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Sample records for acid fracture conductivity

  1. Transmissivity and conductivity of single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Mourzenko, Valeri; Thovert, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    A single fracture can be represented as a void space between two rough surfaces which touch one another. Transmissivity and conductivity can be determined numerically by solving the Stokes and the Laplace equations between these two rough surfaces. These problems were first solved and published by the same authors between 1995 and 2001 (see the corresponding references in [1]). The major purpose of this presentation is to provide updated, complete and more precise results for fractures with surfaces of two different types. Each surface of a fracture can be schematized as a random surface which oscillates around an average plane; this surface is characterized by the probability density of the heights and the autocorrelation function C(u) of these heights; the standard deviation of the height is the roughness sigma. In addition a fracture requires the knowledge of the distance bm between the two average planes and the intercorrelation coefficient theta between the heights. There are two major classes of autocorrelation functions, namely the Gaussian and the self-affine autocorrelation which are both characterized by a length scale l_c, which is a typical scale for the surface features in the Gaussian case and a cut-off length in the self-affine case. There is a major difference between these two classes since the first one corresponds to statistically homogeneous surfaces and the second one to self-affine surfaces; in the latter case which necessitates the introduction of another parameter which is the Hurst exponent, the average properties of the fracture depend on the size of the sample in contrast with the former case. Systematic calculations were performed for these two classes and master curves are provided and discussed. Systematic results for Gaussian fractures are displayed as functions of b_m/sigma, l_c/sigma and theta; the influence of theta is negligible when the ratio l_c/sigma is small enough. It is also shown that the Reynolds approximation does not

  2. Transmissivity and conductivity of single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Thovert, J. F.; Mourzenko, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    A fracture can be seen as a void space between two rough surfaces in partial contact. Transmissivity and conductivity can be determined numerically by solving the Stokes and Laplace equations between these two surfaces. These problems were first solved and published by the same authors between 1995 and 2001. Updated, more complete and precise results are presented here. Each surface of a fracture can be schematized as a random surface oscillating around an average plane, characterized by the probability density and autocorrelation function C(u) of the heights; their standard deviation is the roughness sigma. The two surfaces are separated by a mean distance b_m and their heights are correlated with an intercorrelation coefficient theta. The two major classes for C(u), namely the Gaussian and the self-affine autocorrelations with Hurst exponent H, are both characterized by a length scale l_c, which is a typical scale for the surface features in the Gaussian case and a cut-off length in the self-affine case. Gaussian surfaces are statistically homogeneous while the mean properties in the self-affine case are size-dependent. Systematic calculations were performed for these two classes, with recent emphasis put on the Gaussian fractures. The results are modeled as functions of b_m/sigma, l_c/sigma and theta. Cubic law applies for large b_m/sigma in terms of the aperture reduced by the hydraulic thickness of the surface rugosity. Another cubic law applies in the opposite limit of tight fractures with an offset depending on theta and a prefactor which depends on theta and l_c. A transition takes place between these two regimes. It is also shown that the Reynolds approximation may overestimate the true transmissivity by almost an order of magnitude. Similar calculations were performed for conductivity. The whole work is summarized by a series of master curves and models which can be used to estimate the properties of real fractures.

  3. Freeze-fracture of biological specimens prior to conductive staining.

    PubMed

    Iida, N

    1984-03-01

    Liver, kidney, spleen and other organs of the rat were fixed with glutaraldehyde, substituted with absolute ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), freeze-fractured in liquid nitrogen, stained by the rapid tannin-osmium thiocarbohydrazide-osmium (TaOTO) method (staining with each agent for 10 min), critical-point-dried with liquid carbon dioxide, and observed with the scanning electron microscope. The absolute ethanol or DMSO freeze-fracture method provided flat fracture surfaces (without regard to cell boundaries) of the samples and allowed a good visualization of their inner structures. The fracture surfaces were suitably stained by the rapid TaOTO method, and could be scanned with no charging. Neither maked damage nor undesired dislocation of tissue elements was noted on the freeze-fractured and TaOTO-stained surfaces. This procedure, freeze-fracture prior to conductive staining, has an advantage of eliminating the bulk charging effects that tend to occur in specimens fractured after staining. When substituted with 75% DMSO aqueous solution, the samples spontaneously fractured without any need for razor blades. Fracture planes in this spontaneous fracture sometimes ran along the cell boundaries and allowed a clear visualization in the SEM of the enfaced surfaces of closely associated cells such as hepatocytes. PMID:6204620

  4. Numerical modeling of thermal conductive heating in fractured bedrock.

    PubMed

    Baston, Daniel P; Falta, Ronald W; Kueper, Bernard H

    2010-01-01

    Numerical modeling was employed to study the performance of thermal conductive heating (TCH) in fractured shale under a variety of hydrogeological conditions. Model results show that groundwater flow in fractures does not significantly affect the minimum treatment zone temperature, except near the beginning of heating or when groundwater influx is high. However, fracture and rock matrix properties can significantly influence the time necessary to remove all liquid water (i.e., reach superheated steam conditions) in the treatment area. Low matrix permeability, high matrix porosity, and wide fracture spacing can contribute to boiling point elevation in the rock matrix. Consequently, knowledge of these properties is important for the estimation of treatment times. Because of the variability in boiling point throughout a fractured rock treatment zone and the absence of a well-defined constant temperature boiling plateau in the rock matrix, it may be difficult to monitor the progress of thermal treatment using temperature measurements alone.

  5. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  6. Hydraulic characterization for steam enhanced remediation conducted in fractured rock.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kyle M; Novakowski, Kent; Davis, Eva; Heron, Gorm

    2006-01-10

    To explore the viability of Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) in fractured rock a small-scale steam injection and water/vapour extraction pilot study was conducted at the former Loring Air Force Base in northern Maine, USA. A detailed well testing program was undertaken to assist in the design of the injection and extraction well array, and to assess the possibility of off-site heat and contaminant migration. A structurally complex limestone having low matrix porosity and a sparse distribution of fractures underlies the study site. To characterize the groundwater and steam flow pathways, single-well slug tests and more than 100 pulse interference tests were conducted. The results of the well testing indicate that the study site is dominated by steeply dipping bedding plane fractures that are interconnected only between some wells in the injection/extraction array. The SER system was designed to take advantage of interconnected fractures located at depth in the eastern end of the site. An array of 29 wells located in an area of 60 by 40 m was used for steam injection and water/vapour extraction. The migration of heat was monitored in several wells using thermistor arrays having a 1.5 m vertical spacing. Temperature measurements obtained during and after the 3 month steam injection period showed that heat migration generally occurred along those fracture features identified by the pulse interference testing. Based on these results, it is concluded that the pulse interference tests were valuable in assisting with the design of the injection/extraction well geometry and in predicting the migration pathways of the hot water associated with the steam injection. The pulse interference test method should also prove useful in support of any other remedial method dependant on the fracture network for delivery of remedial fluid or extraction of contaminants.

  7. Proton conducting membrane using a solid acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haile, Sossina M. (Inventor); Chisholm, Calum (Inventor); Boysen, Dane A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A solid acid material is used as a proton conducting membrane in an electrochemical device. The solid acid material can be one of a plurality of different kinds of materials. A binder can be added, and that binder can be either a nonconducting or a conducting binder. Nonconducting binders can be, for example, a polymer or a glass. A conducting binder enables the device to be both proton conducting and electron conducting.

  8. Proton conducting membrane using a solid acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, Calum (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Boysen, Dane (Inventor); Haile, Sossina M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A solid acid material is used as a proton conducting membrane in an electrochemical device. The solid acid material can be one of a plurality of different kinds of materials. A binder can be added, and that binder can be either a nonconducting or a conducting binder. Nonconducting binders can be, for example, a polymer or a glass. A conducting binder enables the device to be both proton conducting and electron conducting. The solid acid material has the general form M.sub.a H.sub.b (XO.sub.t).sub.c.

  9. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  10. Potentially Conductive Channels in Fracture Cements of Low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.; Landry, C. J.; Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Natural fractures in shale reservoirs are frequently filled with mineral cement that lacks any residual fracture porosity that is visible under the petrographic microscope. These fully cemented fractures are generally interpreted to be impermeable for fluid flow. Scanning electron microscopy of calcite, dolomite, and barite fracture cements from a variety of shale reservoirs, prepared using broad ion beam milling, provides evidence of open to partially healed elongate pores that are on the order of hundreds of nanometers in aperture. In calcite fracture cement, these pores have consistent apertures of about 100 nm. In dolomite and barite, apertures are up to 500 nm. These pores have been previously overlooked because traditional thin sectioning and polishing destroys sub-micron details of the fracture cement pore structure. Ion milling preserves these details with a minimum of sample damage during sample preparation. Electron backscatter diffraction shows that these pores occur along grain boundaries within the blocky or columnar fracture cement. While partially healed, these pores, arranged along grain boundaries, are frequently sufficiently well connected acting as channels for fluid flow along and across fully cemented natural fractures. In shale reservoirs of ultra-low matrix permeability, these grain boundary channels may thus provide fracture permeability significantly contributing to reservoir production where intersected or indirectly reactivated by hydraulic fractures.

  11. HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATION FOR STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. This is primarily the result of the complexity of the fracture framework, which governs the groundwater flow pathways and...

  12. Transient pressure behavior for a horizontal well with multiple finite-conductivity fractures in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingjing; Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Liehui

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have been common and efficient practices in exploitation of tight reservoirs. Establishing corresponding mathematical models and analyzing transient pressure behaviors of this type of well-reservoir configuration can provide a better understanding of fluid flow patterns in formation as well as estimations of important parameters. Most current models proposed for fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs do not incorporate either reservoir permeability loss during the production, which is believed to be non-ignorable or finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures. A coupling model for a multi-fractured horizontal well (MFHW) in tight reservoirs is presented in this article, in which finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures and stress-dependant reservoir permeability are taken into account simultaneously. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in the Laplace domain by using source function theory, Laplace transformation, perturbation technique, discretization of fractures, and superposition principle. Analysis of transient pressure responses indicates that several characteristic flow periods of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs can be identified, including linear flow in fracture, bi-linear flow, linear flow in reservoir, pseudo-radial flow around fractures, and pseudo-radial flow around the horizontal wellbore and fractures. Parametric analysis shows that fracture conductivity, fracture spacing, fracture length, permeability modulus, and skin effect can significantly influence the transient pressure responses of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs. The model presented in this article can be applied to obtain important parameters pertinent to reservoir or fractures by type curve matching, and it can also provide useful information for optimizing fracture parameters. Finally, the model presented in this article can also be easily extended to dual-porosity cases.

  13. CONDUCTIVITY TITRATION OF GELATIN SOLUTIONS WITH ACIDS.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, D I

    1923-11-20

    Titrations have been made, by the conductivity method, of gelatin solutions with hydrochloric and sulphuric acids. The results indicate an end-point at about 8.6 cc. of N/10 acid per gm. of gelatin, or a combining weight of about 1,160. These results are in fair agreement with those previously obtained by the hydrogen electrode method. Better agreement between the two methods was found in the case of deaminized gelatin. The data are in accord with a purely chemical conception of the combination between protein and acid.

  14. The Apparent Conductivity for Steady Unsaturated Flow in Periodically Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Dykhuizen, R. C.; Eaton, R. R.

    1992-11-01

    The influence of horizontal fractures on the steady seepage of moisture in variably saturated porous media is analyzed by analytical and numerical means. The fractures are assumed to contain many open (dry) regions, and to be distributed periodically in two dimensions. The dry regions of the fracture form a barrier to moisture flow through the geologic medium. An idealized two-dimensional model that maximizes the barrier effect of the fractures is analyzed. The results of the analysis quantify the effect of the dry regions of the fractures on global water flow through the fractured medium. An apparent conductivity is determined such that the fractured system can be replaced by a homogeneous medium for describing steady unsaturated flow. An asymptotic analysis yields an analytic expression for the apparent hydraulic conductivity through such a system in the limit of small sorptive number (fracture spacing divided by a characteristic capillary suction) for the intact matrix material. The apparent hydraulic conductivity for arbitrary spacing and sorptive number is determined by numerical means. The numerical model accounts for variable hydraulic conductivity as a function of the local pressure head, whereas the asymptotic solution represents the limit of constant conductivity. The numerical results confirm the analytical solution as a lower bound on the apparent hydraulic conductivity.

  15. Electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook

    1987-03-01

    The electrical conductivities of the aqueous solution system of H2SO4-MSO4 (involving ZnSO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), reported by Tozawa et al., were examined in terms of a (H2O) and H+ ion concentration. The equations to compute the concentrations of various species in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions containing metal sulfates were derived for a typical example of the H2SO4-ZnSO4-MgSO4-(Na2SO4)-H2O system. It was found that the H+ ion concentrations in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions corresponding to practical zinc electrowinning solutions are very high and remain almost constant with or without the addition of metal sulfates. The addition of metal sulfates to aqueous sulfuric acid solution causes a decrease in electrical conductivity, and this phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in water activity, which reflects a decrease in the amount of free water. The relationship between conductivity and water activity at a constant H+ ion concentration is independent of the kind of sulfates added. On the other hand, any increase in H+ ion concentration results in an increase in electrical conductivity. A novel method for the prediction of electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution is proposed that uses the calculated data of water activity and the calculated H+ ion concentration. Also, the authors examined an extension of the Robinson-Bower equation to calculate water activity in quarternary solutions based on molarity instead of molality, and found that such calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally by a transpiration method.

  16. Acid-suppressive medications and risk of fracture: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dawei; Feng, Wan; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acid-suppressive medications are widely used for the management of acid-related disorders. It has been reported that acid-suppressive medication users were at increased risk of fracture, but such an association was inconsistent among observational studies. The purpose of our analysis was to assess the relationship between use of antacid drugs and fracture risk. Methods: We systematically searched electronic database and manually examined the reference lists of previous reviews for potentially eligible studies. Given the heterogeneity across studies, random effects models were used to calculate summary estimates. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were conducted to explore the potential heterogeneity. Results: 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. PPI and H2RA were associated with increased risk of hip fracture, with substantial heterogeneity (PPI: 1.216, 1.134-1.304, I2=71.3%; H2RA: 1.128, 1.022-1.245, I2=72.1%). High risk of spine fracture was observed in PPI users (1.216, 95% CI: 1.134-1.304) but not H2RA users. When considering 5 studies conducted among postmenopausal women, the RR was 1.376, (95% CI: 1.043-1.816) with modest heterogeneity (I2=57.7%). Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis found consistent association between hip fracture risk and PPI use but not H2RA use. Positive association for H2RA use lost its significance when considering case-control studies and European studies. Conclusion: Results of this updated meta-analysis provided evidence to support that acid-suppressive medications were associated with increased risk of fracture, especially hip fracture. PMID:26309543

  17. Use of copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid resorbable plates in repair of orbital floor fractures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jonathan; German, Michael; Wong, Brian

    2014-10-01

    The fractures of the orbital floor are common after craniofacial trauma. Repair with resorbable plates is a viable reconstructive option; however, there are few reports in the literature. This study describes our experience using copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLLA/PGA) orbital reconstruction plates (LactoSorb, Lorenz Surgical, Jacksonville, FL) in 29 cases of the orbital floor fracture repair. We conducted a retrospective review of 29 orbital floor fractures at a single institution repaired through transconjunctival, preseptal dissection using PLLA/PGA plates fashioned to repair the orbital floor defect. Associated fractures included zygomaticomaxillary, LeFort, and nasoethmoid fractures. There were six patients with complications. Four patients had transient diplopia with complete resolution of symptoms within 1 year. One patient had diplopia postoperatively, but was later lost to follow-up. Two patients have had persistent enophthalmos since 1 year. In each of these cases, the floor fracture was coincident with significant panfacial or neurotrauma. We did not encounter any adverse inflammatory reactions to the implant material itself. The study concluded that orbital floor fracture repair with resorbable plates is safe, relatively easy to perform, and in the majority of cases was effective without complications. In the presence of severe orbital trauma, more rigid implant materials may be appropriate.

  18. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR HEAT FLOW IN FRACTURES-APPLICATION TO STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. Recent pilot studies conducted at the Edwards Air Force Base in California and the former Loring Air Force Base in Maine ...

  19. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR HEAT FLOW IN FRACTURES - APPLICATION TO STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION CONDUCTED IN FRACTURED ROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of fractured rock sites contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids has long been recognized as the most difficult undertaking of any site clean-up. Recent pilot studies conducted at the Edwards Air Force Base in California and the former Loring Air Force Base in Maine ...

  20. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded

  1. Effects of Boric Acid on Fracture Healing: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Gölge, Umut Hatay; Kaymaz, Burak; Arpaci, Rabia; Kömürcü, Erkam; Göksel, Ferdi; Güven, Mustafa; Güzel, Yunus; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-10-01

    Boric acid (BA) has positive effects on bone tissue. In this study, the effects of BA on fracture healing were evaluated in an animal model. Standard closed femoral shaft fractures were created in 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats under general anesthesia. The rats were allocated into five groups (n = 8 each): group 1, control with no BA; groups 2 and 3, oral BA at doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/day, respectively; group 4, local BA (8 mg/kg); and group 5, both oral and local BA (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg locally). After closed fracture creation, the fracture line was opened with a mini-incision, and BA was locally administered to the fracture area in groups 4 and 5. In groups 2, 3, and 5, BA was administered by gastric gavage daily until sacrifice. The rats were evaluated by clinical, radiological, and histological examinations. The control group (group 1) significantly differed from the local BA-exposed groups (groups 4 and 5) in the clinical evaluation. Front-rear and lateral radiographs revealed significant differences between the local BA-exposed groups and the control and other groups (p < 0.05). Clinical and radiological evaluations demonstrated adequate agreement between observers. The average histological scores significantly differed across groups (p = 0.007) and were significantly higher in groups 4 and 5 which were the local BA (8 mg/kg) and both oral and local BA (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg locally), respectively, compared to the controls. This study suggests that BA may be useful in fracture healing. Further research is required to demonstrate the most effective local dosage and possible use of BA-coated implants. PMID:25846213

  2. Effects of Boric Acid on Fracture Healing: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Gölge, Umut Hatay; Kaymaz, Burak; Arpaci, Rabia; Kömürcü, Erkam; Göksel, Ferdi; Güven, Mustafa; Güzel, Yunus; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-10-01

    Boric acid (BA) has positive effects on bone tissue. In this study, the effects of BA on fracture healing were evaluated in an animal model. Standard closed femoral shaft fractures were created in 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats under general anesthesia. The rats were allocated into five groups (n = 8 each): group 1, control with no BA; groups 2 and 3, oral BA at doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/day, respectively; group 4, local BA (8 mg/kg); and group 5, both oral and local BA (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg locally). After closed fracture creation, the fracture line was opened with a mini-incision, and BA was locally administered to the fracture area in groups 4 and 5. In groups 2, 3, and 5, BA was administered by gastric gavage daily until sacrifice. The rats were evaluated by clinical, radiological, and histological examinations. The control group (group 1) significantly differed from the local BA-exposed groups (groups 4 and 5) in the clinical evaluation. Front-rear and lateral radiographs revealed significant differences between the local BA-exposed groups and the control and other groups (p < 0.05). Clinical and radiological evaluations demonstrated adequate agreement between observers. The average histological scores significantly differed across groups (p = 0.007) and were significantly higher in groups 4 and 5 which were the local BA (8 mg/kg) and both oral and local BA (8 mg/kg/day orally and 8 mg/kg locally), respectively, compared to the controls. This study suggests that BA may be useful in fracture healing. Further research is required to demonstrate the most effective local dosage and possible use of BA-coated implants.

