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Sample records for acid fracture conductivity

  1. Transmissivity and conductivity of single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    A fracture can be seen as a void space between two rough surfaces in partial contact. Transmissivity and conductivity can be determined numerically by solving the Stokes and Laplace equations between these two surfaces. These problems were first solved and published by the same authors between 1995 and 2001. Updated, more complete and precise results are presented here. Each surface of a fracture can be schematized as a random surface oscillating around an average plane, characterized by the probability density and autocorrelation function C(u) of the heights; their standard deviation is the roughness sigma. The two surfaces are separated by a mean distance b_m and their heights are correlated with an intercorrelation coefficient theta. The two major classes for C(u), namely the Gaussian and the self-affine autocorrelations with Hurst exponent H, are both characterized by a length scale l_c, which is a typical scale for the surface features in the Gaussian case and a cut-off length in the self-affine case. Gaussian surfaces are statistically homogeneous while the mean properties in the self-affine case are size-dependent. Systematic calculations were performed for these two classes, with recent emphasis put on the Gaussian fractures. The results are modeled as functions of b_m/sigma, l_c/sigma and theta. Cubic law applies for large b_m/sigma in terms of the aperture reduced by the hydraulic thickness of the surface rugosity. Another cubic law applies in the opposite limit of tight fractures with an offset depending on theta and a prefactor which depends on theta and l_c. A transition takes place between these two regimes. It is also shown that the Reynolds approximation may overestimate the true transmissivity by almost an order of magnitude. Similar calculations were performed for conductivity. The whole work is summarized by a series of master curves and models which can be used to estimate the properties of real fractures.

  2. Field experiments in a fractured clay till. 1. Hydraulic conductivity and fracture aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Larry D.; Cherry, John A.; Gillham, Robert W.

    1993-04-01

    Field values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity measured in the upper 1.5-5.5 m of a weathered and fractured clay-rich till were strongly influenced by smearing around piezometer intakes, which occurs during augering, and by the physical scale of the measuring device. Values measured in conventional augered piezometers were typically 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those measured in piezometers designed to reduce smearing. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity in small-scale seepage collectors or piezometers, which typically intersect fewer than 10 fractures, vary over a much greater range, 10-10 to 10-6 m/s, than large-scale values based on infiltration into 5.5-m-deep trenches which intersect thousands of fractures (range 10-7 to 3×10-7 m/s). Values of hydraulic fracture aperture, 1-43 μm, and fracture porosity, 3×10-5 to 2×10-3, were calculated using the cubic law with fracture orientation/distribution measurements and the small-scale hydraulic conductivity measurements. This paper provides the first reliable determination of the magnitude and spatial distribution of hydraulically derived fracture parameters in a clay deposit. The absence of such data has, until now, severely limited the application of quantitative groundwater flow and contaminant transport models in this type of deposit.

  3. Effect of zoledronic acid on fracture healing in osteoporotic patients with intertrochanteric fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Prabhnoor Singh; Deane, Anit Kumar Samuel; Agrawal, Atul; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Juyal, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To assess the effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on fracture healing in osteoporotic patients with intertrochanteric fracture based on radiological evaluation and to study the correlations between severity of osteoporosis, age, gender, and time taken to fracture union. Settings and Design: An open label study was conducted on 43 patients at a tertiary care center. Subjects and Methods: The osteoporosis status of all the included patients was documented using a double-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. A single dose of injection ZOL 5 mg was administered intravenously to all the patients after fixation during their hospital stay. Follow-up of the patients was done at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery until union was seen radiologically. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were entered into Microsoft Office Excel version 2007, and interpretation and analysis of obtained data were done using summary statistics. Pearson correlation between age, gender, bone mineral density (BMD), and time taken to fracture union was done using the IBM SPSS Version 22.0 (IBM Corp. Released 2013. IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 22.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.). Results: The average age of the patients included in the study was 71.27 ± 11.48 and the average BMD was -4.58±1.42. All the fractures united by the 6th month of follow-up, which was similar to the union rate in comparison with the literature. The correlations between the gender, BMD, age, and time to union were calculated, and all the r values obtained showed very low correlation and the P values in all the variables were not significant. Conclusion: The bisphosphonate therapy did not adversely affect radiologically determined fracture union, and no correlations between severity of osteoporosis, age, gender, and time taken to fracture union were found to be significant. PMID:28251108

  4. Proton conducting membrane using a solid acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haile, Sossina M. (Inventor); Chisholm, Calum (Inventor); Boysen, Dane A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A solid acid material is used as a proton conducting membrane in an electrochemical device. The solid acid material can be one of a plurality of different kinds of materials. A binder can be added, and that binder can be either a nonconducting or a conducting binder. Nonconducting binders can be, for example, a polymer or a glass. A conducting binder enables the device to be both proton conducting and electron conducting.

  5. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  6. Proton conducting membrane using a solid acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, Calum (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Boysen, Dane (Inventor); Haile, Sossina M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A solid acid material is used as a proton conducting membrane in an electrochemical device. The solid acid material can be one of a plurality of different kinds of materials. A binder can be added, and that binder can be either a nonconducting or a conducting binder. Nonconducting binders can be, for example, a polymer or a glass. A conducting binder enables the device to be both proton conducting and electron conducting. The solid acid material has the general form M.sub.a H.sub.b (XO.sub.t).sub.c.

  7. Potentially Conductive Channels in Fracture Cements of Low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.; Landry, C. J.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Natural fractures in shale reservoirs are frequently filled with mineral cement that lacks any residual fracture porosity that is visible under the petrographic microscope. These fully cemented fractures are generally interpreted to be impermeable for fluid flow. Scanning electron microscopy of calcite, dolomite, and barite fracture cements from a variety of shale reservoirs, prepared using broad ion beam milling, provides evidence of open to partially healed elongate pores that are on the order of hundreds of nanometers in aperture. In calcite fracture cement, these pores have consistent apertures of about 100 nm. In dolomite and barite, apertures are up to 500 nm. These pores have been previously overlooked because traditional thin sectioning and polishing destroys sub-micron details of the fracture cement pore structure. Ion milling preserves these details with a minimum of sample damage during sample preparation. Electron backscatter diffraction shows that these pores occur along grain boundaries within the blocky or columnar fracture cement. While partially healed, these pores, arranged along grain boundaries, are frequently sufficiently well connected acting as channels for fluid flow along and across fully cemented natural fractures. In shale reservoirs of ultra-low matrix permeability, these grain boundary channels may thus provide fracture permeability significantly contributing to reservoir production where intersected or indirectly reactivated by hydraulic fractures.

  8. HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATION FOR STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. This is primarily the result of the complexity of the fracture framework, which governs the groundwater flow pathways and...

  9. Comparison of Measured and Modelled Hydraulic Conductivities of Fractured Sandstone Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraka-Lokmane, S.; Liedl, R.; Teutsch, G.

    - A new method for characterising the detailed fracture geometry in sandstone cores is presented. This method is based on the impregnation of samples with coloured resin, without significant disturbance of the fractures. The fractures are made clearly visible by the resin, thus allowing the fracture geometry to be examined digitally. In order to model the bulk hydraulic conductivity, the samples are sectioned serially perpendicular to the flow direction. The hydraulic conductivity of individual sections is estimated by summing the contribution of the matrix and each fracture from the digital data. Finally, the hydraulic conductivity of the bulk sample is estimated by a harmonic average in series along the flow path. Results of this geometrical method are compared with actual physical conductivity values measured from fluid experiments carried out prior to sectioning. The predicted conductivity from the fracture geometry parameters (e.g., fracture aperture, fracture width, fracture length and fracture relative roughness all measured using an optical method) is in good agreement with the independent physical measurements, thereby validating the approach.

  10. A borehole fluid conductivity logging method for the determination of fracture inflow parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1987-10-01

    It is of much current interest to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersecting a wellbore to provide data in the estimation of the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. The fluid inflow rates from the fractures into the wellbore are important quantities to measure. Often these inflows are at very low rates. One often finds that only a few percent of the fractures identified by core inspection and geophysical logging are water-conducting fractures, the rest being closed, clogged, or isolated from the water flow system. A new procedure is proposed and a corresponding method of analysis developed to locate water-conducting fractures and obtain fracture inflow parameters by means of a time sequence of electric conductivity logs of the borehole fluid. The physical basis of the analysis method is discussed. The procedure is applied to an existing set of data, which shows initiation and growth of nine conductivity peaks in a 900-m section of a 1690-m borehole, corresponding to nine water-conducting fractures intersecting the borehole. We are able to match all nine peaks and determine the flow rates from these fractures. 16 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. The direct-current response of electrically conducting fractures excited by a grounded current source

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Chester J.; Aldridge, David F.; Knox, Hunter A.; Schramm, Kimberly A.; Bartel, Lewis C.

    2016-05-01

    Hydraulic fracture stimulation of low permeability reservoir rocks is an established and cross–cutting technology for enhancing hydrocarbon production in sedimentary formations and increasing heat exchange in crystalline geothermal systems. Whereas the primary measure of success is the ability to keep the newly generated fractures sufficiently open, long–term reservoir management requires a knowledge of the spatial extent, morphology, and distribution of the fractures — knowledge primarily informed by microseismic and ground deformation monitoring. To minimize the uncertainty associated with interpreting such data, we investigate through numerical simulation the usefulness of direct-current (DC) resistivity data for characterizing subsurface fractures with elevated electrical conductivity by considering a geophysical experiment consisting of a grounded current source deployed in a steel cased borehole. In doing so, the casing efficiently energizes the fractures with steady current. Finite element simulations of this experiment for a horizontal well intersecting a small set of vertical fractures indicate that the fractures manifest electrically in (at least) two ways: (1) a local perturbation in electric potential proximal to the fracture set, with limited farfield expression and (2) an overall reduction in the electric potential along the borehole casing due to enhanced current flow through the fractures into the surrounding formation. The change in casing potential results in a measurable effect that can be observed far from fractures themselves. Under these conditions, our results suggest that farfield, timelapse measurements of DC potentials can be interpreted by simple, linear inversion for a Coulomb charge distribution along the borehole path, including a local charge perturbation due to the fractures. As a result, this approach offers an inexpensive method for detecting and monitoring the time-evolution of electrically conducting fractures while

  12. The direct-current response of electrically conducting fractures excited by a grounded current source

    DOE PAGES

    Weiss, Chester J.; Aldridge, David F.; Knox, Hunter A.; ...

    2016-05-01

    Hydraulic fracture stimulation of low permeability reservoir rocks is an established and cross–cutting technology for enhancing hydrocarbon production in sedimentary formations and increasing heat exchange in crystalline geothermal systems. Whereas the primary measure of success is the ability to keep the newly generated fractures sufficiently open, long–term reservoir management requires a knowledge of the spatial extent, morphology, and distribution of the fractures — knowledge primarily informed by microseismic and ground deformation monitoring. To minimize the uncertainty associated with interpreting such data, we investigate through numerical simulation the usefulness of direct-current (DC) resistivity data for characterizing subsurface fractures with elevated electricalmore » conductivity by considering a geophysical experiment consisting of a grounded current source deployed in a steel cased borehole. In doing so, the casing efficiently energizes the fractures with steady current. Finite element simulations of this experiment for a horizontal well intersecting a small set of vertical fractures indicate that the fractures manifest electrically in (at least) two ways: (1) a local perturbation in electric potential proximal to the fracture set, with limited farfield expression and (2) an overall reduction in the electric potential along the borehole casing due to enhanced current flow through the fractures into the surrounding formation. The change in casing potential results in a measurable effect that can be observed far from fractures themselves. Under these conditions, our results suggest that farfield, timelapse measurements of DC potentials can be interpreted by simple, linear inversion for a Coulomb charge distribution along the borehole path, including a local charge perturbation due to the fractures. As a result, this approach offers an inexpensive method for detecting and monitoring the time-evolution of electrically conducting fractures while

  13. Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) Removal from Fractured Rock using Thermal Conductive Heating (TCH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    or karst . As control of water inflow may be problematic in fractured media and karst , and capture of contaminants may be difficult, effectiveness is...fractured media and karst , and capture of contaminants may be difficult, effectiveness is expected to be limited in these settings. If water inflow...conductive heating below the water table… As control of water inflow may be problematic in fractured media and karst , and capture of contaminants may be

  14. Electrical conductivity of acidic chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook; Aoki, Masami

    1988-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of aqueous solutions in the system HCl-MCln (where M = K, Na, Mg, Ni, or Cd) were measured at different temperatures. The equivalent electrical conductivity of H+ was calculated on the basis of simple assumptions for these solutions, and show an inverse relationship with water activity in these solutions. The results obtained by varying temperatures, solute ratios, and ionic strength on the electrical conductivity were found to be consistent with a proton jump mechanism for the H+ ion, where the activity of water is the most significant parameter affecting its equivalent conductance, and a viscous (Stokes’ law) drag mechanism (i.e., Walden’s rule is obeyed) for other ions found in acidic solutions.

  15. Moxa Arch Frontier development success through increased fracture conductivity - part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schubarth, S.K.; Chabaud, R.A.; Penny, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Successful development of the Frontier formation in southwest Wyoming begins with the hydraulic fracture treatment design and implementation. Without a design to effectively stimulate the Frontier formation and a proper implementation of that design in the field, production rates will be limited. This paper will describe the results from an extensive drilling and completion program conducted by Bannon Energy Incorporated the Frontier formation on the Moxa Arch. Information from over 100 fracture treatments and the production response from over 550 wells will be used to demonstrate the significant improvement in gas production resulting from the fracture treatment designs and implementation methods employed. The effect of fracture conductivity on gas recovery from this formation will be demonstrated along with the effect of multi-phase flow on fracture conductivity.

  16. Use of copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid resorbable plates in repair of orbital floor fractures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jonathan; German, Michael; Wong, Brian

    2014-10-01

    The fractures of the orbital floor are common after craniofacial trauma. Repair with resorbable plates is a viable reconstructive option; however, there are few reports in the literature. This study describes our experience using copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLLA/PGA) orbital reconstruction plates (LactoSorb, Lorenz Surgical, Jacksonville, FL) in 29 cases of the orbital floor fracture repair. We conducted a retrospective review of 29 orbital floor fractures at a single institution repaired through transconjunctival, preseptal dissection using PLLA/PGA plates fashioned to repair the orbital floor defect. Associated fractures included zygomaticomaxillary, LeFort, and nasoethmoid fractures. There were six patients with complications. Four patients had transient diplopia with complete resolution of symptoms within 1 year. One patient had diplopia postoperatively, but was later lost to follow-up. Two patients have had persistent enophthalmos since 1 year. In each of these cases, the floor fracture was coincident with significant panfacial or neurotrauma. We did not encounter any adverse inflammatory reactions to the implant material itself. The study concluded that orbital floor fracture repair with resorbable plates is safe, relatively easy to perform, and in the majority of cases was effective without complications. In the presence of severe orbital trauma, more rigid implant materials may be appropriate.

  17. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR HEAT FLOW IN FRACTURES-APPLICATION TO STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. Recent pilot studies conducted at the Edwards Air Force Base in California and the former Loring Air Force Base in Maine ...

  18. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR HEAT FLOW IN FRACTURES - APPLICATION TO STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. Recent pilot studies conducted at the Edwards Air Force Base in California and the former Loring Air Force Base in Maine ...

  19. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded

  20. Flowing fluid electric conductivity logging for a deep artesian well in fractured rock with regional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Kunimaru, Takanori

    2013-03-01

    SummaryThe flowing fluid electric conductivity (FFEC) logging method is a well-logging technique that may be used to estimate flow rate, salinity, transmissivity, and hydraulic head of individual fractures or high-permeability zones intersected by a wellbore. Wellbore fluid is first replaced with fluid of a contrasting electric conductivity, then repeated FEC logging is done while the well is pumped. Zones where fluid flows into the wellbore show peaks in the FEC logs, which may be analyzed to infer inflow rate and salinity of the individual fractures. Conducting the procedure with two or more pumping rates (multi-rate FFEC logging) enables individual fracture transmissivity and hydraulic head to be determined. Here we describe the first application of the multi-rate FFEC logging method to an artesian well, using a 500-m well in fractured rock at Horonobe, Japan. An additional new factor at the site is the presence of regional groundwater flow, which heretofore has only been studied with synthetic data. FFEC logging was conducted for two different pumping rates. Several analysis techniques had to be adapted to account for the artesian nature of the well. The results were subsequently compared with independent salinity measurements and transmissivity and hydraulic head values obtained from packer tests in the same well. Despite non-ideal operating conditions, multi-rate FFEC logging successfully determined flow rate, salinity, and transmissivity of 17 conducting fractures intercepted by the logged section of the borehole, including two fractures with regional groundwater flow. Predictions of hydraulic head were less accurate, a not unexpected result in light of operational problems and the form of the equation for hydraulic head, which involves the difference between two uncertain quantities. This study illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of the multi-rate FFEC logging method applied to artesian wells. In conjunction with previous studies, it demonstrates the

  1. Effects of Boric Acid on Fracture Healing: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Gölge, Umut Hatay; Kaymaz, Burak; Arpaci, Rabia; Kömürcü, Erkam; Göksel, Ferdi; Güven, Mustafa; Güzel, Yunus; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-10-01

    Boric acid (BA) has positive effects on bone tissue. In this study, the effects of BA on fracture healing were evaluated in an animal model. Standard closed femoral shaft fractures were created in 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats under general anesthesia. The rats were allocated into five groups (n = 8 each): group 1, control with no BA; groups 2 and 3, oral BA at doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/day, respectively; group 4, local BA (8 mg/kg); and group 5, both oral and local BA (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg locally). After closed fracture creation, the fracture line was opened with a mini-incision, and BA was locally administered to the fracture area in groups 4 and 5. In groups 2, 3, and 5, BA was administered by gastric gavage daily until sacrifice. The rats were evaluated by clinical, radiological, and histological examinations. The control group (group 1) significantly differed from the local BA-exposed groups (groups 4 and 5) in the clinical evaluation. Front-rear and lateral radiographs revealed significant differences between the local BA-exposed groups and the control and other groups (p < 0.05). Clinical and radiological evaluations demonstrated adequate agreement between observers. The average histological scores significantly differed across groups (p = 0.007) and were significantly higher in groups 4 and 5 which were the local BA (8 mg/kg) and both oral and local BA (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg locally), respectively, compared to the controls. This study suggests that BA may be useful in fracture healing. Further research is required to demonstrate the most effective local dosage and possible use of BA-coated implants.

  2. Evaluation of Geochemical Fracture Conductivity Alterations in Shale under Laboratory Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjic, M.; Olabode, A.

    2015-12-01

    In large scale subsurface injection of carbondioxide as obtainable in carbon sequestration programs and in environmentally friendly hydraulic fracturing processes (using supercritical CO2), rock-fluid interaction can affect reservoir and seal rocks properties which are essential in monitoring the progress of these operations. The mineralogical components of sedimentary rocks are geochemically active particularly under enormous earth stresses. While geomechanical properties such as rock stiffness, Poisson's ratio and fracture geometry largely govern fluid flow characteristics in deep fractured formations, the effect of mineralization can lead to flow impedance in the presence of favorable geochemical and thermodynamic conditions. Experimental works which employed the use of analytical tools such as ICP-OES, XRD, SEM/EDS, TOC and BET techniques in investigating diagenetic and micro-structural properties of crushed shale caprock/CO2-brine system concluded that net precipitation reaction processes can affect the distribution of petrophysical nanopores in the shale as a result of rock-fluid interactions. Simulation results previously reported, suggest that influx-induced mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within clay-based sedimentary rocks can continuously close micro-fracture networks, though injection pressure and effective-stress transformation first rapidly expand these fractures. This experimental modelling research investigated the impact of in-situ geochemical precipitation on conductivity of fractures under geomechanical stress conditions. Conductivity is measured as differential-pressure drop equivalence, using a pressure pulse-decay liquid permeametry/core flooding system, as geochemically saturated-fluid is transported through composite cores with embedded micro-tubings that mimic fractures. The reactive fluid is generated from crushed shale rocks of known mineralogical composition when flooded with aqueous CO2 at elevated temperature and pressure

  3. Interpretation of hydraulic conductivity in a fractured-rock aquifer over increasingly larger length dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Allen M.; Ladderud, Jeffery; Yager, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of the hydraulic conductivity over increasingly larger volumes of crystalline rock was conducted in the Piedmont physiographic region near Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Fluid-injection tests were conducted on intervals of boreholes isolating closely spaced fractures. Single-hole tests were conducted by pumping in open boreholes for approximately 30 min, and an interference test was conducted by pumping a single borehole over 3 days while monitoring nearby boreholes. An estimate of the hydraulic conductivity of the rock over hundreds of meters was inferred from simulating groundwater inflow into a kilometer-long section of a Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority tunnel in the study area, and a groundwater modeling investigation over the Rock Creek watershed provided an estimate of the hydraulic conductivity over kilometers. The majority of groundwater flow is confined to relatively few fractures at a given location. Boreholes installed to depths of approximately 50 m have one or two highly transmissive fractures; the transmissivity of the remaining fractures ranges over five orders of magnitude. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity over increasingly larger rock volumes varied by less than half an order of magnitude. While many investigations point to increasing hydraulic conductivity as a function of the measurement scale, a comparison with selected investigations shows that the effective hydraulic conductivity estimated over larger volumes of rock can either increase, decrease, or remain stable as a function of the measurement scale. Caution needs to be exhibited in characterizing effective hydraulic properties in fractured rock for the purposes of groundwater management.

  4. Crosswell seismic investigation of hydraulically conductive, fracture bedrock near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Hsieh, P.A.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire (USA), hydraulically conductive, fractured bedrock was investigated with the crosswell seismic method to determine whether this method could provide any information about hydraulic conductivity between wells. To this end, crosswell seismic data, acoustic logs from boreholes, image logs from boreholes, and single borehole hydraulic tests were analyzed. The analysis showed that, first, the P-wave velocities from the acoustic logs tended to be higher in schist than they were in granite. (Schist and granite were the dominant rock types). Second, the P-wave velocities from the acoustic logs tended to be low near fractures. Third, the hydraulic conductivity was always low (always less than to 10-8 m/s) where no fractures intersected the borehole, but the hydraulic conductivity ranged from low to high (from less than to 10-10 m/s to 10-4 m/s) where one or more fractures intersected the borehole. Fourth, high hydraulic conductivities were slightly more frequent when the P-wave velocity was low (less than 5200 m/s) than when it was high (greater than or equal to 5200 m/s). The interpretation of this statistical relation was that the fractures tended to increase the hydraulic conductivity and to lower the P-wave velocity. This statistical relation was applied to a velocity tomogram to create a map showing the probability of high hydraulic conductivity; the map was consistent with results from independent hydraulic tests. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustaining Fracture Area and Conductivity of Gas shale Reservoirs for Enhancing Long-term Production and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Rivera, R.; Marino, S.; Ghassemi, A.

    2010-12-01

    Natural gas from organic rich shale formations has become an increasingly important energy resource worldwide over the past decade. Extensive hydraulic fracture networks with massive contact surface areas are frequently required to achieve satisfactory economic production in these highly heterogeneous reservoirs, with permeability in the nano-Darcy range. Current operational experience in gas shale plays indicates that the loss of productive fracture area and loss of fracture conductivity, both immediate and over time, are the major factors leading to reduced flow rates, marginal production, and poor gas recovery. This theoretical and experimental project, funded by a RPSEA (Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America) program, is aimed at understanding the multiple causes of loss of fracture surface area and fracture conductivity. The main objectives of the project are: understand the multiple causes of loss of fracture area and fracture conductivity, and define solutions to mitigate the resulting loss of production. Define the types of fracture networks that are more prone to loosing fracture area and define critical parameters, for each reservoir type, (including proppant concentration, fluid interaction, relative shear displacement and others) to preserve fracture conductivity, and define an integrated methodology for evaluating reservoir properties that result in proneness to loss of fracture area and fracture conductivity, and define adequate solutions for the various reservoir types Current results include the evaluation of reservoir geology, mineralogy, reservoir properties, mechanical properties, including surface hardness, and petrologic analysis on cores representative of Barnett, Haynesville and Marcellus reservoir shales. A comparison of these properties provides an initial reference frame for identifying differences in behavior between the various reservoirs, and for anticipating the potential for embedment and loss of fracture conductivity

  6. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  7. Effective-stress-law behavior of Austin chalk rocks for deformation and fracture conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    Austin chalk core has been tested to determine the effective law for deformation of the matrix material and the stress-sensitive conductivity of the natural fractures. For deformation behavior, two samples provided data on the variations of the poroelastic parameter, {alpha}, for Austin chalk, giving values around 0.4. The effective-stress-law behavior of a Saratoga limestone sample was also measured for the purpose of obtaining a comparison with a somewhat more porous carbonate rock. {alpha} for this rock was found to be near 0.9. The low {alpha} for the Austin chalk suggests that stresses in the reservoir, or around the wellbore, will not change much with changes in pore pressure, as the contribution of the fluid pressure is small. Three natural fractures from the Austin chalk were tested, but two of the fractures were very tight and probably do not contribute much to production. The third sample was highly conductive and showed some stress sensitivity with a factor of three reduction in conductivity over a net stress increase of 3000 psi. Natural fractures also showed a propensity for permanent damage when net stressed exceeded about 3000 psi. This damage was irreversible and significantly affected conductivity. {alpha} was difficult to determine and most tests were inconclusive, although the results from one sample suggested that {alpha} was near unity.

  8. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  9. Identification, characterization, and analysis of hydraulically conductive fractures in granitic basement rocks, Millville, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Ollila, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    A suite of geophysical logs designed to identify and characterize fractures and water production in fractures was run in six bedrock boreholes at a ground-water contamination site near the towns of Millville and Uxbridge in south-central Massachusetts. The geophysical logs used in this study included conventional gamma, single-point resistance, borehole fluid resistivity, caliper, spontaneous potential, and temperature; and the borehole televiewer and heat-pulse flowmeter, which are not usually used to log bedrock water-supply wells. Downward flow under ambient hydraulic-head conditions was measured in three of the boreholes at the site, and the profile of fluid column resistivity inferred from the logs indicated downward flow in all six boreholes. Steady injection tests at about 1.0 gallon per minute were used to identify fractures capable of conducting flow under test conditions. Sixteen of 157 fracturesidentified on the televiewer logs and interpreted as permeable fractures in the data analysis were determined to conduct flow under ambient hydraulic-head conditions or during injection. Hydraulic-head monitoring in the bedrock boreholes indicated a consistent head difference between the upper and lower parts of the boreholes. This naturally occurring hydraulic-head condition may account, in part, for the transport of contaminants from the overlying soil into the bedrock aquifer. The downward flow may also account for the decrease in contaminant concentrations found in some boreholes after routine use of the boreholes as water-supply wells was discontinued.

  10. TNF Receptors Predict Hip Fracture Risk in the WHI Study and Fatty Acid Intake Does Not Modify This Association

    PubMed Central

    Ing, Steven W.; Orchard, Tonya S.; Lu, Bo; LaMonte, Michael J.; Barbour, Kamil E.; Cauley, Jane A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Chronic inflammation may increase the risk of fracture, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may reduce fracture risk via down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine gene expression and other mechanisms. Objective: We investigated associations between baseline samples of inflammatory markers, TNFα soluble receptors 1 and 2 (TNFα-sR1 and -sR2), and incident hip fracture. These associations were then tested for effect modification by dietary PUFA intake estimated by a baseline food frequency questionnaire. Design and Setting: A nested case-control study was conducted among participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (ages, 50–79 y). Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were constructed to account for the paired design. Participants: This study sampled 400 pairs of hip fracture cases and controls without incident hip fracture, matched on age, year of enrollment, and menopausal hormone use. Main Outcome Measures: Odds ratio of hip fracture by quartile of TNF soluble receptors. Results: The odds ratio of hip fracture comparing the highest to lowest quartiles was 2.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.05–4.79; P for linear trend, .048) for TNFα-sR1 and 2.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.34–5.99; P for linear trend, .011) for TNFα-sR2, adjusted for FRAX hip fracture score, nutritional variables, and selected factors impacting inflammation; there was a gradient of risk by increasing quartile in TNFα-sR1. PUFA intake did not modify these associations. Conclusions: Women with the highest levels of TNFα-sR1 and TNFα-sR2 had a greater than 2-fold increased hip fracture risk, independent of other fracture risk factors. These associations did not differ by high vs low PUFA intake. PMID:26161450

  11. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; Gainaru, C.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. Our detailed experimental studies discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. These results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  12. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    DOE PAGES

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; ...

    2016-10-07

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. In our detailed experimental studies we discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. Our results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  13. Effect of tracer buoyancy on tracer experiments conducted in fractured crystalline bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew W.

    2003-02-01

    Tracer buoyancy has been shown to influence breakthrough from two-well tracer experiments conducted in porous media. Two-well tracer experiments are presented from fractured crystalline bedrock, in which the specific gravity of the tracer injectate varied from 1.0002 to 1.0133. Under the forced hydraulic conditions imposed, no difference in breakthrough was noted for the three experiments. These results show that even relatively dense tracer injectate solutions may have an insignificant effect on breakthrough when imposed gradients are sufficiently large.

  14. Electrophilic acid gas-reactive fluid, proppant, and process for enhanced fracturing and recovery of energy producing materials

    DOEpatents

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Heldebrant, David J.; Bonneville, Alain H. R.; Jung, Hun Bok; Carroll, Kenneth

    2016-09-20

    An electrophilic acid gas-reactive fracturing and recovery fluid, proppant, and process are detailed. The fluid expands in volume to provide rapid and controlled increases in pressure that enhances fracturing in subterranean bedrock for recovery of energy-producing materials. Proppants stabilize openings in fractures and fissures following fracturing.

  15. Long-term Sustainability of Fracture Conductivity in Geothermal Systems using Proppants

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D Mattson; Ghanashyam Neupane; Mitchell Plummer; Clay Jones; Joe Moore

    2016-02-01

    Long-term sustainability of fracture conductivity is critical for commercial success of engineered geothermal system (EGS) and hydrogeothermal field sites. The injection of proppants has been suggested as a means to enhance the conductivity in these systems. Several studies have examined the chemical behavior of proppants that are not at chemical equilibrium with the reservoir rock and water. These studies have suggested that in geothermal systems, geochemical reactions can lead to enhance proppant dissolution and deposition alteration minerals. We hypothesize that proppant dissolution will decrease the strength of the proppant and can potentially reduce the conductivity of the fracture. To examine the geomechanical strength of proppants, we have performed modified crushing tests of proppants and reservoir rock material that was subjected to geothermal reservoir temperature conditions. The batch reactor experiments heated crushed quartz monzonite rock material, proppants (either quartz sand, sintered bauxite or kryptospheres) with Raft River geothermal water to 250 ºC for a period of 2 months. Solid and liquid samples were shipped to University of Utah for chemical characterization with ICP-OES, ICP-MS, and SEM. A separate portion of the rock/proppant material was subjected to a modified American Petroleum Institute ISO 13503-2 proppant crushing test. This test is typically used to determine the maximum stress level that can be applied to a proppant pack without the occurrence of unacceptable proppant crushing. We will use the test results to examine potential changes in proppant/reservoir rock geomechanical properties as compared to samples that have not been subjected to geothermal conditions. These preliminary results will be used to screen the proppants for long term use in EGS and hot hydrogeothermal systems.

  16. The Effects of Carbon Films Deposited on New Fracture Surfaces on Rock Strength and Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Karner, S.; Kronenberg, A.; Mathez, E.

    2007-12-01

    . (1999) indicate that electrical conductivity in rocks may be enhanced due to carbon deposition on grain and/or fracture surfaces. Our results are important for studies linking variations of crustal electrical properties to seismogenesis, as well as to illuminate physico-chemical mechanisms that may be exploited to monitor injection sites for carbon sequestration. No decrease in rock strength was observed owing to weakening caused by the presence of these carbonaceous pore fluids. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was carried out under contract W-7405-ENG-48 and supported specifically by funding from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  18. [Zoledronic acid reduces risk of any new clinical fracture and risk of death after surgical repair of a low-trauma hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The most common treatment option for postmenopausal osteoporosis are the bisphosphonates which inhibit osteoclast function. Bisphosphonates interfere with cellular metabolism and in large clinical trials reduce risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Zoledronic acid is a potent bisphosphonate also approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In addition zoledronic acid reduce relative risk of any new clinical fracture after surgical repair of low-trauma hip fracture. Also the reduction in the relative risk of death was observed after repeated once-yearly intravenous infusion. In conclusion, this is another interesting option for the treatment of the patients affected with osteoporosis and previous hip fractures.

  19. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A.

  20. Ferromagnetic Conducting Lignosulfonic Acid-doped Polyaniline Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswansthan, Tito (Inventor); Berry, Brian (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A conductive ferromagnetic composition of matter comprising sulfonated lignin or a sulfonated polyflavonoid, or derivatives thereof, and ferromagnetic iron oxide particles is disclosed. Among the uses of the composition is to shield electromagnetic radiation. The ferromagnetic iron oxide particles of the composition are surprisingly stable to acid, and are easily and inexpensively formed from iron cations in solution.

  1. Multifractal analysis of fracture morphology of poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/carbon black conductive composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Hai; Bai, Bao-Feng; Chen, Jing-Bo; Shen, Chang-Yu; Li, Jian-Qiang

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, based on scanning electron microscope (SEM), the fracture morphology of poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/carbon black (EVA/CB) conductive composite with various cross-linkers 2,4-di(2-phenylisopropyl) phenol (DCP) contents were analysed by multifractal analysis. The relationship among the multifractal spectrum, cross-linker DCP content, the fracture morphology, fracture process and some mechanical property were discussed. The results showed that the larger the width Δ α (Δ α = αmax - αmin) of the multifractal spectra f( α), the more nonuniform the fracture surface morphology, in other words, the more the roughness. Moreover, the width Δ α (Δ α = αmax - αmin) of the multifractal spectra f( α) is the result of competition between ductile fracture and brittle fracture. Also, some mechanical property will correspondingly change when various cross-linker DCP contents were added. Multifractal analysis showed that the spectrum width Δ α (Δ α = αmax - αmin) of the multifractal spectra f( α) could be used to characterize the surface morphology and mechanical property of EVA/CB conductive composite, quantitatively.

  2. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  3. Geochemical modelling of EGS fracture stimulation applying weak and strong acid treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigfusson, Bergur; Sif Pind Aradottir, Edda

    2015-04-01

    Engineered Geothermal systems (EGS) provide geothermal power by tapping into the Earth's deep geothermal resources that are otherwise not exploitable due to lack of water and fractures, location or rock type. EGS technologies have the potential to cost effectively produce large amounts of electricity almost anywhere in the world. The EGS technology creates permeability in the rock by hydro-fracturing the reservoir with cold water pumped into the first well (the injection well) at a high pressure. The second well (the production well) intersects the stimulated fracture system and returns the hot water to the surface where electricity can be generated. A significant technological hurdle is ensuring effective connection between the wells and the fracture system and to control the deep-rooted fractures (can exceed 5 000 m depth). A large area for heat transfer and sufficient mass flow needs to be ensured between wells without creating fast flowing paths in the fracture network. Maintaining flow through the fracture system can cause considerable energy penalty to the overall process. Therefore, chemical methods to maintain fractures and prevent scaling can be necessary to prevent excessive pressure build up in the re-injection wells of EGS systems. The effect of different acid treatments on the porosity development of selected rock types was simulated with the aid of the Petrasim interface to the Toughreact simulation code. The thermodynamic and kinetic database of Aradottir et al. (2014) was expanded to include new minerals and the most important fluoride bearing species involved in mineral reactions during acid stimulation of geothermal systems. A series of simulations with injection waters containing fluoric acid, hydrochloric acid and CO2 or mixtures thereof were then carried out and porosity development in the fracture system monitored. The periodic injection of weak acid mixtures into EGS systems may be cost effective in some isolated cases to prevent pressure

  4. Application of fracture-flow hydrogeology to acid-mine drainage at the Bunker Hill Mine, Kellogg, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmar, Thomas E.

    1994-03-01

    The mechanics of groundwater flow through fractured rock has become an object of major research interest during recent years. This project has investigated the flow of groundwater through fractured Precambrian metaquartzite rocks in a portion of the Bunker Hill Mine near Kellogg, Idaho. Groundwater flow through these types of rocks is largely dependent upon the properties of fractures such as faults, joints and relict bedding planes. Groundwater that flows into the mine via the fractures is acidic and is contaminated by heavy metals, which results in a severe acid mine drainage problem. A more complete understanding of how the fractures influence the groundwater flow system is a prerequisite of the evaluation of reclamation alternatives to reduce acid drainage from the mine. Fracture mapping techniques were used to obtain detailed information on the fracture properties observed in the New East Reed drift of the Bunker Hill Mine. The information obtained includes fracture type, orientation, trace length, the number of visible terminations, roughness, waviness, infilling material, and a qualitative measure of the amount of water flowing through each fracture. The hydrogeologic field data collected include routine measurements of the discharge from four individual structural features and four areas where large quantities of water are discharging from vertical rock bolts, the depths to water in three piezometer nests at the ground surface, the pressure variations in four diamond drillholes, and constant discharge flow tests conducted on three of the diamond drillholes. The field data indicate that relict bedding planes are the primary conduits for groundwater flow, and suggest that the two major joint sets that are present connect water flowing through the discontinuous bedding planes. The three minor joint sets that are present do not seem to have a significant impact on groundwater flow, but along with the two major joint sets may store relatively large quantities of

  5. Electrospun poly(lactic acid) based conducting nanofibrous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Ray, S.; Easteal, A. J.

    2009-08-01

    Multi-functionalised micro/nanostructures of conducting polymers in neat or blended forms have received much attention because of their unique properties and technological applications in electrical, magnetic and biomedical devices. Biopolymer-based conducting fibrous mats are of special interest for tissue engineering because they not only physically support tissue growth but also are electrically conductive, and thus are able to stimulate specific cell functions or trigger cell responses. They are effective for carrying current in biological environments and can thus be considered for delivering local electrical stimuli at the site of damaged tissue to promote wound healing. Electrospinning is an established way to process polymer solutions or melts into continuous fibres with diameter often in the nanometre range. This process primarily depends on a number of parameters, including the type of polymer, solution viscosity, polarity and surface tension of the solvent, electric field strength and the distance between the spinneret and the collector. The present research has included polyaniline (PANi) as the conducting polymer and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) as the biopolymer. Dodecylbenzene sulphonic acid (DBSA) doped PANi and PLLA have been dissolved in a common solvent (mixtures of chloroform and dimethyl formamide (DMF)), and the solutions successfully electrospun. DMF enhanced the dielectric constant of the solvent, and tetra butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) was used as an additive to increase the conductivity of the solution. DBSA-doped PANi/PLLA mat exhibits an almost bead-free network of nanofibres that have extraordinarily smooth surface and diameters in the range 75 to 100 nm.

  6. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with

  7. Polaron conductivity mechanism in potassium acid phthalate crystal: AC-conductivity investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipič, Cene; Levstik, Iva; Levstik, Adrijan; Hadži, Dušan

    2016-08-01

    The complex dielectric constant, \\varepsilon *(ν ,T), of potassium acid phthalate monocrystal (KAP) was investigated over the broad frequency and temperature range. While the imaginary part of dielectric constant ε‧‧(ν) increases rapidly with increasing temperature in the studied temperature range, the real part of dielectric constant ε‧(ν) increases only at high temperatures; there is almost no change of ε‧(ν) below 200 K. Both values of ε‧ and ε‧‧ are frequency dependent; the values increase with decreasing frequencies. At temperatures below 450 K the ac electrical conductivity and dielectric constant follow simultaneously the universal dielectric response (UDR). The analysis of the temperature dependence of the UDR parameter s in terms of the theoretical model for small polarons revealed that this mechanism governs the charge transport in KAP crystal in the studied temperature range.

  8. Determining the distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a fractured limestone aquifer by simultaneous injection and geophysical logging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Hess, A.E.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    A field technique for assessing the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer was applied to a fractured carbonate formation in southeastern Nevada. The technique combines the simultaneous use of fluid injection and geophysical logging to measure in situ vertical distributions of fluid velocity and hydraulic head down the borehole; these data subsequently are analyzed to arrive at quantitative estimates of hydraulic conductivity across discrete intervals in the aquifer. The results of this analysis identified the contact margin between the Anchor and Dawn Members of the Monte Cristo Limestone as being the dominant transmissive unit. -from Authors

  9. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  10. [The action of week inorganic acids and lower carboxylic acids on the conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes].

    PubMed

    Kilivnik, K E; Khmarskaia, L A; Ksenzhek, O S

    2009-01-01

    The ability of weak inorganic acids (H2S, HCN) and lower carboxylic acids to interact with bilayer lipid membranes, change their conductivity, and act as protonophores has been investigated. The mechanism of changes in BLM conductivity was studied. Factors influencing the interaction of acids with model lipid membranes were determined. Maximum changes in conductivity were observed at pH values equal to the dissociation constants of weak acids and depend on the coefficients of distribution "octanol-water".

  11. Once-yearly zoledronic acid in the prevention of osteoporotic bone fractures in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Vlachou, Sophia; Galapi, Fotini; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Papadias, K

    2008-01-01

    Zoledronic acid is a nitrogen-containing, third-generation bisphosphonate that has recently been approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis as an annual intravenous infusion. Zoledronic acid is an antiresorptive agent which has a high affinity for mineralized bone and especially for sites of high bone turnover. Zoledronic acid is excreted by the kidney without further metabolism. Zoledronic acid administered as a 5 mg intravenous infusion annually increases bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck by 6.7% and 5.1% respectively and reduces the incidence of new vertebral and hip fractures by 70% and 41% respectively in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Most common side effects are post-dose fever, flu-like symptoms, myalgia, arthralgia, and headache which usually occur in the first 3 days after infusion and are self-limited. Rare adverse effects include renal dysfunction, hypocalcemia, atrial fibrillation, and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:18982915

  12. Association of serum uric acid and incident nonspine fractures in elderly men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study.

    PubMed

    Lane, Nancy E; Parimi, Neeta; Lui, Li-Yung; Wise, Barton L; Yao, Wei; Lay, Yu-An Evan; Cawthon, Peggy M; Orwoll, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Uric acid (UA) is produced from purines by the enzyme xanthine oxidase, and elevated levels may cause arthritis and kidney stones. Conversely, UA also appears to function as an antioxidant and may protect against the oxidative stress associated with aging and disease. We performed a prospective fracture case-cohort study to understand the relation of UA and fracture risk in older men enrolled in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. In the cohort of 5994 men aged 65 years and older attending the baseline MrOS examination, we evaluated a subgroup 1680 men in a case-cohort study design. The analytic group included 387 men with incident nonspine fractures (73 hip) and a random sample of 1383. Serum UA was measured in baseline serum samples. Modified proportional hazards models that account for case-cohort study design were used to estimate the relative hazards (RH) of hip and nonspine fracture in men for serum UA. Models were adjusted for age, race, clinic site, body mass index, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, walking speed, Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) score, frailty, and total. Subjects with incident nonspine fractures were older, had lower total hip bone mineral density (BMD), and higher serum phosphorus. There was an 18% decreased risk of nonspine fractures (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-0.93; p = 0.003) per 1 SD increase of baseline serum and 34% decreased risk of nonspine fractures in quartile 4 of UA versus quartiles 1, 2, and 3 (95% CI 0.49-0.89; p = 0.028) compared with nonfracture cases after multivariate adjustment. Hip fractures were not significantly associated with UA. Total hip BMD was significantly higher in the group of men with high UA levels compared with lower UA levels and increased linearly across quartiles of UA after multivariate adjustment (p for trend = 0.002). In summary, higher serum UA levels were associated with a reduction in risk of incident nonspine fractures but not hip fractures and higher hip BMD.

  13. Proteins, dietary acid load, and calcium and risk of postmenopausal fractures in the E3N French women prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dargent-Molina, Patricia; Sabia, Sèverine; Touvier, Mathilde; Kesse, Emmanuelle; Bréart, Gérard; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Excess dietary proteins and “acid ash” diets have been suspected to increase the risk of osteoporosis, but experimental and epidemiological evidence is mixed. We aimed to determine whether the association between protein intake and the overall acid-base equilibrium of the diet (as renal net acid excretion (RNAE) estimate) and fracture risk vary according to calcium intake. Materials and Methods During an average of 8.37 (± 1.73) years of follow up, 2408 women reported a fracture (excluding high-impact trauma) among 36,217 postmenopausal women from the E3N prospective study. We used Cox regression models to study the interaction between calcium and, respectively, proteins and RNAE, from the 1993 dietary questionnaire, for fracture risk determination, adjusting for potential confounders. Results There was no overall association between fracture risk and total protein or RNAE. However, in the lowest quartile of calcium (< 400 mg/1000 kcal), high protein intake was associated with a significant increased fracture risk (RR = 1.51 for highest versus lowest quartile; 95% CI 1.17–1.94). An increasing fracture risk with increasing animal protein intake was also observed (p trend <0.0001). A similar pattern of interaction for fracture risk was observed between RNAE and calcium. Conclusions In this Western population of post-menopausal women with normal to high protein intake and fairly high calcium intake, there was no overall association between total protein or RNAE and fracture risk. However, there was some evidence that high protein – high acid ash diets were associated with an increased risk of fracture when calcium intake was low (< 400 mg/1000 kcal). PMID:18665794

  14. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Measuring Changes in Electrical Conductivity of Fractures from DC Resistivity Data in an Active Oilfield Environment: A Model Study for Surface-Based Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. J.; Aldridge, D. F.; Knox, H. A.; Schramm, K. A.; Bartel, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Presented here are preliminary results of a numerical modeling study on the feasibility of using DC resistivity data to make useful inferences on depth, size and orientation of subsurface fracture systems in an active oilfield environment. Specifically, we consider an experiment where the steel-cased borehole (consisting of a shallow, vertical section and deep, horizontal section) is one electrode of the DC source, with the other source electrode grounded at the Air/Earth interface some distance away. For simplicity, the fractures are modeled as short sequence of vertical sheets intersecting the horizontal section of the well casing. Finite element analysis of this system shows that as fracture conductivity is elevated, two effects (at least) are observed: a local perturbation in the electric potential in the vicinity of the fracture set, with limited far-field expression; and, an overall change in the electric potential of the entire borehole casing due to current leakage at the site of the fractures. Under ideal conditions, our results suggest that far-field, time-lapse measurements of DC potentials surrounding a borehole casing can be reliably interpreted by simple, linear inversion for a Coulomb charge distribution along the borehole path, including a local charge perturbation due to the fractures. In contrast to regularized, nonlinear 3D inversion of broadband EM or DC data, this approach offers an inexpensive method for detecting and monitoring the time-evolution of electrically conducting fractures while ultimately providing an estimate of their effective conductivity - the latter providing an important measure independent of seismic methods on fracture shape, size, and hydraulic connectivity.

  16. Simulating Remediation of Trichloroethylene in Fractured Bedrock by Thermal Conductive Heating Using the Numerical Model TMVOC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    heat transfer rate positive (Thomas, 1980). 18 Equation 2.4 can be applied to a three-dimensional system where the thermal conductivity, K...consideration when heat is being applied to the system , as the compressibility properties will be changed due to changes in pressure (Fatt, 1958). A...are extracted by a vacuum system . Wells are typically placed 6 to 12 ft apart to ensure complete heating of the source zone when dealing with semi

  17. Relations among water levels, specific conductance, and depths of bedrock fractures in four road-salt-contaminated wells in Maine, 2007–9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Stasulis, Nicholas W.

