive trend in eastern Texas and northern Louisiana, the Travis Peak Formation is about 2,000 ft thick. Most Travis Peak hydrocarbon production in eastern Texas comes from drilling depths between 6,000 and 10,000 ft. Signifi cant decrease in porosity and permeability occurs through that depth interval. Above 8,000-ft drilling depth in eastern Texas, Travis Peak sandstone matrix permeabilities often are signifi cantly higher than the 0.1-millidarcy (mD) cutoff that characterizes tight-gas reservoirs. Below 8,000 ft, matrix permeability of Travis Peak sandstones is low because of pervasive quartz cementation, but abundant natural fractures impart signifi cant fracture permeability. Although pressure data within the middle and lower Travis Peak Formation are limited in eastern Texas

  2. Potential toxicity of presumably insoluble aluminum salts in presence of common dietary acids.

    PubMed

    Dayde, S; Berthon, G

    1990-01-01

    It has recently been shown that aluminum absorption may occur following the administration of oral aluminium-containing phosphate-binders and antacids. Computer simulations based on relevant aluminium complex equilibria have been used in the present work to investigate the potential influence of the simultaneous ingestion of common dietary acids on this phenomenon. It results from these studies that aluminium absorption may be favoured to various extents in the presence of citric, malic, oxalic, succinic and tartric acids.

  3. Allergenic potential of abietic acid, colophony and pine resin-HA. Clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, A T; Boman, A; Wahlberg, J E

    1980-12-01

    Resin acids are considered to be the main allergens in colophony (rosin). Tall oils also contain resin acids and may then be potential sensitizers. A resin acid concentrate (pine resin-HA) together with Chinese colophony were included in our standard series and applied on 563 patients with contact dermatitis. Fourteen showed an isolated sensitivity to colophony and two to pine resin-HA. Six patients reacted to both test compounds. Guinea pig maximization tests (Magnusson & Kligman 1969) showed that pine resin-HA (2 series) was a grade I allergen, abietic acid a grade III allergen and colophony a grade IV allergen. The risk that the resin acids in tall oils would induce contact sensitivity to workers exposed to tall oil-containing products like cutting fluids and cleansing agents is considered to be minimal.

  4. Formation of Amino Acid Precursors by Bombardment of Interstellar Ice Analogs with High Energy Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Mita, Hajime; Yoshida, Satoshi; Shibata, Hiromi; Enomoto, Shingo; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kotaro; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Kebukawa, Yoko

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies. It has been recognized that carbonaceous chondrites contain pristine amino acids [1]. There are several scenarios of the formation of such extraterrestrial amino acids or their precursors. Greenberg proposed a scenario that complex organic compounds were formed in interstellar ices in dense clouds, which were brought into solar system small bodies when the solar system was formed [2]. The ice mantles of interstellar dust particles (ISDs) in dense clouds are composed of H2O, CO, CH3OH, CH4, CO2, NH3, etc. In order to verify the scenario, a number of laboratory experiments have been conducted where interstellar ice analogs were irradiated with high-energy particles [3,4] or UV [5,6], and formation of complex organic compounds including amino acid precursors were detected in the products. Though ion-molecular reactions in gaseous phase and surface reactions on the ice mantles have been studied intensively, much less works on cosmic rays-induced reaction have been reported. In order to study possible formation of complex molecules in interstellar ices, frozen mixtures of water, methanol and ammonia with various mixing ratios were irradiated with high-energy heavy ions such as carbon ions (290 MeV/u) and neon ions (400 MeV/u) from HIMAC, NIRS, Japan. For comparison, gaseous mixtures of water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and/or methane were irradiated with protons (2.5 MeV) from a Tandem accelerator, Tokyo Tech, Japan. Amino acids in the products were determined by cation exchange HPLC after acid hydrolysis. Products, both before and after acid hydrolysis, were also characterized by FT-IR and other techniques. Amino acids were detected in the hydrolyzed products after mixture of CH3OH, NH3 and H2O with various mixing ratios were irradiated with heavy ions, including when their mixing ratio was set close to the reported value of the interstellar ices (10:1:37). In the HIMAC

  5. Formation of Non-Monotonic Potential Structure in the Detached Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Plasma detachment has been investigated by means of PIC simulation which includes plasma-neutral collision and Coulomb collision. In our previous study, we have shown that a strong gradient in temperature appears in front of the target plate in the case that high density and low temperature neutral gas is introduced. It is observed that a potential hill is created in the neutral gas region where ions lose energy due to the elastic and charge exchange collision and, as a result, the ion density increases. This potential structure traps the low energy electrons and may play a role in the development of plasma detachment state. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research Programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059 and the NIFS/NINS project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network.

  6. Pattern formation in liquid-vapor systems under periodic potential and shear.

    PubMed

    Coclite, A; Gonnella, G; Lamura, A

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the phase behavior and pattern formation in a sheared nonideal fluid under a periodic potential is studied. An isothermal two-dimensional formulation of a lattice Boltzmann scheme for a liquid-vapor system with the van der Waals equation of state is presented and validated. Shear is applied by moving walls and the periodic potential varies along the flow direction. A region of the parameter space, where in the absence of flow a striped phase with oscillating density is stable, will be considered. At low shear rates the periodic patterns are preserved and slightly distorted by the flow. At high shear rates the striped phase loses its stability and traveling waves on the interface between the liquid and vapor regions are observed. These waves spread over the whole system with wavelength only depending on the length of the system. Velocity field patterns, characterized by a single vortex, will also be shown.

  7. Influence of Water Table Depth on Pore Water Chemistry and Trihalomethane Formation Potential in Peatlands.

    PubMed

    Gough, Rachel; Holliman, Peter J; Fenner, Nathalie; Peacock, Mike; Freeman, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Drained peatland catchments are reported to produce more colored, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-rich water, presenting problems for potable water treatment. The blocking of peatland drainage ditches to restore the water table is increasingly being considered as a strategy to address this deterioration in water quality. However, the effect of ditch blocking on the potential of DOC to form trihalomethanes (THMs) has not been assessed. In this study, the effect of peat rewetting on pore water DOC concentration and characteristics (including THM formation potential [THMFP]) was assessed over 12 months using peat cores collected from two drained peatland sites. The data show little evidence of differences in DOC concentration or characteristics between the different treatments. The absence of any difference in the THMFP of pore water between treatments suggests that, in the short term at least, ditch blocking may not have an effect on the THMFP of waters draining peatland catchments.

  8. Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. [Influence of GABA(C)-Receptor Antagonist on Formation of Evoked Potentials in Columns of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex].