  3. Flowing fluid electric conductivity logging for a deep artesian well in fractured rock with regional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Kunimaru, Takanori

    2013-03-01

    SummaryThe flowing fluid electric conductivity (FFEC) logging method is a well-logging technique that may be used to estimate flow rate, salinity, transmissivity, and hydraulic head of individual fractures or high-permeability zones intersected by a wellbore. Wellbore fluid is first replaced with fluid of a contrasting electric conductivity, then repeated FEC logging is done while the well is pumped. Zones where fluid flows into the wellbore show peaks in the FEC logs, which may be analyzed to infer inflow rate and salinity of the individual fractures. Conducting the procedure with two or more pumping rates (multi-rate FFEC logging) enables individual fracture transmissivity and hydraulic head to be determined. Here we describe the first application of the multi-rate FFEC logging method to an artesian well, using a 500-m well in fractured rock at Horonobe, Japan. An additional new factor at the site is the presence of regional groundwater flow, which heretofore has only been studied with synthetic data. FFEC logging was conducted for two different pumping rates. Several analysis techniques had to be adapted to account for the artesian nature of the well. The results were subsequently compared with independent salinity measurements and transmissivity and hydraulic head values obtained from packer tests in the same well. Despite non-ideal operating conditions, multi-rate FFEC logging successfully determined flow rate, salinity, and transmissivity of 17 conducting fractures intercepted by the logged section of the borehole, including two fractures with regional groundwater flow. Predictions of hydraulic head were less accurate, a not unexpected result in light of operational problems and the form of the equation for hydraulic head, which involves the difference between two uncertain quantities. This study illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of the multi-rate FFEC logging method applied to artesian wells. In conjunction with previous studies, it demonstrates the

  4. Evaluation of Geochemical Fracture Conductivity Alterations in Shale under Laboratory Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjic, M.; Olabode, A.

    2015-12-01

    In large scale subsurface injection of carbondioxide as obtainable in carbon sequestration programs and in environmentally friendly hydraulic fracturing processes (using supercritical CO2), rock-fluid interaction can affect reservoir and seal rocks properties which are essential in monitoring the progress of these operations. The mineralogical components of sedimentary rocks are geochemically active particularly under enormous earth stresses. While geomechanical properties such as rock stiffness, Poisson's ratio and fracture geometry largely govern fluid flow characteristics in deep fractured formations, the effect of mineralization can lead to flow impedance in the presence of favorable geochemical and thermodynamic conditions. Experimental works which employed the use of analytical tools such as ICP-OES, XRD, SEM/EDS, TOC and BET techniques in investigating diagenetic and micro-structural properties of crushed shale caprock/CO2-brine system concluded that net precipitation reaction processes can affect the distribution of petrophysical nanopores in the shale as a result of rock-fluid interactions. Simulation results previously reported, suggest that influx-induced mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within clay-based sedimentary rocks can continuously close micro-fracture networks, though injection pressure and effective-stress transformation first rapidly expand these fractures. This experimental modelling research investigated the impact of in-situ geochemical precipitation on conductivity of fractures under geomechanical stress conditions. Conductivity is measured as differential-pressure drop equivalence, using a pressure pulse-decay liquid permeametry/core flooding system, as geochemically saturated-fluid is transported through composite cores with embedded micro-tubings that mimic fractures. The reactive fluid is generated from crushed shale rocks of known mineralogical composition when flooded with aqueous CO2 at elevated temperature and pressure

  5. Crosswell seismic investigation of hydraulically conductive, fracture bedrock near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Hsieh, P.A.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire (USA), hydraulically conductive, fractured bedrock was investigated with the crosswell seismic method to determine whether this method could provide any information about hydraulic conductivity between wells. To this end, crosswell seismic data, acoustic logs from boreholes, image logs from boreholes, and single borehole hydraulic tests were analyzed. The analysis showed that, first, the P-wave velocities from the acoustic logs tended to be higher in schist than they were in granite. (Schist and granite were the dominant rock types). Second, the P-wave velocities from the acoustic logs tended to be low near fractures. Third, the hydraulic conductivity was always low (always less than to 10-8 m/s) where no fractures intersected the borehole, but the hydraulic conductivity ranged from low to high (from less than to 10-10 m/s to 10-4 m/s) where one or more fractures intersected the borehole. Fourth, high hydraulic conductivities were slightly more frequent when the P-wave velocity was low (less than 5200 m/s) than when it was high (greater than or equal to 5200 m/s). The interpretation of this statistical relation was that the fractures tended to increase the hydraulic conductivity and to lower the P-wave velocity. This statistical relation was applied to a velocity tomogram to create a map showing the probability of high hydraulic conductivity; the map was consistent with results from independent hydraulic tests. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sustaining Fracture Area and Conductivity of Gas shale Reservoirs for Enhancing Long-term Production and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Rivera, R.; Marino, S.; Ghassemi, A.

    2010-12-01

    Natural gas from organic rich shale formations has become an increasingly important energy resource worldwide over the past decade. Extensive hydraulic fracture networks with massive contact surface areas are frequently required to achieve satisfactory economic production in these highly heterogeneous reservoirs, with permeability in the nano-Darcy range. Current operational experience in gas shale plays indicates that the loss of productive fracture area and loss of fracture conductivity, both immediate and over time, are the major factors leading to reduced flow rates, marginal production, and poor gas recovery. This theoretical and experimental project, funded by a RPSEA (Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America) program, is aimed at understanding the multiple causes of loss of fracture surface area and fracture conductivity. The main objectives of the project are: understand the multiple causes of loss of fracture area and fracture conductivity, and define solutions to mitigate the resulting loss of production. Define the types of fracture networks that are more prone to loosing fracture area and define critical parameters, for each reservoir type, (including proppant concentration, fluid interaction, relative shear displacement and others) to preserve fracture conductivity, and define an integrated methodology for evaluating reservoir properties that result in proneness to loss of fracture area and fracture conductivity, and define adequate solutions for the various reservoir types Current results include the evaluation of reservoir geology, mineralogy, reservoir properties, mechanical properties, including surface hardness, and petrologic analysis on cores representative of Barnett, Haynesville and Marcellus reservoir shales. A comparison of these properties provides an initial reference frame for identifying differences in behavior between the various reservoirs, and for anticipating the potential for embedment and loss of fracture conductivity

  7. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  8. Effective-stress-law behavior of Austin chalk rocks for deformation and fracture conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    Austin chalk core has been tested to determine the effective law for deformation of the matrix material and the stress-sensitive conductivity of the natural fractures. For deformation behavior, two samples provided data on the variations of the poroelastic parameter, {alpha}, for Austin chalk, giving values around 0.4. The effective-stress-law behavior of a Saratoga limestone sample was also measured for the purpose of obtaining a comparison with a somewhat more porous carbonate rock. {alpha} for this rock was found to be near 0.9. The low {alpha} for the Austin chalk suggests that stresses in the reservoir, or around the wellbore, will not change much with changes in pore pressure, as the contribution of the fluid pressure is small. Three natural fractures from the Austin chalk were tested, but two of the fractures were very tight and probably do not contribute much to production. The third sample was highly conductive and showed some stress sensitivity with a factor of three reduction in conductivity over a net stress increase of 3000 psi. Natural fractures also showed a propensity for permanent damage when net stressed exceeded about 3000 psi. This damage was irreversible and significantly affected conductivity. {alpha} was difficult to determine and most tests were inconclusive, although the results from one sample suggested that {alpha} was near unity.

  9. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  10. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  11. TNF Receptors Predict Hip Fracture Risk in the WHI Study and Fatty Acid Intake Does Not Modify This Association

    PubMed Central

    Ing, Steven W.; Orchard, Tonya S.; Lu, Bo; LaMonte, Michael J.; Barbour, Kamil E.; Cauley, Jane A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Chronic inflammation may increase the risk of fracture, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may reduce fracture risk via down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine gene expression and other mechanisms. Objective: We investigated associations between baseline samples of inflammatory markers, TNFα soluble receptors 1 and 2 (TNFα-sR1 and -sR2), and incident hip fracture. These associations were then tested for effect modification by dietary PUFA intake estimated by a baseline food frequency questionnaire. Design and Setting: A nested case-control study was conducted among participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (ages, 50–79 y). Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were constructed to account for the paired design. Participants: This study sampled 400 pairs of hip fracture cases and controls without incident hip fracture, matched on age, year of enrollment, and menopausal hormone use. Main Outcome Measures: Odds ratio of hip fracture by quartile of TNF soluble receptors. Results: The odds ratio of hip fracture comparing the highest to lowest quartiles was 2.24 (95% confidence interval, 1.05–4.79; P for linear trend, .048) for TNFα-sR1 and 2.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.34–5.99; P for linear trend, .011) for TNFα-sR2, adjusted for FRAX hip fracture score, nutritional variables, and selected factors impacting inflammation; there was a gradient of risk by increasing quartile in TNFα-sR1. PUFA intake did not modify these associations. Conclusions: Women with the highest levels of TNFα-sR1 and TNFα-sR2 had a greater than 2-fold increased hip fracture risk, independent of other fracture risk factors. These associations did not differ by high vs low PUFA intake. PMID:26161450

  12. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; Gainaru, C.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. Our detailed experimental studies discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. These results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  13. Field determination of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity tensor of anisotropic media 2. Methodology and application to fractured rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, P.A.; Neuman, S.P.; Stiles, G.K.; Simpson, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical solutions developed in the first paper can be used to interpret the results of cross-hole tests conducted in anisotropic porous or fractured media. Test results from a granitic rock near Oracle in southern Arizona are presented to illustrate how the method works for fractured rocks. At the site, the Oracle granite is shown to respond as a near-uniform, anisotropic medium, the hydraulic conductivity of which is strongly controlled by the orientations of major fracture sets. The cross-hole test results are shown to be consistent with the results of more than 100 single- hole packer tests conducted at the site. -from Authors

  14. Validation of non-Darcian flow effects in slug tests conducted in fractured rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk M.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryA series of rising and falling head slug tests with different initial applied head differentials (ΔHo) were conducted in open fractured dolostone and sandstone boreholes using straddle packers isolating specific depth intervals (1.5 m length) to examine the influence of non-Darcian flow. The open holes were developed and inspected using video and acoustic televiewing (ATV) to ensure that evidence of skin effects due to drilling were absent. The transmissivity (T) values obtained from both the rising and falling head slug tests were very similar at low initial applied head; however, the T values were progressively smaller at larger ΔHo, suggesting error due to non-Darcian flow. Non-Darcian flow behavior was confirmed by constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals where the injection rate (Q) vs. applied head (dH) relationship became non-linear at relatively low injection rates, and the non-Darcian data also resulted in lower T values. For a series of slug tests conducted at different ΔHo, non-Darcian flow effects gradually increased as ΔHo increased, consistent with the trends for constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals. To maintain Darcian flow conditions in the fractured dolostone and sandstone tested in this study, ΔHo must be kept small, generally less than 0.2 m. This study demonstrates that by conducting both "stepped" slug tests and constant head step tests, the Darcian flow assumption for both types of tests can be rigorously validated. However, when only slug tests are conducted, it is necessary to conduct a series of "stepped" slug tests, including tests with small applied head differentials, to avoid errors due to non-Darcian flow.

  15. Electrophilic acid gas-reactive fluid, proppant, and process for enhanced fracturing and recovery of energy producing materials

    DOEpatents

    Fernandez, Carlos A.; Heldebrant, David J.; Bonneville, Alain H. R.; Jung, Hun Bok; Carroll, Kenneth

    2016-09-20

    An electrophilic acid gas-reactive fracturing and recovery fluid, proppant, and process are detailed. The fluid expands in volume to provide rapid and controlled increases in pressure that enhances fracturing in subterranean bedrock for recovery of energy-producing materials. Proppants stabilize openings in fractures and fissures following fracturing.

  16. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  17. Ionic conductivity and glass transition of phosphoric acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yangyang; Lane, Nathan A; Sun, Che-Nan; Fan, Fei; Zawodzinski, Thomas; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the low-temperature dielectric and viscoelastic properties of phosphoric acids in the range of H2O:P2O5 1.5 5. Both dielectric and viscosity measurements allow us to determine the glass-transition temperatures of phosphoric acids. The obtained glass-transition temperatures are in good agreement with previous differential scanning calorimetric measurements. Moreover, our analysis reveals moderate decoupling of ionic conductivity from structural relaxation in the vicinity of the glass transition.

  18. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  19. Ferromagnetic Conducting Lignosulfonic Acid-doped Polyaniline Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswansthan, Tito (Inventor); Berry, Brian (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A conductive ferromagnetic composition of matter comprising sulfonated lignin or a sulfonated polyflavonoid, or derivatives thereof, and ferromagnetic iron oxide particles is disclosed. Among the uses of the composition is to shield electromagnetic radiation. The ferromagnetic iron oxide particles of the composition are surprisingly stable to acid, and are easily and inexpensively formed from iron cations in solution.

  20. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A.

  1. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  2. Effect of citric acid irrigation on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Barutcigil, Cagatay; Karatas, Ertugrul; Topcuoglu, Huseyin Sinan; Yeter, Kubra Yesildal; Ersoy, Ibrahim; Ayrancı, Leyla Benan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of citric acid irrigation on root fracture in different concentrations and at various time exposures on root fracture. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight human mandibular incisors with similar dimensions were selected. The specimens were decoronated, then divided into 6 groups as follows: A group without instrumentation and filling (G1) and the 5 other groups with canal preparation and irrigation of distilled water (G2), 10% citric acid for 1 min (G3), 50% citric acid for 1 min (G4), 10% citric acid for 10 min (G5), and 50% citric acid for 10 min (G6). In the experimental groups, the canals were obturated and subjected to the strength test. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test (P = 0.05). Results: G6 showed the highest fracture resistance (629.97 N), and G3 showed the lowest fracture resistance (507.76 N). However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that use of citric acid is safe in terms of fracture resistance. PMID:24966750

  3. Fatty acids in sparry calcite fracture fills and microsparite cement of septarian diagenetic concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, M. J.; Hendry, J. P.; Taylor, C. W.; Russell, M. A.

    2005-04-01

    Sparry calcite fracture fills and concretion body cements in concretions from the Flodigarry Shale Member of the Staffin Shale Formation, Isle of Skye, Scotland, entrap and preserve mineral and organic materials of sedimentary and diagenetic origin. Fatty acids are a major component of the lipids recovered by decarbonation and comprise mainly n-alkanoic and α-ω dicarboxylic acids. Two generations of fracture-fill calcite (early brown and later yellow) and the concretion body microspar yield significantly different fatty acid profiles. Early brown calcites yield mainly medium-chain n-alkanoic acids with strong even predominance; later yellow calcites are dominated by α-ω dicarboxylic acids with no even predominance. Both fracture fills lack the long-chain n-alkanoic and α-ω dicarboxylic acids additionally recovered from the concretion bodies. The absence of longer chain acids in the calcite spar fracture fills is inferred to result from the transport of fatty acids by septarian mineralising fluids whereby low-aqueous solubility of longer chain acids or their salts accounts for their relative immobility. Comparative experiments have been carried out using conventional solvent extraction on the concretion body and associated shales, both decarbonated and untreated. Extracted lipid yields are higher, but the fatty acids probably derive from mixed locations in the rock including both kerogen- and carbonate-associated lipid pools. Only experiments involving decarbonation yielded α-ω dicarboxylic acids in molecular distributions probably controlled mainly by fluid transport. Alkane biomarker ratios indicate very low thermal maturity has been experienced by the concretions and their host sediments. Septarian cracks lined by brown calcite formed during early burial. Microbial CO 2 from sulphate-reducing bacteria was probably the main source of mineralising carbonate. Emplacement of the later septarian fills probably involved at least one episode of fluid invasion.

