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Sample records for acid formation potential

  1. Reduction of chloroform formation potential of humic acid by sonolysis and ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Naffrechoux, E; Combet, E; Fanget, B; Petrier, C

    2003-04-01

    This study is concerned with the changes of chloroform formation potential during the reaction of humic acid (HA) and sodium hypochlorite caused by different oxidative pretreatments: ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, ultrasonic (US) irradiation or combined UV-US irradiations. The UV and US decomposition of a reagent HA in water was investigated. The characterization of the oxidized HA sample by UV absorptiometry, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography points a synergetic effect of the combined process. The values of the chlorine demand and chloroform formation potential were conventionally determined after a 96 h reaction at neutral pH. It was found that all applied processes decreased the concentration of chloroform but the highest decrease was observed for the UV-US treatment. PMID:12697238

  2. Trihalomethane formation potential of aquatic and terrestrial fulvic and humic acids: Sorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Mohamed Y Z; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-07-15

    Humic substances (HSs) are precursors for the formation of hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water. Various surrogate parameters have been used to investigate the generation of DBPs by HS precursors and the removal of these precursors by activated carbon treatment. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC)- and ultraviolet absorbance (UVA254)-based isotherms are commonly reported and presumed to be good predictors of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). However, THMFP-based isotherms are rarely published such that the three types of parameters have not been compared directly. Batch equilibrium experiments on activated carbon were used to generate constant-initial-concentration sorption isotherms for well-characterized samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). HSs representing type (fulvic acid [FA], humic acid [HA]), origin (aquatic, terrestrial), and geographical source (Nordic, Suwannee, Peat, Soil) were examined at pH6 and pH9. THMFP-based isotherms were generated and compared to determine if DOC- and UVA254-based isotherms were good predictors of the THMFP. The sorption process depended on the composition of the HSs and the chemical nature of the activated carbon, both of which were influenced by pH. Activated carbon removal of THM-precursors was pH- and HS-dependent. In some instances, the THMFP existed after UVA254 was depleted. PMID:25847173

  3. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiDonato, Nicole; Chen, Hongmei; Waggoner, Derek; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2016-04-01

    Soil humic acids are the base soluble/acid insoluble organic components of soil organic matter. Most of what we know about humic acids comes from studies of their bulk molecular properties or analysis of individual fractions after extraction from soils. This work attempts to better define humic acids and explain similarities and differences for several soils varying in degrees of humification using advanced molecular level techniques. Our investigation using electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has given new insight into the distinctive molecular characteristics of humic acids which suggest a possible pathway for their formation. Humic acids from various ecosystems, climate regions and soil textural classes are distinguished by the presence of three predominant molecular components: lignin-like molecules, carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules and condensed aromatic molecules that bear similarity to black carbon. Results show that humification may be linked to the relative abundance of these three types of molecules as well as the relative abundance of carboxyl groups in each molecular type. This work also demonstrates evidence for lignin as the primary source of soil organic matter, particularly condensed aromatic molecules often categorized as black carbon and is the first report of the non-pyrogenic source for these compounds in soils. We also suggest that much of the carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules are sourced from lignin.

  4. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Patrick; DiDonato, Nicole; Waggoner, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Humification is defined as the process by which plant and microbial debris are transformed in to humic substances. Proposed pathways for the formation of humic substances, include the lignin and lignin decomposition theories, the lignin-polyphenol theory as well as the melanoidin pathway. It is generally accepted that a combination of several of these pathways with some modifications may be responsible for producing humic substances. The current study examines humic acids from numerous soil samples to demonstrate their molecular composition. In addition we provide an explanation for the formation of these molecules that introduces a new perspective of the humification process. Our work utilizes advanced analytical techniques such as ESI-FTICR-MS and solid state NMR to more completely characterize humic acids at the molecular level. Methods Humic acids were extracted from soils using 0.5 M NaOH followed by treatment with a Dowex™ ion-exchange resin to remove sodium ions. Solid State 13C NMR spectra were obtained on a Bruker 400 MHz Avance II spectrometer equipped with a 4 mm solid state MAS probe. ESI-FTICR-MS analysis was conducted in the negative ion mode on a Bruker Daltonics 12 Tesla Apex Qe FTICR-MS instrument equipped with an Apollo II ESI source. Results: Soil humic acids from numerous soils were investigated in this study. The molecular formulas calculated from ultrahigh resolution mass spectra of well humified soils fall clearly into two predominant regions consisting of condensed aromatic molecules as well as high H/C, low O/C carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules (CCAM). In contrast, the spectral data for humic acids from a poorly humified spodosol soil show a less dramatic separation of these regions, with relatively more molecular formula plotting in the lignin-like region and relatively fewer condensed aromatic molecules. From the mass spectral observations made for the humic acids, we can readily discern a relationship based on degree of

  5. Compound-Specific Isotopic Analysis of Meteoritic Amino Acids as a Tool for Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael C.; Charnley, Steven B.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (delta D, delta C-13, delta N-15) of organic compounds can reveal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may point towards the most likely of these proposed pathways. The technique of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and isotope ratio mass spectrometry provides compound-specific structural and isotopic information from a single splitless injection, enhancing the amount of information gained from small amounts of precious samples such as carbonaceous chondrites. We have applied this technique to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites. We are using these measurements to evaluate predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways and environments, leading to a better understanding of the origin of these compounds.

  6. Formation of carcinogens indoors by surface-mediated reactions of nicotine with nitrous acid, leading to potential thirdhand smoke hazards

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Gundel, Lara A.; Pankow, James F.; Jacob, Peyton; Singer, Brett C.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that residual nicotine from tobacco smoke sorbed to indoor surfaces reacts with ambient nitrous acid (HONO) to form carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). Substantial levels of TSNAs were measured on surfaces inside a smoker’s vehicle. Laboratory experiments using cellulose as a model indoor material yielded a > 10-fold increase of surface-bound TSNAs when sorbed secondhand smoke was exposed to 60 ppbv HONO for 3 hours. In both cases we identified 1-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-4-butanal, a TSNA absent in freshly emitted tobacco smoke, as the major product. The potent carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone and N-nitroso nornicotine were also detected. Time-course measurements revealed fast TSNA formation, with up to 0.4% conversion of nicotine. Given the rapid sorption and persistence of high levels of nicotine on indoor surfaces—including clothing and human skin—this recently identified process represents an unappreciated health hazard through dermal exposure, dust inhalation, and ingestion. These findings raise concerns about exposures to the tobacco smoke residue that has been recently dubbed “thirdhand smoke.” Our work highlights the importance of reactions at indoor interfaces, particularly those involving amines and NOx/HONO cycling, with potential health impacts. PMID:20142504

  7. Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids in CM and CR chondrites and their use in evaluating potential formation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-09-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (δD, δ13C, and δ15N) of organic compounds can reveal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1/2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CR2 Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CR2 Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing δ13C and increasing δD with increasing carbon number in the α-H, α-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Strecker-cyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light δ13C signatures for β-alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ω-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in α-methyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than in CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  8. Compound-Specific Carbon, Nitrogen, and Hydrogen Isotopic Ratios for Amino Acids in CM and CR Chondrites and their use in Evaluating Potential Formation Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Burton, Aaron S.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic ratios (oD, 013C, and olSN) of organic compounds can revcal information about their origin and formation pathways. Several formation mechanisms and environments have been postulated for the amino acids detected in carbonaceous chondrites. As each proposed mechanism utilizes different precursor molecules, the isotopic signatures of the resulting amino acids may indicate the most likely of these pathways. We have applied gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the compound-specific C, N, and H stable isotopic ratios of amino acids from seven CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites: CM1I2 Allan Hills (ALH) 83100, CM2 Murchison, CM2 Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, CM2 Lonewolf Nunataks (LON) 94101, CRZ Graves Nunataks (GRA) 95229, CRZ Elephant Moraine (EET) 92042, and CR3 Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 99177. We compare the isotopic compositions of amino acids in these meteorites with predictions of expected isotopic enrichments from potential formation pathways. We observe trends of decreasing ODC and increasing oD with increasing carbon number in the aH, (l-NH2 amino acids that correspond to predictions made for formation via Streckercyanohydrin synthesis. We also observe light ODC signatures for -alanine, which may indicate either formation via Michael addition or via a pathway that forms primarily small, straight-chain, amine-terminal amino acids (n-ro-amino acids). Higher deuterium enrichments are observed in amethyl amino acids, indicating formation of these amino acids or their precursors in cold interstellar or nebular environments. Finally, individual amino acids are more enriched in deuterium in CR chondrites than CM chondrites, reflecting different parent-body chemistry.

  9. Gallic acid, one of the components in many plant tissues, is a potential inhibitor for insulin amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Jayamani, Jayaraman; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2014-10-01

    Proteins under stressful conditions can lead to the formation of an ordered self-assembled structure, referred to as amyloid fibrils, to which many neurodegenerative diseases such as Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, etc., are attributed. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation using natural products is one of the main therapeutic strategies to prevent the progression of these diseases. Polyphenols are the mostly consumed as antioxidants in a human nutrition. Herein, we have studied the effect of a simple polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), one of the main components in plant tissues, especially in tea leaves, on the insulin amyloid fibril formation. Different biophysical characterizations such as turbidity, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Thioflavin T (ThT) assays, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy have been used to analyze the inhibition of amyloid fibril formation. The occurrence of fibrils in an AFM image and ThT fluorescence enhancement confirms the formation of insulin amyloid fibrils when incubated under acidic pH 2 at 65 °C. In the presence of GA, absence of fibrils in AFM image and no change in the intensity of ThT fluorescence confirms the inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrils by GA. Spectroscopic results reveal that GA inhibits the conformational transition of α-helix → β-sheet, which is generally induced during the insulin fibril formation. It was found that the inhibitory effect of GA is concentration dependent and non-linear. Based on the observed results, we propose that GA interacts with native insulin, preventing nuclei formation, which is essential for fibril growth, thereby inhibiting the amyloid fibril formation. The present results thus demonstrate that GA can effectively inhibit insulin amyloid fibril formation in vitro. PMID:25105923

  10. Alteration of Basaltic Glass to Mg/Fe-Smectite under Acidic Conditions: A Potential Smectite Formation Mechanism on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, Tanya; Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group including Mg- and Fe-saponite and Fe(III)-rich nontronite have been identified on Mars. Smectites are believed to be formed under neutral to alkaline conditions that prevailed on early Mars. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of smectite and carbonate deposits in Noachian terrain on Mars. However, smectite may have formed under mildly acidic conditions. Abundant smectite formations have been detected as layered deposits hundreds of meters thick in intracrater depositional fans and plains sediments, while no large deposits of carbonates are found. Development of mildly acidic conditions at early Mars might allow formation of smectite but inhibit widespread carbonate precipitation. Little is known regarding the mechanisms of smectite formation from basaltic glass under acidic conditions. The objective of this study was to test a hypothesis that Mars-analogue basaltic glass alters to smectite minerals under acidic conditions (pH 4). The effects of Mg and Fe concentrations and temperature on smectite formation from basaltic glass were evaluated. Phyllosilicate synthesis was performed in batch reactors (Parr acid digestion vessel) under reducing hydrothermal conditions at 200 C and 100 C. Synthetic basaltic glass with a composition similar to that of the Gusev crater rock Adirondack (Ground surface APXS measurement) was used in these experiments. Basaltic glass was prepared by melting and quenching procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the synthesized glass was composed of olivine, magnetite and X-ray amorphous phase. Samples were prepared by mixing 250 mg Adirondack with 0.1 M acetic acid (final pH 4). In order to study influence of Mg concentration on smectite formation, experiments were performed with addition of 0, 1 and 10 mM MgCl2. After 1, 7 and 14 day incubations the solution composition was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and the altered glass and formed

  11. Method of analysis at the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, Sacramento Laboratory - determination of haloacetic acid formation potential, method validation, and quality-control practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zazzi, Barbara C.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of haloacetic acid formation potential of water samples has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center Sacramento Laboratory. The haloacetic acid formation potential is measured by dosing water samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine. The haloacetic acids formed are bromochloroacetic acid, bromodichloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. They are extracted, methylated, and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Method validation experiments were performed to determine the method accuracy, precision, and detection limit for each of the compounds. Method detection limits for these nine haloacetic acids ranged from 0.11 to 0.45 microgram per liter. Quality-control practices include the use of blanks, quality-control samples, calibration verification standards, surrogate recovery, internal standard, matrix spikes, and duplicates.

  12. Photodecomposition of humic acid and natural organic matter in swamp water using a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter: potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Mase, Akinori; Funatogawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Masaru; Aizawa, Kazuhiko; Kato, Shigekazu; Saito, Yoichi; Ito, Tsukasa; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the photodecomposition of aqueous humic acid (HA) by a TiO(2)-coated ceramic foam filter (TCF) reactor and on the potential for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) upon chlorination of the photocatalytically treated solutions. This photocatalytic reactor can also be applied to the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in swamp waters. The proposed photocatalytic reaction system was operated as per standardized methodologies. First, the ability of the TCF to decompose HA (a representative compound of NOM) was evaluated from the changes in the total organic carbon (TOC) and UV(254) with the reaction time. Remarkably, TOC removal and UV(254) values ranging from 44% to 61% and from 60% to 83%, respectively, were achieved. The potential for the formation of DBPs (total trihalomethane and total haloacetic acid) by chlorination of the phototreated solution was strongly dependent on the TOC removal and UV(254) values in the solution. The degree of photodecomposition of NOMs in the swamp water samples and the DBP formation potential showed similar trends as in the case of the standard solutions containing HA. The method used in this study could be effectively used to evaluate the efficiency of TCF for reducing HA and NOM, while suppressing the formation of DBP products. PMID:22921646

  13. Products of ozonized arachidonic acid potentiate the formation of DNA single strand breaks in cultured human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kozumbo, W.J.; Hanley, N.M.; Agarwal, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we examined the potential for environmental levels of ozone (O{sub 3}) to degrade arachidonic acid (AA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid abundantly present in the lung, into products that can produce DNA single strand breaks (ssb) in cultured human lung cells. Human lung fibroblasts were incubated with 60 {mu}M AA that had been previously exposed to an degraded by 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} (1 hr). Incubation of the cells with O{sub 3}-exposed AA (but not with vehicle alone) for 1 hr at 4{degrees}C and 37{degrees}C produced 555 and 245 rad-equivalents of DNA ssb, respectively, as determined by the DNA alkaline elution technique. These breaks were completely eliminated when the ozonized AA solution was incubated with catalase prior to cell treatment, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was solely responsible for damaging DNA. Superoxide dismutase, bovine serum albumin, or heat-inactivated catalase showed little, if any, inhibitory activity. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content for only about 40% of the observed breaks. Potentiation of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA ssb persisted after removal of the carbonyl substances by chromatographic procedures, suggesting that the non-carbonyl component of ozonized AA was the responsible component for inducing augmentation of the observed increases in DNA ssb. Ozonized AA also induced DNA ssb in cultures of the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Again, these breaks were shown to exceed levels that could be attributed to the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. These results indicate that products of ozonized AA can interact to potentiate DNA ssb in human lung cells. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Sources and haloacetic acid/trihalomethane formation potentials of aquatic humic substances in the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake near Lawrence, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomes, M.L.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.; Green, W.R.; Orem, W.H.; Rostad, C.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Cutak, B.J.; Dixon, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) in drinking water. AHS from the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake originated from riparian forest vegetation, reflected respective effects of soil organic matter and aquatic algal/bacterial sources, and bore evidence of biological degradation and photodegradation. AHS from the Wakarusa River showed the effect of terrestrial sources, whereas Clinton Lake humicacid also reflected aquatic algal/bacterial sources. Greater amounts of carbon attributable to tannin-derived chemical structures may correspond with higher HAA5 and THM4 yields for Clinton Lake fulvic acid. Prior to appreciable leaf-fall from deciduous trees, the combined (humic and fulvic acid) THM4 formation potentials for the Wakarusa River approached the proposed EPA THM4 Stage I MCL of 80 ??g/L, and the combined THM4 formation potential for Clinton Lake slightly exceeded the proposed THM4 Stage II MCL of 40 ??g/L. Finally, AHS from Clinton Lake could account for most (>70%) of the THM4 concentrations in finished water from the Clinton Lake Water Treatment Plant based on September 23, 1996, THM4 results.Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U

  15. Effects of Ca(OH)2 assisted aluminum sulfate coagulation on the removal of humic acid and the formation potentials of tri-halomethanes and haloacetic acids in chlorination.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming; Cao, Xiaoting; Chen, Cheng; Shi, Dongrui; Li, Genmao; Mulcahy, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The effects of addition of calcium hydroxide on aluminum sulphate (or alum) coagulation for removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and its subsequent effect on the formation potentials of two major types of regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs), have been examined. The results revealed several noteworthy phenomena. At the optimal coagulation pH (i.e. 6), the coagulation behavior of NOM water solutions versus alum dose, showed large variation and a consequent great change in the formation potentials of the DBPs at certain coagulant doses. However, with addition of a relatively small amount of Ca(OH)2, although the zeta potential of coagulated flocs remained almost the same, NOM removal became more consistent with alum dose. Importantly, also the detrimental effect of charge reversal on NOM removal at the low coagulant dose disappeared. This resulted in a steady decrease in the formation potentials of DBPs as a function of the coagulant dose. Moreover, the addition of Ca(OH)2 broadened the pH range of alum coagulation and promoted further reduction of the formation potentials of the DBPs. The enhancement effects of Ca(OH)2 assisted alum coagulation are especially pronounced at pH 7 and 8. Finally, synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the reduction in DBPs formation potential by Ca(OH)2-assisted alum coagulation was connected to an enhanced removal of small hydrophobic and hydrophilic HA molecules. Ca(OH)2-assistance of alum coagulation appeared to increase substantially the removal of the hydrophilic HA fraction responsible for HAAs formation, prompting further reduction of HAA formation potentials. PMID:23520868

  16. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Natacha C.; Ramiro, Juan M. P.; Quecan, Beatriz X. V.; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D. G.

    2016-01-01

    Use of probiotic biofilms can be an alternative approach for reducing the formation of pathogenic biofilms in food industries. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic (Lactococcus lactis VB69, L. lactis VB94, Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1, and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3) and non-bacteriocinogenic (L. lactis 368, Lactobacillus helveticus 354, Lactobacillus casei 40, and Weissela viridescens 113) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Brazilian’s foods and (ii) to develop protective biofilms with these strains and test them for exclusion of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. LAB were tested for survival in acid and bile salt conditions, surface properties, biosurfactant production, β-galactosidase and gelatinase activity, antibiotic resistance and presence of virulence genes. Most strains survived exposure to pH 2 and 4% bile salts. The highest percentages of auto-aggregation were obtained after 24 h of incubation. Sixty-seven percentage auto-aggregation value was observed in W. viridescens 113 and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 exhibited the highest co-aggregation (69% with Listeria monocytogenes and 74.6% with E. coli O157:H7), while the lowest co-aggregation was exhibited by W. viridescens 113 (53.4% with Listeria monocytogenes and 38% with E. coli O157:H7). Tests for hemolytic activity, bacterial cell adherence with xylene, and drop collapse confirmed the biosurfactant-producing ability of most strains. Only one strain (L. lactis 368) produced β-galactosidase. All strains were negative for virulence genes cob, ccf, cylLL, cylLs, cyllM, cylB, cylA and efaAfs and gelatinase production. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the MIC for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin did not exceed the epidemiological cut-off suggested by the European Food Safety Authority. Some strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics and

  17. Use of Potential Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) Biofilms for the Control of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilms Formation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Natacha C; Ramiro, Juan M P; Quecan, Beatriz X V; de Melo Franco, Bernadette D G

    2016-01-01

    Use of probiotic biofilms can be an alternative approach for reducing the formation of pathogenic biofilms in food industries. The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the probiotic properties of bacteriocinogenic (Lactococcus lactis VB69, L. lactis VB94, Lactobacillus sakei MBSa1, and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3) and non-bacteriocinogenic (L. lactis 368, Lactobacillus helveticus 354, Lactobacillus casei 40, and Weissela viridescens 113) lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Brazilian's foods and (ii) to develop protective biofilms with these strains and test them for exclusion of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. LAB were tested for survival in acid and bile salt conditions, surface properties, biosurfactant production, β-galactosidase and gelatinase activity, antibiotic resistance and presence of virulence genes. Most strains survived exposure to pH 2 and 4% bile salts. The highest percentages of auto-aggregation were obtained after 24 h of incubation. Sixty-seven percentage auto-aggregation value was observed in W. viridescens 113 and Lactobacillus curvatus MBSa3 exhibited the highest co-aggregation (69% with Listeria monocytogenes and 74.6% with E. coli O157:H7), while the lowest co-aggregation was exhibited by W. viridescens 113 (53.4% with Listeria monocytogenes and 38% with E. coli O157:H7). Tests for hemolytic activity, bacterial cell adherence with xylene, and drop collapse confirmed the biosurfactant-producing ability of most strains. Only one strain (L. lactis 368) produced β-galactosidase. All strains were negative for virulence genes cob, ccf, cylLL, cylLs, cyllM, cylB, cylA and efaAfs and gelatinase production. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the MIC for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin did not exceed the epidemiological cut-off suggested by the European Food Safety Authority. Some strains were resistant to one or more antibiotics and resistance

  18. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-05-05

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed.

  19. Sun-drying diminishes the antioxidative potentials of leaves of Eugenia uniflora against formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced in homogenates of rat brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Kade, Ige Joseph; Ibukun, Emmanuel Oluwafemi; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2008-08-01

    Extracts from leaves of Pitanga cherry (Eugenia uniflora) are considered to be effective against many diseases, and are therefore used in popular traditional medicines. In the present study, the antioxidative effect of sun-dried (PCS) and air-dried (PCA) ethanolic extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves were investigated. The antioxidant effects were tested by measuring the ability of both PCS and PCA to inhibit the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) induced by prooxidant agents such as iron (II) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in rat brain and liver tissues. The results showed that while PCA significantly (P<0.0001) inhibited the formation of TBARS in both liver and brain tissues homogenates, PCS did not. Further investigation reveals that the phenolic content of the PCS was significantly (P<0.0001) lower compared to PCA. Since phenolics in plants largely contributed to the antioxidative potency of plants, we conclude that air-drying should be employed in the preparation of extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves before it is administered empirically as a traditional medicament, and hence this study serves a public awareness to traditional medical practitioners. PMID:18539016

  20. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

    1998-04-28

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  1. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOEpatents

    Tustin, Gerald Charles; Dickson, Todd Jay

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0.degree. and 80.degree. C. in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  2. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  3. Impact of butyric acid on butanol formation by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Lars; Doerr, Eric Will; Staaden, Antje; Rehmann, Lars

    2015-11-01

    The butanol yield of the classic fermentative acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) process has been enhanced in the past decades through the development of better strains and advanced process design. Nevertheless, by-product formation and the incomplete conversion of intermediates still decrease the butanol yield. This study demonstrates the potential of increasing the butanol yield from glycerol though the addition of small amounts of butyric acid. The impact of butyric acid was investigated in a 7L stirred tank reactor. The results of this study show the positive impact of butyric acid on butanol yield under pH controlled conditions and the metabolic stages were monitored via online measurement of carbon dioxide formation, pH value and redox potential. Butyric acid could significantly increase the butanol yield at low pH values if sufficient quantities of primary carbon source (glycerol) were present. PMID:26233327

  4. I-ball formation with logarithmic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takeda, Naoyuki E-mail: takedan@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-07-01

    A coherently oscillating real scalar field with potential shallower than quadratic one fragments into spherical objects called I-balls. We study the I-ball formation for logarithmic potential which appears in many cosmological models. We perform lattice simulations and find that the I-balls are formed when the potential becomes dominated by the quadratic term. Furthermore, we estimate the I-ball profile assuming that the adiabatic invariant is conserved during formation and obtain the result that agrees to the numerical simulations.

  5. Studies of the current and potential distributions on lead-acid batteries. III. Formation of the single-side pasted automotive positive plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yonglang; Zhou, Xuechou; Huang, Mingxiang; Liu, Huiyong

    The formation processes of the single-side pasted automotive positive plate have been studied by an in situ electrochemical scan technique. On the pasted side of the positive plate, its polarization is very high and its charge current is very low at the beginning of the formation, compared with those on the non-pasted side. Then, their difference becomes smaller and smaller with the formation. Moreover, the distributions of the current density and the polarization resistance are quite uneven on the pasted side at the initial stage of the formation. The lowest current density and the highest polarization resistance are located in the middle. At the later stage, the charge current on the pasted side becomes a little higher, but its charge amount is still lower than that on the non-pasted side. Although the conductivity of PbO 2 zones is very good, the violent charge at the high polarization will lead to the increase of the contact resistance between the active mass particles at the beginning of the formation.

  6. Chemical abatement of acid mine drainage formation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, J.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic data were used to develop a unified model of hydroxo-, sulfato-, and bisulfato-iron complexes and their stability constants in iron-sulfate solutions. Free energy of formation for each ligand series species was hypothesized to be linear in ligand number because of supporting evidence from the literature. Laboratory tests on the inhibition of acid mine drainage bacteria were conducted. Benzoic acid, sorbic acid, and sodium lauryl sulfate at low concentrations (5 to 10 mg/liter) each effectively inhibited oxidation of ferrous iron in batch cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate of chemical oxidation of ferrous iron in low-pH, sterile batch reactors was not substantially affected at the tested concentrations (5 to 50 mg/liter) of any of the compounds. Low-pH cultures of Thiobacillus thioxidans significantly increased zinc sulfide dissolution rates relative to sterile controls. Sodium lauryl sulfate, benzoic acid, and sorbic acid at concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 mg/liter, respectively, in identical low-pH, batch cultures of Thiobacillus thiooxidans, were sufficient for complete inhibition of bacterial zinc sulfide dissolution. Pilot-scale experiments on the abatement of acid mine drainage formation in both fresh and weathered pyritic coal refuse were also conducted. At doses of 0.5 g/kg and 5.0 g/kg in fresh and weathered refuse, respectively, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and most significantly, sodium lauryl surface, reduced the rate of iron, sulfate, and acidity production in water-leached barrels of coal refuse material.

  7. Formation Buffering Potential Pertaining to Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. R.; Peters, C. A.; Buschkuehle, M.

    2007-12-01

    One promising strategy for decreasing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage in deep saline formations. Modeling efforts and the experimental measurements that support these efforts are critical to determining the fate of injected CO2. The focus of this work is CO2-water-rock interactions as they pertain to formation buffering potential. PHREEQC was used to model pH evolution in siliciclastic and carbonate rocks after simulated injection of CO2. The initial mineral and formation water compositions were determined from analysis of core samples and brines from several formations in the Alberta sedimentary basin in western Canada. Simulation parameters correspond to injection conditions of 50°C, CO2 pressure of 100 bar and high ionic strength. Results indicate that the carbonate formations have a higher buffering potential relative to siliciclastic formations. Considerable variability of acid-catalyzed reactions among formations with similar mineralogical compositions was also observed. To assess the effect of grain coating by clay minerals, a comparative simulation was performed with kaolinite as the dominant mineral in contact with the pore fluids. Results from this simulation showed a pronounced retardation in pH buffering reaction kinetics. This emphasizes the importance for differentiating between mineral abundance and accessibility in model calculations when clay coatings may obscure contact between pore fluids and potentially reactive minerals.

  8. Potential lanthanide ion selective reagents. 3. Metal complex formation with 1,7-diaza-4,10-13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.A.; Ochaya, V.O.

    1986-01-29

    Stability constants for the ligand 1,7-diaza-4,10,13-trioxacyclopentadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (dapda or K21DA) with the lanthanides and several other metal ions have been determined at 25 /sup 0/C in aqueous 0.1 M (CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/NCl medium by a potentiometric method. The results obtained are compared to those obtained for a similar ligand of large cavity size, 1,20-diaza-4,7,13,16-tetraoxacyclooctadecane-N,N'-diacetic acid (dacda or K22DA), which has been previously studied and reported. The stability of dapda is found to reach a peak at Eu(III) with the lanthanide series and is rationalized in terms of the matching of the ligand properties with metal ion characteristics. The transition-metal ions Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) all form stronger dapda (as compared to dacda) complexes due to a better match of the ligand cavity size and metal ion radius. 18 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  9. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Tanya Y.; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G.

    2014-01-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936

  10. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog.

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, J R; Fine, J M; Gordon, T; Sheppard, D

    1989-01-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and niric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction. PMID:2539989

  11. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.R.; Fine, J.M.; Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.

    1989-02-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and nitric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction.

  12. Hydroxyl radical formation during peroxynitrous acid decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, J.W.; Hurst, J.K.; Lymar, S.V.

    1999-03-24

    Yields of O{sub 2} formed during decomposition of peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH) under widely varying medium conditions are compared to predictions based upon the assumption that the reaction involves formation of discrete {sm{underscore}bullet}OH and {sm{underscore}bullet}NO{sub 2} radicals as oxidizing intermediates. The kinetic model used includes all reactions of {sm{underscore}bullet}OH, {sm{underscore}bullet}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and reactive nitrogen species known to be important under the prevailing conditions; because the rate constants for all of these reactions have been independently measured, the calculations contain no adjustable fitting parameters. The model quantitatively accounts for (1) the complex pH dependence of the O{sub 2} yields and (2) the unusual effects of NO{sub 2} {sup {minus}}, which inhibits O{sub 2} formation in neutral, but not alkaline, solutions and also reverses inhibition by organic {sm{underscore}bullet}OH scavengers in alkaline media. Other observations, including quenching of O{sub 2} yields by ferrocyanide and bicarbonate, the pressure dependence of the decomposition rate, and the reported dynamic behavior for O{sub 2} generation in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, also appear to be in accord with the suggested mechanism. Overall, the close correspondence between observed and calculated O{sub 2} yields provides strong support for decomposition via homolysis of the ONOOH peroxo bond.

  13. On the detectability of acid formation in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Daum, P.H.

    1987-03-01

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of detecting by means of field measurements the occurrence of acid forming reactions in natural clouds. This evaluation is performed by calculating the changes in reagent and product concentrations expected from four potentially important in-cloud acid production mechanisms, in representative cloud types, and comparing those changes with concentration differences detectable by available analytical methods. The four acid production mechanisms considered are: aqueous-phase reactions of SO/sub 2/ with O/sub 3/ and with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and gas-phase reactions of NO/sub 2/ with OH radical and with O/sub 3/, the latter leading to acid formation by reaction of N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ with cloud liquid water. The cloud types considered are fog, stratus, cumulus, and mountain lee wave. This evaluation indicates that oxidation of SO/sub 2/ by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ should be detectable in a wide variety of cloud conditions, but that oxidation of SO/sub 2/ by O/sub 3/ is unlikely to be detected by field measurements. The reactions oxidizing NO/sub 2/ may be detectable in fog and stratus clouds, which provide long in-cloud residence times. The paper includes discussion of factors which favor or hinder detection of acid production in clouds, and reviews evidence from published field studies on the occurrence of such production.

  14. Increased formation of ursodeoxycholic acid in patients treated with chenodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Salen, G; Tint, G S; Eliav, B; Deering, N; Mosbach, E H

    1974-01-01

    The formation of ursodeoxycholic acid, the 7 beta-hydroxy epimer of chenodeoxycholic acid, was investigated in three subjects with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis and in four subjects with gallstones. Total biliary bile acid composition was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography before and after 4 months of treatment with 0.75 g/day of chenodeoxycholic acid. Individual bile acids were identified by mass spectrometry. Before treatment, bile from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) subjects contained cholic acid, 85%; chenodeoxycholic acid, 7%; deoxycholic acid, 3%; allocholic acid, 3%; and unidentified steroids, 2%; while bile from gallstone subjects contained cholic acid, 45%; chenodeoxycholic acid, 43%; deoxycholic acid, 11%, and lithocholic acid, 1%. In all subjects, 4 months of chenodeoxycholic acid therapy increased the proportion of this bile acid to approximately 80% and decreased cholic acid to 3% of the total biliary bile acids, the remaining 17% of bile acids were identified as ursodeoxycholic acid. After the intravenous injection of [3H]chenodeoxycholic acid, the specific activity of biliary ursodeoxycholic acid exceeded the specific activity of chenodeoxycholic acid, and the resulting specific activity decay curves suggested precursor-product relationships. When [3H]7-ketolithocholic acid was administrated to another patient treated with chenodeoxycholic acid, radioactivity was detected in both the ursodeoxycholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid fractions. These results indicate that substantial amounts of ursodeoxycholic acid are formed in patients treated with chenodeoxycholic acid. The ursodeoxycholic acid was synthesized from chenodeoxycholic acid presumably via 7-ketolithocholic acid. Images PMID:11344576

  15. Prospects of boswellic acids as potential pharmaceutics.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiyong; Liu, Zhenli; Ning, Zhangchi; Liu, Yuanyan; Song, Zhiqian; Wang, Chun; Lu, Aiping

    2015-03-01

    Boswellic acids have long been considered the main bioactive components of frankincense, and many studies in vitro and in animals as well as several clinical studies have confirmed their various bioactivities. In particular, a large number of mechanistic studies have confirmed their anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. However, not every boswellic acid exhibits a satisfactory pharmacological performance, which depends on the chemical structure and functional groups of the acid. To enhance the pharmacological values of boswellic acids, derivatization has been specifically applied with the aim of discovering more active derivatives of BAs. In addition, the preliminary pharmacokinetic studies of these compounds using various standard methods show their poor bioavailability in humans and rodents, which has led to questions of their pharmacological relevance and potentially limits their use in clinical practice and pharmaceutical development. To improve these effects, some approaches have shown some improvements in effectiveness, and the new formula compatibility approach is considered a very reasonable method for improving the bioavailability of boswellic acids. PMID:25714728

  16. Acid drainage generation and associated Ca-Fe-SO 4 minerals in a periglacial environment, Eagle Plains, Northern Yukon, Canada: A potential analogue for low-temperature sulfate formation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacelle, Denis; Léveillé, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Near Eagle Plains, northern Yukon, Canada, acidic Ca-Fe-Mg sulfate waters are discharging year-long from disturbed permafrosted sandstone bedrock overlying pyritiferous black shales. These acidic waters are precipitating gypsum with minor amounts of jarosite-K (Na), schwertmannite and hematite. This mineral assemblage is similar to that observed at Meridiani Planum (and other location on Mars), making this site a valuable analogue for low-temperature sulfate geochemistry and mineral formation on Mars. Stable O-S isotope analysis of the acidic waters near Eagle Plains revealed that the oxygen in the dissolved sulfate is mostly derived from water (ca. 70%), suggesting that the sulfide oxidation process could be in part biomediated (i.e., accelerated by acidophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria). However, unlike the dissolved sulfate in the waters, the formation of the Ca-Fe-SO 4 minerals appears to be purely abiotic. The stable O-S isotope composition of the sulfate minerals is well within the predicted equilibrium range at low temperature, suggesting that they formed through physico-chemical processes (i.e., evaporation or freezing). Low-temperature geochemical modeling with FREZCHEM and PHREEQC suggests that the mineral assemblage at Eagle Plains precipitated mainly through the freezing of Ca-Fe-Mg-SO 4 acidic waters, rather than through evaporation during the dry summer season, although the latter is still possible. This suggests that the sulfate mineral assemblage observed on Mars could have also formed under a periglacial-type climate. Considering that the active layer in the zone affected by acid drainage does not freeze-over during winter, the residual talik offers a localized niche environment to support acidophilic microorganisms. Overall, the fact that acid drainage is presently active near Eagle Plains allows the direct observation of the low-temperature geochemical processes responsible for generating acid drainage conditions and precipitation of gypsum

  17. Biomimetic formation of chicoric-acid-directed luminescent silver nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaby, Stacey N.; Sarker, Nazmul H.; Tsiola, Areti; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we report the formation of well-defined silver nanodendrites via biomineralization under mild conditions in a single step, in the presence of the plant phytohormone chicoric acid (CA), a well-known HIV-I integrase inhibitor. CA played a dual role as reductant as well as directed the growth of the nanodendrites, which were found to grow primarily in the [111] and [200] directions. In addition to the formation of highly ordered hierarchical structures, the formed Ag nanodendrites were found to exhibit luminescence, as observed by confocal microscopy. This study not only demonstrates a new method for the preparation of luminescent silver nanodendrites using a simple, environmentally friendly biological method, but also indicates the ability of CA, a potent HIV-integrase inhibitor, to interact with silver ions which may shed light on its potential for additional biomedical and biosensor applications.

  18. Hydroxyl radical substitution in halogenated carbonyls: oxalic acid formation.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Carrie J; Dalal, Shakeel S; Francisco, Joseph S; Mebel, Alexander M; Gaffney, Jeffrey S

    2010-03-01

    An ab initio study of OH radical substitution reactions in halogenated carbonyls is conducted. Hydroxyl radical substitution into oxalyl dichloride [ClC(O)C(O)Cl] and oxalyl dibromide [BrC(O)C(O)Br], resulting in the formation of oxalic acid, is presented. Analogous substitution reactions in formyl chloride [ClCH(O)], acetyl chloride [ClC(O)CH(3)], formyl bromide [BrCH(O)], and acetyl bromide [BrC(O)CH(3)] are considered. Energetics of competing hydrogen abstraction reactions for all applicable species are computed for comparison. Geometry optimizations and frequency computations are performed using the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the 6-31G(d) basis set for all minimum species and transition states. Single point energy computations are performed using fourth-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4) and coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)]. Potential energy surfaces, including activation energies and enthalpies, are determined from the computations. These potential energy surfaces show that OH substitution into ClC(O)C(O)Cl and BrC(O)C(O)Br, resulting in the formation of oxalic acid and other minor products, is energetically favorable. Energetics of analogous reactions with ClCH(O), BrCH(O), ClC(O)CH(3), and BrC(O)CH(3) are also computed. PMID:20131850

  19. Potential human health effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Adverse human health effects, namely acute and chronic respiratory effects, can occur from the pre-deposition phase of the acid rain phenomenon due to inhalation of acidic particles and gases. State-of-the-art methodology to evaluate these effects is just now being applied to this question. The major post-deposition effect of the acid rain phenomenon is to acidify water, increasing solubility and subsequent human exposure to mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, a highly toxic compound, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. Deficiencies in the identification of the contribution of pre-deposition of air pollutants and post-deposition mobilization of toxic metals to the recognized potential health effects of the involved toxic substances is due to the fact that scientists have not addressed these specific questions. 113 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  20. A diet high in meat protein and potential renal acid load increases fractional Ca absorption and urinary Ca excretion, without affecting markers of bone resorption or formation in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objective was to determine the effects of high dietary protein (mostly meat) and high potential renal acid load (PRAL) on calcium (Ca) balance and markers of bone metabolism. Methods: In a randomized crossover design, sixteen healthy postmenopausal women consumed two diets: one with l...

  1. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  2. Cytochrome c catalyses the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical from linoleic acid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, Hideo; Nishizaki, Koji; Takagi, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    A reaction of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with cytochrome c was analysed using ESR, HPLC-ESR and HPLC-ESR-MS by the combined use of the spin-trapping technique. The ESR, HPLC-ESR and HPLC-ESR-MS analyses showed that cytochrome c catalyses formation of pentyl and octanoic acid radicals from 13-HPODE. On the other hand, only the alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone/octanoic acid radical adduct was detected in the elution profile of HPLC-ESR for a mixture of 13-HPODE with haematin, indicating that haematin catalyses the formation of octanoic acid radical. In addition, the reaction of 13-HPODE with cytochrome c was inhibited by chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid via two possible mechanisms, i.e. reducing cytochrome c (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and scavenging the radical intermediates (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid). PMID:11742529

  3. FORMATION AND ENANTIOSELECTIVE BIODEGRADATION OF THE ENANTIOMERS OF BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) is formed by chlorination of drinking waters containing naturally occurring bromide. This haloacetic acid is a concern to public health because of suspected carcinogenicity and toxicity, and is a potential target of disinfectant byproduct regulations...

  4. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  5. Field evaluation of gelled acid for carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.C.; Quisenberry, J.L.; Fox, K.B.

    1981-12-01

    A new gelled acid was evaluated in the west Texas, southeast New Mexico, and Oklahoma areas. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine how successful a gelled acid, prepared from xanthan polymer, would be in several carbonate formations. Several types of acidizing techniques were employed. These treatments vary from one to nine stages, with and without diverting agents. More than 20 treatments are summarized. Production figures for the wells treated are discussed, as well as pertinent related information. 5 refs.

  6. Formation of v-shaped potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1983-06-01

    The V-shaped potential structures formed by the injection of a non-neutral electron current into a cold background plasma were simulated numerically. The injection disturbs the initial quasi-neutral plasma, leading to the excitation of strong turbulences which heat the plasma. This leads to expulsion of the plasma from the simulation region. Due to ambipolar electric fields the current injection is interrupted and the initial background plasma is extracted from the system. A particle composition with the characteristics of the two plasma reservoirs now represents the plasma in the simulation region. The interaction of the electron beam with this plasma excites turbulences of smaller amplitudes. A nearly constant time averaged potential drop with nonstationary distribution develops across the system. Single and multiple double layers may form for the duration of one ion plasma period.

  7. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  8. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Dietary Phenolic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Saibabu, Venkata; Fatima, Zeeshan; Khan, Luqman Ahmad; Hameed, Saif

    2015-01-01

    Although modern lifestyle has eased the quality of human life, this lifestyle's related patterns have imparted negative effects on health to acquire multiple diseases. Many synthetic drugs are invented during the last millennium but most if not all of them possess several side effects and proved to be costly. Convincing evidences have established the premise that the phytotherapeutic potential of natural compounds and need of search for novel drugs from natural sources are of high priority. Phenolic acids (PAs) are a class of secondary metabolites spread throughout the plant kingdom and generally involved in plethora of cellular processes involved in plant growth and reproduction and also produced as defense mechanism to sustain various environmental stresses. Extensive research on PAs strongly suggests that consumption of these compounds hold promise to offer protection against various ailments in humans. This paper focuses on the naturally derived PAs and summarizes the action mechanisms of these compounds during disease conditions. Based on the available information in the literature, it is suggested that use of PAs as drugs is very promising; however more research and clinical trials are necessary before these bioactive molecules can be made for treatment. Finally this review provides greater awareness of the promise that natural PAs hold for use in the disease prevention and therapy. PMID:26442119

  10. Formation kinetics of potential fermentation inhibitors in a steam explosion process of corn straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuzhen; Wang, Lan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2013-01-01

    The weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds formed during lignocellulose pretreatment are potential inhibitors of subsequent enzymatic and microbial processes. In this work, the effects of the steam explosion process on the formation of weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds were explored. The correlations of different steam explosion conditions and formation kinetics of degradation products showed that the formation of weak acids and furan derivatives was in the first-order reactions, which are expressed as [Formula: see text]. The formation of weak acids and furan derivatives increases with pretreatment temperature and time. On the other hand, the formation of phenolic compounds showed typical characteristics of continuous reaction, expressed as [Formula: see text]. The formation was affected by the active energies in two stages, temperature and time, and thus existed at extreme value. This work revealed the formation rules of weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds in a steam explosion process and provided theoretical guidelines for improving the process and limiting the production of certain inhibitors. PMID:23188657

  11. Laser photocoagulation stops diabetic retinopathy by controlling lactic acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-08-01

    Many different types of proliferative retinopathy induced by various types of initial disorders have a common pathology in their mid and terminal stages. Thus, proper therapy is devoted toward elimination of the initial cause as well as alleviation of the proliferative processes. Vasodilatation, which is an initial symptom of diabetes, is itself destructive to the retinal capillary bed and appears to be a constant feature in all stages of diabetic retinopathy. In the mid and late stages, the vasodilatation seems very dependent upon capillary dropout, whereas the initial vasodilatation may derive from quite different causes. The efficacy of photocoagulation as a therapy for all stages seems to derive from decreasing the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer sufficiently to result in vasoconstriction of the retinal vessels. A model is proposed to show how diabetes, by altering the metabolism in the photoreceptor layer to produce excess lactic acid, causes the initial vasodilatation. The lactic acid also induces free radical (superoxide) formation; both act together to destroy the retinal capillary bed followed by vasoproliferation. Photocoagulation, thus, is even more appropriate for this particular syndrome than previously had been thought, as it not only reduces potentially destructive vasodilatation but also removes the metabolic cause of the free radical induced destruction of the capillary endothelium which is the initial step in capillary drop-out. A review of the present data indicates that the best type of pan- retinal photocoagulation is a very light type affecting the photoreceptors only with a minimal amount of damage to other parts of retina and the vessels in the choroid. The possible use of photochemical types of destruction of the photoreceptor as a therapeutic modality is attractive, but it is certainly too speculative to use until more detailed investigations have been completed. However, the basic therapeutic approach of choice may be to prevent the

  12. Amino acid sequence prerequisites for the formation of cn ions.

    PubMed

    Downard, K M; Biemann, K

    1993-11-01

    Ammo acid sequence prerequisites are described for the formation of c, ions observed in high-energy collision-induced decomposition spectra of peptides. It is shown that the formation of cn ions is promoted by the nature of the amino acid C-terminal to the cleavage site. A propensity for cn cleavage preceding threonine, and to a lesser extent tryptophan, lysine, and serine, is demonstrated where fragmentation is directed N-terminally at these residues. In addition, the nature of the residue N-terminal to the cleavage site is shown to have little effect on cn ion formation. A mechanism for cn ion formation is proposed and its applicability to the results observed is discussed. PMID:24227531

  13. The role of potential barrier formation in spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The role of potential barrier formation in spacecraft charging at geosynchronous orbit is discussed. The evidence for, and understanding of, spacecraft charging and its hazards to spacecraft operation in the early 1970's are summarized. Theoretical and experimental advances which have changed the basic understanding of the role of barrier formation in charging phenomenology are described. Potential barriers are found to play a fundamental role in the dynamics of spacecraft charging. The consequences for structural and differential charging and for discharging are described.

  14. Indoor air chemistry: Formation of organic acids and aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Lioy, P.J. ||; Wilson, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Laying emphasis on the formation of aldehydes and organic acids, the study has examined the gas-phase reactions of ozone with unsaturated VOCs. The formation of formaldehyde and formic acid was observed for all the three selected unsaturated VOCs: styrene, limonene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. In addition, benzaldehyde was detected in the styrene-ozone-air reaction system, and acetic acid was also found in limonene-ozone-air system. The study has also examined the gas-phase reactions among formaldehyde, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide and found the formation of formic acid. The nitrate radical was suggested to play an important role in converting formaldehyde into formic acid. Experiments for all the reactions were conducted by using a 4.3 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. Since the conditions for the reactions were similar to those for indoor environments, the results from the study can be implicated to real indoor situations and can be employed to support the findings and suggestions from the previous studies: certain aldehydes and organic acids could be generated by indoor chemistry.

  15. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  16. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  17. Characteristics and formation of amino acids and hydroxy acids of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Cooper, G. W.; Pizzarello, S.

    1995-01-01

    Eight characteristics of the unique suite of amino acids and hydroxy acids found in the Murchison meteorite can be recognized on the basis of detailed molecular and isotopic analyses. The marked structural correspondence between the alpha-amino acids and alpha-hydroxy acids and the high deuterium/hydrogen ratio argue persuasively for their formation by aqueous phase Strecker reactions in the meteorite parent body from presolar, i.e., interstellar, aldehydes, ketones, ammonia, and hydrogen cyanide. The characteristics of the meteoritic suite of amino acids and hydroxy acids are briefly enumerated and discussed with regard to their consonance with this interstellar-parent body formation hypothesis. The hypothesis has interesting implications for the organic composition of both the primitive parent body and the presolar nebula.

  18. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. PMID:25912312

  19. Lipoic acid - biological activity and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gorąca, Anna; Huk-Kolega, Halina; Piechota, Aleksandra; Kleniewska, Paulina; Ciejka, Elżbieta; Skibska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (LA; 5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid) was originally isolated from bovine liver by Reed et al. in 1951. LA was once considered a vitamin. Subsequently, it was found that LA is not a vitamin and is synthesized by plants and animals. LA is covalently bound to the ε-amino group of lysine residues and functions as a cofactor for mitochondrial enzymes by catalyzing the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate and branched-chain α-keto acids. LA and its reduced form - dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), meet all the criteria for an ideal antioxidant because they can easily quench radicals, can chelate metals, have an amphiphlic character and they do not exhibit any serious side effects. They interact with other antioxidants and can regenerate them. For this reason, LA is called an antioxidant of antioxidants. LA has an influence on the second messenger nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and attenuates the release of free radicals and cytotoxic cytokines. The therapeutic action of LA is based on its antioxidant properties. Current studies support its use in the ancillary treatment of many diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, autoimmune diseases, cancer and AIDS. This review was undertaken to gather the most recent information regarding the therapeutic properties of LA and its possible utility in disease treatment. PMID:22001972

  20. Field evaluation of gelled acid for carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.C.; Quisenberry, J.L.; Fox, K.B.

    1981-01-01

    A new gelled acid was evaluated in W. Texas, S.E. New Mexico, and Oklahoma. The evaluation determined how successful a gelled acid, prepared from xanthan polymer, would be in the following formations: Ellenburger, Blinebry, San Andres, Clearfork, Canyon Lime, Strawn Lime, Grayburg, Devonian, Drinkard Dolomite, Viola and Chester. Treatment depths vary from 4000 to 22,000 ft. Treatment temperatures vary from 70 to 310 F. Treatments were performed on both oil and gas wells. The age of the wells stimulated varies from new to 30 yr old. The concentration of gelled acid remained constant at 15% HCl. The concentration of gelling agent remained constant at 60 lb/1000 gal. The size of the treatments varied from 5000 to 80,000 gal of gelled acid. More than 20 treatments are summarized. Production figures for the well treated are summarized. Production figures for the wells treated are discussed, as well as pertinent related information.

  1. Study of the mechanisms of acid rain formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F.; Nagamoto, C.; Madel, R.

    1987-11-01

    Samples of rain, snow, cloud water, aerosols and soil were collected in Colorado to study the mechanisms of acid rain formation. Chemical compositions of various types of samples were analyzed to investigate the stepwise incorporation of inpurities into precipitation. Local soil was generally alkaline; atmospheric aerosols, which are mixtures of stirred-up soil particles and anthropogenic pollution, were slightly acidic; cloud condensation nuclei, which initiate clouds at condensation level, had an average pH of approx.6. However, local clouds were very acidic (pH approx.4), indicating that further acidification takes place in clouds by adsorption of acidic gases, e.g., CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, and NO/sub x/. We found that summer showers formed by coalescence of cloud droplets are likely to be as acidic as cloud water. The chemistry of snow may differ from that of clouds, depending on the mechanisms of snow formation. If snow crystals are initiated by deposition nucleation and grown by diffusion of water vapor from surrounding evaporating cloud droplets as in the Bergeron--Findeisen process, the snow crystals are purified and should not be acidic. If the snow crystals are initiated by freezing of cloud droplets and grow by vapor diffusion, then the constituents of cloud water are diluted and the snow is less acidic than cloud water. If snow grains (graupel) are formed by accretion of frozen cloud drops or by riming, the snow can be as acidic as cloud water. Raindrops formed by melting snow inherit the chemistry of the parent snow, but differentiate in scavenging coefficiencies of gases and aerosols below the clouds. Both atmospheric chemical reactions and cloud microphysical processes are responsible for chemical variations in precipitation.

  2. DECOMPOSITION OF TRIHALOACETIC ACIDS AND FORMATION OF THE CORRESPONDING TRIHALOMETHANES IN DRINKING WATER. (R826834)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decomposition of trihaloacetic acids [bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), dibromochloroacetic acid (DBCAA), tribromoacetic acid (TBAA)], and the formation of the corresponding trihalomethanes [bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM)] w...

  3. Acid-catalyzed Heterogeneous Reactions in SOA Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N.; Keywood, M.; Varutbangkul, V.; Gao, S.; Loewer, E.; Surratt, J.; Richard, F. C.; John, S. H.