    PubMed

    Matukhno, A E; Lysenko, L V; Andreeva, Y V; Sukhov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode studies of evoked potentials (EP) in neuronal column of rats barrel cortex show activating action of selective GABA(C)-receptor antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) mainly on secondary components of EP of supragranular afferent layers of column compared to the efferent infragranular layers. These data suggest localization of GABA(C)-receptors on pre- synaptic terminals of thalamo-cortical glutamatergic afferents and ascending apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. A blockade of GABA(C)-receptors with the selective antagonist TPM PA leads to dose-dependent afferent depolarization with development of presynaptic inhibition and suppression of primary components of EP GABA(C)-receptors blocker produces different effects on secondary components of EP in supragranular layers of the cortex caused by the development of neuronal after hyperpolarization followed by high-amplitude primary response and afterdepolarization followed by low-amplitude primary responses with subsequent activation of different voltage-gated channels and formation of different level of cortical direct current potential gradients.

  10. Titan's Primordial Soup: Formation of Amino Acids via Low Temperature Hydrolysis of Tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, Catherine; Somogyi, Á.; Smith, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is a world rich in the "stuff of life". Reactions occurring in its dense nitrogen-methane atmosphere produce a wide variety of organic molecules, which subsequently rain down onto its surface. Water - thought to be another important ingredient for life - is likewise abundant on Titan. Theoretical models of Titan's formation predict that its interior consists of an ice I layer several tens of kilometers thick overlying a liquid ammonia-rich water layer several hundred kilometers thick (Tobie et al., 2005). Though its surface temperature of 94K dictates that Titan is on average too cold for liquid water to persist at its surface, melting caused by impacts and/or cryovolcanism may lead to its episodic availability. Impact melt pools on Titan would likely remain liquid for 102 - 104 years before freezing (O'Brien et al., 2005). The combination of complex organic molecules and transient locales of liquid water make Titan an interesting natural laboratory for studying prebiotic chemistry. In this work, we sought to determine what biomolecules might be formed under conditions analogous to those found in transient liquid water environments on Titan. We hydrolyzed Titan organic haze analogues, or "tholins", in 13 wt. % ammonia-water at 253K and 293K for a year. Using a combination of high resolution mass spectroscopy and tandem mass spectroscopy fragmentation techniques, four amino acids were identified in the hydrolyzed tholin sample. These four species have been assigned as the amino acids asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, and glutamic acid. This represents the first detection of biologically relevant molecules created under conditions similar to those found in impact melt pools and cryolavas on Titan. Future missions to Titan should therefore carry instrumentation capable of detecting amino acids and other prebiotically relevant molecules on its surface This work was supported by the NASA Exobiology Program.

  11. A Potential Mechanism for Perchlorate Formation on Mars: Surface-Radiolysis-Initiated Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is prevalent on Earth, and with observations of perchlorate on lunar samples and chondrite meteorites, along with recent observations indicating the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, it appears that the existence of perchlorate is widespread throughout the solar system. However, the abundance and isotopic composition of Martian perchlorate suggest that the perchlorate formation mechanism on Mars may involve a different path than perchlorate found elsewhere in the solar system. Motivated by this, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model to investigate the viability of perchlorate formation in the atmosphere of Mars, instigated by the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays. The surface-atmosphere interaction to produce Martian perchlorate involves the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere, through surface radiolysis, and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4), followed by surface deposition and mineralization to form surface perchlorates. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find an OClO surface flux as low as 3.2x107 molecules cm-2 s-1, sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; p<0.05) over the same temperature range, suggesting a more uniform maintenance of lipid dynamics despite the presence of cholesterol. These data indicate that EPA and DHA had different effects on membrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  13. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  14. Phs1 and the Synthesis of Very Long Chain Fatty Acids Are Required for Ballistospore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ianiri, Giuseppe; Abhyankar, Ritika; Kihara, Akio; Idnurm, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The production and dissemination of spores by members of the fungal kingdom is a major reason for the success of this eukaryotic lineage in colonizing most terrestrial ecosystems. Ballistospores are a type of spore produced by basidiomycete fungi, such as the mushrooms and plant pathogenic rusts. These spores are forcefully discharged through a unique liquid-drop fusion mechanism, enabling the aerosolization of these particles that can contribute to plant disease and human allergies. The genes responsible for this process are unknown due to technical challenges in studying many of the fungi that produce ballistospores. Here, we applied newly-developed techniques in a forward genetic screen to identify genes required for ballistospore formation or function in a tractable red yeast, a species of Sporobolomyces. One strain bearing a mutation in the PHS1 gene was identified as a mirror mutant. PHS1 encodes 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase required for the third step in very long chain fatty acid biosynthesis. The Sporobolomyces PHS1 gene complements the essential functions of a S. cerevisiae phs1 mutant. The Sporobolomyces phs1 mutant strain has less dehydratase activity and a reduction in very long chain fatty acids compared to wild type. The mutant strain also exhibits sensitivity to cell wall stress agents and loss of shooting due to a delay in ballistospore formation, indicating that the role of Phs1 in spore dissemination may be primarily in cellular integrity. PMID:25148260

  15. [Effects of ascorbic acid on the free radical formations of isoniazid and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Y; Akazawa, M; Tsuchiya, K; Sakurai, H; Kiwada, H; Goromaru, T

    1991-10-01

    By the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and of spin-trapping technique, the effects of ascorbic acid on the formation of the free radical intermediates due to isoniazid (INAH) and its metabolites were investigated with a microsomal system. When alpha-(4-pyridyl 1-oxide)-N-tert butylnitrone (4-POBN) was used as a spin trapping agent, the ESR signal due to hydrazine (Hy) was formed to be most intensive among others. Therefore, it was presumed that Hy is a potent intermediate to cause an INAH-induced hepatic injury. In the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), the free radical formation of Hy, INAH and acetyl hydrazine was significantly inhibited, suggesting that AA may affect the INAH-hepatitis. By the addition of inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 like metyrapone and CO, the generation of the radical from Hy decreased, confirming that the radical is formed by the cytochrome P-450 dependent microsome systems. The 4-POBN-trapped radical species generated from Hy was presumed to be the hydrazyl radical by the results of mass spectrometry.

  16. Inhibitory effect of glutamic acid on the scale formation process using electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Karar, A; Naamoune, F; Kahoul, A; Belattar, N

    2016-08-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate CaCO3 in water has some important implications in geoscience researches, ocean chemistry studies, CO2 emission issues and biology. In industry, the scaling phenomenon may cause technical problems, such as reduction in heat transfer efficiency in cooling systems and obstruction of pipes. This paper focuses on the study of the glutamic acid (GA) for reducing CaCO3 scale formation on metallic surfaces in the water of Bir Aissa region. The anti-scaling properties of glutamic acid (GA), used as a complexing agent of Ca(2+) ions, have been evaluated by the chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods in conjunction with a microscopic examination. Chemical and electrochemical study of this water shows a high calcium concentration. The characterization using X-ray diffraction reveals that while the CaCO3 scale formed chemically is a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the one deposited electrochemically is a pure calcite. The effect of temperature on the efficiency of the inhibitor was investigated. At 30 and 40°C, a complete scaling inhibition was obtained at a GA concentration of 18 mg/L with 90.2% efficiency rate. However, the efficiency of GA decreased at 50 and 60°C.