    2012-01-01

    Data on groundwater-level, specific conductance (a surrogate for chloride), and temperature were collected continuously from 2007 through 2009 at four bedrock wells known to be affected by road salts in an effort to determine the effects of road salting and fractures in bedrock that intersect the well at a depth below the casing on the presence of chloride in groundwater. Dissolved-oxygen data collected periodically also were used to make inferences about the interaction of fractures and groundwater flow. Borehole geophysical tools were used to determine the depths of fractures in each well that were actively contributing flow to the well, under both static and pumped conditions; sample- and measurement-depths were selected to correspond to the depths of these active fractures. Samples of water from the wells, collected at depths corresponding to active bedrock fractures, were analyzed for chloride concentration and specific conductance; from these analyses, a linear relation between chloride concentration and specific conductance was established, and continuous and periodic measurements of specific conductance were assumed to represent chloride concentration of the well water at the depth of measurement. To varying degrees, specific conductance increased in at least two of the wells during winter and spring thaws; the shallowest well, which also was closest to the road receiving salt treatment during the winter, exhibited the largest changes in specific conductance during thaws. Recharge events during summer months, long after application of road salt had ceased for the year, also produced increases in specific conductance in some of the wells, indicating that chloride which had accumulated or sequestered in the overburden was transported to the wells throughout the year. Geophysical data and periodic profiles of water quality along the length of each well’s borehole indicated that the greatest changes in water quality were associated with active fractures; in

  18. Regulation of an ATP-conductive large-conductance anion channel and swelling-induced ATP release by arachidonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amal K; Okada, Yasunobu; Sabirov, Ravshan Z

    2002-01-01

    Mouse mammary C127 cells responded to hypotonic stimulation with activation of the volume-dependent ATP-conductive large conductance (VDACL) anion channel and massive release of ATP. Arachidonic acid downregulated both VDACL currents and swelling-induced ATP release in the physiological concentration range with Kd of 4– 6 μm. The former effect observed in the whole-cell or excised patch mode was more prominent than the latter effect observed in intact cells. The arachidonate effects were direct and not mediated by downstream metabolic products, as evidenced by their insensitivity to inhibitors of arachidonate-metabolizing oxygenases, and by the observation that they were mimicked by cis-unsaturated fatty acids, which are not substrates for oxygenases. A membrane-impermeable analogue, arachidonyl coenzyme A was effective only from the cytosolic side of membrane patches suggesting that the binding site is localized intracellularly. Non-charged arachidonate analogues as well as trans-unsaturated and saturated fatty acids had no effect on VDACL currents and ATP release, indicating the importance of arachidonate's negative charge and specific hydrocarbon chain conformation in the inhibitory effect. VDACL anion channels were inhibited by arachidonic acid in two different ways: channel shutdown (Kd of 4– 5 μm) and reduced unitary conductance (Kd of 13–14 μm) without affecting voltage dependence of open probability. ATP4--conducting inward currents measured in the presence of 100 mm ATP in the bath were reversibly inhibited by arachidonic acid. Thus, we conclude that swelling-induced ATP release and its putative pathway, the VDACL anion channel, are under a negative control by intracellular arachidonic acid signalling in mammary C127 cells. PMID:12154180

  19. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  20. Bias-dependent amino-acid-induced conductance changes in short semi-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abadir, G B; Walus, K; Pulfrey, D L

    2010-01-08

    We study the interaction between short semi-metallic carbon nanotubes and different amino acids using molecular dynamics and ab initio (density functional theory/non-equilibrium Green's function) simulations. We identify two different mechanisms of nanotube conductance change upon adsorption of amino acids: one due to the change of the coordinates of the nanotube arising from van der Waals forces of interaction with the adsorbed amino acid; and one due to electrostatic interactions, which appear only in the case of charged amino acids. We also find that the transport mechanism and the changes in the conductance of the tube upon amino acid adsorption are bias dependent.

  1. Electrical characterization of proton conducting polymer electrolyte based on bio polymer with acid dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvimary, J.; Pradeepa, P.; Sowmya, G.; Edwinraj, S.; Prabhu, M. Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the biodegradable acid doped films composed of chitosan and Perchloric acid with different ratios (2.5 wt %, 5 wt %, 7.5 wt %, 10 wt %) was prepared by the solution casting technique. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of complex electrolytes obeys the Arrhenius relationship. Proton conductivity of the prepared polymer electrolyte of the bio polymer with acid doped was measured to be approximately 5.90 × 10-4 Scm-1. The dielectric data were analyzed using Complex impedance Z*, Dielectric loss ɛ', Tangent loss for prepared polymer electrolyte membrane with the highest conductivity samples at various temperature.

  2. DETERMINATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS BY ION-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH NON-SUPPRESSED CONDUCTIVITY AND OPTICAL DETECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of carboxylic acids using non-suppressed conductivity and UV detections is described. The background conductance of 1-octanesulfonic acid, hexane sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid at varying concentrations was determined. Using 0.2 mM 1-octanesulfonic acid as a mobile...

  3. Chloride conductance in normal and myotonic muscle fibres and the action of monocarboxylic aromatic acids

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, S. H.; Morales-Aguilera, A.

    1971-01-01

    1. Cable parameters, component conductances, excitability and membrane potentials in isolated external intercostal fibre bundles at 38° C from normal and myotonic goats were measured in normal and low-chloride Ringer, and in the presence of monocarboxylic aromatic acids that produce myotonic responses in mammalian muscle. 2. The mean resting chloride conductance in μmho/cm2 of myotonic fibres (range 0-147) was significantly less than that of normal fibres (range 376-951). The mean resting potassium conductance was higher in myotonic fibres (range 123-285) than in normal fibres (range 44-132). Potassium conductance increased about 10 μmho/cm2 per mV increase in absolute resting potential. 3. In normal fibres in normal Ringer 3-chloro-2,5,6-trimethylbenzoic acid; 5,6-dihydro-5,5-dimethyl-7-carboxybenz[c]acridine; phenanthrene-9-carboxylic acid; and anthracene-9-carboxylic acid at 10-5-10-4 M decreased membrane conductance without consistently changing diameter or capacitance. In low-chloride Ringer 3-chloro-2,5,6-trimethylbenzoic acid (5 × 10-5 M) increased potassium conductance in myotonic and normal fibres. It is concluded that these compounds block chloride conductance. 4. The carboxylic acids produced myotonia in normal fibres similar to that in untreated myotonic fibres. 5. Anthracene-9-carboxylic acid intravenously (8 mg/kg) in normal goats produced acutely a condition resembling myotonia congenita. The carboxylic acids produced no myotonic effects in frog muscle. PMID:5316641

  4. Structure and Proton Conductivity in Mixtures of Poly(acrylic acid) and Imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Chang; Griffin, Philip J.; Winey, Karen I.; University of Pennsylvania Team

    2015-03-01

    Proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) typically involves water, which requires that during operation the humidity of the PEM be carefully controlled. In contrast, anhydrous protic polymer membranes promote proton transport by incorporating heterocyclic molecules, such as imidazole and its derivatives, into acid-containing polymers. In this work, we explore the interplay between nanoscale-structure and proton conduction of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) blended at varying compositions with 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (EMI). We present the glass transition temperature from differential scanning calorimetry, morphology characterization from X-ray scattering, and proton conductivity from electrical impedance spectroscopy.

  5. Enhanced charge transport in highly conducting PEDOT-PSS films after acid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiva, V. Akshaya; Bhatia, Ravi; Menon, Reghu

    The high electrical conductivity, good stability, high strength, flexibility and good transparency of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS), make it useful for many applications including polymeric anodes for organic photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, flexible electrodes, supercapacitors, electrochromic devices, field-effect transistors and antistatic-coatings. However, the electrical conductivity of PEDOT-PSS has to be increased significantly for replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the transparent electrode in optoelectronic devices. The as prepared (pristine) PEDOT-PSS film prepared from the PEDOT-PSS aqueous solution usually has conductivity below 1Scm-1, remarkably lower than ITO. Significant conductivity enhancement has been observed on transparent and conductive PEDOT-PSS films after a treatment with inorganic acids. Our study investigates the charge transport in pristine and H2SO4, HNO3, HCl treated PEDOT-PSS films. We have treated the films with various concentrations of acids to probe the effect of the acid treatment on the conduction mechanism. The study includes the measurement of dc and electric field dependent conductivity of films in the temperature range of 4.2K-300K. We have also performed magneto-resistance measurements in the range of 0-5T. An enhancement by a factor of~103 has been observed in the room temperature conductivity. The detailed magneto-transport studies explain the various mechanisms for the conductivity enhancement observed.

  6. Potentiation of large conductance KCa channels by niflumic, flufenamic, and mefenamic acids.

    PubMed

    Ottolia, M; Toro, L

    1994-12-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated K+ (KCa) channels are rapidly activated by niflumic acid dose-dependently and reversibly. External niflumic acid was about 5 times more potent than internal niflumic acid, and its action was characterized by an increase in the channel affinity for [Ca2+], a parallel left shift of the voltage-activation curve, and a decrease of the channel long-closed states. Niflumic acid applied from the external side did not interfere with channel block by charybdotoxin, suggesting that its site of action is not at or near the charybdotoxin receptor. Accordingly, partial tetraethylammonium blockade did not interfere with channel activation by niflumic acid. Flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid also stimulated KCa channel activity and, as niflumic acid, they were more potent from the external than from the internal side. Fenamates applied from the external side displayed the following potency sequence: flufenamic acid approximately niflumic acid > mefenamic acid. These results indicate that KCa channels possess at least one fenamatereceptor whose occupancy leads to channel opening.

  7. Conceptualizing Spatially Dynamic Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions along a Fractured Sedimentary Bedrock Riverbed through Electrical Resistivity and Induced Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, C. M.; Kennedy, C. S.; Parker, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Eramosa River located within the Grand River Watershed in Ontario, Canada, resides upon a densely fractured dolostone aquifer with abundant dissolution-enhanced channel features. While the bedrock aquifer represents a major component of the total water supply for the surrounding region, potential effects of increased groundwater extraction on surface water and surrounding ecosystems are not yet fully understood. In general, little is known about the nature of the interaction between surface water and groundwater along densely fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbeds. For instance, the timing and magnitude of groundwater discharge to surface water and surface water recharge in a fractured carbonate rock environment is expected to differ significantly from its alluvial channel analogs due to the presence of highly transmissive, planar and strongly orientated discrete fracture features that control flow. Non-invasive geophysical methods represent an opportunity to evaluate shallow groundwater dynamics with minimal environmental risk to biota and, ultimately enhance the interpretation of direct hydrogeologic data. Preliminary spatial electrical conductivity measurements collected along a 200 m reach of the river, suggests a seasonally dynamic hyporheic response over a riffle-pool sequence. Based on these results, time-lapse electrical resistivity measurements are being collected every 2-3 weeks along two ~50 m transects perpendicular to the river: the first transect considers changes across an intact bedrock section with exposed vertical and horizontal fracturing along the riverbed, while the second is positioned across a weathered bedrock section with a thin layer of course gravel and sand alluvium. The objective of this study is to collect electrical resistivity snapshots across the riverbed (6-8 m depths) to non-invasively quantify temporal and spatial changes in groundwater-surface water mixing from low to high-stage periods through multiple seasonal cycles

  8. Enhancing proton conduction via doping of supramolecular liquid crystals (4-alkoxybenzoic acids) with imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ting; Wu, Yong; Tan, Shuai; Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Bingzhuo

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing proton conduction via doping was first achieved in hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals consisting of benzoic acids. Supramolecular liquid crystals formed by pure 4-alkoxybenzoic acids (nAOBA, n = 8, 10, 12) exhibited the maximum proton conductivity of 5.0 × 10-8 S cm-1. Doping of nAOBA with 25 mol% imidazole (Im0.25) had little impact on mesomorphism but increased proton conductivities by at least 3 orders of magnitude. The liquid crystals formed by nAOBA-Im0.25 exhibited the maximum proton conductivity of 1.9 × 10-4 S cm-1. It was proposed that structure diffusion of imidazole bridged interdimer proton transfer to form continuous conducting pathways in mesomorphic nAOBA-Im0.25.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C

    2007-10-31

    Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

  10. Novel conducting polymer-heteropoly acid hybrid material for artificial photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael B; Freund, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    Artificial photosynthetic (AP) approaches to convert and store solar energy will require membranes capable of conducting both ions and electrons while remaining relatively transparent and chemically stable. A new approach is applied herein involving previously described in situ chemical polymerization of electronically conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) in the presence of proton conducting heteropoly acid (HPA) phosphomolybdic acid (PMA). The electrochemical behaviour of the PEDOT/PMA hybrid material was investigated and it was found that the conducting polymer (CP) is susceptible to irreversible oxidative processes at potentials where water is oxidized. This will be problematic in AP devices should the process occur in very close proximity to a conducting polymer-based membrane. It was found that PEDOT grants the system good electrical performance in terms of conductivity and stability over a large pH window; however, the presence of PMA was not found to provide sufficient proton conductivity. This was addressed in an additional study by tuning the ionic (and in turn, electronic) conductivity in creating composites with the proton-permselective polymer Nafion. It was found that a material of this nature with near-equal conductivity for optimal chemical conversion efficiency will consist of roughly three parts Nafion and one part PEDOT/PMA.

  11. Measurement of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity on fractured rock outcrops near Altamura (Southern Italy) with an adjustable large ring infiltrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, M.C.; de Carlo, L.; Masciopinto, C.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, field studies set up to measure field-saturated hydraulic conductivity to evaluate contamination risks, have employed small cylinders that may not be representative of the scale of measurements in heterogeneous media. In this study, a large adjustable ring infiltrometer was designed to be installed on-site directly on rock to measure its field-saturated hydraulic conductivity. The proposed device is inexpensive and simple to implement, yet also very versatile, due to its large adjustable diameter that can be fixed on-site. It thus allows an improved representation of the natural system's heterogeneity, while also taking into consideration irregularities in the soil/rock surface. The new apparatus was tested on an outcrop of karstic fractured limestone overlying the deep Murge aquifer in the South of Italy, which has recently been affected by untreated sludge disposal, derived from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants. The quasi-steady vertical flow into the unsaturated fractures was investigated by measuring water levels during infiltrometer tests. Simultaneously, subsurface electrical resistivity measurements were used to visualize the infiltration of water in the subsoil, due to unsaturated water flow in the fractures. The proposed experimental apparatus works well on rock outcrops, and allows the repetition of infiltration tests at many locations in order to reduce model uncertainties in heterogeneous media. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Relevance of Aromatic Amino Acids for Electron Conduction along Geobacter Pili Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Malvankar, Nikhil; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    It has been proposed that the charge transport though Geobacter sulfurreducens pili protein occurs through the aromatic amino acids forming helical conducting chain within pili. X-ray studies of pili show that the aromatic amino acids are packed close enough (3-4 Å) for pi-stacking to occur. Conductivity of the pili network increases with lowering temperature indicating metallic-like transport mechanism. However due to the complexity of charge percolation path in 3D network, the intrinsic conductivity of an individual pili was not known. Here, we report transport measurements of individual pili of G. sulfurreducens. The conductivity, similar to that of organic polymers, shows that the pili may have implications in materials research. In addition, the conductivity value is sufficient to explain the respiration rate of the G. sulfurreducens. Further studies of pili from different natural and genetically modified species with varying amount of aromatic amino acid density demonstrate that it can play a decisive role on the magnitude of the conductivity. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CHM). Nikhil S. Malvankar holds a Career Award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  13. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  14. Vapor sensing mechanism of acid on copper phthalocyanine thin films studied by electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2013-06-01

    The electrical conductivity of thin films of iron phthalocyanine on glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique have been investigated. The electrical conductivity of thin films of these complexes changes when exposed to oxidizing and reducing gases such as halogens, ammonia, water and NOX. Thermal activation energy in the intrinsic region and impurity scattering region can be calculated by using Arrhenius plot. The dark conductivity and photoconductivity have been taken at different temperatures in the range 312-389 K. These films have been studied as chemical sensors for dilute sulphuric acid.

  15. Proton Conducting Polymer Membrane Comprised of 2-Acrylamido-2-Methylpropanesulfonic Acid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    copolymer of hydrophilic 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and 2- hydroxyethyl methacrylate ( HEMA ). Fumed silicas were also added in an... HEMA had a room temperature proton conductivity of 0.029 S cm-1, which increased to 0.06 S cm-1 at 80 C.

  16. Effect of amino acids lysine and arginine on fracture healing in rabbits: A radiological and histomorphological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shivam; Goel, Satish Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Background: Amino acids like arginine and lysine have been suggested to hasten the process of fracture healing by improving the local blood supply, supplementing growth factors, and improving collagen synthesis. We studied the role of lysine and arginine in the fracture repair process with regard to the rate of healing, probable mechanisms involved in the process, and mutual synergism between these agents. Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, 40 rabbits were subjected to ulnar osteotomy. They were distributed in control (14) and test groups (26). Twenty-six animals in the test group were fed with a diet rich in lysine and arginine. Both the groups were followed radiologically and histologically till union. Results: There was better healing of osteotomy in terms of better vascularization, callus formation, and mineralization in the test group. The time of healing in the test group was reduced by a period of 2 weeks. Conclusion: We conclude that amino acids like arginine and lysine may hasten fracture healing. PMID:19838381

  17. Abiogenic and Microbial Controls on Volatile Fatty Acids in Precambrian Crustal Fracture Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Heuer, V.; Tille, S.; Moran, J.; Slater, G.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; Glein, C. R.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2015-12-01

    Saline fracture waters within the Precambrian Shield rocks of Canada and South Africa have been sequestered underground over geologic timescales up to 1.1-1.8 Ga [1, 2]. These fluids are rich in H2 derived from radiolysis and hydration of mafic and ultramafic rocks [1, 2, 3] and host a low-biomass, low-diversity microbial ecosystem at some sites [2]. The abiogenic or biogenic nature of geochemical processes has important implications for bioavailable carbon sources and the role played by abiotic organic synthesis in sustaining a chemosynthetic deep biosphere. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are simple carboxylic acids that may support microbial communities in such environments, such as those found in terrestrial [4] and deep-sea [5] hot springs. We present abundance and δ13C analysis for VFAs in a spectrum of Canadian Shield fluids characterized by varying dissolved H2, CH4, and C2+ n-alkane compositions. Isotope mass balance indicates that microbially mediated fermentation of carbon-rich graphitic sulfides may produce the elevated levels of acetate (39-273 μM) found in Birchtree and Thompson mine. In contrast, thermodynamic considerations and isotopic signatures of the notably higher acetate (1.2-1.9 mM), as well as formate and propionate abundances (371-816 μM and 20-38 μM, respectively) found at Kidd Creek mine suggest a role for abiogenic production via reduction of dissolved inorganic carbon with H2 for formate, and oxidation of C2+ n-alkanes for acetate and propionate, along with possible microbial cycling. VFAs comprise the bulk of dissolved and total organic carbon in the mines surveyed, and as such represent a potential key substrate for life. [1] Holland et al. (2013) Nature 497: 367-360. [2] Lin et al. (2006) Science 314: 479-482. [3] Sherwood Lollar et al. (2014) Nature 516: 379-382. [4] Windman et al. (2007) Astrobiology 7(6): 873-890. [5] Lang et al. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 92: 82-99.

  18. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  19. Influence of Fluorine on the Conductivity and Oxidation of Silicon Nanomembranes after Hydrofluoric Acid Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiang-Fu; Han, Ping; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou

    2011-08-01

    After immersion in hydrofluoric acid, the sheet resistance of a 220-nm-thick silicon nanomembrane, measured in dry air by van der Pauw method, drops around two orders of magnitude initially, then increases and reaches the level of a sample with a native oxide surface in about one month. The surface component and oxidation rate are also characterized by x-ray photo electronic spectroscopy measurement. Fluorine is found to play a significant role in improving conductivity and has no apparent influence on the oxidation rate after hydrofluoric acid treatment.

  20. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Scott-Ward, T S; Li, H; Schmidt, A; Cai, Z; Sheppard, D N

    2004-01-01

    Niflumic acid is widely used to inhibit Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channels. However, the chemical structure of niflumic acid resembles that of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a drug that inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. To investigate how niflumic acid inhibits CFTR Cl(-) channel, we studied recombinant wild-type human CFTR in excised inside-out membrane patches. When added to the intracellular solution, niflumic acid caused a concentration- and voltage-dependent decrease of CFTR Cl(-) current with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (K(i)) of 253 microM and Hill co-efficient of approximately 1, at -50 mV. Niflumic acid inhibition of single CFTR Cl(-) channels was characterized by a very fast, flickery block that decreased dramatically current amplitude without altering open-probability. Consistent with these data, spectral analysis of CFTR Cl(-) currents suggested that channel block by niflumic acid was described by the closed <--> open <--> blocked kinetic scheme with blocker on rate (k(on)) = 13.9 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1), off rate (k(off))=3348 s(-1) and dissociation constant (K(d)) = 241 microM, at -50 mV. Based on these data, we tested the effects of niflumic acid on transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and cyst growth using type I MDCK epithelial cells. Niflumic acid (200 microM) inhibited cAMP-stimulated, bumetanide-sensitive short-circuit current by 55%. Moreover, the drug potently retarded cyst growth. We conclude that niflumic acid is an open-channel blocker of CFTR that inhibits Cl(-) permeation by plugging the channel pore. It or related agents might be of value in the development of new therapies for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  1. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  2. Electrical conductivity of α-LiIO 3 acid type crystals at 1 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galez, C.; Rosso, C.; Teisseyre, Y.; Crettez, J. M.; Bourson, P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Righi, A.; Moreira, R. L.

    1995-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of α-LiIO 3 acid type crystals is studied. By applying a very low amplitude electric field at 1 kHz and performing a continuous sampling of measurements, differences, reproducible for all the investigated samples, appeared between the first and subsequent heatings The anomalies occurring during the first heating are attributed mainly to inclusions of mother liquor, HIO 3 and Li 1-xH xIO 3. The 'intrinsic' conductivity is measured after a first annealing at about 470 K; the activation energies are then calculated.

  3. Phosphoric acid loaded azo (-N═N-) based covalent organic framework for proton conduction.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suman; Kundu, Tanay; Kandambeth, Sharath; Babarao, Ravichandar; Marathe, Yogesh; Kunjir, Shrikant M; Banerjee, Rahul

    2014-05-07

    Two new chemically stable functional crystalline covalent organic frameworkds (COFs) (Tp-Azo and Tp-Stb) were synthesized using the Schiff base reaction between triformylphloroglucinol (Tp) and 4,4'-azodianiline (Azo) or 4,4'-diaminostilbene (Stb), respectively. Both COFs show the expected keto-enamine form, and high stability toward boiling water, strong acidic, and basic media. H3PO4 doping in Tp-Azo leads to immobilization of the acid within the porous framework, which facilitates proton conduction in both the hydrous (σ = 9.9 × 10(-4) S cm(-1)) and anhydrous state (σ = 6.7 × 10(-5) S cm(-1)). This report constitutes the first emergence of COFs as proton conducting materials.

  4. Conductivity Measurements of Synthesized Heteropoly Acid Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Record, K.A.; Haley, B.T.; Turner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cell technology is receiving attention due to its potential to be a pollution free method of electricity production when using renewably produced hydrogen as fuel. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell H2 and O2 react at separate electrodes, producing electricity, thermal energy, and water. A key component of the PEM fuel cell is the membrane that separates the electrodes. DuPont’s Nafion® is the most commonly used membrane in PEM fuel cells; however, fuel cell dehydration at temperatures near 100°C, resulting in poor conductivity, is a major hindrance to fuel cell performance. Recent studies incorporating heteropoly acids (HPAs) into membranes have shown an increase in conductivity and thus improvement in performance. HPAs are inorganic materials with known high proton conductivities. The primary objective of this work is to measure the conductivity of Nafion, X-Ionomer membranes, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Developed Membranes that are doped with different HPAs at different concentrations. Four-point conductivity measurements using a third generation BekkTech conductivity test cell are used to determine membrane conductivity. The effect of multiple temperature and humidification levels is also examined. While the classic commercial membrane, Nafion, has a conductivity of approximately 0.10 S/cm, measurements for membranes in this study range from 0.0030 – 0.58 S/cm, depending on membrane type, structure of the HPA, and the relative humidity. In general, the X-ionomer with H6P2W21O71 HPA gave the highest conductivity and the Nafion with the 12-phosphotungstic (PW12) HPA gave the lowest. The NREL composite membranes had conductivities on the order of 0.0013 – 0.025 S/cm.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of quantitative ultrasound as a technique for screening of osteoporotic fracture risk: report on a health technology assessment conducted in 2001

    PubMed Central

    Aidelsburger, Pamela; Hessel, Franz; Wasem, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Aim: On behalf of the German Agency for Health Technology Assessment (DAHTA@DIMDI) a rapid economic HTA was conducted. Aim of the HTA was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) for screening of osteoporotic fracture risk. Study population was formed by postmenopausal women. QUS was compared to the dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the most frequently used method of measurement. Methods: According to the recommendations for rapid economic HTA a comprehensive literature search was conducted. Data of identified and relevant publications have been extracted in form of a qualitative and quantitative information synthesis. The authors calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for different screening procedures: (1) one-step proceeding comparing QUS with DXA, (2) two-step proceeding starting with QUS followed by DXA in pathologic cases. Results: An additional case diagnosed by DXA in a one-step proceeding rises additional costs of about 1,000 EURO. A two-step proceeding with QUS is cost-effective as long as the costs of one QUS examination are lower than 31%-51% of the costs of one DXA examination. Discussion: All considered studies showed methodological limitations. None of them included long term effects like avoided bone fractures. Considering long-term effects probably would change the results. Due to the weakness of data no concluding judgement about the cost-effectiveness of QUS can be given. PMID:19675686

  6. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  7. Pyrrole-hyaluronic acid conjugates for decreasing cell binding to metals and conducting polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Young; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification of electrically conductive biomaterials has been studied to improve biocompatibility for a number of applications, such as implantable sensors and microelectrode arrays. In this study, we electrochemically coated electrodes with biocompatible and non-cell adhesive hyaluronic acid (HA) to reduce cellular adhesion for potential use in neural prostheses. To this end, pyrrole-conjugated hyaluronic acid (PyHA) was synthesized and employed for electrochemical coating of platinum, indium-tin-oxide, and polystyrene sulfonate-doped polypyrrole electrodes. This PyHA conjugate consists of (1) a pyrrole moiety that allows the compound to be electrochemically deposited onto a conductive substrate and (2) non-adhesive HA to minimize cell adhesion and to potentially decrease inflammatory tissue responses. Our characterization results showed the presence of a hydrophilic p(PyHA) layer on the modified electrode, and impedance measurements revealed impedance that was statistically the same as the unmodified electrode. We found that the p(PyHA)-coated electrodes minimized adhesion and migration of fibroblasts and astrocytes for a minimum of up to 3 months. Also, the coating was stable in physiological solution for 3 months and also stable against enzymatic degradation by hyaluronidase. These studies suggest that this p(PyHA)-coating has the potential to be used to mask conducting electrodes from adverse glial responses that occur upon implantation. In addition, electrochemical coating with PyHA can be potentially extended for the surface modification of other metallic and conducting substances such as stents and biosensors. PMID:20558330

  8. Low proton conductance of plant cuticles and its relevance to the acid-growth theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, S.A.; Seymour, V.; Cleland, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    Evidence obtained on the relation between the pH of the medium and the growth of intact stem sections is compatible with the acid-growth theory only if the proton conductance of the cuticle is an effective barrier to the entry or exit of protons from the tissue. By measuring the rate at which protons cross frozen-thawed epidermal strips of sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) and soybean hypocotyls (Glycine max Morr.) and enzymically isolated cuticles of Berberis aquifolium Persh. and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) fruit, we have now demonstrated the low proton conductance of the cuticular layer. Unless the conductance is enhanced by abrasion of the cuticle or by removal of the cuticular waxes, proton movement into and out of a tissue across the cuticle will be significant only over long time periods.

  9. Low proton conductance of plant cuticles and its relevance to the Acid-growth theory.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, S A; Seymour, V; Cleland, R E

    1981-09-01

    Evidence obtained on the relation between the pH of the medium and the growth of intact stem sections is compatible with the acid-growth theory only if the proton conductance of the cuticle is so low that the cuticle is an effective barrier to the entry or exit of protons from the tissue. By measuring the rate at which protons cross frozen-thawed epidermal strips of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and soybean hypocotyls (Glycine max Morr.) and enzymically isolated cuticles of Berberis aquifolium Persh. and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) fruit, we have now demonstrated the low proton conductance of the cuticular layer. Unless the conductance is enhanced by abrasion of the cuticle or by removal of the cuticular waxes, proton movement into and out of a tissue across the cuticle will be significant only over long time periods.

  10. Novel L-lactic acid biosensors based on conducting polypyrrole-block copolymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Wang, Daoying; Zhang, Muhan; Ni, Yanxiu; Shen, Xiaohui; Song, Youchao; Geng, Zhiming; Xu, Weimin; Liu, Fang; Mao, Chun

    2015-02-07

    The development of advanced nanomaterials for the highly efficient electrical detection of biological species has attracted great attention. Here, novel polypyrrole-Pluronic F127 nanoparticles (PPy-F127 NPs) with conducting and biocompatibility properties were synthesized and used to construct a L-lactic acid biosensor that could be applied in biochemical assays. The PPy-F127 NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis and UV-vis spectroscopy. Lactate oxidase (LOx) structure variation on the PPy-F127 NPs was investigated by circular dichroism (CD). The cyclic voltammetric results indicated that LOx immobilized on the PPy-F127 NPs exhibited direct electron transfer reaction with a formal potential value (E(0)') of 0.154 V vs. SCE. Moreover, the biosensor had good electrocatalytic activity toward L-lactic acid with a wide linear range (0.015-37.5 mM) and a low detection limit of 0.0088 mM. The regression equation was I (μA) = 0.02353c (mM) + 1.4135 (R(2) = 0.9939). The L-lactic acid biosensor had a good anti-interference property towards uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), glucose and cysteine. The idea and method provide a promising platform for the rapid development of biosensors that can be used in the detection of biological species.

  11. Electric conductance of dispersions of metal oxides in solutions of weak acids in mixed dioxane-water solvents.

    PubMed

    Kosmulski, Marek; Mączka, Edward

    2012-08-15

    The electric conductance of solutions of sulfuric, oxalic, benzoic, and salicylic acid (up to 0.02 M) in dioxane-water mixed solvents (90% and 93% dioxane by mass) has been studied in the presence and absence of TiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) (0.5-5% by mass). TiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) enhanced the conductance of solutions of organic acids in aqueous dioxane. The conductance is interpreted in terms of adsorption of acid in molecular form, dissolution of ceramic oxides in form of anionic complexes, and leaching of acidic impurities from ceramic oxides.

  12. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Methattel Raman, Shijeesh; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  13. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  14. Compensation Effect in the Electrical Conduction Process in Some Nucleic Acid Base Complexes with Proflavine Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, D.; Misra, T. N.

    1988-11-01

    Compensation behaviour has been found in electrical conduction process in proflavine complexes with nucleic acid bases, guanine, adenine, uracil and thymine. At low dye concentrations these semiconducting complexes follow a three constant compensation equation σ(T){=}σ0'\\exp (E/2kT0)\\exp (-E/2kT), σ0' and T0 being constants for a specific base. The other notations have their usual meaning. Consistent values of these constants have been obtained by different experimental methods of evaluation. These results suggest that compensation effect has a physical origin.

  15. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group.

  16. The association of red blood cell n-3 and n-6 fatty acids to dietary fatty acid intake, bone mineral density and hip fracture risk in The Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Orchard, Tonya S.; Ing, Steven W.; Lu, Bo; Belury, Martha A.; Johnson, Karen; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Jackson, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in red blood cells (RBC) are an objective indicator of PUFA status and may be related to hip fracture risk. The primary objective of this study was to examine RBC PUFAs as predictors of hip fracture risk in postmenopausal women. A nested case-control study (n=400 pairs) was completed within the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) using 201 incident hip fracture cases from the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) cohort, along with 199 additional incident hip fracture cases randomly selected from the WHI Observational Study. Cases were 1:1 matched on age, race, and hormone use with non-hip fracture controls. Stored baseline RBCs were analyzed for fatty acids using gas chromatography. After removing degraded samples, 324 matched pairs were included in statistical analyses. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were constructed according to case-control pair status; risk of fracture was estimated for tertiles of RBC PUFA. In adjusted hazard models, lower hip fracture risk was associated with higher RBC α-linolenic acid [Hazard ratio (HR) Tertile 3 (T3): 0.44; 95% CI: 0.23-0.85; p for linear trend 0.0154)], eicosapentaenoic acid (HR T3: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.24-0.87; p for linear trend 0.0181) and total n-3 PUFAs (HR T3: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.30-1.01; p for linear trend 0.0492). Conversely, hip fracture nearly doubled with the highest RBC n-6/n-3 ratio (HR T3: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.03-3.70; p for linear trend 0.0399). RBC PUFAs were not associated with BMD. RBC PUFAs were indicative of dietary intake of marine n-3 PUFAs (Spearman’s rho=0.45, p<0.0001), total n-6 PUFAs (rho=0.17, p<0.0001) and linoleic acid (rho= 0.09, p<0.05). These results suggest that higher RBC α-linolenic acid, as well as eicosapentaenoic acid and total n-3 PUFAs, may predict lower hip fracture risk. Contrastingly, a higher RBC n-6/n-3 ratio may predict higher hip fracture risk in postmenopausal women. PMID:23018646

  17. Enhanced proton conductivity of Nafion composite membrane by incorporating phosphoric acid-loaded covalent organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongheng; Li, Zhen; Yang, Xin; Cao, Li; Wang, Chongbin; Zhang, Bei; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-11-01

    Design and fabrication of efficient proton transport channels within solid electrolytes is crucial and challenging to new energy-relevant devices such as proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this study, the phosphoric acid (H3PO4) molecules are impregnated into SNW-1-type covalent organic frameworks (COFs) via vacuum assisted method. High loading of H3PO4 in SNW-1 and low guest leaching rate are achieved due to the similar diameter between H3PO4 and micropores in SNW-1. Then the COF-based composite membranes are fabricated for the first time with impregnated COFs (H3PO4@SNW-1) and Nafion matrix. For the composite membranes, the acid-base pairs formed between H3PO4@SNW-1 networks and Nafion optimize the interfacial interactions and hydrophilic domains. The acidic -PO3H2 groups in pores of H3PO4@SNW-1 provide abundant proton transfer sites. As a result, the continuous proton transfer channels with low energy barrier are created. At the filler content of 15 wt%, the composite membrane exhibits a superior proton conductivity of 0.0604 S cm-1 at 51% relative humidity and 80 °C. At the same time, the maximum power density of single fuel cell is 60.3% higher than that of the recast Nafion membrane.

  18. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  19. Short-term effect of zoledronic acid upon fracture resistance of the mandibular condyle and femoral head in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    López-Jornet, Pía; Vicente-Hernández, Ascensión

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects in terms of resistance to fracture of the mandibular condyle and femoral head following different doses of zoledronic acid in an animal model. Study design: A total of 80 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were included in a prospective randomized study. The animals were randomly divided into four groups of 20 rats each. Group 1 (control) received sterile saline solution, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received a accumulated dose of 0.2 mg, 0.4 mg and 0.6 mg of zoledronic acid, respectively. The animals were sacrificed 28 days after the last dose, and the right hemimandible and the right femur were removed. The fracture strength was measured (in Newtons) with a universal test machine using a 1 kN load connected to a metal rod with one end angled at 30 degrees. The cross-head speed was 1 mm/min. Later, the specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope with backscattered electron imaging (SEM-BSE). At last, chemical analysis and elemental mapping of the mineral bone composition were generated using a microanalytical system based on energy-dispersive and X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Results: A total of 160 fracture tests were performed. The fracture resistance increased in mandible and femur with a higher accumulated dose of zoledronic acid. Statistically significant differences were recorded versus the controls with all the studies groups. The chemical analysis in mandible showed a significantly increased of calcium and phosphorous to compare the control with all of the study groups; however, in femur no statistically significant differences between the four study groups were observed. Conclusions: The administration of bisphosphonates increases the fracture resistance in mandible and femur. Key words:Zoledronic acid, bisphosphonates, animal experimentation, fracture test. PMID:23524420

  20. Plasma phosphatidylcholine concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids are differentially associated with hop bone mineral density and hip fracture in older adults: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may influence bone health. Our objective was to examine associations between plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) PUFA concentrations and hip measures: 1) femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD) (n=765); 2) 4-y change in FN-BMD (n=556); and 3) hip fracture risk (n=76...

  1. Rock specific hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing to enhance a geothermal system — Concepts and field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Günter; Blöcher, Guido; Reinicke, Andreas; Brandt, Wulf

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs developed to extract economic amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. To enhance the productivity of reservoirs, a site specific concept is necessary to actively make reservoir conditions profitable using specially adjusted stimulation treatments, such as multi fracture concepts and site specific well path design. The results of previously performed stimulation treatments in the geothermal research well GtGrSk4/05 at Groß Schönebeck, Germany are presented. The reservoir is located at a 4100-4300 m depth within the Lower Permian of the NE German Basin with a bottom-hole temperature of 150 °C. The reservoir rock is classified by two lithological units from bottom to top: volcanic rocks (andesitic rocks) and siliciclastics ranging from conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones (fluvial sediments). The stimulation treatments included multiple hydraulic stimulations and an acid treatment. In order to initiate a cross-flow from the sandstone layer, the hydraulic stimulations were performed in different depth sections (two in the sandstone section and one in the underlying volcanic section). In low permeability volcanic rocks, a cyclic hydraulic fracturing treatment was performed over 6 days in conjunction with adding quartz in low concentrations to maintain a sustainable fracture performance. Flow rates of up to 150 l/s were realized, and a total of 13,170 m 3 of water was injected. A hydraulic connection to the sandstone layer was successfully achieved in this way. However, monitoring of the water level in the offsetting well EGrSk3/90, which is 475 m apart at the final depth, showed a very rapid water level increase due to the stimulation treatment. This can be explained by a connected fault zone within the volcanic rocks. Two gel-proppant treatments were performed in the slightly higher permeability sandstones to obtain long-term access to the reservoir rocks. During each

  2. Chirality-Discriminated Conductivity of Metal-Amino Acid Biocoordination Polymer Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianzhong; Wu, Yijin; Deng, Ke; He, Meng; He, Liangcan; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xugang; Liu, Yaling; Li, Shunxing; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-27

    Biocoordination polymer (BCP) nanowires are successfully constructed through self-assembly of chiral cysteine amino acids and Cd cations in solution. The varied chirality of cysteine is explored to demonstrate the difference of BCP nanowires in both morphology and structure. More interestingly and surprisingly, the electrical property measurement reveals that, although all Cd(II)/cysteine BCP nanowires behave as semiconductors, the conductivity of the Cd(II)/dl-cysteine nanowires is 4 times higher than that of the Cd(II)/l-cysteine or Cd(II)/d-cysteine ones. The origin of such chirality-discriminated characteristics registered in BCP nanowires is further elucidated by theoretical calculation. These findings demonstrate that the morphology, structure, and property of BCP nanostructures could be tuned by the chirality of the bridging ligands, which will shed light on the comprehension of chirality transcription as well as construction of chirality-regulated functional materials.

  3. Abscisic Acid Regulation of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Aquaporin Gene Expression Is Crucial to the Plant Shoot Growth Enhancement Caused by Rhizosphere Humic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; Bacaicoa, Eva; Garnica, María; Fuentes, Marta; Casanova, Esther; Zamarreño, Angel M; Iriarte, Juan C; Etayo, David; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Baigorri, Roberto; García-Mina, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The physiological and metabolic mechanisms behind the humic acid-mediated plant growth enhancement are discussed in detail. Experiments using cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants show that the shoot growth enhancement caused by a structurally well-characterized humic acid with sedimentary origin is functionally associated with significant increases in abscisic acid (ABA) root concentration and root hydraulic conductivity. Complementary experiments involving a blocking agent of cell wall pores and water root transport (polyethylenglycol) show that increases in root hydraulic conductivity are essential in the shoot growth-promoting action of the model humic acid. Further experiments involving an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis in root and shoot (fluridone) show that the humic acid-mediated enhancement of both root hydraulic conductivity and shoot growth depended on ABA signaling pathways. These experiments also show that a significant increase in the gene expression of the main root plasma membrane aquaporins is associated with the increase of root hydraulic conductivity caused by the model humic acid. Finally, experimental data suggest that all of these actions of model humic acid on root functionality, which are linked to its beneficial action on plant shoot growth, are likely related to the conformational structure of humic acid in solution and its interaction with the cell wall at the root surface.

  4. Abscisic Acid Regulation of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Aquaporin Gene Expression Is Crucial to the Plant Shoot Growth Enhancement Caused by Rhizosphere Humic Acids1

    PubMed Central

    Bacaicoa, Eva; Garnica, María; Fuentes, Marta; Casanova, Esther; Etayo, David; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and metabolic mechanisms behind the humic acid-mediated plant growth enhancement are discussed in detail. Experiments using cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants show that the shoot growth enhancement caused by a structurally well-characterized humic acid with sedimentary origin is functionally associated with significant increases in abscisic acid (ABA) root concentration and root hydraulic conductivity. Complementary experiments involving a blocking agent of cell wall pores and water root transport (polyethylenglycol) show that increases in root hydraulic conductivity are essential in the shoot growth-promoting action of the model humic acid. Further experiments involving an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis in root and shoot (fluridone) show that the humic acid-mediated enhancement of both root hydraulic conductivity and shoot growth depended on ABA signaling pathways. These experiments also show that a significant increase in the gene expression of the main root plasma membrane aquaporins is associated with the increase of root hydraulic conductivity caused by the model humic acid. Finally, experimental data suggest that all of these actions of model humic acid on root functionality, which are linked to its beneficial action on plant shoot growth, are likely related to the conformational structure of humic acid in solution and its interaction with the cell wall at the root surface. PMID:26450705

  5. Degree of cure and fracture properties of experimental acid-resin modified composites under wet and dry conditions

    PubMed Central

    López-Suevos, Francisco; Dickens, Sabine H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effects of core structure and storage conditions on the mechanical properties of acid-resin modified composites and a control material by three-point bending and conversion measurements 15 min and 24 h after curing. Methods The monomers pyromellitic dimethacrylate (PMDM), biphenyldicarboxylic-acid dimethacrylate (BPDM), (isopropylidene-diphenoxy)bis(phthalic-acid) dimethacrylate (IPDM), oxydiphthalic-acid dimethacrylate (ODPDM), and Bis-GMA were mixed with triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in a 40/60 molar ratio, and photo-activated. Composite bars (Barium-oxide-glass/resin = 3/1 mass ratio, (2 × 2 × 25) mm, n = 5) were light-cured for 1 min per side. Flexural strength (FS), elastic modulus (E), and work-of-fracture (WoF) were determined in three-point bending after 15 min (stored dry); and after 24 h under dry and wet storage conditions at 37 °C. Corresponding degrees of conversion (DC) were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data was statistically analyzed (2-way analysis of variance, ANOVA, Holm-Sidak, p < 0.05). Results Post-curing significantly increased FS, E and DC in nearly all cases. WoF did not change, or even decreased with time. For all properties ANOVA found significant differences and interactions of time and material. Wet storage reduced the moduli and the other properties measured with the exception of FS and WoF of ODPDM; DC only decreased in BPDM and IPDM composites. Significance Differences in core structure resulted in significantly different physical properties of the composites studied with two phenyl rings connected by one ether linkage as in ODPDM having superior FS, WoF and DC especially after 24 h under wet conditions. As expected, post-curing significantly contributed to the final mechanical properties of the composites, while wet storage generally reduced the mechanical properties. PMID:17980422

  6. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with conductivity detection for the analysis of phytic acid in food.

    PubMed

    Talamond, P; Doulbeau, S; Rochette, I; Guyot, J P

    2000-02-25

    A sensitive method for the accurate determination of phytic acid in food samples is described. The proposed procedure involves the anion-exchange liquid chromatography with conductivity detection. Initially, two methods of determination of phytic acid were compared: absorptiometry and high-performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with chemically suppressed conductivity detector. Unlike most conventional methods involving precipitation by FeCl3, the simpler and more reliable HPIC assay avoids the numerous assumptions inherent in the iron precipitation and the accuracy is independent of the phytate content. The protocol was also applied to a survey of phytic acid concentration in some cereal, oil and legume seeds.

  7. Investigation of Humidity Dependent Surface Morphology and Proton Conduction in Multi-Acid Side Chain Membranes by Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Economou, Nicholas J; Barnes, Austin M; Wheat, Andrew J; Schaberg, Mark S; Hamrock, Steven J; Buratto, Steven K

    2015-11-05

    In this report, we employ phase-contrast tapping mode and conductive probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) as tools to investigate the nanoscale morphology and proton conductance of a 3M perfluoro-imide acid (PFIA) membrane (625 EW) over a large range of relative humidity (3-95% RH). As a point of comparison, we also investigate 3M perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) (825 EW) and Nafion 212. With AFM, we assess the membrane's water retention and mechanical stability at low RH and high RH, respectively. Cp-AFM allows us to spatially resolve the hydrophilic and electrochemically active domains under a similar set of conditions and observe directly the ties between membrane morphology and proton conductance. From our data, we are able to correlate the improved water retention indicated by the size of the hydrophilic domains with the proton conductance in the PFIA membrane at elevated temperature and compare the result with that observed for the PFSA and Nafion. At high RH conditions, we see evidence of a nearly continuous hydrophilic phase, which indicates a high degree of swelling.

  8. Electrically conductive PVC layers filled with active carbon containing H+-conducting porous structures of sulfuric acid complexes of cyclams on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Krasil'nikova, O. K.

    2015-07-01

    Electrically conductive PVC layers are synthesized. The layers are filled with active carbons containing porous H+-conductive structures of hydroxyethylcyclam/sulfuric acid complexes crosslinked with cellulose fabric. They are interlaid with layers based on the same structures containing added benzene and hexane adsorbates and solvates. It is found that upon anode or cathode polarization of the layers as H+-conductive electrochemical bridges in air and in the vapor and liquid phases of benzene and hexane, either the electroreduction of H+ to H2 or the electrooxidation of H2O to O2 occurs in the areas of contact between active carbon particles and the complexes. The dependences of rates of H2 and O2 formation on the voltage are studied. The magnitudes of overvoltage and the constants of electrochemical reactions are found to depend on the composition of a layer.

  9. Why do proton conducting polybenzimidazole phosphoric acid membranes perform well in high-temperature PEM fuel cells?

    PubMed

    Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Majer, Günter; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-21

    Transport properties and hydration behavior of phosphoric acid/(benz)imidazole mixtures are investigated by diverse NMR techniques, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and conductivity measurements. The monomeric systems can serve as models for phosphoric acid/poly-benzimidazole membranes which are known for their exceptional performance in high temperature PEM fuel cells. (1)H- and (31)P-NMR data show benzimidazole acting as a strong Brønsted base with respect to neat phosphoric acid. Since benzimidazole's nitrogens are fully protonated with a low rate for proton exchange with phosphate species, proton diffusion and conduction processes must take place within the hydrogen bond network of phosphoric acid only. The proton exchange dynamics between phosphate and benzimidazole species pass through the intermediate exchange regime (with respect to NMR line separations) with exchange times being close to typical diffusion times chosen in PFG-NMR diffusion measurements (ms regime). The resulting effects, as described by the Kärger equation, are included into the evaluation of PFG-NMR data for obtaining precise proton diffusion coefficients. The highly reduced proton diffusion coefficient within the phosphoric acid part of the model systems compared to neat phosphoric acid is suggested to be the immediate consequence of proton subtraction from phosphoric acid. This reduces hydrogen bond network frustration (imbalance of the number of proton donors and acceptors) and therefore also the rate of structural proton diffusion, phosphoric acid's acidity and hygroscopicity. Reduced water uptake, shown by TGA, goes along with reduced electroosmotic water drag which is suggested to be the reason for PBI-phosphoric acid membranes performing better in fuel cells than other phosphoric-acid-containing electrolytes with higher protonic conductivity.

  10. Abscisic Acid Induces Rapid Reductions in Mesophyll Conductance to Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Giuseppe; Haworth, Matthew; Wahbi, Said; Mahmood, Tariq; Zuomin, Shi; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The rate of photosynthesis (A) of plants exposed to water deficit is a function of stomatal (gs) and mesophyll (gm) conductance determining the availability of CO2 at the site of carboxylation within the chloroplast. Mesophyll conductance often represents the greatest impediment to photosynthetic uptake of CO2, and a crucial determinant of the photosynthetic effects of drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a fundamental role in signalling and co-ordination of plant responses to drought; however, the effect of ABA on gm is not well-defined. Rose, cherry, olive and poplar were exposed to exogenous ABA and their leaf gas exchange parameters recorded over a four hour period. Application with ABA induced reductions in values of A, gs and gm in all four species. Reduced gm occurred within one hour of ABA treatment in three of the four analysed species; indicating that the effect of ABA on gm occurs on a shorter timescale than previously considered. These declines in gm values associated with ABA were not the result of physical changes in leaf properties due to altered turgor affecting movement of CO2, or caused by a reduction in the sub-stomatal concentration of CO2 (Ci). Increased [ABA] likely induces biochemical changes in the properties of the interface between the sub-stomatal air-space and mesophyll layer through the actions of cooporins to regulate the transport of CO2. The results of this study provide further evidence that gm is highly responsive to fluctuations in the external environment, and stress signals such as ABA induce co-ordinated modifications of both gs and gm in the regulation of photosynthesis. PMID:26862904

  11. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90{degrees}C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Spatially Modulating Interfacial Properties of Transparent Conductive Oxides: Patterning Work Function with Phosphonic Acid Self-Assembled Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Knesting, Kristina M.; Hotchkiss, Peter J.; MacLeod, Bradley A.; Marder, Seth R.; Ginger, David S.