  4. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  5. Geochemical modelling of EGS fracture stimulation applying weak and strong acid treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigfusson, Bergur; Sif Pind Aradottir, Edda

    2015-04-01

    Engineered Geothermal systems (EGS) provide geothermal power by tapping into the Earth's deep geothermal resources that are otherwise not exploitable due to lack of water and fractures, location or rock type. EGS technologies have the potential to cost effectively produce large amounts of electricity almost anywhere in the world. The EGS technology creates permeability in the rock by hydro-fracturing the reservoir with cold water pumped into the first well (the injection well) at a high pressure. The second well (the production well) intersects the stimulated fracture system and returns the hot water to the surface where electricity can be generated. A significant technological hurdle is ensuring effective connection between the wells and the fracture system and to control the deep-rooted fractures (can exceed 5 000 m depth). A large area for heat transfer and sufficient mass flow needs to be ensured between wells without creating fast flowing paths in the fracture network. Maintaining flow through the fracture system can cause considerable energy penalty to the overall process. Therefore, chemical methods to maintain fractures and prevent scaling can be necessary to prevent excessive pressure build up in the re-injection wells of EGS systems. The effect of different acid treatments on the porosity development of selected rock types was simulated with the aid of the Petrasim interface to the Toughreact simulation code. The thermodynamic and kinetic database of Aradottir et al. (2014) was expanded to include new minerals and the most important fluoride bearing species involved in mineral reactions during acid stimulation of geothermal systems. A series of simulations with injection waters containing fluoric acid, hydrochloric acid and CO2 or mixtures thereof were then carried out and porosity development in the fracture system monitored. The periodic injection of weak acid mixtures into EGS systems may be cost effective in some isolated cases to prevent pressure

  6. IDENTIFYING HYDRAULICALLY CONDUCTIVE FRACTURES WITH A SLOW-VELOCITY BOREHOLE FLOWMETER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Alfred E.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey used a recently developed heat-pulse flowmeter to measure very slow borehole axial water velocities in granitic rock at a site near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. The flowmeter was used with other geophysical measurements to locate and identify hydraulically conducting fractures contributing to the very slow vertical water flow in the two boreholes selected for study. The heat-pulse flowmeter has a flow-measuring range in water of 0. 06-6m/min, and can resolve velocity differences as slow as 0. 01 m/min. This is an order of magnitude slower than the stall speed of spinner flowmeters. The flowmeter is 1. 16 m long and 44 mm in diameter. It was calibrated in columns of 76 and 152 mm diameter, to correspond to the boreholes studied. The heat-pulse flowmeter system is evaluated, and problems peculiar to the measurement of very slow axial water velocities in boreholes are discussed.

  7. Electrospun poly(lactic acid) based conducting nanofibrous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Ray, S.; Easteal, A. J.

    2009-08-01

    Multi-functionalised micro/nanostructures of conducting polymers in neat or blended forms have received much attention because of their unique properties and technological applications in electrical, magnetic and biomedical devices. Biopolymer-based conducting fibrous mats are of special interest for tissue engineering because they not only physically support tissue growth but also are electrically conductive, and thus are able to stimulate specific cell functions or trigger cell responses. They are effective for carrying current in biological environments and can thus be considered for delivering local electrical stimuli at the site of damaged tissue to promote wound healing. Electrospinning is an established way to process polymer solutions or melts into continuous fibres with diameter often in the nanometre range. This process primarily depends on a number of parameters, including the type of polymer, solution viscosity, polarity and surface tension of the solvent, electric field strength and the distance between the spinneret and the collector. The present research has included polyaniline (PANi) as the conducting polymer and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) as the biopolymer. Dodecylbenzene sulphonic acid (DBSA) doped PANi and PLLA have been dissolved in a common solvent (mixtures of chloroform and dimethyl formamide (DMF)), and the solutions successfully electrospun. DMF enhanced the dielectric constant of the solvent, and tetra butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) was used as an additive to increase the conductivity of the solution. DBSA-doped PANi/PLLA mat exhibits an almost bead-free network of nanofibres that have extraordinarily smooth surface and diameters in the range 75 to 100 nm.

  8. Reflection seismic imaging of a hydraulically conductive fracture zone in a high noise area, Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, C.; Stephens, M. B.; Cosma, C.

    2007-05-01

    borehole shows that the reflection corresponds to a hydraulically conductive fracture zone that was intersected at about 320 m depth.

  9. Tranexamic acid in hip fracture patients: a protocol for a randomised, placebo controlled trial on the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Gausden, Elizabeth Bishop; Garner, Matthew R; Warner, Stephen J; Levack, Ashley; Nellestein, Andrew M; Tedore, Tiffany; Flores, Eva; Lorich, Dean G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a high incidence of blood transfusion following hip fractures in elderly patients. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has proven efficacy in decreasing blood loss in general trauma patients as well as patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. A randomised controlled trial will measure the effect of TXA in a population of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. Methods This is a double-blinded, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Patients admitted through the emergency room that are diagnosed with an intertrochanteric or femoral neck fracture will be eligible for enrolment and randomised to either treatment with 1 g of intravenous TXA or intravenous saline at the time of skin incision. Patients undergoing percutaneous intervention for non-displaced or minimally displaced femoral neck fractures will not be eligible for enrolment. Postoperative transfusion rates will be recorded and blood loss will be calculated from serial haematocrits. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and is registered with clinicaltrials.gov. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT01940536. PMID:27329438

  10. Does the deoxyribonucleic acid shape dictate its conductivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Polcari, A.; Granata, V.; Sabatino, L.; Colantuoni, V.

    2009-05-01

    We present the evolution of current-voltage characteristics measured on linear fragments of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules as a function of their length. The nonlinear behavior systematically observed at room temperature and also reported on circular plasmids suggests that the more molecules are involved in the conduction process, the higher are the current values measured. At the same time, a characteristic steplike feature superimposed to an overall increasing background appears more pronounced. We interpret this behavior in terms of simultaneous coherent and incoherent transport processes, the former taking place inside the DNA molecule, the latter through the network of molecules. Following our previous analysis on circular molecules, a phenomenological model is developed, in which a tunneling current with an energy dependent transmission coefficient is superimposed to a hopping current. The model provides a semiquantitative evidence that the steplike feature represents the signature of charge transmission inside the molecule. Our results are consistent with many of the conductivity data present in the literature.

  11. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with

  12. Polaron conductivity mechanism in potassium acid phthalate crystal: AC-conductivity investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipič, Cene; Levstik, Iva; Levstik, Adrijan; Hadži, Dušan

    2016-08-01

    The complex dielectric constant, \\varepsilon *(ν ,T), of potassium acid phthalate monocrystal (KAP) was investigated over the broad frequency and temperature range. While the imaginary part of dielectric constant ε‧‧(ν) increases rapidly with increasing temperature in the studied temperature range, the real part of dielectric constant ε‧(ν) increases only at high temperatures; there is almost no change of ε‧(ν) below 200 K. Both values of ε‧ and ε‧‧ are frequency dependent; the values increase with decreasing frequencies. At temperatures below 450 K the ac electrical conductivity and dielectric constant follow simultaneously the universal dielectric response (UDR). The analysis of the temperature dependence of the UDR parameter s in terms of the theoretical model for small polarons revealed that this mechanism governs the charge transport in KAP crystal in the studied temperature range.

  13. Acid secretion and proton conductance in human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Illek, Beate

    2002-04-01

    Acid secretion and proton conductive pathways across primary human airway surface epithelial cultures were investigated with the pH stat method in Ussing chambers and by single cell patch clamping. Cultures showed a basal proton secretion of 0.17 +/- 0.04 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), and mucosal pH equilibrated at 6.85 +/- 0.26. Addition of histamine or ATP to the mucosal medium increased proton secretion by 0.27 +/- 0.09 and 0.24 +/- 0.09 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), respectively. Addition of mast cells to the mucosal medium of airway cultures similarly activated proton secretion. Stimulated proton secretion was similar in cultures bathed mucosally with either NaCl Ringer or ion-free mannitol solutions. Proton secretion was potently blocked by mucosal ZnCl(2) and was unaffected by mucosal bafilomycin A(1), Sch-28080, or ouabain. Mucosal amiloride blocked proton secretion in tissues that showed large amiloride-sensitive potentials. Proton secretion was sensitive to the application of transepithelial current and showed outward rectification. In whole cell patch-clamp recordings a strongly outward-rectifying, zinc-sensitive, depolarization-activated proton conductance was identified with an average chord conductance of 9.2 +/- 3.8 pS/pF (at 0 mV and a pH 5.3-to-pH 7.3 gradient). We suggest that inflammatory processes activate proton secretion by the airway epithelium and acidify the airway surface liquid.

  14. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  15. Determining the distribution of hydraulic conductivity in a fractured limestone aquifer by simultaneous injection and geophysical logging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.; Hess, A.E.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1988-01-01

    A field technique for assessing the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in an aquifer was applied to a fractured carbonate formation in southeastern Nevada. The technique combines the simultaneous use of fluid injection and geophysical logging to measure in situ vertical distributions of fluid velocity and hydraulic head down the borehole; these data subsequently are analyzed to arrive at quantitative estimates of hydraulic conductivity across discrete intervals in the aquifer. The results of this analysis identified the contact margin between the Anchor and Dawn Members of the Monte Cristo Limestone as being the dominant transmissive unit. -from Authors

  16. Phosphonic Acids for Interfacial Engineering of Transparent Conductive Oxides.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Sergio A; Giordano, Anthony J; Smith, O'Neil L; Barlow, Stephen; Li, Hong; Armstrong, Neal R; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Ginger, David; Marder, Seth R

    2016-06-22

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), such as indium tin oxide and zinc oxide, play an important role as electrode materials in organic-semiconductor devices. The properties of the inorganic-organic interface-the offset between the TCO Fermi level and the relevant transport level, the extent to which the organic semiconductor can wet the oxide surface, and the influence of the surface on semiconductor morphology-significantly affect device performance. This review surveys the literature on TCO modification with phosphonic acids (PAs), which has increasingly been used to engineer these interfacial properties. The first part outlines the relevance of TCO surface modification to organic electronics, surveys methods for the synthesis of PAs, discusses the modes by which they can bind to TCO surfaces, and compares PAs to alternative organic surface modifiers. The next section discusses methods of PA monolayer deposition, the kinetics of monolayer formation, and structural evidence regarding molecular orientation on TCOs. The next sections discuss TCO work-function modification using PAs, tuning of TCO surface energy using PAs, and initiation of polymerizations from TCO-tethered PAs. Finally, studies that examine the use of PA-modified TCOs in organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaics are compared. PMID:27227316

  17. Fatigue and fracture behavior of high strength and high conductivity copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meimei

    High strength, high conductivity copper alloys are candidate materials for high heat flux applications in fusion systems. In these applications, copper alloys must withstand exposure in extreme irradiation and thermal conditions. Most studies have concentrated on the influence of temperature, environment, irradiation exposure and microstructure on tensile properties. Relatively few studies have been performed on fatigue and fracture behavior of these alloys. This work aims to characterize and understand fracture, fatigue and creep-fatigue for three copper alloys, dispersion-strengthened CuAl25, and precipitation-hardened CuCrZr and CuNiBe. The role of temperature and environment on the fracture behavior of copper alloys was examined in vacuum between 20 and 300°C. This was accomplished through mechanical tests, microstructural examination and in-situ TEM straining experiments. The results showed that all three copper alloys experienced a loss of fracture resistance at elevated temperatures. Environment is not the single, or even most important, factor contributing to poor toughness at high temperatures. The evaluation of fracture mechanisms revealed that grain boundaries have a significant impact on the fracture behavior of copper alloys. The influence of irradiation on the fatigue behavior of two selected copper alloys, CuAl25 and CuCrZr, was evaluated. The fatigue lives were estimated from tensile properties using the Universal Slopes method. It was found that the influence of irradiation on fatigue performance was not as severe as on tensile properties. The Universal Slopes method provides a reasonable prediction of fatigue response for most unirradiated and irradiated conditions. The fatigue performance of CuAl25 and CuCrZr and OFHC copper was also evaluated under creep-fatigue loading conditions. It was found that creep and stress relaxation have a major impact on fatigue behavior. Fatigue lives were reduced notably with hold time even at room temperature

  18. Dietary intakes of arachidonic acid and alpha-linolenic acid are associated with reduced risk of hip fracture in older adults.

    PubMed

    Farina, Emily K; Kiel, Douglas P; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Schaefer, Ernst J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Tucker, Katherine L

    2011-06-01

    PUFA are hypothesized to influence bone health, but longitudinal studies on hip fracture risk are lacking. We examined associations between intakes of PUFA and fish, and hip fracture risk among older adults (n = 904) in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Participants (mean age ~75 y at baseline) were followed for incident hip fracture from the time they completed the baseline exam (1988-1989) until December 31, 2005. HR and 95% CI were estimated for energy-adjusted dietary fatty acid exposure variables [(n-3) fatty acids: α-linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, DHA, EPA+DHA; (n-6) fatty acids: linoleic acid, arachidonic acid (AA); and the (n-6):(n-3) ratio] and fish intake categories, adjusting for potential confounders and covariates. Protective associations were observed between intakes of ALA (P-trend = 0.02) and hip fracture risk in a combined sample of women and men and between intakes of AA (P-trend = 0.05) and hip fracture risk in men only. Participants in the highest quartile of ALA intake had a 54% lower risk of hip fracture than those in the lowest quartile (Q4 vs. Q1: HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.26-0.83). Men in the highest quartile of AA intake had an 80% lower risk of hip fracture than those in the lowest quartile (Q4 vs. Q1: HR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.04-0.96). No significant associations were observed among intakes of EPA, DHA, EPA+DHA, or fish. These findings suggest dietary ALA may reduce hip fracture risk in women and men and dietary AA may reduce hip fracture risk in men.

  19. Proteins, dietary acid load, and calcium and risk of postmenopausal fractures in the E3N French women prospective study.

    PubMed

    Dargent-Molina, Patricia; Sabia, Sèverine; Touvier, Mathilde; Kesse, Emmanuelle; Bréart, Gérard; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine

    2008-12-01

    Excess dietary proteins and "acid ash" diets have been suspected to increase the risk of osteoporosis, but experimental and epidemiological evidence is mixed. We aimed to determine whether the association between protein intake and the overall acid-base equilibrium of the diet (as renal net acid excretion [RNAE] estimate) and fracture risk vary according to calcium intake. During an average of 8.37 +/- 1.73 yr of follow-up, 2408 women reported a fracture (excluding high-impact trauma) among 36,217 postmenopausal women from the E3N prospective study. We used Cox regression models to study the interaction between calcium and, respectively, proteins and RNAE, from the 1993 dietary questionnaire for fracture risk determination, adjusting for potential confounders. There was no overall association between fracture risk and total protein or RNAE. However, in the lowest quartile of calcium (<400 mg/1000 kcal), high protein intake was associated with a significant increased fracture risk (RR = 1.51 for highest versus lowest quartile; 95% CI, 1.17-1.94). An increasing fracture risk with increasing animal protein intake was also observed (trend, p < 0.0001). A similar pattern of interaction for fracture risk was observed between RNAE and calcium. In this Western population of postmenopausal women with normal to high protein intake and fairly high calcium intake, there was no overall association between total protein or RNAE and fracture risk. However, there was some evidence that high protein-high acid ash diets were associated with an increased risk of fracture when calcium intake was low (<400 mg/1000 kcal). PMID:18665794

  20. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27416518

  1. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  3. Measuring Changes in Electrical Conductivity of Fractures from DC Resistivity Data in an Active Oilfield Environment: A Model Study for Surface-Based Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. J.; Aldridge, D. F.; Knox, H. A.; Schramm, K. A.; Bartel, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Presented here are preliminary results of a numerical modeling study on the feasibility of using DC resistivity data to make useful inferences on depth, size and orientation of subsurface fracture systems in an active oilfield environment. Specifically, we consider an experiment where the steel-cased borehole (consisting of a shallow, vertical section and deep, horizontal section) is one electrode of the DC source, with the other source electrode grounded at the Air/Earth interface some distance away. For simplicity, the fractures are modeled as short sequence of vertical sheets intersecting the horizontal section of the well casing. Finite element analysis of this system shows that as fracture conductivity is elevated, two effects (at least) are observed: a local perturbation in the electric potential in the vicinity of the fracture set, with limited far-field expression; and, an overall change in the electric potential of the entire borehole casing due to current leakage at the site of the fractures. Under ideal conditions, our results suggest that far-field, time-lapse measurements of DC potentials surrounding a borehole casing can be reliably interpreted by simple, linear inversion for a Coulomb charge distribution along the borehole path, including a local charge perturbation due to the fractures. In contrast to regularized, nonlinear 3D inversion of broadband EM or DC data, this approach offers an inexpensive method for detecting and monitoring the time-evolution of electrically conducting fractures while ultimately providing an estimate of their effective conductivity - the latter providing an important measure independent of seismic methods on fracture shape, size, and hydraulic connectivity.

  4. Conducting Polymer Based Nucleic Acid Sensor for Environment Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Bansi Dhar; Prabhakar, Nirmal; Solanki, Pratima R.

    Nucleic acid sensor based on polyaniline has been fabricated by covalently immobilizing double stranded calf thymus (dsCT) DNA onto perchlorate (ClO-4) doped polyaniline (PANI) film deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass plate using 1-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS) chemistry. These dsCT-DNA-PANI/ITO and PANI/ITO electrodes have been characterized using square wave voltammetry, electrochemical impedance, and Fourier-transform-infra-red (FTIR) measurements. This disposable dsCT-DNA-PANI/ITO bioelectrode is stable for about four months, can be used to detect arsenic trioxide (0.1ppm) in 30s.

  5. Relations among water levels, specific conductance, and depths of bedrock fractures in four road-salt-contaminated wells in Maine, 2007–9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Stasulis, Nicholas W.

    2012-01-01

    Data on groundwater-level, specific conductance (a surrogate for chloride), and temperature were collected continuously from 2007 through 2009 at four bedrock wells known to be affected by road salts in an effort to determine the effects of road salting and fractures in bedrock that intersect the well at a depth below the casing on the presence of chloride in groundwater. Dissolved-oxygen data collected periodically also were used to make inferences about the interaction of fractures and groundwater flow. Borehole geophysical tools were used to determine the depths of fractures in each well that were actively contributing flow to the well, under both static and pumped conditions; sample- and measurement-depths were selected to correspond to the depths of these active fractures. Samples of water from the wells, collected at depths corresponding to active bedrock fractures, were analyzed for chloride concentration and specific conductance; from these analyses, a linear relation between chloride concentration and specific conductance was established, and continuous and periodic measurements of specific conductance were assumed to represent chloride concentration of the well water at the depth of measurement. To varying degrees, specific conductance increased in at least two of the wells during winter and spring thaws; the shallowest well, which also was closest to the road receiving salt treatment during the winter, exhibited the largest changes in specific conductance during thaws. Recharge events during summer months, long after application of road salt had ceased for the year, also produced increases in specific conductance in some of the wells, indicating that chloride which had accumulated or sequestered in the overburden was transported to the wells throughout the year. Geophysical data and periodic profiles of water quality along the length of each well’s borehole indicated that the greatest changes in water quality were associated with active fractures; in

  6. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  7. Electrical characterization of proton conducting polymer electrolyte based on bio polymer with acid dopant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvimary, J.; Pradeepa, P.; Sowmya, G.; Edwinraj, S.; Prabhu, M. Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the biodegradable acid doped films composed of chitosan and Perchloric acid with different ratios (2.5 wt %, 5 wt %, 7.5 wt %, 10 wt %) was prepared by the solution casting technique. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of complex electrolytes obeys the Arrhenius relationship. Proton conductivity of the prepared polymer electrolyte of the bio polymer with acid doped was measured to be approximately 5.90 × 10-4 Scm-1. The dielectric data were analyzed using Complex impedance Z*, Dielectric loss ɛ', Tangent loss for prepared polymer electrolyte membrane with the highest conductivity samples at various temperature.