  17. Formation of haloacetic acids from dissolved organic matter fractions during chloramination.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying; Song, Hocheol; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the roles of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions, pH and bromide concentration in the formation of haloacetic acids (HAA) during chloramination. DOM from two surface waters with a low (2.9 L/mg-m) and high (5.1 L/mg-m) specific UV absorbance (SUVA(254)) values was isolated and fractionated into three fractions based on the hydrophobicity [i.e., hydrophobic (HPO), transphilic (TPH) and hydrophilic (HPI)]. DOM mass balances and DBP reactivity checks were performed to characterize the effects of isolation and fractionation steps. The fractions were chloraminated at three pHs and three bromide concentrations. The results showed that pH was the most important factor controlling HAA formation and speciation. The HAA yields significantly decreased with increase in pH from 6.3 to 9.0. The impact of bromide in the formation of brominated HAA species also became less important with increasing pH, and no brominated specie was detectable at pH 9. HPO fractions of the two source waters consistently showed higher HAA yields than TPH and HPI fractions. On the other hand, HPI fractions showed higher bromine incorporation than HPO and TPH fractions. To maintain higher and relatively stable combined chlorine residuals while reducing HAA formation, water utilities may consider keeping pH above 7.5 as one strategy. This will also lower the formation of brominated HAA species which have been shown to be more cyto- and geno-toxic than their chlorinated analogs.

  18. Tube formation in the first trimester placental trophoblast cells: Differential effects of angiogenic growth factors and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Abhilash D; Das, Mrinal K; Sarkar, Arnab; Vilasagaram, Srinivas; Basak, Sanjay; Duttaroy, Asim K

    2016-06-01

    The study aims to investigate whether cytosolic fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) is involved in angiogenic growth factors- and fatty acid-induced tube formation in first trimester placental trophoblast cells, HTR8/SVneo. We determined the tube formation both at basal as well as stimulated levels in the absence and presence of inhibitors of FABP4 and VEGF signaling pathways. Basal level of tube formation was maximally reduced in the presence of 50 µM of FABP4 inhibitor compared with those by VEGF signaling pathway inhibitors (rapamycin, L-NAME, and p38 MAP kinase inhibitor). Whereas docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3 (DHA)-, and VEGF-induced tube formation was maximally inhibited by p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (63.7 and 34.5%, respectively), however, leptin-induced tube formation was inhibited maximally by FABP4 inhibitor (50.7%). ANGPTL4 and oleic acid (OA)-induced tube formation was not blocked by any of these inhibitors. The FABP4 inhibitor inhibited cell growth stimulated by DHA, leptin, VEGF, and OA (P < 0.05) but was not affected by ANGPTL4. VEGF, leptin, and OA also increased FABP4 protein level in these cells, though the uptake of fatty acids by these cells was not affected by the presence of FABP4 inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that FABP4 may be involved in part in the basal level, and stimulated tube formation by VEGF, DHA, and leptin, whereas it has little or no effect in ANGPTL4- and OA-induced tube formation in these cells. Thus, FABP4 may play a differential role in fatty acids and angiogenic growth factors-mediated tube formation in the first trimester trophoblast cells in vitro.

  19. A new occurrence of ambient inclusion trails from the ~1900-million-year-old Gunflint Formation, Ontario: nanocharacterization and testing of potential formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wacey, D; Saunders, M; Kong, C; Kilburn, M R

    2016-09-01

    Ambient inclusion trails (AITs) are tubular microstructures thought to form when a microscopic mineral crystal is propelled through a fine-grained rock matrix. Here, we report a new occurrence of AITs from a fossilized microbial mat within the 1878-Ma Gunflint Formation, at Current River, Ontario. The AITs are 1-15 μm in diameter, have pyrite as the propelled crystal, are infilled with chlorite and have been propelled through a microquartz (chert) or chlorite matrix. AITs most commonly originate at the boundary between pyrite- and chlorite-rich laminae and chert-filled fenestrae, with pyrite crystals propelled into the fenestrae. A subset of AITs originate within the fenestrae, rooted either within the chert or within patches of chlorite. Sulphur isotope data ((34) S/(32) S) obtained in situ from AIT pyrite have a δ(34) S of -8.5 to +8.0 ‰, indicating a maximum of ~30 ‰ fractionation from Palaeoproterozoic seawater sulphate (δ(34) S ≈ +20 ‰). Organic carbon is common both at the outer margins of the fenestrae and in patches of chlorite where most AITs originate, and can be found in smaller quantities further along some AITs towards the terminal pyrite grain. We infer that pyrite crystals now found within the AITs formed via the action of heterotrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria during early diagenesis within the microbial mat, as pore waters were becoming depleted in seawater sulphate. Gases derived from this process such as CO2 and H2 S were partially trapped within the microbial mat, helping produce birds-eye fenestrae, while rapid microquartz precipitation closed porosity. We propose that propulsion of the pyrite crystals to form AITs was driven by two complementary mechanisms during burial and low-grade metamorphism: firstly, thermal decomposition of residual organic material providing CO2 , and potentially CH4 , as propulsive gases, plus organic acids to locally dissolve the microquartz matrix; and secondly, reactions involving clay minerals that

  20. A study of the alumina-silica gel adsorbent for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water: increase in adsorption capacity of the adsorbent due to formation of amorphous aluminosilicate by adsorption of silicic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takushi; Ueda, Akira; Kato, Koichi; Mogi, Katsumi; Matsuo, Shorin

    2002-08-01

    Two kinds of adsorbents (Si adsorbent and Al adsorbent) for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water to retard the formation of silica scales were prepared using silicic acid contained in geothermal water. The Si adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water, and the Al adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water after the addition of aluminum chloride. The specific surface area of the Si adsorbent was small and it's adsorption capacity of silicic acid was low. Although the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent was also small, it was significantly increased by the adsorption of silicic acid and it's adsorption capacity was high. Based on the change in the local structure of aluminum ion by the adsorption of silicic acid, the Al adsorbent was considered to be silica particles covered with crystalline aluminum hydroxide. Moreover, it was concluded that the increase in the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent and the decrease in the zeta potential were due to the formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate with a large surface area and a negative charge (one 4-coordinated Al) by the reaction between aluminum ions and silicic acids.