    2003-12-01

    The importance of heterogeneous reactions in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has recently excited a great deal of interest in the aerosol community. Jang and Kamens (2001) showed enhanced aerosol yield from aldehydes, which can be produced by atmospheric photochemical reactions, in the presence of acidic seed. They suggest that the carbonyl functional groups of the aldehydes further react in the aerosol phase via hydration, polymerization, and hemiacetal/acetal formation with alcohols at an accelerated rate in the presence of acid. Jang et al. (2003) demonstrated similar results using a flow reactor and Czoschke et al. (in press) qualitatively showed increased yields for isoprene and alpha-pinene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic seed. While these findings are intriguing and important, the conditions under which the experiments were carried out were atmospherically unrealistic. A series of SOA formation experiments have been carried out in the Caltech Indoor Chamber Facility, which is comprised of dual 28 m3 FEP Teflon chambers, with the flexibility to carry out both dark ozonolysis and photochemical OH oxidation reactions. Cycloheptene and alpha-pinene were oxidized in the presence of neutral seed under dry (<10% RH) and humid (50% RH) conditions and in the presence of acidic seed under humid (50% RH) conditions. The SOA yields for these experiments will be presented, and the extent of the influence of acid-catalyzed reactions on SOA yield will be discussed. Reference List 1. Cocker, D. R. III. and R. C. Flagan and J. H. Seinfeld, State-of-the-art chamber facility for studying atmospheric aerosol chemistry, Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2594-2601, 2001. 2. Czoschke, N. M., M. Jang, and R. M. Kamens, Effect of acid seed on biogenic sceondary organic aerosol growth, Atmospheric Environment, In press. 3. Jang, M., S. Lee, and R. M. Kamens, Organic aerosol growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of octanal in a flow reactor

  4. Antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials of selected phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Kemal; Tepe, Bektas; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz

    2015-03-01

    In this study, ten different phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, rosmarinic, syringic, and vanillic acids) were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using four different test systems named as β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and chelating effect. In all test systems, rosmarinic acid showed the maximum activity potential, while protocatechuic acid was determined as the weakest antioxidant in β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, and chelating effect assays. Phenolic acids were also screened for their protective effects on pBR322 plasmid DNA against the mutagenic and toxic effects of UV and H2O2. Ferulic acid was found as the most active phytochemical among the others. Even at the lowest concentration value (0.002 mg/ml), ferulic acid protected all of the bands in the presence of H2O2 and UV. It is followed by caffeic, rosmarinic, and vanillic acids. On the other hand, cinnamic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), gallic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml), and protocatechuic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml) could not protect plasmid DNA. PMID:25542528

  5. Acidization of a Direct Heat Hydrothermal Well and its Potential in Developing Additional Direct Heat Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Strawn, J. A.; Prestwich, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A matrix acid treatment on a limestone formation in a low temperature hydrothermal production well in South Dakota has resulted in a 40% increase in heat (BTU) available for use in space heating a hospital. The results of this experimental treatment on the Madison Limestone suggest a significant potential may exist for similar applications, particularly throughout the western United States. This paper presents the results of the acid treatment, suggests other possible areas for similar application, and analyzes the economics for successful treatments.

  6. Processes and fluxes during the initial stage of acid sulfate soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, J.; Hamer, K.; Schulz, H. D.

    2009-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils occur over a wide range of climatic zones, mainly in coastal landscapes. In these soils, the release of sulfuric acid by the oxidation of pyrite generates a very acidic environment (e.g., DENT and PONS, 1995, PONS, 1973). Two major types of acid sulfate soils can be distinguished: In actual acid sulfate soils, the initially contained pyrite was at least partly oxidized. This resulted in a severe acidification of the soil. Potential acid sulfate soils are generally unoxidized and contain large amounts of pyrite. Upon oxidation, these soils will turn into actual acid sulfate soils. By excavation or lowering of the groundwater table, potential acid sulfate soils can be exposed to atmospheric oxygen. During oxidation the pH drops sharply to values below pH 4. This acidification promotes the release of various metals, e.g., alumina, iron and heavy metals. Additionally, large quantities of sulfate are released. In order to assess the effects of disturbances of potential acid sulfate soils, for example by excavations during construction works, several large scale column experiments were conducted with various types of potential acid sulfate soils from Northern Germany. In these experiments, the oxidation and initial profile development of pyritic fen peats and thionic fluvisols were studied over a period of 14 months. The study focused on leaching and the translocation of various metals in the soil profile. To study mobilization processes, element fluxes and the progress of acidification, soil water and leachate were analyzed for total element concentrations. Furthermore, several redox-sensitive parameters, e.g., Fe2+ and sulfide, were measured and changes to the initial solid phase composition were analyzed. Chemical equilibria calculations of the soil water were used to gain insights into precipitation processes of secondary products of pyrite oxidation and leaching products. The results of this study will support the assessment of risks deriving from

  7. Potential effects of chlorogenic acids on platelet activiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coffee (Coffea sp) is a most consumed beverage world-wide. Chlorogenic acids (CHAs) are naturally occurring phenolic acid esters abundantly found in coffee. They are reported to have potential health effects on several chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). At...

  8. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  9. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Andrews, William M.; Overfield, Bethany L.; Robertson, Heather; Wiggins, Amanda; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = 309) in Kentucky and geologic rock formation data from the Kentucky Geological Survey. Radon value locations were plotted on digital geologic maps using ArcGIS and linked to specific geologic map units. Each map unit represented a package of different types of rock (e.g., limestone and/or shale). Log-transformed radon values and geologic formation categories were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results Observed radon levels varied significantly by geologic formation category. Of the 14 geologic formation categories in north central Kentucky, four were associated with median radon levels, ranging from 8.10 to 2.75 pCi/L. Conclusion Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon. PMID:26844090

  10. Nitrate formation in acid forest soils from the Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.M.; Kreitinger, J.P.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nitrate formation in three forest soils from the Adirondacks region of New York was studied in the laboratory. The organic and surface mineral layers of the soils has pH values ranging from 3.6 to 4.1. Nitrate was formed when the soils were treated with artificial rain at pH 3.5, 4.1, or 5.6. Compared to simulated rain at pH 5.6, simulated rain at pH 3.5 enhanced nitrate formation in one soil and inhibited it in two other soils. The rate of nitrate accumulation was about 10 times higher in the organic horizon than in the mineral horizon, and nitrate formation was not enhanced by ammonium additions. Nitrate formation in soil suspensions was dependent on the amount of soil in the suspension, and none was formed if little soil was present. Ammonium did not enhance nitrate production in the suspensions. It is suggested that nitrate formation in these acid soils is not limited by the ammonium supply. 19 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment. PMID:27060495

  12. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in piimitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these inteiesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photo-decomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  13. Formation and Survival of Amino Acids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2003-01-01

    The detection of deuterium enrichments in meteoritic hydroxy and amino acids demonstrates that there is a connection between organic material in the interstellar medium and in primitive meteorites. It has generally been assumed that such molecules formed via reactions of small deuterium enriched insterstellar precursors in liquid water on a large asteroidal or cometary parent body. We have recently show that the W photolysis of interstellar/presolar ices can produce the amino acids alanine, serine, and glycine, as well as hydroxy acids, and glycerol, all of which have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Thus, some of the probiologically interesting organic compounds, compounds found in meteorites may have formed in presolar ice and have not solely been a product of parent body liquid water chemistry. We will report on our isotopic labeling studies of the mechanism of formation of these interesting compounds, and on astrophysically relevant kinetic studies UV photodecomposition of amino acid precursors in the solid state. This is our first year of exobiology funding on this project.

  14. Accuracy potential of large-format still-video cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Hans-Gerd; Niederoest, Markus

    1997-07-01

    High resolution digital stillvideo cameras have found wide interest in digital close range photogrammetry in the last five years. They can be considered fully autonomous digital image acquisition systems without the requirement of permanent connection to an external power supply and a host computer for camera control and data storage, thus allowing for convenient data acquisition in many applications of digital photogrammetry. The accuracy potential of stillvideo cameras has been extensively discussed. While large format CCD sensors themselves can be considered very accurate measurement devices, lenses, camera bodies and sensor mounts of stillvideo cameras are not compression techniques in image storage, which may also affect the accuracy potential. This presentation shows recent experiences from accuracy tests with a number of large format stillvideo cameras, including a modified Kodak DCS200, a Kodak DCS460, a Nikon E2 and a Polaroid PDC-2000. The tests of the cameras include absolute and relative measurements and were performed using strong photogrammetric networks and good external reference. The results of the tests indicate that very high accuracies can be achieved with large blocks of stillvideo imagery especially in deformation measurements. In absolute measurements, however, the accuracy potential of the large format CCD sensors is partly ruined by a lack of stability of the cameras.

  15. Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate: Formation and Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated some thermodynamic properties (i.e., freezing/melting points) and heterogeneous chemistry of sulfuric acid monohydrate (SAM, H2SO4.H2O), using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The freezing point observations of thin liquid sulfuric acid films show that for acid contents between 75 and 85 wt % the monohydrate crystallizes readily at temperatures between 220 and 240 K on a glass substrate. Once formed, SAM can be thermodynamically stable in the H2O partial pressure range of (1-4) x 10(exp -4) torr and in the temperature range of 220-240 K. For a constant H2O partial pressure, lowering the temperature causes SAM to melt when the temperature and water partial pressure conditions are out of its stability regime. The reaction probability measurements indicate that the hydrolysis of N2O5 is significantly suppressed owing to the formation of crystalline SAM: The reaction probability on water-rich SAM (with higher relative humidity, or RH) is of the order of 10(exp -3) at 210 K and decreases by more than an order of magnitude for the acid-rich form (with lower RH). The hydrolysis rate of ClONO2 on water-rich SAM is even smaller, of the order of 10(exp -4) at 195 K. These reported values on crystalline SAM are much smaller than those on liquid solutions. No enhancement of these reactions is observed in the presence of HCl vapor at the stratospheric concentrations. In addition, Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller analysis of gas adsorption isotherms and photomicrography have been performed to characterize the surface roughness and porosities of the SAM substrate. The results suggest the possible formation of SAM in some regions of the middle- or low-latitude stratosphere and, consequently, much slower heterogeneous reactions on the frozen aerosols.

  16. Size distributions and formation of dicarboxylic acids in atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Fang, Ming; Chan, Chak K.

    The PM2.5 concentrations and the size distributions of dicarboxylic acids in Hong Kong were studied. Eleven sets of daily PM2.5 samples were obtained at a downtown sampling site during the period of 5-16 December 2000 using an R&P speciation PM2.5 sampler. About 6-12% of the total oxalic acid was found in the gas phase in some samples. A good correlation between succinate and sulfate ( R2=0.88) and a moderate correlation between oxalate and sulfate ( R2=0.74) were found. Sampling artifacts of oxalate, malonate and succinate were found to be negligible. A total of 18 sets of 48-96 h size distribution data on dicarboxylic acids, sulfate, nitrate and sodium at an urban site and a rural site from June 2000 to May 2001 were obtained using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Data from both sites show similar size distribution characteristics of the dicarboxylic acids. The condensation mode of oxalate was usually observed at 0.177-0.32 μm. The location of the peak of the droplet mode of oxalate was associated with that of sulfate. When the peak of sulfate in the droplet mode appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm, the peak of oxalate sometimes appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm and sometimes shifted to 0.54-1.0 μm. When the peak of sulfate in the droplet mode appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm, the peak of oxalate sometimes appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm and sometimes shifted to 1.0-1.8 μm. Oxalate, succinate and sulfate found in the droplet mode were attributed to in-cloud formation. The slight shift of the oxalate peak from 0.32-0.54 to 0.54-1.0 μm or from 0.54-1.0 to 1.0-1.8 μm was ascribed to minor oxalate evaporation after in-cloud formation. The maximum peak of malonate sometimes appeared in the droplet mode and sometimes appeared at 3.1-6.2 μm. The formation of malonate is associated to the reactions between sea salt and malonic acid.

  17. Smectite Formation from Basaltic Glass Under Acidic Conditions on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Massive deposits of phyllosilicates of the smectite group, including Mg/Fe-smectite, have been identified in Mars's ancient Noachian terrain. The observed smectite is hypothesized to form through aqueous alteration of basaltic crust under neutral to alkaline pH conditions. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere suggested for ancient Mars were favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, the detection of large-scale carbonate deposits is limited on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits may have formed under acidic conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. In this work we investigated formation of saponite at a pH of approximately 4 from Mars-analogue synthetic Adirondack basaltic glass of composition similar to Adirondack class rocks located at Gusev crater. Hydrothermal (200º Centigrade) 14 day experiments were performed with and without 10 millimoles Fe(II) or Mg under anoxic condition [hereafter denoted as anoxic_Fe, anoxic_Mg and anoxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)] and under oxic condition [hereafter denoted as oxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)]. Characterization and formation conditions of the synthesized saponite provided insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for saponite formation on Mars.

  18. Fatty acids and their therapeutic potential in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Lei, Enie; Vacy, Kristina; Boon, Wah Chin

    2016-05-01

    There is little doubt that we are what we eat. Fatty acid supplementation and diets rich in fatty acids are being promoted as ways to a healthier brain. Short chain fatty acids are a product of intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary fibre; and their derivatives are used as an anti-convulstant. They demonstrated therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative conditions as HDAC inhibitors; and while the mechanism is not well understood, have been shown to lower amyloid β in Alzheimer's Disease in preclinical studies. Medium chain fatty acids consumed as a mixture in dietary oils can induce ketogenesis without the need for a ketogentic diet. Hence, this has the potential to provide an alternative energy source to prevent neuronal cell death due to lack of glucose. Long chain fatty acids are commonly found in the diet as omega fatty acids. They act as an anti-oxidant protecting neuronal cell membranes from oxidative damage and as an anti-inflammatory mediator in the brain. We review which agents, from each fatty acid class, have the most therapeutic potential for neurological disorders (primarily Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Autism Spectrum Disorder as well as possible applications to traumatic brain injury), by discussing what is known about their biological mechanisms from preclinical studies. PMID:26939763

  19. Photoenhanced nitrous acid formation upon NO2 uptake on tannic and gentisic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosedova, Yulia; Rouvière, Aurélie; Ammann, Markus

    2010-05-01

    The heterogeneous chemistry of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a potential source of nitrous acid (HONO). Hydroxy and methoxy substituted phenols may play a significant role in the aqueous-phase chemistry occurring on the ground or within aerosol particles in air masses affected by biomass burning. It is well established that electron transfer between phenols and NO2 in alkaline aqueous solutions is fast and could be a source of nitrite in the aqueous phase and HONO in the gas phase. However its kinetics is very slow under atmospheric conditions. The role of phenolic species as electron donors has also been suspected to be responsible for the photoenhanced transformation of NO2 to HONO over humic acids [1]. In this study we used tannic (TA) and gentisic (GA) as another proxy for atmospheric phenolic compounds. TA was shown to easily decompose under near UV light irradiation [2] resulting in oxidized products that might change the hygroscopic properties of the original material or have some potential photosensitizing effect. It was interesting to check the hypothesis that the presence of such products could lead to photoenhanced HONO formation upon NO2 uptake to aqueous surfaces containing TA. Experiments were performed in a horizontal coated wall flow tube (40 cm × 5.9 cm i.d.) circularly surrounded by 7 fluorescence lamps (UV: 300-420 nm, or visible: 400-750 nm), in an air cooled lamp housing. The inner surface coating was containing ~0.5 mg/cm-2 of either TA or GA, and was operated under RH 20-80%, 21-23 °C and ambient pressure. Concentration of HONO in the gas phase at the flow tube exit was measured with a LOPAP (Long Path Absorption Spectrometer). The uptake coefficient (γ) leading to NO2 to HONO conversion above aqueous films containing GA or TA in the dark was in the range 4×10-7 - 2×10-6. The photochemically enhanced HONO production was demonstrated by UV irradiation of the GA or TA coatings being in contact with gaseous NO2. In this case γ was 3-10 times

  20. Method of preparing and using and composition for acidizing subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.

    1984-08-21

    A composition and method of acidizing or fracturing a subterranean formation comprises contacting the formation with a composition comprising an acid, urea, and a selected gelling agent. The urea is present in an amount sufficient to extend the viscous stability of the gelled acid composition in comparison to the acid and gelling agent alone.

  1. Salt and mesophase formation in aqueous suspensions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Smith, S W; Anderson, B D

    1993-10-01

    The solubility and solution behavior of lauric acid (LA) and its 1:1 acid soap (potassium hydrogen dilaurate) were investigated at 32 degrees C over a pH range of 2.5-8.5 and at varying KCl concentrations to examine the self-association of this long-chain carboxylic acid under these conditions. LA's solubility in water exhibited the classical pH dependence of a monocarboxylic acid with no evidence of self-association. In 0.1 M KCl between pH 6.3 and pH 7.3, filtered samples were turbid, suggesting the presence of high molecular weight aggregates (mesophase), which could be removed by ultrafiltration. The apparent LA solubility vs pH profile in ultrafiltered samples was consistent with a solid phase consisting of either the free acid (pH < 6.5) or potassium hydrogen dilaurate (pH > 6.5), again with no evidence of self-association to form low molecular weight species (dimers, etc.). Quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) studies and mannitol trapping experiments indicated that vesicles were present in samples containing mesophase. The mesophase composition was characterized and a mass-action law for mesophase formation was developed to describe the apparent LA solubility versus pH in the mesophase region in terms of three parameters. The index of cooperativity, theta, indicated that the mesophase consists of approximately 25 molecules of LA with an acid:anion ratio, rho, of 1.7. The standard free energy of mesophase formation per mole of monomer was determined to be -6.3 kcal/mol. The aggregate size determined thermodynamically is several orders of magnitude less than that of the mesophase particle size determined by QLS measurements, suggesting that the LA monomer concentration in equilibrium with mesophase may be governed by a small unit domain of the vesicle. These observations may have a bearing on the thermodynamics of self-assembly of lipid bilayer membranes. PMID:8272419

  2. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a donnan potential model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Ephraim, J.H.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 X 10-4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log ??app) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log ??app = 2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential corrrection term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log??= 1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, Mu??nchen.

  3. Formation of Meteoritic Amino Acids: Isovaline and its Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla; Dworkin, Jason

    It has been known for several decades that amino acids, and other complex organics, are found in meteorites. In particular, Murchison (CM) samples contain over seventy amino acids, these being identified by high-level chromatographic methods. Among Murchison's amino acids, isovaline stands out as being both non-biological (non-protein) and having a relatively high abundance. While approximately equal amounts of D- and L- isovaline have been reported in Murchison and other CM meteorites, this molecule's structure appears to prohibit its racemization in aqueous solutions. We recently have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of both isovaline and valine with an eye toward each molecule's formation, stability, and possible interconversions of their D and L enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovalineand valine-containing ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectral methods to assess both amino-acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied in the presence and in the absence of water-ice, and the destruction of both isovaline and valine was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have synthesized isovaline, valine, and their amino acid isomers by solid-phase radiation-chemical pathways other than the oft-invoked Strecker process. This presentation will review and summarize some of our recent findings and place them in a context of related work. - Our work has been supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Experiments were performed in the Cosmic Ice Laboratory (RLH, MHM) and the Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory (JPD) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. [Chlorination byproducts formation potentials of typical nitrogenous organic compounds in water].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Xu, Bin; Qin, Cao; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Gao, Nai-Yun; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Li, Da-Peng

    2011-07-01

    Twelve typical nitrogenous organic compounds including herbicides, pesticides, amino acids, industrial products etc in polluted raw water were selected to investigate formation of typical carbonaceous and nitrogenous DBPs during chlorination and chloramination. To indentify the formation mechanism of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts from nitrogenous chemicals, chlorination and chloroamination of urea herbicides, triazine herbicides, amino acid, and other compounds were investigated. As a result, the potential precursors for different DBPs were defined as well. It has been identified that widely used urea herbicides could produce as many as 9 specific DBPs. The chlorotoluron shows highest reactivity and yields chloroform (CF), monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), 1,1-dichloro-acetone (1,1-DCP), 1,1,1-trichloro-acetone (1,1,1-TCP), chloropicrin (NTCM), dichloro-acetonitrile (DCAN), dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA). The results indicated that aldicarb and dinoseb are important precursors of CF, DCAA, MCAA, NTCM as well. High concentrations of CF and DCAA were found during L-tryptophan chlorination. Furthermore, DBPs formation pathways and mechanisms were suggested during chlorination and chloramination of chlorotoluron, ametryn, dinoseb L-tryptophan. PMID:21922816

  5. Evolution of internal resistance during formation of flooded lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Chris; Deveau, Justin; Swan, Lukas G.

    2016-09-01

    This study employs experimental techniques to measure the changing internal resistance of flooded, flat-plate lead-acid batteries during container formation, revealing a novel indicator of formation completeness. In order to measure internal resistance during formation, d.c. current pulses are superimposed over the constant formation current at set intervals, while change in voltage is measured. The resulting "pulsed" internal resistance is divided into ohmic and interfacial components by measuring the ohmic resistance with short d.c. pulses as well as with a.c. injection. Various constant-current container formations are carried out using different current levels, plate thicknesses, and pulsing techniques, yielding an array of resistance trends which are explained using Butler-Volmer kinetic theory. Ohmic and interfacial resistance trends are shown both theoretically and experimentally to eventually decay to a predictable steady-state value as the formation proceeds, suggesting that this internal resistance method can be used to detect the completion of the formation. The same principles are shown to apply to recharge cycles as well, but with potentially limited practical implications in comparison to formation.

  6. Butyric acid stimulates bovine neutrophil functions and potentiates the effect of platelet activating factor.

    PubMed

    Carretta, M D; Hidalgo, A I; Burgos, J; Opazo, L; Castro, L; Hidalgo, M A; Figueroa, C D; Taubert, A; Hermosilla, C; Burgos, R A

    2016-08-01

    Increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production is associated with subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) and activation of inflammatory processes. In humans and rodents, SCFAs modulate inflammatory responses in the gut via free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2). In bovines, butyric acid is one of the most potent FFA2 agonists. Its expression in bovine neutrophils has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a role in innate immune response in cattle. This study aimed to evaluate if butyric acid modulates oxidative and non-oxidative functions or if it can potentiate other inflammatory mediators in bovine neutrophils. Our results showed that butyric acid can activate bovine neutrophils, inducing calcium (Ca(2+)) influx and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, two second messengers involved in FFA2 activation. Ca(2+) influx induced by butyric acid was dependent on the extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) source and phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Butyric acid alone had no significant effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and chemotaxis; however, a priming effect on platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, was observed. Butyric acid increased CD63 expression and induced the release of neutrophil granule markers matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and lactoferrin. Finally, we observed that butyric acid induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation without affecting cellular viability. These findings suggest that butyric acid, a component of the ruminal fermentative process, can modulate the innate immune response of ruminants. PMID:27288853

  7. Acrylamide formation in different foods and potential strategies for reduction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Richard H

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the progress made to date on acrylamide research pertaining to analytical methods, mechanisms of formation, and mitigation research in the major food categories. Initial difficulties with the establishment of reliable analytical methods have today in most cases been overcome, but challenges still remain in terms of the needs to develop simple and rapid test methods. Several researchers have identified that the main pathway of formation of acrylamide in foods is linked to the Maillard reaction and in particular the amino acid asparagine. Decarboxylation of the resulting Schiff base is a key step, and the reaction product may either furnish acrylamide directly or via 3-aminopropionamide. An alternative proposal is that the corresponding decarboxylated Amadori compound may release acrylamide by a beta-elimination reaction. Many experimental trials have been conducted in different foods, and a number of possible measures identified to relatively lower the amounts of acrylamide in food. The validity of laboratory trials must, however, be assessed under actual food processing conditions. Some progress in relatively lowering acrylamide in certain food categories has been achieved, but can at this stage be considered marginal. However, any options that are chosen to reduce acrylamide must be technologically feasible and also not negatively impact the quality and safety of the final product. PMID:16438297

  8. Modeling trihalomethane formation potential from wastewater chlorination. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    The deletion of federally mandated fecal coliform limits has led many states to review and modify their wastewater disinfection requirements. One issue in analyzing wastewater disinfection is the discharge of potentially carcinogenic halogenated organics formed during the chlorination process. This research investigates the formation of one class of the halogenated organics, the trihalomethanes. The applicability of using drinking water trihalomethane formation models for use with wastewater effluent is examined. Three models are compared for predictive capability by using measured trihalomethane values from previous research data. The results show that a previously developed model is applicable for use based on assumptions stated. Results provide environmental managers with worst case predictions for a range of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) parameters. Predictions indicate that trihalomethane formation from the chlorination of wastewater is typically lower than the Safe Drinking Water Act trihalomethane standard of 100 ug/L. The worst case model predictions reach, and in certain extreme cases, pass the standard of 100 ug/L. This level of trihalomethanes formed is minimized if aeration of the receiving bodies of water occurs. Based on this research, the risk of forming trihalomethanes as disinfection by-products from chlorination do not outweigh the benefits gained from proper chlorine disinfection of effluent.

  9. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  10. Electrochemical removal of bromide and reduction of THM formation potential in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, David Eugene; Suffet, I H

    2002-11-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs), a by-product of the chlorination of natural waters containing dissolved organic carbon and bromide, are the focus of considerable public health concern and regulation due to their potential as a carcinogen by ingestion. This paper presents a promising new water treatment process that lowers the concentration of bromide in drinking water and thus, lowers the THM formation potential. Bromide is oxidized by electrolysis to bromine and then the bromine apparently volatilized. The electrolyzed water, when chlorinated, produces measurably lower amounts of THMs and proportionately fewer brominated THMs, which are of greater public health concern than the chlorinated THMs. Removing bromide should also reduce the formation of other disinfection by-products such as bromate and haloacetic acids. PMID:12448534

  11. Raman and terahertz spectroscopical investigation of cocrystal formation process of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Zhang, Huili; Xue, Jiadan; Fang, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Xia, Yi; Li, Yafang; Hong, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Cocrystallization can improve physical and chemical properties of active pharmaceutical ingredient, and this feature has great potential in pharmaceutical development. In this study, the cocrystal of piracetam and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid under grinding condition has been characterized by Raman and terahertz spectroscopical techniques. The major vibrational modes of individual starting components and cocrystal are obtained and assigned. Spectral results show that the vibrational modes of the cocrystal are different from those of the corresponding parent materials. The dynamic process of such pharmaceutical cocrystal formation has also been monitored directly with Raman and THz spectra. The formation rate is pretty fast in first several 20 min grinding time, and then it becomes slow. After ∼35 min, such process has been almost completed. These results offer us the unique means and benchmark for characterizing the cocrystal conformation from molecule-level and also provide us rich information about the reaction dynamic during cocrystal formation process in pharmaceutical fields.

  12. Computer formation of sealed lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, John A.

    The desire of many companies to enter the growing market of valve-regulated batteries (also known as sealed lead/acid) requires a higher level of control in virtually all the stages of manufacture. Formation charging and charge conditioning is a particular case in point. Whether the valve-regulated battery is of the starved-electrolyte or gelled-electrolyte type, the final stages of formation and charge conditioning require careful attention to control the cell voltage. Charge rates that exceed the oxygen-recombination rate will cause excess gassing and thus reduce the available electrolyte. This, in turn, reduces battery life and, in the case of gelled-electrolyte batteries, causes improper cracking of the gell and concomitant reduction in capacity, performance and life. Valve-regulated batteries require charging equipment that can automatically regulate charge/discharge current and voltage. Given the requirement for multiple steps of battery conditioning, computer control provides a totally effective way to control the voltage, current, time, ampere hours and charge/discharge functions without operator assistance.

  13. Perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCA) atmospheric formation and transport to the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike-thackray, C.; Selin, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) are highly persistent and toxic environmental contaminants that have been found in remote locations such as the Arctic, far from emission sources. These persistent organic pollutants are emitted directly to the atmosphere as well as being produced by the degradation of precursor compounds in the atmosphere, but recent trends towards increasing precursor emissions and decreasing direct emissions raise the importance of production in the atmosphere. Our work aims to improve understanding of the atmospheric degradation of fluorotelomer precursor compounds to form the long-chain PFCAs PFOA (C8) and PFNA (C9).Using the atmospheric chemical transport model GEOS-Chem, which uses assimilated meteorology to simulate the atmospheric transport of trace gas species, we investigate the interaction of the atmospheric formation of PFCAs and the atmospheric transport of their precursor species. Our simulations are a first application of the GEOS-Chem framework to PFCA chemistry. We highlight the importance of the spatial and temporal variability of background atmospheric chemical conditions experienced during transport. We find that yields and formation times of PFOA and PFNA respond differently and strongly to the photochemical conditions of the atmosphere, such as the abundance of NO, HO2, and other photochemical species.

  14. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations. PMID:25915112

  15. Chlorogenic acid increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation when heating fructose alone or with aspartic acid at two pH levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zou, Yueyu; Wu, Taigang; Huang, Caihuan; Pei, Kehan; Zhang, Guangwen; Lin, Xiaohua; Bai, Weibin; Ou, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic acid that ubiquitously exists in fruits. This work aims to investigate whether and how CGA influences HMF formation during heating fructose alone, or with an amino acid. The results showed that that CGA increased 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation. At pH 5.5 and 7.0, the addition of 5.0 μmol/ml CGA increased HMF formation by 49.4% and 25.2%, respectively when heating fructose alone, and by 9.0% and 16.7%, respectively when heating fructose with aspartic acid. CGA significantly increased HMF formation by promoting 3-deoxosone formation, and its conversion to HMF by inhibiting HMF elimination, especially in the Maillard reaction system. A comparison of the catalytic capacity of CGA with its six analogous compounds showed that both its di-hydroxyphenyl and carboxyl groups function in increasing HMF formation. PMID:26213045

  16. Ribonucleic acid synthesis during fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Smith, B A; Dworkin, M

    1981-04-01

    A method has been devised that allowed us, for the first time, to pulse-label M. xanthus cells with precursors for ribonucleic acid biosynthesis while they were undergoing fruiting body formation. Using this method, we examined patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) accumulation throughout the process of fruiting body formation. As development proceeded, the rate of RNA accumulation increased at two periods of the developmental cycle: once just before aggregation and once late in the cycle, when sporulation was essentially completed. In contrast to vegetatively growing cells, in which only stable RNA species are labeled during a 30-min pulse, the majority of radioactivity found in RNA from 30-min pulse-labeled developing cells was found in an unstable heterodisperse fraction that migrated to the 5S to 16S region of sucrose density gradients and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This pattern of incorporation could not be induced (i) by a shift down of vegetatively growing cells to a nutritionally poor medium, in which the generation time was increased to that of developing cells during the growth phase, or (ii) by plating of vegetative cells onto the same solid-surface environment as that of developing cells, but which surface supported vegetative growth rather than fruiting body formation. Thus, the RNA synthesis pattern observed appeared to be related to development per se rather than to nutritional depletion or growth on a solid surface alone. The radioactivity incorporated into the unstable 5S to 16S RNA fraction accumulated as the pulse length was increased from 10 to 30 min; in contrast, an analogous unstable fraction from vegetative cells decreased as pulse length was increased. This suggested that developmental 5S to 16S RNA was more stable than vegetative cell 5S to 16S RNA (presumptive messenger RNA). However, during a 45-min chase period, radioactivity in 30-min-pulse-labeled developmental 5S to 16S RNA decayed to an extent twice that of

  17. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    .9. Fe hydrolysis reactions on Mars is another source of protons that would have contributed to acidity. The presence of SO2 from volcanic processes could also have contributed to geochemical acidification. These sources of acidity competed with base-forming cations that resulted in mildly acidic solutions that were not favorable for carbonate formation but may have allowed for Fe/Mg smectite formation. Noachian to early Hesperian Mars could have been mildly acidic, allowing Fe/Mg smectite formation but preventing widespread carbonate deposition. This paradigm shift from an early Mars that was neutral-alkaline to mildly acidic may possibly explain why there is a disparity between the occurrence of carbonate and Fe/Mg smectites. Potential microbiological activity would not be eliminated under a mildly acidic Mars; however, there could be tighter constraints as to the type and species of microbiology that could exist.

  18. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    .9. Fe hydrolysis reactions on Mars is another source of protons that would have contributed to acidity. The presence of SO2 from volcanic processes could also have contributed to geochemical acidification. These sources of acidity competed with base-forming cations that resulted in mildly acidic solutions that were not favorable for carbonate formation but may have allowed for Fe/Mg smectite formation. Noachian to early Hesperian Mars could have been mildly acidic, allowing Fe/Mg smectite formation but preventing widespread carbonate deposition. This paradigm shift from an early Mars that was neutral-alkaline to mildly acidic may possibly explain why there is a disparity between the occurrence of carbonate and Fe/Mg smectites. Potential microbiological activity would not be eliminated under a mildly acidic Mars; however, there could be tighter constraints as to the type and species of microbiology that could exist.

  19. Increased fracture penetration and productivity using xanthan gelled acid in massive carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Molon, J.P.; Fox, K.B.

    1983-03-01

    A measurable improvement in productivity can be achieved using xanthan gelled acid to stimulate carbonate formations. Well productivity results were compared to conventional acid fracture treatments. The significant improvements over classical acid fracturing techniques are due to the improved control of acid leakoff rates, retarded reaction rate and improved fracture width maintenance. The difficulties involved in acid fracturing massive Middle East carbonate formations are discussed and solutions are proposed using gelled acid technology. Some limitations in computer predictions of acid fracturing results are also discussed.

  20. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  1. Ice Formation Potential of Field-Collected Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion-Matta, A.; Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Marine biogenic particles composed mainly of sea salt and organic material aerosolized from a mesocosm in laboratory experiments have recently been found to act as ice nuclei. How these particles relate to those collected from sea spray under ambient conditions in the field is unknown. This study reports on the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of particles collected during the marine aerosol characterization experiment (MACE) on the south shore of Long Island, New York. Ambient aerosol size distributions were measured and particles were collected on hydrophobically coated substrates and subsequently used for ice nucleation experiments using an ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope. This technique allows detection of ice formation for temperatures between 200 and 273 K and for relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) from 100% up to water saturation. Individual ice nucleating particles were identified for subsequent chemical and physical characterization using both X-ray and electron micro-spectroscopic techniques. Concentrations of bacteria, viruses, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in the bulk seawater, sea-surface microlayer (SML), and in sea spray were determined using established methods and related to airborne sea spray particles and their ice nucleation potential. Onshore aerosol size distribution measurements taken at 5 m height and 10 m away from the breaking waves, revealed a peak maximum at 100 nm and Ntot = 6.8 x 10^2 cm^-3. Bacterial, viral, and TEP were found to be enriched in the SML. Ambient particles collected during MACE were found to nucleate ice efficiently, e. g. at 215 K, ice nucleation occurred on average at 125% RHice. Results of aerosol size distributions and ice nucleation efficiencies are compared to laboratory bubble bursting experiments in which natural seawater was used. The goal of this study is to understand the connection between sea spray aerosolization and atmospheric ice cloud formation and to

  2. Theobromine Inhibits Uric Acid Crystallization. A Potential Application in the Treatment of Uric Acid Nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. Results The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Conclusions Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. PMID:25333633

  3. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  4. Extracellular Nucleic Acids in Urine: Sources, Structure, Diagnostic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Bryzgunova, O. E.; Laktionov, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free nucleic acids (cfNA) may reach the urine through cell necrosis or apoptosis, active secretion of nucleic acids by healthy and tumor cells of the urinary tract, and transport of circulating nucleic acids (cir- NA) from the blood into primary urine. Even though urinary DNA and RNA are fragmented, they can be used to detect marker sequences. MicroRNAs are also of interest as diagnostic probes. The stability of cfNA in the urine is determined by their structure and packaging into supramolecular complexes and by nuclease activity in the urine. This review summarizes current data on the sources of urinary cfNA, their structural features, diagnostic potential and factors affecting their stability. PMID:26483959

  5. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  6. Investigation of trihalomethanes formation potential in Karoon River water, Iran.

    PubMed

    Fooladvand, Moradali; Ramavandi, Bahman; Zandi, Keyvan; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2011-07-01

    Organic matters in raw water have a potential to generate harmful disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes (THMs) during the chlorination process. The objectives of this study were to investigate the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) in Karoon River water and to determine the effect of several factors including total organic carbon (TOC), pH, chlorine dosage, water temperature, and seasonal variation. The results showed that, among all factors, TOC and water temperature have a remarkable effect on THMFP. The experimental results from batch studies indicated that increasing of pH value yielded a greater THMFP concentration for Karoon River water. THMFP levels of Karoon River water in summer times, when water temperature exceeded 26°C, were 1.2-1.6 times higher than in the spring and fall seasons, when water temperature was below 15°C. It was found that the measured THMFP at Karoon River water in the spring and fall seasons were very rarely higher than 100 μg/L. PMID:20824334

  7. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Maleeva, Galyna; Buldakova, Svetlana; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision, and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analyzed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30 nM to 25 μM on α1–α3 and α1/β, α2/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10–25 μM) ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2, α2/β, and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S) in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs. PMID:26578878

  8. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  9. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. PMID:27052717

  10. Anthranilic Acid: A Potential Biomarker and Treatment Target for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; van der Hart, Marieke; Roeser, Julien; Summergrad, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of Trp-Kyn pathway is the most recent hypothesis of mechanisms of schizophrenia. In particular, over-production of kynurenic acid (KYNA), one of the three immediate downstream metabolites of kynurenine (Kyn) along tryptophan (Trp): Kyn pathway, has been considered as a new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. Up-regulation of KYNA formation was suggested to occur at the expense of down-regulated production of 3-hydroxyKyn (3-HK), the second immediate downstream metabolite of Kyn. We were interested to assess the third immediate downstream Kyn metabolite, anthranilic acid (AA). Serum AA concentrations were evaluated in schizophrenia patients and control subjects by HPLC-mass spectrometry method. We found 2-fold increase of AA and 3-fold decrease of 3-HK concentrations in serum of schizophrenia patients. Up regulated formation of AA might contribute to mechanisms of schizophrenia considering experimental evidences of AA augmentation of autoimmune processes in rat and mice; clinical findings of AA elevation in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, autoimmune diseases diametrical to schizophrenia; and involvement of autoimmunity in development of schizophrenia. Present data warrant further studies of AA as biological marker in, at least, a subgroup (associated with autoimmune mechanisms) of schizophrenia patients and as a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27042691

  11. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil. PMID:24007995

  12. Technological and economic potential of poly(lactic acid) and lactic acid derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.; Bonsignore, P.; Moon, S.H.; Frank, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}40,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food processing and industrial applications. lactic acid h,as the potential of becoming a very large volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from renewable carbohydrates for use as feedstocks for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, plant growth regulators, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and specially chemical intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from crude fermentation broths and the conversion of tactic acid to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. The development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis (ED) with bipolar membranes, extractive distillations integrated with fermentation, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The use of bipolar ED can virtually eliminate the salt or gypsum waste produced in the current lactic acid processes. In this paper, the recent technical advances in tactic and polylactic acid processes are discussed. The economic potential and manufacturing cost estimates of several products and process options are presented. The technical accomplishments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the future directions of this program at ANL are discussed.

  13. Glycolaldehyde, methyl formate and acetic acid adsorption and thermal desorption from interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Daren J.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Brown, Wendy A.; Woods, Paul M.; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben

    2015-02-01

    We have undertaken a detailed investigation of the adsorption, desorption and thermal processing of the astrobiologically significant isomers glycolaldehyde, acetic acid and methyl formate. Here, we present the results of laboratory infrared and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of the three isomers from model interstellar ices adsorbed on a carbonaceous dust grain analogue surface. Laboratory infrared data show that the isomers can be clearly distinguished on the basis of their infrared spectra, which has implications for observations of interstellar ice spectra. Laboratory TPD data also show that the three isomers can be distinguished on the basis of their thermal desorption behaviour. In particular, TPD data show that the isomers cannot be treated the same way in astrophysical models of desorption. The desorption of glycolaldehyde and acetic acid from water-dominated ices is very similar, with desorption being mainly dictated by water ice. However, methyl formate also desorbs from the surface of the ice, as a pure desorption feature, and therefore desorbs at a lower temperature than the other two isomers. This is more clearly indicated by models of the desorption on astrophysical time-scales corresponding to the heating rate of 25 and 5 M⊙ stars. For a 25 M⊙ star, our model shows that a proportion of the methyl formate can be found in the gas phase at earlier times compared to glycolaldehyde and acetic acid. This has implications for the observation and detection of these molecules, and potentially explains why methyl formate has been observed in a wider range of astrophysical environments than the other two isomers.

  14. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  15. Microbial community potentially responsible for acid and metal release from an Ostrobothnian acid sulfate soil

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaofen; Lim Wong, Zhen; Sten, Pekka; Engblom, Sten; Österholm, Peter; Dopson, Mark; Nakatsu, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Soils containing an approximately equal mixture of metastable iron sulfides and pyrite occur in the boreal Ostrobothnian coastal region of Finland, termed ‘potential acid sulfate soil materials’. If the iron sulfides are exposed to air, oxidation reactions result in acid and metal release to the environment that can cause severe damage. Despite that acidophilic microorganisms catalyze acid and metal release from sulfide minerals, the microbiology of acid sulfate soil (ASS) materials has been neglected. The molecular phylogeny of a depth profile through the plough and oxidized ASS layers identified several known acidophilic microorganisms and environmental clones previously identified from acid- and metal-contaminated environments. In addition, several of the 16S rRNA gene sequences were more similar to sequences previously identified from cold environments. Leaching of the metastable iron sulfides and pyrite with an ASS microbial enrichment culture incubated at low pH accelerated metal release, suggesting microorganisms capable of catalyzing metal sulfide oxidation were present. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of species similar to Acidocella sp. and other clones identified from acid mine environments. These data support that acid and metal release from ASSs was catalyzed by indigenous microorganisms adapted to low pH. PMID:23369102

  16. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-Weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed under neutral to alkaline conditions during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Gya). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Gya). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the geologic and aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era may have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that characterize the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products resulting from acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. This study focuses on two phyllosilicates commonly identified with sulfates on Mars: nontronite and saponite. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars to better understand the formation process of sulfates in close proximity to phyllosilicates on Mars and constrain the aqueous conditions of these regions on Mars.

  17. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  18. Potential in vivo roles of nucleic acid triple-helices

    PubMed Central

    Buske, Fabian A

    2011-01-01

    The ability of double-stranded DNA to form a triple-helical structure by hydrogen bonding with a third strand is well established, but the biological functions of these structures remain largely unknown. There is considerable albeit circumstantial evidence for the existence of nucleic triplexes in vivo and their potential participation in a variety of biological processes including chromatin organization, DNA repair, transcriptional regulation and RNA processing has been investigated in a number of studies to date. There is also a range of possible mechanisms to regulate triplex formation through differential expression of triplex-forming RNAs, alteration of chromatin accessibility, sequence unwinding and nucleotide modifications. With the advent of next generation sequencing technology combined with targeted approaches to isolate triplexes, it is now possible to survey triplex formation with respect to their genomic context, abundance and dynamical changes during differentiation and development, which may open up new vistas in understanding genome biology and gene regulation. PMID:21525785

  19. Territorial pattern formation in the absence of an attractive potential.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Lewis, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Territoriality is a phenomenon exhibited throughout nature. On the individual level, it is the processes by which organisms exclude others of the same species from certain parts of space. On the population level, it is the segregation of space into separate areas, each used by subsections of the population. Proving mathematically that such individual-level processes can cause observed population-level patterns to form is necessary for linking these two levels of description in a non-speculative way. Previous mathematical analysis has relied upon assuming animals are attracted to a central area. This can either be a fixed geographical point, such as a den- or nest-site, or a region where they have previously visited. However, recent simulation-based studies suggest that this attractive potential is not necessary for territorial pattern formation. Here, we construct a partial differential equation (PDE) model of territorial interactions based on the individual-based model (IBM) from those simulation studies. The resulting PDE does not rely on attraction to spatial locations, but purely on conspecific avoidance, mediated via scent-marking. We show analytically that steady-state patterns can form, as long as (i) the scent does not decay faster than it takes the animal to traverse the terrain, and (ii) the spatial scale over which animals detect scent is incorporated into the PDE. As part of the analysis, we develop a general method for taking the PDE limit of an IBM that avoids destroying any intrinsic spatial scale in the underlying behavioral decisions. PMID:25822451

  20. Potentiation of phenobarbital-induced anticonvulsant activity by pipecolic acid.

    PubMed

    Takahama, K; Miyata, T; Okano, Y; Kataoka, M; Hitoshi, T; Kasé, Y

    1982-07-01

    Pipecolic acid (PA) is an intermediate of lysine metabolism in the mammalian brain. Recent findings suggest a functional connection of PA as neuromodulator in GABAergic transmission. Since many drugs are postulated to produce their effects by interaction with the central GABA system, the influence of PA on the anticonvulsant activity of phenobarbital was examined. Pretreatment of mice with 50 mg . kg-1 of PA potentiated the suppressing effects of the barbiturate on electrically and chemically induced convulsions. However, there was no potentiation of the behavioral effects and hypothermia induced by phenobarbital. PA itself had no or only little effect on the convulsions, motor function and rectal temperature when given in i.p. doses up to 500 mg . kg-1. Intraventricular administration of 500 microgram of PA also did not suppress either type of convulsion, although it produced ptosis, hypotonia, sedation and hypothermia. The results are discussed in relation to GABA system. PMID:6288409

  1. Sorption and leaching potential of acidic herbicides in Brazilian soils.

    PubMed

    Spadotto, Claudio A; Hornsby, Arthur G; Gomes, Marco A F

    2005-01-01

    Leaching of acidic herbicides (2,4-D, flumetsulam, and sulfentrazone) in soils was estimated by comparing the original and modified AF (Attenuation Factor) models for multi-layered soils (AFi). The original AFi model was modified to include the concept of pH-dependence for Kd (sorption coefficient) based on pesticide dissociation and changes in the accessibility of soil organic functional groups able to interact with the pesticide. The original and modified models, considering soil and herbicide properties, were applied to assess the leaching potential of selected herbicides in three Brazilian soils. The pH-dependent Kd values estimated for all three herbicides were observed to be always higher than pH-independent Kd values calculated using average Koc data, and therefore the original AFi model overestimated the overall leaching potential for the soils studied. PMID:15656159

  2. Potential SSP Perfluorooctanoic Acid Related Fluoropolymer Materials Obsolescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segars, Matt G.

    2006-01-01

    The Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative (SEA) has identified a potential for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to incur materials obsolescence issues due to agreements between the fluoro-chemical industry and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to participate in a Global Stewardship Program for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This presentation will include discussions of the chemistry, regulatory drivers, affected types of fluoropolymer and fluoroelastomer products, timeline for reformulations, and methodology for addressing the issue. It will cover the coordination of assessment efforts with the International Space Station and Head Quarters Air Force Space Command, along with some examples of impacted materials. The presentation is directed at all members of the international aerospace community concerned with identifying potential environmentally driven materials obsolescence issues.

  3. Collaborative Learning through Formative Peer Review: Pedagogy, Programs and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondergaard, Harald; Mulder, Raoul A.

    2012-01-01

    We examine student peer review, with an emphasis on formative practice and collaborative learning, rather than peer grading. Opportunities to engage students in such formative peer assessment are growing, as a range of online tools become available to manage and simplify the process of administering student peer review. We consider whether…

  4. Acetic Acid Acts as a Volatile Signal To Stimulate Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Gozzi, Kevin; Yan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Volatiles are small air-transmittable chemicals with diverse biological activities. In this study, we showed that volatiles produced by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis had a profound effect on biofilm formation of neighboring B. subtilis cells that grew in proximity but were physically separated. We further demonstrated that one such volatile, acetic acid, is particularly potent in stimulating biofilm formation. Multiple lines of genetic evidence based on B. subtilis mutants that are defective in either acetic acid production or transportation suggest that B. subtilis uses acetic acid as a metabolic signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation. Lastly, we investigated how B. subtilis cells sense and respond to acetic acid in regulating biofilm formation. We showed the possible involvement of three sets of genes (ywbHG, ysbAB, and yxaKC), all encoding putative holin-antiholin-like proteins, in cells responding to acetic acid and stimulating biofilm formation. All three sets of genes were induced by acetate. A mutant with a triple mutation of those genes showed a severe delay in biofilm formation, whereas a strain overexpressing ywbHG showed early and robust biofilm formation. Results of our studies suggest that B. subtilis and possibly other bacteria use acetic acid as a metabolic signal to regulate biofilm formation as well as a quorum-sensing-like airborne signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation by physically separated cells in the community. PMID:26060272

  5. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  6. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  7. Revegetation potential of acidic mill tailings in southwestern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, J.M.; Beeson, D.L.; Gomez, M.; Lindemann, W.C.; Whitford, W.G.; Zehner, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    A greenhouse project was conducted to examine the revegetation potential of acid mill tailings from an abandoned mill site near Silver City, Grant County, New Mexico. The tailings piles covered about 35 acres, had percent level concentrations of Zn, Cu, Pb, an average pH of 2.2, and an average net neutralization potential of 120 tons calcium carbonate per kiloton tailings. To successfully revegetate the tailings, five problems must be overcome: (1) neutralization of current and future acidity, (2) immobilization of metals, (3) restoration of biological activity, (4) improvement of water holding capacity, and (5) increasing the supply of plant nutrients. Tailings material was mixed with crushed limestone and divided into greenhouse pots in a randomized complete block design with factorial arrangement of treatments, including nine plant species and four organic amendments. Fertilizer was added based on soil fertility analysis. Germination and growth characteristics of plant species, and physical and chemical characteristics of soil were examined. Liming effectively removed or moderated most chemical plant growth problems. Water soluble and plant available metals in neutralized tailings were slightly higher than in native soils.

  8. Aspects of lead/acid battery technology 4. Plate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prout, L.

    By design there is usually an excess of positive over negative material in plates. This compensates to an extent the lesser formation charge input required by positive and renders the mismatch when forming positive plate against negative plate of minor importance. Open tank and container formations are described and the dangers of imcomplete formation when 'no-burn' connections are used. The mechanism of material conversation is illustrated from microsections taken from a traction negative. Variations of container formation to suit factory conditions are detailed and economies in electrolyte usage in open-tank formation. The benefit of rest periods during charge are examined particularly for traction. The drying of the positive plates after formation requires careful control; when used in dry-charged automotive batteries poor initial starting can occur if the drying temperature exceeds 70 °C and the moisture content is below 0.25 wt.%.

  9. Ultraviolet-induced effects on chloramine and cyanogen chloride formation from chlorination of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Weng, ShihChi; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2013-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-based treatment is commonly used to augment chlorination in swimming pools. However, the effects of combined application of UV254/chlorine on disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation are incompletely defined. To examine this issue, experiments were conducted with amino acids (l-arginine, l-histidine, and glycine) that are representative of those introduced to swimming pools via human body fluids. For each precursor, stepwise experiments were conducted with chlorination and UV254 exposure, with/without post-chlorination. Net formation and decomposition of chloramines and cyanogen chloride (CNCl) were measured for a range of chlorine/precursor (Cl/P) molar ratios and UV254 doses. Substantial production of NH2Cl from l-arginine and l-histidine was observed at Cl/P = 1.0 and 2.0 when post-chlorination was applied to UV254-irradiated samples. These results suggested a mechanism of rapid N-chlorination, followed by cleavage of NH3 by UV254 irradiation. CNCl formation was observed from UV254-irradiated samples of l-arginine and l-histidine when Cl/P = 2.0 and 3.0, as well as from glycine for Cl/P ≤ 1. Structurally related precursor compounds were examined for CNCl formation potential in chlorination/UV experiments. CNCl formation was promoted by UV254 exposure of chlorinated imidazole and guanidine compounds, which suggested that these groups contributed to CNCl formation. The results have implications with respect to the application of chlorine and UV for water treatment in swimming pools and other settings, such as water reuse and advanced oxidation processes. PMID:23560482

  10. Oleic Acid: Natural variation and potential enhancement in oilseed crops.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid is a monounsaturated omega 9 fatty acid (MUFA, C18:1) which can be found in various plant lipids and animal fats. Unlike omega 3 (a-linolenic acid, C18:3) and omega 6 (linoleic acid, C18:2) fatty acids which are essential because they cannot be synthesized by humans and must be obtained f...