    2011-09-29

    The interface between an organic semiconductor and a transparent conducting oxide is crucial to the performance of organic optoelectronics. We use microcontact printing to pattern pentafluorobenzyl phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on indium tin oxide (ITO). We obtain high-fidelity patterns with sharply defined edges and with large work function contrast (comparable to that obtained from phosphonic acid SAMs deposited from solution).

  13. Rapid and sensitive liquid chromatographic method using a conductivity detector for the determination of phytic acid in food.

    PubMed

    Talamond, P; Gallon, G; Treche, S

    1998-05-01

    An LC method was developed for the determination of phytic acid in food. The separation was carried out by gradient elution on an anion-exchange column using a conductivity detector. Earlier reversed-phase LC procedures for the quantitation of phytic acid usually required a prepurification step. The prepurification can be avoided by the separation method described in this paper. The method is sensitive and selective, and can be rapidly and easily performed. It is therefore suitable for routine determination.

  14. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  15. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Miguel V; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2001-01-01

    The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 μm, niflumic acid caused a 19 ± 5 % reduction in l-[3H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of dl-[3H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the l-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, l-glutamate and l-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the l-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the l-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters. PMID:11432999

  16. Niflumic acid modulates uncoupled substrate-gated conductances in the human glutamate transporter EAAT4.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, M V; Vandenberg, R J

    2001-07-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid on the substrate-gated currents mediated by the glutamate transporter EAAT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were examined using radiolabelled substrate flux measurements and two-electrode voltage clamp techniques. 2. Niflumic acid significantly enhanced the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4, without affecting the affinity of the substrates towards EAAT4. At a concentration of 300 microM, niflumic acid caused a 19 +/- 5 % reduction in L-[(3)H]glutamate uptake and no significant effect on the uptake of DL-[(3)H]aspartate. Thus, enhancement of the substrate-gated currents in EAAT4 does not correlate with the rate of substrate transport and suggests that the niflumic acid-induced currents are not thermodynamically coupled to the transport of substrate. 3. Niflumic acid and arachidonic acid co-applied with substrate to EAAT4-expressing oocytes had similar functional consequences. However, niflumic acid still enhanced the L-glutamate-gated current to the same extent in the presence and absence of a saturating dose of arachidonic acid, which suggests that the sites of action of the two compounds are distinct. 4. The EAAT4-mediated currents for the two substrates, L-glutamate and L-aspartate, were not enhanced equally by addition of the same dose of niflumic acid and the ionic composition of the niflumic acid-induced currents was not the same for the two substrates. Protons carry the L-glutamate-gated niflumic acid-induced current and both protons and chloride ions carry the L-aspartate-gated niflumic acid-induced current. 5. These results show that niflumic acid can be used to probe the functional aspects of EAAT4 and that niflumic acid and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs could be used as the basis for the development of novel modulators of glutamate transporters.

  17. Kinetics of the electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid on ultrananocrystalline boron doped conductive diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Fernández-González, Carolina; Gómez-Lavín, Sonia; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical degradation and mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Model aqueous solutions of PFOA (100mg/L) were electro-oxidized under galvanostatic conditions in a flow-by undivided cell provided with a tungsten cathode and an anode formed by a commercial ultrananocrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) coating on a niobium substrate. A systematic experimental study was conducted in order to analyze the influence of the following operation variables: (i) the supporting electrolyte, NaClO4 (1.4 and 8.4g/L) and Na2SO4 (5g/L); (ii) the applied current density, japp, in the range 50-200 A/m(2) and (iii) the hydrodynamic conditions, in terms of flowrate in the range 0.4×10(-4)-1.7×10(-4)m(3)/s and temperature in the range 293-313K. After 6h of treatment and at japp 200A/m(2), PFOA removal was higher than 93% and the mineralization ratio, obtained from the decrease of the total organic carbon (TOC) was 95%. The electrochemical generation of hydroxyl radicals in the supporting electrolyte was experimentally measured based on their reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The enhanced formation of hydroxyl radicals at higher japp was related to the faster kinetics of PFOA removal. The fitting of experimental data to the proposed kinetic model provided the first order rate constants of PFOA degradation, kc(1) that moved from 2.06×10(-4) to 15.58×10(-4)s(-1), when japp varied from 50 to 200A/m(2).

  18. An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene).

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Chiffot, Nicolas; King, Martin W; Zhang, Ze

    2015-08-01

    This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 KΩ/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration.

  19. Effect of penicillin on the increase in membrane conductance induced by γ-aminobutyric acid at the crab neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Janet; Large, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of penicillin and picrotoxin on the increase in membrane conductance produced by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at the hermit crab neuromuscular junction were investigated. Penicillin failed to block the effects of GABA, while picrotoxin proved to be a potent antagonist. PMID:4733733

  20. Development of Conducting Polyaniline/ Poly(Lactic Acid) Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultrafine fibers consisting of blends of polyaniline doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid and poly(L-lactic acid) were prepared by electrospinning. The presence of polyaniline resulted in fibers with diameters as thin as 100– 200 nm and a significant reduction of bead formation. These fibers were visu...

  1. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous boric acid at 25--350{degree}C at saturation vapor pressure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    Electrical conductance measurements of aqueous boric acid solutions (15-110 g/kg-H{sub 2}O {equivalent_to} 0.251--1.815 mol/kg-H{sub 2}O) were measured over the temperature range 25 to 75 C at saturation vapor pressures in glass cells with parallel platinum electrodes. Sixteen series of measurements were made involving three samples of boric acid from different sources. Conductance measurements were also made at 15.5 and 30.5 g/kg-H{sub 2}O over the temperature range 100 to 350 C at 50 C intervals with a metallic cell fitted with concentric platinum electrodes. The specific conductances of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} (aq)were calculated after correction for the conductance of the solvent (water) and are tabulated in this report. At the specific conditions requested in the project description, namely a concentration of 110 g/kg-H{sub 2}O and 65 C, the specific conductance of boric acid is 293.2 {+-} 1.8 microSiemens/cm based on duplicate measurements of four independent solutions. The results from these tests will be utilized by the Tokamak Physics Experimental Project (TPX).

  2. Shoulder Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... create difficulty with its function. Types of Shoulder Fractures The type of fracture varies by age. Most ...

  3. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by ... up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of a ...

  4. Greenstick Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Greenstick fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A greenstick fracture occurs when a bone bends and cracks, instead of breaking completely into separate pieces. The fracture looks similar to what happens when you try ...

  5. Impedance Profiling: A Convenient Technique for Determining the Redox or Protonic Acid Doping Characteristics of Conducting Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-18

    public release and sale; its distribution is unlimited. IMPEDANCE PROFILING: A CONVENIENT TECHNIqUE FOR DETERMINING THE REDOX OR PROTONIC ACID DOPING...methods. Results for the oxidative doping of trans-(CH)x in HBF 4 (48% aq.)/H 2 02 , and in CF3 COOH (80%, aq.)/H 20 2 , for cis- (CH)x in iodine / CCl4 ...TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE REDOX OR PROTONIC ACID DOPING CHARACTERISTICS OF CONDUCTING POLYMERS" 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) D.B. Swanson, A.G. MacDiarmid and

  6. Control of ionic conductivity of ionic liquid/photoresponsive poly(amide acid) gels by photoirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Masahiro; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Horie, Kazuyuki; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2007-10-21

    1,3-Dibutylimidazolium bromide was soaked into a polymer network prepared by condensation of 4-4'-diaminoazobenzene, pyromellitic dianhydride and 1,3,5-tri(4-aminophenyl)benzene to form photoresponsive ion conductive gels.

  7. Natural fracture systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this program are (1) to develop a basinal-analysis methodology for natural fracture exploration and exploitation, and (2) to determine the important characteristics of natural fracture systems for use in completion, stimulation, and production operations. Natural-fracture basinal analysis begins with studies of fractures in outcrop, core and logs in order to determine the type of fracturing and the relationship of the fractures to the lithologic environment. Of particular interest are the regional fracture systems that are pervasive in western US tight sand basins. A Methodology for applying this analysis is being developed, with the goal of providing a structure for rationally characterizing natural fracture systems basin-wide. Such basin-wide characterizations can then be expanded and supplemented locally, at sites where production may be favorable. Initial application of this analysis is to the Piceance basin where there is a wealth of data from the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), DOE cooperative wells, and other basin studies conducted by Sandia, CER Corporation, and the USGS (Lorenz and Finley, 1989, Lorenz et aI., 1989, and Spencer and Keighin, 1984). Such a basinal approach has been capable of explaining the fracture characteristics found throughout the southern part of the Piceance basin and along the Grand Hogback.

  8. Acidity-Controlled Conducting Polymer Films for Organic Thermoelectric Devices with Horizontal and Vertical Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woongki; Song, Myeonghun; Park, Soohyung; Nam, Sungho; Seo, Jooyeok; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Organic thermoelectric devices (OTEDs) are recognized one of the next generation energy conversion platforms because of their huge potentials for securing electricity continuously from even tiny heat sources in our daily life. The advantage of OTEDs can be attributable to the design freedom in device shapes and the low-cost fabrication by employing solution coating processes at low temperatures. As one of the major OTE materials to date, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been used, but no study has been yet carried out on its acidity control even though the acidic components in OTEDs can seriously affect the device performance upon operation. Here we demonstrate that the addition of aniline (a weak base) can control the acidity of PEDOT:PSS and enhance the performance of OTEDs. In particular, the vertical OTEDs with aniline-doped PEDOT:PSS films (active area = 1.0 cm2) could continuously generate electricity (0.06 nW) even at low temperatures (<38 °C) when they were mounted on a desk lamp (power = 24 W). PMID:27667013

  9. Acidity-Controlled Conducting Polymer Films for Organic Thermoelectric Devices with Horizontal and Vertical Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woongki; Song, Myeonghun; Park, Soohyung; Nam, Sungho; Seo, Jooyeok; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-09-01

    Organic thermoelectric devices (OTEDs) are recognized one of the next generation energy conversion platforms because of their huge potentials for securing electricity continuously from even tiny heat sources in our daily life. The advantage of OTEDs can be attributable to the design freedom in device shapes and the low-cost fabrication by employing solution coating processes at low temperatures. As one of the major OTE materials to date, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been used, but no study has been yet carried out on its acidity control even though the acidic components in OTEDs can seriously affect the device performance upon operation. Here we demonstrate that the addition of aniline (a weak base) can control the acidity of PEDOT:PSS and enhance the performance of OTEDs. In particular, the vertical OTEDs with aniline-doped PEDOT:PSS films (active area = 1.0 cm2) could continuously generate electricity (0.06 nW) even at low temperatures (<38 °C) when they were mounted on a desk lamp (power = 24 W).

  10. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Chai, M. N.; Isa, M. I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10−4 S cm−1 for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor. PMID:27265642

  11. Effects of the amino acid sequence on thermal conduction through β-sheet crystals of natural silk protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Zhitong; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2015-11-21

    Recent experiments have discovered very different thermal conductivities between the spider silk and the silkworm silk. Decoding the molecular mechanisms underpinning the distinct thermal properties may guide the rational design of synthetic silk materials and other biomaterials for multifunctionality and tunable properties. However, such an understanding is lacking, mainly due to the complex structure and phonon physics associated with the silk materials. Here, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that the amino acid sequence plays a key role in the thermal conduction process through β-sheets, essential building blocks of natural silks and a variety of other biomaterials. Three representative β-sheet types, i.e. poly-A, poly-(GA), and poly-G, are shown to have distinct structural features and phonon dynamics leading to different thermal conductivities. A fundamental understanding of the sequence effects may stimulate the design and engineering of polymers and biopolymers for desired thermal properties.

  12. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, M. N.; Isa, M. I. N.

    2016-06-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10‑4 S cm‑1 for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor.

  13. Effect of diameter of cellulosic nano-fiber on conductivity of poly(aniline sulfonic acid) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konagaya, S.; Shimizu, K.; Terada, M.; Yamada, T.; Sanada, K.; Numata, O.; Sugino, G.

    2014-05-01

    The authors have been studying the effect of cellulosic nano-fiber (CeNF) with the diameter of less than 30 nm and the length of a few micrometers on the conductivity of the conductive polymer composites (PAS/PEs/CeNF) prepared from poly(aniline sulfonic acid) (PAS), a water dispersible polyester (PEs) and CeNF and confirmed that CeNF was effective for the enhancement of their conductivity, and that the conductivity enhancement was attributable to the strong adsorbing ability of CeNF to PAS molecules. Thiner CeNF has so larger surface area that it is expected to adsorb more PAS molecules on its surface, which possibly lead to further conductivity enhancement of the composites. The authors prepared thinner CeNF with the size of 16 nm by the use of ultrasonic dispersing machine. It was clarified that the thinner CeNF had a higher adsorbing ability to PAS molecules and a larger effect on the conductivity enhancement of PAS/PEs/CeNF composites.

  14. Comparison of the supporting strength of a poly-L-lactic acid sheet and porous polyethylene (Medpor) for the reconstruction of orbital floor fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the supporting strength of the curved poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) sheet and porous polyethylene (Medpor) for reconstruction of orbital floor fractures. For one-half and two-thirds orbital floor fractures, reconstruction was performed using the PLLA sheet and Medpor. The PLLA sheet was molded to fit the orbital floor (concavity). The anterior portion (1 cm) was curved to fit the inferior orbital rim and fixed with a screw. Medpor was designed to fit the orbital floor. A screw was fixed 6 mm away from the anterior border of the orbital floor. Each implant was hung by wire, and the degree of sagging of the implant was measured using micrometers by the power of a force gauge. For one-half orbital floor fractures, the power of the PLLA sheet to sag 5 mm was 2.46 (SD, 0.14) N, and that of Medpor was 0.59 (SD, 0.04) N. The power of the PLLA sheet to sag 10 mm was 6.9 (SD, 0.14) N, and that of Medpor was 1.52 (SD, 0.16) N. For two-thirds orbital floor fractures, the power of the PLLA sheet to sag 5 mm was 1.79 (SD, 0.24) N, and that of Medpor was 0.39 (SD, 0.04) N. For 10 mm of sagging, the power of the PLLA sheet was 5.61 (SD, 0.29) N, and that of Medpor was 0.94 (SD, 0.09) N. For sagging of 15 mm, the power of the PLLA sheet was 8.99 (SD, 0.16) N, and that of Medpor was 2.98 (SD, 0.24) N. The PLLA sheet was irreversibly bent when the force reached approximately 8 to 9 N. For Medpor, the degree of sagging during the early stage was larger than at the later stage. In all situations, the supporting power of the PLLA sheet was greater than that of Medpor. The differences were significant in all situations (P = 0.000). The degree of sagging in one-half orbital floor fractures was 2.87 mm for the PLLA sheet and 7.96 mm for Medpor. There was an increased orbital volume of 0.4 mL with the PLLA sheet and 1.19 mL for Medpor. The predicted enophthalmos was 0.41 mm with the PLLA sheet and 1.07 mm with Medpor. The degree of sagging for the two

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of triflic acid and triflate ion/water mixtures: a proton conducting electrolytic component in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sunda, Anurag Prakash; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2011-11-30

    Triflic acid is a functional group of perflourosulfonated polymer electrolyte membranes where the sulfonate group is responsible for proton conduction. However, even at extremely low hydration, triflic acid exists as a triflate ion. In this work, we have developed a force-field for triflic acid and triflate ion by deriving force-field parameters using ab initio calculations and incorporated these parameters with the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations - All Atom (OPLS-AA) force-field. We have employed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the developed force field to characterize structural and dynamical properties of triflic acid (270-450 K) and triflate ion/water mixtures (300 K). The radial distribution functions (RDFs) show the hydrophobic nature of CF(3) group and presence of strong hydrogen bonding in triflic acid and temperature has an insignificant effect. Results from our MD simulations show that the diffusion of triflic acid increases with temperature. The RDFs from triflate ion/water mixtures shows that increasing hydration causes water molecules to orient around the SO(3)(-) group of triflate ions, solvate the hydronium ions, and other water molecules. The diffusion of triflate ions, hydronium ion, and water molecules shows an increase with hydration. At λ = 1, the diffusion of triflate ion is 30 times lower than the diffusion of triflic acid due to the formation of stable triflate ion-hydronium ion complex. With increasing hydration, water molecules break the stability of triflate ion-hydronium ion complex leading to enhanced diffusion. The RDFs and diffusion coefficients of triflate ions, hydronium ions and water molecules resemble qualitatively the previous findings using per-fluorosulfonated membranes.

  16. Thermal stability of proton conducting acid doped polybenzimidazole in simulated fuel cell environments

    SciTech Connect

    Samms, S.R.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, polybenzimidazole membrane doped with phosphoric acid (PBI) was found to have promising properties for use as a polymer electrolyte in a high temperature (ca. 150 to 200 C) proton exchange membrane direct methanol fuel cell. However, operation at 200 C in strongly reducing and oxidizing environments introduces concerns of the thermal stability of the polymer electrolyte. To simulate the conditions in a high temperature fuel cell, PBI samples were loaded with fuel cell grade platinum black, doped with ca. 480 mole percent phosphoric acid (i.e., 4.8 H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} molecules per PBI repeat unit) and heated under atmospheres of either nitrogen, 5% hydrogen, or air in a thermal gravimetric analyzer. The products of decomposition were taken directly into a mass spectrometer for identification. In all cases weight loss below 400 C was found to be due to loss of water. Judging from the results of these tests, the thermal stability of PBI is more than adequate for use as a polymer electrolyte in a high temperature fuel cell.

  17. Nanostructured bacterial cellulose-poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) composite membranes with high storage modulus and protonic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gadim, Tiago D O; Figueiredo, Andrea G P R; Rosero-Navarro, Nataly C; Vilela, Carla; Gamelas, José A F; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R; Figueiredo, Filipe M L

    2014-05-28

    The present study reports the development of a new generation of bio-based nanocomposite proton exchange membranes based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) (PSSA), produced by in situ free radical polymerization of sodium 4-styrenesulfonate using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, followed by conversion of the ensuing polymer into the acidic form. The BC nanofibrilar network endows the composite membranes with excellent mechanical properties at least up to 140 °C, a temperature where either pure PSSA or Nafion are soft, as shown by dynamic mechanical analysis. The large concentration of sulfonic acid groups in PSSA is responsible for the high ionic exchange capacity of the composite membranes, reaching 2.25 mmol g(-1) for a composite with 83 wt % PSSA/PEGDA. The through-plane protonic conductivity of the best membrane is in excess of 0.1 S cm(-1) at 94 °C and 98% relative humidity (RH), decreasing to 0.042 S cm(-1) at 60% RH. These values are comparable or even higher than those of ionomers such as Nafion or polyelectrolytes such as PSSA. This combination of electric and viscoelastic properties with low cost underlines the potential of these nanocomposites as a bio-based alternative to other polymer membranes for application in fuel cells, redox flow batteries, or other devices requiring functional proton conducting elements, such as sensors and actuators.

  18. Aromatic Amino Acids Required for Pili Conductivity and Long-Range Extracellular Electron Transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Madeline; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Leang, Ching; Smith, Jessica A.; Patel, Pranav; Synoeyenbos-West, Oona; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires conductive pili for long-range electron transport to Fe(III) oxides and for high-density current production in microbial fuel cells. In order to investigate this further, we constructed a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated Aro-5, which produced pili with diminished conductivity. This was accomplished by modifying the amino acid sequence of PilA, the structural pilin protein. An alanine was substituted for each of the five aromatic amino acids in the carboxyl terminus of PilA, the region in which G. sulfurreducens PilA differs most significantly from the PilAs of microorganisms incapable of long-range extracellular electron transport. Strain Aro-5 produced pili that were properly decorated with the multiheme c-type cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, pili preparations of the Aro-5 strain had greatly diminished conductivity and Aro-5 cultures were severely limited in their capacity to reduce Fe(III) compared to the control strain. Current production of the Aro-5 strain, with a graphite anode serving as the electron acceptor, was less than 10% of that of the control strain. The conductivity of the Aro-5 biofilms was 10-fold lower than the control strain’s. These results demonstrate that the pili of G. sulfurreducens must be conductive in order for the cells to be effective in extracellular long-range electron transport. PMID:23481602

  19. Acid-doped polymer nanofiber framework: Three-dimensional proton conductive network for high-performance fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Manabu; Takeda, Yasushi; Wakiya, Takeru; Wakamoto, Yuta; Harigaya, Kaori; Ito, Tatsunori; Tarao, Takashi; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2017-02-01

    High-performance polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) with excellent proton conductivity, gas barrier property, and membrane stability are desired for future fuel cells. Here we report the development of PEMs based on our proposed new concept ;Nanofiber Framework (NfF).; The NfF composite membranes composed of phytic acid-doped polybenzimidazole nanofibers (PBINf) and Nafion matrix show higher proton conductivity than the recast-Nafion membrane without nanofibers. A series of analyses reveal the formation of three-dimensional network nanostructures to conduct protons and water effectively through acid-condensed layers at the interface of PBINf and Nafion matrix. In addition, the NfF composite membrane achieves high gas barrier property and distinguished membrane stability. The fuel cell performance by the NfF composite membrane, which enables ultra-thin membranes with their thickness less than 5 μm, is superior to that by the recast-Nafion membrane, especially at low relative humidity. Such NfF-based high-performance PEM will be accomplished not only by the Nafion matrix used in this study but also by other polymer electrolyte matrices for future PEFCs.

  20. Researches on current distribution and plate conductivity of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Ou, Wenjun; Feng, Bo; Huang, Binbin; Liu, Minyi; Zhao, Wenchao; Guo, Yonglang

    2012-07-01

    A cell with tall plates was simulated by two cells and the controlled voltage with time was successfully used to measure the response current-time curves. It indicates that the current in the upper part of the plate is much higher than that in the lower part in early stage of the discharge, but in late stage, it is reversed, especially at high discharge rates. The upper part of the plate has higher capacity and deeper depth of discharge (DOD) so that the active mass degrades and sheds more quickly in cyclic applications. In the initial discharge, the lead sulfate formed at positive plates produces the internal stress and enhances the electric connection among the active mass particles. But the positive active mass only contributes a little to the conductivity of plates. The negative active mass with a bit shrinking but no passivation has better conductivity than the expanded active mass. The higher ohmic polarization of the active mass appears at higher discharge rates, in the upper part of the plates, in the late stage of the discharge, in aged battery, especially for negative plates.

  1. [Atlas fractures].

    PubMed

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  2. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-09-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species.

  3. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species. PMID:27650635

  4. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... compress the underlying brain tissue (subdural or epidural hematoma). A simple fracture is a break in the bone without damage ... Causes of skull fracture can include: Head trauma Falls, automobile accidents, physical assault, and sports

  5. Rib Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... From Brain Injury Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas G. Weiser, MD, MPH, Department of ... Hemothorax Injury to the Aorta Pulmonary Contusion Rib Fractures Tension Pneumothorax Traumatic Pneumothorax (See also Introduction to ...

  6. Hand Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thumb Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Thumb Arthritis Trigger Finger Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  7. A Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyacid with excellent acid catalytic activity and proton-conducting property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shujun; Peng, Qingpo; Chen, Xuenian; Wang, Ruoya; Zhai, Jianxin; Hu, Weihua; Ma, Fengji; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shuxia

    2016-11-01

    A new HPAs H20[P8W60Ta12(H2O)4(OH)8O236]·125H2O (H-1) which comprises a Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyanion, 20 protons, and 125 crystalline water molecules has been prepared through ion-exchange method. The structure and properties of H-1 have been explored in detail. AC impedance measurements indicate that H-1 is a good solid state proton conducting material at room temperature with a conductivity value of 7.2×10-3 S cm-1 (25 °C, 30% RH). Cyclic voltammograms of H-1 indicate the electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of nitrite. Hammett acidity constant H0 of H-1 in CH3CN is -2.91, which is the strongest among the present known HPAs. Relatively, H-1 exhibits excellent catalytic activities toward acetal reaction.

  8. Proton-conducting polymer membrane comprised of a copolymer of 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Charles W.

    In order to identify a proton-conducting polymer membrane suitable for replacing Nafion ® 117 in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), we prepared a cross-linked copolymer of hydrophilic 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Fumed silicas were also added in an attempt to increase the amount of water adsorbed by the membrane and to enhance water retention. Hydrated copolymer membranes adsorbed significantly more water than Nafion ® 117, but were no better at retaining water during drying under ambient conditions. Films composed of 4% AMPS—96% HEMA had a room temperature proton conductivity of 0.029 S cm -1, which increased to 0.06 S cm -1 at 80 °C.

  9. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  10. Low-temperature preparation of highly conductive thin films from acrylic acid-stabilized silver nanoparticles prepared through ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Vo, Duc Quy; Shin, Eun Woo; Kim, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sunwook

    2010-11-16

    The preparation of AcA-stabilized Ag nanoparticles and its application to make highly conductive thin films are reported. The AcA-stabilized Ag nanoparticles were prepared through a ligand exchange of original oleylamine (OLA)-coated Ag nanoparticles with acrylic acid (AcA), which acted as both an antisolvent and a modifying ligand during the ligand exchange process. Efficiencies of the ligand exchange as well as the properties of Ag nanoparticles were analyzed using various techniques including TEM, FT-IR, XPS, TGA, and UV-vis methods. The thin films were fabricated by annealing spin-coated AcA-stabilized Ag nanoparticles. Further, the effects of annealing temperature, time, and film thickness on both the film morphology and electrical conductivity have been investigated. In this work, due to the low boiling temperature of stabilizer (AcA) and adjustment of annealing conditions, high electrical conductivity was obtained for the Ag thin films. For example, when annealing at 175 °C for 30 min, a 70 nm thick film showed a maximum electrical conductivity of 1.12 × 10(5) S cm(-1). A conductive layer on a flexible polymer substrate (e.g., PET) sheet has been successfully prepared by annealing a spin-coated film at 140 °C for 30 min. The combined advantages of long-term stability of the AcA-stabilized Ag nanoparticles, low annealing temperature, and high conductivity of the prepared thin films make this relatively simple method attractive for applications in flexible electronics.

  11. A model for mammalian cochlear hair cell differentiation in vitro: effects of retinoic acid on cytoskeletal proteins and potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Helyer, R; Cacciabue-Rivolta, D; Davies, D; Rivolta, M N; Kros, C J; Holley, M C

    2007-02-01

    We have established a model for the in-vitro differentiation of mouse cochlear hair cells and have used it to explore the influence of retinoic acid on proliferation, cytoskeletal proteins and voltage-gated potassium conductances. The model is based on the conditionally immortal cell line University of Sheffield/ventral otocyst-epithelial cell line clone 36 (US/VOT-E36), derived from ventral otic epithelial cells of the mouse at embryonic day 10.5 and transfected with a reporter for myosin VIIa. Retinoic acid did not increase cell proliferation but led to up-regulation of myosin VIIa and formation of prominent actin rings that gave rise to numerous large, linear actin bundles. Cells expressing myosin VIIa had larger potassium conductances and did not express the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). US/VOT-E36 endogenously expressed the voltage-gated potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.3 and Kv2.1, which we subsequently identified in embryonic and neonatal hair cells in both auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia in vivo. These subunits could underlie the embryonic and neonatal delayed-rectifiers recorded in nascent hair cells in vivo. Kv2.1 was particularly prominent on the basolateral membrane of cochlear inner hair cells. Kv1.3 was distributed throughout all hair cells but tended to be localized to the cuticular plates. US/VOT-E36 recapitulates a coherent pattern of cell differentiation under the influence of retinoic acid and will provide a convenient model for screening the effects of other extrinsic factors on the differentiation of cochlear epithelial cell types in vitro.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  13. Aspartic Acid Residue D3 Critically Determines Cx50 Gap Junction Channel Transjunctional Voltage-Dependent Gating and Unitary Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Li; Nakagawa, So; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Bai, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the aspartic acid residue (D) at the third position is critical in determining the voltage polarity of fast Vj-gating of Cx50 channels. To test whether another negatively charged residue (a glutamic acid residue, E) could fulfill the role of the D3 residue, we generated the mutant Cx50D3E. Vj-dependent gating properties of this mutant channel were characterized by double-patch-clamp recordings in N2A cells. Macroscopically, the D3E substitution reduced the residual conductance (Gmin) to near zero and outwardly shifted the half-inactivation voltage (V0), which is a result of both a reduced aggregate gating charge (z) and a reduced free-energy difference between the open and closed states. Single Cx50D3E gap junction channels showed reduced unitary conductance (γj) of the main open state, reduced open dwell time at ±40 mV, and absence of a long-lived substate. In contrast, a G8E substitution tested to compare the effects of the E residue at the third and eighth positions did not modify the Vj-dependent gating profile or γj. In summary, this study is the first that we know of to suggest that the D3 residue plays an essential role, in addition to serving as a negative-charge provider, as a critical determinant of the Vj-dependent gating sensitivity, open-closed stability, and unitary conductance of Cx50 gap junction channels. PMID:22404924

  14. Cytocompatibility of a conductive nanofibrous carbon nanotube/poly (L-Lactic acid) composite scaffold intended for nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Oraee-Yazdani, Saeed; Dodel, Masumeh; Hanaee-Ahvaz, Hana; Soudi, Sara; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Salehi, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate a conductive aligned nanofibrous substrate and evaluate its suitability and cytocompatibility with neural cells for nerve tissue engineering purposes. In order to reach these goals, we first used electrospinning to fabricate single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) incorporated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibrous scaffolds and then assessed its cytocompatibility with olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC). The plasma treated scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle. OECs were isolated from olfactory bulb of GFP Sprague-Dawley rats and characterized using OEC specific markers via immunocytochemistry and flow cytometery. The cytocompatibility of the conductive aligned nano-featured scaffold was assessed using microscopy and MTT assay. We indicate that doping of PLLA polymer with SWCNT can augment the aligned nanosized substrate with conductivity, making it favorable for nerve tissue engineering. Our results demonstrated that SWCNT/PLLA composite scaffold promote the adhesion, growth, survival and proliferation of OEC. Regarding the ideal physical, topographical and electrical properties of the scaffold and the neurotrophic and migratory features of the OECs, we suggest this scaffold and the cell/scaffold construct as a promising platform for cell delivery to neural defects in nerve tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26600751

  15. Fabrication and characterization of poly(lactic acid)/acetyl tributyl citrate/carbon black as conductive polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiugao; Wang, Ning; Ma, Xiaofei

    2008-03-01

    By using acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) as the plasticizer of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and carbon black (CB) as conductive filler, electrically conductive polymer composites (CPC) with different CB and ATBC contents were prepared. FTIR revealed that the interaction existed between PLA/ATBC matrix and CB filler and ATBC could improve this interaction. The rheology showed that ATBC could obviously decrease the shear viscosity and improve the fluidity of the composites but just the reverse for CB. With the increasing of CB contents, the enforcement effect, storage modulus, and glass-transition temperature increased but the elongation at break decreased. PLA/ATBC/CB composites exhibited the low electrical percolation thresholds of 0.516, 1.20, 2.46, and 2.74 vol % CB at 30, 20, 10, and 0 wt % ATBC. The conductivity of the composite containing 3.98 vol % CB and 30 wt % ATBC reached 1.60 S/cm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the addition of ATBC facilitated the dispersion of the CB in the PLA matrix. Water vapor permeability (WVP) showed that, at the same CB contents, the more ATBC contents there were, the less the values of WVP were.

  16. Anhydrous proton-conducting electrolyte membranes based on hyperbranched polymer with phosphonic acid groups for high-temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takahito; Hirai, Keita; Tamura, Masashi; Uno, Takahiro; Kubo, Masataka; Aihara, Yuichi

    The two different molecular weight hyperbranched polymers (HBP(L)-PA-Ac and HBP(H)-PA-Ac) with both phosphonic acid group as a functional group and acryloyl group as a cross-linker at the chain ends were successfully synthesized as a new thermally stable proton-conducting electrolyte. The cross-linked electrolyte membranes (CL-HBP-PA) were prepared by their thermal polymerizations using benzoyl peroxide and their ionic conductivities under dry condition and thermal properties were investigated. The ionic conductivities of the low molecular weight CL-HBP(L)-PA membrane and the high molecular weight CL-HBP(H)-PA membrane were found to be 1.2 × 10 -5 and 2.6 × 10 -6 S cm -1, respectively, at 150 °C under dry condition, and showed the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) type temperature dependence. Both membranes were thermally stable up to 300 °C, and they had suitable thermal stability as electrolyte membranes for the high-temperature fuel cells under dry condition. Fuel cell measurements using a single membrane electrode assembly cell with both cross-linked membranes were successfully performed.

  17. Polypyrrole-coated electrospun poly(lactic acid) fibrous scaffold: effects of coating on electrical conductivity and neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Sudwilai, Thitima; Ng, Jun Jye; Boonkrai, Chatikorn; Israsena, Nipan; Chuangchote, Surawut; Supaphol, Pitt

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activities play critical roles in both neurogenesis and neural regeneration. In that sense, electrically conductive and biocompatible biomaterial scaffolds can be applied in various applications of neural tissue engineering. In this study, we fabricated a novel biomaterial for neural tissue engineering applications by coating electrospun poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers with a conducting polymer, polypyrole (PPy), via admicellar polymerization. Optimal conditions for polymerization and preparation of PPy-coated electrospun PLA nanofibers were obtained by comparing results from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, and surface conductivity tests. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that PPy-coated electrospun PLA fibrous scaffold is not toxic. The scaffold could support attachment and migration of neural progenitor cells. Neurons derived from progenitor exhibited long neurite outgrowth under electrical stimulation. Our study concluded that PPy-coated electrospun PLA fibers had a good biocompatibility with neural progenitor cells and may serve as a promising material for controlling progenitor cell behaviors and enhancing neural repair.

  18. Overproduction of Abscisic Acid in Tomato Increases Transpiration Efficiency and Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Influences Leaf Expansion1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Andrews, John; Mulholland, Barry J.; McKee, John M.T.; Hilton, Howard W.; Horridge, Jon S.; Farquhar, Graham D.; Smeeton, Rachel C.; Smillie, Ian R.A.; Black, Colin R.; Taylor, Ian B.

    2007-01-01

    Overexpression of genes that respond to drought stress is a seemingly attractive approach for improving drought resistance in crops. However, the consequences for both water-use efficiency and productivity must be considered if agronomic utility is sought. Here, we characterize two tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines (sp12 and sp5) that overexpress a gene encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, the enzyme that catalyzes a key rate-limiting step in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. Both lines contained more ABA than the wild type, with sp5 accumulating more than sp12. Both had higher transpiration efficiency because of their lower stomatal conductance, as demonstrated by increases in δ13C and δ18O, and also by gravimetric and gas-exchange methods. They also had greater root hydraulic conductivity. Under well-watered glasshouse conditions, mature sp5 plants were found to have a shoot biomass equal to the wild type despite their lower assimilation rate per unit leaf area. These plants also had longer petioles, larger leaf area, increased specific leaf area, and reduced leaf epinasty. When exposed to root-zone water deficits, line sp12 showed an increase in xylem ABA concentration and a reduction in stomatal conductance to the same final levels as the wild type, but from a different basal level. Indeed, the main difference between the high ABA plants and the wild type was their performance under well-watered conditions: the former conserved soil water by limiting maximum stomatal conductance per unit leaf area, but also, at least in the case of sp5, developed a canopy more suited to light interception, maximizing assimilation per plant, possibly due to improved turgor or suppression of epinasty. PMID:17277097

  19. Thermal shock fracture mechanics analysis of a semi-infinite medium based on the dual-phase-lag heat conduction model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Li, J. E.; Yang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The generalized lagging behaviour in solids is very important in understanding heat conduction in small-scale and high-rate heating. In this paper, an edge crack in a semi-infinite medium subjected to a heat shock on its surface is studied under the framework of the dual-phase-lag (DPL) heat conduction model. The transient thermal stress in the medium without crack is obtained first. This stress is used as the crack surface traction with an opposite sign to formulate the crack problem. Numerical results of thermal stress intensity factor are obtained as the functions of crack length and thermal shock time. Crack propagation predictions are conducted and results based on the DPL model and those based on the classical Fourier heat conduction model are compared. The thermal shock strength that the medium can sustain without catastrophic failure is established according to the maximum local stress criterion and the stress intensity factor criterion. PMID:25663805

  20. Thermal shock fracture mechanics analysis of a semi-infinite medium based on the dual-phase-lag heat conduction model.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Li, J E; Yang, C

    2015-02-08

    The generalized lagging behaviour in solids is very important in understanding heat conduction in small-scale and high-rate heating. In this paper, an edge crack in a semi-infinite medium subjected to a heat shock on its surface is studied under the framework of the dual-phase-lag (DPL) heat conduction model. The transient thermal stress in the medium without crack is obtained first. This stress is used as the crack surface traction with an opposite sign to formulate the crack problem. Numerical results of thermal stress intensity factor are obtained as the functions of crack length and thermal shock time. Crack propagation predictions are conducted and results based on the DPL model and those based on the classical Fourier heat conduction model are compared. The thermal shock strength that the medium can sustain without catastrophic failure is established according to the maximum local stress criterion and the stress intensity factor criterion.

  1. The Efficacy of Bisphosphonates for Prevention of Osteoporotic Fracture: An Update Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ji-Hye; Jang, Sunmee; Lee, Sumin; Park, Suyeon; Yoon, Hyun Koo

    2017-01-01

    Background The efficacy of bisphosphonates for osteoporotic fracture has been consistently reported in recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) enrolling hundreds of patients. The objective of this study was to update knowledge on the efficacy of available bisphosphonates in the prevention of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Methods An approach “using systematic reviews” on PubMed and Cochrane Library was taken. Twenty-four RCTs investigating the effects of bisphosphonates for the prevention of osteoporotic fracture were included in final analysis. A pairwise meta-analysis was conducted with a random effects model. Subgroup analysis was performed according to the type of bisphosphonate. Results The use of bisphosphonate decrease the risk of overall osteoporotic fracture (odds ratio [OR] 0.62; P<0.001), vertebral fracture (OR 0.55; P<0.001) and non-vertebral fracture (OR 0.73; P<0.001). Subgroup analysis indicated that zoledronic acid showed the lowest risk reduction (OR 0.61; P<0.001) for overall osteoporotic fractures but no significance was observed for etidronate (OR 0.34; P=0.127). Conclusions This update meta-analysis re-confirmed that bisphosphonate use can effectively reduce the risk of osteoporotic fracture. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding etidronate for the prevention of osteoporotic fracture. PMID:28326300

  2. Determination of five priority haloacetic acids by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection and solid phase extraction preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Petr; Makarõtševa, Natalja; Kiplagat, Isaac K; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2012-03-01

    A sensitive capillary electrophoretic separation method with contactless conductivity detection (C4D) for analysis of five priority haloacetic acids (HAA5) is presented. The analytes were baseline separated in an electrolyte composed of 20 mM 2-(N-Morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES), 20 mM L-histidine (HIS), and 30 μM cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at pH 6.0 in less than 4 min. A simplified solid-phase extraction (SPE) preconcentration procedure on highly cross-linked polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) type sorbent was developed and optimized with respect to short preconcentration time. HAA5 from a 25-mL sample aliquot of tap and swimming pool water could be preconcentrated in less than 5 min using an in-house made SPE column with recoveries ranging from 23 to 98%. Combining the SPE preconcentration procedure with capillary electrophoretic analysis, the attained limits of detection were between 6.1 and 12.2 μg/L with total analysis time of less than 10 min.

  3. Rapid and direct determination of glyphosate, glufosinate, and aminophosphonic acid by online preconcentration CE with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    See, Hong Heng; Hauser, Peter C; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2010-01-01

    Rapid and direct online preconcentration followed by CE with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4)D) is evaluated as a new approach for the determination of glyphosate, glufosinate (GLUF), and aminophosphonic acid (AMPA) in drinking water. Two online preconcentration techniques, namely large volume sample stacking without polarity switching and field-enhanced sample injection, coupled with CE-C(4)D were successfully developed and optimized. Under optimized conditions, LODs in the range of 0.01-0.1 microM (1.7-11.1 microg/L) and sensitivity enhancements of 48- to 53-fold were achieved with the large volume sample stacking-CE-C(4)D method. By performing the field-enhanced sample injection-CE-C(4)D procedure, excellent LODs down to 0.0005-0.02 microM (0.1-2.2 microg/L) as well as sensitivity enhancements of up to 245- to 1002-fold were obtained. Both techniques showed satisfactory reproducibility with RSDs of peak height of better than 10%. The newly established approaches were successfully applied to the analysis of glyphosate, glufosinate, and aminophosphonic acid in spiked tap drinking water.

  4. An in situ generated carbon as integrated conductive additive for hierarchical negative plate of lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, M.; Ganesan, M.; Ambalavanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we report an in situ generated carbon from sugar as additive in the Negative Active Mass (NAM) which enhances the charge-discharge characteristics of the lead-acid cells. In situ formed sugar derived carbon (SDC) with leady oxide (LO) provides a conductive network and excellent protection against NAM irreversible lead sulfation. The effect of SDC and carbon black (CB) added negative plates are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The results show that subtle changes in the addition of carbon to NAM led to subsequent changes on the performance during partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) operations in lead-acid cells. Furthermore, SDC added cells exhibit remarkable improvement in the rate capability, active material utilization, cycle performance and charge acceptance compared to that of the conventional CB added cells. The impact of SDC with LO at various synthesis conditions on the electrochemical performance of the negative plate is studied systematically.

  5. Laboratory Visualization of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation and Interaction with a Network of Preexisting Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Borglin, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical visualization experiments of hydraulic fracture propagation within transparent rock-analogue samples containing a network of preexisting fractures. Natural fractures and heterogeneities in rock have a great impact on hydraulic fracture propagation and resulting improvements in reservoir permeability. In recent years, many sophisticated numerical simulations on hydraulic fracturing have been conducted. Laboratory experiments on hydraulic fracturing are often performed with acoustic emission (Micro Earthquake) monitoring, which allows detection and location of fracturing and fracture propagation. However, the detected fractures are not necessarily hydraulically produced fractures which provide permeable pathways connected to the injection (and production) well. The primary objectives of our visualization experiments are (1) to obtain quantitative visual information of hydraulic fracture propagation affected by pre-existing fractures and (2) to distinguish fractures activated by the perturbed stress field away from the injected fluid and hydraulically produced fractures. The obtained data are also used to develop and validate a new numerical modeling technique (TOUGH-RBSN [Rigid-Body-Spring-Network] model) for hydraulic fracturing simulations, which is presented in a companion paper. The experiments are conducted using transparent soda-lime glass cubes (10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm) containing either (1) 3D laser-engraved artificial fractures and fracture networks or (2) a random network of fractures produced by rapid thermal quenching. The strength (and also the permeability for the latter) of the fractures can be altered to examine their impact on hydraulic fracturing. The cubes are subjected to true-triaxial stress within a polyaxial loading frame, and hydraulic fractures are produced by injecting fluids with a range of viscosity into an analogue borehole drilled in the sample. The visual images of developing fractures are obtained both through a port

  6. Highly Conductive Cu-Cu Joint Formation by Low-Temperature Sintering of Formic Acid-Treated Cu Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingdong; Chen, Hongtao; Ji, Hongjun; Li, Mingyu

    2016-12-07

    Highly conductive Cu-Cu interconnections of SiC die with Ti/Ni/Cu metallization and direct bonded copper substrate for high-power semiconductor devices are achieved by the low-temperature sintering of Cu nanoparticles with a formic acid treatment. The Cu-Cu joints formed via a long-range sintering process exhibited good electrical conductivity and high strength. When sintered at 260 °C, the Cu nanoparticle layer exhibited a low resistivity of 5.65 μΩ·cm and the joints displayed a high shear strength of 43.4 MPa. When sintered at 320 °C, the resistivity decreased to 3.16 μΩ·cm and the shear strength increased to 51.7 MPa. The microstructure analysis demonstrated that the formation of Cu-Cu joints was realized by metallurgical bonding at the contact interface between the Cu pad and the sintered Cu nanoparticle layer, and the densely sintered layer was composed of polycrystals with a size of hundreds of nanometers. In addition, high-density twins were found in the interior of the sintered layer, which contributed to the improvement of the performance of the Cu-Cu joints. This bonding technology is suitable for high-power devices operating under high temperatures.

  7. Coarse-grained modeling of the titration and conductance behavior of aqueous fullerene hexa malonic acid (FHMA) solutions.

    PubMed

    Allison, Stuart A; Wu, Hengfu; Moyher, Avery; Soegiarto, Linda; Truong, Bi; Nguyen, Duy; Nguyen, Tam; Park, Donghyun

    2014-03-20

    The coarse-grained continuum primitive model is developed and used to characterize the titration and electrical conductance behavior of aqueous solutions of fullerene hexa malonic acid (FHMA). The spherical FHMA molecule, a highly charged electrolyte with an absolute valence charge as large as 12, is modeled as a dielectric sphere in Newtonian fluid, and electrostatics are treated numerically at the level of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Transport properties (electrophoretic mobilities and conductances) of the various charge states of FHMA are numerically computed using established numerical algorithms. For reasonable choices of the model parameters, good agreement between experiment (published literature) and modeling is achieved. In order to accomplish this, however, a moderate degree of specific binding of principal counterion and FHMA must be included in the modeling. It should be emphasized, however, that alternative explanations are possible. This comparison is made at 25 °C for both Na(+) and Ca(2+) principal counterions. The model is also used to characterize the different charge states and degree of counterion binding to those charge states as a function of pH.

  8. Polyacrylamide-phytic acid-polydopamine conducting porous hydrogel for rapid detection and removal of copper (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Hongda; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Lina; Wang, Zhenxin

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a conducting porous polymer hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor has been developed for rapid detection of copper (II) ions (Cu(2+)). The polymer (termed as PAAM/PA/PDA) hydrogel is prepared through multi-interactions of the monomers dopamine (DA), acrylamide (AAM) and phytic acid (PA) under mild ambient conditions: the AAM polymerizes through free-radical polymerization, DA occurs poly coupling reaction, and PA crosslinks polydopamine (PDA) and polyacrylamide (PAAM) by hydrogen bonds. The three dimensional (3D) network nanostructured PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel not only provides a large surface area for increasing the amount of immobilized molecules/ions, but also exhibits a good conductivity. The PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel-based electrochemical sensor exhibits a low detection limit (1nmolL(-)(1), S/N=3) and wide linear range (from 1nmolL(-)(1) to 1µmolL(-1)) for Cu(2+) detection in aqueous samples. Furthermore, the Cu(2+) can be sensitively detected by the electrochemical sensor in different sample matrices, indicating that the electrochemical sensor could be used to monitor Cu(2+) with reasonable assay performance in practical samples. The PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel also exhibits a good capacity to remove Cu(2+)(231.36±4.70mgg(-1)), which is superior to those of other adsorption materials reported in the literature. The facile synthesized PAAM/PA/PDA hydrogel provides a novel and regenerable platform for monitoring and removing Cu(2+) in real samples.

  9. Optimizing fracture stimulation using treatment-well tiltmeters and integrated fracture modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mayerhofer, M.; Stutz, L.; Davis, E.; Wolhart, S.

    2006-05-15

    This paper covers the optimization of hydraulic fracture treatments in a new coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir in Wyoming. A multiwell pilot project was conducted in the Copper Ridge (CR) field to assess future development potential. Hydraulic fracture mapping was successfully performed with treatment-well tiltmeters on six wells including the first-ever used on propped treatments. The mapped fracture height was then used to calibrate the fracture model, perform on-site fracture-design changes, and optimize future fracture treatments. This paper shows how early use of fracture diagnostics can assist in the development of a new reservoir.

  10. Gout increases risk of fracture: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Lin, Che-Chen; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Po-Hao; Tsai, Chun-Hao

    2016-08-01

    There is still debate on whether high uric acid increases bone mineral density (BMD) against osteoporotic fracture or bone resorption caused by gout inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate whether gout offers a protective effect on bone health or not. We conducted a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to evaluate the association between gout history and risk factors of fracture.A retrospective cohort study was designed using the claim data from Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID). A total of 43,647 subjects with gout and a cohort of 87,294 comparison subjects without gout were matched in terms of age and sex between 2001 and 2009, and the data were followed until December 31, 2011. The primary outcome of the study was the fracture incidence, and the impacts of gout on fracture risks were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model.After an 11-year follow-up period, 6992 and 11,412 incidents of fracture were reported in gout and comparison cohorts, respectively. The overall incidence rate of fracture in individuals with gout was nearly 23%, which was higher than that in individuals without gout (252 vs 205 per 10,000 person-years) at an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 1.14-1.21). Age, sex, and fracture-associated comorbidities were adjusted accordingly. As for fracture locations, patients with gout were found at significant higher fracture risks for upper/lower limbs and spine fractures. In gout patient, the user of allopurinol or benzbromarone has significantly lower risk of facture than nonusers.Gout history is considered as a risk factor for fractures, particularly in female individuals and fracture sites located at the spine or upper/lower limbs.