  8. AMPHOTERIC BEHAVIOR OF COMPLEX SYSTEMS : III. THE CONDUCTIVITY OF SULFANILIC ACID-LYSIN MIXTURES.

    PubMed

    Stearn, A E

    1927-01-20

    Conductivities of sulfanilic acid, lysin, and mixtures of the two were made over a wide pH range, the pH being adjusted by means of phosphate buffers. The actual conductivities of the sulfanilic acid, the lysin, and the mixture were calculated. The difference between the conductivity of the mixture and the sum of the conductivities of the components alone passes through a maximum at a pH theoretically calculable as the isoelectric point of the system. Certain applications of the results are made to the explanation of the behavior of living tissues.

  9. DETERMINATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS BY ION-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH NON-SUPPRESSED CONDUCTIVITY AND OPTICAL DETECTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of carboxylic acids using non-suppressed conductivity and UV detections is described. The background conductance of 1-octanesulfonic acid, hexane sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid at varying concentrations was determined. Using 0.2 mM 1-octanesulfonic acid as a mobile...

  10. Once-yearly zoledronic acid and days of disability, bed rest, and back pain: randomized, controlled HORIZON Pivotal Fracture Trial.

    PubMed

    Cauley, Jane A; Black, Dennis; Boonen, Steven; Cummings, Steven R; Mesenbrink, Peter; Palermo, Lisa; Man, Zulema; Hadji, Peyman; Reid, Ian R

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of once-yearly zoledronic acid on the number of days of back pain and the number of days of disability (ie, limited activity and bed rest) owing to back pain or fracture in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 240 clinical centers in 27 countries. Participants included 7736 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Patients were randomized to receive either a single 15-minute intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) or placebo at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months. The main outcome measures were self-reported number of days with back pain and the number of days of limited activity and bed rest owing to back pain or a fracture, and this was assessed every 3 months over a 3-year period. Our results show that although the incidence of back pain was high in both randomized groups, women randomized to zoledronic acid experienced, on average, 18 fewer days of back pain compared with placebo over the course of the trial (p = .0092). The back pain among women randomized to zoledronic acid versus placebo resulted in 11 fewer days of limited activity (p = .0017). In Cox proportional-hazards models, women randomized to zoledronic acid were about 6% less likely to experience 7 or more days of back pain [relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90-0.99] or limited activity owing to back pain (RR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.87-1.00). Women randomized to zoledronic acid were significantly less likely to experience 7 or more bed-rest days owing to a fracture (RR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.47-0.72) and 7 or more limited-activity days owing to a fracture (RR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.58-0.78). Reductions in back pain with zoledronic acid were independent of incident fracture. Our conclusion is that in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, a once-yearly infusion with zoledronic acid over a 3-year period significantly reduced the

  11. DYNAMIC CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS IN HUMIC AND FULVIC ACID SOLUTIONS. (R828158)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conductivity changes of dilute aqueous humic and fulvic acids solutions were monitored after the addition of small quantities of Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn. The solutions were stirred at a constant and reproducible rate, and measurements proceeded until stable conductivities were atta...

  12. Structure and Proton Conductivity in Mixtures of Poly(acrylic acid) and Imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Chang; Griffin, Philip J.; Winey, Karen I.; University of Pennsylvania Team

    2015-03-01

    Proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) typically involves water, which requires that during operation the humidity of the PEM be carefully controlled. In contrast, anhydrous protic polymer membranes promote proton transport by incorporating heterocyclic molecules, such as imidazole and its derivatives, into acid-containing polymers. In this work, we explore the interplay between nanoscale-structure and proton conduction of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) blended at varying compositions with 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (EMI). We present the glass transition temperature from differential scanning calorimetry, morphology characterization from X-ray scattering, and proton conductivity from electrical impedance spectroscopy.

  13. Enhanced charge transport in highly conducting PEDOT-PSS films after acid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiva, V. Akshaya; Bhatia, Ravi; Menon, Reghu

    The high electrical conductivity, good stability, high strength, flexibility and good transparency of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS), make it useful for many applications including polymeric anodes for organic photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, flexible electrodes, supercapacitors, electrochromic devices, field-effect transistors and antistatic-coatings. However, the electrical conductivity of PEDOT-PSS has to be increased significantly for replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the transparent electrode in optoelectronic devices. The as prepared (pristine) PEDOT-PSS film prepared from the PEDOT-PSS aqueous solution usually has conductivity below 1Scm-1, remarkably lower than ITO. Significant conductivity enhancement has been observed on transparent and conductive PEDOT-PSS films after a treatment with inorganic acids. Our study investigates the charge transport in pristine and H2SO4, HNO3, HCl treated PEDOT-PSS films. We have treated the films with various concentrations of acids to probe the effect of the acid treatment on the conduction mechanism. The study includes the measurement of dc and electric field dependent conductivity of films in the temperature range of 4.2K-300K. We have also performed magneto-resistance measurements in the range of 0-5T. An enhancement by a factor of~103 has been observed in the room temperature conductivity. The detailed magneto-transport studies explain the various mechanisms for the conductivity enhancement observed.

  14. Enhancing proton conduction via doping of supramolecular liquid crystals (4-alkoxybenzoic acids) with imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ting; Wu, Yong; Tan, Shuai; Yang, Xiaohui; Wei, Bingzhuo

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing proton conduction via doping was first achieved in hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals consisting of benzoic acids. Supramolecular liquid crystals formed by pure 4-alkoxybenzoic acids (nAOBA, n = 8, 10, 12) exhibited the maximum proton conductivity of 5.0 × 10-8 S cm-1. Doping of nAOBA with 25 mol% imidazole (Im0.25) had little impact on mesomorphism but increased proton conductivities by at least 3 orders of magnitude. The liquid crystals formed by nAOBA-Im0.25 exhibited the maximum proton conductivity of 1.9 × 10-4 S cm-1. It was proposed that structure diffusion of imidazole bridged interdimer proton transfer to form continuous conducting pathways in mesomorphic nAOBA-Im0.25.

  15. Mechanism of Efficient Proton Conduction in Diphosphoric Acid Elucidated via First-Principles Simulation and NMR.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Rachel A; Vilčiauskas, Linas; Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Bester, Gabriel; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-12-31

    Diphosphoric acid (H4P2O7) is the first condensation product of phosphoric acid (H3PO4), the compound with the highest intrinsic proton conductivity in the liquid state. It exists at higher temperature (T > 200 °C) and lower relative humidity (RH ≈ 0.01%) and shows significant ionic conductivity under these conditions. In this work, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a pure H4P2O7 model system and NMR spectroscopy on nominal H4P2O7 (which contains significant amounts of ortho- and triphosphoric acid in thermodynamic equilibrium) were performed to reveal the nature and underlying mechanisms of the ionic conductivity. The central oxygen of the molecule is found to be excluded from any hydrogen bonding, which has two interesting consequences: (i) compared to H3PO4, the acidity of H4P2O7 is severely increased, and (ii) the condensation reaction only leads to a minor decrease in hydrogen bond network frustration, which is thought to be one of the features enabling high proton conductivity. A topological analysis of diphosphoric acid's hydrogen bond network shows remarkable similarities to that of phosphonic acid (H3PO3). The hydrogen bonding facilitates protonic polarization fluctuations (Zundel polarization) extending over several molecules (Grotthuss chains), the other important ingredient for efficient structural diffusion of protons. At T = 160 °C, this is estimated to make a conductivity contribution of about 0.1 S/cm, which accounts for half of the total ionic conductivity (σ ≈ 0.2 S/cm). The other half is suggested to result from diffusion of charged phosphate species (vehicle mechanism) that are present in high concentration, resembling conduction in ionic liquids. PMID:26633234

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C

    2007-10-31

    Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

  17. Conceptualizing Spatially Dynamic Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions along a Fractured Sedimentary Bedrock Riverbed through Electrical Resistivity and Induced Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, C. M.; Kennedy, C. S.; Parker, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Eramosa River located within the Grand River Watershed in Ontario, Canada, resides upon a densely fractured dolostone aquifer with abundant dissolution-enhanced channel features. While the bedrock aquifer represents a major component of the total water supply for the surrounding region, potential effects of increased groundwater extraction on surface water and surrounding ecosystems are not yet fully understood. In general, little is known about the nature of the interaction between surface water and groundwater along densely fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbeds. For instance, the timing and magnitude of groundwater discharge to surface water and surface water recharge in a fractured carbonate rock environment is expected to differ significantly from its alluvial channel analogs due to the presence of highly transmissive, planar and strongly orientated discrete fracture features that control flow. Non-invasive geophysical methods represent an opportunity to evaluate shallow groundwater dynamics with minimal environmental risk to biota and, ultimately enhance the interpretation of direct hydrogeologic data. Preliminary spatial electrical conductivity measurements collected along a 200 m reach of the river, suggests a seasonally dynamic hyporheic response over a riffle-pool sequence. Based on these results, time-lapse electrical resistivity measurements are being collected every 2-3 weeks along two ~50 m transects perpendicular to the river: the first transect considers changes across an intact bedrock section with exposed vertical and horizontal fracturing along the riverbed, while the second is positioned across a weathered bedrock section with a thin layer of course gravel and sand alluvium. The objective of this study is to collect electrical resistivity snapshots across the riverbed (6-8 m depths) to non-invasively quantify temporal and spatial changes in groundwater-surface water mixing from low to high-stage periods through multiple seasonal cycles

  18. Relevance of Aromatic Amino Acids for Electron Conduction along Geobacter Pili Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Malvankar, Nikhil; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    It has been proposed that the charge transport though Geobacter sulfurreducens pili protein occurs through the aromatic amino acids forming helical conducting chain within pili. X-ray studies of pili show that the aromatic amino acids are packed close enough (3-4 Å) for pi-stacking to occur. Conductivity of the pili network increases with lowering temperature indicating metallic-like transport mechanism. However due to the complexity of charge percolation path in 3D network, the intrinsic conductivity of an individual pili was not known. Here, we report transport measurements of individual pili of G. sulfurreducens. The conductivity, similar to that of organic polymers, shows that the pili may have implications in materials research. In addition, the conductivity value is sufficient to explain the respiration rate of the G. sulfurreducens. Further studies of pili from different natural and genetically modified species with varying amount of aromatic amino acid density demonstrate that it can play a decisive role on the magnitude of the conductivity. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CHM). Nikhil S. Malvankar holds a Career Award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  19. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  20. Measurement of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity on fractured rock outcrops near Altamura (Southern Italy) with an adjustable large ring infiltrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, M.C.; de Carlo, L.; Masciopinto, C.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, field studies set up to measure field-saturated hydraulic conductivity to evaluate contamination risks, have employed small cylinders that may not be representative of the scale of measurements in heterogeneous media. In this study, a large adjustable ring infiltrometer was designed to be installed on-site directly on rock to measure its field-saturated hydraulic conductivity. The proposed device is inexpensive and simple to implement, yet also very versatile, due to its large adjustable diameter that can be fixed on-site. It thus allows an improved representation of the natural system's heterogeneity, while also taking into consideration irregularities in the soil/rock surface. The new apparatus was tested on an outcrop of karstic fractured limestone overlying the deep Murge aquifer in the South of Italy, which has recently been affected by untreated sludge disposal, derived from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants. The quasi-steady vertical flow into the unsaturated fractures was investigated by measuring water levels during infiltrometer tests. Simultaneously, subsurface electrical resistivity measurements were used to visualize the infiltration of water in the subsoil, due to unsaturated water flow in the fractures. The proposed experimental apparatus works well on rock outcrops, and allows the repetition of infiltration tests at many locations in order to reduce model uncertainties in heterogeneous media. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Abiogenic and Microbial Controls on Volatile Fatty Acids in Precambrian Crustal Fracture Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Heuer, V.; Tille, S.; Moran, J.; Slater, G.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; Glein, C. R.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2015-12-01

    Saline fracture waters within the Precambrian Shield rocks of Canada and South Africa have been sequestered underground over geologic timescales up to 1.1-1.8 Ga [1, 2]. These fluids are rich in H2 derived from radiolysis and hydration of mafic and ultramafic rocks [1, 2, 3] and host a low-biomass, low-diversity microbial ecosystem at some sites [2]. The abiogenic or biogenic nature of geochemical processes has important implications for bioavailable carbon sources and the role played by abiotic organic synthesis in sustaining a chemosynthetic deep biosphere. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are simple carboxylic acids that may support microbial communities in such environments, such as those found in terrestrial [4] and deep-sea [5] hot springs. We present abundance and δ13C analysis for VFAs in a spectrum of Canadian Shield fluids characterized by varying dissolved H2, CH4, and C2+ n-alkane compositions. Isotope mass balance indicates that microbially mediated fermentation of carbon-rich graphitic sulfides may produce the elevated levels of acetate (39-273 μM) found in Birchtree and Thompson mine. In contrast, thermodynamic considerations and isotopic signatures of the notably higher acetate (1.2-1.9 mM), as well as formate and propionate abundances (371-816 μM and 20-38 μM, respectively) found at Kidd Creek mine suggest a role for abiogenic production via reduction of dissolved inorganic carbon with H2 for formate, and oxidation of C2+ n-alkanes for acetate and propionate, along with possible microbial cycling. VFAs comprise the bulk of dissolved and total organic carbon in the mines surveyed, and as such represent a potential key substrate for life. [1] Holland et al. (2013) Nature 497: 367-360. [2] Lin et al. (2006) Science 314: 479-482. [3] Sherwood Lollar et al. (2014) Nature 516: 379-382. [4] Windman et al. (2007) Astrobiology 7(6): 873-890. [5] Lang et al. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 92: 82-99.

  2. Electrically conducting silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-08-01

    This article describes the synthesis of an electrically conducting silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel. The synthesis process started with grafting acrylic acid monomers onto the natural polymer guar gum by the use of ammonium persulphate as a free radical initiator in acid medium. Guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) graft copolymer was separated from the polymerization medium, purified and subjected to crosslinking treatment, using alkaline epichlorohydrin as a crosslinking agent. Silver nitrate solution was added during the crosslinking treatment in varying concentrations, that the reaction conditions affect crosslinking of guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) graft copolymer to a hydrogel, as well as reduction of silver nitrate to silver nanoparticles, giving rise to the formation of silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite. Factors affecting the grafting reaction as well as those affecting the crosslinking/reduction treatment were optimized. The so synthesized nanocomposite hydrogel samples were fully characterized, regarding their contents of silver nanoparticles and swelling ratio. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite hydrogel was studied and it was found to be affected by the swelling ratio of the hydrogel as well as its content of silver nanoparticles. PMID:24928058

  3. Electrically conducting silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-08-01

    This article describes the synthesis of an electrically conducting silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel. The synthesis process started with grafting acrylic acid monomers onto the natural polymer guar gum by the use of ammonium persulphate as a free radical initiator in acid medium. Guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) graft copolymer was separated from the polymerization medium, purified and subjected to crosslinking treatment, using alkaline epichlorohydrin as a crosslinking agent. Silver nitrate solution was added during the crosslinking treatment in varying concentrations, that the reaction conditions affect crosslinking of guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) graft copolymer to a hydrogel, as well as reduction of silver nitrate to silver nanoparticles, giving rise to the formation of silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite. Factors affecting the grafting reaction as well as those affecting the crosslinking/reduction treatment were optimized. The so synthesized nanocomposite hydrogel samples were fully characterized, regarding their contents of silver nanoparticles and swelling ratio. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite hydrogel was studied and it was found to be affected by the swelling ratio of the hydrogel as well as its content of silver nanoparticles.

  4. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  5. Synthesis and high proton conductive performance of a quaternary vanadomolybdotungstosilicic heteropoly acid.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huaxue; Wu, Xuefei; Wu, Qingyin; Yan, Wenfu

    2016-09-28

    A new vanadium and molybdenum-substituted quaternary silicon-containing heteropoly acid H6SiW9MoV2O40·15H2O has been synthesized in this paper by the stepwise acidification and the stepwise addition of elemental solutions. The structural feature and hydration of this product were characterized by IR, UV, XRD and TG-DTA, and its proton conductivity was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The result of EIS shows that H6SiW9MoV2O40·15H2O is a solid high-proton conductor with a conductivity of 6.01 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 22 °C and 80% relative humidity, which increases at higher temperatures. Its conductive activation energy is 27.5 kJ mol(-1), which suggests that the mechanism of proton conduction is dominated by the vehicle mechanism. PMID:27534508

  6. Use of weak acids to determine the bulk diffusion limitation of H+ ion conductance through the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Decker, E R; Levitt, D G

    1988-01-01

    The addition of 2 M formic acid at pH 3.75 increased the single channel H+ ion conductance of gramicidin channels 12-fold at 200 mV. Other weak acids (acetic, lactic, oxalic) produce a similar, but smaller increase. Formic acid (and other weak acids) also blocks the K+ conductance at pH 3.75, but not at pH 6.0 when the anion form predominates. This increased H+ conductance and K+ block can be explained by formic acid (HF) binding to the mouth of the gramicidin channel (Km = 1 M) and providing a source of H+ ions. A kinetic model is derived, based on the equilibrium binding of formic acid to the channel mouth, that quantitatively predicts the conductance for different mixtures of H+, K+, and formic acid. The binding of the neutral formic acid to the mouth of the gramicidin channel is directly supported by the observation that a neutral molecule with a similar structure, formamide (and malonamide and acrylamide), blocks the K+ conductance at pH 6.0. The H+ conductance in the presence of formic acid provides a lower bound for the intrinsic conductance of the gramicidin channel when there is no diffusion limitation at the channel mouth. The 12-fold increase in conductance produced by formic acid suggests that greater than 90% of the total resistance to H+ results from diffusion limitation in the bulk solution. PMID:2449253

  7. Polyaniline films and powders: Effect of excess dopant acid on conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; MacDiarmid, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    We have shown previously that excess dopant acid, d,l camphorsulfonic acid, (HCSA), when present in a solution of m-cresol containing polyaniline doped with HCSA, reduces the conductivity of films of the doped polyaniline cast from the solution. We here report that the opposite effect is observed with powders of the same doped polyaniline. Polyaniline doped with HCSA was precipitated by pouring a solution of the doped polyaniline into excess hexane; it was then washed with either methanol or methanol containing HCSA to remove the m-cresol. The quantity of HCSA in the resulting dried powders was determined using TGA techniques. It was found that excess HCSA in the doped polyaniline increased the conductivity of compressed pellets of the polymer. The conductivity was increased from {approximately}4 S/cm (no excess HCSA) to {approximately}40 S/cm in material containing twice the amount of HCSA necessary for doping. The conductivity of {approximately}40 S/cm is the highest yet reported for doped polyaniline powders. Reasons for this increase conductivity will be presented.