  11. Potential of fly ash for neutralisation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Asif; Jia, Yu; Maurice, Christian; Öhlander, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Lignite (PK), bituminous (FI) and biomass (SE) fly ashes (FAs) were mineralogically and geochemically characterised, and their element leachability was studied with batch leaching tests. The potential for acid neutralisation (ANP) was quantified by their buffering capacity, reflecting their potential for neutralisation of acid mine drainage. Quartz was the common mineral in FAs detected by XRD with iron oxide, anhydrite, and magnesioferrite in PK, mullite and lime in FI, and calcite and anorthite in SE. All the FAs had high contents of major elements such as Fe, Si, Al and Ca. The Ca content in SE was six and eight times higher compared to PK and FI, respectively. Sulphur content in PK and SE was one magnitude higher than FI. Iron concentrations were higher in PK. The trace element concentrations varied between the FAs. SE had the highest ANP (corresponding to 275 kg CaCO3 tonne(-1)) which was 15 and 10 times higher than PK and FI, respectively. The concentrations of Ca(2+), SO4 (2-), Na(+) and Cl(-) in the leachates were much higher compared to other elements from all FA samples. Iron, Cu and Hg were not detected in any of the FA leachates because of their mild to strong alkaline nature with pH ranging from 9 to 13. Potassium leached in much higher quantity from SE than from the other ashes. Arsenic, Mn and Ni leached from PK only, while Co and Pb from SE only. The concentrations of Zn were higher in the leachates from SE. The FAs used in this study have strong potential for the neutralisation of AMD due to their alkaline nature. However, on the other hand, FAs must be further investigated, with scaled-up experiments before full-scale application, because they might leach pronounced concentrations of elements of concern with decreasing pH while neutralising AMD. PMID:27209637

  12. FORMATION OF ACIDIC TRACE ORGANIC BY-PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF HUMIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for concentrating and analyzing acidic trace organics produced by the chlorination of humic acids at concentrations approximating common drinking water levels is described. Data are compared from several humic acid sources. Specific compound analyses of the extracts were...

  13. Guanine- Formation During the Thermal Polymerization of Amino Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caw, B. K.; Munoz, E. F.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Young, R. S.

    1964-01-01

    The action of heat on a mixture of amino acids was studied as a possible abiological pathway for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Guanine was detected. This result is significant in the context of chemical evolution.

  14. Potential mechanisms for low uric acid in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Radhika; Young, Sarah; Rosen, Ami; Bernhard, Douglas; Millington, David; Factor, Stewart; Jinnah, H A

    2016-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have described an association between low serum uric acid (UA) and Parkinson disease (PD). Uric acid is a known antioxidant, and one proposed mechanism of neurodegeneration in PD is oxidative damage of dopamine neurons. However, other complex metabolic pathways may contribute. The purpose of this study is to elucidate potential mechanisms of low serum UA in PD. Subjects who met diagnostic criteria for definite or probable PD (n = 20) and controls (n = 20) aged 55-80 years were recruited. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected from all participants, and both uric acid and allantoin were measured and corrected for body mass index (BMI). Urinary metabolites were compared using a twoway ANOVA with diagnosis and sex as the explanatory variables. There were no significant differences between PD and controls for total UA (p = 0.60), UA corrected for BMI (p = 0.37), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on UA (p = 0.24). Similarly, there were no significant differences between PD and controls for allantoin (p = 0.47), allantoin corrected for BMI (p = 0.57), or in the interaction of diagnosis and sex on allantoin (p = 0.78). Allantoin/UA ratios also did not significantly differ by diagnosis (p = 0.99). Our results imply that low serum UA in PD may be due to an intrinsic mechanism that alters the homeostatic set point for serum UA in PD, and may contribute to relatively lower protection against oxidative damage. These findings provide indirect support for neuroprotection trials aimed at raising serum UA. PMID:26747026

  15. Collaborative learning through formative peer review: pedagogy, programs and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søndergaard, Harald; Mulder, Raoul A.

    2012-12-01

    We examine student peer review, with an emphasis on formative practice and collaborative learning, rather than peer grading. Opportunities to engage students in such formative peer assessment are growing, as a range of online tools become available to manage and simplify the process of administering student peer review. We consider whether pedagogical requirements for student peer review are likely to be discipline-specific, taking computer science and software engineering as an example. We then summarise what attributes are important for a modern generic peer review tool, and classify tools according to four prevalent emphases, using currently available, mature tools to illustrate each. We conclude by identifying some gaps in current understanding of formative peer review, and discuss how online tools for student peer review can help create opportunities to answer some of these questions.

  16. Trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials of the Mississippi river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-hallide formation potentials were determined for water samples from 12 sites along the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, MN, to New Orleans, LA, for the summer and fall of 1991 and the spring of 1992. The formation potentials increased with distance upstream, approximately paralleling the increase of the dissolved organic- carbon concentration. The pH and the dissolved organic-carbon and free- chlorine concentrations were significant variables in the prediction of the formation potentials. The trihalomethane formation potential increased as the pH increased, whereas the nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potential decreased. All formation potentials increased as the dissolved organic-carbon and free-chlorine concentrations increased, with the dissolved organic-carbon concentration having a much greater effect.

  17. Ursolic acid (UA): A metabolite with promising therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Plants are known to produce a variety of bioactive metabolites which are being used to cure various life threatening and chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism of action of such bioactive molecules, may open up new avenues for the scientific community to develop or improve novel therapeutic approaches to tackle dreadful diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Ursolic acid (UA) is one among the categories of such plant-based therapeutic metabolites having multiple intracellular and extracellular targets that play role in apoptosis, metastasis, angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. Moreover, the synthetic derivatives of UA have also been seen to be involved in a range of pharmacological applications, which are associated with prevention of diseases. Evidences suggest that UA could be used as a potential candidate to develop a comprehensive competent strategy towards the treatment and prevention of health disorders. The review article herein describes the possible therapeutic effects of UA along with putative mechanism of action. PMID:26775565

  18. Polyunsaturated lysophosphatidic acid as a potential asthma biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Steven J; Park, Gye Young; Christman, John W; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a lipid mediator in biological fluids and tissues, is generated mainly by autotaxin that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine to LPA and choline. Total LPA levels are increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from asthmatic lung, and are strongly induced following subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen in subjects with allergic asthma. Polyunsaturated molecular species of LPA (C22:5 and C22:6) are selectively synthesized in the airways of asthma subjects following allergen challenge and in mouse models of allergic airway inflammation, having been identified and quantified by LC/MS/MS lipidomics. This review discusses current knowledge of LPA production in asthmatic lung and the potential utility of polyunsaturated LPA molecular species as novel biomarkers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate of asthma subjects. PMID:26808693

  19. Effect of Marine Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Thibane, Vuyisile S.; Kock, Johan L. F.; Ells, Ruan; van Wyk, Pieter W. J.; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids on biofilm formation by the human pathogens Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis was investigated. It was found that stearidonic acid (18:4 n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) have an inhibitory effect on mitochondrial metabolism of both C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and that the production of biofilm biomass by C. dubliniensis was more susceptible to these fatty acids than C. albicans. Ultrastructural differences, which may be due to increased oxidative stress, were observed between treated and untreated cells of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis with formation of rough cell walls by both species and fibrillar structures in C. dubliniensis. These results indicate that marine polyunsaturated fatty acids may be useful in the treatment and/or prevention of biofilms formed by these pathogenic yeasts. PMID:21116408

  20. Effect of oxidoreduction potential on aroma biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria in nonfat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Martin, F; Cachon, R; Pernin, K; De Coninck, J; Gervais, P; Guichard, E; Cayot, N

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidoreduction potential (Eh) on the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria in non-fat yogurt. The study was done with yogurts fermented by Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The Eh was modified by the application of different gaseous conditions (air, nitrogen, and nitrogen/hydrogen). Acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, diacetyl, and pentane-2,3-dione, as the major endogenous odorant compounds of yogurt, were chosen as tracers for the biosynthesis of aroma compounds by lactic acid bacteria. Oxidative conditions favored the production of acetaldehyde, dimethyl sulfide, and diketones (diacetyl and pentane-2,3-dione). The Eh of the medium influences aroma production in yogurt by modifying the metabolic pathways of Lb. bulgaricus and Strep. thermophilus. The use of Eh as a control parameter during yogurt production could permit the control of aroma formation. PMID:21257030

  1. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Chi-Ping; Lin, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  2. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  4. Fatty acid synthase as a potential therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Richard; Peluso, Stephane; Nguyen, Paul L; Loda, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is a key enzyme involved in neoplastic lipogenesis. Overexpression of FASN is common in many cancers, and accumulating evidence suggests that it is a metabolic oncogene with an important role in tumor growth and survival, making it an attractive target for cancer therapy. Early small-molecule FASN inhibitors such as cerulenin, C75 and orlistat have been shown to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines and to induce tumor growth delay in several cancer xenograft models but their mechanism is still not well understood. These molecules suffer from pharmacological limitations and weight loss as a side effect that prevent their development as systemic drugs. Several potent inhibitors have recently been reported that may help to unravel and exploit the full potential of FASN as a target for cancer therapy in the near future. Furthermore, novel sources of FASN inhibitors, such as green tea and dietary soy, make both dietary manipulation and chemoprevention potential alternative modes of therapy in the future. PMID:20373869

  5. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  6. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  7. Formation of Organic Tracers for Isoprene SOA under Acidic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical compositions of a series of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples, formed by irradiating mixtures of isoprene and NO in a smog chamber in the absence or presence of acidic aerosols, were analyzed using derivatization-based GC-MS methods. In addition to the known is...

  8. Acid gradient across plasma membrane can drive phosphate bond synthesis in cancer cells: acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  9. Testing the role of silicic acid and bioorganic materials in the formation of rock coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-11-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which the rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of the polymerization of silicic acid with the biooganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the natural ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly on Mars.

  10. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  11. d-Amino Acids Indirectly Inhibit Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis by Interfering with Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Leiman, Sara A.; May, Janine M.; Lebar, Matthew D.; Kahne, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms on surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces. It was previously reported that these biofilms disassemble late in their life cycle and that conditioned medium from late-stage biofilms inhibits biofilm formation. Such medium contained a mixture of d-leucine, d-methionine, d-tryptophan, and d-tyrosine and was reported to inhibit biofilm formation via the incorporation of these d-amino acids into the cell wall. Here, we show that l-amino acids were able to specifically reverse the inhibitory effects of their cognate d-amino acids. We also show that d-amino acids inhibited growth and the expression of biofilm matrix genes at concentrations that inhibit biofilm formation. Finally, we report that the strain routinely used to study biofilm formation has a mutation in the gene (dtd) encoding d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents the misincorporation of d-amino acids into protein in B. subtilis. When we repaired the dtd gene, B. subtilis became resistant to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of d-amino acids without losing the ability to incorporate at least one noncanonical d-amino acid, d-tryptophan, into the peptidoglycan peptide side chain. We conclude that the susceptibility of B. subtilis to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of d-amino acids is largely, if not entirely, due to their toxic effects on protein synthesis. PMID:24097941

  12. D-amino acids indirectly inhibit biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis by interfering with protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Leiman, Sara A; May, Janine M; Lebar, Matthew D; Kahne, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms on surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces. It was previously reported that these biofilms disassemble late in their life cycle and that conditioned medium from late-stage biofilms inhibits biofilm formation. Such medium contained a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tryptophan, and D-tyrosine and was reported to inhibit biofilm formation via the incorporation of these D-amino acids into the cell wall. Here, we show that L-amino acids were able to specifically reverse the inhibitory effects of their cognate D-amino acids. We also show that D-amino acids inhibited growth and the expression of biofilm matrix genes at concentrations that inhibit biofilm formation. Finally, we report that the strain routinely used to study biofilm formation has a mutation in the gene (dtd) encoding D-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents the misincorporation of D-amino acids into protein in B. subtilis. When we repaired the dtd gene, B. subtilis became resistant to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of D-amino acids without losing the ability to incorporate at least one noncanonical D-amino acid, D-tryptophan, into the peptidoglycan peptide side chain. We conclude that the susceptibility of B. subtilis to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of D-amino acids is largely, if not entirely, due to their toxic effects on protein synthesis. PMID:24097941

  13. Studies of the acidic components of the Colorado Green River formation oil shale-Mass spectrometric identification of the methyl esters of extractable acids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, P.; Schnoes, H. K.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    Study of solvent extractable acidic constituents of oil shale from the Colorado Green River Formation. Identification of individual components is based on gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric data obtained for their respective methyl esters. Normal acids, isoprenoidal acids, alpha, omega-dicarboxylic acids, mono-alpha-methyl dicarboxylic acids and methyl ketoacids were identified. In addition, the presence of monocyclic, benzoic, phenylalkanoic and naphthyl-carboxylic acids, as well as cycloaromatic acids, is demonstrated by partial identification.

  14. One-pot nanoparticulation of potentially bioactive peptides and gallic acid encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Himan; Madadlou, Ashkan; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2016-11-01

    Whey protein isolate was hydrolyzed to an in vitro antioxidative hydrolysate, followed by transglutaminase-induced cross-linking and microemulsification in an oil phase. The obtained microemulsion was then dispersed in a gallic acid-rich model wastewater which caused gallic acid transportation into internal nanodroplets. Whey peptides were consequently gelled, yielding nanoparticles. Electrophoresis showed that β-lactoglobulin and low molecular weight peptides were cross-linked by transglutaminase. Protein hydrolysis and subsequent enzymatic cross-linking increased the ζ-potential value. Microscopic investigation indicated that most particles were non-spherical. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked peptides underwent a form of heat-triggered self-assembly in the dry state, while nanoparticles did not show such behavior. Peptide crystallites size was increased by cross-linking and acid-induced particle formation. The latter also caused a reduction in intensity of C-H stretching and C-N bending peaks in infra-red spectrum. Gallic acid release from particles to simulated gastrointestinal fluids was through diffusion from swollen particles, and reached almost 70% release. PMID:27211653

  15. How Acid-Catalyzed Decarboxylation of 2,4-Dimethoxybenzoic Acid Avoids Formation of Protonated CO2.

    PubMed

    Howe, Graeme W; Vandersteen, Adelle A; Kluger, Ronald

    2016-06-22

    The decarboxylation of 2,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid (1) is accelerated in acidic solutions. The rate of reaction depends upon solution acidity in a manner that is consistent with the formation of the conjugate acid of 1 (RCO2H2(+)), with its higher energy ring-protonated tautomer allowing the requisite C-C bond cleavage. However, this would produce the conjugate acid of CO2, a species that would be too energetic to form. Considerations of mechanisms that fit the observed rate law were supplemented with DFT calculations. Those results indicate that the lowest energy pathway from the ring-protonated reactive intermediate involves early proton transfer from the carboxyl group to water along with C-C bond cleavage, producing 1,3-dimethoxybenzene and CO2 directly. PMID:27241436

  16. Bioconverted Products of Essential Fatty Acids as Potential Antimicrobial Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review deals with the recent findings on the microbial conversion of essential fatty acids (EFAs) through Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 NRRL-B-18602, and the antimicrobial properties of bioconverted essential fatty acids, with particular emphasis on n-3 or n-6 fatty acids. The first section deals...

  17. The ex vivo antiplatelet activation potential of fruit phenolic metabolite hippuric acid.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan; Stanley, Roger; Singh, Indu

    2015-08-01

    Polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with reduction in platelet hyperactivity, a significant contributor to thrombus formation. This study was undertaken to investigate the possible role of hippuric acid, a predominant metabolite of plant cyclic polyols, phenolic acids and polyphenols, in reduction of platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Fasting blood samples were collected from 13 healthy subjects to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of hippuric acid (100 μM, 200 μM, 500 μM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on activation-dependant platelet surface-marker expression. Procaspase activating compound-1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin/CD62P monoclonal antibodies were used to evaluate platelet activation-related conformational changes and α-granule release respectively using flow cytometry. Platelets were stimulated ex vivo via the P2Y1/P2Y12- adenosine diphosphate (ADP) pathway of platelet activation. Hippuric acid at a concentration of 1 mM and 2 mM significantly reduced P-selectin/CD62P expression (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001 respectively) induced by ADP. Hippuric acid at 2 mM concentration also inhibited PAC-1 activation-dependant antibody expression (p = 0.03). High ex vivo concentrations of hippuric acid can therefore significantly reduce P-selectin and PAC-1 expression thus reducing platelet activation and clotting potential. However, although up to 11 mM of hippuric acid can be excreted in the urine per day following consumption of fruit, hippuric acid is actively excreted with a recorded Cmax for hippuric acid in human plasma at 250-300 μM. This is lower than the blood concentration of 1-2 mM shown to be bioactive in this research. The contribution of hippuric acid to the protective effects of fruit and vegetable intake against vascular disorders by the pathways measured is therefore low but could be synergistic with lowered doses of antiplatelet drugs and help reduce risk of thrombosis in current antiplatelet drug sensitive populations. PMID

  18. The ozone formation potential of 1-bromo-propane.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Gary Z; Cohen, Jonathan P; Myers, Thomas C; Carter, William P L

    2003-03-01

    1-Bromo-propane (1-BP) is a replacement for high-end chlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) solvents. Its reaction rate constant with the OH radical is, on a weight basis, significantly less than that of ethane. However, the overall smog formation chemistry of 1-BP appears to be very unusual compared with typical volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and relatively complex because of the presence of bromine. In smog chamber experiments, 1-BP initially shows a faster ozone build-up than what would be expected from ethane, but the secondary products containing bromine tend to destroy ozone such that 1-BP can have a net overall negative reactivity. Alternative sets of reactions are offered to explain this unusual behavior. Follow-up studies are suggested to resolve the chemistry. Using one set of bromine-related reactions in a photochemical grid model shows that 1-BP would be less reactive toward peak ozone formation than ethane with a trend toward even lower ozone impacts in the future. PMID:12661686

  19. A new parametrization for ambient particle formation over coniferous forests and its potential implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.; Groth, A.; Trawny, K.; Borchert, S.; Jacobi, S.

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation is a general phenomenon observed over coniferous forests. So far nucleation is either parameterised as a function of gaseous sulphuric acid concentration only, which is unable to explain the observed seasonality of nucleation events at different measurement sites, or as a function of sulphuric acid and organic molecules. Here we introduce different nucleation parameters based on the interaction of sulphuric acid and terpene oxidation products and elucidate the individual importance. They include basic trace gas and meteorological measurements such as ozone and water vapour concentrations, temperature (for terpene emission) and UV B radiation as a proxy for OH radical formation. We apply these new parameters to field studies conducted at conducted at Finnish and German measurement sites and compare these to nucleation observations on a daily and annual scale. General agreement was found, although the specific compounds responsible for the nucleation process remain speculative. This can be interpreted as follows: During cooler seasons the emission of biogenic terpenes and the OH availability limits the new particle formation while towards warmer seasons the ratio of ozone and water vapour concentration seems to dominate the general behaviour. Therefore, organics seem to support ambient nucleation besides sulphuric acid or an OH-related compound. Using these nucleation parameters to extrapolate the current conditions to prognosed future concentrations of ozone, water vapour and organic concentrations leads to a significant potential increase in the nucleation event number.

  20. Wind a potential mechanism of Mars gully formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Z.; Xie, H.

    2007-12-01

    Since Mars gullies were first revealed with the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) in 2000, they rapidly became a hotspot in Mars studying in that some of them are very young features on Mars surface. The previous studies focused on their formation and erosion mechanisms. As a result, several mechanisms have been proposed. But none of them can interpret the formation of all gullies perfectly. High resolution HiRISE images give us a good opportunity to examine it. In this study, we propose that wind could play an important role in some of the gullies formation. Wind is the most important agent acting on Mars surface (Fenton, 2003) and produced many features on Mars surface, including ubiquitous dunes, yardangs, deflation pits, dust storms, and dust deposits. Similarly, wind can also affect the inner edge of craters and valleys, where the gullies have been found mostly. Under the erosion of wind, the small channel will turn to a big gully. Wind could be a major reason to explain (1) why gullies formed in one side of a crater wall, while small wind-blown sand deposits in the opposite side of the same crater, as found in the crater of this HiRISE image (PSP_001697_1390_RED.JP2) and (2) why two craters next to each other, but only the big one has gullies developed. The reason for this is that big crater can form a strong wind circulation. In another HiRISE image (PSP_001330_1395_RED.JP2), we found a rock in the lower end of a gully course in a crater wall, for which we explain this gully is in the process of formation. This rock could be moving down and carving in to form the course due to the wind force. Based on the common characteristics of wind abrasion mechanics (Greeley and Iversen, 1985), we propose the following processes of gully formation by wind: (1) Embryonic stage: one side of a crater wall or valley wall was "softened" by the wind storm and formed some irregular and V-shaped fractured channels. (2) Youthful stage: small impact pits formed

  1. Evidence for the complex relationship between free amino acid and sugar concentrations and acrylamide-forming potential in potato

    PubMed Central

    Muttucumaru, N; Powers, SJ; Elmore, JS; Briddon, A; Mottram, DS; Halford, NG

    2014-01-01

    Free amino acids and reducing sugars participate in the Maillard reaction during high-temperature cooking and processing. This results not only in the formation of colour, aroma and flavour compounds, but also undesirable contaminants, including acrylamide, which forms when the amino acid that participates in the reaction is asparagine. In this study, tubers of 13 varieties of potato (Solanum tuberosum), which had been produced in a field trial in 2010 and sampled immediately after harvest or after storage for 6 months, were analysed to show the relationship between the concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, sugars and acrylamide-forming potential. The varieties comprised five that are normally used for crisping, seven that are used for French fry production and one that is used for boiling. Acrylamide formation was measured in heated flour, and correlated with glucose and fructose concentration. In French fry varieties, which contain higher concentrations of sugars, acrylamide formation also correlated with free asparagine concentration, demonstrating the complex relationship between precursor concentration and acrylamide-forming potential in potato. Storage of the potatoes for 6 months at 9°C had a significant, variety-dependent impact on sugar and amino acid concentrations and acrylamide-forming potential. PMID:25540460

  2. Effects of ion substitution on bile acid-dependent and -independent bile formation by rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, R W; Stephens, J E; Scharschmidt, B F

    1982-01-01

    To characterize the transport mechanisms responsible for formation of canalicular bile, we have examined the effects of ion substitution on bile acid-dependent and bile acid-independent bile formation by the isolated perfused rat liver. Complete replacement of perfusate sodium with choline and lithium abolished taurocholate-induced choleresis and reduced biliary taurocholate output by greater than 70%. Partial replacement of perfusate sodium (25 of 128 mM) by choline reduced bile acid-independent bile formation by 30% and replacement of the remaining sodium (103 mM) by choline reduced bile acid-independent bile formation by an additional 64%. In contrast, replacement of the remaining sodium (103 mM) by lithium reduced bile acid-independent bile formation by only an additional 20%, while complete replacement of sodium (128 mM) by lithium reduced bile formation by only 17%, and lithium replaced sodium as the predominant biliary cation. Replacement of perfusate bicarbonate by Tricine, a zwitterionic amino acid buffer, decreased bile acid-independent bile formation by greater than or equal to 50% and decreased biliary bicarbonate output by approximately 60%, regardless of the accompanying cation. In separate experiments, replacement of sodium by lithium essentially abolished Na,K-ATPase activity measured either as ouabain-suppressible ATP hydrolysis in rat liver or kidney homogenates, or as ouabain-suppressible 86Rb uptake by cultured rat hepatocytes. These studies indicate that bile acid(taurocholate)-dependent bile formation by rat liver exhibits a specific requirement for sodium, a finding probably attributable to the role(s) of sodium in hepatic sodium-coupled taurocholate uptake and/or in maintenance of Na,K-ATPase activity. The surprising finding that bile acid-independent bile formation was substantially unaltered by complete replacement of sodium with the permeant cation lithium does not appear to be explained by Na,K-ATPase-mediated lithium transport. Although

  3. Thermodynamics of sodium dodecyl sulphate-salicylic acid based micellar systems and their potential use in fruits postharvest.

    PubMed

    Cid, A; Morales, J; Mejuto, J C; Briz-Cid, N; Rial-Otero, R; Simal-Gándara, J

    2014-05-15

    Micellar systems have excellent food applications due to their capability to solubilise a large range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances. In this work, the mixed micelle formation between the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and the phenolic acid salicylic acid have been studied at several temperatures in aqueous solution. The critical micelle concentration and the micellization degree were determined by conductometric techniques and the experimental data used to calculate several useful thermodynamic parameters, like standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy of micelle formation. Salicylic acid helps the micellization of SDS, both by increasing the additive concentration at a constant temperature and by increasing temperature at a constant concentration of additive. The formation of micelles of SDS in the presence of salicylic acid was a thermodynamically spontaneous process, and is also entropically controlled. Salicylic acid plays the role of a stabilizer, and gives a pathway to control the three-dimensional water matrix structure. The driving force of the micellization process is provided by the hydrophobic interactions. The isostructural temperature was found to be 307.5 K for the mixed micellar system. This article explores the use of SDS-salicylic acid based micellar systems for their potential use in fruits postharvest. PMID:24423544

  4. Antimicrobial potential of bioconverted products of omega-3 fatty acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioconverted omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (bEPA) and docosahexanoic acid (bDHA), obtained from the microbial conversion of non-bioconverted eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 were evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. bEPA and bDHA at 5 µl/...

  5. Astatine standard redox potentials and speciation in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Champion, J; Alliot, C; Renault, E; Mokili, B M; Chérel, M; Galland, N; Montavon, G

    2010-01-14

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to define astatine (At) speciation in acidic aqueous solution and to answer the two main questions raised from literature data: does At(0) exist in aqueous solution and what is the chemical form of At(+III), if it exists. The experimental approach considers that a given species is characterized by its distribution coefficient (D) experimentally determined in a biphasic system. The change in speciation arising from a change in experimental conditions is observed by a change in D value. The theoretical approach involves quasi-relativistic quantum chemistry calculations. The results show that At at the oxidation state 0 cannot exist in aqueous solution. The three oxidation states present in the range of water stability are At(-I), At(+I), and At(+III) and exist as At(-), At(+), and AtO(+), respectively, in the 1-2 pH range. The standard redox potentials of the At(+)/At(-) and AtO(+)/At(+) couples have been determined, the respective values being 0.36 +/- 0.01 and 0.74 +/- 0.01 V vs NHE. PMID:20014840

  6. Drug Resistance Reversal Potential of Ursolic Acid Derivatives against Nalidixic Acid- and Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Maurya, Anupam; Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Khan, Feroz; Darokar, Mahendra P; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    As a part of our drug discovery program, ursolic acid was chemically transformed into six semi-synthetic derivatives, which were evaluated for their antibacterial and drug resistance reversal potential in combination with conventional antibiotic nalidixic acid against the nalidixic acid-sensitive and nalidixic acid-resistant strains of Escherichia coli. Although ursolic acid and its all semi-synthetic derivatives did not show antibacterial activity of their own, but in combination, they significantly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid up to eightfold. The 3-O-acetyl-urs-12-en-28-isopropyl ester (UA-4) and 3-O-acetyl-urs-12-en-28-n-butyl ester (UA-5) derivatives of ursolic acid reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid by eightfold against nalidixic acid-resistant and four and eightfold against nalidixic acid-sensitive, respectively. The UA-4 and UA-5 were further evaluated for their synergy potential with another antibiotic tetracycline against the multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Escherichia coli-KG4. The results showed that both these derivatives in combination with tetracycline reduced the cell viability in concentration-dependent manner by significantly inhibiting efflux pump. This was further supported by the in silico binding affinity of UA-4 and UA-5 with efflux pump proteins. These ursolic acid derivatives may find their potential use as synergistic agents in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. PMID:25476148

  7. Coal is a potential source of naphthenic acids in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela C; Whittal, Randy M; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2009-03-15

    Naphthenic acids, with the general formula C(n)H(2n+Z)O(2), are found in conventional petroleums and oil sands ores. These acids are toxic to aquatic life, so their discharge from petroleum processing into receiving waters must be avoided. In a previous study, naphthenic acids were putatively identified in groundwaters from two domestic wells that were distant from petroleum sources. However, coal deposits were near these wells. In this study, waters from the two wells were extracted and analyzed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to unequivocally confirm the presence of naphthenic acids and other organic acids. In addition, distilled water was percolated through three crushed coal samples and the leachates were shown to contain a variety of organic acids, including naphthenic acids. These results clearly demonstrate that coal is a source of naphthenic acids and that the naphthenic acids can leach into groundwaters. Thus, the presence of naphthenic acids in waters cannot be solely attributed to petroleum or petroleum industry activities. PMID:19185332

  8. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4

  9. Investigation of mechanics of mine acid formation. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Paciorek, K.L.; Kimble, P.F.; Vatasescu, A.L.; Toben, W.A.; Kratzer, R.H.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of the contract was to determine, by the combination of laboratory experiments and mine samplings, the kinetics and mechanisms of the various reactions that produce mine acid drainage. To achieve this goal, primary investigations were performed utilizing pure iron disulfide in the form of pyrite and marcasite, free from coal. The effects of temperature, concentration, surface area, media nature, oxygen, presence of additional ions and bacterial action with respect to dissolution rates were measured. Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans were included in this study, both as purchased cultures and freshly isolated from mine samples. Mine samplings were performed to determine the type and quantity of bacteria present, the effect of weathering upon coals' propensity to produce acid and other drainage, the effect of other minerals and the nature of the mine water upon ion liberation, and the effect of the different kinds of bacteria upon the above process. It was established that both pyrite and marcasite, provided sufficient surface area is exposed, will produce hydrogen, sulfate, and iron ions. This process is accelerated in the case of pyrite and marcasite by the presence of T. ferrooxidans and ferric ions. T. thiooxidans accelerates marcasite solubilization and the dissolution of iron disulfide present in coal, but had no effect on museum grade pyrite.

  10. Formation of linear polyenes in poly(vinyl alcohol) films catalyzed by phosphotungstic acid, aluminum chloride, and hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Malyi, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of linear polyenes-(CH=CH)n-via acid-catalyzed thermal dehydration of polyvinyl alcohol in 9- to 40-µm-thick films of this polymer containing hydrochloric acid, aluminum chloride, and phosphotungstic acid as dehydration catalysts was studied by electronic absorption spectroscopy. The concentration of long-chain ( n ≥ 8) polyenes in films containing phosphotungstic acid is found to monotonically increase with the duration of thermal treatment of films, although the kinetics of this process is independent of film thickness. In films containing hydrochloric acid and aluminum chloride, the formation rate of polyenes with n ≥ 8 rapidly drops as film thickness decreases and the annealing time increases. As a result, at a film thickness of less than 10-12 µm, long-chain polyenes are not formed at all in these films no matter how long thermal duration is. The reason for this behavior is that hydrochloric acid catalyzing polymer dehydration in these films evaporates from the films during thermal treatment, the evaporation rate inversely depending on film thickness.

  11. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  12. Lactic acid and methane: improved exploitation of biowaste potential.

    PubMed

    Dreschke, G; Probst, M; Walter, A; Pümpel, T; Walde, J; Insam, H

    2015-01-01

    This feasibility study investigated a two-step biorefining approach to increase the value gained by recycling of organic municipal solid waste. Firstly, lactic acid was produced via batch fermentation at 37°C using the indigenous microbiome. Experiments revealed an optimal fermentation period of 24h resulting in high yields of lactic acid (up to 37gkg(-1)). The lactic acid proportion of total volatile fatty acid content reached up to 83%. Lactobacilli were selectively enriched to up to 75% of the bacterial community. Additionally conversion of organic matter to lactic acid was increased from 22% to 30% through counteracting end product inhibition by continuous lactic acid extraction. Secondly, fermentation residues were used as co-substrate in biomethane production yielding up to 618±41Nmlbiomethaneg(-1) volatile solids. Digestate, the only end product of this process can be used as organic fertilizer. PMID:25460983

  13. Reduction of Endogenous Kynurenic Acid Formation Enhances Extracellular Glutamate, Hippocampal Plasticity, and Cognitive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michelle C; Elmer, Greg I; Bergeron, Richard; Albuquerque, Edson X; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert

    2010-01-01

    At endogenous brain concentrations, the astrocyte-derived metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) antagonizes the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and, possibly, the glycine co-agonist site of the NMDA receptor. The functions of these two receptors, which are intimately involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive processes, may, therefore, be enhanced by reductions in brain KYNA levels. This concept was tested in mice with a targeted deletion of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), a major biosynthetic enzyme of brain KYNA. At 21 days of age, KAT II knock-out mice had reduced hippocampal KYNA levels (−71%) and showed significantly increased performance in three cognitive paradigms that rely in part on the integrity of hippocampal function, namely object exploration and recognition, passive avoidance, and spatial discrimination. Moreover, compared with wild-type controls, hippocampal slices from KAT II-deficient mice showed a significant increase in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in vitro. These functional changes were accompanied by reduced extracellular KYNA (−66%) and increased extracellular glutamate (+51%) concentrations, measured by hippocampal microdialysis in vivo. Taken together, a picture emerges in which a reduction in the astrocytic formation of KYNA increases glutamatergic tone in the hippocampus and enhances cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity. Our studies raise the prospect that interventions aimed specifically at reducing KYNA formation in the brain may constitute a promising molecular strategy for cognitive improvement in health and disease. PMID:20336058

  14. Formation of the imidazolides of dinucleotides under potentially prebiotic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleeper, H. L.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Imidazolides of dinucleotides such as ImpApA can be formed from the corresponding dinucleotides in a two-stage process, which gives up to 15% yields under potentially prebiotic conditions. First a solution of the dinucleotide and sodium trimetaphosphate is dried out at constant temperature and humidity. This produces polyphosphates such as p(n)ApA in excellent yield (greater than or equal to 80%). The products are dissolved in water, imidazole is added, and the solution is dried out again. This yields the 5'-phosphorimidazolides.

  15. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid stability and formation in blood and urine.

    PubMed

    Beránková, Katerina; Mutnanská, Katerina; Balíková, Marie

    2006-09-12

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) can cause problems in interpretation of toxicological findings due to its endogenous nature, significant production in tissues after death and potential formation in stored samples. Our study was designed to determine the influence of storage conditions on GHB levels and its possible in vitro formation in blood and urine in cases where no exogenous use of GHB or its precursors was suspected. The samples were prepared by validated method based on liquid-liquid reextraction with adipic acid internal standard and MSTFA derivatization and assayed on a GC-MS operating in EI SIM mode. The first part of the study was performed with pooled blood and urine samples obtained from living and deceased subjects stored with and without NaF (1% w/v) at 4 and -20 degrees C over 8 months. In ante-mortem samples (both blood and urine) no significant GHB production was found. After 4 months of storage, the substantial GHB rise up to 100 mg/Lwas observed in post-mortem blood stored at 4 degrees C without NaF with subsequent gradual decrease in following months. The inhibition of GHB production was apparent during storage in NaF treated frozen blood samples. In post-mortem urine only slight temporary GHB levels were ascertained (up to 8 mg/L). The second part of our study was aimed to analyse 20 individual post-mortem blood samples stored at 4 degrees C for 16-27 days between autopsy and analysis without preservation followed by storage at 4 degrees C with NaF for 4 months. The temporary GHB production with maximum of 28 mg/Lwas detected in some samples. PMID:16857333

  16. Potential formation of three pyrimidine bases in interstellar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Liton; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-12-01

    Work on the chemical evolution of pre-biotic molecules remains incomplete since the major obstacle is the lack of adequate knowledge of rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in interstellar conditions. In this work, we study the possibility of forming three pyrimidine bases, namely, cytosine, uracil and thymine in interstellar regions. Our study reveals that the synthesis of uracil from cytosine and water is quite impossible under interstellar circumstances. For the synthesis of thymine, reaction between uracil and :CH2 is investigated. Since no other relevant pathways for the formation of uracil and thymine were available in the literature, we consider a large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution of cytosine in gas and ice phases. Our modeling result shows that cytosine would be produced in cold, dense interstellar conditions. However, presence of cytosine is yet to be established. We propose that a new molecule, namely, C4N3OH5 could be observable in the interstellar region. C4N3OH5 is a precursor (Z isomer of cytosine) of cytosine and far more abundant than cytosine. We hope that observation of this precursor molecule would enable us to estimate the abundance of cytosine in interstellar regions. We also carry out quantum chemical calculations to find out the vibrational as well as rotational transitions of this precursor molecule along with three pyrimidine bases.

  17. Barrier formation: potential molecular mechanism of enamel fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Lyaruu, D M; Medina, J F; Sarvide, S; Bervoets, T J M; Everts, V; Denbesten, P; Smith, C E; Bronckers, A L J J

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl(-) for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b (-/-) mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b(-/-) mice and was strongly correlated with Cl(-). Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl(-) levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  18. Effects of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization on free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential in potato.

    PubMed

    Muttucumaru, Nira; Powers, Stephen J; Elmore, J Stephen; Mottram, Donald S; Halford, Nigel G

    2013-07-10

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is used routinely in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivation to maximize yield. However, it also affects sugar and free amino acid concentrations in potato tubers, and this has potential implications for food quality and safety because free amino acids and reducing sugars participate in the Maillard reaction during high-temperature cooking and processing. This results in the formation of color, aroma, and flavor compounds, but also some undesirable contaminants, including acrylamide, which forms when the amino acid that participates in the final stages of the reaction is asparagine. Another mineral, sulfur (S), also has profound effects on tuber composition. In this study, 13 varieties of potato were grown in a field trial in 2010 and treated with different combinations of N and S. Potatoes were analyzed immediately after harvest to show the effect of N and S fertilization on concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential. The study showed that N application can affect acrylamide-forming potential in potatoes but that the effect is type- (French fry, chipping, and boiling) and variety-dependent, with most varieties showing an increase in acrylamide formation in response to increased N but two showing a decrease. S application reduced glucose concentrations and mitigated the effect of high N application on the acrylamide-forming potential of some of the French fry-type potatoes. PMID:23768004

  19. Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur Fertilization on Free Amino Acids, Sugars, and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Potato

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer is used routinely in potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivation to maximize yield. However, it also affects sugar and free amino acid concentrations in potato tubers, and this has potential implications for food quality and safety because free amino acids and reducing sugars participate in the Maillard reaction during high-temperature cooking and processing. This results in the formation of color, aroma, and flavor compounds, but also some undesirable contaminants, including acrylamide, which forms when the amino acid that participates in the final stages of the reaction is asparagine. Another mineral, sulfur (S), also has profound effects on tuber composition. In this study, 13 varieties of potato were grown in a field trial in 2010 and treated with different combinations of N and S. Potatoes were analyzed immediately after harvest to show the effect of N and S fertilization on concentrations of free asparagine, other free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential. The study showed that N application can affect acrylamide-forming potential in potatoes but that the effect is type- (French fry, chipping, and boiling) and variety-dependent, with most varieties showing an increase in acrylamide formation in response to increased N but two showing a decrease. S application reduced glucose concentrations and mitigated the effect of high N application on the acrylamide-forming potential of some of the French fry-type potatoes. PMID:23768004

  20. Techniques for jar formation of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weighall, M. J.

    The market for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries is growing steadily and will be given a further boost as the market for 36-V batteries for the 42-V PowerNet develops over the next few years. The manufacture of VRLA batteries poses, however, a number of complex technical problems that are not experienced in the manufacture of conventional flooded batteries. For the large-scale manufacture of automotive batteries or other small VRLA batteries of 100 Ah or less, jar formation rather than plate formation and dry charge would seem to be a logical and economically sound decision. For this to be successful, however, a number of key issues need to be reviewed, starting with a detailed consideration of battery design. This paper reviews issues associated with the jar formation of VRLA batteries. Guidance is given concerning filling techniques (gravity or vacuum fill), the formation process, charging techniques, and formation algorithms. Battery design and separator optimisation is discussed. The properties of the separator, e.g. wicking rate, fibre composition, surface area and compression, may have a critical impact on acid filling and jar formation, and may partially determine the filling and formation conditions to be used. The control of temperature during formation is particularly important. Formation algorithms and temperature data are presented. Attention is drawn to the possible loss of plate-group compression during the formation process, and how this may be avoided.

  1. Hypochlorous Acid as a Potential Wound Care Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Bassiri, M; Najafi, R; Najafi, K; Yang, J; Khosrovi, B; Hwong, W; Barati, E; Belisle, B; Celeri, C; Robson, MC

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a major inorganic bactericidal compound of innate immunity, is effective against a broad range of microorganisms. Owing to its chemical nature, HOCl has never been used as a pharmaceutical drug for treating infection. In this article, we describe the chemical production, stabilization, and biological activity of a pharmaceutically useful formulation of HOCl. Methods: Stabilized HOCl is in the form of a physiologically balanced solution in 0.9% saline at a pH range of 3.5 to 4.0. Chlorine species distribution in solution is a function of pH. In aqueous solution, HOCl is the predominant species at the pH range of 3 to 6. At pH values less than 3.5, the solution exists as a mixture of chlorine in aqueous phase, chlorine gas, trichloride (Cl3−), and HOCl. At pH greater than 5.5, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) starts to form and becomes the predominant species in the alkaline pH. To maintain HOCl solution in a stable form, maximize its antimicrobial activities, and minimize undesirable side products, the pH must be maintained at 3.5 to 5. Results: Using this stabilized form of HOCl, the potent antimicrobial activities of HOCl are demonstrated against a wide range of microorganisms. The in vitro cytotoxicity profile in L929 cells and the in vivo safety profile of HOCl in various animal models are described. Conclusion: On the basis of the antimicrobial activity and the lack of animal toxicity, it is predicted that stabilized HOCl has potential pharmaceutical applications in the control of soft tissue infection. PMID:17492050

  2. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    A series of perhalocarbons are proposed as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production that involve direct contact of the fluid with sulfuric acid and vaporization of the acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids are described and the results of some preliminary high temperature test data are presented.

  3. EPA releases study describing potential acid rain damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acid rain researchers on August 24 offered evidence that if sulfur emissions are not reduced in the future, aquatic systems in the South will suffer damage from acid rain. Evidence also indicates that reductions in sulfur emissions could improve the health of damaged lakes in the Northeast. The study Future Effects of Long-Term Sulfur Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry: The Direct/Delayed Response Project, developed 50-year projections of watershed quality under three plausible acidic deposition, or acid rain, scenarios. Three areas were studied - the Northeast, comprising all of New England and parts of New York and Pennsylvania; the Mid-Appalachian Region, covering much of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia; and the Southern Blue Ridge Province, an area covering parts of North Carolina, Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia. The study is a key element in the closing months of the 10-year National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program.

  4. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp. PMID:27010786

  5. Theoretical studies for the formation of γ-valero-lactone from levulinic acid and formic acid by homogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-07-01

    The γ-valero-lactone (GVL), a potential 'green' candidate for the production of liquid alkanes for transportation fuels, can be obtained by the hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a primary decomposition product of hexoses. On the search for the application of a bifunctional catalyst, we have identified that the versatile Shvo catalyst can be used to transfer the hydrogen required for the reduction of levulinic acid to GVL through a 2-hydroxy-pentanoic acid (2HP) intermediate. Density functional studies (DFT) have been employed here to compute the energetics for the conversion of levulinic acid to GVL. Additionally, we have investigated the potential application of an iron-based congener to replace the conventional Shvo catalyst due to its natural abundance and cost effectiveness.

  6. SOA Formation Potential of Emissions from Soil and Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Vanderschelden, G. S.; Wen, M.; Cobos, D. R.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources exceed all anthropogenic sources combined. VOCs participate in oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere and impact the concentrations of ozone and particulate material. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is particularly complex and is frequently underestimated using state-of-the-art modeling techniques. We present findings that suggest emissions of important SOA precursors from soil and leaf litter are higher than current inventories would suggest, particularly under conditions typical of Fall and Spring. Soil and leaf litter samples were collected at Big Meadow Creek from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. The dominant tree species in this area of the forest are ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and western larch. Samples were transported to the laboratory and housed within a 0.9 cubic meter Teflon dynamic chamber where VOC emissions were continuously monitored with a GC-FID-MS and PTR-MS. Aerosol was generated from soil and leaf litter emissions by pumping the emissions into a 7 cubic meter Teflon aerosol growth chamber where they were oxidized with ozone in the absence of light. The evolution of particle microphysical and chemical characteristics was monitored over the following eight hours. Particle size distribution and chemical composition were measured with a SMPS and HR-ToF-AMS respectively. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates up to 283 micrograms carbon per meter squared per hour. The dominant monoterpenes emitted were beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, and delta-3-carene in descending order. The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and alpha-pinene. Measured soil/litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest that during fall and spring when tree emissions are lower, monoterpene emissions within forests may be

  7. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  8. Participation of P450-dependent oxidation of isoniazid in isonicotinic acid formation in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ono, Y; Wu, X; Noda, A; Noda, H; Yoshitani, T

    1998-04-01

    By determining the formation amount of isonicotinic acid (INA) from isonicotinic acid hydrazide (isoniazid:INH) in isolated rat hepatocytes, we were able to identify the involvement of the oxidative cleavage of the acid hydrazide. INA formation from INH increased significantly using the isolated hepatocytes prepared from rats pretreated with phenobarbital (PB), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), dexamethazone (DEX) and rifampicin (RIF), respectively, in comparison to the control group. On the other hand, a remarkable decrease in INA formation from INH was observed by the addition of such P450 inhibitor as metyrapone or cimetidine as well as an amidase inhibitor bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) to the isolated hepatocytes prepared from PB-pretreated rats. By further experiments using rat hepatic microsomes, the oxidative pathway of INA formation in INH metabolism was determined to be P450-dependent, since NADPH and oxygen were both essential for the oxidative pathway of INH to INA and the amount of INA formation was also significantly increased by P450 inducers. Regarding acetylisoniazid (AcINH) and isonicotinic acid amide (INAA), however, INA formation by P450 was little observed in the microsomal experiments. PMID:9586587

  9. Influence of Oleic Acid on Rumen Fermentation and Fatty Acid Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaoxun; Guan, Leluo; He, Zhixiong; Guan, Yongjuan; Tan, Zhiliang; Han, Xuefeng; Zhou, Chuanshe; Kang, Jinhe; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A series of batch cultures were conducted to investigate the effects of oleic acid (OA) on in vitro ruminal dry matter degradability (IVDMD), gas production, methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) production, and proportion of fatty acids. Rumen fluid was collected from fistulated goats, diluted with incubation buffer, and then incubated with 500 mg Leymus chinensis meal supplemented with different amounts of OA (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg for the CON, OA20, OA40 and OA60 groups, respectively). Incubation was carried out anaerobically at 39°C for 48 h, and the samples were taken at 12, 24 and 48 h and subjected to laboratory analysis. Supplementation of OA decreased IVDMD, the cumulative gas production, theoretical maximum of gas production and CH4 production, but increased H2 production. However, no effect was observed on any parameters of rumen fermentation (pH, ammonia, production of acetate, propionate and butyrate and total volatile fatty acid production). The concentrations of some beneficial fatty acids, such as cis monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were higher (P < 0.05) from OA groups than those from the control group at 12 h incubation. In summary, these results suggest that the OA supplementation in diet can reduce methane production and increase the amount of some beneficial fatty acids in vitro. PMID:27299526

  10. In vitro formation of retinoic acid from retinal in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Hupert, J; Mobarhan, S; Layden, T J; Papa, V M; Lucchesi, D J

    1991-08-01

    Enzymatic conversion of retinal to retinoic acid in rat liver cytosol was detected using a rapid and sensitive assay based on high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). This retinal oxidase assay system did not require extraction steps or any other manipulation of the sample mixture once the sample vial was sealed for incubation. The product (retinoic acid) and the reactant (retinal) were separated by HPLC in 14.0 min with a sensitivity of 15 and 40 pmol per injection for retinoic acid and retinal, respectively. Enzymatic activity was observed to be linear with protein concentration (0-2.4 mg/mL) and time (0-30 min) and displayed a broad pH maximum of 7.7-9.7. The enzyme exhibited Michaelis-Menten single-substrate kinetics with an apparent Km of 0.25 mM. The average specific activity in nine normal rats was 35.6 +/- 3.3 nmol retinoic acid formed/h per mg protein. Incubation of the enzyme with zinc did not affect the rate of retinoic acid synthesis. Dithiothreitol inhibited the reaction. Both NAD and NADH stimulated retinoic acid formation. Formation of retinol was also observed when these pyridine nucleotides were added to the reaction mixture, indicating the presence of retinal reductase activity. The results of kinetic studies suggest that NADH may act indirectly to stimulate retinoic acid formation. PMID:1760155

  11. [Concentrations and acidity contributions of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations of China].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-huan; Xu, Xiao-bin; Yu, Xiao-lan; Tang, Jie

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the concentrations of organic acids in precipitation in China and their contributions to the total acidity of precipitation, samples were taken at 14 stations of regional representativeness in 2007 and analyzed for acetate and formate using ion chromatography. In this paper, data of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations are presented, wet depositions of these organic acids are calculated, and contributions of them to the total free acidity (TFA) of precipitation are estimated. Based on the measurements, the mean concentrations of formate at different stations were in the range of 0.96-3.43 micromol/L, and those of acetate in the range of 0-5.13 micromol/L, close to the levels at remote sites in other countries and at the lower ends of concentration ranges from previous measurements in China. Comparisons indicate that the concentrations of the organic acids at remote sites are lower than those at sites in the vicinity of urban areas. The annual wet depositions of formate and acetate were estimated to be in the ranges of 0.38-4.18 mmol/(m2 x a) and 0.06-5.87 mmol/(m2 x a), respectively, with larger depositions in southern China and smaller depositions in northern China. The relative contributions of the two organic acids to the TFA of precipitation were estimated to be in the range of 0.02%-51.6%, with an overall average of 2.95%. This suggests that although acid rain in China is mainly caused by emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, organic acids can significantly contribute to the acidification of precipitation in some regions and during some periods, hence need to be included in observational studies of acid rain. PMID:20527162

  12. Comparison of chlorination and chloramination in carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection byproduct formation potentials with prolonged contact time.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tokuhara, Shunsuke; Murakami, Michio; Kosaka, Koji; Oguma, Kumiko; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Due to decreasing water demands in Japan, hydraulic retention times of water in piped supply systems has been extended, resulting in a longer contact time with disinfectants. However, the effects of extended contact time on the formation of various disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including carbonaceous DBPs such as trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA), and nitrogenous DBPs such as nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and nitrosomorpholine (NMor), have not yet been investigated in detail. Herein, we compared the formation of these DBPs by chlorination and chloramination for five water samples collected from rivers and a dam in Japan, all of which represent municipal water supply sources. Water samples were treated by either filtration or a combination of coagulation and filtration. Treated samples were subjected to a DBP formation potential test by either chlorine or chloramine for contact times of 1 day or 4 days. Four THM species, nine HAA species, NDMA, and NMor were measured by GC-ECD or UPLC-MS/MS. Lifetime cancer risk was calculated based on the Integrated Risk Information System unit risk information. The experiment and analysis focused on (i) prolonged contact time from 1 day to 4 days, (ii) reduction efficiency by conventional treatment, (iii) correlations between DBP formation potentials and water quality parameters, and (iv) the contribution of each species to total risk. With an increased contact time from 1 day to 4 days, THM formation increased to 420% by chloramination. Coagulation-filtration treatment showed that brominated species in THMs are less likely to be reduced. With the highest unit risk among THM species, dibromochloromethane (DBCM) showed a high correlation with bromine, but not with organic matter parameters. NDMA contributed to lifetime cancer risk. The THM formation pathway should be revisited in terms of chloramination and bromine incorporation. It is also recommended to investigate nitrosamine formation potential by

  13. Nitric acid catalyzed hydrolysis of SO3 in the formation of sulfuric acid: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Bo; Chang, Chun-Ran; Long, Zheng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Bo; Tan, Xing-Feng; Zhang, Wei-Jun

    2013-08-01

    The gas-phase hydrolysis of SO3 in the presence of one water molecule, two water molecules, and nitric acid is investigated utilizing high level quantum chemical methods and transition state theory. The calculated results demonstrate that nitric acid exerts a strong catalytic role in the hydrolysis of SO3 because the activated barrier of hydrolysis of SO3 with the assistance of nitric acid is reduced to about 3.7 kcal/mol, which is about 20 kcal/mol lower than that of the SO3 reaction with water relative to the respective pre-reactive complex.

  14. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore » two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  15. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  16. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  17. Potential nitrosamine formation and its prevention during biological denitrification of red beet juice.