  11. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  12. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  13. Evening primrose oil treatment corrects reduced conduction velocity but not depletion of arachidonic acid in nerve from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, R; Peterson, R G; Kincaid, J C; Eichberg, J

    1998-09-01

    The effects of evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment, a source of gamma-linolenic acid, on the proportions of arachidonoyl-containing molecular species (ACMS) in sciatic nerve phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were determined in conjunction with alterations in nerve conduction velocity. Normal and diabetic rats were either untreated or fed a dietary supplement containing isocalorically equivalent amounts of either EPO or corn oil for the duration of the experiment. After 8 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, nerve conduction velocity was reduced 16% and this deficit was prevented by either EPO or corn oil treatment. Neither EPO nor corn oil supplementation significantly increased the depressed proportions of ACMS. The level of the linoleoyl-containing molecular species, 16:0/18:2, was elevated in the phospholipids from untreated diabetic rats and was further increased by EPO treatment. These results are consistent with decreased activity of the delta6 desaturase that is required for arachidonic acid synthesis in vivo, but suggests that an accompanying deficit in the subsequent delta5 desaturase-catalyzed reaction may be rate-limiting. These findings indicate that maintenance of normal ACMS levels is not required for prevention of diminished nerve conduction velocity and suggest that other factors influenced by an altered polyunsaturated fatty acid pattern, such as metabolites of linoleic acid or gamma-linolenic acid other than arachidonic acid, the energy state of the nerve or the degree of membrane fluidity may contribute to impaired nerve conduction velocity in diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Enhanced conductivity of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) film by acid treatment for indium tin oxide-free organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Chiao; Huang, Chih-Kuo; Hung, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Mei-Ying

    2016-08-01

    An acid treatment is used in the enhancement of the conductivity of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin film, which is often used as the anode in organic solar cells. There are three types of acid treatment for PEDOT:PSS thin film: hydrochloric, sulfuric, and phosphoric acid treatments. In this study, we examine and compare these three ways with each other for differences in conductivity. Hydrochloric acid results in the highest conductivity enhancement, from 0.3 to 1109 S/cm. We also discuss the optical transmittance, conductivity, surface roughness, surface morphology, and stability, as well as the factors that can influence device efficiency. The devices are fabricated using an acid-treated PEDOT:PSS thin film as the anode. The highest power conversion efficiency was 1.32%, which is a large improvement over that of the unmodified organic solar cell (0.21%). It is comparable to that obtained when using indium tin oxide (ITO) as an electrode, ca. 1.46%.

  15. Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro; Manepally, Chandrika; Fedors, Randall; Wyrick, Danielle Y.

    2009-09-01

    Active fractures refer to the portions of unsaturated, connected fractures that actively conduct water. The active fracture model parameter accounts for the reduction in the number of fractures carrying water and in the fracture-matrix interface area in field-scale simulations of flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rocks. One example includes the numerical analyses of the fault test results at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada (USA). In such applications, the active fracture model parameter is commonly used as a calibration parameter without relating it to fracture network orientations and infiltration rates. A two-dimensional, multiphase lattice-Boltzmann model was used in this study to investigate the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios for an unsaturated, variable dipping, and geometrically simple fracture network. The active fracture model parameter differed by as much as 0.11-0.44 when the effects of fracture network orientation, injection rate, and injection mode were included in the simulations. Hence, the numerical results suggest that the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation, injection rates, and injection modes should be explored at the field-scale to strengthen the technical basis and range of applicability of the active fracture model.

  16. Thermal conductivity and acid dissolution behavior of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Lambregts, M. J.; Meyer, M. K.

    2006-02-01

    Dual-phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics are proposed for use in inert matrix fuel for disposition of plutonium and minor actinides in existing light water reactors. The concept for use of this composite material was developed with the intent to capitalize on the known advantages of the composite's constituents: high thermal conductivity of MgO, and stability of ZrO 2 in LWR coolant. The study presented in this paper addressed the thermal conductivity and nitric acid solubility of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics. Thermal analysis, based on experimental and analytical techniques, established that the product of all investigated compositions has the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO 2. Nitric acid dissolution experiments showed that only the free MgO phase dissolves in the nitric acid, leaving behind a porous pellet consisting of a ZrO 2-based solid solution.

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Acid Dissolution Behavior of MgO-ZrO2 Ceramics for Use in LWR Inert Matrix Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    P. G. Medvedev; M. J. Lambregts; M. K. Meyer

    2006-02-01

    Dual-phase MgO–ZrO2 ceramics are proposed for use in inert matrix fuel for disposition of plutonium and minor actinides in existing light water reactors. The concept for use of this composite material was developed with the intent to capitalize on the known advantages of the composite’s constituents: high thermal conductivity of MgO, and stability of ZrO2 in LWR coolant. The study presented in this paper addressed the thermal conductivity and nitric acid solubility of MgO–ZrO2 ceramics. Thermal analysis, based on experimental and analytical techniques, established that the product of all investigated compositions has the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO2. Nitric acid dissolution experiments showed that only the free MgO phase dissolves in the nitric acid, leaving behind a porous pellet consisting of a ZrO2-based solid solution.

  18. Acid Additives Enhancing the Conductivity of Spiro-OMeTAD Toward High-Efficiency and Hysteresis-Less Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhen; Tinkham, Jonathan; Schulz, Philip; Yang, Mengjin; Kim, Dong Hoe; Berry, Joseph; Sellinger, Alan; Zhu, Kai

    2016-10-28

    A general doping strategy, using a wide range of acids with different pKa values as additive, is demonstrated to enhance the conductivity of spiro-OMeTAD, the dominant hole transport material in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Hysteresis-less planar PSCs with ~19% efficiency and better open-circuit voltage and fill factor is achieved with acid doped spiro-OMeTAD.

  19. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  20. Hip Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... make older people more likely to trip and fall — one of the most common causes of hip ... Taking steps to maintain bone density and avoid falls can help prevent hip fracture. Signs and symptoms ...

  1. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  2. Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda L

    2008-01-01

    Many people "slip and fall", especially in the icy areas of the winter season. To prevent an injury to the head, most people put their hand out to hit the ground first, so the wrist usually gets injured. The most frequent injury from this type of "intervention" is a fracture to the distal radius and/or ulna, which is frequently called a "Colles' fracture."

  3. Boxer's fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Boxer's fracture is a common name for a fracture of the distal fifth metacarpal and received its name from one of its most common causes, punching an object with a closed fist. It can occur from a fistfight or from punching a hard object. The injury of a "Boxer's Fracture" earned the name from the way in which the injury occurred, punching an immovable object with a closed fist and no boxing mitt (Figure 1). Naturally, a "Boxer" usually punches his fist into his opponent's face or body. An angry person may perform the same action into a person, or into the wall. The third person may be performing a task and strike something with his fist with forceful action accidentally. In any event, if the closed fist "punches" into an immovable or firm object with force, the most frequent injury sustained would be a fracture of the fifth metacarpal neck. Some caregivers would also call a fourth metacarpal neck fracture a boxer's fracture.

  4. In situ spazialisation of flow laws in a fractured media with multi-parametric measurements (pressure, deformation, water conductivity) and 2d coupled hydro-mechanical (h.m) modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmoille, A.; Cappa, F.; Guglielmie, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Our field experiments have been realized at the Coaraze experimental site which is located in the external Alps of south-eastern France. This site corresponds to a reservoir made up of a 20 m thick pile of fractured Cretaceous limestone limited at the bottom and the top by an impervious layer. The 19,000 m3 of calcareous rock are drained by a spring which is located on a vertical fault contact between limestone and impervious marls. This fault plays the role of a natural dam for the water stocked in the reservoir. The spring is closed with a water-gate, thus, it’s possible to control the piezometric level in the reservoir by opening or closing the gate. The surface of the massif has been clogged to avoid that some leaks appear during the closure of the water-gate, when the water head is increasing. In a first experiment, we realized some hydraulic tests to characterise the different discontinuity behaviours affecting the massif. Those tests consist in pumping and water injection with for target to evaluate the field of hydraulic conductivity in the different fracture. Pumping has been realized in the discontinuity assumed permeable. Water injection has been realized between inflatable packers in the discontinuity assumed to be low permeable. For the second experimentation, we choose two areas in the field of discontinuity tested in the first phase in order to follow the rock and water behaviour during water pressure elevation in the massif. Thus, we focus our attention on one drain constituted by a tectonic fracture and one stratigraphic joint connected to the drain. During these experiments, we proceed of the following way: we closed the water gate three times for duration of 10 to 15 minutes. Thus, we induce three successive piezometric head elevations in the reservoir. Between the tap closures, the reservoir is drained during about ten minutes. The different parameters are recorded during all the experiments, when the water head is increasing and when it is

  5. Integrated Analysis of Flow, Temperature, and Specific-Conductance Logs and Depth-Dependent Water-Quality Samples from Three Deep Wells in a Fractured-Sandstone Aquifer, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Knutson, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of flow, temperature, and specific-conductance logs and depth-dependent water-quality samples collected under ambient and pumped conditions provided a preliminary delineation of flow zones and water quality in three deep abandoned water-supply wells. The integrated analysis was completed as part of the characterization of a fractured-sandstone aquifer in the mountainous setting of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in southern Ventura County, California. In the deepest well, which was 1,768 feet deep and had the highest specific capacity (120 gallons per minute per foot), flow zones were detected at 380 feet (base of casing) and at 440, 595, and 770 feet in the open hole. Under ambient conditions, measured flow was downward from the 380- and 440-foot zones to the 595- and 770-foot zones. Under pumped conditions, most of flow was contributed by the 595-foot zone. Flow from the 380- and 440-foot zones appeared to have lower specific conductance and higher trichloroethylene concentrations than that from the 595-foot zone. In the shallowest well, which was reportedly 940 feet deep but only logged to 915 feet due to blockage, flow zones were detected behind the perforated casing and at 867 feet in the open hole. Under ambient conditions, downward and upward flows appeared to exit at a zone behind the perforated casing at 708 feet. Most of the pumped flow was contributed from zones behind the perforated casing between 565 and 708 feet. Pumped flow also was contributed by zones at 867 feet and below the logged depth. Volatile organic compounds were not detected in the ambient and pumped flows. In the third well, which was 1,272 feet deep and had the lowest specific capacity (3.6 gallons per minute per foot), flow zones were detected in the open hole above and just below the water level near 337 feet and at 615, 785, 995, and 1,070 feet. Under ambient conditions, measured flow in well was downward from the shallowmost zones to the 995-foot zone. Fracture zones at

  6. Estimating flow heterogeneity in natural fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckenby, Robert J.; Sanderson, David J.; Lonergan, Lidia

    2005-10-01

    Examples of small to medium scale fault systems have been mapped in Jurassic sedimentary rocks in north Somerset, England. These examples include contractional and dilational strike-slip oversteps as well as normal faults. These maps form the basis of calculations performed to investigate heterogeneity in natural fracture systems with the aim of predicting fluid flow localisation in different fault styles. As there is no way to measure fracture aperture directly, we use vein thickness to represent an integrated flow path or 'palaeo-aperture' from which we derive a representation of the flow distribution. Three different methods are used to estimate flow heterogeneity based on: (1) fracture density (the ratio of fracture length to area), (2) fracture aperture (fracture porosity) and (3) hydraulic conductance (fracture permeability normalised to the pressure gradient and fluid properties). Our results show that fracture density and hydraulic conductance are poorly correlated and that fracture density does not fully represent the natural heterogeneity of fracture systems. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductance indicate stronger degrees of flow localisation. Different types of structures also seem to display characteristic and predictable patterns of heterogeneity. Normal fault systems show the highest magnitude of localisation along the faults rather than in the relay ramps, while contractional and dilational strike-slip systems show very strong localisation in the faults and oversteps, respectively. In all cases the amount of damage in the oversteps can modify such patterns of heterogeneity.

  7. Laboratory and field evaluation of a combined fluid-loss-control additive and gel breaker for fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, L.A.; Boyd, P.A. )

    1990-08-01

    More than 200% increase in fracture conductivity and permeability was obtained when a new degradable fluid-loss-control additive was used in place of silica flour (SF) in 40-lbm crosslinked hydroxypropyl-guar (HPG) fracturing-fluid systems. The new additive, and organic acid particulate (OAP), slowly degraded into water-soluble monomeric units at temperatures {ge}150{degrees}F after fracture stimulation experiments. The high-acid-content degradation product then acted as an excellent HPG gel breaker and effectively cleaned the proppant packs. As a fluid-loss-control additive, the measured wall-building coefficients were as good as, or better than, those of SF in crosslinked-gel, linear-gel, and N{sub 2}-foam systems. This paper summarizes a 2-year study of the evaluation and application of this new product in fracturing-fluid systems.

  8. Origins of ultralow thermal conductivity in bulk [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM).

    PubMed

    Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Johnson, Michel B; White, Mary Anne

    2016-01-14

    Bulk PCBM has exceptionally low thermal conductivity, 0.07 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. We show that its ultralow thermal conductivity is an intrinsic property. Based on results for thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements down to <2 K, along with Raman spectroscopy and dilatometry, a new model for minimum thermal conductivity was developed. In the model the thermal energy is transferred between entities of phonons oscillating in a range of frequencies, and limited by the atomic density and the phonon mean speed. The model accurately represents the low thermal conductivity for both PCBM and C60/C70.

  9. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO 2 -Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-15

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  10. Fracture types (1) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fracture which goes at an angle to the axis Comminuted - a fracture of many relatively small fragments Spiral - a fracture which runs around the axis of the bone Compound - a fracture (also called ...

  11. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  12. Electrochemical impedance based chiral analysis of anti-ascorbutic drug: l-Ascorbic acid and d-ascorbic acid using C-dots decorated conductive polymer nano-composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Indu; Kant, Rama

    2016-03-15

    Clinical manifestations owing to l-ascorbic acid for scurvy as comparison to d-ascorbic acid and challenges of chiral purity are overcome by using chiral selective conductive polymer nanocomposite which mimics antibodies and enzymes. A novel chiral selective imprinted polyaniline-ferrocene-sulfonic acid film has been electrochemically fabricated on C-dots modified pencil graphite electrode. The performance of the obtained l-ascorbic acid or d-ascorbic acid chiral selective sensor was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The surface characteristics of the C-dots, chiral sensor before and after the de-doping of chiral d- and l-ascorbic acid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Excellent recognition results were obtained by difference in electron transfer resistance. The proposed chiral sensor is capable of measuring d-ascorbic acid or l-ascorbic acid in aqueous as well as in real and commercial samples within the range of 0.020-0.187 nM and 0.003-0.232 nM with detection limit of 0.00073 nM and 0.00016 nM, respectively. The proposed method has also been examined for the chiral selective recognition of ascorbic acid isomers (d- and l-) quantitatively, in complicated matrices of real samples.

  13. Condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Raja; Brown, Ryan; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic indications for different treatments of condylar and subcondylar fractures. It also reviews the steps of different surgical approaches to access the surgical area and explains the pros and cons of each procedure.

  14. Low-temperature bath/high-conductivity zone/stacking micellar electrokinetic chromatography for the analysis of phenolic acids in coffee drink.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhua; Qi, Shengda; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Xingguo

    2008-11-28

    Two stacking methods in micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) were investigated in this article in an attempt to increase the amount of sample injected, as well as to focus analytes onto a small zone. One employed a "high-conductivity zone", which was inserted between the sample zone and background solution to build an unequal conductivity gradient. The other employed a "low-temperature bath". A portion of the capillary was immersed in a low-temperature bath, which served as a "pseudo-low-conductivity zone". As a result, a large volume of sample injection can be achieved. Using three phenolic acids-chlorogenic acid (CGA), caffeic acid (CA) and ferulic acid (FA) in coffee as model compounds, the limit of detection (LoD) was determined to be 0.31microg/ml (S/N=3) for CGA by means of normal MEKC under suppressed electroosmotic flow (EOF). The LoD could be improved to 2.8 x10(-2), 5.3 x10(-3) and 6.0 x10(-3) microg/ml, respectively, when normal MEKC-stacking, high-conductivity zone MEKC-stacking and the low-temperature zone MEKC-stacking methods were applied. Furthermore, the high conductivity zone and the low-temperature bath were operated simultaneously on one capillary to investigate the synergism effect. The results showed that there did exist synergism effect for CGA and CA when the two were hyphenated. The stacking efficiency was higher than that of the single one used. However, there was not synergism effect for FA.

  15. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  16. Injection through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    Tracer tests are conducted in geothermal reservoirs as an aid in forecasting thermal breakthrough of reinjection water. To interpret tracer tests, mathematical models have been developed based on the various transport mechanisms in these highly fractured reservoirs. These tracer flow models have been applied to interpret field tests. The resulting matches between the model and field data were excellent and the model parameters were used to estimate reservoir properties. However, model fitting is an indirect process and the model's ability to estimate reservoir properties cannot be judged solely on the quality of the match between field data and model predictions. The model's accuracy in determining reservoir characteristics must be independently verified in a closely controlled environment. In this study, the closely controlled laboratory environment was chosen to test the validity and accuracy of tracer flow models developed specifically for flow in fractured rocks. The laboratory tracer tests were performed by flowing potassium iodide (KI) through artificially fractured core samples. The tracer test results were then analyzed with several models to determine which best fit the measured data. A Matrix Diffusion model was found to provide the best match of the tracer experiments. The core properties, as estimated by the Matrix Diffusion model parameters generated from the indirect matching process, were then determined. These calculated core parameters were compared to the measured core properties and were found to be in agreement. This verifies the use of the Matrix Diffusion flow model in estimating fracture widths from tracer tests.

  17. Tracer transport in fractured crystalline rock: Evidence of nondiffusive breakthrough tailing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Extended tailing of tracer breakthrough is often observed in pulse injection tracer tests conducted in fractured geologic media. This behavior has been attributed to diffusive exchange of tracer between mobile fluids traveling through channels in fractures and relatively stagnant fluid between fluid channels, along fracture walls, or within the bulk matrix. We present a field example where tracer breakthrough tailing apparently results from nondiffusive transport. Tracer tests were conducted in a fractured crystalline rock using both a convergent and weak dipole injection and pumping scheme. Deuterated water, bromide, and pentafluorobenzoic acid were selected as tracers for their wide range in molecular diffusivity. The late time behavior of the normalized breakthrough curves were consistent for all tracers, even when the pumping rate was changed. The lack of separation between tracers of varying diffusivity indicates that strong breakthrough tailing in fractured geologic media may be caused by advective transport processes. This finding has implications for the interpretation of tracer tests designed to measure matrix diffusion in situ and the prediction of contaminant transport in fractured rock.

  18. Insight from modelling discrete fractures using GEOCRACK

    SciTech Connect

    DuTeaux, Robert; Swenson, Daniel; Hardeman, Brian

    1996-01-24

    This work analyzes the behavior of a numerical geothermal reservoir simulation with flow only in discrete fractures. GEOCRACK is a 2-D finite element model developed at Kansas State University for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) research at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its numerical simulations couple the mechanics of discrete fracture behavior with the state of earth stress, fluid flow, and heat transfer. This coupled model could also be of value for modeling reinjection and other reservoir operating strategies for liquid dominated fractured reservoirs. Because fracture surfaces cool quickly by fluid convection, and heat does not conduct quickly from the interior of reservoir rock, modeling the injection of cold fluid into a fractured reservoir is better simulated by a model with discrete fractures. This work contains knowledge gained from HDR reservoir simulation and continues to develop the general concept of heat mining, reservoir optimization. and the sensitivity of simulation to the uncertainties of fracture spacing and dynamic flow dispersion.

  19. Impact of Partially Cemented and Non-persistent Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei; Ames, Brandon C.; Bunger, Andrew P.; Savitski, Alexei A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents laboratory experiments exploring the interaction between hydraulic fractures and preexisting natural fractures that are strongly cemented relative to the host material strength but over only a portion of the natural fracture. Two sets of experiments were conducted, including the central region cemented case and the top-bottom region cemented case. Three main patterns are observed for the interaction between hydraulic fractures and partially cemented natural fractures: (1) complete crossing, (2) crossing with mismatched crack path and (3) no crossing. The results show that a hydraulic fracture penetrates directly through a fully and strongly cemented preexisting natural fracture. When the proportion of the strongly cemented region decreases or the height of the weak natural fracture increases, the hydraulic fracture is observed to persist through the entire height of the specimen both before and after the interface. However, the fracture path proceeds directly through strongly cemented portions while causing mismatched crack path at uncemented portions. No crossing results are obtained when the strongly cemented region is sufficiently small, around 30 % of the natural fracture's height. Results of this seldom considered but almost certainly realistic configuration of partial cementing suggest that the hydraulic fracture path is strongly influenced by the size of the cemented region of the natural fracture.

  20. Fracture behavior of the Space Shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komine, A.; Kobayashi, A. S.

    1983-01-01

    Stable crack-growth and fracture-toughness experiments were conducted using precracked specimens machined from LI-900 reusable surface insulation (RSI) tiles of the Space Shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) at room temperature. Similar fracture experiments were conducted on fracture specimens with preexisting cracks at the interface of the tile and the strain isolation pad (SIP). Stable crack growth was not observed in the LI-900 tile fracture specimens which had a fracture toughness of 12.0 kPa sq rt of m. The intermittent subcritical crack growth at the tile-pad interface of the fracture specimens was attributed to successive local pull-outs due to tensile overload in the LI-900 tile and cannot be characterized by linear elastic fracture mechanics. No subcritical interfacial crack growth was observed in the fracture specimens with densified LI-900 tiles where brittle fracture initiated at an interior point away from the densification.

  1. Fracture behavior of the Space Shuttle thermal protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Komine, A.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1983-09-01

    Stable crack-growth and fracture-toughness experiments were conducted using precracked specimens machined from LI-900 reusable surface insulation (RSI) tiles of the Space Shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) at room temperature. Similar fracture experiments were conducted on fracture specimens with preexisting cracks at the interface of the tile and the strain isolation pad (SIP). Stable crack growth was not observed in the LI-900 tile fracture specimens which had a fracture toughness of 12.0 kPa sq rt of m. The intermittent subcritical crack growth at the tile-pad interface of the fracture specimens was attributed to successive local pull-outs due to tensile overload in the LI-900 tile and cannot be characterized by linear elastic fracture mechanics. No subcritical interfacial crack growth was observed in the fracture specimens with densified LI-900 tiles where brittle fracture initiated at an interior point away from the densification. 11 references.

  2. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V. |; Morrison, H.F. |

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    White, Lawrence M.; Marotta, Thomas R.; McLennan, Michael K.; Kassel, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    Appropriate clinical radiographic investigation, together with an understanding of the normal radiographic anatomy of the facial skeleton, allows for precise delineation of facial fracutres and associated soft tissue injuries encountered in clinical practice. A combination of multiple plain radiographic views and coronal and axial computed tomographic images allow for optimal delineation of fracture patterns. This information is beneficial in the clinical and surgical management patients with facial injuries

  4. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  5. The contribution of a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance to amino-acid-induced inward current responses of ciliated olfactory neurons of the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Suzuki, N

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether amino-acid-induced inward currents of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, we first studied changes in reversal potential and the current/voltage relationships of the responses of ORNs to an amino acid mixture (l-alanine, l-arginine, l-glutamate and l-norvaline; all 10 mmol l(-)(1)) with different concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the perfusion and recording pipette solutions. We also examined the effects of six different Cl(-) channel blockers on the responses of ORNs using a conventional whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. The amino acid mixture and one blocker were applied focally to the cilia of ORNs using a double-barrelled micropipette and a pressure ejection system. The expected shifts in reversal potential, indicating the contribution of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) conductance, occurred in both positive and negative directions depending on the external and internal Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations. Niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, NPPB [5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzonate] and DCDPC (3', 5-dichlorodiphenylamine-2-carboxylate), at 0.5 mmol l(-)(1), reversibly blocked both the amino-acid-induced inward currents and the background activity in most ORNs. The effectiveness of these blocking agents varied from 77 to 91 % for ORNs perfused externally with standard Ringer's solution. SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), irreversibly inhibited the physiological response (100 % inhibition), whereas DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonate), at 5.0 mmol l(-)(1), had the smallest effect (45 %) of the inhibitors tested. The dose of niflumic acid inducing 50 % inhibition (IC(50)), determined specifically for the current component of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, was 70 micromol l(-)(1). Our results suggest that these blockers are not specific for Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and that

  6. Management of complication from temporal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Cvorovic, Ljiljana; Ljiljana, Cvorovic; Jovanovic, Milan B; Markovic, Marko; Milutinovic, Zoran; Strbac, M

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the study is to review clinical findings and outcomes in patients with temporal bone fractures, and to show an incidence and management of complications. It is the retrospective clinical study and the study took place at tertiary referral center. Fifty-two patients with temporal bone fractures. Data were collected from patients' charts and clinical review. Patients were classified into five groups according to the CT scan. The primary endpoint of study was to show management of possible complication from temporal bone fractures and to analyze association with intracranial injuries. The second endpoint was to show incompleteness of traditionally classification of fracture type. Of the 52 patients with 54 fractures, 27 (50%) had longitudinal fractures, 4 (7.4%) had transverse fractures, 17 (31.5%) had temporal squama-mastoid fractures, 4 (7.4%) had mixed fractures and 2 (3.7%) had isolated meatal fracture. Fifty-eight percent of patients had at least one intracranial pathologic finding, of which 11% had two or more. Persistent conductive hearing loss was noted in 8 of 16 affected patients. The facial paralysis occurred in seven patients. One patient had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo developed 3 weeks after injury. In conclusion, rarely temporal bone fractures are isolated injures. The squama-mastoid fracture in most cases associated with intracranial injuries. Coordination between the neurosurgeon and otologist is essential in the care of such patients. Further large studies will be done to give a more complete classification of temporal bone fractures which will include all fracture patterns and predict clinical outcome.

  7. Herbivore perception decreases photosynthetic carbon-assimilation and reduces stomatal conductance by engaging 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, mitogen-activated protein kinase 4 and cytokinin perception.

    PubMed

    Meza-Canales, Ivan D; Meldau, Stefan; Zavala, Jorge A; Baldwin, Ian T

    2016-12-07

    Herbivory-induced changes in photosynthesis have been documented in many plant species, however the complexity of photosynthetic regulation and analysis has thwarted progress in understanding the mechanism involved, particularly those elicited by herbivore-specific elicitors. Here we analyzed the early photosynthetic gas-exchange responses in Nicotiana attenuata plants after wounding and elicitation with Manduca sexta oral-secretions, and the pathways regulating these responses. Elicitation with M. sexta oral-secretions rapidly decreased photosynthetic carbon-assimilation (AC ) in treated and systemic (untreated, vascularly connected) leaves, which were associated with changes in stomatal conductance, rather than with changes in Rubisco activity and RuBP-turnover. Phytohormone profiling and gas-exchange-analysis of oral-secretion-elicited transgenic plants altered in phytohormone regulation, biosynthesis and perception, combined with micrografting techniques, revealed that the local photosynthetic-responses were mediated by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), while the systemic responses involved interactions among jasmonates, cytokinins and abscisic acid signaling mediated by mitogen activated protein kinase 4 (MPK4). The analysis also revealed a role for cytokinins interacting with MPK4 in CO2 -mediated stomatal regulation. Hence oral-secretions, while eliciting jasmonic acid-mediated defense responses, also elicits OPDA-mediated changes in stomatal conductance and AC , an observation illustrating the complexity and economy of the signaling that regulates defense and carbon assimilation pathways in response to herbivore attack.

  8. Enhanced proton conductivity of Nafion hybrid membrane under different humidities by incorporating metal-organic frameworks with high phytic acid loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; He, Guangwei; Zhang, Bei; Cao, Ying; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi; Tiantian, Zhou

    2014-06-25

    In this study, phytic acid (myo-inositol hexaphosphonic acid) was first immobilized by MIL101 via vacuum-assisted impregnation method. The obtained phytic@MIL101 was then utilized as a novel filler to incorporate into Nafion to fabricate hybrid proton exchange membrane for application in PEMFC under different relative humidities (RHs), especially under low RHs. High loading and uniform dispersion of phytic acid in MIL 101(Cr) were achieved as demonstrated by ICP, FT-IR, XPS, and EDS-mapping. The phytic@MIL101 was dispersed homogeneously in the Nafion matrix when the filler content was less than 12%. Hybrid membranes were evaluated by proton conductivity, mechanical property, thermal stability, and so forth. Remarkably, the Nafion/phytic@MIL hybrid membranes showed high proton conductivity at different RHs, especially under low RHs, which was up to 0.0608 S cm(-1) and 7.63 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 57.4% RH and 10.5% RH (2.8 and 11.0 times higher than that of pristine membrane), respectively. Moreover, the mechanical property of Nafion/phtic@MIL hybrid membranes was substantially enhanced and the thermal stability of membranes was well preserved.

  9. Synthesis of conducting polyelectrolyte complexes of polyaniline and poly(2-acrylamido-3-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) catalyzed by pH-stable palm tree peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Caramyshev, Alexei V; Evtushenko, Evgeny G; Ivanov, Viktor F; Barceló, Alfonso Ros; Roig, Manuel G; Shnyrov, Valery L; van Huystee, Robert B; Kurochkin, Iliya N; Vorobiev, Andrey Kh; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of the stability of five plant peroxidases (horseradish, royal palm tree leaf, soybean, and cationic and anionic peanut peroxidases) was carried out under acidic conditions favorable for synthesis of polyelectrolyte complexes of polyaniline (PANI). It demonstrates that palm tree peroxidase has the highest stability. Using this peroxidase as a catalyst, the enzymatic synthesis of polyelectrolyte complexes of PANI and poly(2-acrylamido-3-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS) was developed. The template polymerization of aniline was carried out in aqueous buffer at pH 2.8. Varying the concentrations of aniline, PAMPS, and hydrogen peroxide as reagents, favorable conditions for production of PANI were determined. UV-vis-NIR absorption and EPR demonstrated that PAMPS and PANI formed the electroactive complex similar to PANI doped traditionally using low molecular weight sulfonic acids. The effect of pH on conformational variability of the complex was evaluated by UV-vis spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopy showed that a size of the particles of the PANI-PAMPS complexes varied between 10 and 25 nm, depending on a concentration of PAMPS in the complex. The dc conductivity of the complexes depends also on the content of PAMPS, the higher conductivity being for the complexes containing the lower content of the polymeric template.

  10. Fracture Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-31

    2219 -T851 aluminum (fractures at low stresses). The parameter KF is alloy compact specimens 1 2 and demonstrate consistent a function of specimen...Congress of 20. Walker, E. K., "The Effect of Stress Ratio Applied Mechanics, 1924. During Crack Propagation and Fatigue for 2024-T3 and 7015- T6 Aluminum ...34Stress- Corrosion Cracking in 12. Kaufman, J. G., and Nelson, F. G., "More Ti-6A1-4V Titanium Alloy in Nitrogen Tetroxide," on Specimen Size Effect in 2219

  11. The effects of dietary treatment with essential fatty acids on sciatic nerve conduction and activity of the Na+/K+ pump in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, M. J.; Tomlinson, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    1. This study examined the effects of dietary essential fatty acid supplementation (5% (w/w) evening primrose oil) upon sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and 86Rb+ pumping in sciatic nerve endoneurial preparations in rats with 4 to 5 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. 2. Control diabetic rats (dietary supplementation with 5% (w/w) hydrogenated coconut oil) exhibited a reduction in motor nerve conduction velocity (16%; P less than 0.05) compared to similarly-fed non-diabetic controls, but there was no significant alteration in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ pumping, a parameter reflecting activity of the Na+/K+ pump. 3. Treatment of diabetic rats with evening primrose oil prevented completely the development of the motor nerve conduction velocity deficit without affecting the severity of diabetes. Evening primrose oil treatment did not significantly affect motor nerve conduction velocity of non-diabetic animals. 4. Evening primrose oil treatment caused a significant reduction in activity of the Na+/K+ pump in sciatic nerves of diabetic animals (45%; P less than 0.05). 5. These results suggest that the acute conduction velocity defect arising in streptozotocin-diabetic rats, and the actions of evening primrose oil upon this, are independent of any effect on activity of the Na+/K+ pump. Other putative mechanisms are discussed. PMID:1313726

  12. Cyclopentadithiophene-benzoic acid copolymers as conductive binders for silicon nanoparticles in anode electrodes of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Lung; Kuo, Tzu-Husan; Yao, Chun-Feng; Chang, Shu-Wei; Yang, Yu-Shuo; Huang, Hsin-Kai; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Horie, Masaki

    2017-02-02

    Cyclopentadithiophene and methyl-2,5-dibromobenzoate have been copolymerised via palladium complex catalysed direct arylation. The methyl ester group in the benzoate unit is converted to the carboxyl group via saponification. The polymers are mixed with Si nanoparticles for use as conducting binders in the fabrication of an anode electrode in lithium ion batteries. The battery with the electrode incorporating the saponified polymer shows much higher specific capacity of up to 1820 mA h g(-1) (total weight) and a higher stability compared with the battery including the polymer before the saponification.

  13. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  14. Hand fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000552.htm Hand fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... need to be repaired with surgery. Types of Hand Fractures Your fracture may be in one of ...

  15. Characteristic Fracture Spacing in Primary and Secondary Recovery from Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Rossen, W.

    2015-12-01

    We showed previously (Gong and Rossen, 2014a,b) that, if the fracture aperture distribution is broad enough in a naturally fractured reservoir, even one where the fracture network is well-connected, most fractures can be eliminated without significantly affecting the flow through the fracture network. During a waterflood or enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) process, the production of oil depends on the supply of injected water or EOR agent. This suggests that the characteristic fracture spacing for the dual-porosity/dual-permeability simulation of waterflood or EOR in a naturally fractured reservoir should account not for all fractures but only the relatively small portion of the fracture network carrying almost all the injected water or EOR agent. In contrast, in primary production even a relatively small fracture represents an effective path for oil to flow to a production well. Thus in primary production the effective fracture spacing should include all the fractures. This distinction means that the "shape factor" in dual-porosity/dual-permeability reservoir simulators and the repeating unit in homogenization should depend on the process involved: specifically, it should be different for primary and secondary or tertiary recovery. We test this hypothesis in a simple representation of a fractured reservoir with a non-uniform distribution of fracture flow conductivities. We compare oil production, flow patterns in matrix, and the pattern of oil recovery around fractures with and without the "unimportant" fractures present. In primary production, all fractures which are much more permeable than matrix play a significant role in production. The shape factor or repeating-unit size should reflect the entire fracture distribution. In secondary or tertiary production, the role of fractures that carry relatively little flow depends on injection rate, the ratio of flow carried by the different fractures, and the permeability of matrix. In some cases, the appropriate shape

  16. Epidemiology of osteoporotic hip fractures in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Angel Antonio; Ferrandez, Luis; Gil, Enrique; Moreno, Alonso

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre study, divided into a retrospective and a prospective portion. The retrospective study evaluated osteoporotic hip fractures that occurred during 2002. The prospective study evaluated osteoporotic hip fractures that occurred during May 2003. The study was conducted in 77 hospitals in Spain and comprised patients 60 years of age and over. In the retrospective study we registered 13,195 hip fractures. Of the patients, 74% were women and 26% were men. The mean age was 80.7±8.4 years. The average incidence was 6.94±0.44 hip fractures per 1,000 inhabitants/year (95% CI, 6.07–7.82). In the prospective study, we registered 1,399 hip fractures. This represents a monthly incidence of 0.60±0.04 hip fractures per 1,000 inhabitants/year (95% CI, 0.51–0.69). Of the subjects, 74% were women and 26% were men. The mean age was 81.4±8.1 years. Using these data, we calculated the average annual prevalence in 2003 to be 7.20 fractures per 1,000 inhabitants. Thirty-three percent had previously suffered a hip fracture. Prior to the fracture, only 18% had received medical treatment for osteoporosis. After discharge from the hospital, only 26% were receiving pharmacological treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:16328387

  17. Movements causing ankle fractures in parachuting.

    PubMed Central

    Ellitsgaard, N; Warburg, F

    1989-01-01

    The parachutist injured in a dramatic accident often describes the injury in an incomplete and biased way and evaluation of materials based solely upon subjective information of this kind can be misleading and of no value for recommendations. As the relation between the mechanical factors of the injury and the lesion in ankle fractures is well documented, an investigation of clinical, radiological and operative findings in 46 parachutists with ankle fractures was conducted. Classification was possible in 44 of 46 fractures. The description of the cause of the trauma in 21 supination-eversion fractures and in 13 pronation-eversion fractures was most frequently faulty landing position or obstacles. The cause of seven supination fractures was oscillation of the parachutist whilst descending with sudden impact against the lateral aspect of the foot. For prophylaxis we recommend improvement of landing and steering techniques and the support of semi-calf boots. PMID:2730996

  18. Chopart fractures.

    PubMed

    Klaue, Kaj

    2004-09-01

    The Chopart articular space was described by François Chopart (1743-1795) as a practical space for amputations in cases of distal foot necrosis. It corresponds to the limit between the anatomical hind-foot and the mid-foot. The bones involved are the talus and the calcaneus proximally, and the navicular and the cuboid distally. This space thus holds two functionally distinct entities, the anterior part of the coxa pedis (an essential functional joint) and the calcaneo-cuboidal joint,which can be considered to be an "adaptive joint" within a normal foot. Trauma to this region may cause fractures and/or dislocations and, in high energy trauma,compartment syndromes. Principles of treatment are immediate reduction of dislocations and realignment of the medial and lateral column of the foot in length and orientation. Open reduction and internal fixation of talus and navicular fractures are often indicated to restore the "coxa pedis". Open reconstruction or fusion in correct length of the calcaneo-cuboidal joint is occasionally indicated. Salvage procedures in malunions include navicular osteotomies and calcaneo-cuboidal bone block fusions. Treatment of joint destructions, especially involving the talo-navicular joint, include triple arthrodesis.

  19. Relative Dating Via Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image of the eastern part of the Tharsis region illustrates how fractures can be used in relative dating of a surface. The fractured materials on the right side of the image are embayed by younger volcanic flows originating to the west of the image. Note how the younger flows cover the ends of the fractures, and are not at all fractured themselves.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.2, Longitude 269.4 East (90.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, G.; Joseph, P. S.; Shankar, G.

    2013-03-01

    Single crystals of L-aspartic acid nickel chloride (LANC) were grown by the slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The grown crystals were subjected to Powder X-ray diffraction studies to confirm the crystal structure. The modes of vibration of different molecular groups present in LANC have been identified by FTIR spectral analysis. Optical transferency of the grown crystal was investigated by UV-Vis-NIR spectrum. The lower optical cut off wavelength for this crystal is observed at 240 nm and energy band gap 5.179 eV. The optical reflectance and optical refractive index studies have been carried out in this crystal. Finally, the optical conductivity and electrical conductivity studies have been carried out on LANC single crystal.

  1. Epidemiology of hip fractures in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Harumi; Owan, Ichiro; Kudoh, Hirohisa; Horizono, Hidehiro; Arakaki, Kaoru; Ikema, Yasunari; Shinjo, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Kaori; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the current incidence of hip fractures in Okinawa prefecture and compared the data with those obtained in our previous study, which was conducted using similar methods in 1987/1988. All patients, aged 50 years or older and residing in Okinawa, admitted to Okinawa hospitals in 2004 for a fresh hip fracture were identified from hospital registries. Details were obtained from the medical records and radiographs of all patients and classified according to fracture type (cervical or trochanteric), age, sex, and fracture location. Subtrochanteric fractures and pathological fractures were excluded. A total of 1,349 patients (242 men and 1,107 women) were admitted for a fresh hip fracture in 2004. Their average age was 76.9 years for men and 82.4 years for women. There were 671 cervical fractures, 654 trochanteric fractures, and 24 unclassified proximal femoral fractures. Comparing the data from 1987/1988 to those from 2004, the total number of hip fractures increased by 188%, from 469 to 1,349. The age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000, standardized to the 2000 US population, were 75.7 and 296.1 in 1987/1988 and 123.6 and 420 in 2004 for men and women, respectively. The incidence rates in all age groups (at 5-year intervals) were higher in 2004 than in 1987/1988, indicating that people 50 years of age or older became more susceptible to hip fractures. Accordingly, the accretion of the hip fracture incidence rate was greater than that which could be explained purely by changes in population size and structure.

  2. Analysis of cationic structure in some room-temperature molten fluorides and dependence of their ionic conductivity and viscosity on hydrofluoric acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Tomohiro; Nakai, Takaaki; Inoue, Hidemi; Nakanishi, Kenta; Kohara, Shinji; Saito, Morihiro; Inaba, Minoru; Tasaka, Akimasa

    2011-08-11

    To understand the ionic and nonionic species in (CH(3))(4)NF·mHF, (CH(3))(3)N·mHF, (C(2)H(5))(4)NF·mHF, and (C(2)H(5))(3)N·mHF melts, the structures of these melts were investigated by infrared spectroscopy, NMR, and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Infrared spectra revealed that three kinds of fluorohydrogenate anions, (FH)(n)F(-) (n = 1, 2, and 3), and molecular hydrofluoric acid (HF) are present in every melt. Ionic conductivity and viscosity of these melts were measured and correlated with their cationic structure. The ionic conductivity of the R(4)N(+)-systems was higher than that of corresponding R(3)NH(+)-systems because a strong N-H···F(HF)(n) interaction prevents the motion of R(3)NH(+) cations in the R(3)N·mHF melts. (CH(3))(4)N(+) and (CH(3))(3)NH(+) cations gave higher ionic conductivity than (C(2)H(5))(4)N(+) and (C(2)H(5))(3)NH(+) cations, respectively, because the ionic radii of former cations were smaller than those of latter. It was concluded that these effects on ionic conductivity can be explained by the cationic structure and the concentration of molecular HF in the melts.

  3. Experimental and Analytical Research on Fracture Processes in ROck

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert H.. Einstein; Jay Miller; Bruno Silva

    2009-02-27

    Experimental studies on fracture propagation and coalescence were conducted which together with previous tests by this group on gypsum and marble, provide information on fracturing. Specifically, different fracture geometries wsere tested, which together with the different material properties will provide the basis for analytical/numerical modeling. INitial steps on the models were made as were initial investigations on the effect of pressurized water on fracture coalescence.

  4. Proton conductivity and fuel cell property of composite electrolyte consisting of Cs-substituted heteropoly acids and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, S. Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kawamura, G.; Muto, H.; Sakai, M.; Matsuda, A.

    Inorganic-organic composite electrolytes were fabricated from partially Cs +-substituted heteropoly acids (Cs-HPAs) and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) (SPEEK) for application in fuel cells. Heteropoly acids, such as phosphotungstic acid (H 3PW 12O 40:WPA), and silicotungstic acid (H 4SiW 12O 40:WSiA), were mechanochemically treated with cesium hydrogen sulfate (CsHSO 4) to obtain the form of Cs-HPAs. SPEEK was prepared from PEEK by sulfonation using concentrated sulfuric acid. Water durability and surface structure of HPAs were modified by introducing Cs + into HPAs. Flexible and hot water stable composite electrolytes were obtained, and their electrochemical properties were markedly improved with the addition of Cs-HPAs into the SPEEK matrix. Maximum power densities of 245 and 247 mW cm -2 were obtained for 50WPA·50CsHSO 4 and 50WSiA·50CsHSO 4 in SPEEK (1/5 by weight) composite electrolytes, respectively, from single cell tests at 80 °C and 80 RH%. These results suggest that a three-dimensional proton-conductive path was formed among homogeneously distributed Cs-HPAs particles in the SPEEK matrix. The Cs-HPAs incorporated into the SPEEK matrix increased the number of protonate sites in the electrolyte. These observations imply that the mechanochemically synthesized Cs-HPAs, which consist of hydrogen bondings between Cs-HPAs and -HSO 4 -, dissociated from CsHSO 4, are promising materials as inorganic fillers in inorganic-organic composite.

  5. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  6. Conducting polymer films fabricated by oxidative graft copolymerization of aniline on poly(acrylic acid) grafted poly(ethylene terephthalate) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiku; Liu, Xuyan; Choi, Ho-Suk; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2008-11-27

    A conductive polyaniline/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PANI/PET) composite film was fabricated via the oxidative graft copolymerization of aniline (ANI) onto the plasma-induced poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) grafted PET surface. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirmed that PANI was successfully grafted onto the surface of the PAAc-g-PET films. The effects of the experimental conditions on the percentage of PANI grafted onto the PAAc-g-PET films were extensively investigated. A very high grafting percentage of ANI can be obtained through the acid-base reaction between the aniline monomer and PAAc on the PAAc-g-PET surface at high temperature. As a result, the grafting percentage of PANI can be increased to as high as 12.18 wt %, which causes the surface resistance of the PANI-g-PAAc-g-PET film to be reduced to about 1000 Omega/sq. We predicted that this is because of the high flexibility of the PAAc molecular chains and high solubility of aniline, both of which facilitate the binding of aniline to PAAc during this high temperature acid-base reaction. It was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the PANI-modified PET surface exhibits higher size irregularity and surface roughness, which further indicated that a much greater number of aniline molecules can be reactively bonded to and distributed along the grafted AAc chains and that the PANI-g-PAAc-g-PET surface resulting from the sequential oxidative graft copolymerization can possess higher electrical conductivity.

  7. Effect of Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Y.; Wang, Y.; Shi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic Fracturing has been used successfully in the oil and gas industry to enhance oil and gas production in the past few decades. Recent years have seen the great development of tight gas, coal bed methane and shale gas. Natural fractures are believed to play an important role in the hydraulic fracturing of such formations. Whether natural fractures can benefit the fracture propagation and enhance final production needs to be studied. Various methods have been used to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) is a numerical method which belongs to the family of discrete element methods. In this paper, DDA is coupled with a fluid pipe network model to simulate the pressure response in the formation during hydraulic fracturing. The focus is to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. In particular, the effect of rock joint properties, joint orientations and rock properties on fracture initiation and propagation will be analyzed. The result shows that DDA is a promising tool to study such complex behavior of rocks. Finally, the advantages of disadvantages of our current model and future research directions will be discussed.

  8. Fracture channel waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  9. Laboratory Visualization Experiments of Temperature-induced Fractures Around a Borehole (Cryogenic Fracturing) in Shale and Analogue Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    In tight shales, hydraulic fracturing is the dominant method for improving reservoir permeability. However, injecting water-based liquids can induce formation damage and disposal problems, thus other techniques are being sought. One alternative to hydraulic fracturing is producing fractures thermally, using low-temperature fluids (cryogens). The primary consequence of thermal stimulation is that shrinkage fractures are produced around the borehole wall. Recently, cryogenic stimulation produced some promising results when the cryogen (typically liquid nitrogen and cold nitrogen gas) could be brought to reservoir depth. Numerical modeling also showed possible significant increases in gas production from a shale reservoir after cryogenic stimulation. However, geometry and the dynamic behavior of these thermally induced fractures under different stress regimes and rock anisotropy and heterogeneity is not yet well understood.Currently, we are conducting a series of laboratory thermal fracturing experiments on Mancos Shale and transparent glass blocks, by injecting liquid nitrogen under atmospheric pressure into room temperature blocks under various anisotropic stress states. The glass blocks allow clear optical visualization of fracture development and final fracturing patterns. For the shale blocks, X-ray CT is used to image both pre-existing and induced fractures. Also, the effect of borehole orientation with respect to the bedding planes and aligned preexisting fractures is examined. Our initial experiment on a uniaxially compressed glass block showed fracturing behavior which was distinctly different from conventional hydraulic fracturing. In addition to tensile fractures in the maximum principal stress directions, the thermal contraction by the cryogen induced (1) chaotic, spalling fractures around the borehole wall, and (2) a series of disk-shaped annular fractures perpendicular to the borehole. When applied to a horizontal borehole, the propagation plane of the

  10. Fracture toughness design in horse hoof keratin.

    PubMed

    Bertram, J E; Gosline, J M

    1986-09-01

    An engineering fracture mechanics approach was applied to the analysis of the fracture resistance of equine hoof-wall. The relationship between fracture toughness and the morphological organization of the keratin hoof tissue was investigated. Fracture toughness was evaluated using the J-integral analysis method which employs the compact tension test geometry. Tensile tests were also conducted to evaluate the effect of the morphological organization on the stress-strain behaviour. Hoof-wall has greatest fracture resistance for cracks running proximally, parallel to the tubular component of the wall keratin. For fully hydrated material tested in this direction the mean critical J-integral value at failure was 1.19 X 10(4)J m-2. This was nearly three times greater than the value determined for the weakest orientation, in which the crack ran parallel to the material between the tubules. The lower fracture toughness of the intertubular material dominates the fracture behaviour of this tissue. The tubular components of the wall appear to reinforce against fracture along the weak plane and the entire wall organization provides the mechanical capability for limiting and controlling fracture in this tissue.