  8. Determination of hippuric acid in human urine by ion chromatography with conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuyong; Wang, Zonghua; Wang, Hui; Ding, Mingyu

    2011-02-01

    A simple, rapid, precise and eco-friendly ion chromatography (IC) method for the determination of hippuric acid (HA) in human urine was proposed in this paper. The separation was carried out an anion exchange column with 2.0 mmol L⁻¹ Na₂CO₃ + 2.0 mmol L⁻¹ NaHCO₃ as mobile phase at the flow-rate 0.7 mL min⁻¹. A suppressed conductivity detector was used and the detection limit was 1.0 μg L⁻¹ (S/N=3) for hippuric acid. The analysis time for one run was 30 min under the optimized IC condition. The recovery of hippuric acid was 93.2-98.0% while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.4-2.3% by seven measurements.

  9. Conductivity Measurements of Synthesized Heteropoly Acid Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Record, K.A.; Haley, B.T.; Turner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cell technology is receiving attention due to its potential to be a pollution free method of electricity production when using renewably produced hydrogen as fuel. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell H2 and O2 react at separate electrodes, producing electricity, thermal energy, and water. A key component of the PEM fuel cell is the membrane that separates the electrodes. DuPont’s Nafion® is the most commonly used membrane in PEM fuel cells; however, fuel cell dehydration at temperatures near 100°C, resulting in poor conductivity, is a major hindrance to fuel cell performance. Recent studies incorporating heteropoly acids (HPAs) into membranes have shown an increase in conductivity and thus improvement in performance. HPAs are inorganic materials with known high proton conductivities. The primary objective of this work is to measure the conductivity of Nafion, X-Ionomer membranes, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Developed Membranes that are doped with different HPAs at different concentrations. Four-point conductivity measurements using a third generation BekkTech conductivity test cell are used to determine membrane conductivity. The effect of multiple temperature and humidification levels is also examined. While the classic commercial membrane, Nafion, has a conductivity of approximately 0.10 S/cm, measurements for membranes in this study range from 0.0030 – 0.58 S/cm, depending on membrane type, structure of the HPA, and the relative humidity. In general, the X-ionomer with H6P2W21O71 HPA gave the highest conductivity and the Nafion with the 12-phosphotungstic (PW12) HPA gave the lowest. The NREL composite membranes had conductivities on the order of 0.0013 – 0.025 S/cm.

  10. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  11. Low proton conductance of plant cuticles and its relevance to the acid-growth theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, S.A.; Seymour, V.; Cleland, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    Evidence obtained on the relation between the pH of the medium and the growth of intact stem sections is compatible with the acid-growth theory only if the proton conductance of the cuticle is an effective barrier to the entry or exit of protons from the tissue. By measuring the rate at which protons cross frozen-thawed epidermal strips of sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) and soybean hypocotyls (Glycine max Morr.) and enzymically isolated cuticles of Berberis aquifolium Persh. and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) fruit, we have now demonstrated the low proton conductance of the cuticular layer. Unless the conductance is enhanced by abrasion of the cuticle or by removal of the cuticular waxes, proton movement into and out of a tissue across the cuticle will be significant only over long time periods.

  12. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Methattel Raman, Shijeesh; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  13. Multiwell fracturing experiments. [Nitrogen foam fracture treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Multiwell fracturing experiments is to test and develop the technology for the efficient stimulation of tight, lenticular gas sands. This requires basic understanding of: (1) fracture behavior and geometry in this complex lithologic environment, and (2) subsequent production into the created fracture. The intricate interplay of the hydraulic fracture with the lens geometry, the internal reservoir characteristics (fractures, reservoir breaks, etc.), the in situ stresses, and the mechanical defects (fracture, bedding, etc.) need to be defined in order to develop a successful stimulation program. The stimulation phase of the Multiwell Experiment is concerned with: (1) determining important rock/reservoir properties that influence or control fracture geometry and behavior, (2) designing fracture treatments to achieve a desired size and objectives, and (3) conducting post-treatment analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Background statement, project description, results and evaluation of future plans are presented. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  15. Flexible and Conducting Carbon Nanofibers Obtained from Electrospun Polyacrylonitrile/Phosphoric Acid Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Baek Ho; Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Kim, Hak Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report on the feasible synthesis of flexible and conductive carbon nanofibers by electrospinning process using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and phosphoric acid (PA) as precursors. The carbon nanofibers were subsequently obtained by stabilization and carbonization of the electrospun PAN nanofibers. From SEM data, it was found that the electrospun PAN nanofibers showed a smooth surface and had an average diameter of approximately 200 nm. Afterwards, the electrospun PAN nanofibers were stabilized at 250 °C and heated at 900 °C for the carbonization process to obtain the carbon nanofibers. The carbonized PAN nanofibers exhibited a drastic improvement of electrical conduction. From Raman spectroscopy data, it was found that the carbonization at 900 °C gave a decrease of the intensity ratio of D and G peaks, indicating higher graphitic structure. PMID:27398565

  16. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group.

  17. Comparison of alternative representations of hydraulic-conductivity anisotropy in folded fractured-sedimentary rock: Modeling groundwater flow in the Shenandoah Valley (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.; Voss, C.I.; Southworth, S.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical representation that explicitly represents the generalized three-dimensional anisotropy of folded fractured-sedimentary rocks in a groundwater model best reproduces the salient features of the flow system in the Shenandoah Valley, USA. This conclusion results from a comparison of four alternative representations of anisotropy in which the hydraulic-conductivity tensor represents the bedrock structure as (model A) anisotropic with variable strikes and dips, (model B) horizontally anisotropic with a uniform strike, (model C) horizontally anisotropic with variable strikes, and (model D) isotropic. Simulations using the US Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport model SUTRA are based on a representation of hydraulic conductivity that conforms to bedding planes in a three-dimensional structural model of the valley that duplicates the pattern of folded sedimentary rocks. In the most general representation, (model A), the directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity conform to the strike and dip of bedding, respectively, while the minimum hydraulic-conductivity direction is perpendicular to bedding. Model A produced a physically realistic flow system that reflects the underlying bedrock structure, with a flow field that is significantly different from those produced by the other three models. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  18. Essential fatty acids prevent slowed nerve conduction in streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Julu, P O

    1988-01-01

    Rats were given streptozotocin to induce insulin-dependent diabetes or citrate buffer alone in two experiments. Initially, the effect of 5 wks of dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on cutaneous nerve conduction velocity (CV) was examined. CV was determined by direct stimulation and recording from saphenous nerve under urethane anesthesia. Secondly, a 5 weeks study of supplementing the diet with GLA, GLA and EPA, or hydrogenated coconut oil (HC) was done. In addition, motor nerve CV was determined by directly stimulating sciatic nerve and recording from gastrocnemius muscle. The acute diabetes led to weight loss, and elevated blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Essential fatty acid (EFA) supplementation had no effect on any of these measures of severity of diabetes. In diabetic rats without EFA supplementation, CV of the myelinated fibers fell by 19-21%, while those receiving both GLA and EPA had normal CV. In diabetic rats receiving GLA alone, CV fell by 5-7%, which was significantly less than those without EFA supplementation (p less than 0.01 for cutaneous, and p less than 0.001 for motor nerves).

  19. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization. PMID:27108970

  20. Mechanism and kinetics of electrochemical degradation of uric acid using conductive-diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Dbira, Sondos; Bensalah, Nasr; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is one of the principal effluents of urine wastewaters, widely used in agriculture as fertilizer, which is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. Hence, the degradation of UA (2,6,8-trihydroxy purine) in aqueous solution of pH 3.0 has been studied by conductive-diamond electrochemical oxidation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the surface of boron-doped diamond anodes were the main oxidizing agents. Effects of current density and supporting electrolyte on the degradation rate and process efficiency are assessed. Results show that the increase of current density from 20 to 60 mA cm(-2) leads to a decrease in the efficiency of the electrochemical process. In addition, the best degradation occurred in the presence of NaCl as conductive electrolyte. Interestingly, an almost total mineralization of 50 ppm UA was obtained when anodic oxidation was performed at low current densities (20 mA cm(-2)) and in the presence of NaCl. This result confirmed that the electrolysis using diamond anodes is a very interesting technology for the treatment of UA. The identification of UA transformation products was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic acid and urea were the two intermediates found. Oxalic acid was the most persistent product. Based on detected intermediates and bibliographic research, a mechanism of UA mineralization by anodic oxidation has been proposed. Ionic chromatography analysis confirmed the release of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions during UA mineralization.

  1. Plasma phosphatidylcholine concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids are differentially associated with hop bone mineral density and hip fracture in older adults: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may influence bone health. Our objective was to examine associations between plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) PUFA concentrations and hip measures: 1) femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD) (n=765); 2) 4-y change in FN-BMD (n=556); and 3) hip fracture risk (n=76...

  2. Rock specific hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing to enhance a geothermal system — Concepts and field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Günter; Blöcher, Guido; Reinicke, Andreas; Brandt, Wulf

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs developed to extract economic amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. To enhance the productivity of reservoirs, a site specific concept is necessary to actively make reservoir conditions profitable using specially adjusted stimulation treatments, such as multi fracture concepts and site specific well path design. The results of previously performed stimulation treatments in the geothermal research well GtGrSk4/05 at Groß Schönebeck, Germany are presented. The reservoir is located at a 4100-4300 m depth within the Lower Permian of the NE German Basin with a bottom-hole temperature of 150 °C. The reservoir rock is classified by two lithological units from bottom to top: volcanic rocks (andesitic rocks) and siliciclastics ranging from conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones (fluvial sediments). The stimulation treatments included multiple hydraulic stimulations and an acid treatment. In order to initiate a cross-flow from the sandstone layer, the hydraulic stimulations were performed in different depth sections (two in the sandstone section and one in the underlying volcanic section). In low permeability volcanic rocks, a cyclic hydraulic fracturing treatment was performed over 6 days in conjunction with adding quartz in low concentrations to maintain a sustainable fracture performance. Flow rates of up to 150 l/s were realized, and a total of 13,170 m 3 of water was injected. A hydraulic connection to the sandstone layer was successfully achieved in this way. However, monitoring of the water level in the offsetting well EGrSk3/90, which is 475 m apart at the final depth, showed a very rapid water level increase due to the stimulation treatment. This can be explained by a connected fault zone within the volcanic rocks. Two gel-proppant treatments were performed in the slightly higher permeability sandstones to obtain long-term access to the reservoir rocks. During each

  3. Interplay between structure and relaxations in perfluorosulfonic acid proton conducting membranes.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Guinevere A; Haugen, Gregory M; Hamrock, Steven J; Di Noto, Vito

    2013-01-16

    This study focuses on changes in the structure of ionomer membranes, provided by the 3M Fuel Cells Component Group, as a function of the equivalent weight (EW) and the relationship between the structure and the properties of the membrane. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction results showed evidence of both non-crystalline and crystalline ordered hydrophobic regions in all the EW membranes except the 700 EW membrane. The spectral changes evident in the vibrational spectra of the 3M membranes can be associated with two major phenomena: (1) dissociation of the proton from the sulfonic acid groups even in the presence of small amounts of water; and (2) changes in the conformation or the degree of crystallinity of the poly(tetrafluoroethylene) hydrophobic domains both as a function of EW and membrane water content. All the membranes, regardless of EW, are thermally stable up to 360 °C. The wet membranes have conductivities between 7 and 20 mS/cm at 125 °C. In this condition, the conductivity values follow VTF behavior, which suggests that the proton migration occurs via proton exchange processes between delocalization bodies (DBs) that are facilitated by the dynamics of the host polymer. The conductivity along the interface between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains makes a larger contribution in the smaller EW membranes likely due to the existence of a greater number of interfaces in the membrane. The larger crystalline domains present in the higher EW membranes provide percolation pathways for charge migration between DBs, which reduces the probability of charge transfer along the interface. Therefore, at higher EWs although there is charge migration along the interface within the hydrophobic-hydrophilic domains, the exchange of protons between different DBs is likely the rate-limiting step of the overall conduction process. PMID:23249300

  4. Chirality-Discriminated Conductivity of Metal-Amino Acid Biocoordination Polymer Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianzhong; Wu, Yijin; Deng, Ke; He, Meng; He, Liangcan; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xugang; Liu, Yaling; Li, Shunxing; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-27

    Biocoordination polymer (BCP) nanowires are successfully constructed through self-assembly of chiral cysteine amino acids and Cd cations in solution. The varied chirality of cysteine is explored to demonstrate the difference of BCP nanowires in both morphology and structure. More interestingly and surprisingly, the electrical property measurement reveals that, although all Cd(II)/cysteine BCP nanowires behave as semiconductors, the conductivity of the Cd(II)/dl-cysteine nanowires is 4 times higher than that of the Cd(II)/l-cysteine or Cd(II)/d-cysteine ones. The origin of such chirality-discriminated characteristics registered in BCP nanowires is further elucidated by theoretical calculation. These findings demonstrate that the morphology, structure, and property of BCP nanostructures could be tuned by the chirality of the bridging ligands, which will shed light on the comprehension of chirality transcription as well as construction of chirality-regulated functional materials. PMID:27556354

  5. Chirality-Discriminated Conductivity of Metal-Amino Acid Biocoordination Polymer Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianzhong; Wu, Yijin; Deng, Ke; He, Meng; He, Liangcan; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xugang; Liu, Yaling; Li, Shunxing; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-27

    Biocoordination polymer (BCP) nanowires are successfully constructed through self-assembly of chiral cysteine amino acids and Cd cations in solution. The varied chirality of cysteine is explored to demonstrate the difference of BCP nanowires in both morphology and structure. More interestingly and surprisingly, the electrical property measurement reveals that, although all Cd(II)/cysteine BCP nanowires behave as semiconductors, the conductivity of the Cd(II)/dl-cysteine nanowires is 4 times higher than that of the Cd(II)/l-cysteine or Cd(II)/d-cysteine ones. The origin of such chirality-discriminated characteristics registered in BCP nanowires is further elucidated by theoretical calculation. These findings demonstrate that the morphology, structure, and property of BCP nanostructures could be tuned by the chirality of the bridging ligands, which will shed light on the comprehension of chirality transcription as well as construction of chirality-regulated functional materials.

  6. Abscisic Acid Regulation of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Aquaporin Gene Expression Is Crucial to the Plant Shoot Growth Enhancement Caused by Rhizosphere Humic Acids.

    PubMed

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; Bacaicoa, Eva; Garnica, María; Fuentes, Marta; Casanova, Esther; Zamarreño, Angel M; Iriarte, Juan C; Etayo, David; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Baigorri, Roberto; García-Mina, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The physiological and metabolic mechanisms behind the humic acid-mediated plant growth enhancement are discussed in detail. Experiments using cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants show that the shoot growth enhancement caused by a structurally well-characterized humic acid with sedimentary origin is functionally associated with significant increases in abscisic acid (ABA) root concentration and root hydraulic conductivity. Complementary experiments involving a blocking agent of cell wall pores and water root transport (polyethylenglycol) show that increases in root hydraulic conductivity are essential in the shoot growth-promoting action of the model humic acid. Further experiments involving an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis in root and shoot (fluridone) show that the humic acid-mediated enhancement of both root hydraulic conductivity and shoot growth depended on ABA signaling pathways. These experiments also show that a significant increase in the gene expression of the main root plasma membrane aquaporins is associated with the increase of root hydraulic conductivity caused by the model humic acid. Finally, experimental data suggest that all of these actions of model humic acid on root functionality, which are linked to its beneficial action on plant shoot growth, are likely related to the conformational structure of humic acid in solution and its interaction with the cell wall at the root surface.

  7. Effect of Glass Transition on Electrical Conduction Characteristics of Poly-L-lactic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hirai, Naoshi; Tanaka, Toshikatsu; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Tajitsu, Yoshiro; Kohtoh, Masanori; Okabe, Shigemitsu

    The temperature dependence of electrical conduction current in additive-free poly-L-lactic acid was measured from 20 °C to 90 °C under application of dc 2.5 kV. Although the current obeys the Arrhenius formula, a hump appears in some conditions, depending on whether the temperature is being ascended or descended, and also on whether the sample was poled or short-circuited prior to the measurements. Even under short-circuit condition, a similar hump alone appears if the sample was poled by a dc voltage beforehand. From these results, it is assumed that orientational polarization or depolarization occurs around 74 °C by the glass transition, and that its resultant current and the conduction current overlap with each other. The fact that polar groups, mainly carbonyl groups, in the sample really changed their directions was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The permittivity also increases around 74 °C. These facts indicate that the number of dipoles, which become possible to rotate toward the direction of electric field, is increased by the glass transition.

  8. A Failure Analysis Conducted on a Fractured AISI 5160 Steel Blade Which Separated from an Agricultural Rotary Cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Alan A.; Storey, Randall J.