  1. Mechanical strain promotes osteoblast ECM formation and improves its osteoinductive potential

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a supportive microenvironment for cells, which is suitable as a tissue engineering scaffold. Mechanical stimulus plays a significant role in the fate of osteoblast, suggesting that it regulates ECM formation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of mechanical stimulus on ECM formation and bioactivity. Methods Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in cell culture dishes and stimulated with mechanical tensile strain. After removing the cells, the ECMs coated on dishes were prepared. The ECM protein and calcium were assayed and MC3T3-E1 cells were re-seeded on the ECM-coated dishes to assess osteoinductive potential of the ECM. Results The cyclic tensile strain increased collagen, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), BMP-4, and calcium levels in the ECM. Compared with the ECM produced by unstrained osteoblasts, those of mechanically stimulated osteoblasts promoted alkaline phosphatase activity, elevated BMP-2 and osteopontin levels and mRNA levels of runt-related transcriptional factor 2 (Runx2) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased secreted calcium of the re-seeded MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusion Mechanical strain promoted ECM production of osteoblasts in vitro, increased BMP-2/4 levels, and improved osteoinductive potential of the ECM. This study provided a novel method to enhance bioactivity of bone ECM in vitro via mechanical strain to osteoblasts. PMID:23098360

  2. Weak shock loadings induce potential hot spots formation around an intergranular pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiao; Li, Xinguo; Zheng, Xianxu; Guo, Wencan; Li, Jianling

    2017-03-01

    The weak shock loading plays the leading role in the unexpected explosion accidents of condensed-phase explosives. Under the weak shock loading conditions, the shear localization is the main factor affecting the formation of hot spots. When a planar stress wave crosses over a pore in the polymeric binder of the polymer bonded explosive (called intergranular pore), the shear localization comes out around the pore, which may induce potential hot spots formation in the polymeric binder and cause the chemical reaction of the nearby energetic crystal granules. In the present work, a novel experiment system consisting of time-resolved shadowgraph and laser-driven compressions was used to record the interactions between the planar stress wave and the intergranular pore. Then, a two-dimensional numerical simulation was performed to calculate the shear localization and the temperature rise around the intergranular pore. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experiments. Finally, the locations of the potential hot spots were determined, and the variations of the locations with the impulse width of incident stress wave were discussed.

  3. Emission characteristics of VOCs emitted from consumer and commercial products and their ozone formation potential.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Kim, Su-Yeon; Son, Youn-Suk; Choi, In-Young; Park, Seong-Ryong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several consumer and commercial products (body wash, dishwashing detergent, air freshener, windshield washer fluid, lubricant, hair spray, and insecticide) were studied and compared. The spray products were found to emit the highest amount of VOCs (~96 wt%). In contrast, the body wash products showed the lowest VOC contents (~1.6 wt%). In the spray products, 21.6-96.4 % of the VOCs were propane, iso-butane, and n-butane, which are the components of liquefied petroleum gas. Monoterpene (C10H16) was the dominant component of the VOCs in the non-spray products (e.g., body wash, 53-88 %). In particular, methanol was present with the highest amount of VOCs in windshield washer fluid products. In terms of the number of carbon, the windshield washer fluids, lubricants, insecticides, and hair sprays comprised >95 % of the VOCs in the range C2-C5. The VOCs in the range C6-C10 were predominantly found in the body wash products. The dishwashing detergents and air fresheners contained diverse VOCs from C2 to C11. Besides comprising hazardous VOCs, VOCs from consumer products were also ozone precursors. The ozone formation potential of the consumer and commercial spray products was estimated to be higher than those of liquid and gel materials. In particular, the hair sprays showed the highest ozone formation potential.

  4. Effects of chlorination operating conditions on trihalomethane formation potential in polyaluminum chloride-polymer coagulated effluent.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihua; Gao, Baoyu; Ma, Defang; Rong, Hongyan; Sun, Shenglei; Wang, Fang; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan

    2015-03-21

    In this study, coagulation performance of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and PAC-lignin acrylamide (PAC+LAM) in reservoir water treatment was contrastively analyzed. Effects of operating conditions including chlorine dose, contact time and pH on the formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMs) during chlorination in coagulated effluent were also investigated. Comparing with PAC, PAC+LAM achieved higher efficiency in the removal of THMs precursors. TTHM yield in unfiltered water samples (UW) was greater than that of filtered water (FW) due to the residual dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the suspended particles or micro flocs. Meanwhile, operating conditions during chlorination had a significant influence on THMs formation potential. With chlorine dose rising, mass ratio of CHCl3 to TTHM increased, whereas that of CHBr2Cl decreased due to higher Cl2/Br(-) molar ratio. TTHM and CHCl3 levels rose with the increase of pH. Under a given chlorination condition, there was a minor effect of contact time on THM speciation.

  5. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  6. A multi-level strategy for anticipating future glacier lake formation and associated hazard potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, H.; Haeberli, W.; Linsbauer, A.; Huggel, C.; Paul, F.

    2010-02-01

    In the course of glacier retreat, new glacier lakes can develop. As such lakes can be a source of natural hazards, strategies for predicting future glacier lake formation are important for an early planning of safety measures. In this article, a multi-level strategy for the identification of overdeepened parts of the glacier beds and, hence, sites with potential future lake formation, is presented. At the first two of the four levels of this strategy, glacier bed overdeepenings are estimated qualitatively and over large regions based on a digital elevation model (DEM) and digital glacier outlines. On level 3, more detailed and laborious models are applied for modeling the glacier bed topography over smaller regions; and on level 4, special situations must be investigated in-situ with detailed measurements such as geophysical soundings. The approaches of the strategy are validated using historical data from Trift Glacier, where a lake formed over the past decade. Scenarios of future glacier lakes are shown for the two test regions Aletsch and Bernina in the Swiss Alps. In the Bernina region, potential future lake outbursts are modeled, using a GIS-based hydrological flow routing model. As shown by a corresponding test, the ASTER GDEM and the SRTM DEM are both suitable to be used within the proposed strategy. Application of this strategy in other mountain regions of the world is therefore possible as well.

  7. [Studies of ozone formation potentials for benzene and ethylbenzene using a smog chamber and model simulation].

    PubMed

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu

    2014-02-01

    Ozone formation potentials from irradiations of benzene-NO(x) and ethylbenzene-NO(x) systems under the conditions of different VOC/NO(x) ratios and RH were investigated using a characterized chamber and model simulation. The repeatability of the smog chamber experiment shows that for two sets of ethylbenzene-NO(x) irradiations with similar initial concentrations and reaction conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity and relative light intensity, the largest difference in O3 between two experiments is only 4% during the whole experimental run. On the basis of smog chamber experiments, ozone formation of photo-oxidation of benzene and ethylbenzene was simulated in terms of the master chemical mechanism (MCM). The peak ozone values for benzene and ethylbenzene simulated by MCM are higher than the chamber data, and the difference between the MCM-simulated results and chamber data increases with increasing RH. Under the conditions of sunlight irradiations, with benzene and ethylbenzene concentrations being in the range of (10-50) x 10(-9) and NO(x) concentrations in the range of (10-100) x 10(-9), the 6 h ozone contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were obtained to be (3.1-33) x 10(-9) and (2.6-122) x 10(-9), whereas the peak O3 contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were (3.5-54) x 10(-9) and (3.8-164) x 10(-9), respectively. The MCM-simulated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values for benzene and ethylbenzene were 0.25/C and 0.97/C (per carbon), respectively. The maximum ozone reactivity (MOR) values for these two species were obtained to be 0.73/C and 1.03/C, respectively. The MOR value of benzene from MCM is much higher than that obtained by carter from SAPRC, indicating that SAPRC may underestimate the ozone formation potential of benzene.