    PubMed

    Kolb, E; Haug, M; Janzowski, C; Vetter, A; Eisenbrand, G

    1997-02-01

    High nitrate intake has been shown to result in an increased risk of endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds. Certain vegetables and vegetable juices contain high concentrations of nitrate. Biological denitrification using strains of Paracoccus denitrificans (P.d.) has been proposed as effective means to reduce nitrate contents in such vegetable juices. During this bacterial denitrification process, substantial nitrite concentrations are transiently formed. This study investigated whether N-nitrosation reactions might occur. The easily nitrosatable amine morpholine was added to red beet juice at high concentration (100 ppm) during denitrification 10 different batches of red beet juice served as raw material. Each batch was submitted to denitrification in the presence and absence of ascorbic acid. In the absence of ascorbic acid, formation of N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) was observed in the low ppb range (0.5-8 ppb). Addition of ascorbic acid (500 mg/litre) inhibited the formation of NMOR, except for those instances where the pH was less than 6 and/or nitrate turnover was low (< 200 mg NO3-/litre/hr). Under conditions leading to high rates of nitrate turnover (> 200 mg NO3-/litre/hr), nitrosamine formation can reliably be prevented by ascorbic acid. The results show that bacterial denitrification of red beet juice high in nitrate can be accomplished without the risk of nitrosamine formation. PMID:9146735

  18. Biosynthetic studies on ansatrienin A. Formation of the cyclohexanecarboxylic acid moiety

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.S.; Kennedy, E.; Reynolds, K.A. ); Cho, H.; Mocek, U.; Beale, J.M.; Floss, H.G. Ohio State Univ., Columbus ); Casati, R. )

    1993-06-16

    The formation of the cyclohexanecarboxylic acid moiety in the biosynthesis of ansatrienin (mycotrienin) has been studied. [sup 13]C- and [sup 2]H-labeled samples of shikimic acid were used to probe the stereochemistry of processing the cyclohexane ring of shikimic acid and to establish the fate of all the precursor hydrogens in this transformation. A sample of [2-[sup 13]C]shikimic acid was fed to Streptomyces collinus Tu 1982, and [sup 13]C in the resulting ansatrienin was found to reside exclusively at C-36. The l-cyclohexenecarboxylic acid accompanying the cyclohexanecarboxylic acid in the hydrolysis of the biosynthetic sample of ansatrienin carried the [sup 13]C label not at C-2 but at C-6. Samples of [2-[sup 2]H]-, [3-[sup 2]H]-, [4-[sup 2]H], [2,5-[sup 2]H[sub 2

  19. Retinoic acid deficiency alters second heart field formation

    PubMed Central

    Ryckebusch, Lucile; Wang, Zengxin; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lin, Song-Chang; Chi, Xuan; Schwartz, Robert; Zaffran, Stéphane; Niederreither, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, has been implicated in various steps of cardiovascular development. The retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) enzyme catalyzes the second oxidative step in RA biosynthesis and its loss of function creates a severe embryonic RA deficiency. Raldh2−/− knockout embryos fail to undergo heart looping and have impaired atrial and sinus venosus development. To understand the mechanism(s) producing these changes, we examined the contribution of the second heart field (SHF) to pharyngeal mesoderm, atria, and outflow tract in Raldh2−/− embryos. RA deficiency alters SHF gene expression in two ways. First, Raldh2−/− embryos exhibited a posterior expansion of anterior markers of the SHF, including Tbx1, Fgf8, and the Mlc1v-nlacZ-24/Fgf10 reporter transgene as well as of Islet1. This occurred at early somite stages, when cardiac defects became irreversible in an avian vitamin A-deficiency model, indicating that endogenous RA is required to restrict the SHF posteriorly. Explant studies showed that this expanded progenitor population cannot differentiate properly. Second, RA up-regulated cardiac Bmp expression levels at the looping stage. The contribution of the SHF to both inflow and outflow poles was perturbed under RA deficiency, creating a disorganization of the heart tube. We also investigated genetic cross-talk between Nkx2.5 and RA signaling by generating double mutant mice. Strikingly, Nkx2.5 deficiency was able to rescue molecular defects in the posterior region of the Raldh2−/− mutant heart, in a gene dosage-dependent manner. PMID:18287057

  20. Retinoic acid deficiency alters second heart field formation.

    PubMed

    Ryckebusch, Lucile; Wang, Zengxin; Bertrand, Nicolas; Lin, Song-Chang; Chi, Xuan; Schwartz, Robert; Zaffran, Stéphane; Niederreither, Karen

    2008-02-26

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active derivative of vitamin A, has been implicated in various steps of cardiovascular development. The retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) enzyme catalyzes the second oxidative step in RA biosynthesis and its loss of function creates a severe embryonic RA deficiency. Raldh2(-/-) knockout embryos fail to undergo heart looping and have impaired atrial and sinus venosus development. To understand the mechanism(s) producing these changes, we examined the contribution of the second heart field (SHF) to pharyngeal mesoderm, atria, and outflow tract in Raldh2(-/-) embryos. RA deficiency alters SHF gene expression in two ways. First, Raldh2(-/-) embryos exhibited a posterior expansion of anterior markers of the SHF, including Tbx1, Fgf8, and the Mlc1v-nlacZ-24/Fgf10 reporter transgene as well as of Islet1. This occurred at early somite stages, when cardiac defects became irreversible in an avian vitamin A-deficiency model, indicating that endogenous RA is required to restrict the SHF posteriorly. Explant studies showed that this expanded progenitor population cannot differentiate properly. Second, RA up-regulated cardiac Bmp expression levels at the looping stage. The contribution of the SHF to both inflow and outflow poles was perturbed under RA deficiency, creating a disorganization of the heart tube. We also investigated genetic cross-talk between Nkx2.5 and RA signaling by generating double mutant mice. Strikingly, Nkx2.5 deficiency was able to rescue molecular defects in the posterior region of the Raldh2(-/-) mutant heart, in a gene dosage-dependent manner. PMID:18287057

  1. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds - Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Hamill, Patrick; Goodman, Jindra K.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the PSC particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is the inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an Er-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 198 K as found for the Antarctic samples.

  2. Formation of Carbonic Acid in Impact of CO2 on Ice and Water.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Barak; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-08-01

    A new mode of formation is proposed for carbonic acid in the atmosphere. It involves impact of vibrationally excited gas-phase CO2 molecules on water or ice particles. This is a first mechanism that supports formation on ice as well as on liquid water surfaces. Results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are presented on collisions of CO2 with (H2O)n clusters (n = 1, 4, 8, 12). Efficient formation of carbonic acid is seen with product lifetimes exceeding 100 ps. The reaction is feasible even for collision of CO2 with a single water molecule but in a different mechanism than for larger clusters. For clusters, the transition state shows charge separation into H3O(+)···HCO3(-), which transforms into neutral carbonic acid as the product, hydrated by the remaining waters. Possible atmospheric implications of the results are discussed. PMID:27420400

  3. Molecular Structures, Acid-Base Properties, and Formation of Group 6 Transition Metal Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shenggang; Guenther, Courtney L.; Kelley, Matthew S.; Dixon, David A.

    2011-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) and coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)) were used to study the group 6 metal (M = Cr, Mo, W) hydroxides: MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3), M2O6-m(OH)2m (m = 1-5), M3O9-m(OH)2m (m = 1, 2), and M4O11(OH)2. The calculations were done up to the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the CCSD(T) method. Molecular structures of many low-energy conformers/isomers were located. Brønsted acidities in the gas phase and pKa values in aqueous solution were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) and MnO3n-1(OH)2 (n = 2-4). In addition, Brønsted basicities and Lewis acidities (fluoride affinities) were predicted for MO3-m(OH)2m (m = 1-3) as well as the metal oxide clusters MnO3n (n = 1-3). The metal hydroxides were predicted to be strong Brønsted acids and weak to modest Brønsted bases and Lewis acids. The pKa values can have values as negative as -31. Potential energy surfaces for the hydrolysis of the MnO3n (n = 1-4) clusters were calculated. Heats of formation of the metal hydroxides were predicted from the calculated reaction energies, and the agreement with the limited available experimental data is good. The first hydrolysis step leading to the formation of MnO3n-1(OH)2 was predicted to be exothermic, with the exothermicity becoming less negative as n increases and essentially converged at n = 3. Reaction rate constants for the hydrogen transfer steps were calculated using transition state theory and RRKM theory. Further hydrolysis of MnO3n-1(OH)2 tends to be endothermic especially for M = Cr. Fifty-five DFT exchange-correlation functionals were benchmarked for the calculations of the reaction energies, complexation energies, and reaction barriers by comparing to our CCSD(T) results. Overall, the DFT results for the potential energy surfaces are semiquantitatively correct, but no single functional works for all processes and all three metals. Among the functionals benchmarked, the wB97, wB97X, B1B95, B97-1, mPW1LYP, and X3LYP functionals have the best

  4. Fe/Mg smectite formation under acidic conditions on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group detected in Noachian and early Hesperian terrains on Mars have been hypothesized to form under neutral to alkaline conditions. These pH conditions would also be favorable for formation of widespread carbonate deposits which have not been detected on Mars. We propose that smectite deposits on Mars formed under moderately acidic conditions inhibiting carbonate formation. We report here the first synthesis of Fe/Mg smectite in an acidic hydrothermal system [200 °C, pHRT ∼ 4 (pH measured at room temperature) buffered with acetic acid] from Mars-analogue, glass-rich, basalt simulant with and without aqueous Mg or Fe(II) addition under N2-purged anoxic and ambient oxic redox conditions. Synthesized Fe/Mg smectite was examined by X-ray-diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe to characterize mineralogy, morphology and chemical composition. Alteration of the glass phase of basalt simulant resulted in formation of the Fe/Mg smectite mineral saponite with some mineralogical and chemical properties similar to the properties reported for Fe/Mg smectite on Mars. Our experiments are evidence that neutral to alkaline conditions on early Mars are not necessary for Fe/Mg smectite formation as previously inferred. Phyllosilicate minerals could instead have formed under mildly acidic pH conditions. Volcanic SO2 emanation and sulfuric acid formation is proposed as the major source of acidity for the alteration of basaltic materials and subsequent formation of Fe/Mg smectite.

  5. A review on protocatechuic Acid and its pharmacological potential.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Sahil; Bais, Souravh

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and polyphenols are heterocyclic molecules that have been associated with beneficial effects on human health, such as reducing the risk of various diseases like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular and brain diseases. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a type of widely distributed naturally occurring phenolic acid. PCA has structural similarity with gallic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid which are well-known antioxidant compounds. More than 500 plants contain PCA as active constituents imparting various pharmacological activity and these effects are due to their antioxidant activities, along with other possible mechanisms, such as anti-inflammatory properties and interaction with several enzymes. Over the past two decades, there have been an increasing number of publications on polyphenols and flavonoids, which demonstrate the importance of understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of both natural and synthesized compounds, considering the benefits from their dietary ingestion as well as pharmacological use. This work aims to review the pharmacological effects of PCA molecules in humans and the structural aspects that contribute to these effects. PMID:25006494

  6. A Review on Protocatechuic Acid and Its Pharmacological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Sahil; Bais, Souravh

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and polyphenols are heterocyclic molecules that have been associated with beneficial effects on human health, such as reducing the risk of various diseases like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular and brain diseases. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a type of widely distributed naturally occurring phenolic acid. PCA has structural similarity with gallic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid which are well-known antioxidant compounds. More than 500 plants contain PCA as active constituents imparting various pharmacological activity and these effects are due to their antioxidant activities, along with other possible mechanisms, such as anti-inflammatory properties and interaction with several enzymes. Over the past two decades, there have been an increasing number of publications on polyphenols and flavonoids, which demonstrate the importance of understanding the chemistry behind the antioxidant activities of both natural and synthesized compounds, considering the benefits from their dietary ingestion as well as pharmacological use. This work aims to review the pharmacological effects of PCA molecules in humans and the structural aspects that contribute to these effects. PMID:25006494

  7. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues Modulating Intracellular and In vitro Microcin E492 Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Paulina; Marcoleta, Andrés; Lobos-Ruiz, Pablo; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M.; Monasterio, Octavio; Lagos, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Microcin E492 (MccE492) is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well-characterized, however, it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in Escherichia coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophilic probes, 2-4′-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54–63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59), which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54–63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  8. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  9. Sulfate Formation From Acid-Weathered Phylosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Most phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed during the planet's earliest Noachian era, then Mars underwent a global change making the planet's surface more acidic [e.g. 1]. Prevailing acidic conditions may have affected the already existing phyllosilicates, resulting in the formation of sulfates. Both sulfates and phyllosilicates have been identified on Mars in a variety of geologic settings [2] but only in a handful of sites are these minerals found in close spatial proximity to each other, including Mawrth Vallis [3,4] and Gale Crater [5]. While sulfate formation from the acidic weathering of basalts is well documented in the literature [6,7], few experimental studies investigate sulfate formation from acid-weathered phyllosilicates [8-10]. The purpose of this study is to characterize the al-teration products of acid-weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments. We focus on three commonly identified phyllosilicates on Mars: nontronite (Fe-smectite), saponite (Mg-smectite), and montmorillonite (Al-smectite) [1, and references therein]. This information will help constrain the formation processes of sulfates observed in close association with phyllosilicates on Mars and provide a better understanding of the aqueous history of such regions as well as the planet as a whole.

  10. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C.; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J.; Bray, Walter M.; Riener, Romina M.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Linington, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  11. Effect of short-chain fatty acids on the formation of amylose microparticles by amylosucrase.

    PubMed

    Lim, Min-Cheol; Park, Kyu-Hwan; Choi, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Da-Hee; Letona, Carlos Andres Morales; Baik, Moo-Yeol; Park, Cheon-Seok; Kim, Young-Rok

    2016-10-20

    Amylose microparticles can be produced by self-assembly of amylose molecules through an amylosucrase-mediated synthesis. Here we investigated the role of short-chain fatty acids in the formation of amylose microparticles and the fate of these fatty acids at the end of the reaction. The rate of self-assembly and production yields of amylose microparticles were significantly enhanced in the presence of fatty acids. The effect was dependent on the length of the fatty acid carbon tail; butanoic acid (C4) was the most effective, followed by hexanoic acid (C6) and octanoic acid (C8). The amylose microparticles were investigated by carrying out SEM, XRD, Raman, NMR, FT-IR and DSC analysis. The size, morphology and crystal structure of the resulting amylose microparticles were comparable with those of amylose microparticles produced without fatty acids. The results indicated the carboxyl group of the fatty acid to be responsible for promoting the self-assembly of amylose chains to form microparticles. The fatty acids were eventually removed from the microstructure through the tight association of amylose double helices to form the amylose microparticles. PMID:27474606

  12. Laboratory studies of the formation of polar stratospheric clouds: Nitric acid condensation on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-10-01

    Thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to 5 × 10-8 - 8 × 10-7 torr HNO3 and 2 - 3 × 10-4 torr H2O and cooled to temperatures near the ice frost point. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the condensed-phase species during isothermal experiments, and gas pressures were monitored with mass spectrometry. Supercooled liquid sulfuric acid films exposed to HNO3 (6 ≤ SNAT ≤ 114) showed indications of HNO3 uptake to form ternary solutions of approximately 4 wt % HNO3, 38 wt % H2SO4, and 59 wt % H2O, followed by crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). NAT crystallization did not initiate significant crystallization of the supercooled H2SO4, but the H2SO4 often crystallized to sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) upon warming. In contrast, when crystalline SAT films were exposed to HNO3 and water, NAT did not condense within several hours, even at HNO3 saturation ratios of 30 or higher. Calculations of the contact parameter from experimental data indicate that m <0.76 for NAT on SAT. Our film studies suggest that crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) growth is most easily accomplished when stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs) remain liquid, absorb HNO3, and produce crystalline nitric acid trihydrate via heterogeneous nucleation. If SSAs crystallize to SAT at some point during the winter, nitric acid condensation is hindered, and PSC formation could become more difficult.

  13. Study and application of several-step tank formation of lead/acid battery plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongyu; Wei, Yongzhong; Luo, Yourong; Duan, Shuzhen

    A several-step tank formation method and related charging equipment have been developed for automotive lead/acid batteries. This process offers the advantages of reduced energy requirements, increased charging efficiency and reduced environmental problems. Results also suggest that several-step formation ameliorates the problem of premature capacity loss and extends the useful service-life of automotive batteries. This is thought to be due to the production of greater amounts of α-PbO 2 in the positive plates.

  14. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  15. Monosilicic acid potential in phytoremediation of the contaminated areas.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xionghui; Liu, Saihua; Huang, Juan; Bocharnikova, Elena; Matichenkov, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The contamination of agricultural areas by heavy metals has a negative influence on food quality and human health. Various remediation techniques have been developed for the removal and/or immobilization of heavy metals (HM) in contaminated soils. Phytoremediation is innovative technology, which has advantages (low cost, easy monitoring, high selectivity) and limitations, including long time for procedure and negative impact of contaminants on used plants. Greenhouse investigations have shown that monosilicic acid can be used for regulation of the HM (Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn) mobility in the soil-plant system. If the concentration of monosilicic acid in soil was increased from 0 to 20 mg L(-1) of Si in soil solution, the HM bioavailability was increased by 30-150%. However, the negative influence on the barley by HM was reduced under monosilicic acid application. If the concentration of monosilicic acid was increased more than 20 mg L(-1), the HM mobility in the soil was decreased by 40-300% and heavy metal uptake by plants was reduced 2-3 times. The using of the monosilicic acid may increase the phytoremediation efficiency. However the technique adaptation will be necessary for phytoremediation on certain areas. PMID:27213242

  16. Different roles of protein kinase C-beta and -delta in arachidonic acid cascade, superoxide formation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Duyster, J; Schwende, H; Fitzke, E; Hidaka, H; Dieter, P

    1993-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase C (PKC)-beta, PKC-delta is exclusively detectable in the membrane fraction of liver macrophages. After long-term treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) PKC-beta is depleted faster (within 3 h) than PKC-delta (> 7h). Simultaneously, pretreatment with PMA for 3 h inhibits the PMA- and zymosan-induced generation of superoxide and the PMA-induced formation of prostaglandin (PG) E2, whereas a preincubation of more than 7 h is required to affect the zymosan-induced release of PGE2 and inositol phosphates. These results support an involvement of PKC-beta in the PMA-induced activation of the arachidonic acid cascade and in superoxide formation and imply an involvement of PKC-delta in zymosan-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and PGE2 formation. Two phorbol ester derivates, sapintoxin A (SAPA) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate 20-acetate (DOPPA), which have been previously reported to activate preferentially PLC-beta but not PKC-delta in vitro [Ryves, Evans, Olivier, Parker and Evans (1992) FEBS Lett. 288, 5-9], induce the formation of PGE2 and superoxide, down-regulate PKC-delta and potentiate inositol phosphate formation in parallel SAPA, but not DOPPA, down-regulates PKC-beta and inhibits the PMA-induced formation of eicosanoids and superoxide. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8389125

  17. A vibrational study of the adsorption and decomposition of formic acid and surface formate on Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, J. E.; Chen, J. G.; Yates, J. T., Jr.

    1986-09-01

    The adsorption and decomposition of formate and formic acid have been studied on the Al(111) surface using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Formic acid reacts with clean Al(111) at 120 K to form a surface formate species. Molecular adsorption of formic acid occurs at 120 K only after saturation of the surface formate layer has been reached. Off-specular vibrational measurements have determined that the formate species is symmetrically bridge bonded through both oxygen atoms with C2v symmetry. A lower symmetry formate species of C1 symmetry is produced upon heating or electron bombardment of a condensed formic acid layer. Thermal or electron induced decomposition of a formate or a condensed formic acid layer is controlled by oxygen incorporation into the aluminum lattice, and results in complete decomposition and production of a carbon and oxygen covered surface. Only hydrogen is evolved from a formate-covered Al(111) surface.

  18. Geometric properties of nucleic acids with potential for autobuilding

    PubMed Central

    Gruene, Tim; Sheldrick, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Medium- to high-resolution X-ray structures of DNA and RNA molecules were investigated to find geometric properties useful for automated model building in crystallographic electron-density maps. We describe a simple method, starting from a list of electron-density ‘blobs’, for identifying backbone phosphates and nucleic acid bases based on properties of the local electron-density distribution. This knowledge should be useful for the automated building of nucleic acid models into electron-density maps. We show that the distances and angles involving C1′ and the P atoms, using the pseudo-torsion angles and that describe the …P—C1′—P—C1′… chain, provide a promising basis for building the nucleic acid polymer. These quantities show reasonably narrow distributions with asymmetry that should allow the direction of the phosphate backbone to be established. PMID:21173468

  19. Controlling Disulfide Bond Formation and Crystal Growth from 2-Mercaptobenzoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Clare E.; Cantos, P. M.; Toby, B. H.; Frisch, M.; Deschamps, J. R.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2011-03-02

    We report disulfide bond formation from 2-mercaptobenzoic acid (2-MBA) under hydrothermal conditions as a function of pH. Under acidic conditions, 2-MBA remains unchanged. Upon increasing pH, however, we observe 50% oxidation to 2,2'-disulfanediyldibenzoic acid (2,2'-DSBA), which is isolated as a cocrystal of both the thiol and disulfide molecules. At neutral pH, we observe complete oxidation and concurrent crystal growth. The pH sensitivity of this system allows targeting crystals of specific composition from simple building units through a straightforward pH manipulation.

  20. System-level understanding of the potential acid-tolerance components of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 under extreme acid stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    In previous study, two extremely acidophilic strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 (collection site: bioleaching leachate) and ZJJN-5 (collection site: bioleaching wastewater) were isolated from a typical industrial bio-heap in China. Here, we unraveled the potential acid-tolerance components of ZJJN-3 by comparing the physiological differences with ZJJN-5 under different acid stresses. The parameters used for comparison included intracellular pH (pHin), capsule morphology, fatty acid composition of cell membrane, transcription of key molecular chaperones, H(+)-ATPase activities and NAD(+)/NADH ratio. It was indicated that the acid-tolerance of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 was systematically regulated. Capsule first thickened and then shed off along with increased acid stress. Cell membrane maintained the intracellular stability by up-regulating the proportion of unsaturated fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acids. Meanwhile, the transcription of key repair molecular chaperones (GrpE-DnaK-DnaJ) was up-regulated by 2.2-3.5 folds for ensuring the proper folding of peptide. Moreover, low pHin promoted ZJJN-3 to biosynthesize more H(+)-ATPase for pumping H(+) out of cells. Furthermore, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio increased due to the decreased H(+) concentration. Based on the above physiological analysis, the potential acid-tolerance components of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 were first proposed and it would be useful for better understanding how these extremophiles responded to the high acid stress. PMID:26264736

  1. Thyroid hormone receptor can modulate retinoic acid-mediated axis formation in frog embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor acts as a hormone-dependent transcriptional transactivator and as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of thyroid hormone. Specifically, thyroid hormone receptor can repress retinoic acid-induced gene expression through interactions with retinoic acid receptor. (Retinoic acid is a potent teratogen in the frog Xenopus laevis, acting at early embryonic stages to interfere with the formation of anterior structures. Endogenous retinoic acid is thought to act in normal anterior-posterior axis formation.) We have previously shown that thyroid hormone receptor RNA (alpha isotype) is expressed and polysome-associated during Xenopus embryogenesis preceding thyroid gland maturation and endogenous thyroid hormone production (D. E. Banker, J. Bigler, and R. N. Eisenman, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5079-5089, 1991). To determine whether thyroid hormone receptor might influence the effects of retinoic acid in early frog development, we have examined the results of ectopic thyroid hormone receptor expression on retinoic acid teratogenesis. We demonstrate that microinjections of full-length thyroid hormone receptor RNA protect injected embryos from retinoic acid teratogenesis. DNA binding is apparently essential to this protective function, as truncated thyroid hormone receptors, lacking DNA-binding domains but including hormone-binding and dimerization domains, do not protect from retinoic acid. We have shown that microinjections of these dominant-interfering thyroid hormone receptors, as well as anti-thyroid hormone receptor antibodies, increase retinoic acid teratogenesis in injected embryos, presumably by inactivating endogenous thyroid hormone receptor. This finding suggests that endogenous thyroid hormone receptors may act to limit retinoic acid sensitivity. On the other hand, after thyroid hormone treatment, ectopic thyroid hormone receptor mediates teratogenesis that is indistinguishable from the dorsoanterior deficiencies produced in retinoic acid

  2. Formation of aqueous-phase α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHP): potential atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Soong, R.; Simpson, A. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this work is on quantifying the degree of the aqueous-phase formation of α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHPs) via reversible nucleophilic addition of H2O2 to aldehydes. Formation of this class of highly oxygenated organic hydroperoxides represents a poorly characterized aqueous-phase processing pathway that may lead to enhanced SOA formation and aerosol toxicity. Specifically, the equilibrium constants of α-HHP formation have been determined using proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Significant α-HHP formation was observed from formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic acid, and methylglyoxal, but not from methacrolein and ketones. Low temperatures enhanced the formation of α-HHPs but slowed their formation rates. High inorganic salt concentrations shifted the equilibria toward the hydrated form of the aldehydes and slightly suppressed α-HHP formation. Using the experimental equilibrium constants, we predict the equilibrium concentration of α-HHPs to be in the μM level in cloud water, but it may also be present in the mM level in aerosol liquid water (ALW), where the concentrations of H2O2 and aldehydes can be high. Formation of α-HHPs in ALW may significantly affect the effective Henry's law constants of H2O2 and aldehydes but may not affect their gas-phase levels. The photochemistry and reactivity of this class of atmospheric species have not been studied.

  3. Formation of aqueous-phase α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHP): potential atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Soong, R.; Simpson, A. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-02-01

    The focus of this work is on quantifying the degree of the aqueous-phase formation of α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHPs) via reversible nucleophilic addition of H2O2 to aldehydes. Formation of this class of highly oxygenated organic hydroperoxides represents a poorly characterized aqueous-phase processing pathway that may lead to enhanced SOA formation and aerosol toxicity. Specifically, the equilibrium constants of α-HHP formation have been determined using proton nuclear resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Significant α-HHP formation was observed from formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic acid, methylglyoxal, but not from methacrolein and ketones. Low temperatures enhanced the formation of α-HHPs but slowed their formation rates. High inorganic salt concentrations shifted the equilibria toward the hydrated form of the aldehydes and slightly suppressed α-HHP formation. Using the experimental equilibrium constants, we predict the equilibrium concentration of α-HHPs to be in the μM level in cloud water but may be present in the mM level in aerosol liquid water (ALW), where the concentrations of H2O2 and aldehydes can be high. Formation of α-HHPs in ALW may significantly affect the effective Henry's law constants of H2O2 and aldehydes but may not affect their gas-phase levels. The photochemistry and reactivity of this class of atmospheric species have not been studied.

  4. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  5. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation in the rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V.; Jetha, N. )

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid solution in preventing intraperitoneal (IP) adhesions. The study design was prospective, randomized and blinded and involved 83 rats. Measured serosal injury was inflicted using a CO2 laser on the right uterine horn of the rat. Animals randomized to groups 1 and 2 received either 0.4% hyaluronic acid or its diluent phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally before and after the injury. In groups 3 and 4, the same solutions were used only after the injury. Postoperative adhesions were assessed at second-look laparotomy. Histologic assessment of the fresh laser injury was carried out on uteri pretreated with hyaluronic acid, PBS, or nothing. Pretreatment with hyaluronic acid was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative adhesions and a significantly decreased crater depth. Hyaluronic acid appears to reduce postoperative IP adhesion formation by coating the serosal surfaces and decreasing the extent of initial tissue injury.

  6. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds: Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, R.F.; Snetsinger, K.G. ); Hamill, P.; Goodman, J.K. ); McCormick, M.P. )

    1990-03-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an ER-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a first appearance temperature T{sub fa} = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a first appearance temperature T{sub fa} = 198 K was found for the Antarctic samples.

  7. Effects of Fe-He potential on primary damage formation in Fe-1% He

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2009-09-15

    The effects of different Fe-He interatomic potentials on primary damage formation in Fe-1%He are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) methods. Simulations of cascades produced by primary knock-on atoms (PKA) of energy Ep = 0.5-10 keV were performed at an irradiation temperature of 100 K. It is found that the Fe-He potentials have significant effects on the point defect creation and the formation of Fe-He interstitial clusters, whereas small effects on the formation of He-vacancy clusters.

  8. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of liquids have been screened as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles that involve the vaporization of sulfuric acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids is described with the results of some preliminary high temperature test data presented.

  9. Biofilm formation and indole-3-acetic acid production by two rhizospheric unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms that live in the rhizosphere play a pivotal role in the functioning and maintenance of soil ecosystems. The study of rhizospheric cyanobacteria has been hampered by the difficulty to culture and maintain them in the laboratory. The present work investigated the production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the potential of biofilm formation on the rhizoplane of pea plants by two cyanobacterial strains, isolated from rice rhizosphere. The unicellular cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 that were isolated from a rice rhizosphere, were investigated. Production of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 was measured under experimental conditions (pH and light). The bioactivity of the cyanobacterial auxin was demonstrated through the alteration of the rooting pattern of Pisum sativum seedlings. The increase in the concentration of L-tryptophan and the time that this amino acid was present in the medium resulted in a significant enhancement of the synthesis of IAA (r > 0.900 at p = 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between the concentration of IAA in the supernatant of the cyanobacteria cultures and the root length and number of the pea seedlings. Observations made by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of cyanobacteria on the surface of the roots and also provided evidence for the penetration of the cyanobacteria in the endorhizosphere. We show that the synthesis of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 occurs under different environmental conditions and that the auxin is important for the development of the seedling roots and for establishing an intimate symbiosis between cyanobacteria and host plants. PMID:24705871

  10. Flavonoids and 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Inhibit the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Sonja; Klinger, Matthias; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been suggested to play a pathophysiological role in several autoimmune diseases. Since NET-formation in response to several biological and chemical stimuli is mostly ROS dependent, in theory any substance that inhibits or scavenges ROS could prevent ROS-dependent NET release. Therefore, in the present comprehensive study, several antioxidative substances were assessed for their capacity to inhibit NET formation of primary human neutrophils in vitro. We could show that the flavonoids (−)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin hydrate, and rutin trihydrate as well as vitamin C and the pharmacological substances N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 5-aminosalicylic acid inhibited PMA induced ROS production and NET formation. Therefore, a broad spectrum of antioxidative substances that reduce ROS production of primary human neutrophils also inhibits ROS-dependent NET formation. It is tempting to speculate that such antioxidants can have beneficial therapeutic effects in diseases associated with ROS-dependent NET formation. PMID:24381411

  11. Hyaluronic acid reagent suppressed endometriotic lesion formation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiko; Yoshino, Osamu; Osuga, Yutaka; Kodama, Ako; Takamura, Masashi; Nishii, Osamu; Taketani, Yuji

    2010-05-15

    In an animal endometriosis model, the administration of hyaluronic acid (HA) reagent significantly suppressed the formation of endometriotic lesions in both number and weight. This effect was found when HA treatment was conducted at the time of endometrial fragment inoculation. PMID:20356589

  12. Structural stability and prebiotic properties of resistant starch type 3 increase bile acid turnover and lower secondary bile acid formation.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, Gerhard; Jacobasch, Gisela; Schmiedl, Detlef

    2005-11-16

    Microbial metabolism is essential in maintaining a healthy mucosa in the large bowel, preferentially through butyrate specific mechanisms. This system depends on starch supply. Two structurally different resistant starches type 3 (RS3) have been investigated with respect to their resistance to digestion, fermentability, and their effects on the composition and turnover of bile acids in rats. RSA (a mixture of retrograded maltodextrins and branched high molecular weight polymers), which is more resistant than RSB (a retrograded potato starch), increased the rate of fermentation accompanied by a decrease of pH in cecum, colon, and feces. Because they were bound to RS3, less bile acids were reabsorbed, resulting in a higher turnover through the large bowel. Because of the rise of volume, the bile acid level was unchanged and the formation of secondary bile acids was partly suppressed. The results proved a strong relation between RS3, short chain fatty acid production, and microflora. However, butyrate specific benefits are only achieved by an intake of RS3 that result in good fermentation properties, which depend on the kind of the resistant starch structures. PMID:16277431

  13. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Brandon R.; Reback, Matthew L.; Jain, Avijita; Appel, Aaron M.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. How biogenic terpenes govern the correlation between sulfuric acid concentrations and new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.; Sihto, S.-L.; Ruuskanen, T. M.

    2008-06-01

    New particle formation has been observed to take place all around the world. However, because of the inability to determine the chemical composition of the smallest clusters or particles, indirect tools such as the correlation between nucleation rate and measured sulfuric acid concentrations have been used to infer the nucleation mechanism. In this study we describe the observed correlation with gaseous sulfuric acid concentrations by interactions of sesquiterpene oxidation products with sulfuric acid. Two formation pathways of nucleation initiating molecules are considered. The interaction of sulfuric acid with organic sulfates, which are formed from stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs, formed from sesquiterpenes), can be used to explain the observed squared relationship between particle formation rate and ambient sulfuric acid concentrations. The corresponding linear dependence is explained with the participation of secondary ozonides, which are formed from sCIs and aldehydes. Both pathways are negatively affected by increasing water vapor concentration as observed in recent studies. In order to check the assumptions made we apply the derived nucleation coefficients to measurements of the BACCI/QUEST IV campaign made during spring 2005 in Hyytiälä, Finland. A reasonable agreement between the measurement data and the predicted nucleation rates is found, giving support for the presented nucleation description.

  15. Oleate salt formation and mesomorphic behavior in the propranolol/oleic acid binary system.

    PubMed

    Crowley, K J; Forbes, R T; York, P; Nyqvist, H; Camber, O

    1999-06-01

    Thermal analysis of propranolol/oleic acid mixtures prepared by solvent evaporation enabled construction of the binary system phase diagram. This allowed both physical and chemical interactions to be identified, including complex formation at the equimolar composition. An incongruent melting complex with a characteristic reaction point was identified in excess oleic acid compositions, a common property of fatty acid/fatty acid salt binary systems. The equimolar complex was confirmed to be propranolol oleate using infrared spectroscopy. Wide-angle X-ray powder diffractometry demonstrated that propranolol oleate possessed long-range positional order ( approximately 25 A d spacing) accompanied by a degree of disorder over shorter d spacings. Such a pattern suggested mesophase formation, explaining the unctuous nature of propranolol oleate at room temperature. Accurate measurement of the long-range d spacing was achieved using small-angle X-ray scattering, permitting differentiation of the three different phases identified (phase I: 25.4 A, phase II: 24.6 A, phase III: 25.4-25.5 A). The implications of drug fatty acid salt formation and also mesomorphism in pharmaceutical systems are discussed. PMID:10350493

  16. On the formation of niacin (vitamin B3) and pyridine carboxylic acids in interstellar model ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtry, Brandon M.; Turner, Andrew M.; Saito, Sean E. J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-06-01

    The formation of pyridine carboxylic acids in interstellar ice grains was simulated by electron exposures of binary pyridine (C5H5N)-carbon dioxide (CO2) ice mixtures at 10 K under contamination-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Chemical processing of the pristine ice and subsequent warm-up phase was monitored on line and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe for the formation of new radiation induced species. In the infrared spectra of the irradiated ice, bands assigned to nicotinic acid (niacin; vitamin B3; m-C5H4NCOOH) along with 2,3-, 2,5-, 3,4-, and 3,5-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (C5H3N(COOH)2) were unambiguously identified along with the hydroxycarbonyl (HOCO) radical. Our study suggests that the reactive pathway responsible for pyridine carboxylic acids formation involves a HOCO intermediate, which forms through the reaction of suprathermal hydrogen ejected from pyridine with carbon dioxide. The newly formed pyridinyl radical may then undergo radical-radical recombination with a hydroxycarbonyl radical to form a pyridine carboxylic acid.

  17. Direct measurements of the ozone formation potential from dairy cattle emissions using a transportable smog chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Cody J.; Yang, Wenli; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Malkina, Irina L.; Flocchini, Robert G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    Tropospheric ozone continues to be an air pollution problem in the United States, particularly in California, Texas, and across the eastern seaboard. The obvious sources of ozone precursors have been largely controlled over the past several decades, leading to the critical examination of secondary sources. In particular, California has new air quality rules addressing agricultural sources of ozone precursors, including dairy farms. Some recent estimates predict that dairy cattle are second only to on-road vehicles as a leading source of ozone precursor emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley. The objective of this work was to directly measure the ozone formation potential from dairy housing. A transportable "smog" chamber was constructed and validated using organic gases known to be present in dairy emissions. The ozone formation potential of emissions from eight non-lactating dairy cows and their fresh waste was then directly evaluated in the field at a completely enclosed cow corral on the campus of the University of California, Davis. The results demonstrate that the majority of the ozone formation is explained by ethanol (EtOH) in the emissions from the dairy cows, not by acetone as previously thought. Ozone formation potential is generally small, with <20 ppb of ozone produced under typical conditions when EtOH concentrations were ˜200 ppb and NO x concentrations were ˜50 ppb. The results match our current understanding of atmospheric ozone formation potential, ruling out the possibility of unknown organic compounds in dairy emissions with significant ozone formation potential. Simulations carried out with a modified form of the Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism verify that actual ozone formation from dairy emissions is much lower than what would be predicted using the current regulatory profiles. Based on these results, the ozone formation potential of emissions from dairy cattle in California seems to be lower than previously estimated.

  18. Characterization and disinfection by-product formation potential of natural organic matter in surface and ground waters from Northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Katz, B.; Martin, B.S.; Noyes, T.I.

    2000-01-01

    Streamwaters in northern Florida have large concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), and commonly flow directly into the ground water system through karst features, such as sinkholes. In this study NOM from northern Florida stream and ground waters was fractionated, the fractions characterized by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and then chlorinated to investigate their disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential (FP). As the NOM character changed (as quantified by changes in NOM distribution in various fractions, such as hydrophilic acids or hydrophobic neutrals) due to migration through the aquifer, the total organic halide (TOX)-FP and trihalomethane (THM)-FP yield of each of these fractions varied also. In surface waters, the greatest DBP yields were produced by the colloid fraction. In ground waters, DBP yield of the hydrophobic acid fraction (the greatest in terms of mass) decreased during infiltration.

  19. N,N-Dimethyl formamide facilitated formation of hexagonal boron nitride from boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yanming; Elsanousi, Ammar; Fan, Ying; Lin, Jing; Li, Jie; Xu, Xuewen; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Tingting; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we report on a promoting novel process for the formation of h-BN plates by using N,N-dimethyl formamide-treated boric acid (DMF-BA). Using this B source, the formation of h-BN can be indeed improved greatly compared to using pure boric acid (BA). This method effectively reduces the content of boric acid and amorphous boric oxide, enhancing the transformation rate of h-BN. For preparation of pure h-BN, it can obviously lower the resultant temperature without further purification process. Via graphitization index (G.I.) calculation and thermostability analysis, the pure h-BN plates obtained from the DMF-BA would be a promising candidate for raw material of c-BN and low-temperature applications in the air.

  20. Molecular and Therapeutic Potential and Toxicity of Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Morceau, Franck; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a branched short-chain fatty acid, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug and a mood stabilizer. Antiepileptic properties have been attributed to inhibition of Gamma Amino Butyrate (GABA) transaminobutyrate and of ion channels. VPA was recently classified among the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, acting directly at the level of gene transcription by inhibiting histone deacetylation and making transcription sites more accessible. VPA is a widely used drug, particularly for children suffering from epilepsy. Due to the increasing number of clinical trials involving VPA, and interesting results obtained, this molecule will be implicated in an increasing number of therapies. However side effects of VPA are substantially described in the literature whereas they are poorly discussed in articles focusing on its therapeutic use. This paper aims to give an overview of the different clinical-trials involving VPA and its side effects encountered during treatment as well as its molecular properties. PMID:20798865

  1. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential. PMID:24031469

  2. Biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Maíra Maciel Mattos; Brugnera, Danilo Florisvaldo; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2010-01-01

    An experimental model was proposed to study biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 on AISI 304 (#4) stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential during this process. In this model, biofilm formation was conducted on the surface of stainless steel coupons, set on a stainless steel base with 4 divisions, each one supporting 21 coupons. Trypic Soy Broth was used as bacterial growth substrate, with incubation at 37 °C and stirring of 50 rpm. The number of adhered cells was determined after 3, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 hours of biofilm formation and biotransfer potential from 96 hours. Stainless steel coupons were submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after 3, 144 and 240 hours. Based on the number of adhered cells and SEM, it was observed that L. monocytogenes adhered rapidly to the stainless steel surface, with mature biofilm being formed after 240 hours. The biotransfer potential of bacterium to substrate occurred at all the stages analyzed. The rapid capacity of adhesion to surface, combined with biotransfer potential throughout the biofilm formation stages, make L. monocytogenes a potential risk to the food industry. Both the experimental model developed and the methodology used were efficient in the study of biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes on stainless steel surface and biotransfer potential. PMID:24031469

  3. The chitosan-gelatin (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation in an acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Voron'ko, Nicolay G; Derkach, Svetlana R; Kuchina, Yuliya A; Sokolan, Nina I

    2016-03-15

    The interaction of cationic polysaccharide chitosan and gelatin accompanied by the stoichiometric (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation has been studied by the methods of capillary viscometry, UV and FTIR spectroscopy and dispersion of light scattering. Complexes were formed in the aqueous phase, with pH being less than the isoelectric point of gelatin (pIgel). The particle size of the disperse phase increases along with the growth of the relative viscosity in comparison with sols of the individual components-polysaccharide and gelatin. Possible models and mechanism of (bio)polyelectrolyte complexes formation have been discussed. It was shown that the complex formation takes place not only due to the hydrogen bonds, but also due to the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged amino-groups of chitosan and negatively charged amino acid residues (glutamic Glu and aspartic Asp acids) of gelatin. PMID:26794762

  4. d-Amino Acids Do Not Inhibit Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sourav; Pires, Marcos M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can either exist in the planktonic (free floating) state or in the biofilm (encased within an organic framework) state. Bacteria biofilms cause industrial concerns and medical complications and there has been a great deal of interest in the discovery of small molecule agents that can inhibit the formation of biofilms or disperse existing structures. Herein we show that, contrary to previously published reports, d-amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermis (S. epidermis) at millimolar concentrations. We evaluated a diverse set of natural and unnatural d-amino acids and observed no activity from these compounds in inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:25658642

  5. d-Amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sourav; Pires, Marcos M

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria can either exist in the planktonic (free floating) state or in the biofilm (encased within an organic framework) state. Bacteria biofilms cause industrial concerns and medical complications and there has been a great deal of interest in the discovery of small molecule agents that can inhibit the formation of biofilms or disperse existing structures. Herein we show that, contrary to previously published reports, d-amino acids do not inhibit biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermis (S. epidermis) at millimolar concentrations. We evaluated a diverse set of natural and unnatural d-amino acids and observed no activity from these compounds in inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:25658642

  6. Origin of sedimentary humic acids, potential carriers of ore-forming elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, P. G.

    Humic acids are complex, macromolecular organic components of sediments and are defined by their solubility in dilute alkali insolubility in dilute acid. Because of their general structural characteristics (for example, their high proportion of oxygen functional groups), humic acids can complex with inorganic cations and may be important in forming ore deposits. In some instances (such as uranium ores), ore bodies are believed to have originated by mobilization of an ore-forming element complexed with humic acids and subsequent precipitation. Knowledge of the mechanism for the formation of humic acids is being applied to two major ore deposits. Carlin-type gold ores from Nevada show that humic acids may have been precursors. This suggests that the humic acids could have played a major role in the transport and accumulation of the ore.

  7. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Carbonyls and Alcohols With Sulfuric Acid: Implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Levitt, N.; Zhang, R.

    2006-12-01

    Recent environmental chamber studies have suggested that acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions of organic carbonyls lead to multifold increases in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass and acid-catalyzed reactions between alcohols and aldehydes in the condensed phase lead to the formation of hemiacetals and acetals, also enhancing secondary organic aerosol growth. The kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous chemistry of carbonyls and alcohols with sulfuric acid, however, remain largely uncertain. In this talk, we present measurements of heterogeneous uptake of several carbonyls and alcohols on liquid H2SO4 in a wide range of acid concentrations and temperatures. The results indicate that uptake of larger carbonyls is explained by aldol condensation. For small dicarbonyls, heterogeneous reactions are shown to decrease with acidity and involve negligible formation of sulfate esters. Hydration and polymerization likely explain the measured uptake of such small dicarbonyls on H2SO4 and the measurements do not support an acid- catalyzed uptake. Atmospheric implications from our findings will be discussed.

  8. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Watts, Richard E; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid ("imino acid"), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3-6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNA(Phe) depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNA(Pro) isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the "tRNA abundance" hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  9. Formation of β-glucogallin, the precursor of ellagic acid in strawberry and raspberry

    PubMed Central

    Schulenburg, Katja; Feller, Antje; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schecker, Johannes H.; Martens, Stefan; Schwab, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Ellagic acid/ellagitannins are plant polyphenolic antioxidants that are synthesized from gallic acid and have been associated with a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the identification and characterization of five glycosyltransferases (GTs) from two genera of the Rosaceae family (Fragaria and Rubus; F.×ananassa FaGT2*, FaGT2, FaGT5, F. vesca FvGT2, and R. idaeus RiGT2) that catalyze the formation of 1-O-galloyl-β-d-glucopyranose (β-glucogallin) the precursor of ellagitannin biosynthesis. The enzymes showed substrate promiscuity as they formed glucose esters of a variety of (hydroxyl)benzoic and (hydroxyl)cinnamic acids. Determination of kinetic values and site-directed mutagenesis revealed amino acids that affected substrate preference and catalytic activity. Green immature strawberry fruits were identified as the main source of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and ellagic acid in accordance with the highest GT2 gene expression levels. Injection of isotopically labeled gallic acid into green fruits of stable transgenic antisense FaGT2 strawberry plants clearly confirmed the in planta function. Our results indicate that GT2 enzymes might contribute to the production of ellagic acid/ellagitannins in strawberry and raspberry, and are useful to develop strawberry fruit with additional health benefits and for the biotechnological production of bioactive polyphenols. PMID:26884604

  10. Formation of β-glucogallin, the precursor of ellagic acid in strawberry and raspberry.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Katja; Feller, Antje; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schecker, Johannes H; Martens, Stefan; Schwab, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    Ellagic acid/ellagitannins are plant polyphenolic antioxidants that are synthesized from gallic acid and have been associated with a reduced risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the identification and characterization of five glycosyltransferases (GTs) from two genera of the Rosaceae family (Fragaria and Rubus; F. × ananassa FaGT2*, FaGT2, FaGT5, F. vesca FvGT2, and R. idaeus RiGT2) that catalyze the formation of 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (β-glucogallin) the precursor of ellagitannin biosynthesis. The enzymes showed substrate promiscuity as they formed glucose esters of a variety of (hydroxyl)benzoic and (hydroxyl)cinnamic acids. Determination of kinetic values and site-directed mutagenesis revealed amino acids that affected substrate preference and catalytic activity. Green immature strawberry fruits were identified as the main source of gallic acid, β-glucogallin, and ellagic acid in accordance with the highest GT2 gene expression levels. Injection of isotopically labeled gallic acid into green fruits of stable transgenic antisense FaGT2 strawberry plants clearly confirmed the in planta function. Our results indicate that GT2 enzymes might contribute to the production of ellagic acid/ellagitannins in strawberry and raspberry, and are useful to develop strawberry fruit with additional health benefits and for the biotechnological production of bioactive polyphenols. PMID:26884604

  11. Formation of amino acids and nucleic acid constituents from simulated primitive planetary atmospheres by irradiation with high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamanashi, H.; Ohashi, A.; Kaneko, T.; Miyakawa, S.; Saito, T.

    It is suggested that primitive Earth atmosphere was only slightly reduced, which w as composed of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water. It has been shown that bioorganic compounds can be hardly formed by energies as UV light, heat and spark discharges. We therefore examined possible formation pat hways of bioorganic compounds in the primitive E arth. A mixt ure of carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water was irradiated with high-energy prot ons generated by a van de Graaff accelerator, whi c h simulated an action of cosm ic rays. Aqueous solution of the product was hydr olyzed, and then analyzed by chromatography and mass spectrometry. A wide variety of amino acids and uracil, one of the nucle ic acid bases, wer e identified. Ribose, the RNA sugar, has not been identified, but formation of reducing polyols was suggested. A mino acids and uracil were also formed from a mixture of carbo n dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen and water, and their yields correlated to the ratio of carbon monoxide and nitrogen in the mixture. Since a certain percentage of carbon monoxide could be expected to be in it [1], cosmic radiation can be regarded as an effective energ so urce for prebiotic formation of life's building blocks in they primitive Earth [2]. In the conventional scenario of chemical evolution, amino acids were formed in t he primitive ocean from such intermediates as HCN an d HCHO formed in t he atmosphere. T his scenario seem s not to be possible due to the following reasons: (1) The irradiation products were quit e complex organic com pound s whose molecular weights were ca. 1000, and they gave amino acids after hydrolysis. (2) Energy yields of amino ac ids in the hydrolysates were comparable to those of HCN and HCHO in the irradiation pro duct s. (3) Irradiation products from a mixture of carbon monoxide and nitrogen without water als o gave amino acids aft er hydrolysis. T hes e observations strongly sugge s t e d that complex precursors of bioor ganic com

  12. Metabolism of Benzoic Acid by Bacteria: 3,5- Cyclohexadiene-1,2-Diol-1-Carboxylic Acid Is an Intermediate in the Formation of Catechol

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Albey M.

    1971-01-01

    3,5-Cyclohexadiene-1,2-diol-1-carboxylic acid (1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-benzoic acid) is converted enzymatically to catechol in cell extracts from Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Azotobacter, and three Pseudomonas species. This enzymatic activity is present only in cultures which have been grown in the presence of benzoic acid, and which convert benzoic acid to catechol rather than to protocatechuic acid. The reaction is assayed by the concomitant formation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The conversion of [14C]benzoic acid to [14C]dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid is demonstrated in cell extracts. A scheme for the conversion of benzoic acid to catechol in bacteria is presented, involving the formation of dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid from benzoic acid by a dioxygenase which is unstable in cell extracts, followed by the dehydrogenation and decarboxylation of dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid to catechol by a previously undescribed enzyme. Experiments with anthranilic acid and phthalic acid suggest that dihydrodihydroxybenzoic acid is a metabolite unique to benzoic acid metabolism. Two new methods for assaying benzoic acid dioxygenase are suggested. PMID:4399343

  13. Formation of delta 22-bile acids in rats is not gender specific and occurs in the peroxisome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, C M; Kren, B T; Steer, C J; Setchell, K D

    1996-03-01

    We recently demonstrated that the formation of delta 22-bile acids is a quantitatively major pathway for normal bile acid synthesis in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat. This pathway is specific for 7 beta-hydroxy bile acids and, when ursodeoxycholic acid is administered, delta 22-ursodeoxycholic acid appears as a major metabolite in the liver tissue, bile, intestinal contents, and plasma. The aims of this study were, therefore, to determine whether this metabolic pathway was gender specific, and to establish that the peroxisome is a site of formation of delta 22-bile acids. Bile acids were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in liver tissue, jejunum, and plasma of adult female rats and in animals fed a diet containing 0.4% and 1% ursodeoxycholic acid. Bile acid metabolism in female rats was found to be similar to that of male rats, and delta 22-beta-muricholic acid, rather than beta-muricholate, was likewise confirmed as the major muricholic acid synthesized. Ursodeoxycholic acid administration resulted in the appearance of delta 22-ursodeoxycholic acid as a major metabolite. When adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with clofibrate, a drug that induces peroxisomal proliferation, liver weight increased 40-60% and total bile acid synthesis decreased markedly, but the relative composition of individual bile acids was unchanged. When ursodeoxycholic acid was added to the diet, the proportion of delta 22-bile acids relative to the corresponding saturated analogues increased significantly compared with untreated rats, indicating that clofibrate had "amplified" the pathway for formation of delta 22-bile acids. When UDCA was incubated in vitro with a peroxisomal-enriched fraction from normal adult male rat liver, delta 22-ursodeoxycholic acid was formed in proportions comparable to that observed in vivo when this bile acid was given orally. These studies establish that the pathway for the formation of delta 22-bile acids is not gender specific and

  14. Effects of ensiling treatments on lactic acid production and supplementary methane formation of maize and amaranth--an advanced green biorefining approach.

    PubMed

    Haag, Nicola Leonard; Nägele, Hans-Joachim; Fritz, Thomas; Oechsner, Hans

    2015-02-01

    A green biorefinery enables the material and energetic use of biomass via lactic acid and methane production. Different ensiling techniques were applied to maize and amaranth with the aim to increase the amount of lactic acid in the silage. In addition the methane formation potential of the ensiled samples and the remaining solid residues after separating the organic juice were assessed. Treating maize with homofermentative lactic acid bacteria in combination with carbonated lime increased the amount of lactic acid about 91.9%. For amaranth no additional lactic acid production was obtained by treating the raw material. Specific methane yields for the solid residues of amaranth were significantly lower in comparison to the corresponding silages. The most promising treatment resulted in a production of 127.9±4.1 g kg(-1) DM lactic acid and a specific methane yield for the solid residue of 349.5±6.6 lN kg(-1) ODM. PMID:25219786

  15. Comparison of oxalate formation from ascorbic and glyoxyl acids in detached glandular heads of tobacco trichomes

    SciTech Connect

    Vogeli-Lange, R.; Wagner, G.J.