  11. Tissue and size-related changes in the fatty acid and stable isotope signatures of the deep sea grenadier fish Coryphaenoides armatus from the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Sharples, Caroline J.; Webster, Lynda; Walsham, Pamela; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Cousins, Nicola J.

    2013-12-01

    Coryphaenoides armatus is a cosmopolitan deep-sea fish that plays a major role in the ecology of abyssal ecosystems. We investigated the trophic ecology and physiology of this species by determining the δ13C, δ15N and fatty acid signatures of muscle, liver and ovary tissues of individuals collected from ∼2700 m to the north and south of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, NE Atlantic. Fatty acid and δ13C data both suggested that C. armatus shows an ontogenetic dietary shift, with the relative contributions of benthic and pelagic prey decreasing and increasing respectively as the animals grow. They also indicated that dietary overlap between animals living to the north and south of the CGFZ increases as they grow, suggesting that larger animals forage over greater distances and are not hindered by the presence of the CGFZ. Comparison of tissue-specific fatty acid signatures with previously published data suggests compositional homeostasis of the fatty acids 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) in the muscle, and 18:1(n-9) in the liver tissues. We ascribe this primarily to strict physiological requirements for these compounds, rather than simply to their abundance in the diet. We pose several speculative mechanisms to explain the observed trends in tissue-specific δ13C and δ15N values, illustrating some of the numerous processes that can influence the isotopic signatures of bulk tissues.

  12. Multiphase Flow in Micro-fracture Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Succi, S.; Wildenschild, D.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional two-phase lattice-Boltzmann model was used to simulate immiscible fluid flow in four micro-fracture geometries closely related to geological fractured systems: (1) a fracture junction with fractal surfaces embedded in a non-porous matrix; (2) a fracture junction embedded in a heterogeneous porous matrix; (3) a heterogeneous porous medium overlying a fracture with fractal surfaces; and (4) a fracture network with fractal surfaces enclosed by a non-porous medium. The spatio-temporal distributions of fluids in fracture junctions were controlled by interplays between velocity-dependent contact angle dynamics, mediated by surface roughness, and pore-scale gravitational, viscous, and capillary forces. All simulations were conducted with actual physical units. Sensitivities of lateral and vertical spreads of fluids in the fracture junctions to the orientation of fracture junctions (tilted vs. vertical) and the wetting strength of fluids were analyzed via temporal moment analyses for the first two geometries. The simulation results revealed that the receding and advancing contact angles varied strongly with the transient fluid velocity. The patterns and distributions of thin films (continuous vs. discontinuous) on rough fracture walls were largely controlled by the wetting strength of the fluids. The spatio-temporal distributions of fluids were highly sensitive to the domain size and boundary conditions (periodic, no-flow, constant density, and flux-type). Single- and two-sided wetting of fracture aperture walls and long-term entrapment of a nonwetting less-dense fluid by a wetting dense fluid were observed in the simulations. These numerical results are useful for the design of experiments and for analyzing the relative strengths of pore-scale processes in more complex and realistic fracture systems such as those encountered at the Yucca Mountain and Idaho National Laboratory sites.

  13. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  14. Estimation of fracture porosity in an unsaturated fractured welded tuff using gas tracer testing

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry Mark

    2001-12-01

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  15. 3D geostatistical modeling of fracture system in a granitic massif to characterize hydraulic properties and fracture distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Kubo, Taiki; Liu, Chunxue; Masoud, Alaa; Amano, Kenji; Kurihara, Arata; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Lanyon, Bill

    2015-10-01

    This study integrates 3D models of rock fractures from different sources and hydraulic properties aimed at identifying relationships between fractures and permeability. The Tono area in central Japan, chiefly overlain by Cretaceous granite, was examined because of the availability of a unique dataset from deep borehole data at 26 sites. A geostatistical method (GEOFRAC) that can incorporate orientations of sampled data was applied to 50,900 borehole fractures for spatial modeling of fractures over a 12 km by 8 km area, to a depth of 1.5 km. GEOFRAC produced a plausible 3D fracture model, in that the orientations of simulated fractures correspond to those of the sample data and the continuous fractures appeared near a known fault. Small-scale fracture distributions with dominant orientations were also characterized around the two shafts using fracture data from the shaft walls. By integrating the 3D model of hydraulic conductivity using sequential Gaussian simulation with the GEOFRAC fractures from the borehole data, the fracture sizes and directions that strongly affect permeable features were identified. Four fracture-related elements: lineaments from a shaded 10-m DEM, GEOFRAC fractures using the borehole and shaft data, and microcracks from SEM images, were used for correlating fracture attributes at different scales. The consistency of the semivariogram models of distribution densities was identified. Using an experimental relationship between hydraulic conductivity and fracture length, the fractures that typically affect the hydraulic properties at the drift scale were surmised to be in the range 100-200 m. These results are useful for a comprehensive understanding of rock fracture systems and their hydraulic characteristics at multiple scales in a target area.

  16. Fracture characteristics of balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc A.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the failure modes of high altitude scientific balloons through an investigation of the fracture characteristics of the thin polyethylene films. Two films were the subject of the evaluation, Winzen Int.'s Stratafilm SF-85 and Raven Industries' Astro-E. Research began with an investigation of the film's cold brittleness point and it's effect on the ultimate strength and elasticity of the polyethylene film. A series of preliminary investigations were conducted to develop an understanding of the material characteristics. The primary focus of this investigation was on the notch sensitivity of the films. Simple stress strain tests were also conducted to enable analysis employing fracture toughness parameters. Studies were conducted on both film types at 23 C (room temperature), -60 C, -90 C, and -120 C.

  17. [Periprosthetic Acetabulum Fractures].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, A J; Stuby, F; de Zwart, P M; Ochs, B G

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to periprosthetic fractures of the femur, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare complications - both primary fractures and fractures in revision surgery. This topic is largely under-reported in the literature; there are a few case reports and no long term results. Due to an increase in life expectancy, the level of patients' activity and the number of primary joint replacements, one has to expect a rise in periprosthetic complications in general and periprosthetic acetabular fractures in particular. This kind of fracture can be intra-, peri- or postoperative. Intraoperative fractures are especially associated with insertion of cementless press-fit acetabular components or revision surgery. Postoperative periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are usually related to osteolysis, for example, due to polyethylene wear. There are also traumatic fractures and fractures missed intraoperatively that lead to some kind of insufficiency fracture. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are treated conservatively if the implant is stable and the fracture is not dislocated. If surgery is needed, there are many possible different surgical techniques and challenging approaches. That is why periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum should be treated by experts in pelvic surgery as well as revision arthroplasty and the features specific to the patient, fracture and prosthetic must always be considered.

  18. Selective perceptions of hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sarge, Melanie A; VanDyke, Matthew S; King, Andy J; White, Shawna R

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) is a focal topic in discussions about domestic energy production, yet the American public is largely unfamiliar and undecided about the practice. This study sheds light on how individuals may come to understand hydraulic fracturing as this unconventional production technology becomes more prominent in the United States. For the study, a thorough search of HF photographs was performed, and a systematic evaluation of 40 images using an online experimental design involving N = 250 participants was conducted. Key indicators of hydraulic fracturing support and beliefs were identified. Participants showed diversity in their support for the practice, with 47 percent expressing low support, 22 percent high support, and 31 percent undecided. Support for HF was positively associated with beliefs that hydraulic fracturing is primarily an economic issue and negatively associated with beliefs that it is an environmental issue. Level of support was also investigated as a perceptual filter that facilitates biased issue perceptions and affective evaluations of economic benefit and environmental cost frames presented in visual content of hydraulic fracturing. Results suggested an interactive relationship between visual framing and level of support, pointing to a substantial barrier to common understanding about the issue that strategic communicators should consider.

  19. Fracture of Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints on Cu Substrates. II: Fracture Mechanism Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Huang, Z.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2012-02-01

    A methodology to construct fracture mechanism maps for Sn-3.8%Ag-0.7%Cu (SAC387) solder joints attached to Cu substrates has been developed. The map, which delineates the operative mechanisms of fracture along with corresponding joint fracture toughness values, is plotted in a space described by two microstructure-dependent parameters, with the abscissa describing the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) and the ordinate representing the strain-rate-dependent solder yield strength. The plot space encompasses the three major mechanisms by which joints fail, namely (i) cohesive fracture of solder, (ii) cleavage fracture of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC), and (iii) fracture of the solder-IMC interface. Line contours of constant fracture toughness values, as well as constant fraction of each of the above mechanisms, are indicated on the plots. The plots are generated by experimentally quantifying the dependence of the operative fracture mechanism(s) on the two microstructure-dependent parameters (IMC geometry and solder yield strength) as functions of strain rate, reflow parameters, and post-reflow aging. Separate maps are presented for nominally mode I and equi-mixed mode loading conditions (loading angle ϕ = 0° and 45°, respectively). The maps allow rapid assessment of the operative fracture mechanism(s) along with estimation of the expected joint fracture toughness value for a given loading condition (strain rate and loading angle) and joint microstructure without conducting actual tests, and may serve as a tool for both prediction and microstructure design.

  20. Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments in intact and pre-fractured rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Rummel, F.; Jung, R.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted to investigate two factors which could influence the use of the hydrofrac technique for in-situ stress determinations; the possible dependence of the breakdown pressure upon the rate of borehole pressurization, and the influence of pre-existing cracks on the orientation of generated fractures. The experiments have shown that while the rate of borehole pressurization has a marked effect on breakdown pressures, the pressure at which hydraulic fractures initiate (and thus tensile strength) is independent of the rate of borehole pressurization when the effect of fluid penetration is negligible. Thus, the experiments indicate that use of breakdown pressures rather than fracture initiation pressures may lead to an erroneous estimate of tectonic stresses. A conceptual model is proposed to explain anomalously high breakdown pressures observed when fracturing with high viscosity fluids. In this model, initial fracture propagation is presumed to be stable due to large differences between the borehole pressure and that within the fracture. In samples which contained pre-existing fractures which were 'leaky' to water, we found it possible to generate hydraulic fractures oriented parallel to the direction of maximum compression if high viscosity drilling mud was used as the fracturing fluid. ?? 1977.

  1. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  2. Ultra-fast determination of caffeine, dipyrone, and acetylsalicylic acid by capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection and identification of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Marra, Mariana Cardoso; Cunha, Rafael Rodrigues; Vidal, Denis Tadeu Rajh; Munoz, Rodrigo Alejandro Abarza; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio; Richter, Eduardo Mathias

    2014-01-31

    Capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4)D) was used for fast, simultaneous determination of dipyrone (DIP), caffeine (CAF), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). In the same run and in less than 1min, the degradation products from DIP and ASA were also detected. In addition, the usage of the CE-C(4)D system allowed, for the first time, the detection of methylamine as a degradation product of DIP. Capillary electrophoresis with electrospray mass spectrometry experiments were carried out in order to confirm the formation of methylamine. The limits of detection by CE-C(4)D were 5, 5, and 6μmolL(-1) for CAF, DIP, and ASA, respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of these compounds in pharmaceutical formulations with similar results to those achieved by HPLC (p<0.05).

  3. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in

  4. [Fractures of the forefoot].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common and comprise approximately two thirds of all foot fractures. Forefoot fractures are caused by direct impact or the effect of indirect force. The forces exerted can range from repetitive minor load (stress fractures) to massive destructive forces (complex trauma). The clinical course in forefoot fractures is typically more favourable than in fractures of the mid- and hindfoot. The incidence of complications like infection or pseudarthrosis is low. Exceptions are rare fractures of the proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal and the sesamoids with higher pseudarthrosis rates. Malunited metatarsal fractures can cause painful conditions that should even be treated operatively. Differences in structure and function of the different forefoot areas and specific fracture types require an adapted management of these special injuries.

  5. Management of metacarpal fractures.

    PubMed

    McNemar, Thomas B; Howell, Julianne Wright; Chang, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Fractures of the hand are the most common fractures of the human skeleton. Metacarpal fractures account for 30% to 50% of all of hand fractures. The mechanisms of these injuries vary from axial loading forces to direct blows to the dorsal hand. Resulting deformities include malrotation, angulation, and shortening. Treatment modalities vary from nonoperative reduction to open reduction and internal fixation. The treatment algorithm is guided by the location of the fracture, the stability of the fracture, and the resultant deformity. Operative procedures, although they may lead to excellent radiographic reduction of fractures, often lead to debilitating stiffness from the inflammatory reaction of the surgical procedure. Operative fixation must be employed judiciously and offered only when confident that non-operative therapy can be improved on with operative intervention. This article reviews the various types of metacarpal fractures, with the treatment options available for each fracture. The indications for each treatment modality, postoperative care, and rehabilitation are presented.

  6. Comparison of the effects of evening primrose oil and triglycerides containing gamma-linolenic acid on nerve conduction and blood flow in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dines, K C; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1995-04-01

    The aim was to ascertain whether the ability of evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment to correct peripheral nerve dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats depends on a gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)-containing triglyceride constituent, di-linolein mono-gamma-linolenate (DLMG). A second objective was to investigate whether the triglyceride conformation of GLA affects efficacy, using tri-gamma-linolenate (TGLA), which is not present in EPO. Third, we examined the actions of these omega-6 essential fatty acid-containing oils on sciatic nerve blood flow to establish a common mechanism. After 6 weeks of diabetes, sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was 21% reduced. EPO treatment caused dose-dependent increases in NCV that reached asymptote within 7 days. DLMG and TGLA, at doses matched for GLA content, had effects indistinguishable from those of EPO. Sciatic blood flow, 47.2% reduced by diabetes, was partially normalized by EPO, DLMG and TGLA. In contrast, sunflower oil (which does not contain GLA) did not alter NCV or blood flow. The data therefore provide strong evidence that DLMG is the active component of EPO and suggest that correction of nerve dysfunction involves a vascular action. The precise triglyceride configuration of GLA does not appear crucial to its effects in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Review of Well Operator Files for Hydraulically Fractured Oil and Gas Production Wells: Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA conducted a survey of oil and gas production wells hydraulically fractured by nine oil and gas service companies in the United States during 2009 and 2010. This is the second well file review report.

  8. On material fracture criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnev, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the nonlinear mechanics of material fracture, a model of the fracture of materials with actual (discrete) structures has been constructed. The model is supported by proofs that crack resistance K 1 c and fracture toughness G 1 c obtained from the energy conservation law without using the assumptions adopted in the linear material fracture mechanics serve as the force and energy criteria in the nonlinear fracture mechanics. It has been shown that energy criterion G 1 c in the nonlinear mechanics is much greater than G 1 c in the linear fracture mechanics.

  9. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  10. Electrically conductive proppant and methods for detecting, locating and characterizing the electrically conductive proppant

    DOEpatents

    Cannan, Chad; Bartel, Lewis; Palisch, Terrence; Aldridge, David

    2015-01-13

    Electrically conductive proppants and methods for detecting, locating, and characterizing same are provided. The electrically conductive proppant can include a substantially uniform coating of an electrically conductive material having a thickness of at least 500 nm. The method can include injecting a hydraulic fluid into a wellbore extending into a subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to open a fracture therein, injecting into the fracture a fluid containing the electrically conductive proppant, electrically energizing the earth at or near the fracture, and measuring three dimensional (x, y, and z) components of electric and magnetic field responses at a surface of the earth or in an adjacent wellbore.

  11. Mechanical degradation of fuel cell membranes under fatigue fracture tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasany, Ramin M. H.; Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza; Kjeang, Erik; Wang, G. G.; Rajapakse, R. K. N. D.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cyclic stresses on the fatigue and mechanical stability of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes are experimentally investigated under standard fuel cell conditions. The experiments are conducted ex-situ by subjecting membrane specimens to cyclic uniaxial tension at controlled temperature and relative humidity. The fatigue lifetime is measured in terms of the number of cycles until ultimate fracture. The results indicate that the membrane fatigue lifetime is a strong function of the applied stress, temperature, and relative humidity. The fatigue life increases exponentially with reduced stresses in all cases. The effect of temperature is found to be more significant than that of humidity, with reduced fatigue life at high temperatures. The maximum membrane strain at fracture is determined to decrease exponentially with increasing membrane lifetime. At a given fatigue life, a membrane exposed to fuel cell conditions is shown to accommodate more plastic strain before fracture than one exposed to room conditions. Overall, the proposed ex-situ membrane fatigue experiment can be utilized to benchmark the fatigue lifetime of new materials in a fraction of the time and cost associated with conventional in-situ accelerated stress testing methods.

  12. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Reaction with Shale in Experiments at Unconventional Gas Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, A. N.; Hakala, A.; Jarvis, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the marked increase in hydraulic fracturing for unconventional natural gas production over the past decade, reactions between hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFF) and shale reservoirs remain poorly reported in the scientific literature. Shale-HFF interaction could cause mineral dissolution, releasing matter from the shale, or mineral precipitation that degrades reservoir permeability. Furthermore, data are limited on whether scale inhibitors are effective at preventing mineral precipitation and whether these inhibitors adversely affect reservoir fluid chemistry and permeability. To investigate HFF-rock interaction within shale reservoirs, we conducted flow-through experiments exposing Marcellus Shale to synthetic HFF at reservoir conditions (66oC, 20MPa). Outcrop shale samples were cored, artificially fractured, and propped open with quartz sand. Synthetic HFFs were mixed with chemical additives similar to those used for Marcellus Shale gas wells in Ohio and Southwestern Pennsylvania (FracFocus.org). We evaluated differences between shale reactions with HFF made from natural freshwater and reactions with HFF made from synthetic produced water (designed to simulate produced water that is diluted and re-used for subsequent hydraulic fracturing). We also compared reactions with HFFs including hydrochloric acid (HCl) to represent the initial acid stage, and HFFs excluding HCl. Reactions were determined through changes in fluid chemistry and X-ray CT and SEM imaging of the shale before and after experiments. Results from experiments with HFF containing HCl showed dissolution of primary calcite, as expected. Experiments using HFF made from synthetic produced water had significant mineral precipitation, particularly of barium and calcium sulfates. X-ray CT images from these experiments indicate precipitation of minerals occurred either along the main fracture or within smaller splay fractures, depending on fluid composition. These experiments suggest that HFF

  13. Transport of Gas Phase Radionuclides in a Fractured, Low-Permeability Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. A.; Chapman, J.

    2001-12-01

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the Department of Energy, DOE) oversaw a joint program between industry and government in the 1960s and 1970s to develop technology to enhance production from low-permeability gas reservoirs using nuclear stimulation rather than conventional means (e.g., hydraulic and/or acid fracturing). Project Rio Blanco, located in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, was the third experiment under the program. Three 30-kiloton nuclear explosives were placed in a 2134 m deep well at 1780, 1899, and 2039 m below the land surface and detonated in May 1973. Although the reservoir was extensively fractured, complications such as radionuclide contamination of the gas prevented production and subsequent development of the technology. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to identify the main transport processes that have occurred and are currently occurring in relation to the detonations, and to estimate the extent of contamination in the reservoir. Minor modifications were made to TOUGH2, the multiphase, multicomponent reservoir simulator developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The simulator allows the explicit incorporation of fractures, as well as heat transport, phase change, and first order radionuclide decay. For a fractured two-phase (liquid and gas) reservoir, the largest velocities are of gases through the fractures. In the gas phase, tritium and one isotope of krypton are the principle radionuclides of concern. However, in addition to existing as a fast pathway, fractures also permit matrix diffusion as a retardation mechanism. Another retardation mechanism is radionuclide decay. Simulations show that incorporation of fractures can significantly alter transport rates, and that radionuclides in the gas phase can preferentially migrate upward due to the downward gravity drainage of liquid water in the pores. This project was funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Operations Office

  14. Transport of gas-phase radionuclides in a fractured, low-permeability reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Clay Cooper; Jenny Chapman

    2001-12-01

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the U.S. Department of Energy, DOE) oversaw a joint program between industry and government in the 1960s and 1970s to develop technology to enhance production from low-permeability gas reservoirs using nuclear stimulation rather than conventional means (e.g., hydraulic and/or acid fracturing). Project Rio Blanco, located in the Piceance Basin, Colorado, was the third experiment under the program. Three 30-kiloton nuclear explosives were placed in a 2,134-m-deep well at 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below the land surface and detonated in May 1973. Although the reservoir was extensively fractured, complications such as radionuclide contamination of the gas prevented production and subsequent development of the technology. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to identify the main transport processes that have occurred and are currently occurring in relation to the detonations, and to estimate the extent of contamination in the reservoir. Minor modifications were made to TOUGH2, the multiphase, multicomponent reservoir simulator developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The simulator allows the explicit incorporation of fractures, as well as heat transport, phase change, and first-order radionuclide decay. For a fractured, two-phase (liquid and gas) reservoir, the largest velocities are of gases through the fractures. In the gas phase, tritium and one isotope of krypton are the principal radionuclides of concern. However, in addition to existing as a fast pathway, fractures also permit matrix diffusion as a retardation mechanism. Another retardation mechanism is radionuclide decay. Simulations show that incorporation of fractures can significantly alter transport rates, and that radionuclides in the gas phase can preferentially migrate upward due to the downward gravity drainage of liquid water in the pores.

  15. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  16. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  17. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  18. Rib fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000539.htm Rib fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A rib fracture is a crack or break in one or ...

  19. Forearm Fractures in Children

    MedlinePlus

    .org Forearm Fractures in Children The forearm is the part of the arm between the wrist and the elbow. It is ... two bones: the radius and the ulna. Forearm fractures are common in childhood, accounting for more than ...

  20. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    .org Thighbone (Femur) Fractures In Children Page ( 1 ) The thighbone (femur) is the largest and strongest bone in the body. It can break ... Cause Statistics The most common cause of thighbone fractures in infants under 1 year old is child ...

  1. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  2. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series—Indications To use the sharing features ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  3. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000166.htm Femur fracture repair - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a fracture (break) in the femur in your leg. It ...

  4. Lisfranc (Midfoot) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... that disrupts multiple different joints and includes multiple fractures. Lisfranc injuries tend to damage the cartilage of ... include ligament strains and tears, as well as fractures and dislocations of bone (far right). (Le ) This ...

  5. Growth Plate Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    .org Growth Plate Fractures Page ( 1 ) The bones of children and adults share many of the same risks for injury. But because they ... to a unique injury called a growth plate fracture. Growth plates are areas of cartilage located near ...

  6. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis-hip ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  7. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Jitendra P.; Bosak, Andrea L.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  8. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  9. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  10. Orbital fractures: a review

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey M; Glavas, Ioannis P

    2011-01-01

    This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1) to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2) to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3) to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training. PMID:21339801

  11. Hydraulic Fracturing Mineback Experiment in Complex Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. J.; McLennan, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") for the recovery of gas and liquids from tight shale formations has gained much attention. This operation which involves horizontal well drilling and massive hydraulic fracturing has been developed over the last decade to produce fluids from extremely low permeability mudstone and siltstone rocks with high organic content. Nearly thirteen thousand wells and about one hundred and fifty thousand stages within the wells were fractured in the US in 2011. This operation has proven to be successful, causing hundreds of billions of dollars to be invested and has produced an abundance of natural gas and is making billions of barrels of hydrocarbon liquids available for the US. But, even with this commercial success, relatively little is clearly known about the complexity--or lack of complexity--of the hydraulic fracture, the extent that the newly created surface area contacts the high Reservoir Quality rock, nor the connectivity and conductivity of the hydraulic fractures created. To better understand this phenomena in order to improve efficiency, a large-scale mine-back experiment is progressing. The mine-back experiment is a full-scale hydraulic fracture carried out in a well-characterized environment, with comprehensive instrumentation deployed to measure fracture growth. A tight shale mudstone rock geologic setting is selected, near the edge of a formation where one to two thousand feet difference in elevation occurs. From the top of the formation, drilling, well logging, and hydraulic fracture pumping will occur. From the bottom of the formation a horizontal tunnel will be mined using conventional mining techniques into the rock formation towards the drilled well. Certain instrumentation will be located within this tunnel for observations during the hydraulic fracturing. After the hydraulic fracturing, the tunnel will be extended toward the well, with careful mapping of the created hydraulic fracture. Fracturing fluid will be

  12. [Epidemiological view of fracture risk].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2010-09-01

    Incidence of hip fracture increases exponentially with age. Women had two times higher hip fracture incidence than men. Major risk factors for the hip fracture are age, sex, bone mineral density, and previous fracture and others, but each risk factor contributes differently to development of the fracture by sites. Factors related to fall are important role in developing hip fracture.

  13. [Osteoporosis and Colles' fracture].

    PubMed

    Hindsø, K; Lauritzen, J B

    2001-10-01

    We describe the connection between osteoporosis and Colles' fractures of the distal radius from an epidemiological and aetiological point of view. In addition, the value of these fractures as markers of osteoporosis and future risk of fracture is assessed. Several studies have clearly shown an epidemiological association between osteoporosis and fractures of the distal radius, with the association strongest for women up to 65 years of age and for osteoporosis located in the forearm. The association weakens for other locations and for older women. Osteoporosis may have some aetiologic significance for the development of Colles' fractures, but several extraskeletal factors are of equal or further importance. The occurrence of a Colles' fracture in the first 10-15 years after the postmenopause indicates an increased relative risk of sustaining another fracture in the future. However the relative risk approaches one after a few years and, because of the comparatively low absolute risk in this age-group, Colles' fracture as a risk factor contributes little to an assessment of the lifetime fracture risk. In a few longitudinal studies, Colles' fractures could not predict the long-term risk of osteoporosis. The presence of a Colles' fracture should lead to considerations concerning the skeletal and extraskeletal causes of the fracture for the purpose of initiating preventive and therapeutic measures.

  14. Elbow fractures and dislocations.

    PubMed

    Little, Kevin J

    2014-07-01

    Elbow fractures are common in pediatric patients. Most injuries to the pediatric elbow are stable and require simple immobilization; however, more severe fractures can occur, often requiring operative stabilization and/or close monitoring. This article highlights the common fractures and dislocations about the pediatric elbow and discusses the history, evaluation, and treatment options for specific injuries.

  15. Fracture-controlled nitrate and atrazine transport in four Iowa till units.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Martin F; Simpkins, William W; Horton, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Fractures in till may provide pathways for agricultural chemicals to contaminate aquifers and surface waters. This study was conducted to quantify the influence of fractures on solute fate and transport using three conservative and two nonconservative tracers. The conservative tracers were potassium bromide (KBr), pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid disodium salt (PIPES); the nonconservative tracers were nitrate and atrazine [6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine]. Three sites in Iowa were investigated, including four late Wisconsinan and Pre-Illinoian tills. Laboratory tracer experiments were conducted using eight large (0.4-0.45 m long by 0.43 m in diameter), undisturbed columns of till collected from depths of 1 to 28 m. The tills were densely fractured, with fracture spacing ranging from 3.8 to 10.4 cm. First arrival velocities of Br- ranged from 0.004 to 64.8 m d(-1), 10 to 100 times faster than predicted for unfractured media. Nitrate behaved as a conservative tracer in weathered till columns, but degraded during experiments using deeper tills. Sorption caused retardation of atrazine in the shallowest four columns. Atrazine degradation occurred in deeper columns as demonstrated by deviations between atrazine and the conservative tracers. Mobile-immobile model (MIM) simulations estimated first-order exchange coefficients (alpha) ranging from 1 x 10(-8) to 1.7 x 10(-2) s(-1), sorption coefficients (K(d)) for atrazine ranging from 2.6 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-3) m3 kg(-1), and degradation half-lives ranging from 0.24 to 67 d (nitrate) and 1.6 to 277 d (atrazine). This study suggests that aquifers and surface waters associated with thin, fractured till units may be vulnerable to contamination, yet deeper aquifers may be protected by these materials due to increased residence times provided by matrix diffusion.

  16. Fracture toughness properties of welded stainless steels for tritium service

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    1994-10-01

    Studies to determine tritium exposure effects on the properties of welded steels are being conducted. In this investigation, the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) Incoloy 903 were. Fracture toughness measurements were conducted for tritium-exposed samples in the as-forged condition and compared with welded samples. Tritium-exposed HERF Incoloy 903 had fracture toughness values that were 33% lower than those for unexposed HERF Incoloy 903. Tritium-exposed welded samples had fracture toughness values that were just 8% of the unexposed HERF alloys and 28% of unexposed welded alloys.

  17. Polymerizing Pyrrole Coated Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) Conductive Nanofibrous Conduit Combined with Electric Stimulation for Long-Range Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jialin; Sun, Binbin; Liu, Shen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunyang; Mo, Xiumei; Che, Junyi; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning and electric stimulation (ES) are both promising methods to support neuron adhesion and guide extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, all studies focus on either electrospinning for conduits material or ES in vitro study to accelerate nerve regeneration; few work on the combined use of these two strategies or ES in vivo study. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the abilities of direct current ES through electrospinning conductive polymer composites composed of polypyrrole and Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PPY/PLCL) in peripheral nerve regeneration. PPY/PLCL composite conduits were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole coated electrospun PLCL scaffolds. Morphologies and chemical compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microscope. Rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells cultured on PPY/PLCL scaffolds were stimulated with 100 mV/cm for 4 h per day. The median neurite length and cell viability were measured in PC-12 cells. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were analyzed in DRG cells. In rats, 15 mm gaps of sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit and PPY/PLCL conduit stimulated with 100 mV potential, respectively. A 100 mV potential direct current ES was applied for 1 h per day at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post-implantation. The PPY/PLCL conduits with ES showed a similar performance compared with the autograft group, and significantly better than the non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit group. These promising results show that the PPY/PLCL conductive conduits’ combined use with ES has great potential for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27877111

  18. Polymerizing Pyrrole Coated Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) Conductive Nanofibrous Conduit Combined with Electric Stimulation for Long-Range Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialin; Sun, Binbin; Liu, Shen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunyang; Mo, Xiumei; Che, Junyi; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning and electric stimulation (ES) are both promising methods to support neuron adhesion and guide extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, all studies focus on either electrospinning for conduits material or ES in vitro study to accelerate nerve regeneration; few work on the combined use of these two strategies or ES in vivo study. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the abilities of direct current ES through electrospinning conductive polymer composites composed of polypyrrole and Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PPY/PLCL) in peripheral nerve regeneration. PPY/PLCL composite conduits were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole coated electrospun PLCL scaffolds. Morphologies and chemical compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microscope. Rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells cultured on PPY/PLCL scaffolds were stimulated with 100 mV/cm for 4 h per day. The median neurite length and cell viability were measured in PC-12 cells. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were analyzed in DRG cells. In rats, 15 mm gaps of sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit and PPY/PLCL conduit stimulated with 100 mV potential, respectively. A 100 mV potential direct current ES was applied for 1 h per day at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post-implantation. The PPY/PLCL conduits with ES showed a similar performance compared with the autograft group, and significantly better than the non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit group. These promising results show that the PPY/PLCL conductive conduits' combined use with ES has great potential for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  19. Niflumic acid inhibits chloride conductance of rat skeletal muscle by directly inhibiting the CLC-1 channel and by increasing intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Liantonio, A; Giannuzzi, V; Picollo, A; Babini, E; Pusch, M; Conte Camerino, D

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Given the crucial role of the skeletal muscle chloride conductance (gCl), supported by the voltage-gated chloride channel CLC-1, in controlling muscle excitability, the availability of ligands modulating CLC-1 are of potential medical as well as toxicological importance. Here, we focused our attention on niflumic acid (NFA), a molecule belonging to the fenamates group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Experimental approach: Rat muscle Cl− conductance (gCl) and heterologously expressed CLC-1 currents were evaluated by means of current-clamp (using two-microelectrodes) and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Fura-2 fluorescence was used to determine intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, in native muscle fibres. Key results: NFA inhibited native gCl with an IC50 of 42 μM and blocked CLC-1 by interacting with an intracellular binding site. Additionally, NFA increased basal [Ca2+]i in myofibres by promoting a mitochondrial calcium efflux that was not dependent on cyclooxygenase or CLC-1. A structure-activity study revealed that the molecular conditions that mediate the two effects are different. Pretreatment with the Ca-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine partially inhibited the NFA effect. Therefore, in addition to direct channel block, NFA also inhibits gCl indirectly by promoting PKC activation. Conclusions and Implications: These cellular effects of NFA on skeletal muscle demonstrate that it is possible to modify CLC-1 and consequently gCl directly by interacting with channel proteins and indirectly by interfering with the calcium-dependent regulation of the channel. The effect of NFA on mitochondrial calcium stores suggests that NSAIDs, widely used drugs, could have potentially dangerous side-effects. PMID:17128287

  20. Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

    2006-10-31

    ) that allow for the easy removal of calcium waste from the well. Physical and chemical analysis of core samples taken from prospective geologic formations for the acid dissolution process confirmed that many of the limestone samples readily dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid. Further, some samples contained oily residues that may help to seal the walls of the final cavern structure. These results suggest that there exist carbonate rock formations well suited for the dissolution technology and that the presence of inert impurities had no noticeable effect on the dissolution rate for the carbonate rock. A sensitivity analysis was performed for characteristics of hydraulic fractures induced in carbonate formations to enhance the dissolution process. Multiple fracture simulations were conducted using modeling software that has a fully 3-D fracture geometry package. The simulations, which predict the distribution of fracture geometry and fracture conductivity, show that the stress difference between adjacent beds is the physical property of the formations that has the greatest influence on fracture characteristics by restricting vertical growth. The results indicate that by modifying the fracturing fluid, proppant type, or pumping rate, a fracture can be created with characteristics within a predictable range, which contributes to predicting the geometry of storage caverns created by acid dissolution of carbonate formations. A series of three-dimensional simulations of cavern formation were used to investigate three different configurations of the acid-dissolution process: (a) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole and no fracture; (b) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole, with an open fracture; and (c) injection into an open borehole connected by a fracture to an adjacent borehole from which the fluids are produced. The two-well configuration maximizes the overall mass transfer from the rock to the

  1. Simulating conservative tracers in fractured till under realistic timescales.

    PubMed

    Helmke, M F; Simpkins, W W; Horton, R

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-fracture and dual-porosity models are infrequently used to simulate solute transport through fractured unconsolidated deposits, despite their more common application in fractured rock where distinct flow regimes are hypothesized. In this study, we apply four fracture transport models--the mobile-immobile model (MIM), parallel-plate discrete-fracture model (PDFM), and stochastic and deterministic discrete-fracture models (DFMs)--to demonstrate their utility for simulating solute transport through fractured till. Model results were compared to breakthrough curves (BTCs) for the conservative tracers potassium bromide (KBr), pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid (PIPES) in a large-diameter column of fractured till. Input parameters were determined from independent field and laboratory methods. Predictions of Br BTCs were not significantly different among models; however, the stochastic and deterministic DFMs were more accurate than the MIM or PDFM when predicting PFBA and PIPES BTCs. DFMs may be more applicable than the MIM for tracers with small effective diffusion coefficients (De) or for short timescales due to differences in how these models simulate diffusion or incorporate heterogeneities by their fracture networks. At large scales of investigation, the more computationally efficient MIM and PDFM may be more practical to implement than the three-dimensional DFMs, or a combination of model approaches could be employed. Regardless of the modeling approach used, fractures should be incorporated routinely into solute transport models in glaciated terrain.

  2. Bone mineral density testing after fragility fracture

    PubMed Central

    Posen, Joshua; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Sale, Joanna; Bogoch, Earl R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with fragility fractures who can be expected to have low bone mineral density (BMD) at the time of fracture and to assist FPs in deciding whether to refer patients for BMD testing. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched from the earliest available dates through September 2009. Study selection English-language articles reporting BMD test results of patients with fragility fractures who were managed in an orthopedic environment (eg, fracture clinic, emergency management by orthopedic surgeons, inpatients) were eligible for review. While the orthopedic environment has been identified as an ideal point for case finding, FPs are often responsible for investigation and treatment. Factors that potentially influenced BMD test results (eg, selection of fracture types, exclusion criteria) were identified. Studies with 2 or more selection factors of potential influence were flagged, and rates of low BMD were calculated including and excluding these studies. Synthesis The distribution of the proportion of persons with low BMD was summarized across studies using descriptive statistics. We calculated lower boundaries on this distribution, using standard statistical thresholds, to determine a lower threshold of the expected rate of low BMD. Conclusion Family physicians evaluating patients with fragility fractures can expect that at least two-thirds of patients with fragility fractures who are older than 50 years of age will have low BMD (T score ≤ −1.0). With this a priori expectation, FPs might more readily conduct a fracture risk assessment and pursue warranted fracture risk reduction strategies following fragility fracture. PMID:24336562

  3. Constitutive modeling of fracture waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Romensky, E. I.; Bourne, N. K.

    2003-02-01

    A fracture wave (FW) in a brittle material is a narrow transition region (border) of a continuous fracture zone, which may be associated with the damage accumulation process initiated by propagation of shock waves. In multidimensional structures the fracture wave may behave in an unusual way. The high-speed photography of penetration of a borosilicate (Pyrex) glass block [N. K. Bourne, L. Forde, and J. E. Field, Proc. SPIE 2869, 626 (1997)] shows a visible fracture zone with an apparent flat front although the projectile is a hemispherically nosed rod. A strain-rate-sensitive model is being developed and employed for analysis of the role of the complex stress state and kinetic description of the damage accumulation to describe the process of the impact. Numerical analysis is conducted with a one-dimensional wave propagation code employing the model and with the LS-DYNA2D hydrocode in which the model has been implemented. The analysis demonstrates that (i) the second (plastic) shock wave is superseded by quicker FW relaxing stress behind the elastic precursor, and (ii) the FW front flattening is apparently caused by the change in the acoustic directional properties. This change is associated with the phase-like transition due to the damage accumulation within the FW. In particular, the FW transition separates a highly anisotropic zone of material characterized acoustically by longitudinal and shear waves in front of the FW from a nearly isotropic region of the material characterized only by bulk waves behind the FW.

  4. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    quantify the distribution of apertures and the nature of the asperities. Low resolution images of fluids in a sample with a shear fracture were performed and they provide the confidence that flow patterns and saturations could be determined in the future. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective is to understand the impact of the fracture, its topology and occupancy on the nature of mass transfer between the matrix and the fracture. Counter-current imbibition next to the fracture was observed and quantified, including the influence of formation layering.

  5. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    quantify the distribution of apertures and the nature of the asperities. Low resolution images of fluids in a sample with a shear fracture were performed and they provide the confidence that flow patterns and saturations could be determined in the future. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective is to understand the impact of the fracture, its topology and occupancy on the nature of mass transfer between the matrix and the fracture. Counter-current imbibition next to the fracture was observed and quantified, including the influence of formation layering.

  6. Indicators: Conductivity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conductivity is a measure of the ability of water to pass an electrical current. Because dissolved salts and other inorganic chemicals conduct electrical current, conductivity increases as salinity increases.

  7. Mechanisms for fast flow in unsaturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin

    1998-03-01

    Although fractures in rock are well-recognized as pathways for fast percolation of water, the possibility that fast flow could occur along unsaturated fracture pathways is commonly not considered in vadose zone hydrology. In this study, two mechanisms for fast flow along unsaturated fractures were investigated, film flow and surface zone flow. The importance of fracture surface roughness was demonstrated through experiments conducted on ceramic blocks having simple surface topographies. Those experiments showed that film flow on fracture surfaces is largely due to flow along continuous surface channels which become water-filled at near-zero matric (capillary) potentials. The second mechanism, surface zone flow, is important when the permeability of the rock along fractures (fracture skin) is significantly greater than that of the bulk rock matrix. Surface zone fast flow was demonstrated through water imbibition (sorptivity) experiments. These mechanisms help explain observations of rapid solute transport in unsaturated subsurface environments.

  8. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  9. Stress fractures in runners.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Provencher, Matthew T

    2012-04-01

    Stress fractures are a relatively common entity in athletes, in particular, runners. Physicians and health care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for stress fractures in runners presenting with insidious onset of focal bone tenderness associated with recent changes in training intensity or regimen. It is particularly important to recognize “high-risk” fractures, as these are associated with an increased risk of complication. A patient with confirmed radiographic evidence of a high-risk stress fracture should be evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Runners may benefit from orthotics, cushioned sneakers, interval training, and vitamin/calcium supplementation as a means of stress fracture prevention.

  10. Fracture toughness of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a study to determine the fracture toughness and to characterize fracture modes of silicon as a function of the orientation of single-crystal and polycrystalline material. It is shown that bar specimens cracked by Knoop microhardness indentation and tested to fracture under four-point bending at room temperature were used to determine the fracture toughness values. It is found that the lowest fracture toughness value of single crystal silicon was 0.82 MN/m to the 3/2 in the 111 plane type orientation, although the difference in values in the 111, 110, and 100 planes was small.

  11. [Rarely seen fractures].

    PubMed

    Subaşi, M; Kapukaya, A; Kesemenli, C; Coban, V

    2001-10-01

    Rarely seen fractures are presented in this study. One case was a calcaneal spur, 2 cases osteochondroma pedicule fractures and talus posteromedial tubercle fracture due to direct trauma. Calcaneal spur and osteochondromas were removed surgically and posteromedial tubercle was treated by short-leg cast immobilization. In conclusion, we think that fractures of osteochondroma and calcaneal spur may be treated by surgical removal which do not cause any functional disorders after this operation, but fractures like the talus posteromedial tubercle should be treated conservatively by short-leg immobilization in the early period.

  12. Conductive hydrogel composed of 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid and Fe(3+) used as enhanced electrochemical immunosensing substrate for tumor biomarker.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiqiang; Han, Hongliang; Ma, Zhanfang

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a new conductive hydrogel was prepared by a simple cross-linking coordination method using 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid as the ligand and Fe(3+) as the metal ion. The hydrogel film was formed on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by a drop coating method, which can dramatically facilitate the transport of electrons. A sensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated following electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a hydrogel film and immobilization of an antibody. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a lung cancer biomarker, was used as the model analyte to be detected. The proposed immunosensor exhibited a wide linear detection range of 1pgmL(-1) to 200ngmL(-1) and a limit of detection of 0.26pgmL(-1) (the ratio of signal to noise (S/N)=3). Moreover, the detection of NSE in human serum samples showed satisfactory accuracy compared with the data determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), indicating good analytical performance of the immunoassay.

  13. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance1

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Samuel C.V.; Daloso, Danilo M.; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions. PMID:26542441

  14. Influence of humic acid applications on modulus of rupture, aggregate stability, electrical conductivity, carbon and nitrogen content of a crusting problem soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, İ.; Şeker, C.

    2015-11-01

    Soil structure is often said to be the key to soil productivity since a fertile soil, with desirable soil structure and adequate moisture supply, constitutes a productive soil. Soil structure influences soil water movement and retention, erosion, crusting, nutrient recycling, root penetration and crop yield. The objective of this work is to study humic acid (HA) application on some physical and chemical properties in weakly structured soils. The approach involved establishing a plot experiment in laboratory conditions. Different rates of HA (control, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 %) were applied to soil during three incubation periods (21, 42 and 62 days). At the end of the each incubation period, the changes in physicochemical properties were measured. Generally, HA addition increased electrical conductivity values during all incubation periods. HA applications decreased soil modulus of rupture. Application of HA at the rate of 4 % significantly increased soil organic carbon contents. HA applications at the rate of 4 % significantly increased both mean soil total nitrogen content and aggregate stability after three incubation periods (p < 0.05). Therefore, HA has the potential to improve the structure of soil in the short term.

  15. Characteristics of bone turnover in the long bone metaphysis fractured patients with normal or low Bone Mineral Density (BMD).

    PubMed

    Wölfl, Christoph; Schweppenhäuser, Daniela; Gühring, Thorsten; Takur, Caner; Höner, Bernd; Kneser, Ulrich; Grützner, Paul Alfred; Kolios, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic fractures increases as our population ages. Until now, the exact biochemical processes that occur during the healing of metaphyseal fractures remain unclear. Diagnostic instruments that allow a dynamic insight into the fracture healing process are as yet unavailable. In the present matched pair analysis, we study the time course of the osteoanabolic markers bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), as well as the osteocatabolic markers crosslinked C-telopeptide of type-I-collagen (β-CTX) and serum band 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP5b), during the healing of fractures that have a low level of bone mineral density (BMD) compared with fractures that have a normal BMD. Between March 2007 and February 2009, 30 patients aged older than 50 years who suffered a metaphyseal fracture were included in our study. BMDs were verified by dual energy Xray absorptiometry (DXEA) scans. The levels of BTMs were examined over an 8-week period. Osteoanabolic BAP levels in those with low levels of BMD were significantly different from the BAP levels in those with normal BMD. BAP levels in the former group increased constantly, whereas the latter group showed an initial strong decrease in BAP followed by slowly rising values. Osteocatabolic β-CTX increased in the bone of the normal BMD group constantly, whereas these levels decreased significantly in the bone of the group with low BMD from the first week. TRAP5b was significantly reduced in the low level BMD group. With this work, we conduct first insights into the molecular biology of the fracture healing process in patients with low levels of BMD that explains the mechanism of its fracture healing. The results may be one reason for the reduced healing qualities in bones with low BMD.

  16. Modern Workflows for Fracture Rock Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T.

    2015-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) is a numerical simulation approach that represents a conducting fracture network using geologically realistic geometries and single-conductor hydraulic and transport properties. In terms of diffusion analogues, equivalent porous media derive from heat conduction in continuous media, while DFN simulation is more similar to electrical flow and diffusion in circuits with discrete pathways. DFN modeling grew out of pioneering work of David Snow in the late 1960s with additional impetus in the 1970's from the development of the development of stochastic approaches for describing of fracture geometric and hydrologic properties. Research in underground test facilities for radioactive waste disposal developed the necessary linkages between characterization technologies and simulation as well as bringing about a hybrid deterministic stochastic approach. Over the past 40 years DFN simulation and characterization methods have moved from the research environment into practical, commercial application. The key geologic, geophysical and hydrologic tools provide the required DFN inputs of conductive fracture intensity, orientation, and transmissivity. Flow logging either using downhole tool or by detailed packer testing identifies the locations of conducting features in boreholes, and image logging provides information on the geology and geometry of the conducting features. Multi-zone monitoring systems isolate the individual conductors, and with subsequent drilling and characterization perturbations help to recognize connectivity and compartmentalization in the fracture network. Tracer tests and core analysis provide critical information on the transport properties especially matrix diffusion unidentified conducting pathways. Well test analyses incorporating flow dimension boundary effects provide further constraint on the conducting geometry of the fracture network.

  17. Subsurface fracture spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Hill, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to document and analyze the unique set of data on subsurface fracture characteristics, especially spacing, provided by the US Department of Energy's Slant Hole Completion Test well (SHCT-1) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Two hundred thirty-six (236) ft (71.9 m) of slant core and 115 ft (35.1 m) of horizontal core show irregular, but remarkably close, spacings for 72 natural fractures cored in sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group. Over 4200 ft (1280 m) of vertical core (containing 275 fractures) from the vertical Multiwell Experiment wells at the same location provide valuable information on fracture orientation, termination, and height, but only data from the SHCT-1 core allow calculations of relative fracture spacing. Within the 162-ft (49-m) thick zone of overlapping core from the vertical and deviated wellbores, only one fracture is present in vertical core whereas 52 fractures occur in the equivalent SHCT-1 core. The irregular distribution of regional-type fractures in these heterogeneous reservoirs suggests that measurements of average fracture spacing'' are of questionable value as direct input parameters into reservoir engineering models. Rather, deviated core provides data on the relative degree of fracturing, and confirms that cross fractures can be rare in the subsurface. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Atraumatic sternum fracture

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsen, Sebastian Ørskov; Madsen, Christina Friis

    2014-01-01

    The spine, pelvic bones and long bones of the lower extremities are common sites for insufficiency fractures. Cases of sternum insufficiency fractures have rarely been reported among elderly patients. Insufficiency fractures tend to occur in bones with decreased mechanical strength especially among elderly patients, in postmenopausal women and patients with underlying diseases. We describe a case of spontaneous sternum insufficiency fracture in a healthy man, with no known risk factors to fracture, or previous history of fractures. Sternum insufficiency fracture is a rare cause of chest pain. This case serves to remind the emergency physician to remain vigilant for other non-cardiac, non-pulmonary and non-traumatic causes of chest pain, especially among patients with known risk factors such as osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and patients on long-term steroid treatment. If diagnosed correctly, these patients can be discharged and treated as outpatients as this case emphasises. PMID:25326566

  19. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  20. Fractal Analysis of Permeability of Unsaturated Fractured Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoping; Shi, Wei; Huang, Lili

    2013-01-01

    A physical conceptual model for water retention in fractured rocks is derived while taking into account the effect of pore size distribution and tortuosity of capillaries. The formula of calculating relative hydraulic conductivity of fractured rock is given based on fractal theory. It is an issue to choose an appropriate capillary pressure-saturation curve in the research of unsaturated fractured mass. The geometric pattern of the fracture bulk is described based on the fractal distribution of tortuosity. The resulting water content expression is then used to estimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the fractured medium based on the well-known model of Burdine. It is found that for large enough ranges of fracture apertures the new constitutive model converges to the empirical Brooks-Corey model. PMID:23690746

  1. Fracture toughness and the effects of stress state on fracture of nickel aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Michal, Gary M.; Locci, Ivan; Rigney, Joseph D.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of stress state on the fracture behavior of Ni3Al, Ni3Al + B, and NiAl were determined using either notched or fatigue-precracked bend bars tested to failure at room temperature, in addition to testing specimens in tension under superposed hydrostatic pressure. Although Ni3Al is observed to fail in a macroscopically brittle intergranular manner in tension tests conducted at room temperature, the fracture toughnesses presently obtained on Ni3Al exceeded 20 MPam, and R-curve behavior was exhibited. In situ monitoring of the fracture experiments was utilized to aid in interpreting the source(s) of the high toughness in Ni3Al, while SEM fractography was utilized to determine the operative fracture modes. The superposition by hydrostatic pressure during tensile testing of NiAl specimens was observed to produce increased ductility without changing the fracture mode.