  8. Angiotensin II induces phosphatidic acid formation in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts: evaluation of the roles of phospholipases C and D.

    PubMed

    Booz, G W; Taher, M M; Baker, K M; Singer, H A

    1994-12-21

    Phosphatidic acid has been proposed to contribute to the mitogenic actions of various growth factors. In 32P-labeled neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, 100 nM [Sar1]angiotensin II was shown to rapidly induce formation of 32P-phosphatidic acid. Levels peaked at 5 min (1.5-fold above control), but were partially sustained over 2 h. Phospholipase D contributed in part to phosphatidic acid formation, as 32P- or 3H-phosphatidylethanol was produced when cells labeled with [32P]H3PO4 or 1-O-[1,2- 3H]hexadecyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were stimulated in the presence of 1% ethanol. [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phospholipase D activity was transient and mainly mediated through protein kinase C (PKC), since PKC downregulation reduced phosphatidylethanol formation by 68%. Residual activity may have been due to increased intracellular Ca2+, as ionomycin also activated phospholipase D in PKC-depleted cells. Phospholipase D did not fully account for [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid: 1) compared to PMA, a potent activator of phospholipase D, [Sar1]angiotensin II produced more phosphatidic acid relative to phosphatidylethanol, and 2) PKC downregulation did not affect [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59949 depressed [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation by only 21%, indicating that activation of a phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase also can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid. Thus, additional pathways not involving phospholipases C and D, such as de novo synthesis, may contribute to [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid in these cells. Finally, as previously shown for [Sar1]angiotensin II, phosphatidic acid stimulated mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  10. Ultrafast formation of the benzoic acid triplet upon ultraviolet photolysis and its sequential photodissociation in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chunfan; Su Hongmei; Sun Xuezhong; George, Michael W.

    2012-05-28

    Time-resolved infrared (TR-IR) absorption spectroscopy in both the femtosecond and nanosecond time domain has been applied to examine the photolysis of benzoic acid in acetonitrile solution following either 267 nm or 193 nm excitation. By combining the ultrafast and nanosecond TR-IR measurements, both the excited states and the photofragments have been detected and key mechanistic insights were obtained. We show that the solvent interaction modifies the excited state relaxation pathways and thus the population dynamics, leading to different photolysis behavior in solution from that observed in the gas phase. Vibrational energy transfer to solvents dissipates excitation energy efficiently, suppressing the photodissociation and depopulating the excited S{sub 2} or S{sub 3} state molecules to the lowest T{sub 1} state with a rate of {approx}2.5 ps after a delayed onset of {approx}3.7 ps. Photolysis of benzoic acid using 267 nm excitation is dominated by the formation of the T{sub 1} excited state and no photofragments could be detected. The results from TR-IR experiments using higher energy of 193 nm indicate that photodissociation proceeds more rapidly than the vibrational energy transfer to solvents and C-C bond fission becomes the dominant relaxation pathway in these experiments as featured by the prominent observation of the COOH photofragments and negligible yield of the T{sub 1} excited state. The measured ultrafast formation of T{sub 1} excited state supports the existence of the surface intersections of S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}, S{sub 2}/T{sub 2}, and S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}, and the large T{sub 1} quantum yield of {approx}0.65 indicates the importance of the excited state depopulation to triplet manifold as the key factor affecting the photophysical and photochemical behavior of the monomeric benzoic acid.

  11. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into disease-related isoforms (PrPSc). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrPC in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrPSc formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrPC. In contrast, PrPC containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrPC) was not converted to PrPSc. Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrPC inhibited the production of PrPSc within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrPC contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrPC. Desialylated PrPC was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrPC and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrPC in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrPC modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrPSc formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:26553874

  12. Resistance to benzalkonium chloride, peracetic acid and nisin during formation of mature biofilms by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Saá Ibusquiza, P; Herrera, J J R; Cabo, M L

    2011-05-01

    Increase of resistance to the application of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), peracetic acid (PA) and nisin during biofilm formation at 25 °C by three strains of Listeria monocytogenes (CECT 911, CECT 4032, CECT 5873 and BAC-adapted CECT 5873) in different scenarios was compared. For this purpose, resistance after 4 and 11-days of biofilm formation was quantified in terms of lethal dose 90% values (LD(90)), determined according with a dose-response logistic mathematical model. Microscopic analyses after 4 and 11-days of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation were also carried out. Results demonstrated a relation between the microscopic structure and the resistance to the assayed biocides in matured biofilms. The worst cases being biofilms formed by the strain 4032 (in both stainless steel and polypropylene), which showed a complex "cloud-type" structure that correlates with the highest resistance of this strain against the three biocides during biofilm maturation. However, that increase in resistance and complexity appeared not to be dependent on initial bacterial adherence, thus indicating mature biofilms rather than planctonic cells or early-stage biofilms must be considered when disinfection protocols have to be optimized. PA seemed to be the most effective of the three disinfectants used for biofilms. We hypothesized both its high oxidizing capacity and low molecular size could suppose an advantage for its penetration inside the biofilm. We also demonstrated that organic material counteract with the biocides, thus indicating the importance of improving cleaning protocols. Finally, by comparing strains 5873 and 5873 adapted to BAC, several adaptative cross-responses between BAC and nisin or peracetic acid were identified.

  13. Dietary arachidonic acid as a risk factor for age-associated neurodegenerative diseases: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mélanie H; Pelleieux, Sandra; Vitale, Nicolas; Olivier, Jean Luc

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease and associated diseases constitute a major public health concern worldwide. Nutrition-based, preventive strategies could possibly be effective in delaying the occurrence of these diseases and lower their prevalence. Arachidonic acid is the second major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and several studies support its involvement in Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this review is to examine how dietary arachidonic acid contributes to Alzheimer's disease mechanisms and therefore to its prevention. First, we explore the sources of neuronal arachidonic acid that could potentially originate from either the conversion of linoleic acid, or from dietary sources and transfer across the blood-brain-barrier. In a second part, a brief overview of the role of the two main agents of Alzheimer's disease, tau protein and Aβ peptide is given, followed by the examination of the relationship between arachidonic acid and the disease. Third, the putative mechanisms by which arachidonic acid could influence Alzheimer's disease occurrence and evolution are presented. The conclusion is devoted to what remains to be determined before integrating arachidonic acid in the design of preventive strategies against Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Potential use of cuminic acid as a botanical fungicide against Valsa mali.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Yang; Han, LiRong; Zhang, Xing; Feng, Juntao