    1987-08-01

    Ca-oxalate crystal containing cells from detached glandular heads of trichomes from Nicotiana tabacum, TI 1068, are capable of converting (1-/sup 14/C) ascorbic acid (AA) and (1-/sup 14/C) glyoxylic acid (GA) to oxalate. AA was found to be a better precursor for oxalate formation than GA. In detached glandular heads, 3.6x more label was converted to oxalate from AA than from GA, in the epidermis the factor was 3x while that with petiole tissue was 7x. Oxalate formation from AA, in detached glandular heads, was only partially inhibited in the dark and in the presence of metabolic inhibitors, suggesting that a nonenzymatic component might be involved. Oxalate formation from GA increased in the presence of metabolic inhibitors. During treatment of detached glandular heads with 2 mM Ca-acetate for 2 days, oxalate formation from AA was stimulated 3 fold, while the presence of 2mM Ca-acetate had no effect on the oxalate formation from GA. These results suggest that Ca/sup 2 +/ stimulates the formation of Ca-oxalate crystals in glandular head cells, and that AA can serve as a precursor for oxalate production.

  16. Trihalomethane, haloacetonitrile, and chloral hydrate formation potentials of organic carbon fractions from sub-tropical forest soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Kuang, Wan-fang; Liu, Lu-ying; Li, Kexin; Wong, Kin-hang; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po-keung

    2009-12-30

    Forest landscapes represent the major land-cover type for the watersheds of the East River, which is the source of water for 40 million people in South China. Forest soils with high levels of organic carbon are a potential terrestrial source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the East River. DOC is of great concern, since it can form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment. In this study, soils from three altitudes (200, 450 and 900 m) in the Xiangtou Mountain Nature Reserve in South China, representing soils from evergreen moon forest, transitional evergreen broadleaf forest, and evergreen broadleaf forest, respectively, were evaluated for their potential contributions of DBP precursors into the East River. The water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) in three forest soils was physically and chemically fractionated into particulate organic carbon (1.2-0.45 microm), colloidal organic carbon (0.45-0.22 microm), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (<0.22 microm), hydrophobic acid (HPOA), transphilic acid and hydrophilic acid and were analysed for the formation potentials of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), and chloral hydrate (CHD). Also, soils were incubated at 15, 25 and 35 degrees C for 14d in darkness to examine the impact of temperature effects on the availability and characteristics of WEOC. The extraction study showed that the amount of WEOC was proportional to soil organic carbon content, of which about 1% was water extractable. Regardless of soil type, DOC and HPOA were the most reactive fractions in forming THMs, CHD, and HANs. Production of DOC and HPOA in WEOC increased over 14 d incubation as incubation temperature increased, but the temperature did not alter the distribution of physical and chemical fractions and their reactivity in DBP formation. Results suggest higher inputs of DOC and DBP precursors from forest watersheds into source water may result in a warmer environment. PMID:19695772

  17. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-08-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep-tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  18. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  19. Effect of ascorbic acid on the properties of ammonia caramel colorant additives and acrylamide formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxing; Gu, Zhengbiao

    2014-09-01

    Ammonia caramels are among the most widely used colorant additives in the food industry. They are commonly prepared through the Maillard reaction and caramelization of mixtures of reducing sugars with ammonia or ammonium salts. Antioxidants are known to inhibit acrylamide formation during the Maillard reaction, and they may affect the properties of the ammonia caramel products. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the antioxidant ascorbic acid on the properties of ammonia caramel. A mixture of glucose and ammonia was allowed to react at 120 °C for 60 min in the presence of ascorbic acid at final concentrations of 0 to 0.08 M. The ammonia caramels obtained from these reactions were all positively charged. As the concentration of ascorbic acid increased, the color intensity of the ammonia caramel showed a decreasing trend, while the intensity of the fluorescence and total amount of pyrazines in the volatiles showed a tendency to increase. The addition of ascorbic acid did not result in obvious changes in the UV-visible spectra of the ammonia caramels and the types of pyrazines in the volatiles were also unchanged. It is noteworthy that the addition of 0.02 to 0.08 M ascorbic acid did reduce the formation of the by-product acrylamide, a harmful substance in food. When the concentration of ascorbic acid added reached 0.04 M, the content of acrylamide in the ammonia caramel was 20.53 μg/L, which was approximately 44% lower than that without ascorbic acid. As a result, ascorbic acid can be considered to improve the quality and safety of ammonia caramels. PMID:25204396

  20. The Effect of Temperature on Fatty Acid Vesicle Formation in Simulated Deep-ocean Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, A.; Abbey, W.; Vance, S.

    2011-12-01

    Ice-covered worlds may harbor life beneath the ice within reservoirs of liquid water, or at water-rock interfaces in hydrothermal vent communities as have been observed in similar locales on Earth. One theory of life's emergence on Earth holds that initial metabolic and replication reactions took place in protobiotic cell membranes. These may have been composed of n- monocarboxylic acids (fatty acids) alone, rather than more complex phospholipid structures. Our experiments in the lab confirm that aqueous decanoic acid self-assembles into bilayer vesicles at standard temperature and pressure (25°C, 1 atm) in the pH range between 7 and 8.5, as indicated by stepwise increases in fluorescence induced by ultraviolet excitation of dye conjugated to decanoic acid solution. Life's chemical evolution in primordial oceans on Earth or elsewhere could have occurred over a range of temperatures, however. We explore the pH range for vesicle formation for temperatures from 0° C to 50° C. The role of pressure in the formation of protobiotic cell membranes is similarly important to whether life may have formed in deep-ocean environments on Earth, or on icy worlds in the solar system. Hydrostatic pressure has been shown to retard denaturation at above-optimal temperatures, but could affect the pH range for formation of protobiotic cell membranes.

  1. Adsorption and Thermal Processing of Glycolaldehyde, Methyl Formate, and Acetic Acid on Graphite at 20 K.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daren J; Puletti, Fabrizio; Woods, Paul M; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A

    2015-07-01

    We present the first detailed comparative study of the adsorption and thermal processing of the three astrophysically important C2O2H4 isomers glycolaldehyde, methyl formate, and acetic acid adsorbed on a graphitic grain analogue at 20 K. The ability of the individual molecule to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds is extremely important, dictating the growth modes of the ice on the surface and the measured desorption energies. Methyl formate forms only weak intermolecular bonds and hence wets the graphite surface, forming monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer ices, with the multilayer having a desorption energy of 35 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, glycolaldehyde and acetic acid dewet the surface, forming clusters even at the very lowest coverages. The strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding for glycolaldehyde and acetic acid is reflected in their desorption energies (46.8 and 55 kJ mol(-1), respectively), which are comparable to those measured for other hydrogen-bonded species such as water. Infrared spectra show that all three isomers undergo structural changes as a result of thermal processing. In the case of acetic acid and glycolaldehyde, this can be assigned to the formation of well-ordered, crystalline, structures where the molecules form chains of hydrogen-bonded moieties. The data reported here are of relevance to astrochemical studies of hot cores and star-forming regions and can be used to model desorption from interstellar ices during the warm up phase with particular importance for complex organic molecules. PMID:26057183

  2. Determination of complex formation constants by phase sensitive alternating current polarography: Cadmium-polymethacrylic acid and cadmium-polygalacturonic acid.

    PubMed

    Garrigosa, Anna Maria; Gusmão, Rui; Ariño, Cristina; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2007-10-15

    The use of phase sensitive alternating current polarography (ACP) for the evaluation of complex formation constants of systems where electrodic adsorption is present has been proposed. The applicability of the technique implies the previous selection of the phase angle where contribution of capacitive current is minimized. This is made using Multivariate Curve Resolution by Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) in the analysis of ACP measurements at different phase angles. The method is checked by the study of the complexation of Cd by polymethacrylic (PMA) and polygalacturonic (PGA) acids, and the optimal phase angles have been ca. -10 degrees for Cd-PMA and ca. -15 degrees for Cd-PGA systems. The goodness of phase sensitive ACP has been demonstrated comparing the determined complex formation constants with those obtained by reverse pulse polarography, a technique that minimizes the electrode adsorption effects on the measured currents. PMID:19073101

  3. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-07-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic (BA) aerosols, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2), malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols, whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8), which showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids controls their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  4. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on cholesterol gallstone formation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Min; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Na-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Soon; Zhang, Dan; Yi, Hee; Cho, Hee-Jung; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin-Suk; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the preventive effect of ω-3 fatty acids against cholesterol gallstone (CG) formation. CG formation was induced in C57BL/6J mice using a lithogenic diet (LD). The mice were divided into four treatment groups: i) LD, ii) LD plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), iii) LD plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and iv) LD plus EPA plus DHA. Subsequent to feeding the mice the LD for four weeks, EPA and/or DHA (70 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for eight weeks. The mice in the EPA treatment groups exhibited significantly less gallstone formation than those in the LD group. By contrast, DHA treatment only slightly suppressed gallstone formation. The expression of mucin 2, 5AC, 5B and 6 was significantly decreased in the gallbladders of mice in the EPA groups (70-90%) and the LD plus DHA group (30-50%), compared with that in the mice in the LD group. In addition, the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased in the livers of mice in the EPA treatment group compared with that in the livers of mice in the LD group. In conclusion, EPA was found to have a dominant anti-lithogenic effect in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:25333303

  5. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K.; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  6. Molecular understanding of atmospheric particle formation from sulfuric acid and large oxidized organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Bianchi, Federico; Lönn, Gustaf; Ehn, Mikael; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Dommen, Josef; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ortega, Ismael K; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Hutterli, Manuel; Duplissy, Jonathan; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Breitenlechner, Martin; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Kajos, Maija; Keskinen, Helmi; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kürten, Andreas; Kurtén, Theo; Laaksonen, Ari; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Praplan, Arnaud P; Rondo, Linda; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Sipilä, Mikko; Tomé, António; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Hansel, Armin; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-10-22

    Atmospheric aerosols formed by nucleation of vapors affect radiative forcing and therefore climate. However, the underlying mechanisms of nucleation remain unclear, particularly the involvement of organic compounds. Here, we present high-resolution mass spectra of ion clusters observed during new particle formation experiments performed at the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experiments involved sulfuric acid vapor and different stabilizing species, including ammonia and dimethylamine, as well as oxidation products of pinanediol, a surrogate for organic vapors formed from monoterpenes. A striking resemblance is revealed between the mass spectra from the chamber experiments with oxidized organics and ambient data obtained during new particle formation events at the Hyytiälä boreal forest research station. We observe that large oxidized organic compounds, arising from the oxidation of monoterpenes, cluster directly with single sulfuric acid molecules and then form growing clusters of one to three sulfuric acid molecules plus one to four oxidized organics. Most of these organic compounds retain 10 carbon atoms, and some of them are remarkably highly oxidized (oxygen-to-carbon ratios up to 1.2). The average degree of oxygenation of the organic compounds decreases while the clusters are growing. Our measurements therefore connect oxidized organics directly, and in detail, with the very first steps of new particle formation and their growth between 1 and 2 nm in a controlled environment. Thus, they confirm that oxidized organics are involved in both the formation and growth of particles under ambient conditions. PMID:24101502

  7. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen that has been found in many thermally processed foods. The effects of thermal processing, gamma and UV-C irradiation on formation of furan from different fatty acids was studied. In addition, formation of furan from fatty acid emulsions during storage at 25C and...

  8. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikanto, Joonas; Duplissy, Jonathan; Määttänen, Anni; Henschel, Henning; Donahue, Neil M.; Brus, David; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We derive a version of Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by quantum chemical results on sulfuric acid-water hydration to describe neutral and ion-induced particle formation in the binary sulfuric acid-water system. The theory is extended to treat the kinetic regime where the nucleation free energy barrier vanishes at high sulfuric acid concentrations or low temperatures. In the kinetic regime particle formation rates become proportional to sulfuric acid concentration to second power in the neutral system or first power in the ion-induced system. We derive simple general expressions for the prefactors in kinetic-type and activation-type particle formation calculations applicable also to more complex systems stabilized by other species. The theory predicts that the binary water-sulfuric acid system can produce strong new particle formation in the free troposphere both through barrier crossing and through kinetic pathways. At cold stratospheric and upper free tropospheric temperatures neutral formation dominates the binary particle formation rates. At midtropospheric temperatures the ion-induced pathway becomes the dominant mechanism. However, even the ion-induced binary mechanism does not produce significant particle formation in warm boundary layer conditions, as it requires temperatures below 0°C to take place at atmospheric concentrations. The theory successfully reproduces the characteristics of measured charged and neutral binary particle formation in CERN CLOUD3 and CLOUD5 experiments, as discussed in a companion paper.

  9. Formation of chain structures in systems of charged grains interacting via isotropic pair potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I.; Koss, K. G.

    2013-05-15

    Conditions for the formation of chain structures of charged grains confined in the gravitational field by external electric fields are studied analytically and numerically. The relationships between the parameters of the pair interaction potential, the number of grains, and the electric field gradient in the trap are found. A criterion for the violation of stable equilibrium in a quasi-one-dimensional chain of grains and the formation of a new configuration in the system is proposed.

  10. Boronic acid-containing proteasome inhibitors: alert to potential pharmaceutical bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Austin C; Yu, Erya; Ring, Steven C; Chovan, James P

    2013-04-15

    Medicinal chemists try to avoid certain organic functional groups, summarized in an ever-growing list, in order to avoid the potential bioactivation to reactive metabolites. To add to that alert list, we report herein that boronic acid-containing compound structures, such as those found in proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and ixazomib, can become bioactivated to chemically reactive imine amide metabolites. Test compounds, ixazomib and bortezomib, were incubated in vitro using human liver fractions containing cytosol and microsomes (S9) under conventional conditions in the presence of GSH. Metabolites were then analyzed using LC-MS(n) with or without online hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) liquid chromatography coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap. The exact mass measurements of both the precursor and product ions were acquired through data dependent acquisition and compared with theoretical values of proposed fragment ions. Upon deboronation catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes, both test compounds formed imine amide metabolites that were identified by high resolution exact mass measurements in both normal aqueous and HDX HPLC-MS analysis. GSH conjugates were also identified and were postulated as nucleophilic addition of GSH to the imine amide metabolites. All mass spectrometric and HDX measurements of these GSH conjugates proved that the GSH unit was added to the carbon atom of the imine amide partial structure, hence demonstrating the electrophilic property of these imine amide metabolites. The awareness of the formation of electrophilic imine amide metabolites from boronic acid-containing compounds, where the boron atom is bonded to a carbon atom adjacent to an amide nitrogen, should help in drug candidate design and optimization with regard to avoiding potential bioactivation. PMID:23514361

  11. Sulfate Mineral Formation from Acid-weathered Phyllosilicates: Implications for the Aqueous History of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Patricia; Ming, Douglas; Rampe, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are common in Noachian terrains whereas sulfates are found in the younger Hesperian terrains and suggest alteration under more acidic conditions. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era would have been exposed to the prevailing acidic conditions during the Hesperian. The purpose of this project is to characterize the effects of acid-weathering on phyllosilicates to better understand the aqueous history of Mars. Nontronite, montmorillonite, and saponite were exposed to H2SO4 solutions at water-rock (WR) ratios of 50 and 25.X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of all three acid-treated minerals showed progressive collapse of the phyllosilicate basal spacing with increasing acid concentration. Bassanite formed as an intermediate phase in weathered nontronite and montmorillonite from extracted interlayer Ca. The octahedral cation determined which sulfate formed at high acid concentration: rhomboclase from nontronite, alunogen from montmorillonite, hexahydrite and kieserite from saponite. Gypsum and anhydrite also formed as intermediate phases in nontronite treated at WR=25, showing a change in sulfate hydration state with changing acid concentration (i.e. water activity). Scanning electron microscopy analyses detected phases not identified by XRD. Al-sulfate was found in nontronite weathered at WR=25 and Ca-sulfate in weathered saponite. Near-infrared reflectance spectra of the weathered samples showed decreasing intensity of the hydration/hydroxylation bands and a change or disappearance of metal-OH bands indicating dehydration and dissociation of the interlayers and octahedral layers, respectively, with increased acid weathering.Sulfate mineral formation from acid-weathered phyllosilicates may explain the presence of phyllosilicates and sulfates in close proximity to each other on Mars, such as in Gale Crater. The CheMin XRD instrument on Curiosity may find evidence for acid-weathered phyllosilicates in Mt. Sharp by comparing the 001

  12. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  13. Carbamic acid and carbamate formation in NH{3}:CO{2} ices - UV irradiation versus thermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, J. B.; Theulé, P.; Duvernay, F.; Borget, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2008-12-01

    Context: We study carbamic acid [ NH{2}COOH] and ammonium carbamate [ NH{2}COO-] [ NH{4}+] formation in interstellar ice analogs. Aims: We demonstrate how carbamic acid [ NH{2}COOH] and ammonium carbamate [ NH{2}COO-] [ NH{4}+] can be formed from both thermal reactions and energetic photons in an NH{3}:CO{2} ice mixture. Methods: Infrared and mass spectroscopy are used to monitor NH{3}:CO{2} ice mixture evolution during both warming and VUV photon irradiation. Results: Carbamic acid and ammonium carbamate can be produced thermally in a 1:1 ratio from NH{3} and CO{2} above 80 K. They can be also formed in a 28:1 ratio by less efficient processes such as energetic photons. Our study and its results provide fresh insight into carbamic acid formation in interstellar ices. Conclusions: We demonstrate that care is required to separate irradiation-induced reactivity from purely thermal reactivity in ices in which ammonia and carbon dioxide are both present. From an interstellar chemistry point of view, carbamic acid and ammonium carbamate are readily produced from the ice mantle of a typical interstellar grain and should therefore be a detectable species in molecular clouds.

  14. Nucleobase and amino acid formation through impacts of meteorites on the early ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks on the prebiotic Earth was the first crucial step for the origins of life. Extraterrestrial delivery of intact amino acids and nucleobases is the prevailing hypothesis for their availability on prebiotic Earth because of the difficulties associated with the production of these organics from terrestrial carbon and nitrogen sources under plausible prebiotic conditions. However, the variety and amounts of these intact organics delivered by meteorites would have been limited. Previous shock-recovery experiments have demonstrated that meteorite impact reactions could have generated organics on the prebiotic Earth. Here, we report on the simultaneous formation of nucleobases (cytosine and uracil) found in DNA and/or RNA, various proteinogenic amino acids (glycine, alanine, serine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, valine, leucine, isoleucine, and proline), non-proteinogenic amino acids, and aliphatic amines in experiments simulating reactions induced by extraterrestrial objects impacting on the early oceans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the formation of nucleobases from inorganic materials by shock conditions. In these experiments, bicarbonate was used as the carbon source. Bicarbonate, which is a common dissolved carbon species in CO2-rich atmospheric conditions, was presumably the most abundant carbon species in the early oceans and in post-impact plumes. Thus, the present results expand the possibility that impact-induced reactions generated various building blocks for life on prebiotic Earth in large quantities through the use of terrestrial carbon reservoirs.

  15. Formation of Lactic Acid from Cellulosic Biomass by Alkaline Hydrothermal Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Jini, F.; Kishita, A.; Enomoto, H.; Tohji, K.

    2008-02-01

    Glucose, as a model compound of cellulosic biomass, was used as a test material. Ca(OH)2 and NaOH were selected as alkali. Results showed that both NaOH and Ca(OH)2, can promote the formation of lactic acid in a hydrothermal reaction of glucose. In the case of the addition of NaOH, lactic acid was obtained with a good yield of 27% based on a carbon base at 300 °C for 60 s with a NaOH concentration of 2.5 M. In the case of the addition of Ca(OH)2, the highest yield of lactic acid is 20%, which occurred at 300 °C for 60 s with a Ca(OH)2 concentration of 0.32 M. The formation mechanisms of lactic acid from glucose were also discussed according to intermediate products identified. Lactic acid may be generated via formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde besides via the aldose having three carbon atoms in hydrothermal reaction which all formed by the reverse aldol condensation of hexoses.

  16. Assessment of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis potentialities to recover metals, sulfuric acid, and recycled water from acid gold mining effluent.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Bárbara C; Ferreira, Carolina D; Marques, Larissa S; Martins, Sofia S; Amaral, Míriam C S

    2016-01-01

    This work assessed the potential of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to treat acid streams contaminated with metals, such as effluent from the pressure oxidation process (POX) used in refractory gold ore processing. NF and RO were evaluated in terms of rejections of sulfuric acid and metals. Regarding NF, high sulfuric acid permeation (∼100%), was observed, while metals were retained with high efficiencies (∼90%), whereas RO led to high acid rejections (<88%) when conducted in pH values higher than 1. Thus, sequential use of NF and RO was proved to be a promising treatment for sulfuric acid solutions contaminated by metals, such as POX effluent. In this context, a purified acid stream could be recovered in NF permeate, which could be further concentrated in RO. Recovered acid stream could be reused in the gold ore processing or commercialized. A metal-enriched stream could be also recovered in NF retentate and transferred to a subsequent metal recovery stage. In addition, considering the high acid rejection obtained through the proposed system, RO permeate could be used as recycling water. PMID:27438241

  17. Amino derivatives of glycyrrhetinic acid as potential inhibitors of cholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Lucas, Susana Dias; Sommerwerk, Sven; Csuk, René

    2014-07-01

    The development of remedies against the Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the biggest challenges in medicinal chemistry nowadays. Although not completely understood, there are several strategies fighting this disease or at least bringing some relief. During the progress of AD, the level of acetylcholine (ACh) decreases; hence, a therapy using inhibitors should be of some benefit to the patients. Drugs presently used for the treatment of AD inhibit the two ACh controlling enzymes, acetylcholinesterase as well as butyrylcholinesterase; hence, the design of selective inhibitors is called for. Glycyrrhetinic acid seems to be an interesting starting point for the development of selective inhibitors. Although its glycon, glycyrrhetinic acid is known for being an AChE activator, several derivatives, altered in position C-3 and C-30, exhibited remarkable inhibition constants in micro-molar range. Furthermore, five representative compounds were subjected to three more enzyme assays (on carbonic anhydrase II, papain and the lipase from Candida antarctica) to gain information about the selectivity of the compounds in comparison to other enzymes. In addition, photometric sulforhodamine B assays using murine embryonic fibroblasts (NiH 3T3) were performed to study the cytotoxicity of these compounds. Two derivatives, bearing either a 1,3-diaminopropyl or a 1H-benzotriazolyl residue, showed a BChE selective inhibition in the single-digit micro-molar range without being cytotoxic up to 30μM. In silico molecular docking studies on the active sites of AChE and BChE were performed to gain a molecular insight into the mode of action of these compounds and to explain the pronounced selectivity for BChE. PMID:24853320

  18. Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation

    DOEpatents

    Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

  19. Metalloenzyme-Like Zeolites as Lewis Acid Catalysts for C-C Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-10-19

    The use of metalloenzyme-like zeolites as Lewis acid catalysts for C-C bond formation reactions has received increasing attention over the past few years. In particular, the observation of direct aldol condensation reactions enabled by hydrophobic zeolites with isolated framework metal sites has encouraged the development of catalytic approaches for producing chemicals from biomass-derived compounds. The discovery of new Diels-Alder cycloaddition/dehydration routes and experimental and computational studies of Lewis acid catalyzed carbonyl-ene reactions have given a further boost to this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26465652

  20. In Situ Investigation of a Self-Accelerated Cocrystal Formation by Grinding Pyrazinamide with Oxalic Acid.

    PubMed

    Kulla, Hannes; Greiser, Sebastian; Benemann, Sigrid; Rademann, Klaus; Emmerling, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    A new cocrystal of pyrazinamide with oxalic acid was prepared mechanochemically and characterized by PXRD, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, DTA-TG, and SEM. Based on powder X-ray diffraction data the structure was solved. The formation pathway of the reaction was studied in situ using combined synchrotron PXRD and Raman spectroscopy. Using oxalic acid dihydrate the initially neat grinding turned into a rapid self-accelerated liquid-assisted grinding process by the release of crystallization water. Under these conditions, the cocrystal was formed directly within two minutes. PMID:27428942

  1. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  2. Radiation- and photo-induced formation of salicylic acid from phenol and CO{sub 2} in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Krapfenbauer, K.; Getoff, N.

    1996-12-31

    The concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is steady increasing because of the combustion of fossil fuels and the industrial pollution. As a result, global warming has occurred. In the present study the formation of the salicylic acid and other products, originating from the carboxylation of phenol is investigated. It has been found that the formation of salicylic acid strongly depend on several experimental conditions: pH of the solution, concentration of phenol and CO{sub 2}, and absorbed dose. The formation of salicylic acid was also studied in the presence of catalysts. Photo-induced carboxylation of phenol to salicylic acid will be also reported. Probable reaction mechanisms for the salicylic acid formation are suggested. Finally, a comparison is made between the well known industrial Kolbe-Schmitt process for salicylic acid production and the aspects of the present new method for CO{sub 2} utilization.

  3. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  4. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  5. Utilization of biologically generated acid for drilling fluid damage removal and uniform acid placement across long formation intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S.W.; Harris, R.E.; Penny, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A method of drilling damage removal is presented which uses biologically generated acid (BGA) as the stimulation fluid. The BGA solution is not reactive during the actual pumping stage which allows its displacement into the reservoir to be controlled by the relatively low permeability of the near wellbore damage. Catalytic generation of acid occurs at a controlled rate once the BGA has been injected into the formation and results in uniform damage removal around the near wellbore region. The ability of BGA to be generated under a variety of temperature and pressure conditions and the compatibility evaluation of BGA with a variety of commonly used oil and water based drilling muds is first presented to establish some of the operational guidelines for BGA use. Drilling damage removal studies utilizing the modified API linear conductivity flow cell and carbonate material with BGA is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of this stimulation fluid. Dual core flow test data is then presented which shows BGA`s ability and HCL`s inability to remove drilling damage over long horizontal intervals in carbonate formations.

  6. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    PubMed

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014. PMID:25174836

  7. Chitosan grafted monomethyl fumaric acid as a potential food preservative.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Ullah, Shafi; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims at in vitro antibacterial and antioxidant activity evaluation of chitosan modified with monomethyl fumaric acid (MFA) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as mediator. Three different kinds of chitosan derivatives Ch-Ds-1,Ch-Ds-2 and Ch-Ds-3 were synthesized by feeding different concentration of MFA. The chemical structures of resulting materials were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HR-XRD, FT-IR and TNBS assay. The results showed that Ch-Ds-1, Ch-Ds-2 and Ch-Ds-3 were successfully synthesized. The % amino groups of chitosan modified by MFA were evaluated by TNBS assay and ranging from 1.82±0.05% to 7.88±0.04%. All the chitosan derivatives are readily soluble in water and swelled by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), toluene and dimethyl formamide (DMF). The antioxidant activity for all the chitosan derivatives have been significantly improved (P<0.05) compared to the chitosan. Upon antibacterial activity at pH 4.0, all the chitosan derivatives showed significant (P<0.05) antibacterial activity against Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes strains and Gram negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis strains compared to chitosan. In conclusion, MFA modified chitosan has shown enhanced activities along with solubility, and could be used as a novel food preservative and packaging material for long time food safety and security. PMID:27516253

  8. Ferulic Acid: Therapeutic Potential Through Its Antioxidant Property

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Marimuthu; Sudheer, Adluri R.; Menon, Venugopal P.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable public and scientific interest in the use of phytochemicals derived from dietary components to combat human diseases. They are naturally occurring substances found in plants. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phytochemical commonly found in fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, sweet corn and rice bran. It arises from metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine by Shikimate pathway in plants. It exhibits a wide range of therapeutic effects against various diseases like cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative. A wide spectrum of beneficial activity for human health has been advocated for this phenolic compound, at least in part, because of its strong antioxidant activity. FA, a phenolic compound is a strong membrane antioxidant and known to positively affect human health. FA is an effective scavenger of free radicals and it has been approved in certain countries as food additive to prevent lipid peroxidation. It effectively scavenges superoxide anion radical and inhibits the lipid peroxidation. It possesses antioxidant property by virtue of its phenolic hydroxyl group in its structure. The hydroxy and phenoxy groups of FA donate electrons to quench the free radicals. The phenolic radical in turn forms a quinone methide intermediate, which is excreted via the bile. The past few decades have been devoted to intense research on antioxidant property of FA. So, the present review deals with the mechanism of antioxidant property of FA and its possible role in therapeutic usage against various diseases. PMID:18188410

  9. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars suggests that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. If early Mars surface geochemical conditions were neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would preclude the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of the proposed work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions.

  10. Physicochemical consequences of amino acid variations that contribute to fibril formation by immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Raffen, R.; Dieckman, L. J.; Szpunar, M.; Wunschl, C.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Dave, P.; Wilkins Stevens, P.; Cai, X.; Schiffer, M.; Stevens, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    The most common form of systemic amyloidosis originates from antibody light chains. The large number of amino acid variations that distinguish amyloidogenic from nonamyloidogenic light chain proteins has impeded our understanding of the structural basis of light-chain fibril formation. Moreover, even among the subset of human light chains that are amyloidogenic, many primary structure differences are found. We compared the thermodynamic stabilities of two recombinant kappa4 light-chain variable domains (V(L)s) derived from amyloidogenic light chains with a V(L) from a benign light chain. The amyloidogenic V(L)s were significantly less stable than the benign V(L). Furthermore, only the amyloidogenic V(L)s formed fibrils under native conditions in an in vitro fibril formation assay. We used site-directed mutagenesis to examine the consequences of individual amino acid substitutions found in the amyloidogenic V(L)s on stability and fibril formation capability. Both stabilizing and destabilizing mutations were found; however, only destabilizing mutations induced fibril formation in vitro. We found that fibril formation by the benign V(L) could be induced by low concentrations of a denaturant. This indicates that there are no structural or sequence-specific features of the benign V(L) that are incompatible with fibril formation, other than its greater stability. These studies demonstrate that the V(L) beta-domain structure is vulnerable to destabilizing mutations at a number of sites, including complementarity determining regions (CDRs), and that loss of variable domain stability is a major driving force in fibril formation. PMID:10091653

  11. Effect of carbonaceous soil amendments on potential mobility of weak acid herbicides in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of carbonaceous amendments in soil has been proposed to decrease potential offsite transport of weak acid herbicides and metabolites by increasing their sorption to soil. The effects of organic olive mill waste, biochars from different feed stocks, and humic acid bound to clay on sorption of MCP...

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Indole-3-Butyric Acid-Induced Adventitious Root Formation in Nodal Cuttings of Camellia sinensis (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Li-Yuan; Wu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Li, Hai-Lin; Tan, Li-Qiang; Cao, Hong-Li; Cheng, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is a popular world beverage, and propagation of tea plants chiefly depends on the formation of adventitious roots in cuttings. To better understand potential mechanisms involved in adventitious root formation, we performed transcriptome analysis of single nodal cuttings of C. sinensis treated with or without indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) using the Illumina sequencing method. Totally 42.5 million RNA-Seq reads were obtained and these were assembled into 59,931 unigenes, with an average length of 732 bp and an N50 of 1292 bp. In addition, 1091 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the tea cuttings treated with IBA compared to controls, including 656 up- and 435 down-regulated genes. Further real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed RNA-Seq data. Functional annotation analysis showed that many genes were involved in plant hormone signal transduction, secondary metabolism, cell wall organization and glutathione metabolism, indicating potential contributions to adventitious rooting. Our study presents a global view of transcriptome profiles of tea cuttings in response to IBA treatment and provides new insights into the fundamental mechanisms associated with auxin-induced adventitious rooting. Our data will be a valuable resource for genomic research about adventitious root formation in tea cuttings, which can be used to improve rooting for difficult-to-root varieties. PMID:25216187

  13. Transcriptome analysis of indole-3-butyric acid-induced adventitious root formation in nodal cuttings of Camellia sinensis (L.).

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Wang, Li-Yuan; Wu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Li, Hai-Lin; Tan, Li-Qiang; Cao, Hong-Li; Cheng, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is a popular world beverage, and propagation of tea plants chiefly depends on the formation of adventitious roots in cuttings. To better understand potential mechanisms involved in adventitious root formation, we performed transcriptome analysis of single nodal cuttings of C. sinensis treated with or without indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) using the Illumina sequencing method. Totally 42.5 million RNA-Seq reads were obtained and these were assembled into 59,931 unigenes, with an average length of 732 bp and an N50 of 1292 bp. In addition, 1091 differentially expressed unigenes were identified in the tea cuttings treated with IBA compared to controls, including 656 up- and 435 down-regulated genes. Further real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed RNA-Seq data. Functional annotation analysis showed that many genes were involved in plant hormone signal transduction, secondary metabolism, cell wall organization and glutathione metabolism, indicating potential contributions to adventitious rooting. Our study presents a global view of transcriptome profiles of tea cuttings in response to IBA treatment and provides new insights into the fundamental mechanisms associated with auxin-induced adventitious rooting. Our data will be a valuable resource for genomic research about adventitious root formation in tea cuttings, which can be used to improve rooting for difficult-to-root varieties. PMID:25216187

  14. Evaluating Healthful Properties of Cereals and Cereal Fractions by Their Bile-Acid-Binding Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The healthful, cholesterol-lowering (atherosclerosis amelioration) or detoxification of harmful metabolites (cancer prevention) potential of cereals and cereal fractions could be predicted by evaluating their in vitro bile acid binding under physiological conditions. Using equal dry matter per incu...

  15. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer. PMID:25336096

  16. Formation of complex precursors of amino acids by irradiation of simulated interstellar media with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Suzuki, N.; Taniuchi, T.; Kaneko, T.; Yoshida, S.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in such extraterrestrial bodies as meteorites and comets Amino acids were identified in the extracts from Murchison meteorite and other carbonaceous chondrites It is hypothesized that these compounds are originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts ISDs in molecular clouds by cosmic rays and ultraviolet light UV Formation of amino acid precursors by high energy protons or UV irradiation of simulated ISDs was reported by several groups The amino acid precursors were however not well-characterized We irradiated a frozen mixture of methanol ammonia and water with heavy ions to study possible organic compounds abiotically formed in molecular clouds by cosmic rays A mixture of methanol ammonia and water was irradiated with carbon beams 290 MeV u from a heavy ion accelerator HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences Japan Irradiation was performed either at room temperature liquid phase or at 77 K solid phase The products were characterized by gel filtration chromatography GFC FT-IR pyrolysis PY -GC MS etc Amino acids were analyzed by HPLC and GC MS after acid hydrolysis or the products Amino acids such as glycine and alanine were identified in the products in both the cases of liquid phase and solid phase irradiation Energy yields G-values of glycine were 0 014 liquid phase and 0 007 solid phase respectively Average molecular weights of the products were estimated as to 2300 in both the case Aromatic hydrocarbons N-containing heterocyclic

  17. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Khaing, Zin Z; Milman, Brian D; Vanscoy, Jennifer E; Seidlits, Stephanie K; Grill, Raymond J; Schmidt, Christine E

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI. PMID:21753237

  18. Keto-Mycolic Acid-Dependent Pellicle Formation Confers Tolerance to Drug-Sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sambandan, Dhinakaran; Dao, Dee N.; Weinrick, Brian C.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gurcha, Sudagar S.; Ojha, Anil; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs, William R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chronic nature of tuberculosis (TB), its requirement of long duration of treatment, its ability to evade immune intervention, and its propensity to relapse after drug treatment is discontinued are reminiscent of other chronic, biofilm-associated bacterial diseases. Historically, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was grown as a pellicle, a biofilm-like structure, at the liquid-air interface in a variety of synthetic media. Notably, the most widely administered human vaccine, BCG, is grown as a pellicle for vaccine production. However, the molecular requirements for this growth remain ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that keto-mycolic acids (keto-MA) are essential for pellicle growth, and mutants lacking in or depleted of this MA species are unable to form a pellicle. We investigated the role of the pellicle biofilm in the reduction of antibiotic sensitivity known as drug tolerance using the pellicle-defective ΔmmaA4 mutant strain. We discovered that the ΔmmaA4 mutant, which is both pellicle defective and highly sensitive to rifampicin (RIF) under planktonic growth, when incorporated within the wild-type pellicle biofilm, was protected from the bactericidal activity of RIF. The observation that growth within the M. tuberculosis pellicle biofilm can confer drug tolerance to a drug-hypersensitive strain suggests that identifying molecular requirements for pellicle growth could lead to development of novel interventions against mycobacterial infections. Our findings also suggest that a class of drugs that can disrupt M. tuberculosis biofilm formation, when used in conjunction with conventional antibiotics, has the potential to overcome drug tolerance. PMID:23653446

  19. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing, Zin Z.; Milman, Brian D.; Vanscoy, Jennifer E.; Seidlits, Stephanie K.; Grill, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  20. Specificity and formation of unusual amino acids of an amide ligation strategy for unprotected peptides.

    PubMed

    Tam, J P; Rao, C; Liu, C F; Shao, J

    1995-03-01

    An important step in the recently developed ligation strategy known as domain ligation strategy to link unprotected peptide segments without activation is the ring formation between the C-terminal ester aldehyde and the N-terminal amino acid bearing a beta-thiol or beta-hydroxide. A new method was developed to define the specificity of this reaction using a dye-labeled alanyl ester aldehyde to react with libraries of 400 dipeptides which contained all dipeptide combinations of the 20 genetically coded amino acids. Three different ester aldehydes of the dye-labeled alanine: alpha-formylmethyl (FM), beta-formylethyl (FE), and beta,beta,beta-dimethyl and formylethyl esters (DFE), were examined. The DFE ester was overly hindered and reacted with N-terminal Cys dipeptides (Cys-X). Interestingly, it also reacted slowly with the sequences of X-Gly where Gly was the second amino acid and the X-Gly amide bond participated in the ring formation. Although the FE ester reacted similarly as the FM ester in the ring formation, the subsequent O,N-acyl transfer was at least 30-fold slower than those of the FM-ester. The FM alpha-formyl methyl ester was the most suitable ester and was reactive with dipeptides of six N-terminal amino acids: Cys, Thr, Trp, Ser, His and Asn. The order and extent of their reactivity were highly dependent on pH, solvent and neighboring participation by the adjacent amino acid. In general, they could be divided into three categories. (1) N-Terminal Cys and Thr were the most reactive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7775013

  1. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere. PMID:26460477

  2. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; Martin-Uriz, Patxi San; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  3. Separation of the isomers of benzene poly(carboxylic acid)s by quaternary ammonium salt via formation of deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yucui; Li, Jian; Ren, Shuhang; Niu, Muge; Wu, Weize

    2014-11-26

    Because of similar properties and very low volatility, isomers of benzene poly(carboxylic acid)s (BPCAs) are very difficult to separate. In this work, we found that isomers of BPCAs could be separated efficiently by quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) via formation of deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Three kinds of QASs were used to separate the isomers of BPCAs, including the isomers of benzene tricarboxylic acids (trimellitic acid, trimesic acid, and hemimellitic acid) and the isomers of benzene dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid and isophthalic acid). Among the QASs, tetraethylammonium chloride was found to have the best performance, which could completely separate BPCA isomers in methyl ethyl ketone solutions. It was found that the hydrogen bond forming between QAS and BPCA results in the selective separation of BPCA isomers. QAS in DES was regenerated effectively by the antisolvent method, and the regenerated QAS was reused four times with the same high efficiency. PMID:25351281

  4. Understanding Particle Formation: Solubility of Free Fatty Acids as Polysorbate 20 Degradation Byproducts in Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Nidhi; Demeule, Barthélemy; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the aqueous solubilities at 2-8 °C of the major free fatty acids (FFAs) formed by polysorbate 20 (PS20) degradation and identify possible ways to predict, delay, or mitigate subsequent particle formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. The FFA solubility limits at 2-8 °C were determined by titrating known amounts of FFA in monoclonal antibody formulations and identifying the FFA concentration leading to visible and subvisible particle formation. The solubility limits of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids at 2-8 °C were 17 ± 1 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 1.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.04% (w/v) PS20 at pH 5.4 and >22 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 0.75 ± 0.25 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.02% (w/v) PS20 at pH 6.0. For the first time, a 3D correlation between FFA solubility, PS20 concentration, and pH has been reported providing a rational approach for the formulator to balance these with regard to potential particle formation. The results suggest that the lower solubilities of the longer chain FFAs, generated from degradation of the stearate, palmitate, and myristate fraction of PS20, is the primary cause of seeding and subsequent FFA precipitation rather than the most abundant lauric acid. PMID:26419285

  5. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  6. Highly efficient peptide formation from N-acetylaminoacyl-AMP anhydride and free amino acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of the N-blocked dipeptide, N-acetylglycylglycine, from N-acetylglycyl adenylate anhydride and glycine in aqueous solution at 25 C, and at various PH's are reported. The reaction is of interest in that over a physiologically relevant pH range (6-8), peptide synthesis proceeds more rapidly than hydrolysis, even at those pH's at which this compound becomes increasingly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Under similar conditions, the corresponding unblocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides are considerably more unstable, and undergo appreciable hydrlysis in the presence of free amino acid. Because N-blocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides serve as model compounds of peptidyl adenylate anhydrides, these results suggest that primitive amino acid polymerization systems may have operated by cyclic reactivation of the peptidyl carboxyl group, rather than that of the incoming amino acid.

  7. Light and acid dual-responsive organogel formation based on m-methyl red derivative.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinhua; Gao, Aiping; Lv, Haiting; Wu, Yan; Wang, Xiuxiu; Fan, Yang

    2013-12-01

    A new gelator 1 that included m-methyl red was synthesized and fully characterized. It was found that the organogel of 1 was stable in DMSO even if the organogel was stimulated by acid or light. The organogel was thoroughly characterized using various microscopic techniques including field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. The organogel exhibited tunable structures and optical properties under different stimulation. The regular nanoring structure was turned into microspheres after the organogel in DMSO was stimulated at 254 nm light or acid. At the same time, the color of molecule 1 in gel state and solution state was all changed after stimulation by light or acid. The hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking were found to be the main driving forces for gel formation. This dual-responsive gel held promise for soft materials application in upscale smart responsive materials. PMID:24135789

  8. Insights into the formation mechanism of chloropropanol fatty acid esters under laboratory-scale deodorization conditions.

    PubMed

    Hori, Katsuhito; Hori-Koriyama, Natsuko; Tsumura, Kazunobu; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chloropropanol fatty acid esters (CPFAEs) are well-known contaminants in refined oils and fats, and several research groups have studied their formation. However, the results obtained in these studies were not satisfactory because the CPFAEs were not analyzed comprehensively. Thus, in the present study, a comprehensive analysis was performed to obtain new details about CPFAE formation. Each lipid (monopalmitin, dipalmitin, tripalmitin, monoolein, diolein, triolein, and crude palm oil) was heated at 250°C for 90 min, and the CPFAEs were analyzed using supercritical fluid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that CP fatty acid monoesters were formed from monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols after heating in the presence of a chlorine compound. In addition, CP fatty acid diesters were formed from diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols under the same conditions. In the case of crude palm oil, only CP fatty acid diesters were formed. Therefore, these results indicated that CPFAEs in refined palm oil were formed mainly from triacylglycerols. PMID:26822095

  9. Uric acid induces NADPH oxidase-independent neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Nishinaka, Yoko; Arai, Toshiyuki; Morita, Makiko; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Adachi, Souichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Kouhei

    2014-01-10

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of extracellular DNA fibers with antimicrobial peptides that capture and kill microbes. NETs play a critical role in innate host defense and in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. While the mechanism of NET formation remains unclear, reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced via activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox) are known to be an important requirement. In this study, we investigated the effect of uric acid (UA) on NET formation. UA, a well-known ROS scavenger, was found to suppress Nox-dependent ROS release in a dose-dependent manner. Low concentrations of UA significantly inhibited Nox-dependent NET formation. However, high concentrations of UA unexpectedly induced, rather than inhibited, NET formation. NETs were directly induced by UA alone in a Nox-independent manner, as revealed by experiments using control neutrophils treated with ROS inhibitors or neutrophils of patients with chronic granulomatous disease who have a congenital defect in ROS production. Furthermore, we found that UA-induced NET formation was partially mediated by NF-κB activation. Our study is the first to demonstrate the novel function of UA in NET formation and may provide insight into the management of patients with hyperuricemia. PMID:24326071

  10. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  11. Effects of copper, iron and fluoride co-crystallized with sugar on caries development and acid formation in deslivated rats.

    PubMed

    Rosalen, P L; Pearson, S K; Bowen, W H

    1996-11-01

    The purpose was to explore the effects of combinations of copper, iron and fluoride (Cu, Fe and F) incorporated in sucrose by co-crystallization on caries development in the deslivated rat model and to examine acid formation by bacteria in the rat mouth. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were infected with Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 and desalivated when aged 26 days. Eight groups were placed in a König-Höfer programmed feeder and received 17 meals daily at hourly intervals, and essential nutrition (NCP No. 2) by gavage twice daily for 21 days. The groups received (1) plain sucrose, (2) F (8 parts/10(6)) co-crystallized with sucrose, (3) Fe (88 parts/10(6)) sucrose, (4) Cu (75 parts/10(6)) sucrose, (5) Cu + F sucrose, (6) Cu + L Fe sucrose, (7) F + Fe sucrose, and (8) Cu + Fe + F sucrose. At death the jaws were removed and sonicated in 0.9% saline solution for microbial assessment. In addition, organic acid assays were performed for each animal. Keyes smooth-surface and sulcal caries scores were lowest in the Cu + Fe + F sucrose group, but not statistically significantly different from those of the other Cu groups. The numbers of Strep. sobrinus found in the groups that received Cu, Cu + Fe, Cu + F, F + Fe and Cu + Fe + F sugar were lower than in the control group. Lactic acid was found in lower concentrations in Fe, Cu, Cu + F, Cu + Fe and F + Fe groups than in the other groups. It appears that combinations of Cu; Fe and F co-crystallized with sugar may have an additive effect in reducing the cariogenic potential of sugar by affecting lactic acid formation and reducing bacterial colonization. PMID:9068864

  12. Tribological properties of boric acid and boric-acid-forming surfaces: Part 2, Formation and self-lubrication mechanisms of boric acid films on boron- and boric-oxide-containing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A.; Busch, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the formation and self-lubricating mechanisms of boric acid films on boron- and boric oxide-containing surfaces. As reported in part I, boric acid, owing to a layered triclinic crystal structure and weak interlayer bonds, enjoys an unusual lubrication capability. RF-magnetron sputtering and vacuum evaporation techniques were used to produce thin coatings of boron and boric oxides on steel substrates. The results of tribological experiments indicate that the room temperature friction coefficient of tribosystems that include boron and/or boric oxide coatings ranges from 0.05 to 0.07, depending on the coating type. Laser-Raman spectroscopy of these surfaces revealed that this low friction is associated with a thin boric acid film that forms on the surfaces of these coatings. The fabrication and potential importance of boric acid and boric acid-forming surfaces for practical applications are enumerated. Surface engineering of tribomaterials, such as these demonstrated in this paper, is suggested as a new lubrication concept for use in present and future tribological industries. 16 refs.

  13. Bleb formation is induced by alkaline but not acidic pH in estrogen receptor silenced breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham A; Mathew, Princy M; Alam-Eldin, Nada S; Luqmani, Yunus A

    2015-04-01

    De novo and acquired resistance to endocrine-based therapies in breast cancer occurs in parallel with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with enhanced proliferative and metastatic potential, and poor clinical outcome. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA-induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF7 cells. All of these exhibit EMT. We have previously reported that brief exposure of specifically ER- breast cancer cells, to extracellular alkaline pH, results in cell rounding and segregation, and leads to enhanced invasive potential. In this study we describe more detailed morphological changes and compare these with cell exposure to acidic pH. Morphological changes and localization of various molecules critical for cell adhesion and motility, associated with pH effects, were assessed by live cell microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence. Exposure of either ER- or ER+ breast cancer cells to extracellular acidic pH did not induce significant changes in morphological appearance. Conversely, brief exposure of specifically ER silenced cells, to alkaline pH, resulted in cell contractolation and formation of bleb-like actin-rich structures which were evenly distributed on the outer membrane. Integrin α2, FAK, and JAM-1 were found in the cytoplasm streaming into the newly formed blebs. These blebs appear to be related to cell polarity and movement. Pre-treatment with cytochalasin-D or inhibitors of Rho or MLCK prevented both contractolation and bleb formation. Our data suggest that the effect of pH on the microenvironment of endocrine resistant breast cancer cells needs to be more extensively investigated. Alkaline, rather than acidic pH, appears to induce dramatic morphological changes, and enhances their invasive capabilities, through re-organization of cortical actin. PMID:25672508

  14. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  15. Rural School as a Resource for the Intellectual and Labour Potential Formation of the Rural Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasibullov, Ramis R.; Korshunova, Olga V.; Arshabekov, Nurgali R.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research problem is reasoned by the need to create conceptual grounds of life organization variants in the rural school as a resource of intellectual and labor potential formation of rural society taking into account the socio-economic realities of Russia's development in the beginning of the twenty-first century, as well as…

  16. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  17. Cognitive Association Formation in Episodic Memory: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Alice S. N.; Vallesi, Antonino; Picton, Terence W.; Tulving, Endel

    2009-01-01

    The present study focused on the processes underlying cognitive association formation by investigating subsequent memory effects. Event-related potentials were recorded as participants studied pairs of words, presented one word at a time, for later recall. The findings showed that a frontal-positive late wave (LW), which occurred 1-1.6 s after the…

  18. Automated Mapping of Potential for Ephemeral Gully Formation in Agricultural Watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erosion associated with ephemeral gullies in cultivated areas is known to contribute significantly to soil loss and sediment yield from arable watersheds. Despite this, no automated method currently exists for mapping the potential for ephemeral gully formation. This study identifies that the capabi...

  19. Phenolic acid composition, antiatherogenic and anticancer potential of honeys derived from various regions in Greece.