  2. Small-scale electrical resistivity tomography of wet fractured rocks.

    PubMed

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Sharpe, Roger; Wood, Thomas; Heath, Gail

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments that tested the ability of the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to locate correctly wet and dry fractures in a meso-scale model. The goal was to develop a method of monitoring the flow of water through a fractured rock matrix. The model was a four by six array of limestone blocks equipped with 28 stainless steel electrodes. Dry fractures were created by placing pieces of vinyl between one or more blocks. Wet fractures were created by injecting tap water into a joint between blocks. In electrical terms, the dry fractures are resistive and the wet fractures are conductive. The quantities measured by the ERT system are current and voltage around the outside edge of the model. The raw ERT data were translated to resistivity values inside the model using a three-dimensional Occam's inversion routine. This routine was one of the key components of ERT being tested. The model presented several challenges. First, the resistivity of both the blocks and the joints was highly variable. Second, the resistive targets introduced extreme changes the software could not precisely quantify. Third, the abrupt changes inherent in a fracture system were contrary to the smoothly varying changes expected by the Occam's inversion routine. Fourth, the response of the conductive fractures was small compared to the background variability. In general, ERT was able to locate correctly resistive fractures. Problems occurred, however, when the resistive fracture was near the edges of the model or when multiple fractures were close together. In particular, ERT tended to position the fracture closer to the model center than its true location. Conductive fractures yielded much smaller responses than the resistive case. A difference-inversion method was able to correctly locate these targets.

  3. A semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Wu, Yonghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks. The model dynamically couples an analytical dual-porosity model with a numerical discrete fracture model. The small-scale fractures with the matrix are idealized as a dual-porosity continuum and an analytical flow solution is derived based on source functions in Laplace domain. The large-scale fractures are represented explicitly as the major fluid conduits and the flow is numerically modeled, also in Laplace domain. This approach allows us to include finer details of the fracture network characteristics while keeping the computational work manageable. For example, the large-scale fracture network may have complex geometry and varying conductivity, and the computations can be done at predetermined, discrete times, without any grids in the dual-porosity continuum. The validation of the semi-analytical model is demonstrated in comparison to the solution of ECLIPSE reservoir simulator. The simulation is fast, gridless and enables rapid model setup. On the basis of the model, we provide detailed analysis of the flow behavior of a horizontal production well in fractured reservoir with multi-scale fracture networks. The study has shown that the system may exhibit six flow regimes: large-scale fracture network linear flow, bilinear flow, small-scale fracture network linear flow, pseudosteady-state flow, interporosity flow and pseudoradial flow. During the first four flow periods, the large-scale fracture network behaves as if it only drains in the small-scale fracture network; that is, the effect of the matrix is negligibly small. The characteristics of the bilinear flow and the small-scale fracture network linear flow are predominantly determined by the dimensionless large-scale fracture conductivity. And low dimensionless fracture conductivity will generate large pressure drops in the large-scale fractures surrounding the wellbore. With

  4. Determination of the spectrum of low molecular mass organic acids in urine by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity and ultraviolet photometric detection--an efficient tool for monitoring of inborn metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Tůma, Petr; Samcová, Eva; Stulík, Karel

    2011-01-24

    A mixture of 29 organic acids (OAs) occurring in urine was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) and UV photometric detection. The optimized analytical system involved a 100 cm long polyacrylamide-coated capillary (50 μm i.d.) and the background electrolyte of 20mM 2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES)/NaOH+10% (v/v) methanol, pH 6.0 (pH is related to the 20mM MES/NaOH buffer in water). The LOD values obtained by C(4)D for the OAs which do not absorb UV radiation range from 0.6 μM (oxalic acid) to 6.8 μM (pyruvic acid); those obtained by UV photometry for the remaining OAs range from 2.9 μM (5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid) to 10.2 μM (uric acid). The repeatability of the procedure developed is characterized by the coefficients of variation, which vary between 0.3% (tartaric acid) and 0.6% (5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid) for the migration time and between 1.3% (tartaric acid) and 3.5% (lactic acid) for the peak area. The procedure permitted quantitation of 20 OAs in a real urine sample and was applied to monitoring of the occurrence of the inborn metabolic fault of methylmalonic aciduria.

  5. Optimization of flow modeling in fractured media with discrete fracture network via percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donado-Garzon, L. D.; Pardo, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fractured media are very heterogeneous systems where occur complex physical and chemical processes to model. One of the possible approaches to conceptualize this type of massifs is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN). Donado et al., modeled flow and transport in a granitic batholith based on this approach and found good fitting with hydraulic and tracer tests, but the computational cost was excessive due to a gigantic amount of elements to model. We present in this work a methodology based on percolation theory for reducing the number of elements and in consequence, to reduce the bandwidth of the conductance matrix and the execution time of each network. DFN poses as an excellent representation of all the set of fractures of the media, but not all the fractures of the media are part of the conductive network. Percolation theory is used to identify which nodes or fractures are not conductive, based on the occupation probability or percolation threshold. In a fractured system, connectivity determines the flow pattern in the fractured rock mass. This volume of fluid is driven through connection paths formed by the fractures, when the permeability of the rock is negligible compared to the fractures. In a population of distributed fractures, each of this that has no intersection with any connected fracture do not contribute to generate a flow field. This algorithm also permits us to erase these elements however they are water conducting and hence, refine even more the backbone of the network. We used 100 different generations of DFN that were optimized in this study using percolation theory. In each of the networks calibrate hydrodynamic parameters as hydraulic conductivity and specific storage coefficient, for each of the five families of fractures, yielding a total of 10 parameters to estimate, at each generation. Since the effects of the distribution of fault orientation changes the value of the percolation threshold, but not the universal laws of classical

  6. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  7. Characterization of the hydraulic properties of fractures in chalk.

    PubMed

    Nativ, Ronit; Adar, Eilon; Assaf, Lior; Nygaard, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The fracture systems intersecting Eocene chalk formations in the Negev desert, Israel, and their hydraulic properties were characterized using a variety of geologic and hydrologic techniques. These included identification of the prevailing directions of fracture systems in outcrops, in cores retrieved from inclined coreholes, in coreholes using video logs, and in trenches. The orientation and inclination of these fracture systems were determined, and evidence of ground water flow on the fracture surfaces was described and ranked. Their hydraulic conductivity was determined through slug and pumping tests performed at discrete intervals. Temperature, electrical conductivity, caliper, gamma and heat-pulse logs were conducted in the same coreholes. The results from the logs, tests, and core descriptions were compared to identify reliable and cost-effective tools for investigating the hydraulic characteristics of fracture systems. We concluded that in the study area: (1) fracture mapping in outcrops and coreholes (including downhole video and caliper logs) must be supplemented by hydraulic testing of the mapped fracture sets in the coreholes; (2) inclined coreholes provide information regarding the orientation of the hydraulically active fracture systems that cannot be obtained from vertical boreholes; (3) hydraulic testing of unpacked holes provides a reasonable estimate of the maximum hydraulic conductivity; and (4) the hydraulic conductivity distribution with depth is log normal and all significant ground water flow takes place within the upper 25 m.

  8. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer in a Heterogeneous Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisladottir, V. R.; Roubinet, D.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy harvesting requires extraction and injection of geothermal fluid. Doing so in an optimal way requires a quantitative understanding of site-specific heat transfer between geothermal fluid and the ambient rock. We develop a heat transfer particle-tracking approach to model that interaction. Fracture-network models of heat transfer in fractured rock explicitly account for the presence of individual fractures, ambient rock matrix, and fracture-matrix interfaces. Computational domains of such models span the meter scale, whereas fracture apertures are on the millimeter scale. The computations needed to model these multi-scale phenomenon can be prohibitively expensive, even for methods using nonuniform meshes. Our approach appreciably decreases the computational costs. Current particle-tracking methods usually assume both infinite matrix and one-dimensional (1D) heat transfer in the matrix blocks. They rely on 1D analytical solutions for heat transfer in a single fracture, which can lead to large predictive errors. Our two-dimensional (2D) heat transfer simulation algorithm is mesh-free and takes into account both longitudinal and transversal heat conduction in the matrix. It uses a probabilistic model to transfer particle to the appropriate neighboring fracture unless it returns to the fracture of origin or remains in the matrix. We use this approach to look at the impact of a fracture-network topology (e.g. the importance of smaller scale fractures), as well as the matrix block distribution on the heat transport in heterogeneous fractured rocks.

  9. A Hierarchical Approach to Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Taasan, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    Recent research conducted under NASA LaRC's Creativity and Innovation Program has led to the development of an initial approach for a hierarchical fracture mechanics. This methodology unites failure mechanisms occurring at different length scales and provides a framework for a physics-based theory of fracture. At the nanoscale, parametric molecular dynamic simulations are used to compute the energy associated with atomic level failure mechanisms. This information is used in a mesoscale percolation model of defect coalescence to obtain statistics of fracture paths and energies through Monte Carlo simulations. The mathematical structure of predicted crack paths is described using concepts of fractal geometry. The non-integer fractal dimension relates geometric and energy measures between meso- and macroscales. For illustration, a fractal-based continuum strain energy release rate is derived for inter- and transgranular fracture in polycrystalline metals.

  10. Location of fractures and the characteristics of patients with atypical femoral fractures: analyses of 38 Japanese cases.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Kojiro; Nishino, Tomofumi; Kamada, Hiroshi; Nozawa, Daisuke; Mishima, Hajime; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine fracture location and the characteristics of patients with atypical femoral fractures (AFFs). We studied 38 AFFs in 34 patients admitted to our institution between November 2007 and July 2013. The diagnostic criteria for the AFFs were based on 2014 American Society of Bone and Mineral Research guidelines. We classified the fracture location as proximal, middle, or distal to trisect the femoral diaphysis from just distal to the lesser trochanter to just proximal to the supracondylar flare. Bowing was defined as a line through the inside of the tip of the great trochanter and a condylar center that was outside the medullary cavity. We investigated the fracture's location, existence of coronal bowing, and bisphosphonates (BPs), glucocorticoids (GCs), and proton pump inhibitors therapy. We analyzed associations between fracture location and demographic and clinical factors. Twelve fractures were proximal, 25 were middle, and one was distal. Nineteen limbs showed femoral bowing. Thirty-one patients received BP treatment-20 patients received alendronic acid, eight risedronic acid, and three minodronic acid. Fourteen patients received a GC, and 16 received a proton pump inhibitor. There was a significant association between coronal bowing and middle fracture locations, GC therapy and proximal fracture locations, and older age and middle fracture locations. Tall height and heavy weight had an association with proximal fracture location, and short height and light weight had an association with middle fracture location. In conclusion, we provide evidence supporting a causal relationship between BP-related severely suppressed bone turnover and AFFs. We also provide evidence supporting additional influences from altered distribution of mechanical stress with femoral bowing and various factors, such as GC therapy, age, body weight, and height, which might negatively affect bone intensity and quality and result in fracture.

  11. Field fracturing multi-sites project. Annual report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct experiments to definitively determine hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments are to be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment, as well as surface facilities and equipment conducive to acquiring high-quality data. The primary Project goal is to develop a fully characterized, tight reservoir-typical, field-scale hydraulic fracturing test site to diagnose, characterize, and test hydraulic fracturing technology and performance. It is anticipated that the research work being conducted by the multi-disciplinary team of GRI and DOE contractors will lead to the development of a commercial fracture mapping tool/service.

  12. Accelerated fracture healing in mice lacking the 5-lipoxygenase gene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promotes inflammation by synthesizing pro-inflammatory prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Inflammation is an early response to bone fracture, and ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing. Arachidonic acid is also converted into leukotrienes by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). We hypothesized that 5-LO is a negative regulator of fracture healing and that in the absence of COX-2, excess leukotrienes synthesized by 5-LO will impair fracture healing. Methods Fracture healing was assessed in mice with a targeted 5-LO mutation (5-LOKO mice) and control mice by radiographic and histological observations, and measured by histomorphometry and torsional mechanical testing. To assess effects on arachidonic acid metabolism, prostaglandin E2, F2α, and leukotriene B4 levels were measured in the fracture calluses of control, 5-LOKO COX-1KO, and COX-2KO mice by enzyme linked immunoassays. Results Femur fractures in 5-LOKO mice rapidly developed a cartilaginous callus that was replaced with bone to heal fractures faster than in control mice. Femurs from 5-LOKO mice had substantially better mechanical properties after 1 month of healing than did control mice. Callus leukotriene levels were 4-fold higher in mice homozygous for a targeted mutation in the COX-2 gene (COX-2KO), which indicated that arachidonic acid was shunted into the 5-LO pathway in the absence of COX-2. Interpretation These experiments show that 5-LO negatively regulates fracture healing and that shunting of arachidonic acid into the 5-LO pathway may account, at least in part, for the impaired fracture healing response observed in COX-2KO mice. PMID:21067431

  13. Characterizing Reactive Flow Paths in Fractured Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Huerta, N. J.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration can be a viable method for reducing anthropogenic CO2 flux into the atmosphere. However, the technology must be economically feasible and pose acceptable risk to stakeholders. One key risk is CO2 leakage out of the storage reservoir. Potential driving forces for leakage are the overpressure due to CO2 injection and the buoyancy of free phase CO2. Potential hazards of leakage are contamination of Underground Sources of Drinking Water or the atmosphere and would be deemed an unacceptable risk. Wells potentially provide a fast path for leakage from the reservoir. While the well's cement casing is reactive with CO2 and CO2-saturated brine, the low cement matrix permeability and slow diffusion rate make it unlikely that CO2 will escape through a properly constructed wellbore. However, highly permeable fractures with micrometer scale apertures can occur in cement casings. Reactions that occur in the flow in these fractures can either be self-limiting or self-enhancing. Therefore, understanding the reactive flow is critical to understanding of leakage evolution through these fractures. The goal of our work is to characterize the modification of the flow paths in the fracture due to reaction with acidic brine. With this aim we have characterized both the initial flow path of un-reactive flow and the final flow path after introduction of low-pH acid along the same fracture. Class H cement cores 3-6 cm in length and 2.5 cm diameter are created and a single natural and unique fracture is produced in each core using the Brazilian method. Our experimental fluid is injected at a constant rate into the cement core housed in a Hassler Cell under confining pressure. A solution of red dye and deionized water is pumped through the fracture to stain the un-reactive flow paths. Deionized water is then pumped through the core to limit diffusion of the dye into non-flowing portions of the fracture. After staining the initial flow path, low pH water due to

  14. Abiotic reversible self-assembly of fulvic and humic acid aggregates in low electrolytic conductivity solutions by dynamic light scattering and zeta potential investigation.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Milad Rabbani; Stretz, Holly A; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-12-15

    The aggregation of humic substances and their interaction with filtration media (membranes, soils) has implications for our understanding of membrane fouling during water treatment, the facilitated transport of contaminants, and the transport of organic matter through the microbial loop. To investigate the aggregation of fulvic and humic acids in low electrolytic conductivity solutions, laboratory studies of simulated environmental water samples as well as actual environmental water samples were examined. Intensity-, volume-, and number-based particle size distributions (PSDs) were obtained by dynamic light scattering. Aggregates were categorized into three ranges, i.e., 10-100 nm, 100-1000 nm, and >1 μm. Individual biomacromolecules and the aggregates between 10 nm and 1 μm were presumed to be precursors for the formation of a large 5-μm-sized-particle. The self-assembly of the large-in-volume, few-in-number, 5-μm-sized particle was observed in real-time and occurred in unfiltered samples and in samples filtered (0.45 μm) at a nominal size one order of magnitude smaller. The supramicrometer-sized particle formed, dissipated, and spontaneously re-formed over turbulent/quiescent cycles in the presence of sodium azide indicating reversible abiotic self-assembly. Zeta potential analyses demonstrated that colloidal stability increased as concentration increased. DLS studies of the environmental water samples were comparable to those of the simulated laboratory samples. The operational range of the instrumentation used in these experiments was 0.6 nm-6 μm; therefore, aggregates larger than 6 μm may exist in these solutions.

  15. Effects of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and PIP gene expression of tomato seedlings subject to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y Y; Yan, F; Hu, L P; Zhou, X T; Zou, Z R; Cui, L R

    2015-06-11

    The effects of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) on photosynthesis, plant growth, and the expression of two aquaporin genes in tomato seedlings under control and salinity conditions were investigated. Exogenous ALA application significantly improved net photosynthetic rate (Pn), total chlorophyll content, and plant biomass accumulation of tomato seedlings under salinity stress. As revealed by real-time PCR analyses, after treatment with ALA alone, expression of both LePIP1 and LePIP2 in the two tomato cultivars was up-regulated at 2 h and subsequently decreased to normal levels. Under salinity stress, transcript levels of LePIP1 in both leaves and roots of salt-sensitive cultivars (cv. Zhongza No.9) increased significantly and were considerably higher than in cultivars exposed to ALA alone. In contrast, the expression levels of LePIP1 and LePIP2 in cvs. Jinpeng No.1 cultivars were slightly lower under salinity stress than under ALA treatment. In addition, transcript levels of both LePIP1 and LePIP2 in the roots of Jinpeng No. 1 cultivars were considerably lower than those in the roots of Zhongza No. 9 cultivars under salinity stress, regardless of ALA supplementation, implying that Jinpeng No. 1 cultivars had a better capacity to maintain membrane intrinsic protein stability. Further, ALA application distinctly counteracted the up- or down-regulation of LePIP1 and LePIP2 in both cultivars under salinity stress, in accordance with the improvements instomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and Pn of tomato leaves. The results presented here indicate that ALA controls aquaporin expression, thus, presumably ALA regulates water homeostasis and enhances salt tolerance of tomato seedlings.

  16. [Epidemiology of hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Hagino, Hiroshi

    2006-12-01

    Age- and gender-specific numbers of patients with hip fracture increase with age and peaked at the age 80-84; however, age- and gender-specific incidences increase exponentially with age. According to the recent nation-wide survey, the most common cause of hip fractures was a simple fall, 68.8% sustained fractures in-doors, and the incidences were higher in the winter than the summer period. More than 90% of patients with hip fracture were treated surgically and about 3/4 of patients with femoral neck fractures were treated with hemi-arthroplasty. Hip fractures for Asian people including Japanese are lower than those for Caucasians living in Northern Europe and North America; however, recent reports from the Asian area indicated an increase in the incidence with time.

  17. Dyslipidemia and sternum fracture.

    PubMed

    Can, Cagdas; Gulactı, Umut; Sarıhan, Aydin; Topacoglu, Hakan

    2013-06-01

    Tenderness over the sternum is a clue for possible sternal fracture. Sternal fractures usually occur at the body or manubrium. Lateral chest radiography could detect a sternum fracture, but the diagnosis is usually made by chest tomography. Traumatic sternum fracture considered as a marker of seriously life-threatening, high-energy injury. In hyperlipidemia, oxidized lipids accumulate in vascular tissues and trigger atherosclerosis. Such lipids also deposit in bone tissues where they may promote osteoporosis. In the literature, there is no previously reported traumatic sternal fracture due to hyperlipidemia-induced osteoporosis. Here, we report a case of a combined mixed type familial hyperlipidemia-induced osteoporosis in which the patient having seat belt on had an unexpected sternum fracture in a low-energy motor vehicle accident.

  18. Fracture properties of bioabsorbable HA/PLLA/PCL composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. D.; Todo, M.; Arakawa, K.; Tsuji, H.; Takenoshita, Y.

    2005-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite particle filled poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(e-caprolactone) blend (HA/PLLA/PCL) composite materials were developed by melt-mixing, and their bending mechanical properties and fracture toughness were examined. It was found that the fracture absorbed energy and fracture toughness are maximized with the PCL content of 5wt%. Local plastic deformation of PLLA/PCL matrix is the main mechanism of energy dissipation during fracture. This ductile deformation is considered to be initiated in the surroundings of voids formed due to interfacial debonding at HA/matrix interfaces and phase separation of PLLA and PCL. On the other hand, fracture toughness of HA/PLLA/PCL with the PCL contents of 10 and 15wt% becomes lower than that of HA/PLLA. In these composites, void formation causes severe local stress concentration and therefore degrades the materials rather than improving the fracture resistance.

  19. Triaxial coreflood study of the hydraulic fracturing of Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Frash, L.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the central questions in unconventional oil and gas production research is the cause of limited recovery of hydrocarbon. There are many hypotheses including: 1) inadequate penetration of fractures within the stimulated volume; 2) limited proppant delivery; 3) multiphase flow phenomena that blocks hydrocarbon migration; etc. Underlying any solution to this problem must be an understanding of the hydrologic properties of hydraulically fractured shale. In this study, we conduct triaxial coreflood experiments using a gasket sealing mechanism to characterize hydraulic fracture development and permeability of Utica Shale samples. Our approach also includes fracture propagation with proppants. The triaxial coreflood experiments were conducted with an integrated x-ray tomography system that allows direct observation of fracture development using x-ray video radiography and x-ray computed tomography at elevated pressure. A semi-circular, fracture initiation notch was cut into an end-face of the cylindrical samples (1"-diameter with lengths from 0.375 to 1"). The notch was aligned parallel with the x-ray beam to allow video radiography of fracture growth as a function of injection pressure. The proppants included tungsten powder that provided good x-ray contrast for tracing proppant delivery and distribution within the fracture system. Fractures were propagated at injection pressures in excess of the confining pressure and permeability measurements were made in samples where the fractures propagated through the length of the sample, ideally without penetrating the sample sides. Following fracture development, permeability was characterized as a function of hydrostatic pressure and injection pressure. X-ray video radioadiography was used to study changes in fracture aperture in relation to permeability and proppant embedment. X-ray tomography was collected at steady-state conditions to fully characterize fracture geometry and proppant distribution.

  20. Investigation of post hydraulic fracturing well cleanup physics in the Cana Woodford Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rong

    Hydraulic fracturing was first carried out in the 1940s and has gained popularity in current development of unconventional resources. Flowing back the fracturing fluids is critical to a frac job, and determining well cleanup characteristics using the flowback data can help improve frac design. It has become increasingly important as a result of the unique flowback profiles observed in some shale gas plays due to the unconventional formation characteristics. Computer simulation is an efficient and effective way to tackle the problem. History matching can help reveal some mechanisms existent in the cleanup process. The Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology (FAST) Consortium at Colorado School of Mines previously developed a numerical model for investigating the hydraulic fracturing process, cleanup, and relevant physics. It is a three-dimensional, gas-water, coupled fracture propagation-fluid flow simulator, which has the capability to handle commonly present damage mechanisms. The overall goal of this research effort is to validate the model on real data and to investigate the dominant physics in well cleanup for the Cana Field, which produces from the Woodford Shale in Oklahoma. To achieve this goal, first the early time delayed gas production was explained and modeled, and a simulation framework was established that included all three relevant damage mechanisms for a slickwater fractured well. Next, a series of sensitivity analysis of well cleanup to major reservoir, fracture, and operational variables was conducted; five of the Cana wells' initial flowback data were history matched, specifically the first thirty days' gas and water producing rates. Reservoir matrix permeability, net pressure, Young's modulus, and formation pressure gradient were found to have an impact on the gas producing curve's shape, in different ways. Some moderately good matches were achieved, with the outcome of some unknown reservoir information being proposed using the

  1. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  2. [Nasal fractures in adults].

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Sannia; Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Bilde, Anders; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-03-07

    The risk of complications warrants treatment of most dislocated nasal fractures. Other injuries including other facial fractures and septal haematoma must be treated if present at the initial presentation. The usual treatment for a simple nasal fracture is closed reduction in local anaesthesia after five to seven days. Complicated cases require open reduction in general anaesthesia. Later revision of the deviated nose may become necessary in patients suffering from complications such as persistent nasal stenosis and/or deformity.

  3. Pediatric Hand Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nellans, Kate W.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pediatric hand fractures are common childhood injuries. Identification of the fractures in the emergency room setting can be challenging owing to the physes and incomplete ossification of the carpus that are not revealed in the xrays. Most simple fractures can be treated with appropriate immobilization through buddy taping, finger splints, or casting. If correctly diagnosed, reduced and immobilized, these fractures usually result in excellent clinical outcomes. However, fractures may require operative stabilization if they have substantial angulation or rotation, extend into the joint, or cannot be held in a reduced position with splinting alone. Most fractures can be treated operatively with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning if addressed within the first week following the injury. In children, the thick, vascular-rich periosteum and bony remodeling potential make anatomic reductions and internal fixation rarely necessary. Most fractures complete bony healing in 3-4 weeks, with the scaphoid being a notable exception. Following immobilization, children rarely develop hand stiffness and formal occupational therapy is usually not necessary. Despite the high potential for excellent outcomes in pediatric hand fractures, some fractures remain difficult to diagnose and treat. PMID:24209954

  4. [Chondral and osteochondral fractures].

    PubMed

    Kayaoğlu, E Esin; Binnet, Mehmet S

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic chondral and osteochondral fractures and their role in the development of joint degeneration are not fully elucidated. While assessing traumatic knee injuries, one important criterion for the diagnosis of chondral fractures is to remember the possibility of a chondral or osteochondral fracture. Symptoms in osteochondral fractures are more obvious and cause severe pain and difficulty in movement of knee with hemarthrosis. The presence of hemarthrosis facilitates the diagnosis of an osteochondral fracture. Chondral and osteochondral fractures may be associated with other intra-articular pathologies. There are two main mechanisms of these fractures, including a direct effect causing avulsion or impaction and, a more common mechanism, flexion-rotation force to the knee, which is also the mechanism for an acute patellar dislocation. It is known that arthroscopic treatment is the best method for the diagnosis and treatment of chondral and osteochondral fractures. In osteochondral lesions, the aim of treatment is to restore the congruity of articular surfaces. In agreement with literature data, our clinical experience favors internal fixation as the most effective method for the treatment of osteochondral fractures.

  5. Fracture detection logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Benzing, William M.

    1992-06-09

    A method and apparatus by which fractured rock formations are identified and their orientation may be determined includes two orthogonal motion sensors which are used in conjunction with a downhole orbital vibrator. The downhole vibrator includes a device for orienting the sensors. The output of the sensors is displayed as a lissajou figure. The shape of the figure changes when a subsurface fracture is encountered in the borehole. The apparatus and method identifies fractures rock formations and enables the azimuthal orientation of the fractures to be determined.

  6. SEGMENTAL CLAVICLE FRACTURE

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Evander Azevedo

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to present an unusual case of segmental clavicle fracture associated with ipsilateral rib fracture. Although the clavicle is very superficial, undetected cases of both types of fracture may occur, because these patients usually suffer multiple trauma. The case of a patient with a fracture of the diaphysis and lateral extremity of the clavicle is described: the patient was treated surgically and an excellent result was achieved. Similar cases in the literature are reviewed and their management is discussed. PMID:27047835

  7. [(Impending) pathological fracture].

    PubMed

    Sutter, P M; Regazzoni, P

    2002-01-01

    Pathological fractures will be encountered in increasing frequency due to more patients with cancer, surviving a longer period. The skeleton is the third most frequent localization for metastases. Breast cancer is still the most common primary tumor, but bone metastases from lung cancer seem to be diagnosed more and more. Despite of finding metastases most often in the spinal column, fractures are seen mostly at the femoral site. A pathological fracture and, in almost all cases, an impending fracture are absolute indication for operation. An exact definition of an "impending fracture" is still lacking; it is widely accepted, that 50 per cent of bone mass must be destroyed before visualization in X-ray is possible, thus defining an impending fracture. The score system by Mirels estimates the fracture risk by means of four parameters (localization, per cent of destructed bone mass, type of metastasis, pain). Improving quality of life, relieving pain, preferably with a single operation and a short length of stay are the goals of (operative) treatment. For fractures of the proximal femur, prosthetic replacement, for fractures of the subtrochanteric region or the shaft, intramedullary nails are recommended. Postoperative radiation therapy possibly avoids tumor progression. In patient with a good long term prognosis, tumor should be removed locally aggressive.

  8. Mandibular Fractures and Associated Factors at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gadicherla, Srikanth; Sasikumar, Prem; Gill, Satpal Singh; Bhagania, Manish; Kamath, Abhay Taranath; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution, etiology and type of mandibular fractures in subjects referred to our institution. Methods A retrospective study of 689 subjects, during the period from May 2010 to September 2013 with mandibular fractures was conducted. Information on age, gender, mechanism of injury and sites of trauma was obtained from the trauma registry. Data were tabulated and analyzed statistically. Results A total of 653 subjects had mandibular fractures, out of which 574 were males. The mean age of the participants was 31.54 ± 13.07. The majority of the subjects were between 21-40 years of age, in both males (61.7%) and females (54.4%). The major cause of fractures was road traffic accidents (87.4%) followed by fall (6.9%) and assault (4%), with the least frequent being gunshot injuries (0.3%). Almost half of the patients had parasymphysis fractures (50.2%), followed by angle (24.3%), condyle (20.4%), ramus (2.3%) and coronoid (2%). A total of 115 patients had bilateral fractures out of which 29 had parasymphysis, 12 had body fractures and 74 had bilateral condylar fractures. Double mandibular fractures were reported in 193 subjects; out of which 151 subjects had double contralateral and 42 had double unilateral fractures. Triple unilateral fracture was reported in only one subject. A total of 338 subjects had multiple fractures among the study population. Conclusions Mandibular fractures can be complicated and demanding, and have a compelling impact on patients’ quality of life. Our study reported that parasymphysis was the most common region involved in mandible fractures. PMID:28144599

  9. Long term infiltration and tracer transport in fractured rocks: Field observations and model analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guoping; Liu, Hui-Hai; Salve, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    SummaryThis paper presents modeling analyses of long term infiltration and tracer tests in fractured tuffs at Yucca Mountain, NV, USA. The experiments were conducted on a 20 m thick tuff section in a flyover formed by two exploratory tunnels. The infiltration test last for 870 days. Both measured infiltration and seepage show significant temporal and spatial variations. The tracer test used inorganic tracers (I -, Br -, F -) and organic tracers (fluorobenzoic acids) released 559 days after the infiltration test started. Leaching from dry salts from fracture walls was found to have affected tracer breakthroughs. The unsaturated flow was evaluated by optimizing 45 parameter values in a three-dimensional model, which accounts for fracture-matrix interaction and heterogeneous hydraulic properties in a column-based scheme. The field data are valuable asset to evaluate the modeling approaches for fractured rocks and the relative importance of the matrix diffusion process. Results show that matrix diffusion is an important process for transport, and that effective matrix-diffusion coefficients at the field-scale are larger than those at the laboratory-scale for the solutes.

  10. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A

    2016-01-28

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%-30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%-42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes.

  11. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%–30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%–42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes. PMID:26828525

  12. Analysis of zygomatic fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the natural history of zygomatic fractures in 469 cases over 14 years. The medical records of patients seeking treatment for zygomatic fractures were reviewed. The zygomatic fractures were classified as monopod, dipod, or tripod fractures for most patients. The monopod fractures included (1) zygomaticofrontal, (2) zygomaticomaxillary, and (3) zygomatic arch fractures. The dipod fractures were subclassified into 3 types according to combination of the previously mentioned 3 sites, which were 1 and 2, 1 and 3, and 2 and 3. Tripod fracture included all 1, 2, and 3. Among 469 cases of zygomatic fractures, tripod fractures (n = 238, 50.7%), zygomaticomaxillary fracture (n = 121, 25.8%), and isolated fracture of the zygomatic arch (n = 98 20.9%) formed most of the cases (n = 457, 97.4%). About one-half cases were tripod fractures (n = 238, 50.7%), and another half cases were monopod fractures (n = 220, 46.9%). Only 11 cases (2.4%) were dipod fractures. Most of the monopod fractures were zygomaticomaxillary (n = 121, 25.8%) and zygomatic arch fractures (n = 98, 20.9%). Among the dipod fractures, no cases of zygomaticofrontal and zygomatic arch fractures were reported. An open reduction was performed in 73.8% (346 cases), closed reduction in 24.5% (115 cases), and conservative treatment in only 1.7%. In tripod fracture (n = 238), an open reduction and internal fixation was performed for most of the cases (n = 225, 94.5%), and closed reduction was performed in only 11 cases (4.6%). In monopod zygomaticomaxillary fracture (n = 121), internal fixation was performed for most of the cases (n = 108, 89.3%), and closed reduction was performed in only 9 cases (7.7%). However, in monopod fracture of the zygomatic arch (n = 98), most of the cases (n = 95, 96.9%) were treated with closed reduction; open reduction was performed in only 1 case (1.0%). At zygomaticofrontal area (n = 241), internal fixation was performed in most of the cases (n

  13. The Process of Hydraulic Fracturing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydraulic fracturing, know as fracking or hydrofracking, produces fractures in a rock formation by pumping fluids (water, proppant, and chemical additives) at high pressure down a wellbore. These fractures stimulate the flow of natural gas or oil.

  14. Compression fractures of the back

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral compression fractures ... the most common cause of this type of fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become ... the spine, such as multiple myeloma Having many fractures of the vertebrae can lead to kyphosis . This ...

  15. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... training for health care providers. Learn More Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... older. What You Can Do to Prevent Hip Fractures You can prevent hip fractures by taking steps ...

  16. Experimental assessment of the sealing effectiveness of rock fracture grouting

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, A.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effectiveness of cement grouts as sealants of fractures in rock. Laboratory experiments have been conducted on seven 15-cm granite cubes containing saw cuts, three 23-cm diameter andesite cores containing induced tension cracks, and one 15-cm diameter marble core containing a natural fracture. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the fractures is determined under a range of normal stresses, applied in loading and unloading cycles, from 0 to 14 MPa (2000 psi). Grout is injected through an axial borehole, at a pressure of 1.2 to 8.3 MPa (180 to 1200 psi), pressure selected to provide a likely groutable fracture aperture, while the fracture is stressed at a constant normal stress. The fracture permeability is measured after grouting. Flow tests on the ungrouted samples confirm the inverse relation between normal stress and fracture permeability. The equivalent aperture determined by these tests is a reliable indicator of groutability. Postgrouting permeability measurements as performed here, and frequently in practice, can be misleading, since incomplete grouting of fractures can result in major apparent reductions in permeability. The apparent permeability reduction is caused by grouting of a small area of a highly preferential flowpath directly adjacent to the hole used for grouting and for permeability testing. Experimental results confirm claims in the literature that ordinary portland cement inadequately penetrates fine fractures.

  17. Laboratory testing of cement grouting of fractures in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, C.J.; Daemen, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    Fractures in the rock mass surrounding a repository and its shafts, access drifts, emplacement rooms and holes, and exploratory or in-situ testing holes, may provide preferential flowpaths for the flow of groundwater or air, potentially containing radionuclides. Such cracks may have to be sealed. The likelihood that extensive or at least local grouting will be required as part of repository sealing has been noted in numerous publications addressing high level waste repository closing. The objective of this work is to determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing (grouting) in welded tuff. Experimental work includes measurement of intact and fracture permeability under various normal stresses and injection pressures. Grout is injected into the fractures. The effectiveness of grouting is evaluated in terms of grout penetration and permeability reduction, compared prior to and after grouting. Analysis of the results include the effect of normal stress, injection pressure, fracture roughness, grout rheology, grout bonding, and the radial extent of grout penetration. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders with three types of fractures: (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural fractures, and (3) sawcuts. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and of the fractures is measured under a range of normal stresses. The surface topography of the fracture is mapped, and the results are used to determine aperture distributions across the fractures. 72 refs., 76 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. An analytical thermohydraulic model for discretely fractured geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Don B.; Koch, Donald L.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    2016-09-01

    In discretely fractured reservoirs such as those found in Enhanced/Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS), knowledge of the fracture network is important in understanding the thermal hydraulics, i.e., how the fluid flows and the resulting temporal evolution of the subsurface temperature. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model of the fluid flow and heat transport in a discretely fractured network that can be used for a wide range of modeling applications and serve as an alternative analysis tool to more computationally intensive numerical codes. Given the connectivity and structure of a fracture network, the flow in the system was solved using a linear system of algebraic equations for the pressure at the nodes of the network. With the flow determined, the temperature in the fracture was solved by coupling convective heat transport in the fracture with one-dimensional heat conduction perpendicular to the fracture, employing the Green's function derived solution for a single discrete fracture. The predicted temperatures along the fracture surfaces from the analytical solution were compared to numerical simulations using the TOUGH2 reservoir code. Through two case studies, we showed the capabilities of the analytical model and explored the effect of uncertainty in the fracture apertures and network structure on thermal performance. While both sources of uncertainty independently produce large variations in production temperature, uncertainty in the network structure, whenever present, had a predominant influence on thermal performance.

  19. [Fracture arthroplasty of femoral neck fractures].

    PubMed

    Braun, K F; Hanschen, M; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of elderly patients has recently taken place leading to an increase in joint replacement surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight new developments and to present a treatment algorithm for femoral neck fractures. The age limit must be individually determined considering the comorbidities and perioperative risk profile. Pertrochanteric femoral fractures are nearly exclusively treated by osteosynthesis regardless of age. The situation for femoral neck fractures is more complex. Patients younger than 65 years should generally be treated by osteosynthesis but patients older than 65 years benefit from hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. In patients aged between 65 and 75 years with high functional demands and a justifiable perioperative risk, total joint replacement is the treatment of choice. In physically less active patients older than 75 years and poor general condition, preference should be given to hemiarthroplasty.

  20. The feasibility of ranking material fracture toughness by ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess the feasibility of ultrasonically ranking material fracture toughness. Specimens of two grades of maraging steel for which fracture toughness values were measured were subjected to ultrasonic probing. The slope of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency curve was empirically correlated with the plane strain fracture toughness value for each grade of steel.

  1. The feasibility of ranking material fracture toughness by ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess the feasibility of ultrasonically ranking material fracture toughness. Specimens of two grades of maraging steel for which fracture toughness values were measured were subjected to ultrasonic probing. The slope of the attenuation coefficient vs frequency curve was empirically correlated with the plane strain fracture toughness value for each grade of steel.

  2. Avulsion fractures in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Ala-Ketola, L.

    1977-01-01

    34 cases of avulsion fractures are described. Each fracture took place during athletic training or competition. Excepting six sportsmen participating in a general fitness programme, every patient was an active competitive athlete. There were six women and 28 men; their average age was 20.1 years, raised by a few middle-aged "fitness sportsmen". Most avulsion fractures took place in sprinters and hurdlers; next were middle and long distance renner, footballers, fitness joggers, skiers and ice-hockey players. The most usual location of a fracture was the anterior pelvic spines; avulsion fractures were also detected in various parts of lower limbs. There were fewer avulsion fractures in the area of the trunk and upper extremities. Roetgenologically, the diagnosis of an avulsion fracture is generally easy to make. However, the diagnosis is facilitated by knowing the mechanism of the injury, the technique of the athletic event, and some of the training methods. Generally, a fracture heals well, even if it requires both sufficient immobilisation and some delay in resuming physical exertion. PMID:884433

  3. Fracture of glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise are the following: to observe and understand the fracture behavior of a brittle material; and to quantify the effects of various treatments on that material designed to modify its strength. A brief introduction to beam bending, fracture mechanics, influence of surface defects, residual stress, and static fatigue is presented. A test procedure for specimen testing is also presented.

  4. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  5. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  6. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Drugs, Procedures & DevicesProcedures & DevicesYour Health Resources ...

  7. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  8. Colloid Transport and Retention in Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    2001-02-01

    The goal of this project was to identify the chemical and physical factors that control the transport of colloids in fractured materials, and develop a generalized capability to predict colloid attachment and detachment based on hydraulic factors (head, flow rate), physical processes and structure (fracture aperture, matrix porosity), and chemical properties (surface properties of colloids, solution chemistry, and mineralogy of fracture surfaces). Both aqueous chemistry and physical structure of geologic formations influenced transport. Results of studies at all spatial scales reached consensus on the importance of several key controlling variables: (1) colloid retention is dominated by chemical conditions favoring colloid-wall interactions; (2) even in the presence of conditions favorable to colloid collection, deposited colloids are remobilized over long times and this process contributes substantially to the overall extent of transport; (3) diffusive exchange between water-conducting fractures and finer fractures and pores acts to ''buffer'' the effects of the major fracture network structure, and reduces predictive uncertainties. Predictive tools were developed that account for fundamental mechanisms of colloid dynamics in fracture geometry, and linked to larger-scale processes in networks of fractures. The results of our study highlight the key role of physical and hydrologic factors, and processes of colloid remobilization that are potentially of even greater importance to colloid transport in the vadose zone than in saturated conditions. We propose that this work be extended to focus on understanding vadose zone transport processes so that they can eventually be linked to the understanding and tools developed in our previous project on transport in saturated groundwater systems.

  9. Discrete fracture simulations of the hydrogeology at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, J.L.

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue Project site at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia to investigate and simulate radionuclide migration in fractured rocks. Discrete fracture simulations were conducted within a cubic volume (180-m edge length) of fractured Cahill Formation schist oriented with one major axis parallel to the trend of the Koongarra Fault. Five hundred fractures are simulated within this domain. The fractures have a mean orientation parallel to the idealized plane of the Koongarra Fault dipping 55{degrees} SE. Simple flow modeling of this fracture network was conducted by assigning constant head boundaries to upgradient and downgradient vertical faces of the cube, which trend parallel to the fault. No-flow boundaries were assigned to all other faces. The fracture network allows hydraulic communication across the block, in spite of relatively low fracture density across the block.

  10. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED BEDROCK FOR STEAM INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most difficult setting in which to conduct groundwater remediation is that where chlorinated solvents have penetrated fractured bedrock. To demonstrate the potential viability of steam injection as a means of groundwater clean-up in this type of environment, steam will be in...

  12. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. Method of Evaluating Delayed Fracture Susceptibility of Tempered Martensitic Steel Showing Quasi-Cleavage Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yu; Takai, Kenichi

    2017-02-01

    The difference in the hydrogen charging methods, immersion in a NH4SCN aqueous solution, and cathodic electrolysis in a NaOH aqueous solution, did not affect the hydrogen state present in the steel, but it did affect the surface state of the specimens through corrosion, causing fracture strength to fluctuate in tensile testes. As for stress application method, the fracture strength at lower crosshead speeds in tensile tests was consistent with that found for hydrogen precharging prior to stress application in CLTs as long as hydrogen charging was conducted by cathodic electrolysis. However, the fracture strength obtained with concurrent hydrogen charging without precharging prior to stress application in CLTs was higher than that with hydrogen precharging prior to stress application in CLTs regardless of the same hydrogen content. In other words, delayed fracture susceptibility was affected by the order of hydrogen charging and stress application for quasi-cleavage fracture associated with local plastic deformation, i.e., dislocation motion. Therefore, by taking into account the cathodic electrolysis in the NaOH solution, the low crosshead speed and the order of hydrogen charging and stress application, the fracture strength in CLTs, and tensile tests coincided with respect to quasi-cleavage fracture even though the stress application methods were different.

  14. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  15. What does a tensiometer measure in fractured rock?

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Faybishenko, B.

    1998-02-01

    Tensiometers are routinely used in both the laboratory and the field for measuring the capillary pressure in unsaturated porous media. The authors conducted a laboratory experiment on a fractured basalt core. They also examined the performance of a tensiometer in fractured porous media by means of numerical simulation, in which the tensiometer itself and its interaction with the formation were explicitly modeled. They conclude that the gauge pressure is primarily affected by the fracture rock component fracture or matrix that conducts water into or out of the ceramic cup of the tensiometer. Fracture flow is accurately monitored during imbibition events, whereas during drainage, the matrix capillary pressure is registered, leading to a strong hysteretic behavior in the pressure measurements.

  16. [Research conducted at the Stefan S. Nicolau Institute of Virology of Bucharest in the area of nucleic acids and genetic engineering].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A brief review is done of some of the most important studies realised by the "Stefan S. Nicolau" Institute researchers in the field of nucleic acids. It is worth mentioning among these the investigations about interactions between nucleic acids and some biologically active substances, the recombinant DNA, as well as the most recent works on DNA-DNA hybridization in the avidine-biotine system.

  17. Bone imaging and fracture risk assessment in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sophie A; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are more common and are associated with greater morbidity and morality in patients with kidney disease than in members of the general population. Thus, it is troubling that in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients there has been a paradoxical increase in fracture rates over the past 20 years compared to the general population. Increased fracture incidence in CKD patients may be driven in part by the lack of screening for fracture risk. In the general population, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the clinical standard to stratify fracture risk, and its use has contributed to decreases in fracture incidence. In contrast, in CKD, fracture risk screening with DXA has been uncommon due to its unclear efficacy in predicting fracture and its inability to predict type of renal osteodystrophy. Recently, several prospective studies conducted in patients across the spectrum of kidney disease have demonstrated that bone mineral density measured by DXA predicts future fracture risk and that clinically relevant information regarding fracture risk is provided by application of the World Health Organization cutoffs for osteopenia and osteoporosis to DXA measures. Furthermore, novel high-resolution imaging tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have been used to elucidate the effects of kidney disease on cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength and to identify potential targets for strategies that protect against fractures. This review will discuss the updated epidemiology of fractures in CKD, fracture risk screening by DXA, and the utility of state-of-the art imaging methods to uncover the effects of kidney disease on the skeleton.

  18. Patterns of Maxillofacial Fractures in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Padmanidhi; Mehrotra, Divya; Agarwal, Rajul; Kumar, Sumit; Pandey, Rahul

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to obtain dependable epidemiologic data of the variation in cause and characteristics of maxillofacial fractures by identifying, describing, and quantifying trauma. This retrospective study was conducted in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India, over 1 year, based on a systematic computer-assisted database search from March 2015 to March 2016 for maxillofacial fractures. The demographics, etiology, geographic distribution, date of injury, site and number of fractures, and type of intervention were recorded for each. The study population consisted of 1,000 patients with 1,543 fractures. The male:female ratio was 8:1. A peak incidence of fractures was seen in the third decade (mean age: 30.3) with maximum patients younger than 40 years (80.8%). The incidence of fractures was highest in spring (42.9%). Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of trauma (64.4%) and mainly involved two wheelers (60.2%). Single-site fractures were most common. Mostly zygomatic (45.1%) and mandibular fractures (44.4%) were encountered, accounting for approximately 90% of all fractures. The main site of mandibular fractures was the body (34.4%); 46.2% of fractures underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) while 53.8% were treated by closed methods. The study provides important data to contrive future plans for injury prevention. The trend of most traffic-related injuries continues with the increasing traffic on roads. Zygomatic complex and mandibular fractures remain the most frequent. The major populations at risk are young men and those driving two wheelers. The use of helmets could achieve a large reduction in maxillofacial fractures. Awareness for preventive measures and safety guidelines should be propagated and legislation on traffic rules strictly reinforced.