    2011-07-01

    One of the six blades of an agricultural rotary cutter used for cutting down small trees and bushes broke into two pieces while the blades were rotating. One piece was hurled from the cutter and struck a young farmer, who had been operating the machine, causing a near fatal leg injury. In the ensuing litigation against the manufacturers and marketer of the machine each litigant retained a metallurgist and other experts. The metallurgists jointly directed laboratory work on the broken blade conducted at an independent laboratory according to a protocol which they developed and which was approved by the court. As a result of the laboratory work the present authors, working for the Plaintiffs, concluded that failure of the blade occurred because it contained quench cracks introduced when it was manufactured. The Defendants' metallurgists concluded that the blade had been misassembled onto the machine and, as a result, had failed by fatigue. Eventually, the case was set for a jury trial in a Circuit Court in rural Kentucky. The jury found for the Plaintiffs and awarded them $5.9 million in damages. Part of this judgement was later reversed by the Kentucky Court of Appeals and the case was then settled without a second trial under terms which were not revealed.

  9. Superprotonic conductivity of a UiO-66 framework functionalized with sulfonic acid groups by facile postsynthetic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Phang, Won Ju; Jo, Hyuna; Lee, Woo Ram; Song, Jeong Hwa; Yoo, Kicheon; Kim, BongSoo; Hong, Chang Seop

    2015-04-20

    Facile postsynthetic oxidation of the thiol-laced UiO-66-type framework UiO-66(SH)2 enabled the generation of UiO-66(SO3 H)2 with sulfonic acid groups covalently linked to the backbone of the system. The oxidized material exhibited a superprotonic conductivity of 8.4×10(-2)  S cm(-1) at 80 °C and 90 % relative humidity, and long-term stability of the conductivity was observed. This level of conductivity exceeds that of any proton-conducting MOF reported to date and is equivalent to the conductivity of the most effective known electrolyte, Nafion.

  10. The effect of formic acid concentration on the conductivity and corrosion resistance of chromium carbide coatings electroplated with trivalent chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chen-En; Pu, Nen-Wen; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Tseng, Chun-Chieh; Ger, Ming-Der

    2013-10-01

    Different concentrations of formic acid were added into a trivalent chromium electroplating solution to produce chromium carbide (Crsbnd C) coatings. The influence of the formic acid concentration on chemical composition, microstructure, surface morphology, corrosion resistance, conductivity and carbon content of the resulting Crsbnd C coatings was studied. Formic acid was found to increase the carbon content in the coatings so as to form Crsbnd C films. These coatings had a nearly amorphous structure containing Cr, Cr2O3, and various Crsbnd C compounds with carbon content uniformly distributed throughout the coatings. The carbon content and the conductivity of the Crsbnd C layer were correlated with formic acid concentration. For a formic acid concentration of 2 M, the Crsbnd C layer had the highest carbon content (∼28%), the lowest contact resistance, and the best corrosion resistance along with a corrosion current density of ∼6.4 × 10-7 A/cm2.

  11. The Effect of 3 Versus 6 Years of Zoledronic Acid Treatment of Osteoporosis: A Randomized Extension to the HORIZON-Pivotal Fracture Trial (PFT)

    PubMed Central

    Black, Dennis M; Reid, Ian R; Boonen, Steven; Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina; Cauley, Jane A; Cosman, Felicia; Cummings, Steven R; Hue, Trisha F; Lippuner, Kurt; Lakatos, Peter; Leung, Ping Chung; Man, Zulema; Martinez, Ruvie Lou Maria; Tan, Monique; Ruzycky, Mary Ellen; Su, Guoqin; Eastell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Zoledronic acid 5 mg (ZOL) annually for 3 years reduces fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. To investigate long-term effects of ZOL on bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk, the Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic acid Once Yearly–Pivotal Fracture Trial (HORIZON-PFT) was extended to 6 years. In this international, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled extension trial, 1233 postmenopausal women who received ZOL for 3 years in the core study were randomized to 3 additional years of ZOL (Z6, n = 616) or placebo (Z3P3, n = 617). The primary endpoint was femoral neck (FN) BMD percentage change from year 3 to 6 in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary endpoints included other BMD sites, fractures, biochemical bone turnover markers, and safety. In years 3 to 6, FN-BMD remained constant in Z6 and dropped slightly in Z3P3 (between-treatment difference = 1.04%; 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 1.7; p = 0.0009) but remained above pretreatment levels. Other BMD sites showed similar differences. Biochemical markers remained constant in Z6 but rose slightly in Z3P3, remaining well below pretreatment levels in both. New morphometric vertebral fractures were lower in the Z6 (n = 14) versus Z3P3 (n = 30) group (odds ratio = 0.51; p = 0.035), whereas other fractures were not different. Significantly more Z6 patients had a transient increase in serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dL (0.65% versus 2.94% in Z3P3). Nonsignificant increases in Z6 of atrial fibrillation serious adverse events (2.0% versus 1.1% in Z3P3; p = 0.26) and stroke (3.1% versus 1.5% in Z3P3; p = 0.06) were seen. Postdose symptoms were similar in both groups. Reports of hypertension were significantly lower in Z6 versus Z3P3 (7.8% versus 15.1%, p < 0.001). Small differences in bone density and markers in those who continued versus those who stopped treatment suggest residual effects, and therefore, after 3 years of annual ZOL, many patients may discontinue

  12. Investigation of Humidity Dependent Surface Morphology and Proton Conduction in Multi-Acid Side Chain Membranes by Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Economou, Nicholas J; Barnes, Austin M; Wheat, Andrew J; Schaberg, Mark S; Hamrock, Steven J; Buratto, Steven K

    2015-11-01

    In this report, we employ phase-contrast tapping mode and conductive probe atomic force microscopy (cp-AFM) as tools to investigate the nanoscale morphology and proton conductance of a 3M perfluoro-imide acid (PFIA) membrane (625 EW) over a large range of relative humidity (3-95% RH). As a point of comparison, we also investigate 3M perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) (825 EW) and Nafion 212. With AFM, we assess the membrane's water retention and mechanical stability at low RH and high RH, respectively. Cp-AFM allows us to spatially resolve the hydrophilic and electrochemically active domains under a similar set of conditions and observe directly the ties between membrane morphology and proton conductance. From our data, we are able to correlate the improved water retention indicated by the size of the hydrophilic domains with the proton conductance in the PFIA membrane at elevated temperature and compare the result with that observed for the PFSA and Nafion. At high RH conditions, we see evidence of a nearly continuous hydrophilic phase, which indicates a high degree of swelling. PMID:26439098

  13. Abscisic Acid Induces Rapid Reductions in Mesophyll Conductance to Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Giuseppe; Haworth, Matthew; Wahbi, Said; Mahmood, Tariq; Zuomin, Shi; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The rate of photosynthesis (A) of plants exposed to water deficit is a function of stomatal (gs) and mesophyll (gm) conductance determining the availability of CO2 at the site of carboxylation within the chloroplast. Mesophyll conductance often represents the greatest impediment to photosynthetic uptake of CO2, and a crucial determinant of the photosynthetic effects of drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a fundamental role in signalling and co-ordination of plant responses to drought; however, the effect of ABA on gm is not well-defined. Rose, cherry, olive and poplar were exposed to exogenous ABA and their leaf gas exchange parameters recorded over a four hour period. Application with ABA induced reductions in values of A, gs and gm in all four species. Reduced gm occurred within one hour of ABA treatment in three of the four analysed species; indicating that the effect of ABA on gm occurs on a shorter timescale than previously considered. These declines in gm values associated with ABA were not the result of physical changes in leaf properties due to altered turgor affecting movement of CO2, or caused by a reduction in the sub-stomatal concentration of CO2 (Ci). Increased [ABA] likely induces biochemical changes in the properties of the interface between the sub-stomatal air-space and mesophyll layer through the actions of cooporins to regulate the transport of CO2. The results of this study provide further evidence that gm is highly responsive to fluctuations in the external environment, and stress signals such as ABA induce co-ordinated modifications of both gs and gm in the regulation of photosynthesis. PMID:26862904

  14. Abscisic Acid Induces Rapid Reductions in Mesophyll Conductance to Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Giuseppe; Haworth, Matthew; Wahbi, Said; Mahmood, Tariq; Zuomin, Shi; Centritto, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The rate of photosynthesis (A) of plants exposed to water deficit is a function of stomatal (gs) and mesophyll (gm) conductance determining the availability of CO2 at the site of carboxylation within the chloroplast. Mesophyll conductance often represents the greatest impediment to photosynthetic uptake of CO2, and a crucial determinant of the photosynthetic effects of drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a fundamental role in signalling and co-ordination of plant responses to drought; however, the effect of ABA on gm is not well-defined. Rose, cherry, olive and poplar were exposed to exogenous ABA and their leaf gas exchange parameters recorded over a four hour period. Application with ABA induced reductions in values of A, gs and gm in all four species. Reduced gm occurred within one hour of ABA treatment in three of the four analysed species; indicating that the effect of ABA on gm occurs on a shorter timescale than previously considered. These declines in gm values associated with ABA were not the result of physical changes in leaf properties due to altered turgor affecting movement of CO2, or caused by a reduction in the sub-stomatal concentration of CO2 (Ci). Increased [ABA] likely induces biochemical changes in the properties of the interface between the sub-stomatal air-space and mesophyll layer through the actions of cooporins to regulate the transport of CO2. The results of this study provide further evidence that gm is highly responsive to fluctuations in the external environment, and stress signals such as ABA induce co-ordinated modifications of both gs and gm in the regulation of photosynthesis. PMID:26862904

  15. Electrically conductive PVC layers filled with active carbon containing H+-conducting porous structures of sulfuric acid complexes of cyclams on fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Novikov, A. K.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Krasil'nikova, O. K.

    2015-07-01

    Electrically conductive PVC layers are synthesized. The layers are filled with active carbons containing porous H+-conductive structures of hydroxyethylcyclam/sulfuric acid complexes crosslinked with cellulose fabric. They are interlaid with layers based on the same structures containing added benzene and hexane adsorbates and solvates. It is found that upon anode or cathode polarization of the layers as H+-conductive electrochemical bridges in air and in the vapor and liquid phases of benzene and hexane, either the electroreduction of H+ to H2 or the electrooxidation of H2O to O2 occurs in the areas of contact between active carbon particles and the complexes. The dependences of rates of H2 and O2 formation on the voltage are studied. The magnitudes of overvoltage and the constants of electrochemical reactions are found to depend on the composition of a layer.

  16. Low urine pH and acid excretion do not predict bone fractures or the loss of bone mineral density: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The acid-ash hypothesis, the alkaline diet, and related products are marketed to the general public. Websites, lay literature, and direct mail marketing encourage people to measure their urine pH to assess their health status and their risk of osteoporosis. The objectives of this study were to determine whether 1) low urine pH, or 2) acid excretion in urine [sulfate + chloride + 1.8x phosphate + organic acids] minus [sodium + potassium + 2x calcium + 2x magnesium mEq] in fasting morning urine predict: a) fragility fractures; and b) five-year change of bone mineral density (BMD) in adults. Methods Design: Cohort study: the prospective population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine associations between acid excretion (urine pH and urine acid excretion) in fasting morning with the incidence of fractures (6804 person years). Multiple linear regression was used to examine associations between acid excretion with changes in BMD over 5-years at three sites: lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total hip (n = 651). Potential confounders controlled included: age, gender, family history of osteoporosis, physical activity, smoking, calcium intake, vitamin D status, estrogen status, medications, renal function, urine creatinine, body mass index, and change of body mass index. Results There were no associations between either urine pH or acid excretion and either the incidence of fractures or change of BMD after adjustment for confounders. Conclusion Urine pH and urine acid excretion do not predict osteoporosis risk. PMID:20459740

  17. Studies of structural, optical, dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of different alkylbenzenesulfonic acids doped polypyrrole nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, J.; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers doped with alkylbenzenesulfonic acids (ABSA) have been synthesized using interfacial polymerization method. HRTEM studies confirm the formation of PPy nanofibers with average diameter ranging from 13 nm to 25 nm. Broad X-ray diffraction peak in 2 θ range 20-23.46° reveals amorphous structure of PPy nanofibers. The ordering or crystallinity of polymer chains increases, while their interplanar spacing (d) and interchain separation (R) decreases for short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers. FTIR studies reveal that short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers show higher value of "effective conjugation length". PPy nanofibers doped with short alkyl chain ABSA dopant exhibit smaller optical band gap. TGA studies show enhanced thermal stability of short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers. Decrease in dielectric permittivity ε ‧ (ω) with increasing frequency suggests presence of electrode polarization effects. Linear decrease in dielectric loss ε ″ (ω) with increasing frequency suggests dominant effect of dc conductivity process. Low value of non-exponential exponent β (<1) reveals non-Debye relaxation of charge carriers. Scaling of imaginary modulus (M ″) reveals that the charge carriers follow the same relaxation mechanism. Moreover, the charge carriers in PPy nanofibers follow the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) transport mechanism.

  18. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90{degrees}C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Spatially Modulating Interfacial Properties of Transparent Conductive Oxides: Patterning Work Function with Phosphonic Acid Self-Assembled Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Knesting, Kristina M.; Hotchkiss, Peter J.; MacLeod, Bradley A.; Marder, Seth R.; Ginger, David S.

    2011-09-29

    The interface between an organic semiconductor and a transparent conducting oxide is crucial to the performance of organic optoelectronics. We use microcontact printing to pattern pentafluorobenzyl phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on indium tin oxide (ITO). We obtain high-fidelity patterns with sharply defined edges and with large work function contrast (comparable to that obtained from phosphonic acid SAMs deposited from solution).

  20. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  1. Kinetics of the electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid on ultrananocrystalline boron doped conductive diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Fernández-González, Carolina; Gómez-Lavín, Sonia; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical degradation and mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Model aqueous solutions of PFOA (100mg/L) were electro-oxidized under galvanostatic conditions in a flow-by undivided cell provided with a tungsten cathode and an anode formed by a commercial ultrananocrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) coating on a niobium substrate. A systematic experimental study was conducted in order to analyze the influence of the following operation variables: (i) the supporting electrolyte, NaClO4 (1.4 and 8.4g/L) and Na2SO4 (5g/L); (ii) the applied current density, japp, in the range 50-200 A/m(2) and (iii) the hydrodynamic conditions, in terms of flowrate in the range 0.4×10(-4)-1.7×10(-4)m(3)/s and temperature in the range 293-313K. After 6h of treatment and at japp 200A/m(2), PFOA removal was higher than 93% and the mineralization ratio, obtained from the decrease of the total organic carbon (TOC) was 95%. The electrochemical generation of hydroxyl radicals in the supporting electrolyte was experimentally measured based on their reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The enhanced formation of hydroxyl radicals at higher japp was related to the faster kinetics of PFOA removal. The fitting of experimental data to the proposed kinetic model provided the first order rate constants of PFOA degradation, kc(1) that moved from 2.06×10(-4) to 15.58×10(-4)s(-1), when japp varied from 50 to 200A/m(2).

  2. Kinetics of the electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid on ultrananocrystalline boron doped conductive diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Ane; Fernández-González, Carolina; Gómez-Lavín, Sonia; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    This work deals with the electrochemical degradation and mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Model aqueous solutions of PFOA (100mg/L) were electro-oxidized under galvanostatic conditions in a flow-by undivided cell provided with a tungsten cathode and an anode formed by a commercial ultrananocrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) coating on a niobium substrate. A systematic experimental study was conducted in order to analyze the influence of the following operation variables: (i) the supporting electrolyte, NaClO4 (1.4 and 8.4g/L) and Na2SO4 (5g/L); (ii) the applied current density, japp, in the range 50-200 A/m(2) and (iii) the hydrodynamic conditions, in terms of flowrate in the range 0.4×10(-4)-1.7×10(-4)m(3)/s and temperature in the range 293-313K. After 6h of treatment and at japp 200A/m(2), PFOA removal was higher than 93% and the mineralization ratio, obtained from the decrease of the total organic carbon (TOC) was 95%. The electrochemical generation of hydroxyl radicals in the supporting electrolyte was experimentally measured based on their reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide. The enhanced formation of hydroxyl radicals at higher japp was related to the faster kinetics of PFOA removal. The fitting of experimental data to the proposed kinetic model provided the first order rate constants of PFOA degradation, kc(1) that moved from 2.06×10(-4) to 15.58×10(-4)s(-1), when japp varied from 50 to 200A/m(2). PMID:24981910

  3. An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene).

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Chiffot, Nicolas; King, Martin W; Zhang, Ze

    2015-08-01

    This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 KΩ/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration. PMID:25630631

  4. An electrically conductive 3D scaffold based on a nonwoven web of poly(L-lactic acid) and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene).

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Chiffot, Nicolas; King, Martin W; Zhang, Ze

    2015-08-01

    This study was to demonstrate that an extremely thin coating of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on nonwoven microfibrous poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) web is of sufficient electrical conductivity and stability in aqueous environment to sustain electrical stimulation (ES) to cultured human skin fibroblasts. The PEDOT imparted the web a surface resistivity of approximately 0.1 KΩ/square without altering the web morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the surface chemistry of the PLLA/PEDOT is characteristic of both PLLA and PEDOT. The PEDOT-coated web also showed higher hydrophilicity, lower glass transition temperature and unchanged fiber crystallinity and thermal stability compared with the PLLA web. The addition of PEDOT to the web marginally increased the web's tensile strength and lowered the elongation. An electrical stability test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT structure was more stable than a polypyrrole treated PLLA fabric, showing only a slow deterioration in conductivity when exposed to culture medium. The cytotoxicity test showed that the PLLA/PEDOT scaffold was not cytotoxic and supported human dermal fibroblast adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Preliminary ES experiments have demonstrated that this conductive web mediated effective ES to fibroblasts. Therefore, this new conductive biodegradable scaffold may be used to electrically modulate cellular activity and tissue regeneration.