    PubMed

    Spilioti, Eliana; Jaakkola, Mari; Tolonen, Tiina; Lipponen, Maija; Virtanen, Vesa; Chinou, Ioanna; Kassi, Eva; Karabournioti, Sofia; Moutsatsou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    The phenolic acid profile of honey depends greatly on its botanical and geographical origin. In this study, we carried out a quantitative analysis of phenolic acids in the ethyl acetate extract of 12 honeys collected from various regions in Greece. Our findings indicate that protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid are the major phenolic acids of the honeys examined. Conifer tree honey (from pine and fir) contained significantly higher concentrations of protocatechuic and caffeic acid (mean: 6640 and 397 µg/kg honey respectively) than thyme and citrus honey (mean of protocatechuic and caffeic acid: 437.6 and 116 µg/kg honey respectively). p-Hydroxybenzoic acid was the dominant compound in thyme honeys (mean: 1252.5 µg/kg honey). We further examined the antioxidant potential (ORAC assay) of the extracts, their ability to influence viability of prostate cancer (PC-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells as well as their lowering effect on TNF- α-induced adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells (HAEC). ORAC values of Greek honeys ranged from 415 to 2129 µmol Trolox equivalent/kg honey and correlated significantly with their content in protocatechuic acid (p<0.001), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p<0.01), vanillic acid (p<0.05), caffeic acid (p<0.01), p-coumaric acid (p<0.001) and their total phenolic content (p<0.001). Honey extracts reduced significantly the viability of PC-3 and MCF-7 cells as well as the expression of adhesion molecules in HAEC. Importantly, vanillic acid content correlated significantly with anticancer activity in PC-3 and MCF-7 cells (p<0.01, p<0.05 respectively). Protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid and total phenolic content correlated significantly with the inhibition of VCAM-1 expression (p<0.05, p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively). In conclusion, Greek honeys are rich in phenolic acids, in particular protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid and exhibit significant antioxidant, anticancer and

  20. Phenolic Acid Composition, Antiatherogenic and Anticancer Potential of Honeys Derived from Various Regions in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Spilioti, Eliana; Jaakkola, Mari; Tolonen, Tiina; Lipponen, Maija; Virtanen, Vesa; Chinou, Ioanna; Kassi, Eva; Karabournioti, Sofia; Moutsatsou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    The phenolic acid profile of honey depends greatly on its botanical and geographical origin. In this study, we carried out a quantitative analysis of phenolic acids in the ethyl acetate extract of 12 honeys collected from various regions in Greece. Our findings indicate that protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid are the major phenolic acids of the honeys examined. Conifer tree honey (from pine and fir) contained significantly higher concentrations of protocatechuic and caffeic acid (mean: 6640 and 397 µg/kg honey respectively) than thyme and citrus honey (mean of protocatechuic and caffeic acid: 437.6 and 116 µg/kg honey respectively). p-Hydroxybenzoic acid was the dominant compound in thyme honeys (mean: 1252.5 µg/kg honey). We further examined the antioxidant potential (ORAC assay) of the extracts, their ability to influence viability of prostate cancer (PC-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells as well as their lowering effect on TNF- α-induced adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells (HAEC). ORAC values of Greek honeys ranged from 415 to 2129 µmol Trolox equivalent/kg honey and correlated significantly with their content in protocatechuic acid (p<0.001), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p<0.01), vanillic acid (p<0.05), caffeic acid (p<0.01), p-coumaric acid (p<0.001) and their total phenolic content (p<0.001). Honey extracts reduced significantly the viability of PC-3 and MCF-7 cells as well as the expression of adhesion molecules in HAEC. Importantly, vanillic acid content correlated significantly with anticancer activity in PC-3 and MCF-7 cells (p<0.01, p<0.05 respectively). Protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid and total phenolic content correlated significantly with the inhibition of VCAM-1 expression (p<0.05, p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively). In conclusion, Greek honeys are rich in phenolic acids, in particular protocatechuic and p-hydroxybenzoic acid and exhibit significant antioxidant, anticancer and

  1. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * PREFACE * INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE * LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AT TOHOKU UNIVERSITY * CHAPTER 1: DOUBLE LAYERS, SHEATHS, AND POTENTIAL STRUCTURES * 1.1 Double Layers * On Fluid Models of Stationary, Acoustic Double Layers (Invited) * Particle Simulation of Double Layer (Invited) * Space-Time Dependence of Non-Steady Double Layers * The Role of Low Energy Electrons for the Generation of Anode Double Layers in Glow Discharges * Arbitrary Amplitude Ion-Acoustic Double Layers in a Dusty Plasma * 1.2 Sheaths * Bounded Plasma Edge Physics as Observed from Simulations in 1D and 2D (Invited) * Control of RF Sheath Structure in RF Diode Discharge * Observation of Density Gradients with Fine Structures and Low Frequency Wave Excitation at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary * Double Sheath Associated with an Electron Emission to a Plasma Containing Negative Ions * Sheath Edge and Floating Potential for Multi-Species Plasmas Including Dust Particles * 1.3 Potential Structures and Oscillations * Potential Structure Formed at a Constriction of a DC He Positive Column and its Coupling with Ionization Wave * Potential Structure in a New RF Magnetron Device with a Hollow Electrode * Potential Disruption in a RF Afterglow Electronegative Plasma * Potential Oscillation in a Strongly Asymmetry RF Discharge Containing Negative Ions * Effects of External Potential Control on Coulomb Dust Behavior * Potential Structure of Carbon Arc Discharge for High-Yield Fullerenes Formation * Control of Axial and Radial Potential Profiles in Tandem Mirrors (Invited) * CHAPTER 2: FIELD-ALIGNED ELECTRIC FIELDS AND RELATED PARTICLE ACCELERATIONS * 2.1 Field-Aligned Potential Formation * Formation of Large Potential Difference in a Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines (Invited) * Presheath Formation in front of an Oblique End-Plate in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma * Plasma Potential Formation Due to ECRH in a Magnetic Well * Electrostatic

  2. Cartilage Acidic Protein–1B (LOTUS), an Endogenous Nogo Receptor Antagonist for Axon Tract Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yasufumi; Iketani, Masumi; Kurihara, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Yamashita, Naoya; Nakamura, Fumio; Arie, Yuko; Kawasaki, Takahiko; Hirata, Tatsumi; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Goshima, Yoshio; Takei, Kohtaro

    2011-01-01

    Neural circuitry formation depends on the molecular control of axonal projection during development. By screening with fluorophore-assisted light inactivation in the developing mouse brain, we identified cartilage acidic protein–1B as a key molecule for lateral olfactory tract (LOT) formation and named it LOT usher substance (LOTUS). We further identified Nogo receptor–1 (NgR1) as a LOTUS-binding protein. NgR1 is a receptor of myelin-derived axon growth inhibitors, such as Nogo, which prevent neural regeneration in the adult. LOTUS suppressed Nogo-NgR1 binding and Nogo-induced growth cone collapse. A defasciculated LOT was present in lotus-deficient mice but not in mice lacking both lotus- and ngr1. These findings suggest that endogenous antagonism of NgR1 by LOTUS is crucial for normal LOT formation. PMID:21817055

  3. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Degradation Using UV-Persulfate Process: Modeling of the Degradation and Chlorate Formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Yalei; Peng, Yue; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Crittenden, John C

    2016-01-19

    In this study, we investigated the destruction and by-product formation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) using ultraviolet light and persulfate (UV-PS). Additionally, we developed a first-principles kinetic model to simulate both PFOA destruction and by-product and chlorate (ClO3(-)) formation in ultrapure water (UW), surface water (SW), and wastewater (WW). PFOA degradation was significantly suppressed in the presence of chloride and carbonate species and did not occur until all the chloride was converted to ClO3(-) in UW and for low DOC concentrations in SW. The model was able to simulate the PS decay, pH changes, radical concentrations, and ClO3(-) formation for UW and SW. However, our model was unable to simulate PFOA degradation well in WW, possibly from PS activation by NOM, which in turn produced sulfate radicals. PMID:26686982

  4. Biomimetic Nitration of Conjugated Linoleic Acid: Formation and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Conjugated Nitrodienes

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitro-conjugated linoleic acids (NO2-cLA), endogenous nitrodiene lipids which act as inflammatory signaling mediators, were isolated and single isomers purified from the biomimetic acidic nitration products of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Structures were elucidated by means of detailed NMR and HPLC–MS/MS spectroscopic analysis and the relative double bond configurations assigned. Additional synthetic methods produced useful quantities and similar isomeric distributions of these unusual and reactive compounds for biological studies and isotopic standards, and the potential conversion of nitro-linoleic to nitro-conjugated linoleic acids was explored via a facile base-catalyzed isomerization. This represents one of the few descriptions of naturally occurring conjugated nitro dienes (in particular, 1-nitro 1,3-diene), an unusual and highly reactive motif with few biological examples extant. PMID:24350701

  5. Potential applications of antimicrobial fatty acids in medicine, agriculture and other industries.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial effects of free fatty acids are well recognised and these compounds can prevent the growth of or directly kill bacteria, fungi and other microbes by affecting multiple cellular targets, including the cell membrane and components found therein. Moreover, fatty acids exert detrimental effects on microbial pathogens by interfering with mechanisms of virulence, such as preventing biofilm formation and inhibiting the production of toxins and enzymes. The antimicrobial properties of free fatty acids can be exploited for the preservation of perishable products, such as food and cosmetics, and for the prevention and treatment of infections. These safe natural products are particularly useful in circumstances where antimicrobial activity is required but where the use of conventional antibiotics is undesirable or forbidden. This review focuses on the most promising prospects for exploiting the antimicrobial properties of free fatty acids for applications in various industries. The benefits of using fatty acids as antimicrobial agents are discussed and relevant recent patents are highlighted. PMID:22630821

  6. Toward Accurate Modeling of the Effect of Ion-Pair Formation on Solute Redox Potential.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaohui; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-09-13

    A scheme to model the dependence of a solute redox potential on the supporting electrolyte is proposed, and the results are compared to experimental observations and other reported theoretical models. An improved agreement with experiment is exhibited if the effect of the supporting electrolyte on the redox potential is modeled through a concentration change induced via ion pair formation with the salt, rather than by only considering the direct impact on the redox potential of the solute itself. To exemplify the approach, the scheme is applied to the concentration-dependent redox potential of select molecules proposed for nonaqueous flow batteries. However, the methodology is general and enables rational computational electrolyte design through tuning of the operating window of electrochemical systems by shifting the redox potential of its solutes; including potentially both salts as well as redox active molecules. PMID:27500744

  7. Antimicrobial Property of Lauric Acid Against Propionibacterium acnes: Its Therapeutic Potential for Inflammatory Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C.; Fang, Jia-You; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The strong bactericidal properties of lauric acid (C12:0), a middle chain-free fatty acid commonly found in natural products, have been shown in a number of studies. However, it has not been demonstrated whether lauric acid can be used for acne treatment as a natural antibiotic against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), which promotes follicular inflammation (inflammatory acne). This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of lauric acid against P. acnes both in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of the skin bacteria P. acnes, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) with lauric acid yielded minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against the bacterial growth over 15 times lower than those of benzoyl peroxide (BPO). The lower MIC values of lauric acid indicate stronger antimicrobial properties than that of BPO. The detected values of half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of lauric acid on P. acnes, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis growth indicate that P. acnes is the most sensitive to lauric acid among these bacteria. In addition, lauric acid did not induce cytotoxicity to human sebocytes. Notably, both intradermal injection and epicutaneous application of lauric acid effectively decreased the number of P. acnes colonized with mouse ears, thereby relieving P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. The obtained data highlight the potential of using lauric acid as an alternative treatment for antibiotic therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:19387482

  8. Kinetics of gypsum formation and growth during the dissolution of colemanite in sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, E.; Eroğlu, İ.; Özkar, S.

    2001-11-01

    One of the most important boron minerals, colemanite, is dissolved in aqueous sulfuric acid to produce boric acid whereby gypsum is formed as byproduct. Filtration of gypsum has an important role in boric acid production because gypsum affects the efficiency, purity and crystallization of boric acid. The formation and growth kinetics of gypsum during the dissolution of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied in a batch reactor by varying the temperature (60-90°C), stirring rate (150-400 rpm), and initial concentrations of the reactants. The initial CaO/H 2SO 4 molar ratio was varied between 0.21-0.85 by keeping the initial concentration of sulfate ion at [SO 42-] o=0.623 mol/l, and 0.85-3.41 by keeping the initial concentration of colemanite at [B 2O 3] o=0.777 mol/l. The crystallization of gypsum from the solution was followed by monitoring the calcium ion concentration in the solution as it is decreased by the formation of calcium sulfate precipitate. The calcium ion concentration in the liquid phase first undergoes a rapid exponential decay and then slowly approaches an asymptotic value of the saturation concentration at the respective temperature. The saturation concentration decreases with the increasing temperature from 5.2 mmol/l at 60°C to 3.1 mmol/l at 80°C, however, further increase in the temperature up to 90°C causes an increase in the saturation concentration to 5.1 mmol/l. The stirring rate was found to have no significant effect on dissolution in the range of 150-400 rpm. The minimum saturation concentration of the calcium ion was obtained at 80°C when the initial CaO/H 2SO 4 molar ratio is 0.85. The boric acid concentration in the solution decreases with the decreasing initial concentration of sulfuric acid. After the fast dissolution reaction of colemanite in aqueous sulfuric acid, the nucleation of the gypsum crystals first occurs from the supersaturated solution and then the crystals grow on these nuclei. The needle like crystals

  9. Evaluation of Acid Producing Potential of Road-cut Rock Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Han, D.

    2006-12-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) developed as a result of road construction represents a number of technical, environmental, and social problems. Engineering impacts from ARD, the product of atmospheric oxidation of rock-forming sulfide minerals, including degradation of surface water quality, disintegration of construction materials, and structural damage of buildings, have been documented widely around the world. To characterize the ARD and to evaluate acid producing potential of road-cut rocks, samples of rocks and water were collected from two road-cut sites of shale to phyllite showing such visual indicators of ARD as orange iron precipitates along streambed and rocks. Acid Base Accounting (ABA) test, the most commonly applied static test to evaluate the potential acidity, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were performed for fifteen rock samples. In terms of NAPP (Net Acid Producing Potential) and NAGpH (pH of Net Acid Generation), seven, four, and four rock samples were classified into a PAF (potentially acid forming) group, a NAF (non-acid forming) group, and an uncertain group, respectively. Water samples with low pH of 4.4, low DO (dissolved oxygen), and high contents of heavy metals and sulfate ion showed the generation of ARD in the studied area, which confirmed the applicability of ABA test to prediction of ARD in road-cut rock slopes. Evaluation of acid producing potential of earth materials should be an essential step in the pre-design stage of construction works especially in the vicinity of mining areas.

  10. Deuterium Fractionation during Amino Acid Formation by Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs Containing Deuterated Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Takano, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH2DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α-alanine, β-alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α-alanine and β-alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  11. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-oleic acid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2015-04-29

    The solubility of starch-inclusion complexes affects the digestibility and bioavailability of the included molecules. Acetylation with two degrees of substitution, 0.041 (low) and 0.091 (high), combined without or with a β-amylase treatment was employed to improve the yield and solubility of the inclusion complex between debranched potato starch and oleic acid. Both soluble and insoluble complexes were recovered and analyzed for their degree of acetylation, complexation yields, molecular size distributions, X-ray diffraction patterns, and thermal properties. Acetylation significantly increased the amount of recovered soluble complexes as well as the complexed oleic acid in both soluble and insoluble complexes. High-acetylated debranched-only starch complexed the highest amount of oleic acid (38.0 mg/g) in the soluble complexes; low-acetylated starch with or without the β-amylase treatment resulted in the highest complexed oleic acid in the insoluble complexes (37.6-42.9 mg/g). All acetylated starches displayed the V-type X-ray pattern, and the melting temperature generally decreased with acetylation. The results indicate that starch acetylation with or without the β-amylase treatment can improve the formation and solubility of the starch-oleic acid complex. PMID:25877005

  12. Towards reducing DBP formation potential of drinking water by favouring direct ozone over hydroxyl radical reactions during ozonation.

    PubMed

    De Vera, Glen Andrew; Stalter, Daniel; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Weinberg, Howard S; Keller, Jurg; Farré, Maria José

    2015-12-15

    When ozonation is employed in advanced water treatment plants to produce drinking water, dissolved organic matter reacts with ozone (O3) and/or hydroxyl radicals (OH) affecting disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation with subsequently used chlorine-based disinfectants. This study presents the effects of varying exposures of O3 and •OH on DBP concentrations and their associated toxicity generated after subsequent chlorination. DBP formation potential tests and in vitro bioassays were conducted after batch ozonation experiments of coagulated surface water with and without addition of tertiary butanol (t-BuOH, 10 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mg/mg O3), and at different pH (6-8) and transferred ozone doses (0-1 mg/mg TOC). Although ozonation led to a 24-37% decrease in formation of total trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetamides, an increase in formation of total trihalonitromethanes, chloral hydrate, and haloketones was observed. This effect however was less pronounced for samples ozonated at conditions favoring molecular ozone (e.g., pH 6 and in the presence of t-BuOH) over •OH reactions (e.g., pH 8 and in the presence of H2O2). Compared to ozonation only, addition of H2O2 consistently enhanced formation of all DBP groups (20-61%) except trihalonitromethanes. This proves that •OH-transformed organic matter is more susceptible to halogen incorporation. Analogously, adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) concentrations increased under conditions that favor •OH reactions. The ratio of unknown to known AOX, however, was greater at conditions that promote direct O3 reactions. Although significant correlation was found between AOX and genotoxicity with the p53 bioassay, toxicity tests using 4 in vitro bioassays showed relatively low absolute differences between various ozonation conditions. PMID:26378731

  13. Slow peptide bond formation by proline and other N-alkylamino acids in translation

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Watts, Richard E.; Tan, Zhongping; Cornish, Virginia W.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are made from 19 aa and, curiously, one N-alkylamino acid (“imino acid”), proline (Pro). Pro is thought to be incorporated by the translation apparatus at the same rate as the 19 aa, even though the alkyl group in Pro resides directly on the nitrogen nucleophile involved in peptide bond formation. Here, by combining quench-flow kinetics and charging of tRNAs with cognate and noncognate amino acids, we find that Pro incorporates in translation significantly more slowly than Phe or Ala and that other N-alkylamino acids incorporate much more slowly. Our results show that the slowest step in incorporation of N-alkylamino acids is accommodation/peptidyl transfer after GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu. The relative incorporation rates correlate with expectations from organic chemistry, suggesting that amino acid sterics and basicities affect translation rates at the peptidyl transfer step. Cognate isoacceptor tRNAs speed Pro incorporation to rates compatible with in vivo, although still 3–6 times slower than Phe incorporation from Phe-tRNAPhe depending on the Pro codon. Results suggest that Pro is the only N-alkylamino acid in the genetic code because it has a privileged cyclic structure that is more reactive than other N-alkylamino acids. Our data on the variation of the rate of incorporation of Pro from native Pro-tRNAPro isoacceptors at 4 different Pro codons help explain codon bias not accounted for by the “tRNA abundance” hypothesis. PMID:19104062

  14. Do carboximide–carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Gautam, Raj; Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular inter­actions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations. PMID:25995843

  15. Extraction of pyridines into fluorous solvents based on hydrogen bond complex formation with carboxylic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Geib, Steven; Weber, Stephen G

    2007-04-15

    A molecular receptor embedded in a 'poor-solvent' receiving phase, such as a fluorous phase, should offer the ideal medium for selective extraction and sensing. The limited solubility of most solutes in fluorous phases enhances selectivity by reducing the extraction of unwanted matrix components. Thus, receptor-doped fluorous phases may be ideal extraction media. Unfortunately, sufficient data do not exist to judge the capability of this approach. The solubilities of very few nonfluorous solutes are known. As far as we are aware, such important quantities as the strength of a hydrogen bond in a fluorous environment are not known. Thus, it is currently impossible to predict whether a particular receptor/solute complex based on a particular set of noncovalent interactions will provide enough thermodynamic stabilization to extract the solute into the fluorous phase. In this work, fluorous carboxylic acids (a carboxylic acid-terminated perfluoropolypropylene oxide called Krytox and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA)) were used as receptors and substituted pyridines as solutes to show that the fluorous receptor dramatically enhances the liquid-liquid extraction of the polar substrates from chloroform into perfluorohexanes. The method of continuous variations was used to determine the receptor-pyridine complex stoichiometry of 3:1. The free energies of formation of the 3:1 complexes from one pyridine and 3/2 H-bonded cyclic dimers of the fluorous carboxylic acid are -30.4 (Krytox) and -37.3 kJ mol-1 (PFDA). The free energy required to dissociate the dimer in perfluorohexanes is +16.5 kJ mol-1 (Krytox). The crystal structure of the complex showed a 1:1 stoichiometry with a mixed strong-weak hydrogen-bonded motif. Based on the stoichiometry, crystal structure, and UV and IR spectroscopic shifts, we propose that the 3:1 complex has four hydrogen bonds and the carboxylic acid transfers a proton to pyridine. The resulting pyridinium carboxylate N+H-O- hydrogen bond is accompanied

  16. Retinoic acid, local cell-cell interactions, and pattern formation in vertebrate limbs.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S V; Gardiner, D M

    1992-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, has remarkable effects on developing and regenerating limbs. These effects include teratogenesis, arising from RA's ability to inhibit growth and pattern formation. They also include pattern duplication, arising as a result of the stimulation of additional growth and pattern formation. In this review we present evidence that the diverse effects of RA are consistent with a singular, underlying explanation. We propose that in all cases exogenously applied RA causes the positional information of pattern formation-competent cells to be reset to a value that is posterior-ventral-proximal with respect to the limb. The diversity of outcomes can be seen as a product of the mode of application of exogenous RA (global versus local) coupled with the unifying concept that growth and pattern formation in both limb development and limb regeneration are controlled by local cell-cell interactions, as formulated in the polar coordinate model. We explore the possibility that the major role of endogenous RA in limb development is in the establishment of the limb field rather than as a diffusible morphogen that specifies graded positional information across the limb as previously proposed. Finally, we interpret the results of the recent finding that RA can turn tail regenerates into limbs, as evidence that intercalary interactions may also be involved in the formation of the primary body axis. PMID:1628749

  17. Formation of the Q ball in the thermal logarithmic potential and its properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta

    2010-04-15

    We investigate the Q-ball formation in the thermal logarithmic potential by means of the lattice simulation, and reconfirm qualitatively the relation between Q-ball charge and the amplitude of the Affleck-Dine field at the onset of its oscillation. We find time dependence of some properties of the Q ball, such as its size and the field value at its center. Since the thermal logarithmic potential decreases as the temperature falls down, the gravity-mediation potential will affect the properties of the Q ball. Even in the case when the gravity-mediation potential alone does not allow Q-ball solution, we find the transformation from the thick-wall type of the Q ball to the thin-wall type, contrary to the naive expectation that the Q balls will be destroyed immediately when the gravity-mediation potential becomes dominant at the center of the Q ball.

  18. Stimulation of delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Formation in Algal Extracts by Heterologous RNA.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J D; Mayer, S M; Beale, S I

    1986-12-01

    Formation of the chlorophyll and heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from glutamate in soluble extracts of Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, and Cyanidium caldarium was stimulated by addition of low molecular weight RNA derived from greening algae or plant tissue. Enzyme extracts were prepared for the ALA formation assay by high-speed centrifugation, partial RNA depletion, and gel filtration through Sephadex G-25. RNA was extracted from greening barley epicotyls, greening cucumber cotyledon chloroplasts, and growing cells of Chlorella, Euglena, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Anacystis nidulans, freed of protein, and fractionated on DEAE-cellulose to yield an active component corresponding to the tRNA-containing fraction. RNA from homologous and heterologous species stimulated ALA formation when added to enzyme extracts, and the degree of stimulation was proportional to the amount of RNA added. Algal enzyme extracts were stimulated by algal RNAs interchangeably, with the exception of RNA prepared from aplastidic Euglena, which did not stimulate ALA production. RNA from greening cucumber cotyledon chloroplasts and greening barley epicotyls stimulated ALA formation in algal enzyme incubations. In contrast, tRNA from Escherichia coli, both nonspecific and glutamate-specific, as well as wheat germ, bovine liver, and yeast tRNA, failed to reconstitute ALA formation. Moreover, E. coli tRNA inhibited ALA formation by algal extracts, both in the presence and absence of added algal RNA. Chlorella extracts were capable of catalyzing aminoacyl bond formation between glutamate and both the activity reconstituting and nonreconstituting RNAs, indicating that the inability of some RNAs to stimulate ALA formation was not due to their inability to serve as glutamyl acceptors. The first step in the ALA-forming reaction sequence has been proposed to be activation of glutamate via aminoacyl bond formation with a specific tRNA, analogous to the first step in peptide bond

  19. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing. PMID:25047093

  20. Effects of short-chain fatty acids on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, S; Kawarai, T; Narisawa, N; Tuna, E B; Sato, N; Tsugane, T; Saeki, Y; Ochiai, K; Senpuku, H

    2013-10-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer and has important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are secreted extracellularly as a product of metabolism by gram-negative anaerobes, e.g. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum; and the SCFA may affect biofilm development with interaction between A. naeslundii and gram-negative bacteria. Our aim was to investigate the effects of SCFA on biofilm formation by A. naeslundii and to determine the mechanism. We used the biofilm formation assay in 96-well microtiter plates in tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose using safranin stain of the biofilm monitoring 492 nm absorbance. To determine the mechanism by SCFA, the production of chaperones and stress-response proteins (GrpE and GroEL) in biofilm formation was examined using Western blot fluorescence activity with GrpE and GroEL antibodies. Adding butyric acid (6.25 mm) 0, 6 and 10 h after beginning culture significantly increased biofilm formation by A. naeslundii, and upregulation was observed at 16 h. Upregulation was also observed using appropriate concentrations of other SCFA. In the upregulated biofilm, production of GrpE and GroEL was higher where membrane-damaged or dead cells were also observed. The upregulated biofilm was significantly reduced by addition of anti-GroEL antibody. The data suggest biofilm formation by A. naeslundii was upregulated dependent on the production of stress proteins, and addition of SCFA increased membrane-damaged or dead cells. Production of GroEL may physically play an important role in biofilm development. PMID:23731652

  1. Tyrosine-rich acidic matrix protein (TRAMP) accelerates collagen fibril formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacBeath, J R; Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1993-09-15

    Tyrosine-rich acidic matrix protein (TRAMP) is a recently discovered protein that co-purifies with porcine skin lysyl oxidase and is equivalent to the M(r) 22,000 extracellular matrix protein from bovine skin that co-purifies with dermatan sulfate proteoglycans (Cronshaw, A. D., MacBeath, J. R. E., Shackleton, D. R., Collins, J. F., Fothergill-Gilmore, L. A., and Hulmes, D. J. S. (1993) Matrix 13, 255-266; Neame, P. J., Choi, H. U., and Rosenberg, L. C. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 5474-5479). The effect of TRAMP on collagen fibril formation was studied in vitro by reconstitution of fibrils from lathyritic rat skin collagen I. Fibril formation was initiated by the warm start procedure, in which acidic collagen solutions and double strength neutral buffer, both preincubated separately at 34 degrees C, were mixed. When monitored by turbidimetry, TRAMP was found to accelerate collagen fibril formation. Acceleration occurred at sub-stoichiometric molar ratios of TRAMP collagen, and the presence of TRAMP stabilized the fibrils against low temperature dissociation. It was confirmed by centrifugation that the amount of fibrillar collagen formed in the presence of TRAMP was greater than in its absence. By SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and scanning densitometry, binding of TRAMP to collagen was detected that approached saturation with a molar ratio of TRAMP to collagen of approximately 1:2. Fibrils formed in the presence of TRAMP were normal when observed by electron microscopy, although fibril diameters were smaller than the controls. TRAMP was found to partially reverse the inhibitory effects of urea and increased ionic strength on the kinetics of fibril formation, although inhibition by glucose was unaffected. TRAMP also accelerated the assembly of pepsin-treated collagen, where the non-helical, telopeptide regions were partially removed. Acceleration of collagen fibril formation by TRAMP is discussed in the light of the known effects of other extracellular matrix

  2. Retinoic acid and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulate osteoclast formation by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Hamilton, N.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of retinoic acid (RA) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) on osteoclast formation were examined in intact fetal long bones of different ages/developmental stages maintained in organ culture using a chemically defined medium with or without the presence of serum. Besides stimulating bone resorption, RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 increased the number of osteoclasts in 19-day-old fetal rat tibiae. Likewise, these bone-resorbing agents induced and stimulated osteoclast formation in 19- and 18-day-old metatarsal bones which were osteoclast-free at the beginning of the culture. The response to 1,25-(OH)2D3 was greatly enhanced by 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) irrespective of the developmental stage of the long bone. The response to RA was not. Light microscopic autoradiography after labeling of the cultures with tritiated thymidine showed that both RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 induced osteoclast differentiation from proliferating and postmitotic precursors. However, neither agent was able to stimulate proliferation of osteoclast progenitor cells in the older bones (19 days). Studies on the formation of osteoclast-like (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive) cells in bone marrow cultures indicated that FBS was a potent inducer of osteoclast-like cell formation. In the presence of FBS, 1,25-(OH)2D3 significantly stimulated this response, but RA did not. The results demonstrate that although both RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 stimulate osteoclast formation from proliferating and postmitotic precursors in long bones in vitro, they do so by different mechanisms.

  3. Identification of Ourmiavirus 30K movement protein amino acid residues involved in symptomatology, viral movement, subcellular localization and tubule formation.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Anderson, Charles T; Turina, Massimo; Rosa, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Several plant viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) classified in the 30K superfamily. Despite a great functional diversity, alignment analysis of MP sequences belonging to the 30K superfamily revealed the presence of a central core region, including amino acids potentially critical for MP structure and functionality. We performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) MP, and studied the effects of amino acid substitutions on MP properties and virus infection. We identified five OuMV mutants that were impaired in systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana, and two mutants showing necrosis and pronounced mosaic symptoms, respectively, in N. benthamiana. Green fluorescent protein fusion constructs (GFP:MP) of movement-defective MP alleles failed to localize in distinct foci at the cell wall, whereas a GFP fusion with wild-type MP (GFP:MPwt) mainly co-localized with plasmodesmata and accumulated at the periphery of epidermal cells. The movement-defective mutants also failed to produce tubular protrusions in protoplasts isolated from infected leaves, suggesting a link between tubule formation and the ability of OuMV to move. In addition to providing data to support the importance of specific amino acids for OuMV MP functionality, we predict that these conserved residues might be critical for the correct folding and/or function of the MP of other viral species in the 30K superfamily. PMID:26637973

  4. Isoprene Epoxydiols as Precursors to Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: Acid-Catalyzed Reactive Uptake Studies with Authentic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Zhang, Zhenfa; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Zhang, Haofei; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formed from the photooxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions, have recently been proposed as precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the basis of mass spectrometric evidence. In the present study, IEPOX isomers were synthesized in high purity (> 99%) to investigate their potential to form SOA via reactive uptake in a series of controlled dark chamber studies followed by reaction product analyses. IEPOX-derived SOA was substantially observed only in the presence of acidic aerosols, with conservative lower-bound yields of 4.7–6.4% for β-IEPOX and 3.4–5.5% for δ-IEPOX, providing direct evidence for IEPOX isomers as precursors to isoprene SOA. These chamber studies demonstrate that IEPOX uptake explains the formation of known isoprene SOA tracers found in ambient aerosols, including 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, dimers, and IEPOX-derived organosulfates. Additionally, we show reactive uptake on the acidified sulfate aerosols supports a previously unreported acid-catalyzed intramolecular rearrangement of IEPOX to cis- and trans-3-methyltetrahydrofuran-3,4-diols (3-MeTHF-3,4-diols) in the particle phase. Analysis of these novel tracer compounds by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) suggests that they contribute to a unique factor resolved from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of AMS organic aerosol spectra collected from low-NOx, isoprene-dominated regions influenced by the presence of acidic aerosols. PMID:22103348

  5. Solid-Phase Formation Of Isovaline, A Non-Biological, Meteoritic Amino Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Lewis, A. S.; Moore, M. H.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.

    2007-10-01

    Among the Murchison (CM) meteoritic amino acids, isovaline stands out as being non-biological (nonprotein) and having a high abundance. Approximately equal amounts of D- and L-isovaline have been reported in CM meteorites, but the molecule's structure appears to prohibit racemization in aqueous solutions. While it is possible that isovaline could be made by the oft-studied Strecker reaction, laboratory experiments have seldom been able to produce this molecule from realistic molecular precursors. Recently we have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of isovaline with an eye toward the molecule's formation, its stability, and the interconversion of its D- and L-enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovaline-containing ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive LC/ToF-MS methods to assess both amino acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied both in the presence and absence of water-ice, and the destruction of isovaline was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have continued our earlier work on solid-phase amino acid formation, extending it to cover isovaline. In this presentation we will report the results of these newer investigations. This work was supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. AL was supported by an award from the Summer Undergraduate Internship in Astrobiology program.

  6. Spectroscopic investigation on cocrystal formation between adenine and fumaric acid based on infrared and Raman techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yong; Fang, Hong Xia; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hui Li; Hong, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of double-stranded DNA, adenine has powerful hydrogen-bond capability, due to rich hydrogen bond donors and acceptors existing within its molecular structure. Therefore, it is easy to form cocrystal between adenine and other small molecules with intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect. In this work, cocrystal of adenine and fumaric acid has been characterized as model system by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The experimental results show that the cocrystal formed between adenine and fumaric acid possesses unique spectroscopical characteristic compared with that of starting materials. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to optimize the molecular structures and simulate vibrational modes of adenine, fumaric acid and the corresponding cocrystal. Combining the theoretical and experimental vibrational results, the characteristic bands corresponding to bending and stretching vibrations of amino and carbonyl groups within cocrystal are shifted into lower frequencies upon cocrystal formation, and the corresponding bond lengths show some increase due to the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Different vibrational modes shown in the experimental spectra have been assigned based on the simulation DFT results. The study could provide experimental and theoretical benchmarks to characterize cocrystal formed between active ingredients and cocrystal formers and also the intermolecular hydrogen-bond effect within cocrystal formation process by vibrational spectroscopic techniques.

  7. Participation of oleic acid in the formation of the aortic aneurysm in Marfan syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Soto, María Elena; Iturriaga Hernández, Alejandra Valeria; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto; Velázquez Espejel, Rodrigo; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2016-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is associated with progressive aortic dilatation and endothelial dysfunction that lead to early acute dissection and rupture of the aorta and sudden death. Alteration in fatty acid (FA) metabolism can stimulate nitric oxide (NO) overproduction which increases the activity of the inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS) that is involved in endothelial dysfunction. We evaluated the participation of FA in the formation of thoracic aneurysms in MFS and its relation to the iNOS. Oleic acid (OA), iNOS, citrulline, nitrates and nitrites, TGF-β1, TNF-α, monounsaturated FA and NO synthase activity were significantly increased (p<0.05) in tissue from the aortas of MFS. Saturated FA, eNOS and HDL were significantly decreased (p<0.05). Arachidonic acid, delta-9 desaturase tended to increase and histological examination showed an increase in cystic necrosis, elastic fibers and collagen in MFS. The increase in OA contributes to the altered pathway of iNOS, which favors endothelial dysfunction and formation of the aortic aneurysms in MFS. PMID:27163200

  8. The management of biofilm formation after hyaluronic acid gel filler injections: a review

    PubMed Central

    DUMITRAŞCU, DINU I.; GEORGESCU, ALEXANDRU V.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim One of the most popular procedures of facial fillers in recent years has become the use of hyaluronic acid (HA). However, this method may be associated with local side effects of different severity. Many of them are not due to allergies, as previously believed, but to the formation of biofilm. We review the current knowledge on biofilm after HA. Methods All pertinent full text papers retrieved from PubMed under search words: “biofilm”, “hyaluronic acid”, “dermal fillers”, “hyaluronic acid complications” and “hyaluronic acid side effects” were analyzed; 29 of 60 articles were selected fro analysis. Results Local infections were reported: 13 cases are attributable to the activation of the biofilm. Clinical evolution is generally mild. Therapy should avoid NSAID and is based on the administration of antibiotics, oral corticosteroids, or 5-Flourouracil. Removal of HA with hyaluronidase has also been proposed. Conclusions The use of HA in cosmetic procedures might be accompanied by local adverse effects attributable to biofilm formation. This usually has a mild evolution, but in special cases requires specific therapy. PMID:26527945

  9. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590355

  10. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic, kojic and picolinic acids

    PubMed Central

    Çevik, Kübra; Ulusoy, Seyhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The inhibitory effects of iron chelators, and FeCl3 chelation on biofilm formation and swarming motility were investigated against an opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory activity of 2,2’-bipyridyl, lipoic acid, kojic acid and picolinic acid on biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and three clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa PAK01, P. aeruginosa PAK02 and P. aeruginosa PAK03) were investigated, based on crystal violet assay, and swarming motility test. Results: The kojic, lipoic and picolinic acid inhibited biofilm formation by 5-33% in all tested P. aeruginosa isolates. When chelated iron was added, biofilm inhibition rates were determined to be 39-57%. Among the tested chelators against P. aeruginosa, lipoic acid (84%) and kojic acid (68%) presented the highest inhibition of swarming motility. This is the first study to report the inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on biofilm formation and swarming motility of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: It is considered that lipoic and picolinic acids can serve as alternatives for the treatment of the P. aeruginosa infections by inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:26557964

  11. Effects of epigallocatechin gallate, L-ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and dihydrolipoic acid on the formation of deoxyguanosine adducts derived from lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Raghu G; Wu, Mona Y; Emami, Armaghan; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2010-01-01

    Oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) releases alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes that modify deoxyguanosine (dG) to form cyclic 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine adducts. One of the major adducts detected in vivo is acrolein (Acr)-derived 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine (Acr-dG). We used a chemical model system to examine the effects of 4 antioxidants known to inhibit fatty acid oxidation on the formation of Acr-dG and 8-oxodeoxyguaonsine (8-oxodG) from the PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) under oxidative conditions. We found that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) inhibit both Acr-dG and 8-oxodG formation. In contrast, ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol actually increase Acr-dG at high concentrations and do not show a concentration-dependant inhibition of 8-oxodG. We also studied their effects on blocking Acr-dG formation directly from Acr. EGCG and DHLA can both effectively block Acr-dG formation, but ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol show weak or little effect. These results highlight the complexity of antioxidant mechanisms and also reveal that EGCG and DHLA are effective at suppressing lipid peroxidation-induced Acr-dG and 8-oxodG formation as well as blocking the reaction of dG with Acr. PMID:20574923

  12. Oil shale potential of the Heath and Tyler formations, Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, W.E.; Cole, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The units in the middle of the Heath formation below the gypsum beds were found to have the highest oil yields. That interval was generally 25 to 50 ft (7.6 to 15.2 m) thick. The upper portion of the Heath formation yielded as much as 9.8 gal/ton in section 9, and 14.9 gal/ton in section 10. The Tyler formation was determined to have very low oil potential, with the maximum yield being 2.2 gal/ton. The instability of some of the Heath slopes could present problems in the mining of oil shale. Specific stratigraphic horizons in which zones of high and low oil and metal contents occur would be extremely difficult to map in areas where the units have been displaced by landslide movement.

  13. Lane formation in pedestrian counterflows driven by a potential field considering following and avoidance behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Xiaolu; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2015-08-01

    Lane formation in pedestrian counterflows is an interesting self-organization phenomenon. It is believed to be caused by the following or avoidance behaviours of pedestrians. In this paper, a potential field CA model that considers the velocity and density distributions of a crowd and their subjective consciousness is proposed to study the effects of the two behaviours on lane formation in the case of a pedestrian counterflow in a corridor with a periodic boundary. An indexing system is introduced to distinguish the three different patterns observed in the counterflow, and a smoothness index is introduced to measure the smoothness of the counterflow. It is found that avoidance behaviour is more relevant to lane formation than following behaviour. Some differences between the two behaviours are also presented.

  14. Palmitic Acid Reduces Circulating Bone Formation Markers in Obese Animals and Impairs Osteoblast Activity via C16-Ceramide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Ahmad; Kiefhaber, Kathryn; Gold, Tziporah; Muluke, Munira; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and impaired lipid metabolism increase circulating and local fatty acid (FA) levels. Our previous studies showed that a high high-saturated -fat diet induced greater bone loss in mice than a high high-unsaturated-fat diet due to increased osteoclast numbers and activity. The impact of elevated FA levels on osteoblasts is not yet clear. We induced obesity in 4 week old male mice using a palmitic acid (PA)- or oleic acid (OA)-enriched high fat high-fat diet (HFD) (20 % of calories from FA), and compared them to mice on a normal (R) caloric diet (10 % of calories from FA). We collected serum to determine FA and bone metabolism marker levels. Primary osteoblasts were isolated; cultured in PA, OA, or control (C) medium; and assessed for mineralization activity, gene expression, and ceramide levels. Obese animals in the PA and OA groups had significantly lower serum levels of bone formation markers P1NP and OC compared to normal weight animals (*p < 0.001), with the lowest marker levels in animals on an PA-enriched HFD (*p < 0.001). Accordingly, elevated levels of PA significantly reduced osteoblast mineralization activity in vitro (*p < 0.05). Elevated PA intake significantly increased C16 ceramide accumulation. This accumulation was preventable through inhibition of SPT2 (serine palmitoyl transferase 2) using myriocin. Elevated levels of PA reduce osteoblast function in vitro and bone formation markers in vivo. Our findings suggest that saturated PA can compromise bone health by affecting osteoblasts, and identify a potential mechanism through which obesity promotes bone loss. PMID:26758875

  15. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  16. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  17. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  18. Formation of organic acids from the gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene was studied in static chamber experiments using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. Two isomers of C(7)-diacids and three isomers of C(7)-aldehydic acids were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Possible mechanisms of formation of these acids were investigated using different OH radical scavengers and relative humidities, and were compared to those reported earlier for the ozonolysis of beta-pinene. In addition, branching ratios for some of the individual reaction steps, e.g. the branching ratio between the two hydroperoxide channels of the C(7)-CI, were deduced from the quantitative product yield data. Branching ratios for POZ decomposition and the stabilisation/decomposition of the C(7-)CI were also obtained from measurements of the C(7) primary carbonyl product. PMID:19458821

  19. Formation of Small Gas Phase Carbonyls from Heterogeneous Oxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Gao, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are emitted into the atmosphere from gas and diesel powered vehicles, cooking, plants, and marine biota. Field measurements have suggested that FAs, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), could make up an important contribution to the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols. Due to the existence of carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecules, PUFA are believed to be highly reactive towards atmospheric oxidants such as OH and NO3 radicals and ozone, which will contribute to aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity. Previous work from our group has shown that small carbonyls formed from the heterogeneous reaction of linoleic acid (LA) thin films with gas-phase O3. It is known that the formation of small carbonyls in the atmosphere is not only relevant to the atmospheric budget of volatile organic compounds but also to secondary organic aerosol formation. In the present study, using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) we again investigated carbonyl formation from the same reaction system, i.e. the heterogeneous ozonolysis of LA film. In addition to the previously reported carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA), a source of reactive oxygen species that is mutagenic, has been identified as a product for the first time. Small dicarbonyls, e.g. glyoxal, are expected to be formed from the further oxidation of MDA. In this presentation, the gas-phase chemistry of MDA with OH radicals using a newly built Teflon chamber in our group will also be presented.

  20. Data on the relationship between bromide content and the formation potential of THMs, HAAs, and HANs upon chlorination and monochloramination of Karoon River water, Iran.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Samad; Kafaei, Raheleh; Hashemi, Seyedenayat; Ramavandi, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    This data article reports the relationship between of the bromide ion concentration and the formation potential of disinfectant byproducts (DBPs) including, trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), and haloacetonitriles (HANs) upon chlorination and monochloramination of the raw water of Karoon River water in Iran. Water samples were collected at an intake of a drinking water treatment plant during July 2014. All tests were performed in triplicate (n=3) and the mean of three measurements reported herein. The data of the formation potential of DBPs was determined under different bromide ions content. The data show the relationship between bromide concentration and DBPs formation that will be useful in the future management, operation and design of water treatment plants. PMID:27331122

  1. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  2. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  3. Precipitate Formation Potential of Resin Regeneration Effluent in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-10-09

    Calculations performed as part of this study indicate that injection of treated groundwater containing treated regenerant solution has a high potential for precipitate formation that could lead to plugging of formation porosity surrounding the injection well. In the worst case scenario, substantial plugging could occur within a year of the initiation of injection. Some uncertainty is associated with respect to this conclusion. The uncertainty results from the fact that equilibrium with the most stable mineral assemblage cannot always be assumed and that slow precipitation rates could occur and reliable estimates of precipitation kinetics under Hanford aquifer conditions are not available. It is recommended that the potential of calcium phosphate precipitation be investigated further using a combination of laboratory and field investigations.

  4. Rapid Formation of Cell Aggregates and Spheroids Induced by a "Smart" Boronic Acid Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2016-09-01

    Cell surface engineering has emerged as a powerful approach to forming cell aggregates/spheroids and cell-biomaterial ensembles with significant uses in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Herein, we demonstrate that cell membrane remodeling with a thermoresponsive boronic acid copolymer induces the rapid formation of spheroids using either cancer or cardiac cell lines under conventional cell culture conditions at minute concentrations. It is shown that the formation of well-defined spheroids is accelerated by at least 24 h compared to non-polymer-treated controls, and, more importantly, the polymer allows for fine control of the aggregation kinetics owing to its stimulus response to temperature and glucose content. On the basis of its simplicity and effectiveness to promote cellular aggregation, this platform holds promise in three-dimensional tissue/tumor modeling and tissue engineering applications. PMID:27571512

  5. Organosulfate formation during the uptake of pinonaldehyde on acidic sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng

    2006-07-01

    Organosulfates are observed in studies of pinonaldehyde reactions with acidic sulfate aerosols using aerosol mass spectrometry, during which a significant fraction of the pinonaldehyde reaction products were found to consist of organosulfate compounds that account for 6-51% of the initial SO4= mass. Resultant aerosol mass spectra were consistent with proposed sulfate ester mechanisms, which likely form stable products. The existence of organosulfates was also confirmed in studies of the reaction system in bulk solution. The formation of organosulfates suggests that conventional inorganic SO4= chemical analysis may underestimate total SO4= mass in ambient aerosols.

  6. XAS and RIXS study of acetic acid and methyl formate in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, O.; Nishida, N.; Kanai, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tokushima, T.

    2016-05-01

    Structure of acetic acid (AA) and methyl formate (MF) in the liquid phase is studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct XES spectra are observed by tuning photon energy for both molecules. Model structure in the liquid phase is constructed using the classical and first principle molecular dynamics simulations, and XES spectra are calculated using density functional theory. Calculated XES spectra are consistent with experimental ones. The effect of core-hole induced excited state molecular dynamics are discussed.

  7. Positronium Formation Of Glyeisdyl Methacrylic Acid (GMA)/Styrene Grafted On PVDF Membrane For Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Hady, E. E.; Abdel-Hamed, M. O.; Eltonny, M. M.

    2011-06-01

    Simultaneous gamma irradiation was used effectively for grafting of glycidyl methacrylic acid and styrene onto Poly vinyldine fluoride (PVDF). Membranes were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The properties of the obtained membranes were evaluated in terms of proton conductivity, methanol permeability and positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) parameters. The high probability of Positronium formation enables the application of PALS to the study of free volume. Good property values approved the applicability of the membrane from the cost benefit point of view.

  8. Some organic acids attenuate the effects of furosemide on the endocochlear potential.

    PubMed

    Rybak, L P; Whitworth, C

    1987-01-01

    A series of organic acid transport inhibitors significantly reduced the endocochlear potential (EP) decline produced by furosemide in the chinchilla. Probenecid, sodium salicylate and penicillin G were much more effective than novobiocin, meclofenamate or diatrizoate. Inhibitors of organic base transport, choline and N-methyl nicotinamide, had no effect on the furosemide-induced drop of the EP. These findings suggest that at least part of furosemide ototoxicity may be mediated by organic acid transport. PMID:2951360

  9. Analysis of the potential formation of a Breccia chimney beneath the WIPP repository

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegler, P.

    1982-05-01

    This report evaluates the potential formation of a Breccia pipe beginning at the Bell Canyon aquifer beneath the WIPP repository and the resulting release of radioactivity to the surface. Rock mechanics considerations indicate that the formation of a Breccia pipe by collapse of a cavern is not reasonable. Even if rock mechanics is ignored, the overlying strata act as a barrier and would prevent the release of radioactivity to the biosphere. Gradual formation of a Breccia pipe is so slow that the plutonium-239 in the waste (one of the most important long-lived components) would decay during formation. If Bell Lake and San Simon Sinks are the surface manifestation of a regional deep dissolution wedge, such a wedge is too far removed to represent pipe forming activity near the WIPP site. The formation of a Breccia pipe under the WIPP repository is highly unlikely. If it did occur, the concentration of plutonium-239 in brine reaching the surface would be less than the maximum permissible concentration in water specified in the Code of Federal Regulation Title 10, part 20.

  10. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, D James; Kroll, Jay A; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 ((3)B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited (1)B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  11. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF).

  12. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  13. Effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on bone formation in the expanded inter-premaxillary suture

    PubMed Central

    Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Aksakalli, Sertac; Ezirganli, Seref; Birlik, Muhammet; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Background Narrow maxilla is a common problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. To solve this problem, a procedure called rapid maxillary expansion (RME) has been used. However, relapse tendency is a major problem of RME. Although relapse tendency is not clearly understood, various treatment procedures and new applications have been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the possible effectiveness of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on new bone formation in rat midpalatal suture after RME. Materials and methods Twenty male Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study. The animals were randomly divided into two groups as control and CAPE group. In the CAPE group, CAPE was administered systemically via intraperitoneal injection. RME procedure was performed on all animals. For this purpose, the springs were placed on the maxillary incisors of rats and activated for 5 days. After then, the springs were removed and replaced with short lengths of rectangular retaining wire for consolidation period of 15 days. At the end of the study, histomorphometric analysis was carried out to assess new bone formation. Results New bone formation was significantly greater in the CAPE group than the control group (P<0.05). CAPE enhances new bone formation in midpalatal suture after RME. Conclusion These results show that CAPE may decrease the time needed for retention. PMID:26730181

  14. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-15

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO{sub 4}, by H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}).2H{sub 2}O and Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O fertilizer. - Graphical abstract: A new synthesis scheme for preparation of composite titanium phosphate (TiP) ion-exchangers upon one-stage decomposition process of natural sphene with phosphoric acid is presented. Syntheses of {alpha}-TiP-silica composites proceed via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases. The concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} determines the porosity of final products and their sorption affinities.

  15. [Linking optical properties of dissolved organic matter with NDMA formation potential in the Huangpu River].

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Ai; Li, Yong-Mei; Chen, Ling; Huang, Qing-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Surface water samples from the Huangpu River were filtered to measure the UV absorption and fluorescence spectrum. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and its formation potential (NDMA-FP) were also analyzed to explore relationships between the properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the formation potential of disinfection byproducts-NDMA in the Huangpu River. The study found that: NDMA-FP concentration increased with the increasing of DOC concentration (r = 0.487, P < 0.01), but it had negative relationships with SUVA254 and HIX (r = -0.605, P < 0.01; r = -0.396, P < 0.01). NDMA-FP concentration had positive relationships with the fluorescence intensity of protein-like substances such as low-molecular-weight (LMW) tyrosine-like and tryptophan-like substances (r = 0.421, P < 0.01; r = 0.426, P < 0.01), but had a negative relationship with humic-like substance (r = -0.422, P < 0.01). Therefore, NDMA formation potential increases with the increasing DOM content in the Huangpu River, which is significantly related with the protein-like substances, but decreases with the increasing aromaticity and humification of DOM. PMID:24881383

  16. Furan formation from fatty acids as a result of storage, gamma irradiation, UV-C and heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong

    2015-05-15

    The effects of gamma and UV-C irradiation in comparison with thermal processing and storage at 25°C on formation of furan from different fatty acids were investigated. Results showed that furan was generated from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic and linolenic acid during thermal (120°C, 25 min) and UV-C (11.5 J/cm(2)) treatments. Gamma irradiation (up to 20 kGy) did not induce formation of significant amounts of furan from any of the fatty acids studied. Storage of unsaturated fatty acid emulsions at 25°C for 3 days led to the formation of furan (7-11 ng/mL) even without prior thermal or non-thermal treatments. pH significantly impacted furan formation with >3.5 times more furan formed at pH 9 than at pHs 3 or 6 during 3 days at 25°C. The addition of Trolox, BHA, and propyl gallate had no significant effect on furan formation from linolenic acid while α-tocopherol and FeSO4 promoted furan formation. PMID:25577103

  17. Acid mine drainage potential of raw, retorted, and combusted Eastern oil shale: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.; Reddy, K.J.

    1987-09-01

    In order to manage the oxidation of pyritic materials effectively, it is necessary to understand the chemistry of both the waste and its disposal environment. The objective of this two-year study was to characterize the acid production of Eastern oil shale waste products as a function of process conditions, waste properties, and disposal practice. Two Eastern oil shales were selected, a high pyrite shale (unweathered 4.6% pyrite) and a low pyrite shale (weathered 1.5% pyrite). Each shale was retorted and combusted to produce waste products representative of potential mining and energy conversion processes. By using the standard EPA leaching tests (TCLP), each waste was characterized by determining (1) mineralogy, (2) trace element residency, and (3) acid-base account. Characterizing the acid producing potential of each waste and potential trace element hazards was completed with laboratory weathering studies. 32 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Standard enthalpies of formation of α-aminobutyric acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.

    2016-08-01

    Heats of solution of crystalline α-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide at 298.15 K are measured by means of direct calorimetry. Standard enthalpies of formation of the amino acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution are calculated.