  19. The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Hemond, H.F.; Charles, D.F.; Norton, S.A.

    1993-03-05

    A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

  20. Epidemiology of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Parkkari, J; Sievänen, H; Heinonen, A; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    1996-01-01

    There were an estimated 1.66 million hip fractures world-wide in 1990. According to the epidemiologic projections, this worldwide annual number will rise to 6.26 million by the year 2050. This rise will be in great part due to the huge increase in the elderly population of the world. However, the age-specific incidence rates of hip fractures have also increased during the recent decades and in many countries this rise has not leveled off. In the districts where this increase has either showed or leveled off, the change seems to especially concern women's cervical fractures. In men, the increase has continued unabated almost everywhere. Reasons for the age-specific increase are not known: increase in the age-adjusted incidence of falls of the elderly individuals with accompanying deterioration in the age-adjusted bone quality (strength, mineral density) may partially explain the phenomenon. The growth of the elderly population will be more marked in Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa than in Europe and North America, and it is in the former regions that the greatest increments in hip fracture are projected so that these regions will account for over 70% of the 6.26 million hip fractures in the year 2050. The incidence rates of hip fractures vary considerably from population to population and race to race but increase exponentially with age in every group. Highest incidences have been described in the whites of Northern Europe (Scandinavia) and North America. In Finland, for example, the 1991 incidence of hip fractures was 1.1% for women and 0.7% for men over 70 years of age. Among elderly nursing home residents, the figures can be as high as 6.2% and 4.9%. The lifetime risk of a hip fracture is 16%-18% in white women and 5%-6% in white men. At the age of 80 years, every fifth woman and at the age of 90 years almost every second woman has suffered a hip fracture. Since populations are aging worldwide, the mean age of the hip fracture patients are

  1. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

  2. Denosumab. Limited efficacy in fracture prevention, too many adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    The standard drug for postmenopausal osteoporotic women with a high risk of fracture is alendronic acid, used in conjunction with non-drug measures. There are no drugs with demonstrated efficacy on the risk of fracture in castrated men with prostate cancer. Denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits a cytokine acting mainly on bone cells and lymphocytes, has been authorised in the European Union for use in both these settings. There are no trials comparing denosumab versus alendronic acid for symptomatic fracture prevention. In two trials involving 1189 and 504 women, the incidence of clinical fractures, recorded as simple adverse effects, did not differ significantly between the groups. In a placebo-controlled trial in about 7900 elderly osteoporotic women, denosumab significantly reduced the incidence of symptomatic vertebral fractures (0.8% versus 2.6% after 3 years) and hip fractures (0.7% versus 1.2%). An indirect comparison, providing weak evidence, suggests that denosumab is less effective than alendronic acid. In a placebo-controlled trial in 1468 castrated men with prostate cancer, denosumab did not reduce the incidence of symptomatic fractures after 3 years. Only the incidence of vertebral fractures, detected on routine radiographs, showed a statistically significant decline (1.5% versus 3.5%). Denosumab has numerous adverse effects. In placebo-controlled trials, this monoclonal antibody was associated with a higher incidence of deep-seated infections such as endocarditis, cancer, and skin rash. More data are needed on the risk of pancreatitis, long-term bone disorders (atypical fractures, delayed fracture healing, osteonecrosis of the jaw), hypocalcaemia and cataracts, all of which were reported in clinical trials. In practice, denosumab is not sufficiently effective to outweigh its established and potential risks in postmenopausal osteoporotic women or in castrated men with prostate cancer.

  3. Understanding Hydraulic Fracture Stimulations in Oil-Gas Developments Using Microseismicity (M<0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbancic, T.; Baig, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    effectiveness of different stimulation programs, and define the "effective fracture zone" associated with the stimulation. Knowledge of the effective fracture zone can then be used to estimate the Stimulated Reservoir Area (SRA) or Volume (SRV) associated with the treatment program and enable enhanced calculations of productivity. Using Hudson plots, changes in fracture behaviour from an opening dominated, fracture-extension regime to an ineffective closure-dominant regime, can identify Points of Diminishing Returns (PDR) as temporal points where continued stimulation of the reservoir with the same pumping regime will no longer extend the fracture network. Understanding when a fracture stage reaches a PDR enables engineers to adjust treatment plans to re-initiate fracture extension, achieve better proppant distribution or design future fracture networks to realize higher conductivity. This ability to integrate microseismic analysis with knowledge of the fracture treatment program serves as an invaluable tool for engineers who are trying to design and perform optimal fracture stimulations.

  4. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  5. Tibial fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    Palmu, Sauli A; Auro, Sampo; Lohman, Martina; Paukku, Reijo T; Peltonen, Jari I; Nietosvaara, Yrjänä

    2014-01-01

    Background Tibial fracture is the third most common long-bone fracture in children. Traditionally, most tibial fractures in children have been treated non-operatively, but there are no long-term results. Methods 94 children (64 boys) were treated for a tibial fracture in Aurora City Hospital during the period 1980–89 but 20 could not be included in the study. 58 of the remaining 74 patients returned a written questionnaire and 45 attended a follow-up examination at mean 27 (23–32) years after the fracture. Results 89 children had been treated by manipulation under anesthesia and cast-immobilization, 4 by skeletal traction, and 1 with pin fixation. 41 fractures had been re-manipulated. The mean length of hospital stay was 5 (1–26) days. Primary complications were recorded in 5 children. The childrens’ memories of treatment were positive in two-thirds of cases. The mean subjective VAS score (range 0–10) for function appearance was 9. Leg-length discrepancy (5–10 mm) was found clinically in 10 of 45 subjects and rotational deformities exceeding 20° in 4. None of the subjects walked with a limp. None had axial malalignment exceeding 10°. Osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee was seen in radiographs from 2 subjects. Interpretation The long-term outcome of tibial fractures in children treated non-operatively is generally good. PMID:24786903

  6. Effect of Internal Aperture Variability on Tracer Transport in Large Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Hyman, J.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Aperture variability within individual fractures is usually neglected in modeling flow and transport through fractured media. Typically, individual fractures are assumed to be homogeneous. However, in reality, individual fractures are heterogeneous, which may affect flow and transport in fractured media. The relative importance of including in-fracture variability in flow and transport modeling has been under debate for a long time. Previous studies have shown flow channeling on an individual fracture with internal variability, where the fracture is considered isolated from the rest of the fracture network. Although these studies yield some clear insights into the process, the boundary conditions are impractical for field-scale networks, where the realistic boundary conditions are determined by fracture connections in the network. Therefore, flow in a single fracture is controlled not only by in-fracture variability but also by boundary conditions. In order to address the question of the importance of in-fracture variability, the internal heterogeneity of every individual fracture is incorporated into a three-dimensional fracture network, represented by a composition of intersecting fractures. The new DFN simulation capability, dfnWorks, is used to generate a kilometer scale DFNs similar to the Forsmark, Sweden site. In our DFN model, the in-fracture aperture variability is scattered over each cell of the computational mesh along the fracture, representing by a stationary Gaussian random field with various correlation lengths. The Lagrangian particle tracking is conducted in multiple DFN realizations and the flow-dependent Lagrangian parameters, non-reacting travel time, τ, and cumulative reactivity parameter, β, are obtained along particles streamlines. It is shown that early particle travel times are more sensitive to in-fracture aperture variability than tails of travel time distributions, where no significant effect of the aperture variations and spatial

  7. Development of hydraulic fracture network propagation model in shale gas reservoirs: 2D, single-phase and 3D, multi-phase model development, parametric studies, and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Chong Hyun

    The most effective method for stimulating shale gas reservoirs is a massive hydraulic fracture treatment. Recent analysis using microseismic technology have shown that complex fracture networks are commonly created in the field as a result of the stimulation of shale wells. The interaction between pre-existing natural fractures and the propagating hydraulic fracture is a critical factor affecting the created complex fracture network; however, many existing numerical models simulate only planar hydraulic fractures without considering the pre-existing fractures in the formation. The shale formations already contain a large number of natural fractures, so an accurate fracture propagation model needs to be developed to optimize the fracturing process. In this research, we first characterized the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing and fluid flow in the shale gas reservoir. Then, a 2D, single-phase numerical model and a 3D, 2-phase coupled model were developed, which integrate dynamic fracture propagation, interactions between hydraulic fractures and pre-existing natural fractures, fracture fluid leakoff, and fluid flow in a petroleum reservoir. By using the developed model, we conducted parametric studies to quantify the effects of treatment rate, treatment size, fracture fluid viscosity, differential horizontal stress, natural fracture spacing, fracture toughness, matrix permeability, and proppant size on the geometry of the hydraulic fracture network. The findings elucidate important trends in hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs that are useful in improving the design of treatments for specific reservoir settings.

  8. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  9. Occult fractures of extremities.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Mo; El-Khoury, Georges Y

    2007-05-01

    Recent advances in cross-sectional imaging, particularly in CT and MR imaging, have given these modalities a prominent role in the diagnosis of fractures of the extremities. This article describes the clinical application and imaging features of cross-sectional imaging (CT and MR imaging) in the evaluation of patients who have occult fractures of the extremities. Although CT or MR imaging is not typically required for evaluation of acute fractures, these modalities could be helpful in the evaluation of the occult osseous injuries in which radiographic findings are equivocal or inconclusive.

  10. Haemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    patients with pelvic fractures. Ann Surg 2001;233:843–50. 12. Blackmore CC, Cummings P, Jurkovich GJ , et al. Predicting major hemorrhage in patients...with pelvic fracture. J Trauma 2006;61:346–52. 13. Blackmore CC, Jurkovich GJ , Linnau KF, et al. Assessment of volume of hemorrhage and outcome from...outcome of blunt trauma patients sustaining pelvic fractures. Injury 2000;31:677–82. 55. Haidukewych GJ , Kumar S, Prpa B. Placement of half-pins for

  11. Clinical survey of fractured teeth.

    PubMed

    Gher, M E; Dunlap, R M; Anderson, M H; Kuhl, L V

    1987-02-01

    Through a standardized procedure using clinical examination, interviews, and dental history, this 2-year study documents 100 cases of tooth fracture in 98 patients. For comparison, pertinent information was also recorded for more than 2,000 teeth in a randomly selected sample population. Two chief types of fracture were found: incomplete crown-root fractures and root fractures associated with earlier endodontic therapy.

  12. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  13. Lower limb fractures associated with multiligament knee injury

    PubMed Central

    Stagnaro, Joaquin; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Barla, Jorge; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Knee ligament injuries related to lower limb fractures are common and frequently unnoticed. Management of acute polytrauma is usually focused in the bone lesion and a complete physical examination might be really difficult. The purpose of this study was to analyze a series of patients who suffered multiligament knee injuries associated to a lower limb fracture. Hypothesis: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the initial management can lead to an early diagnosis of ligament injuries. Methods: A retrospective search was conducted from our hospital´s electronic database. We evaluated the initial diagnosis and acute surgical treatment, and management and functional outcomes after the ligament lesion was diagnosed. Results: Seven patients who presented a knee multiligament injury associated with a lower limb fracture were evaluated. The average age was 29 years. Primary diagnoses were: four tibial plateau fractures; one open fracture-dislocation of the knee; one open leg fracture and ipsilateral hip dislocation; and one bifocal femur fracture. Only three patients had an MRI during the initial management of trauma. Six out of seven patients had to be operated on for the multiligament knee injury. The period between the resolution of the fracture and the ligamentous repair was from 3 to 24 months. Conclusion: Poor functional outcomes are reported in patients with multiligament knee injuries associated with high-energy lower limb fractures. We consider an MRI during the initial management can lead to better outcomes. A trauma surgeon working alongside an arthroscopic surgeon might optimize the results for these lesions.

  14. Clogging of fractured formations by biocolloids suspended in reclaimed wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C.; Masciopinto, C.; La Mantia, R.; Manariotis, I. D.

    2009-12-01

    Two pilot-scale fractured filters consisting of horizontal limestone slabs were employed to investigate fracture aperture clogging due to deposition of biocolloids suspended in reclaimed wastewater. To better understand the behavior of real fractured aquifers, the filters intentionally were not “clean”. The fracture apertures were randomly spread with soil deposits and both filters were pre-flooded with reclaimed wastewater to simulate the field conditions of the Nardò fractured aquifer in the Salento area, Italy, where due to artificial groundwater recharge the fractures are not “clean”. One of the filters was injected with secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant collected prior to the chlorination step, and the other with exactly the same effluent, which was further treated in a commercial membrane reactor. Consequently, the organic and pathogen concentrations were considerably higher in the secondary effluent than the membrane reactor effluent. The injected wastewater was continuously recirculated. The pathogen removal by the filter was more significant for the secondary wastewater than the cleaner membrane reactor effluent. A simple mathematical model was developed to describe fracture clogging. The results suggest that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured filters can be significantly reduced from the retention of viable and inactivated biocolloids originating from reclaimed wastewater. Fracture aperture clogging is strongly related to the chemical oxygen demand of the reclaimed wastewater injected. Schematic diagram of the experimental setup.

  15. Veining Failure and Hydraulic Fracturing in Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the hydraulic fracturing, the pressurized fluid creates new fractures and reactivates existing natural fractures forming a highly conductive Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) around the borehole. We extend the previous work on Lyons sandstone and pyrophyllite to anisotropic shale from the Wolfcamp formation. We divide the rock anisotropy into two groups: a) conventional and b) unconventional (shaly) anisotropy. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), compressional velocity anisotropy, and SEM analysis are used to identify three causes of anisotropy: bedding planes, clay lamination, and calcite veins. Calcite vein is a subsequently filled with calcite bonded weakly to the matrix. Velocity anisotropy and visual observations demonstrate the calcite filled veins to be mostly subparallel to the fabric direction. Brazilian tests are carried out to observe the fracture initiation and propagation under tension. High speed photography (frame rate 300,000 frame/sec) was used to capture the failure. Strain gauges and Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors recorded the deformation leading up to and during failure. SEM imaging and surface profilometry were employed to study the post-failure fracture system and failed surface topology. Fracture permeability was measured as a function of effective stress. Brazilian tests on small disks containing a centered single vein revealed the shear strength of the veins. We interpret the strain data and number, frequency, and amplitude of AE events which are correlated well with the observed fracture process zone, surface roughness, and permeability. The unpropped fracture has enhanced permeability by two orders of magnitude. The observed anisotropic tensile failure seems to have a universal trend with a minimum strength occurring at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis. The veins at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis were easily activated at 30% of the original failure load. The measured strength of the vein is as low as 6

  16. SIZE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN FRACTURE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas H. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The research conducted under DOE grant DE-FG26-98FT40385 provides a detailed assessment of size scaling issues in natural fracture and active fault networks that extend over scales from several tens of kilometers to less than a tenth of a meter. This study incorporates analysis of data obtained from several sources, including: natural fracture patterns photographed in the Appalachian field area, natural fracture patterns presented by other workers in the published literature, patterns of active faulting in Japan mapping at a scale of 1:100,000, and lineament patterns interpreted from satellite-based radar imagery obtained over the Appalachian field area. The complexity of these patterns is always found to vary with scale. In general,but not always, patterns become less complex with scale. This tendency may reverse as can be inferred from the complexity of high-resolution radar images (8 meter pixel size) which are characterized by patterns that are less complex than those observed over smaller areas on the ground surface. Model studies reveal that changes in the complexity of a fracture pattern can be associated with dominant spacings between the fractures comprising the pattern or roughly to the rock areas bounded by fractures of a certain scale. While the results do not offer a magic number (the fractal dimension) to characterize fracture networks at all scales, the modeling and analysis provide results that can be interpreted directly in terms of the physical properties of the natural fracture or active fault complex. These breaks roughly define the size of fracture bounded regions at different scales. The larger more extensive sets of fractures will intersect and enclose regions of a certain size, whereas smaller less extensive sets will do the same--i.e. subdivide the rock into even smaller regions. The interpretation varies depending on the number of sets that are present, but the scale breaks in the logN/logr plots serve as a guide to interpreting the

  17. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Doug; Leggett, Jim

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  18. Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

    MedlinePlus

    ... risks and benefits of surgery for your clavicle fracture. There are risks associated with any surgery, including: • Infection • Bleeding • Pain • Blood clots in your leg • Damage to ...

  19. Calcaneal stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jason M; Vidt, Louis G; Gehl, Richard S; Montgomery, Travis

    2005-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When historic or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In some cases they can continue to go unrecognized because the symptoms of calcaneal stress fractures sometimes improves with treatments aimed at plantar fasciitis. Calcaneal stress fractures can occur in any population of adults and even children and are common among active people, such as athletes, sports enthusiasts, and military personnel. It is likely that the number of diagnosed calcaneal stress fractures will rise among practitioners with an increased recognition of their possibility.

  20. Vertebral Compression Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... OI: Information on Vertebral Compression Fractures 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981- ... osteogenesis imperfecta contact : Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation 804 W. Diamond Avenue, Suite 210, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 Tel: 800- ...

  1. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  2. Fracturing high-permeability reservoirs increases productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dusterhoft, R.G. ); Chapman, B.J. )

    1994-06-20

    Hydraulic fracturing of high-permeability reservoirs has increased long-term hydrocarbon production and reduced sand production in many areas of the world. A key element is the reduction of near well bore drawdown during production. Drawdown, the difference between reservoir and production pressures, is the driving force for flow into the well bore. As drawdown increases because of higher production rates or depletion, formation instability may cause fines and sand to migrate into the well bore region. A greater well bore radius reduces both radial velocity and drawdown. Fracturing beyond the well bore region effectively bypasses the damaged zone, increasing the effective radius of the well bore and enabling higher flow rates with lower drawdown pressures. In essence, the reservoir energy is used more efficiently because the conductive proppant bed bypasses the near well bore restrictions. The paper discusses candidate well selection; proppant selection; sand control; minifrac procedures; spurt losses; fracture design; equipment; case histories in West Africa and offshore Louisiana.

  3. New proppant for deep hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Underdown, D.R.; Das, K.

    1982-01-01

    Much work has been done in the development and evaluation of various materials for use as proppants for hydraulic fracturing. Sand is most often used as a frac proppant in shallow wells. Deep wells having high closure stresses require a proppant such as sintered bauxite which will not crush under such adverse conditions. Proppants such as ceramic and zirconium oxide beads and resin coated sand have been developed for deep hydraulic fracturing; however, use of these materials has been limited. A new frac proppant has been developed which exhibits the properties necessary for use in deep hydraulic fracturing. This frac proppant is produced by precuring a specially modified phenol-formaldehyde resin onto sand. The new frac proppant maintains conductivity and resists crushing, similar to that of sintered bauxite at high closure stress. 11 references.

  4. Thermodynamic transient behavior of a geothermal fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Ascencio, F.; Samaniego, F.; Cinco-Ley, H.; Rivera, J.

    1995-01-26

    This paper presents a space integrated zero dimensional model that describes the thermodynamic behavior of a geothermal fracture undergoing exploitation. The main assumptions involved are: fluid and energy entering the fracture come from the surrounding matrix, fracture of infinite conductivity, and that the steam and water phases are gravitationally segregated and in thermodynamic equilibrium. The nonlinear equations of mass and energy conservation are numerically solved. A sensitivity analysis on the main parameters that affect this problem was carried out. Water recharge is described by a linear infinite aquifer, and heat flow from the matrix to the fluid was also considered by means of a linear infinite system. The behavior of the system is clearly described for conditions of exploitation in the steam, in the water, or mixed completion in both steam and water zones.

  5. Microbial processes in fractured rock environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinner, Nancy E.; Eighmy, T. Taylor; Mills, M.; Coulburn, J.; Tisa, L.

    Little is known about the types and activities of microbes in fractured rock environments, but recent studies in a variety of bedrock formations have documented the presence of a diverse array of prokaryotes (Eubacteria and Archaea) and some protists. The prokaryotes appear to live in both diffusion-dominated microfractures and larger, more conductive open fractures. Some of the prokaryotes are associated with the surfaces of the host rock and mineral precipitates, while other planktonic forms are floating/moving in the groundwater filling the fractures. Studies indicate that the surface-associated and planktonic communities are distinct, and their importance in microbially mediated processes occurring in the bedrock environment may vary, depending on the availability of electron donors/acceptors and nutrients needed by the cells. In general, abundances of microbes are low compared with other environments, because of the paucity of these substances that are transported into the deeper subsurface where most bedrock occurs, unless there is significant pollution with an electron donor. To obtain a complete picture of the microbes present and their metabolic activity, it is usually necessary to sample formation water from specific fractures (versus open boreholes), and fracture surfaces (i.e., cores). Transport of the microbes through the major fracture pathways can be rapid, but may be quite limited in the microfractures. Very low abundances of small ( 2-3 μm) flagellated protists, which appear to prey upon planktonic bacteria, have been found in a bedrock aquifer. Much more research is needed to expand the understanding of all microbial processes in fractured rock environments.

  6. Monitoring hydraulic fracturing with seismic emission volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Tang, Y.; Chen, H.; TAO, K.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have made it possible to access the reservoirs that are not available for massive production in the past. Hydraulic fracturing is designed to enhance rock permeability and reservoir drainage through the creation of fracture networks. Microseismic monitoring has been proven to be an effective and valuable technology to image hydraulic fracture geometry. Based on data acquisition, seismic monitoring techniques have been divided into two categories: downhole and surface monitoring. Surface monitoring is challenging because of the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio of the raw data. We applied the techniques used in earthquake seismology and developed an integrated monitoring system for mapping hydraulic fractures. The system consists of 20 to 30 state-of-the-art broadband seismographs, which are generally about hundreds times more sensible than regular geophones. We have conducted two experiments in two basins with very different geology and formation mechanism in China. In each case, we observed clear microseismic events, which may correspond to the induced seismicity directly associated with fracturing and the triggered ones at pre-existing faults. However, the magnitude of these events is generally larger than magnitude -1, approximately one to two magnitudes larger than those detected by downhole instruments. Spectrum-frequency analysis of the continuous surface recordings indicated high seismic energy associated with injection stages. The seismic energy can be back-projected to a volume that surrounds each injection stage. Imaging seismic emission volume (SEV) appears to be an effective way to map the stimulated reservior volume, as well as natural fractures.

  7. Laboratory Scale Hydraulic Fracture and Proppant Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, M. D.; Rao, R. R.; Bolintineanu, D.; Lechman, J. B.; Bauer, S. J.; Quintana, E.

    2015-12-01

    A series of fracture and proppant injection tests have been conducted on Marcellus shale from an outcrop in Pennsylvania at the laboratory scale. The shale outcrop was recently exposed by new construction and shows little sign of weathering. Specimens 3 inches in diameter and nominally 6 inches long were cored (parallel to bedding) from blocks taken from the outcrop. A 3 inch hole was then cored down the center of the specimen and "cased" with 0.25 inch high pressure tubing, leaving 0.75 inches of space at the bottom of the borehole uncased. Specimens were then loaded under in an axisymmetric extension stress state and hydraulically fractured in order to generate the appropriate fracture orientation to represent the opening of a fracture in a typical long horizontal well, where fractures are "disks on a string." After fracture with water, while still under stress, a guar/proppant mixture was injected into the specimen to investigate the distribution of proppant in the fracture. Silicon carbide particles were used as proppant to assist in proppant visualization in microCT scans performed after the test was completed. Corresponding numerical analyses (using the finite element method) of the flow path and particle transport are underway, coupled with idealized flow experiments to validate the codes being used to model the particle transport. Some of the meshes being used were developed directly from CT scans. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-6111 A.

  8. Modelling of Specimen Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-23

    improve and test the software for larger dynamic problems. The following future work is recommended. 1) Multiple LS - DYNA files – for large problems...continuation of a previous study involving the implementation of a micromechanical fracture model into the LS - DYNA user-defined subroutines. Two fracture...these parameters involved parsing the output data of the selected FE code, LS - DYNA , including element stresses, strain energies, and nodal coordinates

  9. Fracture and Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    fracture. The main additional categories of crack growth are elastic-plastic crack growth, fatigue crack growth, and crack growth as affected by...FRACTURE AND FATIGUE R. 0. RITCHIE W. W. GERBERICH J. H. UNDERWOOD DTIC AM ELECTE JUL 1 11988 APRIL 1988 FH US ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND...other authorized documents. N The use of trade name(s) and/or manufacturer (s) does not constitute an official indorsement or approval. DESTRUCTION NOTICE

  10. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  11. Interlaminar fracture of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has been found to be a useful tool for understanding composite delamination. Analyses for calculating strain energy release rates associated with delamination growth have been developed. These analyses successfully characterized delamination onset and growth for particular sources of delamination. Low velocity impact has been found to be the most severe source of composite delamination. A variety of test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness are being developed to identify new composite materials with enhanced delamination resistance.

  12. A 3D POM-MOF composite based on Ni(ΙΙ) ion and 2,2‧-bipyridyl-3,3‧-dicarboxylic acid: Crystal structure and proton conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Meilin; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Sun, Jingjing; Duan, Xianying

    2013-06-01

    We have succeeded in constructing a 3D POM-MOF, {H[Ni(Hbpdc)(H2O)2]2[PW12O40]·8H2O}n (H2bpdc=2,2'-bipyridyl-3,3'-dicarboxylic acid), by the controllable self-assembly of H2bpdc, Keggin-anions and Ni2+ ions based on the electrostatic and coordination interactions. Interestingly, Hbpdc- as polydentate organic ligands and Keggin-anion as polydentate inorganic ligands are covalently linked transition-metal nickel at the same time. The title complex represents a new example of introducing the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid frameworks into POMs chemistry. Based on Keggin-anions being immobilized as part of the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework, the title complex realizes four approaches in the 1D hydrophilic channel used to engender proton conductivity in MOFs. Its water adsorption isotherm at room temperature and pressure shows that the water content in it was 31 cm3 g-1 at the maximum allowable humidity, corresponding to 3.7 water molecules per unit formula. It exhibits good proton conductivities (10-4-10-3 S cm-1) at 100 °C in the relative humidity range 35-98%. The corresponding activation energy (Ea) of conductivity was estimated to be 1.01 eV.

  13. Hyponatremia and Fractures: Findings from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Sophie A; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Harrison, Stephanie Litwack; Bucur, Roxana C; Ensrud, Kristine; Orwoll, Eric S; Bauer, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia may be a risk factor for fracture. To determine the relationship between hyponatremia and fracture we conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses using data from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS). The MrOS study enrolled 5122 community dwelling men aged ≥ 65 years from six centers across the United States. We excluded men taking bisphosphonates, those with unknown medication history, those without serum sodium measures, or those with out of range assays for serum sodium. Serum sodium was measured at study entry. Subjects were followed for fractures (nonspine (including hip), hip, and incident and prevalent morphometric) for up to 9 years. We used cox proportional hazards models to analyze the association between serum sodium levels (<135mmol/L versus ≥135mmol/L) and risk of nonspine and hip fractures, with results presented as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We examined the association between morphometric vertebral fractures and serum sodium using logistic regression models, presented as odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI. Hyponatremia was observed in 64 men (1.2% of the cohort). After adjusting for age, BMI, study center, and other covariates, we found that, compared to men with serum sodium ≥ 135mmol/L, those with serum sodium <135mmol/L, had an increased risk hip fracture (HR=3.04; 95% CI: 1.37 to 6.75), prevalent (OR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.22 to 4.95) and incident (OR=3.53; 95% CI: 1.35 to 9.19) morphometric spine fractures but not nonspine fractures (OR=1.44; 95% CI: 0.85 to 2.44). Adjusting for bone mineral density did not change our findings. Our data demonstrate that hyponatremia is associated with up to a doubling in the risk of hip and morphometric spine fractures, independent of BMD. Further studies, to determine how hyponatremia causes fractures and if correction of hyponatremia decreases fractures, are needed. PMID:25294595

  14. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Guk; Shin, Dong-Eun

    2015-01-01

    The most common fractures of the spine are associated with the thoracolumbar junction. The goals of treatment of thoracolumbar fracture are leading to early mobilization and rehabilitation by restoring mechanical stability of fracture and inducing neurologic recovery, thereby enabling patients to return to the workplace. However, it is still debatable about the treatment methods. Neurologic injury should be identified by thorough physical examination for motor and sensory nerve system in order to determine the appropriate treatment. The mechanical stability of fracture also should be evaluated by plain radiographs and computed tomography. In some cases, magnetic resonance imaging is required to evaluate soft tissue injury involving neurologic structure or posterior ligament complex. Based on these physical examinations and imaging studies, fracture stability is evaluated and it is determined whether to use the conservative or operative treatment. The development of instruments have led to more interests on the operative treatment which saves mobile segments without fusion and on instrumentation through minimal invasive approach in recent years. It is still controversial for the use of these treatments because there have not been verified evidences yet. However, the morbidity of patients can be decreased and good clinical and radiologic outcomes can be achieved if the recent operative treatments are used carefully considering the fracture pattern and the injury severity. PMID:25705347

  15. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  16. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  17. Prevention of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Meunier, P J

    1993-11-30

    For a 50-year old Caucasian woman today, the risk of a hip fracture over her remaining life-time is about 17%. Tomorrow the situation will clearly be worse because the continuous increase in life expectancy will cause a three-fold increase in worldwide fracture incidence over the next 60 years. Through diagnostic bone mass measurements at the hip and assessment of biochemical parameters, a great deal has been learned in recent years about reduction of hip fracture risk. Preventive strategies are based on prevention of falls, use of hip protectors, and prevention of bone fragility. The latter includes the optimization of peak bone mass during childhood, postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and also late prevention consisting in reversing senile secondary hyperparathyroidism, which plays an important role in the decrease of skeletal strength. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, which results from both vitamin D insufficiency and low calcium intake, is preventable with vitamin D3 and calcium supplements. They have recently been shown capable of providing effective prevention of hip fractures in elderly women living in nursing homes, with a reduction of about 25% in the number of hip fractures noted in a 3-year controlled study in 3,270 women (intention-to-treat analysis). In conclusion, it is never too early to reduce the risk of osteoporosis and never too late to prevent hip fractures.

  18. FRACTURE-RESISTANT MONOLITHIC DENTAL CROWNS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Methods Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Results Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. Significance The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. PMID:26792623

  19. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  20. Hydrologic mechanisms governing fluid flow in partially saturated, fractured, porous tuff at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1984-10-01

    In contrast to the saturated zone where fluid moves rapidly along fractures, the fractures (with apertures large relative to the size of matrix pores) will desaturate first during drainage process and the bulk of fluid flow would be through interconnected pores in the matrix. Within a partially drained fracture, the presence of a relatively continuous air phase will produce practically an infinite resistance to liquid flow in the direction parallel to the fracture. The residual liquid will be held by capillary force in regions around fracture contact areas where the apertures are small. Normal to the fracture surfaces, the drained portion of the fractures will reduce the effective area for liquid flow from one matrix block to another matrix block. A general statistical theory is constructed for flow along the fracture and for flow between the matrix blocks to the fractures under partially saturated conditions. Results are obtained from an aperture distribution model for fracture saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and effective matrix-fracture flow areas as functions of pressure. Drainage from a fractured tuff column is simulated. The parameters for the simulations are deduced from fracture surface characteristics, spacings and orientations based on core analyses, and from matrix characteristics curve based on laboratory measurements. From the cases simulated for the fractured, porous column with discrete vertical and horizontal fractures and porous matrix blocks explicitly taken into account, it is observed that the highly transient changes from fully saturated conditions to partially saturated conditions are extremely sensitive to the fracture properties. However, the quasi-steady changes of the fluid flow of a partially saturated, fractured, porous system could be approximately simulated without taking the fractures into account. 22 references, 16 figures.

  1. Workflow Integrating Fracture Permeability Characterization and Multiphase Flow Modeling for CO2 Storage and Risk Assessments in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.; Pashin, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring safe and permanent storage of sequestered CO2in naturally fractured geological media is vital for the success of geologic storage projects. Critical needs exist to develop advanced techniques to characterize and model fluid transport in naturally fractured reservoirs and seals. We have developed a scale-independent 3-D stochastic fracture permeability characterization workflow that employs multiple discrete fracture network (DFN) realizations. The workflow deploys a multidirectional flux-based upwind weighting scheme that is capable of modeling multiphase flow in highly heterogeneous fractured media. The techniques employed herein show great promise for increasing the accuracy of capacity determinations and the prediction of pressure footprints associated with injected CO2 plumes. The proposed workflow has been conducted in a simulation study of flow transport and risk assessment of CO2 injection into a deep fractured saline formation using geological parameters from Knox Group carbonate and Red Mountain shale rocks in central Alabama. A 3-D fracture permeability map was generated from multiple realizations of DFN models. A multiphase flow model composed of supercritical CO2 and saline water was applied to simulate CO2 plume evolution during and after injection. Injection simulation reveals significant permeability anisotropy that favors development of northeast-elongate CO2 plumes. The spreading front of the CO2 plume shows strong viscous fingering effects. Post-injection simulation indicates significant lateral spreading of CO2 near the top of the fractured formations because of the buoyancy of injectate in rock matrix and strata-bound vertical fractures. Risk assessment shows that although pressure drops faster in the fractured formations than in those lacking fractures, lateral movement of CO2 along natural fractures necessitates that the injectate be confined by widespread seals with high integrity.

  2. Importance of greenstick lamina fractures in low lumbar burst fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ersozlu, S.; Aydinli, U.

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar burst fractures (L3–L5) represent a small percentage of all spinal fractures. The treatment of fractures involving the lumbar spine has been controversial. Lamina fractures may be complete or of the greenstick type. Dural tears and nerve root entrapment may accompany these lamina fractures. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of dural tear in patients who had lumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures and the importance of these lamina fractures when choosing the optimum treatment. Twenty-six patients with 28 lumbar burst fractures were treated from 1995 through 2002. The average follow-up was 60 months (range 32–110 months). The male to female ratio was 21:5 and the mean age was 37 years (17–64). Dural tear was detected in seven (25%) out of 28 burst fractures. The functional outcome of the entire study group was assessed using the Smiley-Webster Scale. Good to excellent results were obtained in 24 (92%) of 26 patients. Lumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures occur mostly in the L2–L4 area. In the surgical treatment, any reduction manoeuvre will close the fracture and crush the entrapped neural elements. Therefore, it may be better to explore the greenstick lamina fracture whether there is any neural entrapment or not, before any reduction manoeuvre is attempted. PMID:16501977

  3. Appropriate Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Lullo, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Many years ago when the author assumed the role of assistant principal for school climate, discipline, and attendance, he inherited many school policies and guidelines that were outdated, unfair, and without merit in the current school climate. Because the school conduct code had not been revised since the school opened in 1960, many of the…

  4. Electrochemical degradation of Acid Blue and Basic Brown dyes on Pb/PbO2 electrode in the presence of different conductive electrolyte and effect of various operating factors.

    PubMed

    Awad, H S; Galwa, N Abo

    2005-12-01

    Electrocatalytic degradation of Acid Blue and Basic Brown dyes from simulated wastewater on lead dioxide anode was investigated in different conductive electrolytes. It was shown that complete degradation of these dyes is dependent primarily on type and concentration of the conductive electrolyte. The highest electrocatalytic activity was achieved in the presence of NaCl (2g/l) and could be attributed to indirect oxidation of the investigated dyes by the electrogenerated hypochlorite ions formed from the chloride oxidation. In addition, contribution from direct oxidation could also be possible via reaction of these organic compounds with the electrogenerated hydroxyl radicals adsorbed on the lead dioxide surface. In the presence of NaOH, the electrocatalytic activity of the employed anode was not comparable to that in NaCl due primarily to the absence of chloride. This indicates that dyes degradation in NaOH occurs exclusively via direct electrochemical process. However, in H2SO4, the electrode performance was poor due partially to the absence of chloride from the conductive solution. The possibility of electrode poisoning as a result of growth of adherent film on the anode surface or production of stable intermediates not easily further oxidized by direct electrolysis in H2SO4 might also be accountable for the poor performance observed in this conductive electrolyte. Optimizing the conditions that ensure effective electrochemical degradation of Acid Blue and Basic Brown dyes on lead dioxide electrode necessitates the control of all the operating factors.

  5. Introduction to the GRI/DOE Field Fracturing Multi-Site Project

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.E.; Middlebrook, M.L.; Warpinski, N.R.; Cleary, M.P.; Branagan, P.T.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project is to conduct field experiments and analyze data that will result in definitive determinations of hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments will be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment, as well as surface facilities and equipment that are conducive to acquiring high-quality data. It is anticipated that the primary benefit of the project experiments will be the development and widespread commercialization of new fracture diagnostics technologies to determine fracture length, height, width and azimuth. Data resulting from these new technologies can then be used to prove and refine the 3D fracture model mechanisms. It is also anticipated that data collected and analyzed in the project will define the correct techniques for determining fracture closure pressure. The overall impact of the research will be to provide a foundation for a fracture diagnostic service industry and hydraulic fracture optimization based on measured fracture response.

  6. Deuterium isotope effects on the ionization constant of acetic acid in H2O and D2O by AC conductance from 368 to 548 K at 20 MPa.

    PubMed

    Erickson, K M; Arcis, H; Raffa, D; Zimmerman, G H; Tremaine, P R

    2011-03-31

    Values of the ionization constant of acetic acid in H(2)O and D(2)O (K(HAc) and K(DAc)) and the deuterium isotope effect, ΔpK = pK(DAc) - pK(HAc), have been determined from T = 368 K to T = 548 K at p = 20 MPa, using a flow-through ac conductance cell built at the University of Delaware. Measurements were made on dilute (ionic strength ∼ 10(-4) mol·kg(-1)) solutions of acetic acid, sodium acetate, hydrochloric acid, and sodium chloride in H(2)O and D(2)O, injected in sequence at each temperature and pressure, so that systematic errors in the measured conductance of each solution would cancel. Experimental values for the molar conductivity, Λ, of the strong electrolytes were used to calculate the molar conductivity at infinite dilution, Λ°, using the Fuoss-Hsia-Fernández-Prini (FHFP) equation. These were used to calculate the molar conductivity at infinite dilution for acetic acid which was in turn used to calculate the degree of dissociation and finally the ionization constants of acetic acid. This same procedure was done for the pertinent deuterated solutes in D(2)O. Measured values of log K(HAc), log K(DAc), and ΔpK were obtained to a precision of ±0.008. The present results are in agreement with the only other accurate study at high temperatures and pressures (Mesmer, R. E.; Herting, D. L. J. Solution Chem.1978, 7, 901-913). The deuterium isotope effects, ΔpK, become independent of temperature above ∼420 K, at a value approximately 0.1 unit lower than that at 298 K. These values are ΔpK = 0.43 ± 0.01 and ΔpK = 0.51 ± 0.01, respectively. The temperature dependence of the Walden product ratio, (λ°η)(D(2)O)/(λ°η)(H(2)O), indicates a change in the relative hydration behavior of ions, whereby the effective Stokes radii of the sodium, chloride, and acetate ions in D(2)O relative to H(2)O reverse above ∼423 K. The results also suggest that the greater efficiency of the well-established proton-hopping transport mechanisms for OH(-) and H(3)O

  7. Calculation Method and Distribution Characteristics of Fracture Hydraulic Aperture from Field Experiments in Fractured Granite Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yang-Bing; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yan, E.-Chuan; Chen, Gang; Lü, Fei-fei; Ji, Hui-bin; Song, Kuang-Yin

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the fracture hydraulic aperture and its relation to the mechanical aperture and normal stress is urgently needed in engineering construction and analytical research at the engineering field scale. A new method based on the in situ borehole camera measurement and borehole water-pressure test is proposed for the calculation of the fracture hydraulic aperture. This method comprises six steps. The first step is to obtain the equivalent hydraulic conductivity of the test section from borehole water-pressure tests. The second step is a tentative calculation to obtain the qualitative relation between the reduction coefficient and the mechanical aperture obtained from borehole camera measurements. The third step is to choose the preliminary reduction coefficient for obtaining the initial hydraulic aperture. The remaining three steps are to optimize, using the genetic algorithm, the hydraulic apertures of fractures with high uncertainty. The method is then applied to a fractured granite engineering area whose purpose is the construction of an underground water-sealed storage cavern for liquefied petroleum gas. The probability distribution characteristics of the hydraulic aperture, the relationship between the hydraulic aperture and the mechanical aperture, the hydraulic aperture and the normal stress, and the differences between altered fractures and fresh fractures are all analyzed. Based on the effects of the engineering applications, the method is proved to be feasible and reliable. More importantly, the results of the hydraulic aperture obtained in this paper are different from those results elicited from laboratory tests, and the reasons are discussed in the paper.

  8. Endodontic-orthodontic management of fractured anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Delivanis, P; Delivanis, H; Kuftinec, M M

    1978-09-01

    A case history is presented of a 10-year-old patient, who accidentally injured her maxillary central incisor. The fracture of the crown extended 2 mm below the crest of the alveolar bone. After a pulpotomy was done as a temporary measure, orthodontic appliances were placed by bonding brackets on the maxillary anterior teeth and fitting a sectional arch wire to extrude the fractured tooth. After successful extrusion, the fracture line was brought above the level of alveolar bone where successful restoration of the tooth by the acid-etch method could be accomplished.

  9. Geophysical characterization of fractured bedrock at Site 8, former Pease Air Force Base, Newington, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, Thomas J.; Degnan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Borehole-geophysical logs collected from eight wells and direct-current resistivity data from three survey lines were analyzed to characterize the fractured bedrock and identify transmissive fractures beneath the former Pease Air Force Base, Newington, N.H. The following logs were used: caliper, fluid temperature and conductivity, natural gamma radiation, electromagnetic conductivity, optical and acoustic televiewer, and heat-pulse flowmeter. The logs indicate several foliation and fracture trends in the bedrock. Two fracture-correlated lineaments trending 28? and 29?, identified with low-altitude aerial photography, are coincident with the dominant structural trend. The eight boreholes logged at Site 8 generally have few fractures and have yields ranging from 0 to 40 gallons per minute. The fractures that probably resulted in high well yields (20?40 gallons per minute) strike northeast-southwest or by the right hand rule, have an orientation of 215?, 47?, and 51?. Two-dimensional direct-current resistivity methods were used to collect detailed subsurface information about the overburden, bedrock-fracture zone depths, and apparent-dip directions. Analysis of data inversions from data collected with dipole-dipole and Schlumberger arrays indicated electrically conductive zones in the bedrock that are probably caused by fractured rock. These zones are coincident with extensions of fracture-correlated lineaments. The fracture-correlated lineaments and geophysical-survey results indicate a possible northeast-southwest anisotropy to the fractured rock.

  10. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture.

  11. Water infiltration and intermittent flow in rough-walled fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace

    1995-05-01

    Flow visualization experiments were conducted in transparent replicas of natural rough-walled fractures. The fracture was inclined to observe the interplay between capillary and gravity forces. Water was introduced into the fracture by a capillary siphon. Preferential flow paths were observed, where intermittent flow frequently occurred. The water infiltration experiments suggest that intermittent flow in fractures appears to be the rule rather than the exception. In order to investigate the mechanism causing intermittent flow in fractures, parallel plates with different apertures were assembled using lucite and glass. A medium-coarse-fine pore structure is believed to cause the intermittency in flow. Intermittent flow was successfully produced in the parallel plate experiments using the lucite plates. After several trials, intermittent flow was also produced in the glass plates.

  12. Geothermal energy enhancement by thermal fracture. [REX (Rock Energy Extraction)

    SciTech Connect

    Demuth, R.B.; Harlow, F.H.

    1980-12-01

    A large, vertical, circular fracture created deep within hot rock is connected to the surface through two holes. The inlet provides a source of cold water and the outlet extracts heated water. Cooling of the rock produces thermal stresses that fracture the rock adjacent to the primary crack, thereby enhancing the heat extraction rate by means of convective transport. The properties of the thermal fracture network vary with position and time. The REX code for high-speed computer was written and used to study the coupled processes of primary-crack flow and lateral thermal fracture heat transport. Calculations for elapsed times of 100 y show that thermal fracture enhancement can double the heat extraction rate over the results from conduction alone. Long-term enhancement predictions depend on data from rock-mechanics studies, which the REX code is prepared to accept as they become available.

  13. The Boxer's Fracture: Splint Immobilization Is Not Necessary.

    PubMed

    Dunn, John C; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Orr, Justin D; Pallis, Mark; Mitchell, Justin S

    2016-05-01

    Fractures of the fifth metacarpal neck, or boxer's fractures, are common, particularly among young men. Because of the high frequency of this injury, there is a considerable range of treatment options. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether reduction and splint or cast immobilization is necessary for fractures of the fifth metacarpal neck. The authors conducted a systematic review of all published studies that randomized these fractures to cast immobilization vs treatment with soft wrap without reduction. Cast immobilization is not superior to soft wrap without reduction in most cases. The study found that reduction and cast immobilization is not necessary for boxer's fractures. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):188-192.].

  14. Effect of isolated fractures on accelerated flow in unsaturated porous rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Nimmo, J.R.; Dragila, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Fractures that begin and end in the unsaturated zone, or isolated fractures, have been ignored in previous studies because they were generally assumed to behave as capillary barriers and remain nonconductive. We conducted a series of experiments using Berea sandstone samples to examine the physical mechanisms controlling flow in a rock containing a single isolated fracture. The input fluxes and fracture orientation were varied in these experiments. Visualization experiments using dyed water in a thin vertical slab of rock were conducted to identify flow mechanisms occurring due to the presence of the isolated fracture. Two mechanisms occurred: (1) localized flow through the rock matrix in the vicinity of the isolated fracture and (2) pooling of water at the bottom of the fracture, indicating the occurrence of film flow along the isolated fracture wall. These mechanisms were observed at fracture angles of 20 and 60 degrees from the horizontal, but not at 90 degrees. Pooling along the bottom of the fracture was observed over a wider range of input fluxes for low-angled isolated fractures compared to high-angled ones. Measurements of matrix water pressures in the samples with the 20 and 60 degree fractures also demonstrated that preferential flow occurred through the matrix in the fracture vicinity, where higher pressures occurred in the regions where faster flow was observed in the visualization experiments. The pooling length at the terminus of a 20 degree isolated fracture was measured as a function of input flux. Calculations of the film flow rate along the fracture were made using these measurements and indicated that up to 22% of the flow occurred as film flow. These experiments, apparently the first to consider isolated fractures, demonstrate that such features can accelerate flow through the unsaturated zone and should be considered when developing conceptual models.

  15. Radionuclide Transport in Fracture-Granite Interface Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Mori, A

    2007-09-12

    In situ radionuclide migration experiments, followed by excavation and sample characterization, were conducted in a water-conducting shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland to study diffusion paths of radionuclides in fractured granite. In this work, we employed a micro-scale mapping technique that interfaces laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA/ICP-MS) to measure the fine-scale (micron-range) distribution of actinides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np) in the fracture-granite interface zones. Long-lived {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np were detected in flow channels, as well as in the adjacent rock matrix, using the sensitive, feature-based mapping of the LA/ICP-MS technique. The injected sorbing actinides are mainly located within the advective flowing fractures and the immediately adjacent regions. The water-conducting fracture studied in this work is bounded on one side by mylonite and the other by granitic matrix regions. These actinides did not penetrate into the mylonite side as much as the relatively higher-porosity granite matrix, most likely due to the low porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and diffusivity of the fracture wall (a thickness of about 0.4 mm separates the mylonite region from the fracture) and the mylonite region itself. Overall, the maximum penetration depth detected with this technique for the more diffusive {sup 237}Np over the field experimental time scale of about 60 days was about 10 mm in the granitic matrix, illustrating the importance of matrix diffusion in retarding radionuclide transport from the advective fractures. Laboratory tests and numerical modeling of radionuclide diffusion into granitic matrix was conducted to complement and help interpret the field results. Measured apparent diffusivity of multiple tracers in granite provided consistent predictions for radionuclide transport in the fractured granitic rock.

  16. Thrower's fracture of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Dodson, Christopher C; Ilyas, Asif M

    2014-10-01

    Thrower's fractures are spiral fractures of the humerus caused by forceful throwing of a ball. Although these fractures have been cited in the literature, little research exists regarding the significance of stress fractures and fatigue injuries that may precede these injuries. This article presents 3 cases of middle-aged recreational baseball pitchers who sustained mid to distal third spiral humerus fractures, reviews the biomechanics of a thrower's fracture, and provides a detailed review of the literature to help better understand this condition and guide treatment.

  17. Electrical and Magnetic Imaging of Proppants in Shallow Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, J. L. S.; Murdoch, L. C.; LaBrecque, D. J.; Slack, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an important tool to increase the productivity of wells used for oil and gas production, water resources, and environmental remediation. Currently there are relatively few tools available to monitor the distribution of proppants within a hydraulic fracture, or the propagation of the fracture itself. We have been developing techniques for monitoring hydraulic fractures by injecting electrically conductive, dielectric, or magnetically permeable proppants. We then use the resulting contrast with the enveloping rock to image the proppants using geophysical methods. Based on coupled laboratory and numerical modeling studies, three types of proppants were selected for field evaluation. Eight hydraulic fractures were created near Clemson, SC in May of 2015 by injecting specialized proppants at a depth of 1.5 m. The injections created shallow sub-horizontal fractures extending several meters from the injection point.Each cell had a dense array of electrodes and magnetic sensors on the surface and four shallow vertical electrode arrays that were used to obtain data before and after hydraulic fracturing. Net vertical displacement and transient tilts were also measured. Cores from 130 boreholes were used to characterize the general geometries, and trenching was used to characterize the forms of two of the fractures in detail. Hydraulic fracture geometries were estimated by inverting pre- and post-injection geophysical data. Data from cores and trenching show that the hydraulic fractures were saucer-shaped with a preferred propagation direction. The geophysical inversions generated images that were remarkably similar in form, size, and location to the ground truth from direct observation. Displacement and tilt data appear promising as a constraint on fracture geometry.