  5. Arcuate Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In the upper left corner of this VIS image are a series of fractures. Where the fractures are exposed on the surface it is impossible to tell the plane of the fracture; however where the fractures are visible in the cliff wall it is possible to see that the fractures dip to the north. This image shows part of the caldera of Tharsis Tholus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.7, Longitude 176.5 East (183.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Development of Conducting Polyaniline/ Poly(Lactic Acid) Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultrafine fibers consisting of blends of polyaniline doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid and poly(L-lactic acid) were prepared by electrospinning. The presence of polyaniline resulted in fibers with diameters as thin as 100– 200 nm and a significant reduction of bead formation. These fibers were visu...

  7. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous boric acid at 25--350{degree}C at saturation vapor pressure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    Electrical conductance measurements of aqueous boric acid solutions (15-110 g/kg-H{sub 2}O {equivalent_to} 0.251--1.815 mol/kg-H{sub 2}O) were measured over the temperature range 25 to 75 C at saturation vapor pressures in glass cells with parallel platinum electrodes. Sixteen series of measurements were made involving three samples of boric acid from different sources. Conductance measurements were also made at 15.5 and 30.5 g/kg-H{sub 2}O over the temperature range 100 to 350 C at 50 C intervals with a metallic cell fitted with concentric platinum electrodes. The specific conductances of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} (aq)were calculated after correction for the conductance of the solvent (water) and are tabulated in this report. At the specific conditions requested in the project description, namely a concentration of 110 g/kg-H{sub 2}O and 65 C, the specific conductance of boric acid is 293.2 {+-} 1.8 microSiemens/cm based on duplicate measurements of four independent solutions. The results from these tests will be utilized by the Tokamak Physics Experimental Project (TPX).

  8. Evaluation of in vitro resistance of titanium and resorbable (poly-L-DL-lactic acid) fixation systems on the mandibular angle fracture.

    PubMed

    Bregagnolo, L A; Bertelli, P F; Ribeiro, M C; Sverzut, C E; Trivellato, A E

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, by mechanical in vitro testing, a 2.0-mm system made with poly-L-DL-lactide acid with an analogue titanium-based system. Mandible replicas were used as a substrate and uniformly sectioned on the left mandibular angle. The 4-hole plates were adapted and stabilized passively in the same site in both groups using four screws, 6.0mm long. During the resistance-to-load test, the force was applied perpendicular to the occlusal plane at three different points: first molar at the plated side; first molar at the contralateral side; and between the central incisors. At 1mm of displacement, no statistically significant difference was found. At 2mm displacement, a statistically significant difference was observed when an unfavourable fracture was simulated and the load was applied in the contralateral first molar and when a favourable fracture was simulated and the load was applied between the central incisors. At the failure displacement, a statistically significant difference was observed only when the favourable fracture was simulated and the load was applied on the first molar at the plated side. In conclusion, despite more failure, the poly-L-DL-lactic acid-based system was effective.

  9. Acidity-Controlled Conducting Polymer Films for Organic Thermoelectric Devices with Horizontal and Vertical Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woongki; Song, Myeonghun; Park, Soohyung; Nam, Sungho; Seo, Jooyeok; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Organic thermoelectric devices (OTEDs) are recognized one of the next generation energy conversion platforms because of their huge potentials for securing electricity continuously from even tiny heat sources in our daily life. The advantage of OTEDs can be attributable to the design freedom in device shapes and the low-cost fabrication by employing solution coating processes at low temperatures. As one of the major OTE materials to date, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been used, but no study has been yet carried out on its acidity control even though the acidic components in OTEDs can seriously affect the device performance upon operation. Here we demonstrate that the addition of aniline (a weak base) can control the acidity of PEDOT:PSS and enhance the performance of OTEDs. In particular, the vertical OTEDs with aniline-doped PEDOT:PSS films (active area = 1.0 cm2) could continuously generate electricity (0.06 nW) even at low temperatures (<38 °C) when they were mounted on a desk lamp (power = 24 W). PMID:27667013

  10. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, M. N.; Isa, M. I. N.

    2016-06-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10‑4 S cm‑1 for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor.

  11. Effects of the amino acid sequence on thermal conduction through β-sheet crystals of natural silk protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Bai, Zhitong; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2015-11-21

    Recent experiments have discovered very different thermal conductivities between the spider silk and the silkworm silk. Decoding the molecular mechanisms underpinning the distinct thermal properties may guide the rational design of synthetic silk materials and other biomaterials for multifunctionality and tunable properties. However, such an understanding is lacking, mainly due to the complex structure and phonon physics associated with the silk materials. Here, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that the amino acid sequence plays a key role in the thermal conduction process through β-sheets, essential building blocks of natural silks and a variety of other biomaterials. Three representative β-sheet types, i.e. poly-A, poly-(GA), and poly-G, are shown to have distinct structural features and phonon dynamics leading to different thermal conductivities. A fundamental understanding of the sequence effects may stimulate the design and engineering of polymers and biopolymers for desired thermal properties. PMID:26455593

  12. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Chai, M N; Isa, M I N

    2016-01-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor. PMID:27265642

  13. Novel Proton Conducting Solid Bio-polymer Electrolytes Based on Carboxymethyl Cellulose Doped with Oleic Acid and Plasticized with Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Chai, M. N.; Isa, M. I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The plasticized solid bio-polymer electrolytes (SBEs) system has been formed by introducing glycerol (Gly) as the plasticizer into the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with oleic acid (OA) via solution casting techniques. The ionic conductivity of the plasticized SBEs has been studied using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy. The highest conductivity achieved is 1.64 × 10−4 S cm−1 for system containing 40 wt. % of glycerol. FTIR deconvolution technique had shown that the conductivity of CMC-OA-Gly SBEs is primarily influenced by the number density of mobile ions. Transference number measurement has shown that the cation diffusion coefficient and ionic mobility is higher than anion which proved the plasticized polymer system is a proton conductor. PMID:27265642

  14. Natural fracture systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this program are (1) to develop a basinal-analysis methodology for natural fracture exploration and exploitation, and (2) to determine the important characteristics of natural fracture systems for use in completion, stimulation, and production operations. Natural-fracture basinal analysis begins with studies of fractures in outcrop, core and logs in order to determine the type of fracturing and the relationship of the fractures to the lithologic environment. Of particular interest are the regional fracture systems that are pervasive in western US tight sand basins. A Methodology for applying this analysis is being developed, with the goal of providing a structure for rationally characterizing natural fracture systems basin-wide. Such basin-wide characterizations can then be expanded and supplemented locally, at sites where production may be favorable. Initial application of this analysis is to the Piceance basin where there is a wealth of data from the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), DOE cooperative wells, and other basin studies conducted by Sandia, CER Corporation, and the USGS (Lorenz and Finley, 1989, Lorenz et aI., 1989, and Spencer and Keighin, 1984). Such a basinal approach has been capable of explaining the fracture characteristics found throughout the southern part of the Piceance basin and along the Grand Hogback.

  15. Effect of diameter of cellulosic nano-fiber on conductivity of poly(aniline sulfonic acid) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konagaya, S.; Shimizu, K.; Terada, M.; Yamada, T.; Sanada, K.; Numata, O.; Sugino, G.

    2014-05-01

    The authors have been studying the effect of cellulosic nano-fiber (CeNF) with the diameter of less than 30 nm and the length of a few micrometers on the conductivity of the conductive polymer composites (PAS/PEs/CeNF) prepared from poly(aniline sulfonic acid) (PAS), a water dispersible polyester (PEs) and CeNF and confirmed that CeNF was effective for the enhancement of their conductivity, and that the conductivity enhancement was attributable to the strong adsorbing ability of CeNF to PAS molecules. Thiner CeNF has so larger surface area that it is expected to adsorb more PAS molecules on its surface, which possibly lead to further conductivity enhancement of the composites. The authors prepared thinner CeNF with the size of 16 nm by the use of ultrasonic dispersing machine. It was clarified that the thinner CeNF had a higher adsorbing ability to PAS molecules and a larger effect on the conductivity enhancement of PAS/PEs/CeNF composites.

  16. An evaluation of the effects of acid rain on low conductivity headwater streams in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, Ann E.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of water collected at 32 sites on headwater streams in Pennsylvania during low-flow conditions in 1970-80 were compared to pre-1971 data to evaluate whether acid rain had changed the chemistry of the streams in the previous decade. Most pH, alkalinity, and sulfate values of the samples collected in 1970-80 fell within the ranges of values for samples collected before 1971. The limited data indicate, however, that pH may have increased and alkalinity and sulfate may have decreased with time.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of acid rain on low conductivity headwater streams in Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.R.; Brown, A.E.

    1981-09-01

    Analyses of water collected at 32 sites on headwater streams in Pennsylvania during low-flow conditions in 1979-1980 were compared to pre-1971 data to evaluate whether acid rain had changed the chemistry of the streams in the previous decade. Most pH alkalinity, and sulfate values of the samples collected in 1979-1980 fell within the ranges of values for samples collected before 1971. The limited data indicate, however, that pH may have increased and alkalinity and sulfate may have decreased with time. 7 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

  18. New observations on the ultrastructure of mammalian conducting airway epithelium: application of liquid propane freezing, deep etching, and rotary shadowing techniques to freeze-fracture.

    PubMed

    Carson, J L; Collier, A M; Smith, C A

    1984-10-01

    Freshly isolated, viable hamster tracheal epithelium was rapidly frozen in a jet of liquid nitrogen-cooled propane followed by freeze-fracture, deep etching, and rotary shadowing. Examination of the replicas by transmission electron microscopy revealed characteristic features of both ciliated and nonciliated cells, profiles of tight junctional complexes, and two distinct types of membrane particle complexes. The findings of this study suggest that rapid freezing of viable biological specimens coupled with freeze-fracture, deep etching, and rotary shadowing may provide a useful approach to achieving some additional perspectives of cell structure and function. Since the experimental protocol avoided any use of chemical fixation and processing procedures generally employed in electron microscopy, this study also validates for airway epithelium the details of fine structure observed using more conventional ultrastructural methods. PMID:6544880

  19. Nanostructured bacterial cellulose-poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) composite membranes with high storage modulus and protonic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gadim, Tiago D O; Figueiredo, Andrea G P R; Rosero-Navarro, Nataly C; Vilela, Carla; Gamelas, José A F; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R; Figueiredo, Filipe M L

    2014-05-28

    The present study reports the development of a new generation of bio-based nanocomposite proton exchange membranes based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) (PSSA), produced by in situ free radical polymerization of sodium 4-styrenesulfonate using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, followed by conversion of the ensuing polymer into the acidic form. The BC nanofibrilar network endows the composite membranes with excellent mechanical properties at least up to 140 °C, a temperature where either pure PSSA or Nafion are soft, as shown by dynamic mechanical analysis. The large concentration of sulfonic acid groups in PSSA is responsible for the high ionic exchange capacity of the composite membranes, reaching 2.25 mmol g(-1) for a composite with 83 wt % PSSA/PEGDA. The through-plane protonic conductivity of the best membrane is in excess of 0.1 S cm(-1) at 94 °C and 98% relative humidity (RH), decreasing to 0.042 S cm(-1) at 60% RH. These values are comparable or even higher than those of ionomers such as Nafion or polyelectrolytes such as PSSA. This combination of electric and viscoelastic properties with low cost underlines the potential of these nanocomposites as a bio-based alternative to other polymer membranes for application in fuel cells, redox flow batteries, or other devices requiring functional proton conducting elements, such as sensors and actuators.

  20. Aromatic Amino Acids Required for Pili Conductivity and Long-Range Extracellular Electron Transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Madeline; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Leang, Ching; Smith, Jessica A.; Patel, Pranav; Synoeyenbos-West, Oona; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires conductive pili for long-range electron transport to Fe(III) oxides and for high-density current production in microbial fuel cells. In order to investigate this further, we constructed a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated Aro-5, which produced pili with diminished conductivity. This was accomplished by modifying the amino acid sequence of PilA, the structural pilin protein. An alanine was substituted for each of the five aromatic amino acids in the carboxyl terminus of PilA, the region in which G. sulfurreducens PilA differs most significantly from the PilAs of microorganisms incapable of long-range extracellular electron transport. Strain Aro-5 produced pili that were properly decorated with the multiheme c-type cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, pili preparations of the Aro-5 strain had greatly diminished conductivity and Aro-5 cultures were severely limited in their capacity to reduce Fe(III) compared to the control strain. Current production of the Aro-5 strain, with a graphite anode serving as the electron acceptor, was less than 10% of that of the control strain. The conductivity of the Aro-5 biofilms was 10-fold lower than the control strain’s. These results demonstrate that the pili of G. sulfurreducens must be conductive in order for the cells to be effective in extracellular long-range electron transport. PMID:23481602

  1. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-09-21

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species.

  2. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species. PMID:27650635

  3. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species. PMID:27650635

  4. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. A Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyacid with excellent acid catalytic activity and proton-conducting property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shujun; Peng, Qingpo; Chen, Xuenian; Wang, Ruoya; Zhai, Jianxin; Hu, Weihua; Ma, Fengji; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shuxia

    2016-11-01

    A new HPAs H20[P8W60Ta12(H2O)4(OH)8O236]·125H2O (H-1) which comprises a Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyanion, 20 protons, and 125 crystalline water molecules has been prepared through ion-exchange method. The structure and properties of H-1 have been explored in detail. AC impedance measurements indicate that H-1 is a good solid state proton conducting material at room temperature with a conductivity value of 7.2×10-3 S cm-1 (25 °C, 30% RH). Cyclic voltammograms of H-1 indicate the electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of nitrite. Hammett acidity constant H0 of H-1 in CH3CN is -2.91, which is the strongest among the present known HPAs. Relatively, H-1 exhibits excellent catalytic activities toward acetal reaction.

  6. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  7. Ozone and simulated acid rain effects on growth root hydraulic conductivity, and photosynthesis of red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Chevone, B.I.; Seiler, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Three-year-old red spruce seedlings were exposed to ozone (O/sub 3/) at 0.00 (control) or 0.10 ppm, 4 hr/d, 3 d/wk in combination with simulated rain (pH 3.0 or 5.6, 1 hr/d, 2 d/wk at 0.75 cm/hr) for 10 wks. All seedlings were submitted to two drought cycles after the 10-wk-treatment. O/sub 3/ significantly decreased root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) by 21% after 10 wks across all rain pHs. The reduction of Lp in seedlings treated with O/sub 3/ was enhanced by drought stress. Rain pH alone did not affect Lp during the 10-wks-exposure and drought cycles. However, the O/sub 3/ effect on Lp was more severe at pH 5.6 than at pH 3.0. Rain at pH 3.0 stimulated shoot height growth by 31% compared with pH 5.6 across all O/sub 3/ treatments. However, root, shoot, and total dry weight of seedlings were not changed by any treatments. Neither O/sub 3/ nor rain pH affected net photosynthetic (P/sub i/) response to branch water potential in plants subjected to one or two drought cycles. However, P/sub i/ was less sensitive to water potential after two drought cycles, indicating physiological adjustment to drought stress.

  8. Fabrication and Protein Conjugation of Aligned Polypyrrole-Poly(L-lactic acid) Fibers Film with the Conductivity and Stability.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiabang; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu; Yang, Anneng; Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The conducting composite scaffold, including fiber-cores of aligned poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and shell-layer of polypyrrole (PPy), was fabricated, and then bovine serum albumin (BSA) was conjugated on the PPy shell-layer. Aligned PLLA fibers (about 300 nm diameter) were obtained by electrospinning and rotating drum collection, and then coated by PPy nanoparticles (NPs, about 50 nm diameter) via chemical oxidation. The surface resistivity of PPy-PLLA fibers film were 0.971, 0.874 kΩ. cm at the fiber's vertical and parallel directions, respectively. The results of PPy-PLLA fibers film immersed in phosphate buffer saline for 8 d indicated that the fibers morphology and the film conductivity were not significantly changed, and the fluorescent images showed that FITC-labeled BSA (FITC-BSA) were successfully conjugated in the fibers film with carbodiimide chemistry, and the largest amount of FITC-BSA conjugated in the fibers film from 100 μg/mL proteins solution was 31.31 μg/cm2 due to lots of poly(glutamic acid) in surface-nanogrooves of the fibers surface. Under electrical stimulation of 100 mV, the fibers film was accompanied the release of all conjugated FITC-BSA with the detachment of some PPy NPs. These results suggested that PPy-PLLA fibers film would be potentially applied in the construction of degradable tissue engineering scaffold with protein factors, especially neurotrophic factors for nerve tissue repair. PMID:27455643

  9. Fabrication and Protein Conjugation of Aligned Polypyrrole-Poly(L-lactic acid) Fibers Film with the Conductivity and Stability.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiabang; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu; Yang, Anneng; Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The conducting composite scaffold, including fiber-cores of aligned poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and shell-layer of polypyrrole (PPy), was fabricated, and then bovine serum albumin (BSA) was conjugated on the PPy shell-layer. Aligned PLLA fibers (about 300 nm diameter) were obtained by electrospinning and rotating drum collection, and then coated by PPy nanoparticles (NPs, about 50 nm diameter) via chemical oxidation. The surface resistivity of PPy-PLLA fibers film were 0.971, 0.874 kΩ. cm at the fiber's vertical and parallel directions, respectively. The results of PPy-PLLA fibers film immersed in phosphate buffer saline for 8 d indicated that the fibers morphology and the film conductivity were not significantly changed, and the fluorescent images showed that FITC-labeled BSA (FITC-BSA) were successfully conjugated in the fibers film with carbodiimide chemistry, and the largest amount of FITC-BSA conjugated in the fibers film from 100 μg/mL proteins solution was 31.31 μg/cm2 due to lots of poly(glutamic acid) in surface-nanogrooves of the fibers surface. Under electrical stimulation of 100 mV, the fibers film was accompanied the release of all conjugated FITC-BSA with the detachment of some PPy NPs. These results suggested that PPy-PLLA fibers film would be potentially applied in the construction of degradable tissue engineering scaffold with protein factors, especially neurotrophic factors for nerve tissue repair.

  10. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  11. Measurement of Solute Diffusion Behavior in Fractured Waste Glass Media

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Meyer, Philip D.