  19. Formation of Amino Acid Precursors by Bombardment of Interstellar Ice Analogs with High Energy Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Mita, Hajime; Yoshida, Satoshi; Shibata, Hiromi; Enomoto, Shingo; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kotaro; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Kebukawa, Yoko

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial bodies. It has been recognized that carbonaceous chondrites contain pristine amino acids [1]. There are several scenarios of the formation of such extraterrestrial amino acids or their precursors. Greenberg proposed a scenario that complex organic compounds were formed in interstellar ices in dense clouds, which were brought into solar system small bodies when the solar system was formed [2]. The ice mantles of interstellar dust particles (ISDs) in dense clouds are composed of H2O, CO, CH3OH, CH4, CO2, NH3, etc. In order to verify the scenario, a number of laboratory experiments have been conducted where interstellar ice analogs were irradiated with high-energy particles [3,4] or UV [5,6], and formation of complex organic compounds including amino acid precursors were detected in the products. Though ion-molecular reactions in gaseous phase and surface reactions on the ice mantles have been studied intensively, much less works on cosmic rays-induced reaction have been reported. In order to study possible formation of complex molecules in interstellar ices, frozen mixtures of water, methanol and ammonia with various mixing ratios were irradiated with high-energy heavy ions such as carbon ions (290 MeV/u) and neon ions (400 MeV/u) from HIMAC, NIRS, Japan. For comparison, gaseous mixtures of water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and/or methane were irradiated with protons (2.5 MeV) from a Tandem accelerator, Tokyo Tech, Japan. Amino acids in the products were determined by cation exchange HPLC after acid hydrolysis. Products, both before and after acid hydrolysis, were also characterized by FT-IR and other techniques. Amino acids were detected in the hydrolyzed products after mixture of CH3OH, NH3 and H2O with various mixing ratios were irradiated with heavy ions, including when their mixing ratio was set close to the reported value of the interstellar ices (10:1:37). In the HIMAC

  20. Tsunami characteristics and formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit in Sanriku Coast: implications from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, D.; Haraguchi, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geological investigation of paleotsunami deposit is crucial for knowing the history and magnitude of tsunami events in the past. Among various kinds of grain sizes, sandy tsunami deposit has been best investigated by previous studies, because of its potential for identification in the sedimentary column. Many sandy tsunami deposits have been found from coastal plains, which have sandy beach and low-lying wetlands. However, sandy tsunami deposits in narrow valleys at rocky ria coast have rarely been found. It may be presumed that formation potential of sandy tsunami layer in the rocky coasts is generally lower than coastal plains, because of the absence of sandy beach, tsunami run-up on steeper slope and stronger return flow. In this presentation, characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake tsunami in Sanriku Coast, a continuous rocky ria coast located in the northeast Japan, is investigated based on numerical modeling. In addition, the formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit is also investigated based on numerical modeling of sediment transport. Preliminary result of tsunami hydrodynamics showed that the waveform and amplification of the tsunami are clearly affected by the local bathymetry, which is associated with submerged topography formed during the last glacial stage. Although the tsunami height in the offshore of each bay is around 8.0 m, the tsunami height at the bay head was increased in different way. The amplification factor at the bay head was typically 2.0 among most of V-shaped narrow embayments; meanwhile the amplification factor is much lower than 1.0 at some cases. The preliminary result of the modeling of sediment transport predicted huge amount of sediments may be suspended into the water column, given that sandy deposit is available there. Massive erosion and deposition of sea bottom sediments may commonly take place in the bays. However, formation of onshore tsunami deposit differs from each other. Whether the suspended sediments

  1. Bispalladacycle-catalyzed Brønsted acid/base-promoted asymmetric tandem azlactone formation-Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Weber, Manuel; Jautze, Sascha; Frey, Wolfgang; Peters, René

    2010-09-01

    Cooperative activation by a soft bimetallic catalyst, a hard Brønsted acid, and a hard Brønsted base has allowed the formation of highly enantioenriched, diastereomerically pure masked alpha-amino acids with adjacent quaternary and tertiary stereocenters in a single reaction starting from racemic N-benzoylated amino acids. The products can, for example, be used to prepare bicyclic dipeptides. PMID:20715774

  2. Titan's Primordial Soup: Formation of Amino Acids via Low Temperature Hydrolysis of Tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, Catherine; Somogyi, Á.; Smith, M. A.

    2009-09-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is a world rich in the "stuff of life". Reactions occurring in its dense nitrogen-methane atmosphere produce a wide variety of organic molecules, which subsequently rain down onto its surface. Water - thought to be another important ingredient for life - is likewise abundant on Titan. Theoretical models of Titan's formation predict that its interior consists of an ice I layer several tens of kilometers thick overlying a liquid ammonia-rich water layer several hundred kilometers thick (Tobie et al., 2005). Though its surface temperature of 94K dictates that Titan is on average too cold for liquid water to persist at its surface, melting caused by impacts and/or cryovolcanism may lead to its episodic availability. Impact melt pools on Titan would likely remain liquid for 102 - 104 years before freezing (O'Brien et al., 2005). The combination of complex organic molecules and transient locales of liquid water make Titan an interesting natural laboratory for studying prebiotic chemistry. In this work, we sought to determine what biomolecules might be formed under conditions analogous to those found in transient liquid water environments on Titan. We hydrolyzed Titan organic haze analogues, or "tholins", in 13 wt. % ammonia-water at 253K and 293K for a year. Using a combination of high resolution mass spectroscopy and tandem mass spectroscopy fragmentation techniques, four amino acids were identified in the hydrolyzed tholin sample. These four species have been assigned as the amino acids asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, and glutamic acid. This represents the first detection of biologically relevant molecules created under conditions similar to those found in impact melt pools and cryolavas on Titan. Future missions to Titan should therefore carry instrumentation capable of detecting amino acids and other prebiotically relevant molecules on its surface This work was supported by the NASA Exobiology Program.

  3. Assessment of the antioxidant potential and fatty acid composition of four Centaurea L. taxa from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aktumsek, Abdurrahman; Zengin, Gokhan; Guler, Gokalp Ozmen; Cakmak, Yavuz Selim; Duran, Ahmet

    2013-11-01

    This paper focused on the assessment of antioxidant property and fatty acid composition of four Centaurea species. The antioxidant activity of its methanol extract was evaluated by several in vitro experiments including phosphomolybedum assay, DPPH assay, β-carotene/linoleic acid, ferric and cupric reducing power. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also evaluated. The methanol extract of Centaurea pulcherrima var. pulcherrima showed the superior free radical scavenging activity, linoleic acid inhibition capacity, reducing power and also had the highest total phenolic content. A significant relationship between antioxidant capacity and total phenolic components was found. The oils of Centaurea taxa were also analysed for fatty acid concentration by gas chromatography. The principal fatty acids in the species were palmitic acid (23.38-30.49%) and linoleic acid (20.19-29.93%). These findings suggest that the Centaurea species could be used as a potential source of new natural antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids in food industry, cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:23768332

  4. Inhibitory effect of glutamic acid on the scale formation process using electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Karar, A; Naamoune, F; Kahoul, A; Belattar, N

    2016-08-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate CaCO3 in water has some important implications in geoscience researches, ocean chemistry studies, CO2 emission issues and biology. In industry, the scaling phenomenon may cause technical problems, such as reduction in heat transfer efficiency in cooling systems and obstruction of pipes. This paper focuses on the study of the glutamic acid (GA) for reducing CaCO3 scale formation on metallic surfaces in the water of Bir Aissa region. The anti-scaling properties of glutamic acid (GA), used as a complexing agent of Ca(2+) ions, have been evaluated by the chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods in conjunction with a microscopic examination. Chemical and electrochemical study of this water shows a high calcium concentration. The characterization using X-ray diffraction reveals that while the CaCO3 scale formed chemically is a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the one deposited electrochemically is a pure calcite. The effect of temperature on the efficiency of the inhibitor was investigated. At 30 and 40°C, a complete scaling inhibition was obtained at a GA concentration of 18 mg/L with 90.2% efficiency rate. However, the efficiency of GA decreased at 50 and 60°C. PMID:26824779

  5. Phs1 and the Synthesis of Very Long Chain Fatty Acids Are Required for Ballistospore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ianiri, Giuseppe; Abhyankar, Ritika; Kihara, Akio; Idnurm, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The production and dissemination of spores by members of the fungal kingdom is a major reason for the success of this eukaryotic lineage in colonizing most terrestrial ecosystems. Ballistospores are a type of spore produced by basidiomycete fungi, such as the mushrooms and plant pathogenic rusts. These spores are forcefully discharged through a unique liquid-drop fusion mechanism, enabling the aerosolization of these particles that can contribute to plant disease and human allergies. The genes responsible for this process are unknown due to technical challenges in studying many of the fungi that produce ballistospores. Here, we applied newly-developed techniques in a forward genetic screen to identify genes required for ballistospore formation or function in a tractable red yeast, a species of Sporobolomyces. One strain bearing a mutation in the PHS1 gene was identified as a mirror mutant. PHS1 encodes 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase required for the third step in very long chain fatty acid biosynthesis. The Sporobolomyces PHS1 gene complements the essential functions of a S. cerevisiae phs1 mutant. The Sporobolomyces phs1 mutant strain has less dehydratase activity and a reduction in very long chain fatty acids compared to wild type. The mutant strain also exhibits sensitivity to cell wall stress agents and loss of shooting due to a delay in ballistospore formation, indicating that the role of Phs1 in spore dissemination may be primarily in cellular integrity. PMID:25148260

  6. Key amino acids of arabidopsis VKOR in the activity of phylloquinone reduction and disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jian; Cui, Hao-Ran; Yu, Zhi-Bo; Du, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins in chloroplast are regulated through the disulfide bond/thiol transformation to realize their activities. A homologue of VKOR (Vitamin K epoxide reductase) in Arabidopsis chloroplast is found to catalyze the disulfide bond formation in vivo and to mediate the specific phylloquinone reduction in vitro. It is also called LTO1 (Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase 1). Investigations about functions and essential amino acid residues of AtVKOR have important theoretical significance to clarify the chloroplast redox regulation mechanism. In this study, several amino acids in the VKOR domain of AtVKOR were identified to be involved in binding of phylloquinone. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to study the function of these positions. The results suggested that residues Ser77, Leu87, Phe137 and Leu141 were quite important in the binding and catalyzing the reduction of phylloquinone. These residues were also involved in the electron transferring and disulfide bond formation of substrate proteins by motility assays in vivo, suggesting that the binding of phylloquinone not only affected the delivery of electrons to phylloquinone but also affected the whole electron transfer process. The conserved cysteines in the AtVKOR domain also played critical roles in phylloquinone reduction. When each of the four conserved cysteines was mutated to alanine, the mutants lost reduction activity entirely, suggesting that the four conserved cysteines played crucial roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:25267254

  7. Myristoleic acid inhibits osteoclast formation and bone resorption by suppressing the RANKL activation of Src and Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in osteoclasts such as formation of actin ring is required for bone-resorbing activity. The tyrosine kinase Src is a key player in massive cytoskeletal change of osteoclasts, thereby in bone destruction. In order for Src to be activated, trafficking to the inner plasma membrane via myristoylation is of importance. A previous study reported that myristoleic acid derived from myristic acid, inhibited N-myristoyl-transferase, an essential enzyme for myristoylation process. This prompted us to investigate whether myristoleic acid could affect osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, we observed that myristoleic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in vitro, especially, at later stages of differentiation. Myristoleic acid attenuated the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and Pyk2, which associates with Src, by RANKL. When myristoleic acid was co-administered with soluble RANKL into mice, RANKL-induced bone loss was substantially prevented. Bone dissection clearly revealed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly diminished by myristoleic acid. On the other hand, myristoleic acid treatment had little or no influence on early osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos and NFATc1, and proteins related to cytoskeletal rearrangement, including DC-STAMP, integrin αv and integrin β3 in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that myristoleic acid is capable of blocking the formation of large multinucleated osteoclasts and bone resorption likely through suppressing activation of Src and Pyk2. PMID:26528796

  8. The Arduous Journey to Black Hole Formation in Potential Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.

    2012-07-01

    We present a quantitative study on the properties at death of fast-rotating massive stars evolved at low-metallicity—objects that are proposed as likely progenitors of long-duration γ-ray bursts (LGRBs). We perform one-dimensional+rotation stellar-collapse simulations on the progenitor models of Woosley and Heger, and critically assess their potential for the formation of a black hole and a Keplerian disk (namely, a collapsar) or a proto-magnetar. We note that theoretical uncertainties in the treatment of magnetic fields and the approximate handling of rotation compromise the accuracy of stellar-evolution models. We find that only the fastest rotating progenitors achieve sufficient compactness for black hole formation while the bulk of models possess a core density structure typical of garden-variety core-collapse supernova (SN) progenitors evolved without rotation and at solar metallicity. Of the models that do have sufficient compactness for black hole formation, most of them also retain a large amount of angular momentum in the core, making them prone to a magneto-rotational explosion, therefore preferentially leaving behind a proto-magnetar. A large progenitor angular-momentum budget is often the sole criterion invoked in the community today to assess the suitability for producing a collapsar. This simplification ignores equally important considerations such as the core compactness, which conditions black hole formation, the core angular momentum, which may foster a magneto-rotational explosion preventing black hole formation, or the metallicity and the residual envelope mass which must be compatible with inferences from observed LGRB/SNe. Our study suggests that black hole formation is non-trivial, that there is room for accommodating both collapsars and proto-magnetars as LGRB progenitors, although proto-magnetars seem much more easily produced by current stellar-evolutionary models.

  9. THE ARDUOUS JOURNEY TO BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN POTENTIAL GAMMA-RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Dessart, Luc; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: evanoc@tapir.caltech.edu

    2012-07-20

    We present a quantitative study on the properties at death of fast-rotating massive stars evolved at low-metallicity-objects that are proposed as likely progenitors of long-duration {gamma}-ray bursts (LGRBs). We perform one-dimensional+rotation stellar-collapse simulations on the progenitor models of Woosley and Heger, and critically assess their potential for the formation of a black hole and a Keplerian disk (namely, a collapsar) or a proto-magnetar. We note that theoretical uncertainties in the treatment of magnetic fields and the approximate handling of rotation compromise the accuracy of stellar-evolution models. We find that only the fastest rotating progenitors achieve sufficient compactness for black hole formation while the bulk of models possess a core density structure typical of garden-variety core-collapse supernova (SN) progenitors evolved without rotation and at solar metallicity. Of the models that do have sufficient compactness for black hole formation, most of them also retain a large amount of angular momentum in the core, making them prone to a magneto-rotational explosion, therefore preferentially leaving behind a proto-magnetar. A large progenitor angular-momentum budget is often the sole criterion invoked in the community today to assess the suitability for producing a collapsar. This simplification ignores equally important considerations such as the core compactness, which conditions black hole formation, the core angular momentum, which may foster a magneto-rotational explosion preventing black hole formation, or the metallicity and the residual envelope mass which must be compatible with inferences from observed LGRB/SNe. Our study suggests that black hole formation is non-trivial, that there is room for accommodating both collapsars and proto-magnetars as LGRB progenitors, although proto-magnetars seem much more easily produced by current stellar-evolutionary models.

  10. Ethyl Formate: A Potential Disinfestation Treatment for Eucalyptus Weevil (Gonipterus platensis) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Apples.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manjree; Ren, Yonglin; Newman, James; Learmonth, Stewart

    2015-12-01

    Export of Pink Lady apples from Australia has been significantly affected by infestations of adult eucalyptus weevils (Gonipterus platensis Marelli). These weevils cling tenaciously to the pedicel of apple fruit when selecting overwintering sites. As a result, apples infested with live G. platensis adults lead to rejection for export. Since the Montreal Protocol restricted use of methyl bromide as postharvest treatment, it was necessary to consider alternative safer fumigants for disinfestation of eucalyptus weevil. Laboratory experiments were conducted using concentrations of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, and 80 mg/liter of ethyl formate. Complete control (100% mortality) was achieved at 25-30 mg/liter of ethyl formate at 22-24°C for 24-h exposure without apples. However, with 90-95% of the volume full of apples, complete control was achieved at 40 mg/liter of ethyl formate at 22-24°C for 24-h exposure. No phytotoxicity was observed and after one day aeration, residue of ethyl formate declined to natural levels (0.05-0.2 mg/kg). Five ethyl formate field trials were conducted in cool storages (capacity from 250-900 tons) and 100% kill of eucalyptus weevils were achieved at 50-55 mg/liter at 7-10°C for 24 h. Ethyl formate has great potential for preshipment treatment of apples. Its use is considerably cheaper and safer than already existing fumigants like methyl bromide and phosphine. PMID:26470387

  11. Tube formation in the first trimester placental trophoblast cells: Differential effects of angiogenic growth factors and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Abhilash D; Das, Mrinal K; Sarkar, Arnab; Vilasagaram, Srinivas; Basak, Sanjay; Duttaroy, Asim K

    2016-06-01

    The study aims to investigate whether cytosolic fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) is involved in angiogenic growth factors- and fatty acid-induced tube formation in first trimester placental trophoblast cells, HTR8/SVneo. We determined the tube formation both at basal as well as stimulated levels in the absence and presence of inhibitors of FABP4 and VEGF signaling pathways. Basal level of tube formation was maximally reduced in the presence of 50 µM of FABP4 inhibitor compared with those by VEGF signaling pathway inhibitors (rapamycin, L-NAME, and p38 MAP kinase inhibitor). Whereas docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3 (DHA)-, and VEGF-induced tube formation was maximally inhibited by p38 MAP kinase inhibitor (63.7 and 34.5%, respectively), however, leptin-induced tube formation was inhibited maximally by FABP4 inhibitor (50.7%). ANGPTL4 and oleic acid (OA)-induced tube formation was not blocked by any of these inhibitors. The FABP4 inhibitor inhibited cell growth stimulated by DHA, leptin, VEGF, and OA (P < 0.05) but was not affected by ANGPTL4. VEGF, leptin, and OA also increased FABP4 protein level in these cells, though the uptake of fatty acids by these cells was not affected by the presence of FABP4 inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that FABP4 may be involved in part in the basal level, and stimulated tube formation by VEGF, DHA, and leptin, whereas it has little or no effect in ANGPTL4- and OA-induced tube formation in these cells. Thus, FABP4 may play a differential role in fatty acids and angiogenic growth factors-mediated tube formation in the first trimester trophoblast cells in vitro. PMID:26992362

  12. Nicotinic Acid Activates the Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1 – A Potential Mechanism for Cutaneous Flushing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Mao, Rongrong; Cai, Anping; Jia, Yunfang; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Xu, Lin; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nicotinic acid (a.k.a. niacin or vitamin B3), widely used to treat dyslipidemias, represents an effective and safe means to reduce the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, a substantial fraction of patients discontinue treatment due to a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly termed flushing. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic acid causes flushing partially by activating the capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a polymodal cellular sensor that mediates the flushing response upon consumption of spicy food. Approach and Results We observed that the nicotinic acid-induced increase in blood flow was substantially reduced in Trpv1−/− knockout mice, indicating involvement of the channel in flushing response. Using exogenously expressed TRPV1, we confirmed that nicotinic acid at sub-millimolar to millimolar concentrations directly and potently activates TRPV1 from the intracellular side. Binding of nicotinic acid to TRPV1 lowers its activation threshold for heat, causing channel opening at physiological temperatures. Activation of TRPV1 by voltage or ligands (capsaicin and 2-APB) is also potentiated by nicotinic acid. We further demonstrated that nicotinic acid does not compete directly with capsaicin but may activate TRPV1 through the 2-APB activation pathway. Using live-cell fluorescence imaging, we observed that nicotinic acid can quickly enter the cell through a transporter-mediated pathway to activate TRPV1. Conclusions Direct activation of TRPV1 by nicotinic acid may lead to cutaneous vasodilation that contributes to flushing, suggesting a potential novel pathway to inhibit flushing and improve compliance. PMID:24675661

  13. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  14. Seed Regeneration Potential of Canopy Gaps at Early Formation Stage in Temperate Secondary Forests, Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiao-Ling; Zhu, Jiao-Jun; Yu, Li-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Promoting the seed regeneration potential of secondary forests undergoing gap disturbances is an important approach for achieving forest restoration and sustainable management. Seedling recruitment from seed banks strongly determines the seed regeneration potential, but the process is poorly understood in the gaps of secondary forests. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the effects of gap size, seed availability, and environmental conditions on the seed regeneration potential in temperate secondary forests. It was found that gap formation could favor the invasion of more varieties of species in seed banks, but it also could speed up the turnover rate of seed banks leading to lower seed densities. Seeds of the dominant species, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, were transient in soil and there was a minor and discontinuous contribution of the seed bank to its seedling emergence. For Quercus mongolica, emerging seedling number was positively correlated with seed density in gaps (R = 0.32, P<0.01), especially in medium and small gaps (<500 m2). Furthermore, under canopies, there was a positive correlation between seedling number and seed density of Acer mono (R = 0.43, P<0.01). Gap formation could promote seedling emergence of two gap-dependent species (i.e., Q. mongolica and A. mono), but the contribution of seed banks to seedlings was below 10% after gap creation. Soil moisture and temperature were the restrictive factors controlling the seedling emergence from seeds in gaps and under canopies, respectively. Thus, the regeneration potential from seed banks is limited after gap formation. PMID:22745771

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  16. In situ calcite formation in limestone-saturated water leaching of acid rock waste.

    PubMed

    Smart, Roger St C; Miller, Stuart D; Stewart, Warwick S; Rusdinar, Yuni; Schumann, Russell E; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Li, Jun

    2010-07-15

    The result of leaching of a 75% acid rock/25% limestone column with limestone-saturated solution has shown that the pH of the effluent recovered from 2.5, after apparent loss of acid neutralizing capacity after 4 years with water leaching, to pH 7 in less than 3 years. Bulk assay results, XRD and SEM/EDS analyses of samples from the column at 384 weeks (pH 3.6) and 522 weeks (pH 6.9) during this recovery have suggested that this is due to formation in situ of fine calcite. Calcite, initially blended to the column material at 25 wt.% was not found in the XRD of the 384 week sample but is clearly found in the 522 week XRD. This increased calcite content appears to be derived from the limestone-saturated water as finely divided solid precipitated in the drying cycles in the column. This result is confirmed by assessment of the 522 week sample as non-acid forming. Loss of some reactive aluminosilicate minerals, formation of secondary, precipitated, surface-attached gypsum and loss of fine secondary jarosite occurs across this pH range but fine, surface-attached jarosite is still found in the 522 week sample implying relatively slow dissolution kinetics. In comparison with the 384 week sample, armouring of highly reacted pyrite particles by surface layers of iron oxyhydroxides and aluminosilicates has become more extensive at 522 weeks after return of the pH to neutral values. This is consistent with results from Freeport field samples from limestone blended test pads where pyrite armouring was also substantially increased at higher pH. The results suggest that it may be possible to effectively maintain neutral pH and passivate pyrite, reducing oxidation rates by more than an order of magnitude, using limestone-saturated solution dump feed rather than bulk limestone blending or covers. PMID:20452647

  17. Ultrafast formation of the benzoic acid triplet upon ultraviolet photolysis and its sequential photodissociation in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chunfan; Su Hongmei; Sun Xuezhong; George, Michael W.

    2012-05-28

    Time-resolved infrared (TR-IR) absorption spectroscopy in both the femtosecond and nanosecond time domain has been applied to examine the photolysis of benzoic acid in acetonitrile solution following either 267 nm or 193 nm excitation. By combining the ultrafast and nanosecond TR-IR measurements, both the excited states and the photofragments have been detected and key mechanistic insights were obtained. We show that the solvent interaction modifies the excited state relaxation pathways and thus the population dynamics, leading to different photolysis behavior in solution from that observed in the gas phase. Vibrational energy transfer to solvents dissipates excitation energy efficiently, suppressing the photodissociation and depopulating the excited S{sub 2} or S{sub 3} state molecules to the lowest T{sub 1} state with a rate of {approx}2.5 ps after a delayed onset of {approx}3.7 ps. Photolysis of benzoic acid using 267 nm excitation is dominated by the formation of the T{sub 1} excited state and no photofragments could be detected. The results from TR-IR experiments using higher energy of 193 nm indicate that photodissociation proceeds more rapidly than the vibrational energy transfer to solvents and C-C bond fission becomes the dominant relaxation pathway in these experiments as featured by the prominent observation of the COOH photofragments and negligible yield of the T{sub 1} excited state. The measured ultrafast formation of T{sub 1} excited state supports the existence of the surface intersections of S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}, S{sub 2}/T{sub 2}, and S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}, and the large T{sub 1} quantum yield of {approx}0.65 indicates the importance of the excited state depopulation to triplet manifold as the key factor affecting the photophysical and photochemical behavior of the monomeric benzoic acid.

  18. Ultrafast formation of the benzoic acid triplet upon ultraviolet photolysis and its sequential photodissociation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunfan; Su, Hongmei; Sun, Xuezhong; George, Michael W.

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved infrared (TR-IR) absorption spectroscopy in both the femtosecond and nanosecond time domain has been applied to examine the photolysis of benzoic acid in acetonitrile solution following either 267 nm or 193 nm excitation. By combining the ultrafast and nanosecond TR-IR measurements, both the excited states and the photofragments have been detected and key mechanistic insights were obtained. We show that the solvent interaction modifies the excited state relaxation pathways and thus the population dynamics, leading to different photolysis behavior in solution from that observed in the gas phase. Vibrational energy transfer to solvents dissipates excitation energy efficiently, suppressing the photodissociation and depopulating the excited S2 or S3 state molecules to the lowest T1 state with a rate of ˜2.5 ps after a delayed onset of ˜3.7 ps. Photolysis of benzoic acid using 267 nm excitation is dominated by the formation of the T1 excited state and no photofragments could be detected. The results from TR-IR experiments using higher energy of 193 nm indicate that photodissociation proceeds more rapidly than the vibrational energy transfer to solvents and C-C bond fission becomes the dominant relaxation pathway in these experiments as featured by the prominent observation of the COOH photofragments and negligible yield of the T1 excited state. The measured ultrafast formation of T1 excited state supports the existence of the surface intersections of S2/S1, S2/T2, and S1/T1/T2, and the large T1 quantum yield of ˜0.65 indicates the importance of the excited state depopulation to triplet manifold as the key factor affecting the photophysical and photochemical behavior of the monomeric benzoic acid.

  19. Bioanalytical and chemical assessment of the disinfection by-product formation potential: role of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Farré, Maria José; Day, Sophie; Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2013-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) formed from natural organic matter and disinfectants like chlorine and chloramine may cause adverse health effects. Here, we evaluate how the quantity and quality of natural organic matter and other precursors influence the formation of DBPs during chlorination and chloramination using a comprehensive approach including chemical analysis of regulated and emerging DBPs, total organic halogen quantification, organic matter characterisation and bioanalytical tools. In vitro bioassays allow us to assess the hazard potential of DBPs early in the chain of cellular events, when the DBPs react with their molecular target(s) and activate stress response and defence mechanisms. Given the reactive properties of known DBPs, a suite of bioassays targeting reactive modes of toxic action including genotoxicity and sensitive early warning endpoints such as protein damage and oxidative stress were evaluated in addition to cytotoxicity. Coagulated surface water was collected from three different drinking water treatment plants, along with reverse osmosis permeate from a desalination plant, and DBP formation potential was assessed after chlorination and chloramination. While effects were low or below the limit of detection before disinfection, the observed effects and DBP levels increased after disinfection and were generally higher after chlorination than after chloramination, indicating that chlorination forms higher concentrations of DBPs or more potent DBPs in the studied waters. Bacterial cytotoxicity, assessed using the bioluminescence inhibition assay, and induction of the oxidative stress response were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by genotoxicity. Source waters with higher dissolved organic carbon levels induced increased DBP formation and caused greater effects in the endpoints related to DNA damage repair, glutathione conjugation/protein damage and the Nrf2 oxidative stress response pathway after disinfection. Fractionation studies

  20. Role of 3-Nitropropanoic Acid in Nitrate Formation by Aspergillus flavus1

    PubMed Central

    Doxtader, K. G.; Alexander, M.

    1966-01-01

    Doxtader, K. G. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), and M. Alexander. Role of 3-nitropropanoic acid in nitrate formation by Aspergillus flavus. J. Bacteriol. 91:1186–1191. 1966.—Aspergillus flavus formed nitrate, 3-nitropropanoic acid (3-NPA), kojic acid, and a substance tentatively identified as N-formyl-N-hydroxy-glycine during growth in a medium with ammonium as sole nitrogen source. The concentration of the nitro compound reached a maximum prior to the appearance of nitrate; the 3-NPA level subsequently decreased with a concomitant increase in nitrate concentration. Replacement cultures of A. flavus produced nitrate from culture filtrates containing 3-NPA or from synthetic 3-NPA but not when supplied with fresh ammonium-sucrose medium, the nitrate-nitrogen formed being equivalent to 50% of the quantity of the 3-NPA-nitrogen initially present. Neither nitrate nor 3-NPA was synthesized by the fungus during growth in media with low pH or low ammonium concentrations. It is proposed that 3-NPA is either an intermediate or is in equilibrium with an intermediate in nitrification by the fungus. PMID:5929750

  1. Enigmatic Isovaline: Investigating the Stability, Racemization, and Formation of a Non-biological Meteoritic Amino Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla; Lewis, Ariel; Dworkin, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Among the Murchison meteoritic amino acids, isovaline stands out as being both nonbiological (non-protein) and having a relatively high abundance. While approximately equal amounts of D- and L-isovaline have been reported in Murchison and other CM meteorites, the molecule's structure appears to prohibit its racemization in aqueous solutions. We recently have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of both isovaline and valine with an eye toward each molecule's formation, stability, and possible interconversions of D and L enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovaline- and valinecontaining ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectral methods to assess both amino acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied in the presence and in the absence of water-ice, and the destruction of both isovaline and valine was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have undertaken experiments to synthesize isovaline, valine, and their amino acid isomers by solid-phase radiation-chemical pathways other than the oft-invoked Strecker process. This presentation will review and summarize some of our recent findings. -- Our work has been supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Experiments were performed in the Cosmic Ice Laboratory (RLH, MHM, AL) and the Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory (JPD, DPG) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. Resistance to benzalkonium chloride, peracetic acid and nisin during formation of mature biofilms by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Saá Ibusquiza, P; Herrera, J J R; Cabo, M L

    2011-05-01

    Increase of resistance to the application of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), peracetic acid (PA) and nisin during biofilm formation at 25 °C by three strains of Listeria monocytogenes (CECT 911, CECT 4032, CECT 5873 and BAC-adapted CECT 5873) in different scenarios was compared. For this purpose, resistance after 4 and 11-days of biofilm formation was quantified in terms of lethal dose 90% values (LD(90)), determined according with a dose-response logistic mathematical model. Microscopic analyses after 4 and 11-days of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation were also carried out. Results demonstrated a relation between the microscopic structure and the resistance to the assayed biocides in matured biofilms. The worst cases being biofilms formed by the strain 4032 (in both stainless steel and polypropylene), which showed a complex "cloud-type" structure that correlates with the highest resistance of this strain against the three biocides during biofilm maturation. However, that increase in resistance and complexity appeared not to be dependent on initial bacterial adherence, thus indicating mature biofilms rather than planctonic cells or early-stage biofilms must be considered when disinfection protocols have to be optimized. PA seemed to be the most effective of the three disinfectants used for biofilms. We hypothesized both its high oxidizing capacity and low molecular size could suppose an advantage for its penetration inside the biofilm. We also demonstrated that organic material counteract with the biocides, thus indicating the importance of improving cleaning protocols. Finally, by comparing strains 5873 and 5873 adapted to BAC, several adaptative cross-responses between BAC and nisin or peracetic acid were identified. PMID:21356446

  3. Sialic Acid on the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Regulates PrP-mediated Cell Signaling and Prion Formation.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    The prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into disease-related isoforms (PrP(Sc)). In this study, the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to PrP(C) in prion formation was examined using a cell painting technique. PrP(Sc) formation in two prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1 and ScN2a cells) and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons was increased following the introduction of PrP(C). In contrast, PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc). Furthermore, the presence of desialylated PrP(C) inhibited the production of PrP(Sc) within prion-infected cortical neurons and ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The membrane rafts surrounding desialylated PrP(C) contained greater amounts of sialylated gangliosides and cholesterol than membrane rafts surrounding PrP(C). Desialylated PrP(C) was less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C) and was not released from cells by treatment with glimepiride. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) in neurons caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 from PrP-containing membrane rafts and reduced the activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. These findings show that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. These results suggest that pharmacological modification of GPI glycosylation might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:26553874

  4. Oligomerization as a potential mechanism for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmeen, F.; Sauret, N.; Claeys, M.; Maria, P. C.; Massi, L.

    2009-04-01

    Electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been used to investigate oligomer formation in dark chamber experiments designed to study the polymerization conditions of common atmospheric photooxidation products without photochemical action. Methylglyoxal has been selected as the monomer considering, it is a gas-phase product from the atmospheric oxidation of isoprene and terpenes (biogenic sources) as well as of aromatic compounds (anthropogenic sources). Aqueous-phase oligomer formation of methylglyoxal has been investigated in a simulated cloud matrix, under dark conditions in view of its short life time (~1.6 hrs). A mechanistic pathway for the growth of oligomers via aldol condensation under cloud conditions and in the absence of UV-light and the OH radical is proposed here for the first time. Soluble oligomers (n=1-12) formed in the course of acid-catalyzed aldol condensation have been detected and identified by positive and negative ion ESI-MS, while their relative abundance is estimated from the full-scan mass spectra. In particular, oligomer abundances and their adduct formation was considered with special emphasis on the structural elucidation of these oligomers and their corresponding adduct products. The oligomer series starts with a β-hydroxy ketone via aldol condensation and oligomers are formed by multiple addition of C3H4O2 units (72 Da) to the parent β-hydroxy ketone. MS2 ion trap experiments have been performed to structurally characterize the oligomers. Oligomers could form under conditions encountered in clouds even at micromolar concentrations and thus could significantly result in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) after cloud droplet evaporation. Therefore, it is proposed that oligomer formation does not only occur during droplet evaporation when the concentrations of products increase but could as well be an in-cloud process and substantially enhance in-cloud SOA yields.

  5. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulphuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Simulation Chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulphuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulphuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOC). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulphuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapor mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulphuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulphuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  6. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  7. Use of simulated evaporation to assess the potential for scale formation during reverse osmosis desalination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    The tendency of solutes in input water to precipitate efficiency lowering scale deposits on the membranes of reverse osmosis (RO) desalination systems is an important factor in determining the suitability of input water for desalination. Simulated input water evaporation can be used as a technique to quantitatively assess the potential for scale formation in RO desalination systems. The technique was demonstrated by simulating the increase in solute concentrations required to form calcite, gypsum, and amorphous silica scales at 25??C and 40??C from 23 desalination input waters taken from the literature. Simulation results could be used to quantitatively assess the potential of a given input water to form scale or to compare the potential of a number of input waters to form scale during RO desalination. Simulated evaporation of input waters cannot accurately predict the conditions under which scale will form owing to the effects of potentially stable supersaturated solutions, solution velocity, and residence time inside RO systems. However, the simulated scale-forming potential of proposed input waters could be compared with the simulated scale-forming potentials and actual scale-forming properties of input waters having documented operational histories in RO systems. This may provide a technique to estimate the actual performance and suitability of proposed input waters during RO.

  8. Formation of stable radicals in catechin/nitrous acid systems: participation of dinitrosocatechin.

    PubMed

    Morina, Filis; Takahama, Umeo; Mojović, Miloš; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Veljović-Jovanović, Sonja

    2016-03-01

    Catechins are transformed into dinitrosocatechins (diNOcats) and then oxidized to the quinones by salivary nitrite under conditions simulating the stomach. This manuscript deals with formation of stable radicals in the NO group of diNOcat during nitrite-induced oxidation of (+)-catechin and diNOcat at pH 2. We postulated two mechanisms for the stable radical formation; one is nitrous acid-induced oxidation of diNOcat in the A-ring, and the other intermolecular charge transfer from the A-ring of diNOcat and/or diNOcat quinone to the quinone moiety of the B-ring of diNOcat quinone. In addition, an unstable phenoxyl radical, which might be transformed into quinone, was also produced, accompanying the formation of the stable radical on the NO group. Taking the above results into account, we mainly focus on the adverse effects of the radicals and quinone, which may be produced from (+)-catechin in the stomach under the conditions of high salivary nitrite concentrations. PMID:26471661

  9. Determination of enthalpy of formation of methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lapuerta, Magín; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Oliva, Fermín

    2010-02-01

    Biofuels composed by fatty acid methyl esters are widely used as partly substituting fuels for diesel fossil fuels. Additionally, it is expected that the diesel biofuel norms will be extended to ethyl esters produced from bioethanol in the upcoming years. A precise knowledge of the standard enthalpy of formation is necessary for the calculation of some parameters useful for the analysis of the combustion process and emissions of a diesel engine operating with different fuels, such as the heating value, the adiabatic flame temperature or the kinetic mechanisms. However, experimental data for this property are scarce, and only available for short-chain, saturated methyl esters. In this work, four estimation methods for the calculation of the enthalpy of formation are examined and compared. Three of them are simple methods based on groups or bonds contribution, and another one is a computational method (with Gaussian 03 software). After presenting the implementation rules for each of them, conclusions are stated based on the results attained. Gaussian and Benson-Groups methods seem to be more accurate in predicting the actual values of the enthalpy of formation, both methods considering the separation between double bonds and the edge effects in the molecule. However, only the Gaussian method considers the effect of the position of the double bond in the molecule for all the unsaturated esters. PMID:19917272

  10. Effects of gaseous sulphuric acid on diesel exhaust nanoparticle formation and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rönkkö, Topi; Lähde, Tero; Heikkilä, Juha; Pirjola, Liisa; Bauschke, Ulrike; Arnold, Frank; Schlager, Hans; Rothe, Dieter; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko; Keskinen, Jorma

    2013-10-15

    Diesel exhaust gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) concentrations and particle size distributions, concentrations, and volatility were studied at four driving conditions with a heavy duty diesel engine equipped with oxidative exhaust after-treatment. Low sulfur fuel and lubricant oil were used in the study. The concentration of the exhaust GSA was observed to vary depending on the engine driving history and load. The GSA affected the volatile particle fraction at high engine loads; higher GSA mole fraction was followed by an increase in volatile nucleation particle concentration and size as well as increase of size of particles possessing nonvolatile core. The GSA did not affect the number of nonvolatile particles. At low and medium loads, the exhaust GSA concentration was low and any GSA driven changes in particle population were not observed. Results show that during the exhaust cooling and dilution processes, besides critical in volatile nucleation particle formation, GSA can change the characteristics of all nucleation mode particles. Results show the dual nature of the nucleation mode particles so that the nucleation mode can include simultaneously volatile and nonvolatile particles, and fulfill the previous results for the nucleation mode formation, especially related to the role of GSA in formation processes. PMID:24044459

  11. Calculation of 29Si NMR shifts of silicate complexes with carbohydrates, amino acids, and muhicarboxylic acids: potential role in biological silica utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Nita

    2004-01-01

    The existence of ether or ester-like complexes of silicate with organic compounds has long been debated in the literature on biological utilization of silicon. Comparison of theoretically calculated 29Si NMR chemical shifts for such complexes with experimentally measured values in biological systems could provide a diagnostic tool for identifying which, if any of these molecules exist under physiological conditions. Results are presented here for ab initio molecular orbital calculations of 29Si NMR shifts and formation energies of silicate complexes with polyalcohols, sugar-acids, pyranose sugars, amino acids and multicarboxylic acids. The effects of functional group and molecular structure including ligand size, denticity, ring size, silicon polymerization and coordination number on calculated 29Si shifts were considered. The potential role of such compounds in biological silica utilization pathways is discussed. 29Si NMR shifts and energies were calculated at the HF/6-311+G(2d,p)//HF/6-31G* level. The main result is that only five-membered rings containing penta- and hexa-coordinated Si can explain experimentally observed resonances at ˜ -101 and -141 ppm. Further, the heptet observed in 1H- 29Si coupled spectra can only be explained by structures where Si bonds to oxygens atoms in H-C-O-Si linkages with six symmetrically equivalent H atoms. While compounds containing quadra-coordinated silicon may exist in intracellular silicon storage pools within diatoms, calculated reaction energies suggest that the organism has no thermodynamic advantage in taking up extracellular organ-silicate compounds, instead of silicic acid, from the ambient aqueous environment. Hyper-coordinated complexes are deemed unlikely for transport and storage, though they may exist as transient reactive intermediates or activated complexes during enzymatically- catalyzed silica polymerization, as known previously from sol-gel silica synthesis studies.

  12. Current and potential distributions on positive plates with conductive Pb 3O 4 and BaPbO 3 in their formation and discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yonglang; Liu, Huan

    The positive plates with conductive materials, Pb 3O 4 and BaPbO 3, in automotive lead-acid batteries were investigated by measuring their current and potential distributions in the course of formation and discharge. It is found that these two conductive materials, especially Pb 3O 4, enhance the formation in the initial stage greatly and that they make the current and potential distributions more uniform. In the discharge, the addition of Pb 3O 4 increases the capacity of the positive plate, but it is unfavorable to the paste curing and causes poor contact between active mass (AM) particles so that the polarization increases greatly at 3 C discharge rate. The BaPbO 3 additive improves not only the formation but also the discharge performance because of its stability in acidic media and at high polarization. The violent charge at high polarization around the plates in the initial formation can lead to poor AM contact and high polarization resistance.

  13. Broad substrate specificity of phosphotransbutyrylase from Listeria monocytogenes: A potential participant in an alternative pathway for provision of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Sen, Suranjana; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of the serious food-borne disease listeriosis, has a membrane abundant in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). BCFAs are normally biosynthesized from branched-chain amino acids via the activity of branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (Bkd), and disruption of this pathway results in reduced BCFA content in the membrane. Short branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs) added as media supplements result in incorporation of BCFAs arising from the supplemented BCCAs in the membrane of L. monocytogenes bkd mutant MOR401. High concentrations of the supplements also effect similar changes in the membrane of the wild type organism with intact bkd. Such carboxylic acids clearly act as fatty acid precursors, and there must be an alternative pathway resulting in the formation of their CoA thioester derivatives. Candidates for this are the enzymes phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and butyrate kinase (Buk), the products of the first two genes of the bkd operon. Ptb from L. monocytogenes exhibited broad substrate specificity, a strong preference for branched-chain substrates, a lack of activity with acetyl CoA and hexanoyl CoA, and strict chain length preference (C3-C5). Ptb catalysis involved ternary complex formation. Additionally, Ptb could utilize unnatural branched-chain substrates such as 2-ethylbutyryl CoA, albeit with lower efficiency, consistent with a potential involvement of this enzyme in the conversion of the carboxylic acid additives into CoA primers for BCFA biosynthesis. PMID:27320015

  14. Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for simultaneous determination of small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Sriboonvorakul, Natthida; Leepipatpiboon, Natchanun; Dondorp, Arjen M; Pouplin, Thomas; White, Nicholas J; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2013-12-15

    Acidosis is an important cause of mortality in severe falciparum malaria. Lactic acid is a major contributor to metabolic acidosis, but accounts for only one-quarter of the strong anion gap. Other unidentified organic acids have an independent strong prognostic significance for a fatal outcome. In this study, a simultaneous bio-analytical method for qualitative and quantitative assessment in plasma and urine of eight small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria was developed and validated. High-throughput strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction in a 96-well plate format was used for sample preparation. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to negative mass spectroscopy was utilized for separation and detection. Eight possible small organic acids; l-lactic acid (LA), α-hydroxybutyric acid (aHBA), β-hydroxybutyric acid (bHBA), p-hydroxyphenyllactic acid (pHPLA), malonic acid (MA), methylmalonic acid (MMA), ethylmalonic acid (EMA) and α-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) were analyzed simultaneously using a ZIC-HILIC column with an isocratic elution containing acetonitrile and ammonium acetate buffer. This method was validated according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines with additional validation procedures for endogenous substances. Accuracy for all eight acids ranged from 93.1% to 104.0%, and the within-day and between-day precisions (i.e. relative standard deviations) were lower than 5.5% at all tested concentrations. The calibration ranges were: 2.5-2500μg/mL for LA, 0.125-125μg/mL for aHBA, 7.5-375μg/mL for bHBA, 0.1-100μg/mL for pHPLA, 1-1000μg/mL for MA, 0.25-250μg/mL for MMA, 0.25-100μg/mL for EMA, and 30-1500μg/mL for aKGA. Clinical applicability was demonstrated by analyzing plasma and urine samples from five patients with severe falciparum malaria; five acids had increased concentrations in plasma (range LA=177-1169μg/mL, aHBA=4.70-38.4μg/mL, bHBA=7.70-38.0μg/mL, pHPLA=0.900-4.30

  15. Liquid chromatographic–mass spectrometric method for simultaneous determination of small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria☆

    PubMed Central

    Sriboonvorakul, Natthida; Leepipatpiboon, Natchanun; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Pouplin, Thomas; White, Nicholas J.; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Acidosis is an important cause of mortality in severe falciparum malaria. Lactic acid is a major contributor to metabolic acidosis, but accounts for only one-quarter of the strong anion gap. Other unidentified organic acids have an independent strong prognostic significance for a fatal outcome. In this study, a simultaneous bio-analytical method for qualitative and quantitative assessment in plasma and urine of eight small organic acids potentially contributing to acidosis in severe malaria was developed and validated. High-throughput strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction in a 96-well plate format was used for sample preparation. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled to negative mass spectroscopy was utilized for separation and detection. Eight possible small organic acids; l-lactic acid (LA), α-hydroxybutyric acid (aHBA), β-hydroxybutyric acid (bHBA), p-hydroxyphenyllactic acid (pHPLA), malonic acid (MA), methylmalonic acid (MMA), ethylmalonic acid (EMA) and α-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) were analyzed simultaneously using a ZIC-HILIC column with an isocratic elution containing acetonitrile and ammonium acetate buffer. This method was validated according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines with additional validation procedures for endogenous substances. Accuracy for all eight acids ranged from 93.1% to 104.0%, and the within-day and between-day precisions (i.e. relative standard deviations) were lower than 5.5% at all tested concentrations. The calibration ranges were: 2.5–2500 μg/mL for LA, 0.125–125 μg/mL for aHBA, 7.5–375 μg/mL for bHBA, 0.1–100 μg/mL for pHPLA, 1–1000 μg/mL for MA, 0.25–250 μg/mL for MMA, 0.25–100 μg/mL for EMA, and 30–1500 μg/mL for aKGA. Clinical applicability was demonstrated by analyzing plasma and urine samples from five patients with severe falciparum malaria; five acids had increased concentrations in plasma (range LA = 177–1169 μg/mL, aHBA = 4.70–38.4

  16. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O.; Knee, Joseph L.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA—H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA—HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes.

  17. Composition, texture and methane potential of cellulosic residues from Lewis acids organosolv pulping of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Constant, Sandra; Barakat, Abdellatif; Robitzer, Mike; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dumas, Claire; Quignard, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    Cellulosic pulps have been successfully isolated from wheat straw through a Lewis acids organosolv treatment. The use of Lewis acids with different hardness produced pulps with different delignification degrees. The cellulosic residue was characterised by chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, scanning electron microscopy and potential for anaerobic digestibility. Surface area and pore volume increased with the hardness of the Lewis acid, in correspondence with the decrease of the amount of lignin and hemicellulose in the pulp. The non linearity of the correlation between porosity and composition suggests that an agglomeration of cellulose fibrils occurs in the early stages of pulping. All organosolv pulps presented a significantly higher methane potential than the parent straw. A methane evolution of 295Ncm(3)/g OM was reached by a moderate improvement of the accessibility of the native straw. PMID:27295251

  18. Potential human health effects of acid rain: report of a workshop

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, Robert A.; Bachmann, John; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Ferris, Benjamin G.; Graham, Judith; Mushak, Paul; Perl, Daniel P.; Rall, David P.; Schlesinger, Richard; Sharpe, William; Wood, John M.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the potential impact of the acid precipitation phenomenon on human health. There are two major components to this phenomenon: the predepositional phase, during which there is direct human exposure to acidic substances from ambient air, and the post-depositional phase, in which the deposition of acid materials on water and soil results in the mobilization, transport, and even chemical transformation of toxic metals. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. PMID:3896772

  19. Synthesis, activity, and docking study of phenylthiazole acids as potential agonists of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Taijin; Shi, Min; Ye, Haoyu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-mediated transcription factor playing key roles in glucose and lipid homeostasis, and PPARγ ligands possess therapeutic potential in these as well as other areas. In this study, a series of phenylthiazole acids have been synthesized and evaluated for agonistic activity by a convenient fluorescence polarization-based PPARγ ligand screening assay. Compound 4t, as a potential PPARγ agonist with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) 0.75±0.20 μM, exhibited in vitro potency comparable with a 0.83±0.14 μM of the positive control rosiglitazone. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that phenylthiazole acid 4t interacted with the amino acid residues of the active site of the PPARγ complex in a stable manner, consistent with the result of the in vitro ligand assay. PMID:27313447

  20. Screening of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria based on gastrointestinal properties and perfluorooctanoate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiali; Wang, Fan; Xu, Qi; Yin, Boxing; Fang, Dongsheng; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Wang, Gang; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of lactic acid bacteria capable of binding or degrading food-borne carcinogens may reduce human exposure to these deleterious compounds. In this study, 25 Lactobacillus strains isolated from human, plant, or dairy environments were investigated for their potential probiotic capacity against perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) toxicity. The PFOA binding, tolerance ability, and acid and bile salt tolerance were investigated and assessed by principal component analysis. Additionally, the effect of different pH levels and binding times was assessed. These strains exhibited different degrees of PFOA binding; the strain with the highest PFOA binding capability was Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM738, which bound to 49.40 ± 1.5 % of available PFOA. This strain also exhibited relatively good cellular antioxidative properties, acid and bile salt tolerance, and adhesion to Caco-2 cells. This study suggests that L. plantarum CCFM738 could be used as a potential probiotic in food applications against PFOA toxicity. PMID:27094185

  1. Recent Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) Studies Concerning the Formation of Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Douglas M.; Adams, Nigel G.; Babcock, Lucia M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently the simplest amino acid, glycine, has been detected in interstellar clouds, ISC, although this has since been contested. In order to substantiate either of these claims, plausible routes to amino acids need to be investigated. For gas phase synthesis, the SIFT technique has been employed to study simple amino acids via ion-molecule reactions of several ions of interstellar interest with methylamine, ethylamine, formic acid, acetic acid, and methyl formate. Carboxylic acid type ions were considered in the reactions involving the amines. In reactions where the carboxylic acid and methyl formate neutrals were studied, the reactant ions were primarily amine ion fragments. It was observed that the amines and acids preferentially fragment or accept a proton whenever energetically possible. NH3(+), however, uniquely reacted with the neutrals via atom abstraction to form NH4(+). These studies yielded a body of data relevant to astrochemistry, supplementing the available literature. However, the search for gas phase routes to amino acids using conventional molecules has been frustrated. Our most recent research investigates the fragmentation patterns of several amino acids and several possible routes have been suggested for future study.

  2. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97%) and thickness (−50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  3. Neuraminidase inhibition of Dietary chlorogenic acids and derivatives - potential antivirals from dietary sources.