  18. In situ gels improve formation acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Yeager, V.; Shuchart, C.

    1997-01-20

    Viscosity-controlled acid effectively improves acid placement, provides more uniform damage removal, improves surface etching, and controls acid fluid loss. Viscosity-controlled acid (VCA) contains gels that break back to original viscosity 1 day after being pumped. These acids have been used for: matrix-acidizing long horizontal and vertical well intervals; controlling fluid loss in fracture acidizing to obtain longer fractures and deeper live-acid penetration. Fluid pH controls gel formation and breaking. In one operator`s horizontal wells, viscosity-controlled acid increased production by 2.5--6 fold. In carbonate formation fracture-acidizing, these acids have shown production improvements of 170 to 375%. VCA acid can be used in both cased or open hole, in vertical or deviated/horizontal wells.

  19. [Humeral shaft fractures].

    PubMed

    Schittko, A

    2004-08-01

    Since Lorenz Böhler postulated in his 1964 summary with the title "Against the operative treatment of fresh humeral shaft fractures" that the operative treatment is the exception in the therapy of humeral fractures times have changed. In the last years a conservative treatment of a humeral fracture is the exception and only used after straight indications. The operative therapy nowadays is the gold standard because of the development of new intramedullar and rotation stable implants in addition to the classical osteosynthesis with the plate. But even the external fixator for primary stabilisation in polytrauma patients or as rescue procedure after complications should be in repertory of every orthopedic surgeon. Attention should be put on the avoidance of primary and the correct treatment of secondary nerval lesions, esp. of the radial nerve. Here we are tending to the operative revision of the nerve in indistinct cases. In the treatment of the seldom humeral shaft fracture of the child conservative treatment is to prefer; in complications a resolute shift to a final operative stabilisation of the fracture is necessary.

  20. Frontal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies.

  1. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  2. From Stochastic toward Deterministic Characterization of Discrete Fracture Network via Thermal Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvari, M.; Jalali, M.; Bayer, P.; Jiménez Parras, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of fractures play an essential role in different disciplines, including hydrogeology, geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in the host rocks. Understanding the physical properties of these planar features would reduce the uncertainty of the numerical models and enhance the reliability of their results. Among the fracture properties, orientation and spacing are relatively easily estimated via borehole logs, core images, and outcrops, whereas the fracture geometry (i.e. length, width, and height) is more difficult to investigate. As the fracture geometry controls the hydraulic and thermal behavior of the fracture network through the strong dependency of the fracture conductivity with fracture aperture, it is possible to estimate these geometrical properties indirectly through hydraulic and thermal tomography investigations. To reach this goal, an innovative approach is introduced for discrete fracture network (DFN) characterization of heterogeneous fractured media via active thermal tracer testing. A synthetic DFN model is constructed based on the geological properties of an arbitrary fracture medium such as fracture orientation, length, spacing and persistency. Different realization are then constructed by considering all the above mentioned fracture properties except the length of fracture segments. Pressure and temperature fields are estimated inside the fracture network by means of an implicit upwind finite difference method, which is used to compute heat tracer travel times between injection and observation points and record the full temperature breakthrough curves at the monitoring points. A trans-dimensional inversion is then adopted to update the lengths fracture segment (add or remove) of the DFN model by comparison between proposed and observed travel times (Figure 1). The resulting assemble of the models can be used as an input geometry for deterministic simulations of fracture

  3. A 3D POM–MOF composite based on Ni(ΙΙ) ion and 2,2´-bipyridyl-3,3´-dicarboxylic acid: Crystal structure and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Meilin; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Sun, Jingjing; Duan, Xianying

    2013-06-01

    We have succeeded in constructing a 3D POM–MOF, (H[Ni(Hbpdc)(H₂O)₂]₂[PW₁₂O₄₀]·8H₂O)n (H₂bpdc=2,2´-bipyridyl-3,3´-dicarboxylic acid), by the controllable self-assembly of H₂bpdc, Keggin-anions and Ni²⁺ ions based on the electrostatic and coordination interactions. Interestingly, Hbpdc⁻ as polydentate organic ligands and Keggin-anion as polydentate inorganic ligands are covalently linked transition-metal nickel at the same time. The title complex represents a new example of introducing the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid frameworks into POMs chemistry. Based on Keggin-anions being immobilized as part of the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework, the title complex realizes four approaches in the 1D hydrophilic channel used to engender proton conductivity in MOFs. Its water adsorption isotherm at room temperature and pressure shows that the water content in it was 31 cm³ g⁻¹ at the maximum allowable humidity, corresponding to 3.7 water molecules per unit formula. It exhibits good proton conductivities (10⁻⁴–10⁻³ S cm⁻¹) at 100 °C in the relative humidity range 35–98%. The corresponding activation energy (E{sub a}) of conductivity was estimated to be 1.01 eV. - Graphical abstract: A POM–MOF composite constructed by Keggin-type polyanion, Ni²⁺ and H₂bpdc shows good proton conductivities of 10⁻⁴–10⁻³ S cm⁻¹ at 100 °C under 35–98% RH. - Highlights: • A POM–MOF was constructed by combining metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework and Keggin anion. • It opens a pathway for design and synthesis of multifunctional hybrid materials based on two building units. • Three types of potential proton-carriers have been assembled in the 1D hydrophilic channels of the POM–MOF. • It achieved such proton conductivities as 10⁻⁴–10⁻³ S cm⁻¹ at 100 °C in the RH range 35–98%.

  4. Characterizing Fractured Rock with Geo-structural and Micro-structural Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dershowitz, William

    2015-04-01

    Fracture spatial structure and hydro-mechanical properties are key to the understanding of fractured rock geomechanical stability, hydrodynamics, and solute transport. This paper presents a quantitative approach to fracture characterization to provide information useful for stability and flow analysis, and for coupled flow/geomechanics. The approach presented is based on the concept of geo-structural, hydro-mechanical, and microstructural models. This approach is applicable for data collected from exposed surfaces (mapping, LiDAR, aero-magnetics), boreholes (core, optical images, and images based on resistivity and geophysical methods), and three dimensional imaging (seismic attributes and microseismics). Examples are presented comparing the results of conventional fracture characterization procedures and the recommended procedure. Fracture characterization for geo-structural fracture models is based on the idea that the geologically based fracture spatial pattern is the key, rather than individual fracture statistics. For example, while fracture intensity statistics can useful, the three dimensional fracture pattern for a bedded sedimentary rock can be better reproduced from the combination of a mechanical bedding model and a correlation between fracture spacing and bed height. In a fracture geo-structural model, the fracture spatial pattern, orientation, and intensity should be characterized in a combination of global and local coordinate systems. While some fracture sets may be oriented relative to the regional tectonics (the global coordinate system), other fracture sets are oriented relative to bedding (a local coordinate system). Fracture hydro-mechanical models define the combination of (a) conductive fractures, (b) flow-barrier fractures, (c) fractures which provide storage porosity, (d) fractures of significance for kinematic stability, and (e) fractures of significance for rock mass strength and deformability. The hydromechanical fractures are a subset of

  5. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-05

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed.

  6. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed.

  7. Experimental investigation of the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of artificially fractured granite

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Guo, Qinghai; Tan, Long; Zhuang, Yaqin; Liu, Mingliang; Zhang, Canhai; Xiang, Wei; Rohn, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hydraulic and heat-transfer properties of two sets of artificially fractured granite samples are investigated. First, the morphological information is determined using 3D modelling technology. The area ratio is used to describe the roughness of the fracture surface. Second, the hydraulic properties of fractured granite are tested by exposing samples to different confining pressures and temperatures. The results show that the hydraulic properties of the fractures are affected mainly by the area ratio, with a larger area ratio producing a larger fracture aperture and higher hydraulic conductivity. Both the hydraulic apertureand the hydraulic conductivity decrease with an increase in the confining pressure. Furthermore, the fracture aperture decreases with increasing rock temperature, but the hydraulic conductivity increases owing to a reduction of the viscosity of the fluid flowing through. Finally, the heat-transfer efficiency of the samples under coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical conditions is analysed and discussed. PMID:28054594

  8. An Examination of the Transition of Fracture Characteristics in Long Bones from Fresh to Dry in Central Florida: Evaluating the Timing of Injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Ashley E; Schultz, John J

    2017-03-01

    It is important to conduct timing of injury research analyzing fracture characteristics at known postmortem intervals (PMI) because bone can retain fresh characteristics throughout the PMI. Defleshed pig (Sus scrofa) long bones were fractured weekly in two environments (full sun and shade) over 14 weeks in Central Florida and fracture characteristics were categorized (N = 136) for analysis. Results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) using time in weeks (PMI) as a dependent variable indicate significant relationships between PMI and Fracture Angle (p < 0.001), Fracture Surface (p < 0.001), and Fracture Outline (p < 0.001). Fracture characteristics associated with perimortem trauma (smooth Fracture Surfaces and curved or V-shaped Fracture Outlines) were commonly observed. Analysis of fracture characteristics for each environment demonstrated similar patterns. Overall, the loss of only fresh fracture characteristics for each bone was noted earlier in the PMI for the Central Florida region than previously reported.

  9. Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fracture: a variant of scaphocapitate fractures

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Neil G; Cosgrave, Ciaran H; O'Neill, Barry James; Kelly, Eamonn P

    2014-01-01

    Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fractures are uncommon. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who sustained this fracture following direct trauma. The patient was successfully treated by open reduction internal fixation of the scaphoid and proximal capitate fragment, with a good clinical outcome at 1-year follow-up. This pattern is a new variant of scaphocapitate fracture as involves a fracture of the radial styloid as well. PMID:24686808

  10. Critically Stressed Fractures as Conduits: Mechanically-Chemically-Mediated Anisotropy of the Effective Permeability of Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. S.; Nejati, M.; Paluszny, A.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been suggested that fractures that are critically oriented with respect to the in situ stress field are the most likely to be hydraulically conductive. This observation is revisited from the point of view of chemically mediated compaction processes, using numerical multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. Fracture contact is computed explicitly for discrete fracture networks, to find local displacements and contact tractions, which govern the initial permeability of the fractures. Subsequent flow simulations compute the full permeability tensor of the network. Local normal tractions then inform a series of transient reactive-transport, elastic-contact simulations at the grain scale that model the compaction of the fracture void space due to pressure-solution and free-face precipitation, assuming the pore-fluid in equilibrium concentration. The ensuing change of fracture transmissivity feeds back to the discrete fracture network model, wherein changes in the permeability tensor are evaluated. The eigenvectors of the initial permeability tensor reflect the higher permeability of fractures having shear/normal stress ratios near 0.6, which are characterized by relatively high permeability due to their combination of shear displacement and normal compression. The resulting preferred flow direction of the network becomes more pronounced over time as fractures that are subject to larger normal stresses experience stronger compaction, for two reasons. Firstly, larger normal traction over the surfaces provides a stronger drive for pressure solution at the contacting asperities. Secondly, these fractures are subject to smaller shear displacement. Their void space has less pronounced channels and is more sensitive to hydraulic sealing due to contact-zone percolation during the compaction process. It is concluded that mechanically-chemically mediated closure processes contribute to critically stressed fractures being likely hydraulic conduits.

  11. A Mutation in Transmembrane Domain 7 (TM7) of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters Disrupts the Substrate-dependent Gating of the Intrinsic Anion Conductance and Drives the Channel into a Constitutively Open State*

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Salazar, Delany; Jiang, Jie; Divito, Christopher B.; Garcia-Olivares, Jennie; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are responsible for the clearance of glutamate after synaptic release. This energetically demanding activity is crucial for precise neuronal communication and for maintaining extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. In addition to their ability to recapture glutamate from the extracellular space, EAATs exhibit a sodium- and glutamate-gated anion conductance. Here we show that substitution of a conserved positively charged residue (Arg-388, hEAAT1) in transmembrane domain 7 with a negatively charged amino acid eliminates the ability of glutamate to further activate the anion conductance. When expressed in oocytes, R388D or R388E mutants show large anion currents that display no further increase in amplitude after application of saturating concentrations of Na+ and glutamate. They also show a substantially reduced transport activity. The mutant transporters appear to exist preferentially in a sodium- and glutamate-independent constitutive open channel state that rarely transitions to complete the transport cycle. In addition, the accessibility of cytoplasmic residues to membrane-permeant modifying reagents supports the idea that this substrate-independent open state correlates with an intermediate outward facing conformation of the transporter. Our data provide additional insights into the mechanism by which substrates gate the anion conductance in EAATs and suggest that in EAAT1, Arg-388 is a critical element for the structural coupling between the substrate translocation and the gating mechanisms of the EAAT-associated anion channel. PMID:26203187

  12. Evaluation of bone surrogates for indirect and direct ballistic fractures.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia; Andrecovich, Chris; DeMaio, Marlene; Dougherty, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of injury for fractures to long bones has been studied for both direct ballistic loading as well as indirect. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted on both post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) and animal surrogates which have constraints in terms of storage, preparation and testing. The identification of a validated bone surrogate for use in forensic, medical and engineering testing would provide the ability to investigate ballistic loading without these constraints. Two specific bone surrogates, Sawbones and Synbone, were evaluated in comparison to PMHS for both direct and indirect ballistic loading. For the direct loading, the mean velocity to produce fracture was 121 ± 19 m/s for the PMHS, which was statistically different from the Sawbones (140 ± 7 m/s) and Synbone (146 ± 3 m/s). The average distance to fracture in the indirect loading was .70 cm for the PMHS. The Synbone had a statistically similar average distance to fracture (.61 cm, p=0.54) however the Sawbones average distance to fracture was statistically different (.41 cm, p<0.05). Fractures patterns were found to be comparable to the PMHS for tests conducted with Synbones, however the input parameters were slightly varied to produce similar results. The fractures patterns with the Sawbones were not found to be as comparable to the PMHS. An ideal bone surrogate for ballistic testing was not identified and future work is warranted.

  13. Fracture mechanics expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E.; Elfer, N.; Casadaban, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to fracture mechanics, an analytical method used extensively in the National Space Transportation System to conservatively predict the remaining service life of an article when a flaw or a material defect is detected. These analyses are performed on hardware containing material defects that have been detected by various nondestructive inspection techniques. An expert system being developed to streamline the process so that hardware dispositions may be obtained in a timely and consistent manner is discussed. The expert system reduces the potential for errors due to the manual transcription between the various software programs involved in completing a fracture mechanics analysis. NEXPERT Object, the expert system development shell selected for this purpose, allows the various software programs used in fracture mechanics analyses to be accessed and manipulated from the same platform.

  14. Geometrically Frustrated Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    When a flat elastic sheet is forced to conform to a surface with Gaussian curvature, stresses arise in the sheet. The mismatch between initial and final metrics gives rise to new fracture behavior which cannot be achieved by boundary loading alone. Using experiments of PDMS sheets frustrated on 3D-printed surfaces and a linearized analytical model, we demonstrate the ability of curvature to govern the sheets' fracture phenomenology. In this talk, we first show that curvature can both stimulate and suppress fracture initiation, depending on the position and orientation of the initial slit. Secondly, we show that curvature can steer the path of a crack as it propagates through the material. Lastly, the curvature can arrest cracks which would otherwise continue to propagate.

  15. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  16. Oblique shear fractures of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Alan E; Ahmad, Nawaiz

    2003-08-01

    Traumatic fractures of the lunate are rare. This article presents two patients who had displaced oblique lunate fractures and distal radius fractures. Both fractures achieved union; however, transient avascular necrosis occurred in the proximal healing of one patient.

  17. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    .org Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Page ( 1 ) Spinal fractures can vary widely in severity. While some fractures are very serious injuries that require emergency treatment, other fractures can ...

  18. Unified tensile fracture criterion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z F; Eckert, J

    2005-03-11

    We find that the classical failure criteria, i.e., maximum normal stress criterion, Tresca criterion, Mohr-Coulomb criterion, and von Mises criterion, cannot satisfactorily explain the tensile fracture behavior of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials. For a better description, we propose an ellipse criterion as a new failure criterion to unify the four classical criteria above and apply it to exemplarily describe the tensile fracture behavior of BMGs as well as a variety of other materials. It is suggested that each of the classical failure criteria can be unified by the present ellipse criterion depending on the difference of the ratio alpha=tau(0)/sigma(0).

  19. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  20. Abraham Colles: Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2012-08-01

    Every reader of this journal will be all too familiar with Colles' fracture; either seeing patients with it in A & E, helping with its reduction and splinting or being part of the anaesthetics team involved in its management. On an icy winter's day there might be half a dozen patients with this injury in your accident unit, mostly elderly ladies. Yet it was not until 1814 that Abraham Colles accurately described this injury and its treatment in his paper 'On the fracture of the carpal extremity of the radius', published in the Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal of that year.

  1. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  2. Challenges and opportunities for fractured rock imaging using 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Judith; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-02-02

    There is an increasing need to characterize discrete fractures away from boreholes to better define fracture distributions and monitor solute transport. We performed a 3D evaluation of static and time-lapse cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data sets from a limestone quarry in which flow and transport are controlled by a bedding-plane feature. Ten boreholes were discretized using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, and 2D panel measurements were inverted for a 3D distribution of conductivity. We evaluated the benefits of 3D versus 2.5D inversion of ERT data in fractured rock while including the use of borehole regularization disconnects (BRDs) and borehole conductivity constraints. High-conductivity halos (inversion artifacts) surrounding boreholes were removed in static images when BRDs and borehole conductivity constraints were implemented. Furthermore, applying these constraints focused transient changes in conductivity resulting from solute transport on the bedding plane, providing a more physically reasonable model for conductivity changes associated with solute transport at this fractured rock site. Assuming bedding-plane continuity between fractures identified in borehole televiewer data, we discretized a planar region between six boreholes and applied a fracture regularization disconnect (FRD). Although the FRD appropriately focused conductivity changes on the bedding plane, the conductivity distribution within the discretized fracture was nonunique and dependent on the starting homogeneous model conductivity. Synthetic studies performed to better explain field observations showed that inaccurate electrode locations in boreholes resulted in low-conductivity halos surrounding borehole locations. These synthetic studies also showed that the recovery of the true conductivity within an FRD depended on the conductivity contrast between the host rock and fractures. Our findings revealed that the potential exists to improve imaging of fractured

  3. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  4. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases your fracture risk. Catching yourself so you land on your hands or grabbing onto an object as you fall can prevent a hip fracture. Protective responses, such as reflexes and changes in posture that break the fall, can reduce ...

  5. Colles wrist fracture – aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228899 . Prawer A. Radius and ulna fractures. In: Eiff MP, Hatch RL, eds. Fracture Management for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap ...

  6. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  7. Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    .org Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist Page ( 1 ) The scaphoid is one of the small bones in the wrist. It is ... that the scaphoid is injured. Cause A scaphoid fracture is usually caused by a fall on an ...

  8. Fracture propagation, pipe deformation study

    SciTech Connect

    Aloe, A.; Di Candia, A.; Bramante, M.

    1983-04-15

    Shear fracture propagation has become an important research subject connected with design aspects of gas pipelines. Difficulties involved in predicting safe service conditions from pure theoretical studies require 1:1 scale experiments. Through these tests, semiempirical design criteria was formulated where the minimum level of material quality, indicated by Charpy V energy in the ductile range, is determined as a function of pipe geometry and hoop stress. Disagreements exist among these criteria. Different arrest energy predictions at high hoop stresses and different effects ascribed to the thickness have called for further research in the field. Some interesting indications were obtained about shape and size of the plastic zone ahead of the propagating crack. Burst tests have been conducted and are discussed.

  9. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  10. Fracture analysis of HPOTP bearing balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture analysis conducted on four HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) bearing balls from the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) is described. Nondestructive evaluation, optical microscopy, and transmission microscopy techniques were used in the analysis. The cracks are initiated at or close to the ball surface under conditions of high cyclic stresses and high coefficient of friction. The cracks lead to spalls and subsequent crack propagation occurs by fatigue mode under concentrated loading of cyclic nature.

  11. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Carly W.; Goto, D. M.

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  12. Protection of 2-(3-Thienyl)ethanol with 3-Thienylacetic Acid and Hard Cross- Linked Conducting Films by Electropolymerization of the Ester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Dass, Amala; Mulik, Sudir; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia

    2005-01-01

    The ester (compound 1) of 2-(3-thienyl)ethanol (T-etOH) with 3-thienylacetic acid was synthesized as a monomer whose two thiophene groups could be electropolymerized independently, becoming members of different polymer chains in a highly-crosslinked highly-insoluble polymer. Indeed, 1 was electropolymerized successfully alone and together with 3-methylthiophene (3MeT). Films of poly(1) are hard (3H, as opposed to less than 6B for poly(3MeT)), and the close proximity of the polymeric strands creates pi-stacking interactions. The behavior of 1 suggests that by: (a) limiting the potential used for the oxidation of monomeric esters of T-etOH at the foot of their oxidation waves (less than 1.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl); and, (b) compensating for the decrease in the electrogenerated radical concentration by increasing the monomer concentration, practically all esters of T-etOH should be electropolymerizable. This was confirmed by durable film formation from the archetypical ester of T-etOH, the 2-(3-thienyl)ethyl acetate (T-etOAc), whose homo-electropolymerization is reported for the first time.

  13. Penis Fracture: Is It Possible?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Sexual health Is it possible to fracture your penis? Answers from Landon Trost, M.D. Yes. Although rare, penis fracture ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/expert-answers/penis-fracture/faq-20058154 . Mayo Clinic ...

  14. ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mukul M. Sharma

    2005-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those

  15. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  16. Pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level for treatment of thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunpeng; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Dan; Xu, Hui; Geng, Wei; Luo, Dawei; Ma, Jinzhu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Use of a pedicle screw at the level of fracture, also known as an intermediate screw, has been shown to improve clinical results in managing thoracolumbar(TL) fractures, but there is a paucity of powerful evidence to support the claim. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes between pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level and conventional pedicle screw fixation (one level above and one level below the fracture level) for thoracolumbar (TL) fractures. Methods: A meta-analysis of cohort studies was conducted between pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level (combined screw group) and conventional pedicle screw fixation (conventional group) for the treatment of TL fractures from their inception to December 2015. An extensive search of studies was performed in PubMed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library. The following outcome measures were extracted: visual analogue scale (VAS), operation time and intraoperative blood loss, Cobb angle and anterior vertebral height (AVH), and complications. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3.5. Results: From 10 relevant studies identified, 283 patients undergoing pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level were compared with 285 conventional pedicle screw procedures. The pooled analysis showed that there was statistically significant difference in terms of postoperative Cobb angle (95% confidence interval (CI), −3.00, −0.75; P = 0.001) and AVH (95% CI, 0.04, 12.23; P = 0.05), correction loss (Cobb angle: P < 0.0001; AVH: P < 0.0001) and implant failure rate (95% CI, 0.06, 0.62; P = 0.006), and blood loss (W 95% CI, 2.22, 23.60; P = 0.02) between 2 groups. But in terms of other complications, there were no differences between 2 groups (95% CI, 0.23, 2.04; P = 0.50). No difference was found in operation time (95% CI, −5.36, 14.67; P = 0.36) and VAS scores (95% CI, −0.44, 0

  17. Fracture behaviour of functionally graded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marur, Prabhakar R.

    in the graded zone, approaches the bimaterial crack behavior as the material gradient is increased. The mode-mixity is shown to be strongly dependent on the material gradient. Static and dynamic fracture tests are conducted on precracked specimens fabricated from homogenous, bimaterial and FGM. In the dynamic fracture study, complimentary finite element simulations are performed using the measured interaction forces as the traction boundary conditions. The measured dynamic strains and complex SIF data match favorably with the numerical results. The fracture test results show that, by joining two dissimilar materials with a graded zone, the strength of the resulting system has, at the minimum, the strength of the corresponding bimaterial.

  18. Tibia (Shinbone) Shaft Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in patients who are less healthy. • Early motion. Many doctors encourage leg motion early in the recovery period. For example, if ... will help you restore normal muscle strength, joint motion, and flexibility. AAOS does not endorse any treatments, ...

  19. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures cont. Page ( 5 ) • Early motion. Many doctors encourage motion of the foot and ankle early in the ... therapy. Specific exercises can improve the range of motion in your foot and ankle, and strengthen supporting ...

  20. Infiltration into Fractured Bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Jones, Robert

    2007-09-01

    One potential consequence of global climate change and rapid changes in land use is an increased risk of flooding. Proper understanding of floodwater infiltration thus becomes a crucial component of our preparedness to meet the environmental challenges of projected climate change. In this paper, we present the results of a long-term infiltration experiment performed on fractured ash flow tuff. Water was released from a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) with a head of {approx}0.04 m, over a period of {approx}800 days. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns not amenable to current infiltration models, which were originally developed for infiltration into soils over a short duration. In particular, we observed that in part of the infiltration plot, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests. We suggest that these anomalies result from increases in fracture permeability during infiltration, which may be caused by swelling of clay fillings and/or erosion of infill debris. Interaction of the infiltration water with subsurface natural cavities (lithophysal cavities) could also contribute to such anomalies. This paper provides a conceptual model that partly describes the observed infiltration patterns in fractured rock and highlights some of the pitfalls associated with direct extension of soil infiltration models to fractured rock over a long period.

  1. Metatarsal fracture (acute) - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 88. Richter M, Kwon JY, DiGiovanni CW. Foot injuries. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, Anderson ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Foot Injuries and Disorders Fractures Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  2. Statistical Physics of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Alava, Mikko; Nukala, Phani K; Zapperi, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Disorder and long-range interactions are two of the key components that make material failure an interesting playfield for the application of statistical mechanics. The cornerstone in this respect has been lattice models of the fracture in which a network of elastic beams, bonds, or electrical fuses with random failure thresholds are subject to an increasing external load. These models describe on a qualitative level the failure processes of real, brittle, or quasi-brittle materials. This has been particularly important in solving the classical engineering problems of material strength: the size dependence of maximum stress and its sample-to-sample statistical fluctuations. At the same time, lattice models pose many new fundamental questions in statistical physics, such as the relation between fracture and phase transitions. Experimental results point out to the existence of an intriguing crackling noise in the acoustic emission and of self-affine fractals in the crack surface morphology. Recent advances in computer power have enabled considerable progress in the understanding of such models. Among these partly still controversial issues, are the scaling and size-effects in material strength and accumulated damage, the statistics of avalanches or bursts of microfailures, and the morphology of the crack surface. Here we present an overview of the results obtained with lattice models for fracture, highlighting the relations with statistical physics theories and more conventional fracture mechanics approaches.

  3. Bipartite patella fracture.

    PubMed

    Canizares, George H; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2003-02-01

    Bipartite patella fracture is an uncommon injury that has rarely been described in the literature. It can be quite debilitating in the competitive athlete and is often overlooked by the treating physician. A bone scan can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate treatment often results in a successful outcome.

  4. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: Comparison of methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muldoon, M.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of ???10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head - and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  5. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Maureen; Bradbury, Ken R

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of approximately 10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid.

  6. Discriminants of prevalent fractures in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Cremers, Serge; Zhang, Amy; Thomas, Valeri; Stein, Emily; Cohen, Adi; Chauncey, Ryan; Nikkel, Lucas; Yin, Michael T; Liu, Xiaowei S; Boutroy, Stephanie; Staron, Ronald B; Leonard, Mary B; McMahon, Donald J; Dworakowski, Elzbieta; Shane, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have higher rates of fracture than the general population. Increased bone remodeling, leading to microarchitectural deterioration and increased fragility, may accompany declining kidney function, but there are no reliable methods to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. In this cross-sectional study of 82 patients with predialysis CKD, high-resolution imaging revealed that the 23 patients with current fractures had significantly lower areal density at the femoral neck; total, cortical, and trabecular volumetric bone density; cortical area and thickness; and trabecular thickness. Compared with levels in the lowest tertile, higher levels of osteocalcin, procollagen type-1 N-terminal propeptide, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b were associated with higher odds of fracture, even after adjustment for femoral neck T-score. Discrimination of fracture prevalence was best with a femoral neck T-score of -2.0 or less and a value in the upper two tertiles for osteocalcin, procollagen type-1 N-terminal propeptide, or tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b; these values corresponded to the upper half of the normal premenopausal reference range. In summary, these cross-sectional data suggest that measurement of bone turnover markers may increase the diagnostic accuracy of densitometry to identify patients with CKD at high risk for fracture.

  7. Conducting a thermal conductivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    A physically transparent approximate theory of phonon decay rates is presented starting from a pair potential model of the interatomic forces in an insulator or semiconductor. The theory applies in the classical regime and relates the 3-phonon decay rate to the third derivative of the pair potential. Phonon dispersion relations do not need to be calculated, as sum rules relate all the needed quantities directly to the pair potential. The Brillouin zone averaged phonon lifetime turns out to involve a dimensionless measure of the anharmonicity multiplied by an effective density of states for 3-phonon decay. Results are given for rare gas and alkali halide crystals. For rare gases, the results are in good agreement with more elaborate perturbation calculations. Comparison to experimental data on phonon linewidths and thermal conductivity are made.

  8. Noninvasive fatigue fracture model of the rat ulna.

    PubMed

    Tami, A E; Nasser, P; Schaffler, M B; Knothe Tate, M L

    2003-11-01

    Fatigue damage occurs in response to repeated cyclic loading and has been observed in situ in cortical bone of humans and other animals. When microcracks accumulate and coalesce, failure ensues and is referred to as fatigue fracture. Experimental study of fatigue fracture healing is inherently difficult due to the lack of noninvasive models. In this study, we hypothesized that repeated cyclic loading of the rat ulna results in a fatigue fracture. The aim of the study was to develop a noninvasive long bone fatigue fracture model that induces failure through accumulation and coalescence of microdamage and replicates the morphology of a clinical fracture. Using modified end-load bending, right ulnae of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cyclically loaded in vivo to fatigue failure based on increased bone compliance, which reflects changes in bone stiffness due to microdamage. Preterminal tracer studies with 0.8% Procion Red solution were conducted according to protocols described previously to evaluate perfusion of the vasculature as well as the lacunocanalicular system at different time points during healing. Eighteen of the 20 animals loaded sustained a fatigue fracture of the medial ulna, i.e. through the compressive cortex. In all cases, the fracture was closed and non-displaced. No disruption to the periosteum or intramedullary vasculature was observed. The loading regime did not produce soft tissue trauma; in addition, no haematoma was observed in association with application of load. Healing proceeded via proliferative woven bone formation, followed by consolidation within 42 days postfracture. In sum, a noninvasive long bone fatigue fracture model was developed that lends itself for the study of internal remodeling of periosteal woven bone during fracture healing and has obvious applications for the study of fatigue fracture etiology.

  9. Viscoelasticity of crosslinked fracturing fluids and proppant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, A.R. )

    1988-11-01

    In hydraulic fracturing treatments, the success of the treatment strongly depends on the proper placement of proppant particles in the fracture. ''Proper placement'' means the packing of the fracture to achieve maximum conductivity of gas/oil through the fracture into the wellbore. The placement of the proppants along the fracture is based on design equations where sand transport velocity is related to the rheological parameters of the fracturing fluid and characteristics of the proppant particle, such as size and density. The present work describes the theoretical transport equations that take into account the elasticity of the fluid in predicting proppant settling rate in the fracture. It presents the rheological data of commonly used fracturing fluids (titanate and borate crosslinked), including viscous and elastic parameter measurements made with a Rheometrics Pressure Rheometer (RPR) and Rheometrics Mechanical Spectrometer (RMS-800). These data show some important differences between borate crosslinked gels and titanate crosslinked gels. The paper also presents experimental data of proppant settling rates in various fracturing fluids and how these can be correlated with rheological parameters obtained in this work. The difference in rheology between borate and titanate gels was correlated with the difference in settling rates of proppants in these two gels. The theoretical and experimental work presented here led to the conclusion that the model for proppant placement in a hydraulic fracture should include: (1) proppant characteristics, (2) viscous rheological parameters (KAPPA and n), (3) elastic parameters (complex dynamic viscosity) from linear viscoelastic constitutive equation, and (4) normal stress difference from nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The influence of crosslinked-polymer-gel network structure on proppant transport is also discussed.

  10. Explosively produced fracture of oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-10-01

    Explosive cratering experiments were conducted as a part of the research effort to study the explosively produced fracture of oil shale. They were designed to identify and analyze the major factors involved in the fracturing of oil shale, to provide data for the verification of the computer models, and ultimately to lead to the design of a rubble bed for in situ retorting oil shale. The rubble excavated from eight cratering experiments was separated and the volumes of rubble in each screened size category are presented. Also presented are the data from the detailed investigation of the joint/fracture attitudes (strikes and dips) within a crater interior after excavation. The data were tabulated and plotted to allow future comparisons and analyses pertinent to similar experiments. A brief discussion of the experiment site and the graphical representation of the data are included. Finally, since the homogeneity of the oil shale is an important consideration in the selection of a site for these explosive fracture experiments, cores were taken and analyzed. The identification of the geological parameters and their extent and how they delineate the overall characterization of the experiment site, including the subsurface geology, is given. It is shown how the postshot core analysis will indicate how the blast affected the rock.

  11. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  12. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads is examined. The central objectives of the project are: (1) to report the current state of the art, and (2) recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest is the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. The authors conducted a survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  13. Mandibular Fractures in Iraq: An Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Bede, Salwan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of the mandibular fractures relating to gender, age, the etiology of injury, and the rendered treatment modalities and complications. The data of the patients who sustained mandibular fractures were retrieved and were analyzed retrospectively, and based on these data a descriptive analysis was conducted. A total of 112 patients were included in this study; the most common cause was road traffic accidents (RTAs) followed by assaults and missile injuries. The most frequently involved age group was 11 to 20 years, treatment modalities included conservative, closed reduction and indirect fixation, and open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) in 11.6, 79.5, and 8.9% of the cases, respectively. Most of the major complications were injury related. This study showed RTAs to be the most frequent cause followed by assaults, it also showed that a high percentage of assault victims were females mainly of low socioeconomic status. Another distinguishing feature in this study was the high incidence of missile injuries in the form of bullets and blasts. Closed reduction still has an important role in the treatment of fractures of mandible especially when the necessary equipments for ORIF are not readily available. A higher complication rate was observed in patients diagnosed with multiple and comminuted fractures as well as those caused by violence in the form of missile and assault injuries. PMID:25709754

  14. Entablature: fracture types and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. E. S.; Blake, S.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-05-01

    Entablature is the term used to describe zones or tiers of irregular jointing in basaltic lava flows. It is thought to form when water from rivers dammed by the lava inundates the lava flow surface, and during lava-meltwater interaction in subglacial settings. A number of different fracture types are described in entablature outcrops from the Búrfell lava and older lava flows in Þjórsárdalur, southwest Iceland. These are: striae-bearing, column-bounding fractures and pseudopillow fracture systems that themselves consist of two different fracture types—master fractures with dimpled surface textures and subsidiary fractures with curved striae. The interaction of pseudopillow fracture systems and columnar jointing in the entablature produces the chevron fracture patterns that are commonly observed in entablature. Cube-jointing is a more densely fractured version of entablature, which likely forms when more coolant enters the hot lava. The entablature tiers display closely spaced striae and dendritic crystal shapes which indicate rapid cooling. Master fracture surfaces show a thin band with an evolved composition at the fracture surface; mineral textures in this band also show evidence of quenching of this material. This is interpreted as gas-driven filter pressing of late-stage residual melt that is drawn into an area of low pressure immediately preceding or during master fracture formation by ductile extensional fracture of hot, partially crystallised lava. This melt is then quenched by an influx of water and/or steam when the master fracture fully opens. Our findings suggest that master fractures are the main conduit for coolant entering the lava flow during entablature formation.

  15. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  16. Colloid transport in dolomite rock fractures: effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pulin K; Sleep, Brent E

    2012-09-18

    The effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength on microsphere transport in variable-aperture dolomite rock fractures were studied in a laboratory-scale system. Fractures with different aperture distributions and mineral compositions were artificially created in two dolomite rock blocks. Transport tests were conducted with bromide and carboxylate-modified latex microspheres (20, 200, and 500 nm diameter). Under overall unfavorable attachment conditions, there was significant retention of the 20 nm microsphere and minimal retention of the 500 nm microsphere for all conditions examined. Aperture variability produced significant spatial variation in colloid transport. Flushing with low ionic strength solution (1 mM) following microsphere transport at 12 mM ionic strength solution produced a spike in effluent microsphere concentrations, consistent with retention of colloids in secondary energy minima. Surface roughness and charge heterogeneity effects may have also contributed to the effect of microsphere size on retention. Matrix diffusion influenced bromide transport but was not a dominant factor in transport for any microsphere size. Calibrated one-dimensional, two-site kinetic model parameters for colloid transport in fractured dolomite were sensitive to the physical and chemical properties of both the fractured dolomite and the colloids, indicating the need for mechanistic modeling for accurate prediction.

  17. Risk factors for fracture in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Kyla L; Zou, Guangyong; Leslie, William D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Lam, Ngan N; McArthur, Eric; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Knoll, Gregory A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Kim, S Joseph; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general and transplant-specific risk factors for fractures in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of all adults who received a kidney-only transplant (n = 2723) in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to determine general and transplant-specific risk factors for major fractures (proximal humerus, forearm, hip, and clinical vertebral). The final model was established using the backward elimination strategy, selecting risk factors with a P-value ≤ 0.2 and forcing recipient age and sex into the model. We also assessed risk factors for other fracture locations (excluding major fractures, and fractures involving the skull, hands or feet). RESULTS: There were 132 major fractures in the follow-up (8.1 fractures per 1000 person-years). General risk factors associated with a greater risk of major fracture were older recipient age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) per 5-year increase 1.11, 95%CI: 1.03-1.19] and female sex (aHR = 1.81, 95%CI: 1.28-2.57). Transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of fracture included older donor age (5-year increase) (aHR = 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02-1.17) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by diabetes (aHR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.09-2.72) or cystic kidney disease (aHR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.08-2.78) (compared to glomerulonephritis as the reference cause). Risk factors across the two fracture locations were not consistent (major fracture locations vs other). Specifically, general risk factors associated with an increased risk of other fractures were diabetes and a fall with hospitalization prior to transplantation, while length of time on dialysis, and renal vascular disease and other causes of ESRD were the transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of other fractures. CONCLUSION: Both general and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with a higher risk of fractures in kidney transplant

  18. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19–2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91–1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30–1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with

  19. Geomechanical Parameters in Fracturing Process of Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    statistical analysis of microcracks formation inferred from SEM mosaics. The brittleness leads also to the dependence of failure on fabric dependent tensile strength. We observe twice as much Mode II fracturing (layer activation) at lower stress levels for Lyons sandstone. The rock microstructure, lamination, and brittleness control the break down pressure. They also influence the FPZ and laminations reactivation which affect the fracture conductivity and stimulated reservoir volume (SRV).

  20. Risedronate’s Role in Reducing Hip Fracture in Postmenopausal Women with Established Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Brian J.; Das, Shyamal

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a significant concern for postmenopausal women and is a critical factor in hip fracture. Examining evidence for osteoporosis medications in hip fracture is important for optimizing treatment. Purpose Review risedronate’s role for hip fracture in postmenopausal women. Methods A literature search was conducted using Medline and Web of Science. The search was limited using the terms “risedronate” and “hip fracture,” and to studies that included women. Similar articles linked to the search and pertinent articles in bibliographies were also examined. Results Risedronate has demonstrated efficacy and cost effectiveness for hip fracture, but may not be beneficial for patients with low fracture risk. Risedronate is generally well tolerated, but may cause side effects in some patient populations. Conclusion Risedronate has benefit for hip fracture, but patients should be carefully screened to determine the appropriateness of risedronate before starting treatment. PMID:22267947

  1. Triplane fractures in the hand.

    PubMed

    Garcia Mata, S; Hidalgo Ovejero, A; Martinez Grande, M

    1999-02-01

    Two new cases of triplane fracture of the distal tibia are reported in the proximal phalanx of the thumb and the distal radius, respectively, of a 12-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy. Neither fracture showed any displacement, achieving healing at 4 weeks of external immobilization. Triplane fractures can occur across growth plates other than the distal tibia. Because of the rapid physiologic physeal arrest, the potential for growth deformity is null. In cases without displacement, these fractures should be treated conservatively by external immobilization, as one would treat a one-plane fracture.

  2. Phalangeal fractures: displaced/nondisplaced.

    PubMed

    Gaston, R Glenn; Chadderdon, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    Nonsurgical management is the preferred treatment of stable, extra-articular fractures of the proximal and middle phalanx, most distal phalanx fractures, and, rarely, nondisplaced intraarticular fractures in elite athletes. Techniques that afford maximal strength with minimal dissection, thus allowing earlier return to play, are ideal. Open reduction with internal fixation with plate fixation is most often chosen for unstable phalangeal shaft fractures in high-demand athletes to provide rigid internal fixation and allow immediate range of motion and more rapid return to sport. It is our practice to routinely treat unicondylar fractures with surgery with percutaneous headless compression screws in elite athletes.

  3. Coupling Hydraulic Fracturing Propagation and Gas Well Performance for Simulation of Production in Unconventional Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Winterfeld, P. H.; Wu, Y. S.; Wang, Y.; Chen, D.; Yin, C.; Pan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing combined with horizontal drilling has made it possible to economically produce natural gas from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. An efficient methodology for evaluating hydraulic fracturing operation parameters, such as fluid and proppant properties, injection rates, and wellhead pressure, is essential for the evaluation and efficient design of these processes. Traditional numerical evaluation and optimization approaches are usually based on simulated fracture properties such as the fracture area. In our opinion, a methodology based on simulated production data is better, because production is the goal of hydraulic fracturing and we can calibrate this approach with production data that is already known. This numerical methodology requires a fully-coupled hydraulic fracture propagation and multi-phase flow model. In this paper, we present a general fully-coupled numerical framework to simulate hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture gas well performance. This three-dimensional, multi-phase simulator focuses on: (1) fracture width increase and fracture propagation that occurs as slurry is injected into the fracture, (2) erosion caused by fracture fluids and leakoff, (3) proppant subsidence and flowback, and (4) multi-phase fluid flow through various-scaled anisotropic natural and man-made fractures. Mathematical and numerical details on how to fully couple the fracture propagation and fluid flow parts are discussed. Hydraulic fracturing and production operation parameters, and properties of the reservoir, fluids, and proppants, are taken into account. The well may be horizontal, vertical, or deviated, as well as open-hole or cemented. The simulator is verified based on benchmarks from the literature and we show its application by simulating fracture network (hydraulic and natural fractures) propagation and production data history matching of a field in China. We also conduct a series of real-data modeling studies with different combinations of

  4. Colles' fracture - is it a signal of osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Hossain, M; Hoq, M F; Fatima, N; Laskar, M H; Emran, M A; Asaduzzaman, K M; Alam, M

    2011-10-01

    Asymptomatic post-menopausal osteoporosis is common but some-times associated with pain and deformity. Symptomatic osteoporosis is usually associated with fracture. A 59 years old post-menopausal woman presented with a history of acute low-back-pain. She had menopause for 12 years. She gave history of colles' fracture at about two years back. Her mother died as consequences of femoral neck fracture. MRI of vertebral spine showed demineralization with partial collapse of D6,7,12 and L1 vertebra. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry of vertebra showed BMD T-score of -4.5. Patient was managed with IV infusion of zoledronic acid, oral intake of vitamin D and calcium supplements and with regular non-weight-bearing exercises. Her condition improved gradually. During post-menopausal period, every women must be aware of osteoporosis and any fracture in that time must be evaluated to rule out osteoporosis.

  5. Borehole sampling of fracture populations - compensating for borehole sampling bias in crystalline bedrock aquifers, Mirror Lake, Grafton County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, G.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Barton, C.C.; Johnson, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The clustering of orientations of hydraulically conductive fractures in bedrock at the Mirror Lake, New Hampshire fractured rock study site was investigated by comparing the orientations of fracture populations in two subvertical borehole arrays with those mapped on four adjacent subvertical roadcuts. In the boreholes and the roadcuts, the orientation of fracture populations appears very similar after borehole data are compensated for undersampling of steeply dipping fractures. Compensated borehole and pavement fracture data indicate a northeast-striking population of fractures with varying dips concentrated near that of the local foliation in the adjacent rock. The data show no correlation between fracture density (fractures/linear meter) and distance from lithologic contacts in both the boreholes and the roadcuts. The population of water-producing borehole fractures is too small (28 out of 610 fractures) to yield meaningful orientation comparisons. However, the orientation of large aperture fractures (which contains all the producing fractures) contains two or three subsidiary clusters in orientation frequency that are not evident in stereographic projections of the entire population containing all aperture sizes. Further, these subsidiary orientation clusters do not coincide with the dominant (subhorizontal and subvertical) regional fracture orientations.

  6. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  7. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  8. Numerical simulation of heterogeneous fractured gas reservoir systems with turbulence and closure stress effects

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Although techniques for designing a fracture treatment are available, the intended results of these techniques are often not attained. The evaluation of fracturing treatments on low permeability gas wells is required to both optimize the fracturing design and form prediction calculations of a treatments effect. This study primarily investigates the effect of fracture height on the performance of vertically fractured wells. The effects of layered media, turbulance, and closure pressure are included in this work. Consider that a well, intercepted by a vertical fracture, is in the center of a squared drainage system with closed outer boundary. Any increase in well productivity will be determined by fracture parameters, which are: fracture length, height, fracture conductivity, and location of the fracture in the formaton. On the basis of the analysis of fluid flow in porous media, the problem solving technique used in this study is the numerical method. A three-dimensional finite difference fully implicit model was written for this. In addition, the Sparse Matrix technique was used as a solver. Furthermore, Slices Source Over Relaxation was used as an iterative method for solving routines. Presented here are the numerical results of the three-dimensional model for a well intercepting a vertical fracture wth finite conductivity. The results are presented in the general form of dimensionless variables. Type curves considering the effect of fracture height on well performance are included. In addition, type curves for turbulent flow in the fracture are also obtained. Finally, other important contributions of this work are the data showing the effect of layered formation on fractured well performance.

  9. Gout and the Risk of Non-vertebral Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyoung C; Paik, Julie M; Liu, Jun; Curhan, Gary C; Solomon, Daniel H

    2017-02-01

    Prior studies suggest an association between osteoporosis, systemic inflammation, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. Conflicting findings exist on the association between hyperuricemia and osteoporosis. Furthermore, it remains unknown whether gout, a common inflammatory arthritis, affects fracture risk. Using data from a US commercial health plan (2004-2013), we evaluated the risk of non-vertebral fracture (ie, forearm, wrist, hip, and pelvis) in patients with gout versus those without. Gout patients were identified with ≥2 diagnosis codes and ≥1 dispensing for a gout-related drug. Non-gout patients, identified with ≥2 visits coded for any diagnosis and ≥1 dispensing for any prescription drugs, were free of gout diagnosis and received no gout-related drugs. Hip fracture was the secondary outcome. Fractures were identified with a combination of diagnosis and procedure codes. Cox proportional hazards models compared the risk of non-vertebral fracture in gout patients versus non-gout, adjusting for more than 40 risk factors for osteoporotic fracture. Among gout patients with baseline serum uric acid (sUA) measurements available, we assessed the risk of non-vertebral fracture associated with sUA. We identified 73,202 gout and 219,606 non-gout patients, matched on age, sex, and the date of study entry. The mean age was 60 years and 82% were men. Over the mean 2-year follow-up, the incidence rate of non-vertebral fracture per 1,000 person-years was 2.92 in gout and 2.66 in non-gout. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.12) for non-vertebral fracture and 0.83 (95% CI 0.65-1.07) for hip fracture in gout versus non-gout. Subgroup analysis (n = 15,079) showed no association between baseline sUA and non-vertebral fracture (HR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.93-1.15), adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity score, and number of any prescription drugs. Gout was not associated with a risk of non

  10. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  11. Spinous process fractures in osteoporotic thoracolumbar vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Seo, M R N; Park, S Y; Park, J S; Jin, W; Ryu, K N

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the incidence and pattern of spinous process fractures (SPFs) in patients with osteoporotic compression fractures (OCFs) of the thoracolumbar spine. Methods Spinal MRI or CT of 398 female patients (age range 50–89 years, mean age 70 years) who had OCFs in the thoracolumbar spine were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence, location and imaging results for the SPFs were evaluated. Results Of the 398 patients who had thoracolumbar OCFs, 14 (3.5%) had SPF. In six patients with single compression fractures, the SPF occurred at the level just above the vertebral compression fracture. In six out of seven patients with multiple continuous compression fractures, the SPF occurred just one level above the uppermost level of the compression fracture. The remaining one patient who had thoracolumbar spinal fixation at T12–L2 with continuous compression fractures in T12–L5 had a SPF in L2. In one patient who had multiple compression fractures in discontinuous levels (fractures at T10 and L1, respectively), the SPF occurred at T12. The directions of the fractures were vertical or oblique vertical (perpendicular to the long axis of the spinous process) in all cases. Conclusion In the presence of an OCF in the thoracolumbar spine, a SPF was found in 3.5% of cases, and most of the fractures were located just one level above the compression fracture. Therefore, in patients who have OCF, the possibility of a SPF in the level just above the compression fracture should be considered. PMID:21343317

  12. Potential contaminant pathways from hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathways-advective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fractures-could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of h