    2017-01-03

    Valsa canker caused by Valsa mali is commonly present in eastern Asia and cause large economic losses. Because of limited agricultural measures and chemical residues of commonly used fungicides there is an urgent need of alternative plant protecting agents. On this background the activity of cuminic acid, a plant extract from the seed of Cuminum cyminum L, was assessed. The median effective concentration (EC50) values for inhibition of mycelial growth of seven V. mali strains ranged from 3.046 to 8.342 μg/mL, with an average EC50 value of 4.956 ± 0.281 μg/mL. The antifungal activity was the direct activity of cuminic acid instead of the influence on the pH of media by cuminic acid. After treated with cuminic acid, mycelia dissolved with decreased branches and swelling; cell membrane permeability increased while pectinases activity decreased significantly. Moreover, peroxidase (POD) activity of the apple leaves increased after treated with cuminic acid. Importantly, on detached branches of apple tree, cuminic acid exhibited both protective and curative activity. These results indicated that cuminic acid not only showed the antifungal activity, but also could improve the defense capacity of the plants. Taken together, cuminic acid showed the potential as a natural alternative to commercial fungicides or a lead compound to develop new fungicides for the control of Valsa canker.

  15. Enigmatic Isovaline: Investigating the Stability, Racemization, and Formation of a Non-biological Meteoritic Amino Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla; Lewis, Ariel; Dworkin, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Among the Murchison meteoritic amino acids, isovaline stands out as being both nonbiological (non-protein) and having a relatively high abundance. While approximately equal amounts of D- and L-isovaline have been reported in Murchison and other CM meteorites, the molecule's structure appears to prohibit its racemization in aqueous solutions. We recently have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of both isovaline and valine with an eye toward each molecule's formation, stability, and possible interconversions of D and L enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovaline- and valinecontaining ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectral methods to assess both amino acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied in the presence and in the absence of water-ice, and the destruction of both isovaline and valine was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have undertaken experiments to synthesize isovaline, valine, and their amino acid isomers by solid-phase radiation-chemical pathways other than the oft-invoked Strecker process. This presentation will review and summarize some of our recent findings. -- Our work has been supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Experiments were performed in the Cosmic Ice Laboratory (RLH, MHM, AL) and the Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory (JPD, DPG) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. Contribution of natural and anthropogenic emissions to acid precipitation formation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.; Barrera, G.; Castellanos, L.; Moreno, D.

    1996-12-31

    The emissions of precursor compounds that contribute significantly the formation of acid precipitation in urban areas are associated with the burning of fossils fuels from mobile, area and point sources. In Mexico City, these include services, institutions and residences aggregated as area sources, as well as industrial point sources, including smelting, refinement of petroleum and power generation. In addition, dusts from soil erosion and lack of vegetation in the urban landscape contribute to modification of natural rain water. It is common knowledge that acid precipitation characterizes a large variety of compounds, as much related to precursor emissions as to prevailing environmental factors. This study attempts to establish the contribution of natural and anthropogenic emissions and meteorological conditions during the rainy season by analysis of spatial and temporal distributions, as of different ions in solution with rain water, as well as the modeling of wind patterns, as represented by using the arc/info software. This study`s results also show the geographic areas impacted by the acid rain phenomenon and the acidification rates in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the past 3 years.

  17. Detection and formation scenario of citric acid, pyruvic acid, and other possible metabolism precursors in carbonaceous meteorites.

    PubMed

    Cooper, George; Reed, Chris; Nguyen, Dang; Carter, Malika; Wang, Yi

    2011-08-23

    Carbonaceous meteorites deliver a variety of organic compounds to Earth that may have played a role in the origin and/or evolution of biochemical pathways. Some apparently ancient and critical metabolic processes require several compounds, some of which are relatively labile such as keto acids. Therefore, a prebiotic setting for any such individual process would have required either a continuous distant source for the entire suite of intact precursor molecules and/or an energetic and compact local synthesis, particularly of the more fragile members. To date, compounds such as pyruvic acid, oxaloacetic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, and α-ketoglutaric acid (all members of the citric acid cycle) have not been identified in extraterrestrial sources or, as a group, as part of a "one pot" suite of compounds synthesized under plausibly prebiotic conditions. We have identified these compounds and others in carbonaceous meteorites and/or as low temperature (laboratory) reaction products of pyruvic acid. In meteorites, we observe many as part of three newly reported classes of compounds: keto acids (pyruvic acid and homologs), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (citric acid and homologs), and tricarboxylic acids. Laboratory syntheses using (13)C-labeled reactants demonstrate that one compound alone, pyruvic acid, can produce several (nonenzymatic) members of the citric acid cycle including oxaloacetic acid. The isotopic composition of some of the meteoritic keto acids points to interstellar or presolar origins, indicating that such compounds might also exist in other planetary systems.

  18. Formation of stable radicals in catechin/nitrous acid systems: participation of dinitrosocatechin.

    PubMed

    Morina, Filis; Takahama, Umeo; Mojović, Miloš; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja

    2016-03-01

    Catechins are transformed into dinitrosocatechins (diNOcats) and then oxidized to the quinones by salivary nitrite under conditions simulating the stomach. This manuscript deals with formation of stable radicals in the NO group of diNOcat during nitrite-induced oxidation of (+)-catechin and diNOcat at pH 2. We postulated two mechanisms for the stable radical formation; one is nitrous acid-induced oxidation of diNOcat in the A-ring, and the other intermolecular charge transfer from the A-ring of diNOcat and/or diNOcat quinone to the quinone moiety of the B-ring of diNOcat quinone. In addition, an unstable phenoxyl radical, which might be transformed into quinone, was also produced, accompanying the formation of the stable radical on the NO group. Taking the above results into account, we mainly focus on the adverse effects of the radicals and quinone, which may be produced from (+)-catechin in the stomach under the conditions of high salivary nitrite concentrations.

  19. Peptide bond formation does not involve acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Beringer, Malte; Adio, Sarah; Rodnina, Marina V

    2006-05-01

    Ribosomes catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between aminoacyl esters of transfer RNAs within a catalytic center composed of ribosomal RNA only. Here we show that the reaction of P-site formylmethionine (fMet)-tRNA(fMet) with a modified A-site tRNA substrate, Phelac-tRNA(Phe), in which the nucleophilic amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl group, does not show the pH dependence observed with small substrate analogs such as puromycin and hydroxypuromycin. This indicates that acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues is not important in the reaction with the full-size substrate. Rather, the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation by positioning the tRNAs, or their 3' termini, through interactions with rRNA that induce and/or stabilize a pH-insensitive conformation of the active site and provide a preorganized environment facilitating the reaction. The rate of peptide bond formation with unmodified Phe-tRNA(Phe) is estimated to be >300 s(-1).