    PubMed

    Gamaleldin Elsadig Karar, Mohamed; Matei, Marius-Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Illenberger, Susanne; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Plants rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs), caffeic acids and their derivatives have been found to exert antiviral effects against influenza virus neuroaminidase. In this study several dietary naturally occurring chlorogenic acids, phenolic acids and derivatives were screened for their inhibitory activity against neuroaminidases (NAs) from C. perfringens, H5N1 and recombinant H5N1 (N-His)-Tag using a fluorometric assay. There was no significant difference in inhibition between the different NA enzymes. The enzyme inhibition results indicated that chlorogenic acids and selected derivatives, exhibited high activities against NAs. It seems that the catechol group from caffeic acid was important for the activity. Dietary CGA therefore show promise as potential antiviral agents. However, caffeoyl quinic acids show low bioavailibility and are intensly metabolized by the gut micro flora, only low nM concentrations are observed in plasma and urine, therefore a systemic antiviral effect of these compounds is unlikely. Nevertheless, gut floral metabolites with a catechol moiety or structurally related dietary phenolics with a catechol moiety might serve as interesting compounds for future investigations. PMID:27010419

  4. Lipids and Fatty Acids of Nudibranch Mollusks: Potential Sources of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Natalia V.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular diversity of chemical compounds found in marine animals offers a good chance for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds of unique structures and diverse biological activities. Nudibranch mollusks, which are not protected by a shell and produce chemicals for various ecological uses, including defense against predators, have attracted great interest for their lipid composition. Lipid analysis of eight nudibranch species revealed dominant phospholipids, sterols and monoalkyldiacylglycerols. Among polar lipids, 1-alkenyl-2-acyl glycerophospholipids (plasmalogens) and ceramide-aminoethyl phosphonates were found in the mollusks. The fatty acid compositions of the nudibranchs differed greatly from those of other marine gastropods and exhibited a wide diversity: very long chain fatty acids known as demospongic acids, a series of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids, including unusual 21:2∆7,13, and an abundance of various odd and branched fatty acids typical of bacteria. Symbiotic bacteria revealed in some species of nudibranchs participate presumably in the production of some compounds serving as a chemical defense for the mollusks. The unique fatty acid composition of the nudibranchs is determined by food supply, inherent biosynthetic activities and intracellular symbiotic microorganisms. The potential of nudibranchs as a source of biologically active lipids and fatty acids is also discussed. PMID:25196731

  5. Decomposition of Pyruvic Acid on the Ground-State Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2016-01-21

    A potential energy surface is reported for isomerization and decomposition of gas-phase pyruvic acid (CH3C(O)C(O)OH) in its ground electronic state. Consistent with previous works, the lowest energy pathway for pyruvic acid decomposition is identified as decarboxylation to produce hydroxymethylcarbene (CH3COH), with overall barrier of 43 kcal mol(-1). This study discovers that pyruvic acid can also isomerize to the α-lactone form with a barrier of only 36 kcal mol(-1), from which CO elimination can occur at 49 kcal mol(-1) above pyruvic acid. An additional novel channel is identified for the tautomerisation of pyruvic acid to the enol form, via a double H-shift mechanism. The barrier for this process is 51 kcal mol(-1), which is around 20 kcal mol(-1) lower than the barrier for conventional keto-enol tautomerization via a 1,3-H shift transition state. Rate coefficients are calculated for pyruvic acid decomposition through RRKM theory/master equation simulations at 800-2000 K and 1 atm, showing good agreement with the available experimental data. The dissociation of vibrationally excited pyruvic acid produced through photoexcitation and subsequent internal conversion to the ground state is also modeled under tropospheric conditions and is seen to produce appreciable quantities of CO (∼1-4%) in addition to CH3COH via the dominant CO2 loss channel. PMID:26587666

  6. POTENTIAL ABATEMENT PRODUCTION AND MARKETING OF BYPRODUCT SULFURIC ACID IN THE U.S

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the market potential for sulfur and sulfuric acid byproducts of combustion in power plant boilers. (Air quality regulations require control of SOx emissions from power plant boilers. Recovery of sulfur in useful form would avoid waste ...

  7. Formation of Short-Chain Fatty Acids from H2 and CO2 by a Mixed Culture of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, I.; Cooney, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The biological utilization of CO2 and H2 for the formation of short-chain fatty acids was studied by using a mixed culture of bacteria. Optimization of a medium was carried out in continuous culture to identify limiting factors which controlled growth and production of organic acids. The optimal pH for growth and acid production was 7.0 at 37°C; the maximal cell concentration obtained was 5.9 g of cells per liter (dry weight), and the maximal amount of volatile acids formed was 4.7 g/liter, with acetic acid as the predominant acid. With the optimized medium, it was found that the rate of transfer of hydrogen or carbon dioxide, or both, from gas to liquid was the limiting factor which controlled growth and production of acids. PMID:16345680

  8. Investigating the Potential for Large-Scale Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Shale Gas Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Celia, M. A.; Kanno, C.; Bandilla, K.; Doster, F.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies [Godec et al., Int. J. Coal. Geol., 2013; Liu et al., IJGGC, 2013; Tao and Clarens, ES&T, 2013] have suggested the possibility of geological CO2 sequestration in depleted shale gas formations, motivated by large storage capacity estimates in these formations. The kinetics and practicality of injecting large amounts of CO2 into shale gas wells at the appropriate scale remain as open questions. To further investigate the feasibility of CO2 sequestration, models of gas flow and storage in a horizontal shale gas well were developed based on observed behavior of gas production data and the associated models that are consistent with those observations [Patzek et al., PNAS, 2013]. Both analytical and numerical models were used to investigate the well-scale kinetics of CO2 injection into a typical shale gas well. It was found that relatively low rates could be injected into individual wells compared with CO2 emissions from large industrial sources, and that injection rates would rapidly decline with time. Based on typical well parameters, 170 wells would be required to inject the emissions from one large coal-fired power plant over a 15 year period. Significant practical and logistical challenges to industrial-scale CO2 sequestration in depleted shale gas formations arise due to the relatively low injection rates, low storage capacity of individual wells and large numbers of wells required. These challenges include the difficulty of managing the required large, ever-changing networks of injection wells, potentially prohibitive energy requirements, and leakage concerns in hydraulically fractured wells. The combination of these factors, and the fact that they are all likely less of an issue for other potential geological sequestration targets such as deep saline aquifers, mean that targets in conventional formations are more likely to be suitable for industrial-scale CO2 sequestration.

  9. Effects of irradiation on trans fatty acids formation in ground beef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Mônica S.; Villavicencio, Anna Lúcia C. H.; Mancini-filho, Jorge

    2002-03-01

    In order to give the consumer the assurance that meat processed by irradiation is a safe product, a great deal of research has been developed in the world. The effect of irradiation on the hygienic quality of meat and meat products is considered as related to the control of meat-borne parasites of humans; elimination of pathogens from fresh meat and poultry; and elimination of pathogens from processed meat. Lipid oxidation and associated changes are the major causes of the quality deterioration of meat during storage. Irradiation of lipids induces the production of free radicals, which react with oxygen, leading to the formation of carbonyls, responsible for alterations in food nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Trans fatty acids are present in ground beef and can also be formed during its processing. Interestingly, the trans fatty acids, due to their chemical and physical characteristics, show more resistance to the oxidizing process. This property motivated us to investigate the level of the trans fatty acids, as well as the level of oxidation in irradiated ground beef. Irradiation of ground beef was performed by gamma rays from a 60Co source. The applied radiation doses were 0; 1.0; 2.0; 3.0; 4.0; 5.0; 6.0; 7.0 and 8.0 kGy. Lipid peroxidation in terms of TBA number and carbonyl content was monitored during storage. The sample characteristics and trans fatty acids composition were measured, following irradiation and after 60 and 90 days of storage at -10°C.

  10. Effects of lactic acid bacteria on low-density lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidation and aortic fatty lesion formation in hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Oishi, K; Yoshida, Y; Okumura, T; Sato, T; Naito, E; Yokoi, W; Sawada, H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Streptococcus thermophilus YIT 2001, a strain of lactic acid bacteria, on the susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation and the formation of aortic fatty lesions in hyperlipidemic hamsters. S. thermophilus YIT 2001 had the highest in vitro antioxidative activity against LDL oxidation among the 79 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria tested, which was about twice that of S. thermophilus YIT 2084. The lag time of LDL oxidation in the YIT 2001 feeding group was significantly longer than in controls, but was unchanged in the YIT 2084 group. After the feeding of YIT 2001, lag times were prolonged and areas of aortic fatty lesions were dose-dependently attenuated, although there were no effects on plasma lipid levels. These results suggest that YIT 2001 has the potential to prevent the formation of aortic fatty lesions by inhibiting LDL oxidation. PMID:25380799

  11. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  12. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  13. Use of three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy for predicting the disinfection by-product formation potential of reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixia; Ren, Huiqin; Li, Jianbing; Ma, Zhongzhi; Wan, Hongwen; Zheng, Xiaoying; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-11-01

    This study was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of chlorination disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors and the disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) of reclaimed water samples. Two major DBP precursors were examined in this study, including humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA). The 3DEEM fluorescence results obtained from various reclaimed water samples indicated that the reclaimed water samples were rich in fulvic acid-like substances that were associated with two main peaks (Ex/Em = 235-245/420-440 nm, and Ex/Em = 330-340/410-430 nm) in the fluorescence spectrum. The results also illustrated that the wavelength location of peak fluorescence intensity of a reclaimed water sample was independent of the influent water quality and the wastewater treatment process used in the reclamation plant. As a result, the peak fluorescence intensity and the wavelength location of the peak were used to identify the species of DBP precursors and their concentrations in the reclaimed water sample. Four regression models were then developed to relate the peak fluorescence intensity of the water sample to its DBPFP, including the formation potential of trihalomethane (THMFP) and the formation potential of haloacetic acid (HAAFP). The regression models were verified using the measured DBPFP results of a series of reclaimed water samples. It was found that the regression modeling results matched the measured DBPFP values well, with prediction errors below 10%. Therefore, the use of 3DEEM fluorescence spectroscopy together with the developed regression models in this study can provide a reliable and rapid tool for monitoring the quality of reclaimed water. Using this method, water quality could be monitored online, without utilizing the lengthy conventional DBPFP measurement. PMID:22925392

  14. Behavioral and Physiological Changes during Benthic-Pelagic Transition in the Harmful Alga, Heterosigma akashiwo: Potential for Rapid Bloom Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Elizabeth D.; Grünbaum, Daniel; Patterson, Johnathan; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2013-01-01

    Many species of harmful algae transition between a motile, vegetative stage in the water column and a non-motile, resting stage in the sediments. Physiological and behavioral traits expressed during benthic-pelagic transition potentially regulate the timing, location and persistence of blooms. The roles of key physiological and behavioral traits involved in resting cell emergence and bloom formation were examined in two geographically distinct strains of the harmful alga, Heterosigma akashiwo. Physiological measures of cell viability, division and population growth, and cell fatty acid content were made using flow cytometry and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry techniques as cells transitioned between the benthic resting stage and the vegetative pelagic stage. Video-based tracking was used to quantify cell-level swimming behaviors. Data show increased temperature and light triggered rapid emergence from the resting stage and initiated cell swimming. Algal strains varied in important physiological and behavioral traits, including survivorship during life-stage transitions, population growth rates and swimming velocities. Collectively, these traits function as “population growth strategies” that can influence bloom formation. Many resting cells regained the up-swimming capacity necessary to cross an environmentally relevant halocline and the ability to aggregate in near-surface waters within hours after vegetative growth supporting conditions were restored. Using a heuristic model, we illustrate how strain-specific population growth strategies can govern the timescales over which H. akashiwo blooms form. Our findings highlight the need for identification and quantification of strain-specific physiological and behavioral traits to improve mechanistic understanding of bloom formation and successful bloom prediction. PMID:24124586

  15. Foam-stabilizing effects and cling formation patterns of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids in lager beer.

    PubMed

    Kunimune, Takeshi; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2008-09-24

    Foam-stabilizing properties and cling formation patterns of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids were investigated using an unhopped lager beer. Unhopped beer was dosed with iso-alpha-acid (Iso), rho-iso-alpha-acid (Rho), tetrahydro-iso-alpha-acid (Tetra), and hexahydro-iso-alpha-acid (Hexa), separately, over a range of concentrations from 2 to 10 ppm. A uniform foam was created by Inpack 2000 Flasher Head and was measured by a NIBEM Foam Stability Tester (NIBEM-TPH) followed by a NIBEM Cling Meter (NIBEM-CLM) to determine the relationship between the concentration and NIBEM-30 and the cling formation ability of each compound. The foam-stabilizing power was determined to be Tetra, Hexa, Iso, and Rho from the strongest to weakest. Linear regression models were created using the NIBEM-TPH data set, and on the basis of 95% confidence intervals, the foam stability of Tetra or Hexa became significantly larger than that of Iso when 2.4 or 4.2 ppm of Tetra or Hexa was used as a replacement for Iso, respectively. Cling formation patterns could be categorized into three groups: "ring", "mesh", and "powdery". The control beer had the lowest foam stability and did not yield any foam cling. PMID:18729457

  16. Formation of image-potential states at the graphene/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbrust, N.; Güdde, J.; Höfer, U.

    2015-10-01

    The formation of image-potential states at the interface between a graphene layer and a metal surface is studied by means of model calculations. An analytical one-dimensional model-potential for the combined system is constructed and used to calculate energies and wave functions of the image-potential states at the \\bar{{{Γ }}}-point as a function of the graphene-metal distance. It is demonstrated how the double series of image-potential states of freestanding graphene evolves into interfacial states that interact with both surfaces at intermediate distances, and finally into a single series of states resembling those of a clean metal surface covered by a monoatomic spacer layer. The model quantitatively reproduces experimental data available for graphene/Ir(111) and graphene/Ru(0001), systems which strongly differ in interaction strength and therefore adsorption distance. Moreover, it provides a clear physical explanation for the different binding energies and lifetimes of the first (n = 1) image-potential state in the valley and hill areas of the strongly corrugated moiré superlattice of graphene/Ru(0001).

  17. Laboratory Simulated Acid-Sulfate Weathering of Basaltic Materials: Implications for Formation of Sulfates at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Mertzman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Acid-sulfate weathering of basaltic materials is a candidate formation process for the sulfate-rich outcrops and rocks at the MER rover Opportunity and Spirit landing sites. To determine the style of acid-sulfate weathering on Mars, we weathered basaltic materials (olivine-rich glassy basaltic sand and plagioclase feldspar-rich basaltic tephra) in the laboratory under different oxidative, acid-sulfate conditions and characterized the alteration products. We investigated alteration by (1) sulfuric-acid vapor (acid fog), (2) three-step hydrothermal leaching treatment approximating an open system and (3) single-step hydrothermal batch treatment approximating a "closed system." In acid fog experiments, Al, Fe, and Ca sulfates and amorphous silica formed from plagioclase-rich tephra, and Mg and Ca sulfates and amorphous silica formed from the olivine-rich sands. In three-step leaching experiments, only amorphous Si formed from the plagioclase-rich basaltic tephra, and jarosite, Mg and Ca sulfates and amorphous silica formed from olivine-rich basaltic sand. Amorphous silica formed under single-step experiments for both starting materials. Based upon our experiments, jarosite formation in Meridiani outcrop is potential evidence for an open system acid-sulfate weathering regime. Waters rich in sulfuric acid percolated through basaltic sediment, dissolving basaltic phases (e.g., olivine) and forming jarosite, other sulfates, and iron oxides. Aqueous alteration of outcrops and rocks on the West Spur of the Columbia Hills may have occurred when vapors rich in SO2 from volcanic sources reacted with basaltic materials. Soluble ions from the host rock (e.g., olivine) reacted with S to form Ca-, Mg-, and other sulfates along with iron oxides and oxyhydroxides.

  18. [Influence of GABA(C)-Receptor Antagonist on Formation of Evoked Potentials in Columns of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex].

    PubMed

    Matukhno, A E; Lysenko, L V; Andreeva, Y V; Sukhov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode studies of evoked potentials (EP) in neuronal column of rats barrel cortex show activating action of selective GABA(C)-receptor antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) mainly on secondary components of EP of supragranular afferent layers of column compared to the efferent infragranular layers. These data suggest localization of GABA(C)-receptors on pre- synaptic terminals of thalamo-cortical glutamatergic afferents and ascending apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. A blockade of GABA(C)-receptors with the selective antagonist TPM PA leads to dose-dependent afferent depolarization with development of presynaptic inhibition and suppression of primary components of EP GABA(C)-receptors blocker produces different effects on secondary components of EP in supragranular layers of the cortex caused by the development of neuronal after hyperpolarization followed by high-amplitude primary response and afterdepolarization followed by low-amplitude primary responses with subsequent activation of different voltage-gated channels and formation of different level of cortical direct current potential gradients. PMID:26841661

  19. Novel 14,21-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acids: structures, formation pathways, and enhancement of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Tian, Haibin; Hong, Song

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds remain a medical challenge, where well-coordinated cellular and molecular processes required by optimal healing are impaired by diabetes, aging, or other diseases. In determining mechanisms that regulate wound healing, we found that wounding induced formation of novel endogenous 14S,21S-dihydroxy-docosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acids (14S,21S-diHDHA);14R,21R-diHDHA; 14S,21R-diHDHA; and/or 14R,21S-diHDHA. 12-lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 catalysis in tandem converted docosahexaenoic acid to 14S,21R-diHDHA and 14S,21S-diHDHA through the intermediacy of 14S-HDHA; P450 also converted 14R-HDHA to novel 14R,21R-diHDHA and 14R,21S-diHDHA. Macrophages function as the combination of 12-lipoxgenase and P450 to generate these 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers, as well as their intermediates 14S-HDHA, 14R-HDHA, and 21-HDHA. The structure and formation pathways of 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers were further confirmed by macrophage biosynthesis of 14,21-diHDHA-21,22,22,22-d4 stereoisomers, 14S-HDHA-d5, 14R-HDHA-d5, and 21-HDHA-d4 from DHA-21,21,22,22,22-d5. We found that 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA enhanced wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue growth, and capillary vasculature formation of murine wounds. 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA produced by macrophages may partially represent the molecular mechanisms for macrophage pro-healing function. Taken together, 14,21-dihydroxy-DHA stereoisomers and their formation pathways may represent a novel mechanism in the orchestration of wound healing processes, which may provide new insight for developing novel therapeutic modalities that counteract impairments to wound healing. PMID:19965612

  20. Novel 14,21-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acids: structures, formation pathways, and enhancement of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Tian, Haibin; Hong, Song

    2010-05-01

    Chronic wounds remain a medical challenge, where well-coordinated cellular and molecular processes required by optimal healing are impaired by diabetes, aging, or other diseases. In determining mechanisms that regulate wound healing, we found that wounding induced formation of novel endogenous 14S,21S-dihydroxy-docosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acids (14S,21S-diHDHA);14R,21R-diHDHA; 14S,21R-diHDHA; and/or 14R,21S-diHDHA. 12-lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 catalysis in tandem converted docosahexaenoic acid to 14S,21R-diHDHA and 14S,21S-diHDHA through the intermediacy of 14S-HDHA; P450 also converted 14R-HDHA to novel 14R,21R-diHDHA and 14R,21S-diHDHA. Macrophages function as the combination of 12-lipoxgenase and P450 to generate these 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers, as well as their intermediates 14S-HDHA, 14R-HDHA, and 21-HDHA. The structure and formation pathways of 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers were further confirmed by macrophage biosynthesis of 14,21-diHDHA-21,22,22,22-d(4) stereoisomers, 14S-HDHA-d(5), 14R-HDHA-d(5), and 21-HDHA-d(4) from DHA-21,21,22,22,22-d(5). We found that 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA enhanced wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue growth, and capillary vasculature formation of murine wounds. 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA produced by macrophages may partially represent the molecular mechanisms for macrophage pro-healing function. Taken together, 14,21-dihydroxy-DHA stereoisomers and their formation pathways may represent a novel mechanism in the orchestration of wound healing processes, which may provide new insight for developing novel therapeutic modalities that counteract impairments to wound healing. PMID:19965612

  1. Potential of spectroscopic techniques and chemometric analysis for rapid measurement of docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in algal oil.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; He, Yong

    2014-09-01

    Developing rapid methods for measuring long-chain ω-3 (n-3) poly-unsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) contents has been a crucial request from the algal oil industry. In this study, four spectroscopy techniques, namely visible and short-wave near infra-red (Vis-SNIR), long-wave near infra-red (LNIR), mid-infra-red (MIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, were exploited for determining the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) contents in algal oil. The best prediction for both DHA and EPA were achieved by NMR spectroscopy, in which the determination coefficients of cross-validation (rCV(2)) values were 0.963 and 0.967 for two LCPUFAs. The performances of Vis-SNIR and LNIR spectroscopy were also accepted. The variable selection was proved as an efficient and necessary step for the spectral analysis in this study. The results were promising and implied that spectroscopy techniques have a great potential for assessment of DHA and EPA in algal oil. PMID:24731319

  2. Influence of Water Table Depth on Pore Water Chemistry and Trihalomethane Formation Potential in Peatlands.

    PubMed

    Gough, Rachel; Holliman, Peter J; Fenner, Nathalie; Peacock, Mike; Freeman, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Drained peatland catchments are reported to produce more colored, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)-rich water, presenting problems for potable water treatment. The blocking of peatland drainage ditches to restore the water table is increasingly being considered as a strategy to address this deterioration in water quality. However, the effect of ditch blocking on the potential of DOC to form trihalomethanes (THMs) has not been assessed. In this study, the effect of peat rewetting on pore water DOC concentration and characteristics (including THM formation potential [THMFP]) was assessed over 12 months using peat cores collected from two drained peatland sites. The data show little evidence of differences in DOC concentration or characteristics between the different treatments. The absence of any difference in the THMFP of pore water between treatments suggests that, in the short term at least, ditch blocking may not have an effect on the THMFP of waters draining peatland catchments. PMID:26803099

  3. Pattern formation in liquid-vapor systems under periodic potential and shear.

    PubMed

    Coclite, A; Gonnella, G; Lamura, A

    2014-06-01

    In this paper the phase behavior and pattern formation in a sheared nonideal fluid under a periodic potential is studied. An isothermal two-dimensional formulation of a lattice Boltzmann scheme for a liquid-vapor system with the van der Waals equation of state is presented and validated. Shear is applied by moving walls and the periodic potential varies along the flow direction. A region of the parameter space, where in the absence of flow a striped phase with oscillating density is stable, will be considered. At low shear rates the periodic patterns are preserved and slightly distorted by the flow. At high shear rates the striped phase loses its stability and traveling waves on the interface between the liquid and vapor regions are observed. These waves spread over the whole system with wavelength only depending on the length of the system. Velocity field patterns, characterized by a single vortex, will also be shown. PMID:25019908

  4. Close proximity formation flying via linear quadratic tracking controller and artificial potential function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Leonel; Ceriotti, Matteo; Radice, Gianmarco

    2015-11-01

    A Riccati-based tracking controller with collision avoidance capabilities is presented for proximity operations of spacecraft formation flying near elliptic reference orbits. The proposed dynamical model incorporates nonlinear accelerations from an artificial potential field, in order to perform evasive maneuvers during proximity operations. In order to validate the design of the controller, test cases based on the physical and orbital features of the Prototype Research Instruments and Space Mission Technology Advancement (PRISMA) will be implemented, extending it to scenarios with multiple spacecraft performing reconfigurations and on-orbit position switching. The results show that the tracking controller is effective, even when nonlinear repelling accelerations are present in the dynamics to avoid collisions, and that the potential-based collision avoidance scheme is convenient for reducing collision threat.

  5. Efficacy of potential chemopreventive agents on rat colon aberrant crypt formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Wargovich, M J; Jimenez, A; McKee, K; Steele, V E; Velasco, M; Woods, J; Price, R; Gray, K; Kelloff, G J

    2000-06-01

    We assessed the effects of 78 potential chemopreventive agents in the F344 rat using two assays in which the inhibition of carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon was the measure of efficacy. In both assays ACF were induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) in F344 rats by two sequential weekly injections at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last AOM injection, animals were evaluated for the number of aberrant crypts detected in methylene blue stained whole mounts of rat colon. In the initiation phase protocol agents were given during the period of AOM administration, whereas in the post-initiation assay the chemopreventive agent was introduced during the last 4 weeks of an 8 week assay, a time when ACF had progressed to multiple crypt clusters. The agents were derived from a priority listing based on reports of chemopreventive activity in the literature and/or efficacy data from in vitro models of carcinogenesis. During the initiation phase carboxyl amidoimidazole, p-chlorphenylacetate, chlorpheniramine maleate, D609, diclofenac, etoperidone, eicosatetraynoic acid, farnesol, ferulic acid, lycopene, meclizine, methionine, phenylhexylisothiocyanate, phenylbutyrate, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, S-allylcysteine, taurine, tetracycline and verapamil were strong inhibitors of ACF. During the post-initiation phase aspirin, calcium glucarate, ketoprofen, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, retinol and rutin inhibited the outgrowth of ACF into multiple crypt clusters. Based on these data, certain phytochemicals, antihistamines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and retinoids show unique preclinical promise for chemoprevention of colon cancer, with the latter two drug classes particularly effective in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis. PMID:10837003

  6. A new occurrence of ambient inclusion trails from the ~1900-million-year-old Gunflint Formation, Ontario: nanocharacterization and testing of potential formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wacey, D; Saunders, M; Kong, C; Kilburn, M R

    2016-09-01

    Ambient inclusion trails (AITs) are tubular microstructures thought to form when a microscopic mineral crystal is propelled through a fine-grained rock matrix. Here, we report a new occurrence of AITs from a fossilized microbial mat within the 1878-Ma Gunflint Formation, at Current River, Ontario. The AITs are 1-15 μm in diameter, have pyrite as the propelled crystal, are infilled with chlorite and have been propelled through a microquartz (chert) or chlorite matrix. AITs most commonly originate at the boundary between pyrite- and chlorite-rich laminae and chert-filled fenestrae, with pyrite crystals propelled into the fenestrae. A subset of AITs originate within the fenestrae, rooted either within the chert or within patches of chlorite. Sulphur isotope data ((34) S/(32) S) obtained in situ from AIT pyrite have a δ(34) S of -8.5 to +8.0 ‰, indicating a maximum of ~30 ‰ fractionation from Palaeoproterozoic seawater sulphate (δ(34) S ≈ +20 ‰). Organic carbon is common both at the outer margins of the fenestrae and in patches of chlorite where most AITs originate, and can be found in smaller quantities further along some AITs towards the terminal pyrite grain. We infer that pyrite crystals now found within the AITs formed via the action of heterotrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria during early diagenesis within the microbial mat, as pore waters were becoming depleted in seawater sulphate. Gases derived from this process such as CO2 and H2 S were partially trapped within the microbial mat, helping produce birds-eye fenestrae, while rapid microquartz precipitation closed porosity. We propose that propulsion of the pyrite crystals to form AITs was driven by two complementary mechanisms during burial and low-grade metamorphism: firstly, thermal decomposition of residual organic material providing CO2 , and potentially CH4 , as propulsive gases, plus organic acids to locally dissolve the microquartz matrix; and secondly, reactions involving clay minerals that

  7. Determination of thymine glycol residues in irradiated or oxidized DNA by formation of methylglyceric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of DNA solutions with X-irradiation various oxidants including hydrogen peroxide plus ferrous ion, hydrogen peroxide plus copper ion and ascorbate, permanganate, or sonication in the presence of dissolved oxygen all produced varying amounts of thymine glycol residues. After denaturing the DNA with heat, the glycol residues were reduced and labeled at the 6 position with tritium- labeled sodium borohydride. Subsequent reaction with anhydrous methanolic HCl gave a quantitative yield of the methyl ester of methylglyceric acid, which was determined by thin layer chromatography. The method, developed using thymidine as a model, was used to ascertain the requirements for glycol formation in DNA. It was shown that hydroxyl radical generating systems, permanganate, X-irradiation, or sonication in presence of oxygen were required, but hydrogen peroxide in the absence of iron or copper and ascorbate was inactive. Application to determination of DNA damage in vivo is being explored.

  8. Arachidonic acid stimulates formation of a novel complex containing nucleolin and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa C; Williams, Jason; Johnson, Katina; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D

    2011-02-18

    Arachidonic acid (AA) stimulates cell adhesion through a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase-mediated RhoA signaling pathway. Here we report that a proteomic screen following AA-treatment identified nucleolin, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, in a complex with the GTPase, RhoA, that also included the Rho kinase, ROCK. AA-stimulated cell adhesion was inhibited by expression of nucleolin-targeted shRNA and formation of the multiprotein complex was blocked by expression of dominant-negative RhoA. AA-treatment also induced ROCK-dependent serine phosphorylation of nucleolin and translocation of nucleolin from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it appeared to co-localize with RhoA. These data suggest the existence of a new signaling pathway through which the location and post-translational state of nucleolin are modulated. PMID:21281639

  9. Formation of short chain fatty acids by the gut microbiota and their impact on human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The formation of SCFA is the result of a complex interplay between diet and the gut microbiota within the gut lumen environment. The discovery of receptors, across a range of cell and tissue types for which short chain fatty acids SCFA appear to be the natural ligands, has led to increased interest in SCFA as signaling molecules between the gut microbiota and the host. SCFA represent the major carbon flux from the diet through the gut microbiota to the host and evidence is emerging for a regulatory role of SCFA in local, intermediary and peripheral metabolism. However, a lack of well-designed and controlled human studies has hampered our understanding of the significance of SCFA in human metabolic health. This review aims to pull together recent findings on the role of SCFA in human metabolism to highlight the multi-faceted role of SCFA on different metabolic systems. PMID:26963409

  10. Formation of formic acid and organic peroxides in the ozonolysis of ethene with added water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Osamu; Neeb, Peter; Limbach, Stefan; Moortgat, Geert K.

    1994-07-01

    Ozonolysis of C2H4 was carried out in a 580 l glass reaction vessel at 1-5 ppm reactant concentrations, with added water vapour. Under dry conditions ([H2O]0 = 0.5 ppm), HCHO, CO, CO2, (CHO)2O (formic acid anhydride), H2O2, and CH3OOH were identified as the reaction products. Under wet conditions ([H2O]0 = 2 × 104 ppm), HCOOH yields approaching ca. 20% of the converted C2H4, were observed, while no (CHO)2O was formed. Hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, HOCH2OOH, was observed as the major peroxide, and found to be formed only in the presence of water vapour. Direct reactions of H2O vapour with the excited CH2OO* radicals and with stabilized CH2OO radicals are postulated to explain the formation of HCOOH and HOCH2OOH in the presence of water vapour, respectively.

  11. Rapid thermal annealing of spin-coated phosphoric acid films for shallow junction formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoththaman, S.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J.; Mertens, R.

    1997-07-01

    Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of spin-coated phosphoric acid (H3PO4) films on silicon substrates has been studied for the formation of shallow junctions. The junctions are characterized by spreading resistance profiling. Device quality, shallow (<0.2 μm), n+p junctions are formed by the resulting phosphorous diffusion with the junction depth and surface concentration depending on the RTA conditions. The films have been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after various RTA treatments. The presence of P=O bonds in the films becomes evident after the RTA treatment at elevated temperatures (>750 °C), below which absorption bands originating from water species are noted. More than 15% efficient, shallow emitter, large-area (10 cm×10 cm) n+pp+ silicon solar cells are fabricated with a short-time processing using this rapid thermal processing technique.

  12. Metallamacrocycle formation through dimerization of metal bioconjugates derived from amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Celedonio M; García-Rodríguez, Raúl; Miguel, Daniel

    2016-01-21

    Metallamacrocycles of 12, 16, and 22 members are obtained by deprotonation of the carboxylic group of the side chain of iminopyridine complexes derived from the amino acid β-alanine, and the peptides Gly-Gly and Gly-Gly-Gly. Instead of the expected intramolecular attack to give tridentate (N,N,O) ligands, the deprotonated carboxylate attacks in an inter-molecular manner to give dimers in which the ligand acts as a bridge bonded in a κ(2)(N,N') chelating fashion to one metal and as κ(O) to the other metal. The formation of the dimers is supported by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. PMID:26645303

  13. Modeling the effect of relative humidity on nitrous acid formation in the Houston area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Lijun; Roy, Anirban; Czader, Beata; Pan, Shuai; Jeon, Wonbae; Souri, Amir Hossein; Choi, Yunsoo

    2016-04-01

    The field and laboratory based relative humidity (RH) impact on nitrous acid (HONO) heterogeneous reaction has not been considered in chemical transport models. This study parameterized this dependency into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. In view of the positive linear correlation between the reaction rate and RH, the HONO heterogeneous reaction rate constants were respectively scaled by the factors of RH/30 and RH/40. Two corresponding sensitivity tests were carried out in the period of September 2013 in Houston. Both tests significantly improved modeled HONO concentrations and reduced the bias for NO2 in comparison with observations. However, the model is still not capable of reproducing the high HONO concentrations in the morning rush hours. Further work is needed to explore the underlying mechanisms for the early morning HONO formation.

  14. Gas-Phase Formation Rates of Nitric Acid and Its Isomers Under Urban Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okumura, M.; Mollner, A. K.; Fry, J. L.; Feng, L.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone formation in urban smog is controlled by a complex set of reactions which includes radical production from photochemical processes, catalytic cycles which convert NO to NO2, and termination steps that tie up reactive intermediates in long-lived reservoirs. The reaction OH + NO2 + M -4 HONO2 + M (la) is a key termination step because it transforms two short-lived reactive intermediates, OH and NO2, into relatively long-lived nitric acid. Under certain conditions (low VOC/NOx), ozone production in polluted urban airsheds can be highly sensitive to this reaction, but the rate parameters are not well constrained. This report summarizes the results of new laboratory studies of the OH + NO2 + M reaction including direct determination of the overall rate constant and branching ratio for the two reaction channels under atmospherically relevant conditions.

  15. Myristic acid potentiates palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis associated with lipodystrophy by sustaning de novo ceramide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Laura; Torres, Sandra; Baulies, Anna; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Elena, Montserrat; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Caballeria, Joan; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C.; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA) induces hepatocyte apoptosis and fuels de novo ceramide synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Myristic acid (MA), a free fatty acid highly abundant in copra/palmist oils, is a predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and stimulates ceramide synthesis. Here we investigated the synergism between MA and PA in ceramide synthesis, ER stress, lipotoxicity and NASH. Unlike PA, MA is not lipotoxic but potentiated PA-mediated lipoapoptosis, ER stress, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome c release in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). Moreover, MA kinetically sustained PA-induced total ceramide content by stimulating dehydroceramide desaturase and switched the ceramide profile from decreased to increased ceramide 14:0/ceramide16:0, without changing medium and long-chain ceramide species. PMH were more sensitive to equimolar ceramide14:0/ceramide16:0 exposure, which mimics the outcome of PA plus MA treatment on ceramide homeostasis, than to either ceramide alone. Treatment with myriocin to inhibit ceramide synthesis and tauroursodeoxycholic acid to prevent ER stress ameliorated PA plus MA induced apoptosis, similar to the protection afforded by the antioxidant BHA, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-Fmk and JNK inhibition. Moreover, ruthenium red protected PMH against PA and MA-induced cell death. Recapitulating in vitro findings, mice fed a diet enriched in PA plus MA exhibited lipodystrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver ceramide content and cholesterol levels, ER stress, liver damage, inflammation and fibrosis compared to mice fed diets enriched in PA or MA alone. The deleterious effects of PA plus MA-enriched diet were largely prevented by in vivo myriocin treatment. These findings indicate a causal link between ceramide synthesis and ER stress in lipotoxicity, and imply that the consumption of diets enriched in MA and PA can cause NASH associated with lipodystrophy. PMID:26539645

  16. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  17. [An endogenous dithiol with antioxidant properties: alpha-lipoic acid, potential uses in cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ghibu, S; Richard, C; Delemasure, S; Vergely, C; Mogosan, C; Muresan, A

    2008-06-01

    Alpha-Lipoic acid (ALA) is a natural compound, chemically named 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid, also referred to as thioctic acid. In humans, ALA is synthetized by the liver and other tissues with high metabolic activity: heart, kidney. ALA is both water and fat soluble and therefore, is widely distributed in both cellular membranes and cytosol. Recently, a greater deal of attention has been given to antioxidant function for ALA and its reduced formed: dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). ALA scavenges hydroxyl radicals, hypochlorous acid and singlet oxygen. It may also exert antioxidant effects in biological systems through transitional metal chelation. Dihydrolipoic acid has been shown to have antioxidant but also pro-oxidant properties in systems in which hydroxyl radical was generated. ALA/DHLA ratio has the capacity to recycle endogenous antioxidants such as vitamin E. A number of experimental as well as clinical studies point to the usefulness of ALA as a therapeutic agent for such diverse conditions as diabetes, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, neuropathy, neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia-reperfusion injury. ALA represents a potential agent on the vascular endothelium, recording to ALA/DHLA redox couple is one of the most powerful biological antioxidant systems. PMID:18571145

  18. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids of Marine Macroalgae: Potential for Nutritional and Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hugo; Barreira, Luísa; Figueiredo, Filipe; Custódio, Luísa; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Polo, Cristina; Rešek, Eva; Engelen, Aschwin; Varela, João

    2012-01-01

    As mammals are unable to synthesize essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), these compounds need to be taken in through diet. Nowadays, obtaining essential PUFA in diet is becoming increasingly difficult; therefore this work investigated the suitability of using macroalgae as novel dietary sources of PUFA. Hence, 17 macroalgal species from three different phyla (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta) were analyzed and their fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) profile was assessed. Each phylum presented a characteristic fatty acid signature as evidenced by clustering of PUFA profiles of algae belonging to the same phylum in a Principal Components Analysis. The major PUFA detected in all phyla were C18 and C20, namely linoleic, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids. The obtained data showed that rhodophytes and phaeophytes have higher concentrations of PUFA, particularly from the n-3 series, thereby being a better source of these compounds. Moreover, rhodophytes and phaeophytes presented “healthier” ∑n-6/∑n-3 and PUFA/saturated fatty acid ratios than chlorophytes. Ulva was an exception within the Chlorophyta, as it presented high concentrations of n-3 PUFA, α-linolenic acid in particular. In conclusion, macroalgae can be considered as a potential source for large-scale production of essential PUFA with wide applications in the nutraceutical and pharmacological industries. PMID:23118712

  19. Potential Biological Applications of Bio-Based Anacardic Acids and Their Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Fatma B.; Mubofu, Egid B.

    2015-01-01

    Cashew nut shells (CNS), which are agro wastes from cashew nut processing factories, have proven to be among the most versatile bio-based renewable materials in the search for functional materials and chemicals from renewable resources. CNS are produced in the cashew nut processing process as waste, but they contain cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) up to about 30–35 wt. % of the nut shell weight depending on the method of extraction. CNSL is a mixture of anacardic acid, cardanol, cardol, and methyl cardol, and the structures of these phenols offer opportunities for the development of diverse products. For anacardic acid, the combination of phenolic, carboxylic, and a 15-carbon alkyl side chain functional group makes it attractive in biological applications or as a synthon for the synthesis of a multitude of bioactive compounds. Anacardic acid, which is about 65% of a CNSL mixture, can be extracted from the agro waste. This shows that CNS waste can be used to extract useful chemicals and thus provide alternative green sources of chemicals, apart from relying only on the otherwise declining petroleum based sources. This paper reviews the potential of anacardic acids and their semi-synthetic derivatives for antibacterial, antitumor, and antioxidant activities. The review focuses on natural anacardic acids from CNS and other plants and their semi-synthetic derivatives as possible lead compounds in medicine. In addition, the use of anacardic acid as a starting material for the synthesis of various biologically active compounds and complexes is reported. PMID:25894225

  20. Potential biological applications of bio-based anacardic acids and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Fatma B; Mubofu, Egid B

    2015-01-01

    Cashew nut shells (CNS), which are agro wastes from cashew nut processing factories, have proven to be among the most versatile bio-based renewable materials in the search for functional materials and chemicals from renewable resources. CNS are produced in the cashew nut processing process as waste, but they contain cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) up to about 30-35 wt. % of the nut shell weight depending on the method of extraction. CNSL is a mixture of anacardic acid, cardanol, cardol, and methyl cardol, and the structures of these phenols offer opportunities for the development of diverse products. For anacardic acid, the combination of phenolic, carboxylic, and a 15-carbon alkyl side chain functional group makes it attractive in biological applications or as a synthon for the synthesis of a multitude of bioactive compounds. Anacardic acid, which is about 65% of a CNSL mixture, can be extracted from the agro waste. This shows that CNS waste can be used to extract useful chemicals and thus provide alternative green sources of chemicals, apart from relying only on the otherwise declining petroleum based sources. This paper reviews the potential of anacardic acids and their semi-synthetic derivatives for antibacterial, antitumor, and antioxidant activities. The review focuses on natural anacardic acids from CNS and other plants and their semi-synthetic derivatives as possible lead compounds in medicine. In addition, the use of anacardic acid as a starting material for the synthesis of various biologically active compounds and complexes is reported. PMID:25894225

  1. Estimation of Molecular Acidity via Electrostatic Potential at the Nucleus and Valence Natural Atomic Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shubin; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2009-01-01

    An effective approach of estimating molecular pKa values from simple density functional calculations is proposed in this work. Both the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) at the nucleus of the acidic atom and the sum of valence natural atomic orbitals are employed for three categories of compounds, amines and anilines, carbonyl acids and alcohols, and sulfonic acids and thiols. A strong correlation between experimental pKa values and each of these two quantities for each of the three categories has been discovered. Moreover, if the MEP is subtracted by the isolated atomic MEP for each category of compounds, we observe a single unique linear relationship between the resultant MEP difference and experimental pKa data of amines, anilines, carbonyl acids, alcohols, sulfonic acids, thiols, and their substituents. These results can generally be utilized to simultaneously estimate pKa values at multiple sites with a single calculation for either relatively small molecules in drug design or amino acids in proteins and macromolecules. PMID:19317439

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of new quinazolone derivatives of nalidixic acid as potential antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Grover, Gaurav; Kini, Suvarna G

    2006-02-01

    In continuation of our work on synthesis of biheterocycles carrying the biodynamic heterocyclic systems at position 3, a series of new nalidixic acid derivatives having quinazolones moiety were synthesised to achieve enhanced biological activity and wide spectrum of activity. Nalidixic acid was first converted into its acid chloride using thionyl chloride as an acylating agent at laboratory temperature. Later it was converted to methyl ester. Nalidixoyl chloride formed vigorously reacts with methanol to give a methyl ester of nalidixic acid. The ester on addition of hydrazine hydrate furnished nalidixic acid hydrazide. Appropriate anthranilic acid was refluxed with acetic anhydride to form Benzoxazine/Acetanthranil. 5-iodo-derivative of anthranilic acid was prepared and also utilised to obtain 6-iodo-Benzoxazine/Acetanthranil. Also, 6-nitro-Benzoxazine/Acetanthranil was obtained by nitration of acetanthranil using conc. H(2)SO(4) and fuming HNO(3). Equimolar proportions of the appropriate synthesised acetanthranils and nalidixic acid hydrazide in the presence of ethanol were refluxed to synthesise quinazolones. Elemental analysis and IR spectra confirmed nalidixic acid hydrazide formation. The structures of the compounds obtained have been established on the basis of Spectral (IR, (1)H NMR and mass) data. The current study also involves in vitro antimicrobial screening (using Agar dilution and Punch well diffusion method) of synthesised quinazolone derivatives bearing nalidixic acid moiety on randomly collected microbial strains. The derivatives Ga (NAH), Gb (QN) and Gd (NiQNA) showed marked inhibitory activity against enteric pathogen like Aeromonas hydrophila, a causative agent of diarrhoea in both children as well as adults. Among the respiratory pathogens included in study, derivative Gd (NiQNA) was found to be active against Streptococcus pyogenes. No significant inhibitory activity was seen by any of synthesised derivatives against Coagulase negative

  3. Effects of chlorination operating conditions on trihalomethane formation potential in polyaluminum chloride-polymer coagulated effluent.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruihua; Gao, Baoyu; Ma, Defang; Rong, Hongyan; Sun, Shenglei; Wang, Fang; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan

    2015-03-21

    In this study, coagulation performance of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and PAC-lignin acrylamide (PAC+LAM) in reservoir water treatment was contrastively analyzed. Effects of operating conditions including chlorine dose, contact time and pH on the formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMs) during chlorination in coagulated effluent were also investigated. Comparing with PAC, PAC+LAM achieved higher efficiency in the removal of THMs precursors. TTHM yield in unfiltered water samples (UW) was greater than that of filtered water (FW) due to the residual dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the suspended particles or micro flocs. Meanwhile, operating conditions during chlorination had a significant influence on THMs formation potential. With chlorine dose rising, mass ratio of CHCl3 to TTHM increased, whereas that of CHBr2Cl decreased due to higher Cl2/Br(-) molar ratio. TTHM and CHCl3 levels rose with the increase of pH. Under a given chlorination condition, there was a minor effect of contact time on THM speciation. PMID:25497022

  4. A purple acid phosphatase plays a role in nodule formation and nitrogen fixation in Astragalus sinicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Si, Zaiyong; Li, Fang; Xiong, Xiaobo; Lei, Lei; Xie, Fuli; Chen, Dasong; Li, Yixing; Li, Youguo

    2015-08-01

    The AsPPD1 gene from Astragalus sinicus encodes a purple acid phosphatase. To address the functions of AsPPD1 in legume-rhizobium symbiosis, its expression patterns, enzyme activity, subcellular localization, and phenotypes associated with its over-expression and RNA interference (RNAi) were investigated. The expression of AsPPD1 was up-regulated in roots and nodules after inoculation with rhizobia. Phosphate starvation reduced the levels of AsPPD1 transcripts in roots while increased those levels in nodules. We confirmed the acid phosphatase and phosphodiesterase activities of recombinant AsPPD1 purified from Pichia pastoris, and demonstrated its ability to hydrolyze ADP and ATP in vitro. Subcellular localization showed that AsPPD1 located on the plasma membranes in hairy roots and on the symbiosomes membranes in root nodules. Over-expression of AsPPD1 in hairy roots inhibited nodulation, while its silencing resulted in nodules early senescence and significantly decreased nitrogenase activity. Furthermore, HPLC measurement showed that AsPPD1 overexpression affects the ADP levels in the infected roots and nodules, AsPPD1 silencing affects the ratio of ATP/ADP and the energy charge in nodules, and quantitative observation demonstrated the changes of AsPPD1 transcripts level affected nodule primordia formation. Taken together, it is speculated that AsPPD1 contributes to symbiotic ADP levels and energy charge control, and this is required for effective nodule organogenesis and nitrogen fixation. PMID:26105827

  5. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant’s defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  6. Jasmonic acid is a crucial signal transducer in heat shock induced sesquiterpene formation in Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Liao, Yong-Cui; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Juan; Sun, Pei-Wen; Gao, Zhi-Hui; Sui, Chun; Wei, Jian-He

    2016-01-01

    Agarwood, a highly valuable resinous and fragrant heartwood of Aquilaria plants, is widely used in traditional medicines, incense and perfume. Only when Aquilaria trees are wounded by external stimuli do they form agarwood sesquiterpene defensive compounds. Therefore, understanding the signaling pathway of wound-induced agarwood formation is important. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a well-characterized molecule that mediates a plant's defense response and secondary metabolism. However, little is known about the function of endogenous JA in agarwood sesquiterpene biosynthesis. Here, we report that heat shock can up-regulate the expression of genes in JA signaling pathway, induce JA production and the accumulation of agarwood sesquiterpene in A. sinensis cell suspension cultures. A specific inhibitor of JA, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), could block the JA signaling pathway and reduce the accumulation of sesquiterpene compounds. Additionally, compared to SA and H2O2, exogenously supplied methyl jasmonate has the strongest stimulation effect on the production of sesquiterpene compounds. These results clearly demonstrate the central induction role of JA in heat-shock-induced sesquiterpene production in A. sinensis. PMID:26902148

  7. Weathering processes and pickeringite formation in a sulfidic schist: a consideration in acid precipitation neutralization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, R.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Extremely low abrasion pH values (2.8-3.3) characterize the weathering products of the Partridge Formation, a Middle-Ordovician metamorphosed, black, sulfidic shale. The local occurrence is observed of two sulfates that are rare in the Northeast: pickeringite and jarosite. X-ray diffraction studies of the weathering residues and the sulfate efflorescences have also identified dioctahedral and trioctahedral illite, kaolinite, vermiculite, and an 11-12 Angstrom phase, thought to be a type of randomly-interstratified biotite-vermiculite. From the mineralogical studies, qualitative weathering processes for the schist are formulated. A probable mechanism for the intense chemical weathering of the schist appears to be oxidation of iron sulfides to form iron oxide-hydroxides, sulfates, and sulfuric acid. This natural weathering process is proposed as an analog to anthropogenic low pH rock weathering resulting from acid precipitation. In the Northeast, natural weathering rates, may, in places, significantly affect the water chemistry and mineralogy used to quantify total (natural plus anthropogenic) weathering and leaching rates. 27 references, 4 figures.

  8. Colorimetric determination of thiram based on formation of gold nanoparticles using ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Rastegarzadeh, S; Abdali, Sh

    2013-01-30

    A novel optical method for the determination of thiram has been developed using surface plasmon resonance peak of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The stable and dispersed AuNPs were directly synthesized by reduction of HAuCl4 with ascorbic acid in micellar media according to a simple approach. The presence of thiram during formation of AuNPs results in the decrease of the intensity of plasmon resonance peak. The variation in the plasmon absorbance allows the colorimetric determination of thiram. The effect of different variables such as pH, ascorbic acid and CTAB concentrations was studied and optimized. The proposed method is capable of determining thiram over a range of 2.0×10(-7)-1.0×10(-5) mol L(-1) with a limit of detection 1.7×10(-7) mol L(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method was <3.7%. The method was successfully applied to the determination of thiram in water and plant seed samples. PMID:23597883

  9. Reduction of Dietary Acid Load as a Potential Countermeasure for Bone Loss Associated with Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Watts, S. M.; Sams, C. F.; Whitson, P. A.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    In several studies we tested the concepts that diet can alter acid-base balance and that reducing the dietary acid load has a positive effect on maintenance of bone. In study 1, (n = 11, 60-90 d bed rest), the renal acid load of the diet was estimated from its chemical composition, and was positively correlated with urinary markers of bone resorption (P less than 0.05); that is, the greater the acid load, the greater the excretion of bone resorption markers. In study 2, in males (n = 8, 30 d bed rest), an estimate of the ratio of nonvolatile acid precursors to base precursors in the diet was positively correlated (P less than 0.05) with markers of bone resorption. In study 3, for 28 d subjects received either a placebo (n = 6) or an essential amino acid supplement (n = 7) that included methionine, a known acid precursor. During bed rest (28 d), urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels in the supplemented group but not the control group (P less than 0.05), and in the supplemented group, urinary pH decreased (P less than 0.05). In study 4, less bone resorption occurred in space crew members who received potassium citrate (n = 6) during spaceflight of 4-6 months than in crew members who received placebo or were not in the study (n = 8) (P less than 0.05). Reducing acid load has the potential to mitigate increased bone resorption during spaceflight, and may serve as a bone loss countermeasure.

  10. ABIOTIC FORMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS (RCOOH) IN INTERSTELLAR AND SOLAR SYSTEM MODEL ICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2010-12-10

    The present laboratory study simulated the abiotic formation of carboxylic acids (RCOOH) in interstellar and solar system model ices of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2})-hydrocarbon mix C{sub n} H{sub 2n+2} (n = 1-6). The pristine model ices were irradiated at 10 K under contamination-free, ultrahigh vacuum conditions with energetic electrons generated in the track of galactic cosmic-ray particles. The chemical processing of the ices was monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer during the irradiation phase and subsequent warm-up phases on line and in situ in order to extract qualitative (carriers) and quantitative (rate constants and yields) information on the newly synthesized species. Carboxylic acids were identified to be the main carrier, together with carbon monoxide (CO) and a trace of formyl (HCO) and hydroxycarbonyl (HOCO) radicals at 10 K. The upper limit of acid column density at 10 K was estimated as much as (1.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup 17} molecules cm{sup -2} at doses of 17 {+-} 2 eV molecule{sup -1}, or the yield of 39% {+-} 4% from the initial column density of carbon dioxide. The temporal column density profiles of the products were then numerically fit using two independent kinetic schemes of reaction mechanisms. Finally, we transfer this laboratory simulation to star-forming regions of the interstellar medium, wherein cosmic-ray-induced processing of icy grains at temperatures as low as 10 K could contribute to the current level of chemical complexity as evidenced in astronomical observations and in extracts of carbonaceous meteorites.

  11. Hyodeoxycholic acid improves HDL function and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDLR-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Shaposhnik, Zory; Meng, Yonghong; Rosales, Melenie; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Judy; Ratiner, Boris; Zadini, Filiberto; Zadini, Giorgio; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a natural secondary bile acid, hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), on lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-null (LDLRKO) mice. Female LDLRKO mice were maintained on a Western diet for 8 wk and then divided into 2 groups that received chow, or chow + 1.25% HDCA, diets for 15 wk. We observed that mice fed the HDCA diet were leaner and exhibited a 37% (P<0.05) decrease in fasting plasma glucose level. HDCA supplementation significantly decreased atherosclerotic lesion size at the aortic root region, the entire aorta, and the innominate artery by 44% (P<0.0001), 48% (P<0.01), and 94% (P<0.01), respectively, as compared with the chow group. Plasma VLDL/IDL/LDL cholesterol levels were significantly decreased, by 61% (P<0.05), in the HDCA group as compared with the chow diet group. HDCA supplementation decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption by 76% (P<0.0001) as compared with the chow group. Furthermore, HDL isolated from the HDCA group exhibited significantly increased ability to mediate cholesterol efflux ex vivo as compared with HDL of the chow diet group. In addition, HDCA significantly increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol efflux, such as Abca1, Abcg1, and Apoe, in a macrophage cell line. Thus, HDCA is a candidate for antiatherosclerotic drug therapy.—Shih, D. M., Shaposhnik, Z., Meng, Y., Rosales, M., Wang, X., Wu, J., Ratiner, B., Zadini, F., Zadini, G., Lusis, A. J. Hyodeoxycholic acid improves HDL function and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDLR-knockout mice. PMID:23752203