  20. Effects of gaseous sulphuric acid on diesel exhaust nanoparticle formation and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rönkkö, Topi; Lähde, Tero; Heikkilä, Juha; Pirjola, Liisa; Bauschke, Ulrike; Arnold, Frank; Schlager, Hans; Rothe, Dieter; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko; Keskinen, Jorma

    2013-10-15

    Diesel exhaust gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) concentrations and particle size distributions, concentrations, and volatility were studied at four driving conditions with a heavy duty diesel engine equipped with oxidative exhaust after-treatment. Low sulfur fuel and lubricant oil were used in the study. The concentration of the exhaust GSA was observed to vary depending on the engine driving history and load. The GSA affected the volatile particle fraction at high engine loads; higher GSA mole fraction was followed by an increase in volatile nucleation particle concentration and size as well as increase of size of particles possessing nonvolatile core. The GSA did not affect the number of nonvolatile particles. At low and medium loads, the exhaust GSA concentration was low and any GSA driven changes in particle population were not observed. Results show that during the exhaust cooling and dilution processes, besides critical in volatile nucleation particle formation, GSA can change the characteristics of all nucleation mode particles. Results show the dual nature of the nucleation mode particles so that the nucleation mode can include simultaneously volatile and nonvolatile particles, and fulfill the previous results for the nucleation mode formation, especially related to the role of GSA in formation processes.

  1. Variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production by natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains.

    PubMed

    Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kichise, Yuki; Izumoto, Eiji; Nakayama, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Research on the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and fermentation profile is being intensely pursued because of the potential for developing advanced fermentation technologies. In the present study, we isolated naturally occurring strains of yeast from sake mash that produce high levels of malic acid and demonstrate that variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production. To define the underlying biochemical mechanism, we determined the activities of enzymes required for malic acid synthesis and found that pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase activities in strains that produce high levels of malic acid were elevated compared with the standard sake strain K901. These results inspired us to hypothesize that decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was responsible for increased malic acid synthesis, and we present data supporting this hypothesis. Thus, the mitochondrial membrane potential of high malic acid producers was lower compared with standard strains. We conclude that mitochondrial membrane potential correlates with malic acid production.

  2. Bile Acids in Polycystic Liver Diseases: Triggers of Disease Progression and Potential Solution for Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perugorria, Maria J; Labiano, Ibone; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Marzioni, Marco; Marin, Jose J G; Bujanda, Luis; Banales, Jesús M

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) are a group of genetic hereditary cholangiopathies characterized by the development and progressive growth of cysts in the liver, which are the main cause of morbidity. Current therapies are based on surgical procedures and pharmacological strategies, which show short-term and modest beneficial effects. Therefore, the determination of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis appears to be crucial in order to find new potential targets for pharmacological therapy. Ductal plate malformation during embryogenesis and abnormal cystic cholangiocyte growth and secretion are some of the key mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PLDs. However, the discovery of the presence of bile acids in the fluid collected from human cysts and the intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic bile acids in an animal model of PLD (i.e. polycystic kidney (PCK) rat) suggest a potential role of impaired bile acid homeostasis in the pathogenesis of these diseases. On the other hand, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has emerged as a new potential therapeutic tool for PLDs by promoting the inhibition of cystic cholangiocyte growth in both PCK rats and highly symptomatic patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD: most common type of PLD), and improving symptoms. Chronic treatment with UDCA normalizes the decreased intracellular calcium levels in ADPKD human cholangiocytes in vitro, which results in the reduction of their baseline-stimulated proliferation. Moreover, UDCA decreases the liver concentration of cytotoxic bile acids in PCK rats and the bile acid-dependent enhanced proliferation of cystic cholangiocytes. Here, the role of bile acids in the pathogenesis of PLDs and the potential therapeutic value of UDCA for the treatment of these diseases are reviewed and future lines of investigation in this field are proposed.

  3. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  4. Mutual Amino Acid Catalysis in Salt-Induced Peptide Formation Supports this Mechanism's Role in Prebiotic Peptide Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachot, Yuttana; Rode, Bernd M.

    1999-10-01

    The presence of some amino acids and dipeptides under the conditions of the salt-induced peptide formation reaction (aqueous solution at 85 °C, Cu(II) and NaCl) has been found to catalyze the formation of homopeptides of other amino acids, which are otherwise produced only in traces or not at all by this reaction. The condensation of Val, Leu and Lys to form their homodipeptides can occur to a considerable extent due to catalytic effects of other amino acids and related compounds, among which glycine, histidine, diglycine and diketopiperazine exhibit the most remarkable activity. These findings also lead to a modification of the table of amino acid sequences preferentially formed by the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) reaction, previously used for a comparison with the sequence preferences in membrane proteins of primitive organisms

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  6. Evaluation of toxicity of capsaicin and zosteric acid and their potential application as antifoulants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingwei; Barrios, Carlos A; Cutright, Teresa; Zhang Newby, Bi-min

    2005-10-01

    The toxicity of two natural product antifoulants, capsaicin and zosteric acid, was evaluated using the Microtox assay and a static toxicity test. The EC50 values obtained from the Microtox assay for capsaicin and zosteric acid were 11.75 +/- 1.02 and 442 +/- 100 mg/L, respectively. The static toxicity test, conducted with freshwater organisms, yielded capsaicin EC50 values of 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 23 +/- 2.0 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 +/- 3.9 and 375 +/- 10 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Tests with marine organisms resulted in capsaicin EC50 values of 6.9 +/- 0.2 and 15.6 +/- 0.4 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively; whereas zosteric acid EC50 values were 7.4 +/- 0.1 and 18 +/- 0.6 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. These results indicate that zosteric acid is much less toxic than capsaicin and that both are substantially less toxic than the currently used antifoulants, such as TBT (EC50 < 0.01 ppb). Their effectiveness as natural antifoulants was demonstrated by preliminary attachments studies. As the aqueous antifoulant concentration increased, significant inhibition of bacteria attachment or prevention of biofilm formation was achieved. Hence, both capsaicin and zosteric acid could be attractive alternatives as new antifouling compounds.

  7. Delaware Mountain Group (DMG) hydrology-salt removal potential. [Castile formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.J.; Snow, R.E.; Cosler, D.J.; Haji-Djafari, S.

    1982-12-01

    This study has been performed to assess potential salt dissolution from the evaporite sequences by the underlying aquifer and to evaluate the impact of this process on the WIPP facility integrity. The hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics of the DMG have been reviewed and the various salt dissolution hypotheses and mechanimsms have been examined. Based on analytical and numerical evaluations, the following conclusions have been reached: The potential dissolution mechanisms include diffusion and convection from halite layers to the Bell Canyon and Captain Reef aquifers. Computation of the present dissolution rate based on observed chloride concentration levels in the Bell Canyon aquifer indicates that diffusion and possibly very weak convection result in removal of halite from the Castile overlying the DMG. Evaluation of the DMG hydrogeologic conditions and review of the range of values for the hydrogeologic and geochemical parameters which influence salt removal indicate that general salt removal by the diffusion process would produce an advancement of the dissolution front of only 0.3 cm in 10,000 yr. Based on an analysis of potential changes in the hydrologic characteristics of the Bell Canyon aquifer, an increase in flow rate of even one order of magnitude would not increase the salt removal from the Castile Formation by more than 17% cm. analysis of implausible worst-case dissolution rates associated with both diffusive and convective dissolution at the Bell Canyon aquifer-Castile Formation interface suggests that the structural integrity of the WIPP facility located more than 400 m above would not be affected. In this analysis, it was determined that the theoretical maximum cavity radius would be seven meters over a fracture and one meter above a circular porous zone in a period of 10,000 yrs.

  8. Lewis acid-catalysed formation of two-dimensional phthalocyanine covalent organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Eric L; Dichtel, William R

    2010-08-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) offer a new strategy for assembling organic semiconductors into robust networks with atomic precision and long-range order. General methods for COF synthesis will allow complex building blocks to be incorporated into these emerging materials. Here we report a new Lewis acid-catalysed protocol to form boronate esters directly from protected catechols and arylboronic acids. This transformation also provides crystalline boronate ester-linked COFs from protected polyfunctional catechols and bis(boronic acids). Using this method, we prepared a new COF that features a square lattice composed of phthalocyanine macrocycles joined by phenylene bis(boronic acid) linkers. The phthalocyanines stack in an eclipsed fashion within the COF to form 2.3 nm pores that run parallel to the stacked chromophores. The material's broad absorbance over the solar spectrum, potential for efficient charge transport through the stacked phthalocyanines, good thermal stability and the modular nature of COF synthesis, show strong promise for applications in organic photovoltaic devices.

  9. Photo-tautomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol: a potential route to tropospheric acids.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Duncan U; Heazlewood, Brianna R; Maccarone, Alan T; Conroy, Trent; Payne, Richard J; Jordan, Meredith J T; Kable, Scott H

    2012-09-07

    Current atmospheric models underestimate the production of organic acids in the troposphere. We report a detailed kinetic model of the photochemistry of acetaldehyde (ethanal) under tropospheric conditions. The rate constants are benchmarked to collision-free experiments, where extensive photo-isomerization is observed upon irradiation with actinic ultraviolet radiation (310 to 330 nanometers). The model quantitatively reproduces the experiments and shows unequivocally that keto-enol photo-tautomerization, forming vinyl alcohol (ethenol), is the crucial first step. When collisions at atmospheric pressure are included, the model quantitatively reproduces previously reported quantum yields for photodissociation at all pressures and wavelengths. The model also predicts that 21 ± 4% of the initially excited acetaldehyde forms stable vinyl alcohol, a known precursor to organic acid formation, which may help to account for the production of organic acids in the troposphere.

  10. Formation of Amino Acids on the Sonolysis of Aqueous Solutions Containing Acetic Acid, Methane, or Carbon Dioxide, in the Presence of Nitrogen Gas.

    PubMed

    Dharmarathne, Leena; Grieser, Franz

    2016-01-21

    The sonolysis of aqueous solutions containing acetic acid, methane, or carbon dioxide in the presence of nitrogen gas was found to produce a number of different amino acids at a rate of ∼1 to 100 nM/min, using ultrasound at an operating power of 70 W and 355 kHz. Gas-phase elementary reactions are suggested, and discussed, to account for the formation of the complex biomolecules from the low molar mass solutes used. On the basis of the results, a new hypothesis is presented to explain the formation of amino acids under primitive atmospheric conditions and how their formation may be linked to the eventual abiotic genesis of life on Earth.

  11. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97%) and thickness (−50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  12. Effects of irradiation on trans fatty acids formation in ground beef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Mônica S.; Villavicencio, Anna Lúcia C. H.; Mancini-filho, Jorge

    2002-03-01

    In order to give the consumer the assurance that meat processed by irradiation is a safe product, a great deal of research has been developed in the world. The effect of irradiation on the hygienic quality of meat and meat products is considered as related to the control of meat-borne parasites of humans; elimination of pathogens from fresh meat and poultry; and elimination of pathogens from processed meat. Lipid oxidation and associated changes are the major causes of the quality deterioration of meat during storage. Irradiation of lipids induces the production of free radicals, which react with oxygen, leading to the formation of carbonyls, responsible for alterations in food nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Trans fatty acids are present in ground beef and can also be formed during its processing. Interestingly, the trans fatty acids, due to their chemical and physical characteristics, show more resistance to the oxidizing process. This property motivated us to investigate the level of the trans fatty acids, as well as the level of oxidation in irradiated ground beef. Irradiation of ground beef was performed by gamma rays from a 60Co source. The applied radiation doses were 0; 1.0; 2.0; 3.0; 4.0; 5.0; 6.0; 7.0 and 8.0 kGy. Lipid peroxidation in terms of TBA number and carbonyl content was monitored during storage. The sample characteristics and trans fatty acids composition were measured, following irradiation and after 60 and 90 days of storage at -10°C.

  13. Boric Acid Reduces the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Accelerates Wound Healing Process.

    PubMed

    Tepedelen, Burcu Erbaykent; Soya, Elif; Korkmaz, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    Boron is absorbed by the digestive and respiratory system, and it was considered that it is converted to boric acid (BA), which was distributed to all tissues above 90 %. The biochemical essentiality of boron element is caused by boric acid because it affects the activity of several enzymes involved in the metabolism. DNA damage repair mechanisms and oxidative stress regulation is quite important in the transition stage from normal to cancerous cells; thus, this study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of boric acid on DNA damage and wound healing in human epithelial cell line. For this purpose, the amount of DNA damage occurred with irinotecan (CPT-11), etoposide (ETP), doxorubicin (Doxo), and H2O2 was determined by immunofluorescence through phosphorylation of H2AX((Ser139)) and pATM((Ser1981)) in the absence and presence of BA. Moreover, the effect of BA on wound healing has been investigated in epithelial cells treated with these agents. Our results demonstrated that H2AX((Ser139)) foci numbers were significantly decreased in the presence of BA while wound healing was accelerated by BA compared to that in the control and only drug-treated cells. Eventually, the results indicate that BA reduced the formation of DNA double strand breaks caused by agents as well as improving the wound healing process. Therefore, we suggest that boric acid has important therapeutical effectiveness and may be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases where oxidative stress and wound healing process plays an important role.

  14. Recent Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) Studies Concerning the Formation of Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Douglas M.; Adams, Nigel G.; Babcock, Lucia M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently the simplest amino acid, glycine, has been detected in interstellar clouds, ISC, although this has since been contested. In order to substantiate either of these claims, plausible routes to amino acids need to be investigated. For gas phase synthesis, the SIFT technique has been employed to study simple amino acids via ion-molecule reactions of several ions of interstellar interest with methylamine, ethylamine, formic acid, acetic acid, and methyl formate. Carboxylic acid type ions were considered in the reactions involving the amines. In reactions where the carbo