    2008-10-01

    Determination of aqueous phase diffusion coefficients of solutes through fractured media is essential for understanding and modeling contaminants transport at many hazardous waste disposal sites. No methods for earlier measurements are available for the characterization of diffusion in fractured glass blocks. We report here the use of time-lag diffusion experimental method to assess the diffusion behavior of three different solutes (Cs, Sr and Pentafluoro Benzoic Acid or PFBA) in fractured, immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) glass forms. A fractured media time-lag diffusion experimental apparatus that allows the measurement of diffusion coefficients has been designed and built for this purpose. Use of time-lag diffusion method, a considerably easier experimental method than the other available methods, was not previously demonstrated for measuring diffusion in any fractured media. Hydraulic conductivity, porosity and diffusion coefficients of a solute were experimentally measured in fractured glass blocks using this method for the first time. Results agree with the range of properties reported for similar rock media earlier, indicating that the time-lag experimental method can effectively characterize the diffusion coefficients of fractured ILAW glass media.

  12. A new growth factor controlled drug release system to promote healing of bone fractures: nanospheres of recombinant human bone morphogenetic-2 and polylactic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Lei; Li, Cai; Tan, Yinghui; Zhang, Gang

    2011-04-01

    To prepare a new drug control release system, which can markedly promote the healing of bone fractures. Optimized water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion evaporation method, prepared nanospheres of recombinant human bone morphogenetic-2 and polylactic acid (rhBMP-2-PLA-Ns). Its physical character was determined by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Its bioactivity was measured with the microculture tetrazolium test immunohistochemical analyses, alizarin red staining and western blot analysis. rhBMP-2-PLA-Ns exhibited an even and uniform spherical appearance without adhesion, with a particle size distribution between 35 and 65 nm, and a mean size of 45 nm. The drug loading volume and encapsulation efficiency reached ([124.73 +/- 0.41] x 10(-3))% and (90.54 +/- 1.32)%, respectively. The drug release in vitro persisted for 14 days, with a mean concentration of 73.44 +/- 5.38 ng/ml, and corresponded to the Higuichi equation (r = 0.9962). The microculture tetrazolium test showed that 4 days later, the optical density value ranking was rhBMP-2-PLA-N group > rhBMP-2 group > blank control group. Fluorescence immunocytochemical analysis showed that 10 days later the fluorescent density of the rhBMP-2-PLA-N group was significantly higher than the other two groups. Western blot analysis confirmed that the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor in the rhBMP-2-PLA-N group was the greatest. This study showed that rhBMP-2-PLA-Ns have excellent biological activity, can promote proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts. The drug release time is suitable for fracture healing and is an ideal delivery system for fracture healing. PMID:21776677

  13. Effect of a bioabsorbable, super-high molecular weight poly-D,L-lactic acid plate containing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, NING-FENG; HUANG, YU-FENG; WANG, JIN-WU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a bioabsorbable, super-high molecular weight poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA) plate exhibiting the sustained release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) (PDLLA-rhBMP-2) on the treatment of fracture with internal fixation. A total of 32 New Zealand rabbits were randomly allocated to one of four groups (2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks), and a 2.5-mm middle ulnar osteotomy was performed bilaterally. The right side (experimental side) was fixed internally with PDLLA-rhBMP-2, and the left side (control side) was fixed with a normal PDLLA plate. At 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, the gross pathology of the ulnas was examined and radiographic, histological and computer image analyses were performed. The results demonstrated that the ulna fractures were fixed stably with the two bioactive plates at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. At the 8-week time-point, 7 rabbits exhibited good healing at the osteotomy site on the experimental side. At 12 weeks after surgery, 8 rabbits exhibited good healing at the osteotomy site on both sides, but the experimental side showed enhanced compatibility between the plates and surrounding tissue, faster bone formation, a greater bone regeneration mass and better medullary canal structure compared with the control side. In conclusion, PPLLA-rhBMP-2 may be effectively used to treat fracture or nonunion at a non-weight-bearing site. PMID:26640559

  14. Highly proton conductive phosphoric acid-nonionic surfactant lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases and application in graphene optical modulators.

    PubMed

    Tunkara, Ebrima; Albayrak, Cemal; Polat, Emre O; Kocabas, Coskun; Dag, Ömer

    2014-10-28

    Proton conducting gel electrolytes are very important components of clean energy devices. Phosphoric acid (PA, H(3)PO(4) · H2O) is one of the best proton conductors, but needs to be incorporated into some matrix for real device applications, such as into lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases (LLCMs). Herein, we show that PA and nonionic surfactant (NS, C(12)H(25)(OCH(2)CH(2))(10)OH, C(12)E(10)) molecules self-assemble into PANS-LLCMs and display high proton conductivity. The content of the PANS-LLCM can be as high 75% H(3)PO(4) · H2O and 25% 10-lauryl ether (C(12)H(25)(OCH(2)CH(2))(10)OH, C(12)E(10)), and the mesophase follows the usual LLC trend, bicontinuous cubic (V1)-normal hexagonal (H1)-micelle cubic (I1), by increasing the PA concentration in the media. The PANS-LLCMs are stable under ambient conditions, as well as at high (up to 130 °C) and low (-100 °C) temperatures with a high proton conductivity, in the range of 10(-2) to 10(-6) S/cm. The mesophase becomes a mesostructured solid with decent proton conductivity below -100 °C. The mesophase can be used in many applications as a proton-conducting media as well as a phosphate source for the synthesis of various metal phosphates. As an application, we demonstrate a graphene-based optical modulator using supercapacitor structure formed by graphene electrodes and a PANS electrolyte. A PANS-LLC electrolyte-based supercapacitor enables efficient optical modulation of graphene electrodes over a range of wavelengths, from 500 nm to 2 μm, under ambient conditions.

  15. Cytocompatibility of a conductive nanofibrous carbon nanotube/poly (L-Lactic acid) composite scaffold intended for nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Oraee-Yazdani, Saeed; Dodel, Masumeh; Hanaee-Ahvaz, Hana; Soudi, Sara; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Salehi, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate a conductive aligned nanofibrous substrate and evaluate its suitability and cytocompatibility with neural cells for nerve tissue engineering purposes. In order to reach these goals, we first used electrospinning to fabricate single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) incorporated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibrous scaffolds and then assessed its cytocompatibility with olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC). The plasma treated scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle. OECs were isolated from olfactory bulb of GFP Sprague-Dawley rats and characterized using OEC specific markers via immunocytochemistry and flow cytometery. The cytocompatibility of the conductive aligned nano-featured scaffold was assessed using microscopy and MTT assay. We indicate that doping of PLLA polymer with SWCNT can augment the aligned nanosized substrate with conductivity, making it favorable for nerve tissue engineering. Our results demonstrated that SWCNT/PLLA composite scaffold promote the adhesion, growth, survival and proliferation of OEC. Regarding the ideal physical, topographical and electrical properties of the scaffold and the neurotrophic and migratory features of the OECs, we suggest this scaffold and the cell/scaffold construct as a promising platform for cell delivery to neural defects in nerve tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26600751

  16. Metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Rammelt, Stefan; Heineck, Jan; Zwipp, Hans

    2004-09-01

    Metatarsal fractures are relatively common and if malunited, a frequent source of pain and disability. Nondisplaced fractures and fractures of the second to fourth metatarsal with displacement in the horizontal plane can be treated conservatively with protected weight bearing in a cast shoe for 4-6 weeks. In most displaced fractures, closed reduction can be achieved but maintenance of the reduction needs internal fixation. Percutaneous pinning is suitable for most fractures of the lesser metatarsals. Fractures with joint involvement and multiple fragments frequently require open reduction and plate fixation. Transverse fractures at the metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction of the fifth metatarsal ("Jones fractures") require an individualized approach tailored to the level of activity and time to union. Avulsion fractures of the fifth metatarsal bone are treated by open reduction and tension-band wiring or screw fixation if displaced more than 2 mm or with more that 30% of the joint involved. The metatarsals are the most common site of stress fractures, most of which are treated nonoperatively. Symptomatic posttraumatic deformities need adequate correction, in most cases by osteotomy across the former fracture site.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  18. Is vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7) associated with an increased incidence of hip fracture? An explanation for the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Nobuo; Kitamura, Kei-Ichiro; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Itomura, Miho; Hamazaki, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    High calcium intake may increase hip fracture (HF) incidence. This phenomenon, known as the calcium paradox, might be explained by vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7, VA), the highly specific trans fatty acid (TFA) present in dairy products. First, we ecologically investigated the relationship between 18:1 TFA intake and HF incidence using data from 12 to 13 European countries collected before 2000; then we measured the effects of VA and elaidic acid (18:1t n-9, EA) on osteoblasts from goldfish scales (tissues very similar to mammalian bone), with alkaline phosphatase as a marker; and finally we measured the effect of VA on mRNA expression in the scales for the major bone proteins type I collagen and osteocalcin. HF incidence was significantly correlated with 18:1 TFA intake in men (r=0.57) and women (r=0.65). Incubation with 1μmol/L VA and EA for 48h significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase activity by 25% and 21%, respectively. Incubation of scales with 10μmol/L VA for 48h significantly decreased mRNA expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin (by about 50%). In conclusion, VA may be causatively related to HF and could explain the calcium paradox. It may be prudent to reduce 18:1 TFA intake, irrespective of trans positions, to prevent HF.

  19. Is vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7) associated with an increased incidence of hip fracture? An explanation for the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Nobuo; Kitamura, Kei-Ichiro; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Itomura, Miho; Hamazaki, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    High calcium intake may increase hip fracture (HF) incidence. This phenomenon, known as the calcium paradox, might be explained by vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7, VA), the highly specific trans fatty acid (TFA) present in dairy products. First, we ecologically investigated the relationship between 18:1 TFA intake and HF incidence using data from 12 to 13 European countries collected before 2000; then we measured the effects of VA and elaidic acid (18:1t n-9, EA) on osteoblasts from goldfish scales (tissues very similar to mammalian bone), with alkaline phosphatase as a marker; and finally we measured the effect of VA on mRNA expression in the scales for the major bone proteins type I collagen and osteocalcin. HF incidence was significantly correlated with 18:1 TFA intake in men (r=0.57) and women (r=0.65). Incubation with 1μmol/L VA and EA for 48h significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase activity by 25% and 21%, respectively. Incubation of scales with 10μmol/L VA for 48h significantly decreased mRNA expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin (by about 50%). In conclusion, VA may be causatively related to HF and could explain the calcium paradox. It may be prudent to reduce 18:1 TFA intake, irrespective of trans positions, to prevent HF. PMID:27269708

  20. Spontaneous fractures of the mandible concept & treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Marcussen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous fractures of the mandible dispose a surgical challenge in comparisons to fractures caused by trauma due to several complicating factors. Additionally: controversies exist concerning the terminology of the field. Material and Methods We conducted a retrospective study of all patients with mandibular fractures, with exclusion of fractures of the coronoid process and the alveolar process, treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark between February 2003 and February 2013. Data collected from the medical records included sex, age, cause of fracture, site of fracture, and treatment. Results We identified 517 patients with 684 mandible fractures. Twenty-five of these were spontaneous fractures and 659 fractures were of traumatic origin. Condylar fractures rarely occur spontaneously, but constitute the majority of the traumatic fractures. Excluding these fractures from the analysis, we found a non-surgical approach in 14 of 24 (58%) of the spontaneous fractures and 110 of 376 (29%) of the traumatic fractures. This was statistically significant. Conclusions We found a statistical significant difference in favor of non-surgical approach in spontaneous fractures and we discussed the treatment challenges of these fractures. We addressed the terminological controversies regarding pathological fractures, and suggested the term spontaneous fractures denoting a fracture occurring during normal jaw function being either pathological or non-pathological. Key words:Mandibular fractures, spontaneous fractures, pathological fractures, traumatic fractures, treatment. PMID:26636905

  1. Efficient high-permeability fracturing offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Phillipi, M.; Farabee, M.

    1996-12-31

    Offshore operators can more efficiently and effectively perform high-permeability and conventional hydraulic fracture treatments by blending treatment slurries under microprocessor control, adding undiluted acid on-the-fly, and altering sand concentrations and other slurry properties instantaneously. A two-skid system has been designed with these considerations in mind. The system, which can be shipped efficiently in ISO containers, has been tested on fluids up to 210-cp viscosity and can step or ramp sand concentrations up to a maximum of 20 lb/gal. All additives, including acid treatments, are added on-the-fly; leftover additives and acids may be stored for future jobs. The system may be applied in most conditions, including offshore wells requiring conventional or high-permeability fracture treatments and certain land-based wells in remote areas where a compact skid is needed. Three significant benefits have resulted from using the compact-skid system: offshore operators have been able to ship the skid system at 20% of shipping costs of non-ISO equipment; on-the-fly mixing has prevented material waste associated with batch-mixing; and volumes pumped on actual jobs have closely matched job designs. Data have been collected from several Gulf of Mexico jobs run with the two-part skid system that has been designed for conducting hydraulic fracture treatments from offshore rigs.

  2. Responses of pyriform cortex neurons to excitatory amino acids: voltage dependence, conductance changes, and effects of divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Hori, N; Galeno, T; Carpenter, D O

    1987-03-01

    The actions of ionophoretically applied N-methyl aspartate (NMA), quisqualate, and kainate, thought to activate three different types of excitatory amino acid receptors, were studied on pyramidal neurons of the rat pyriform cortex, maintained in an isolated, submerged, and perfused brain slice. Intracellular recordings were made with either K acetate or CsCl electrodes. In most neurons all three agonists elicited monophasic responses which could be evoked at 20-sec intervals. Some neurons showed biphasic responses, most commonly to kainate but, on occasion, also for quisqualate. The slower component appeared to be correlated with excitotoxicity and, consequently, was difficult to study. As a result the kainate responses studied were from neurons selected for having a single component. In neurons selected for having a linear current-voltage relationship or neurons loaded with Cs to suppress K conductance and linearize the current-voltage relationship, the average changes in resistance recorded during ionophoretic responses at resting potential were as follows: NMA, 131.2 +/- 6.7% of control; kainate, 104.7 +/- 5.8% of control; and quisqualate, 92.8 +/- 2.8% of control. The magnitude and direction of the conductance change were very reproducible in any one neuron, but especially for kainate some cells showed clear conductance increases, while others showed clear conductance decreases. Using CsCl electrodes it was possible to reduce K+ conductance and depolarize the neurons over a wider range. By passing depolarizing current it was possible to reverse the responses. The response to all three agonists reversed at the same depolarized potential. This observation indicates that while there are differences in the ionic channels associated with the three agonists at resting potential, the channels have similar properties at more depolarized potentials. Responses to all three agonists were influenced by the concentrations of divalent cations in the perfusion medium. The NMA

  3. Seeking enhanced lead/acid battery performance through the use of conductive tin-dioxide-coated glass-flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Lim, O.; Ozgun, H.; Rand, D. A. J.

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this research is to raise the level of active-material utilization in the positive plates of lead/acid batteries (without diminishing other performance characteristics) and, thereby, to increase the energy output per unit weight. The strategy is to increase the electrical conductivity of the material by adding a proprietary particulate that consists of glass-flakes coated with a thin (less than 5 microns) layer of tin dioxide. The particulates are incorporated in positive plates that are prepared as automotive designs under a wide range of processing conditions, i.e., paste densities, acid-to-oxide ratios, low-/high-temperature (3BS/4BS) curing. Plate performance is evaluated in terms of active-material utilization, cold-cranking capability, repetitive reserve capacity, and life endurance under the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) procedure. Compared with untreated cells, the following benefits of adding the particulates to positive plates have been confirmed: (1) acceleration of the formation process; (2) increase in the BET surface area of formed materials; (3) improvement in active-material utilization at the 5-h and 20-h discharge rates; (4) maintenance of cycleability under repetitive, reserve-capacity duty; (5) increase in cycle life under the JIS schedule. The encouraging outcomes of this research suggest that further benefits are likely to be gained by designing elongated particulates of lighter weight. This will increase the number of counts per unit area and, thereby, will improve the contact between the individual particles of the positive active material and will further enhance the electrical conductivity of the plate.

  4. An in situ generated carbon as integrated conductive additive for hierarchical negative plate of lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, M.; Ganesan, M.; Ambalavanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we report an in situ generated carbon from sugar as additive in the Negative Active Mass (NAM) which enhances the charge-discharge characteristics of the lead-acid cells. In situ formed sugar derived carbon (SDC) with leady oxide (LO) provides a conductive network and excellent protection against NAM irreversible lead sulfation. The effect of SDC and carbon black (CB) added negative plates are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The results show that subtle changes in the addition of carbon to NAM led to subsequent changes on the performance during partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) operations in lead-acid cells. Furthermore, SDC added cells exhibit remarkable improvement in the rate capability, active material utilization, cycle performance and charge acceptance compared to that of the conventional CB added cells. The impact of SDC with LO at various synthesis conditions on the electrochemical performance of the negative plate is studied systematically.

  5. Enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity by methyl jasmonate and the role of calcium and abscisic acid in this process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Romera, Beatriz; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Li, Guowei; Luu, Doan-Trung; Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela; Zamarreño, Angel María; García-Mina, Jose María; Maurel, Christophe; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-04-01

    The role of jasmonic acid in the induction of stomatal closure is well known. However, its role in regulating root hydraulic conductivity (L) has not yet been explored. The objectives of the present research were to evaluate how JA regulates L and how calcium and abscisic acid (ABA) could be involved in such regulation. We found that exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) increased L of Phaseolus vulgaris, Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Tomato plants defective in JA biosynthesis had lower values of L than wild-type plants, and that L was restored by addition of MeJA. The increase of L by MeJA was accompanied by an increase of the phosphorylation state of the aquaporin PIP2. We observed that MeJA addition increased the concentration of cytosolic calcium and that calcium channel blockers inhibited the rise of L caused by MeJA. Treatment with fluoridone, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, partially inhibited the increase of L caused by MeJA, and tomato plants defective in ABA biosynthesis increased their L after application of MeJA. It is concluded that JA enhances L and that this enhancement is linked to calcium and ABA dependent and independent signalling pathways. PMID:24131347

  6. An amino acid outside the pore region influences apamin sensitivity in small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Andreas; Ferraro, Teresa; D'hoedt, Dieter; Stocker, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK, K(Ca)) are a family of voltage-independent K+ channels with a distinct physiology and pharmacology. The bee venom toxin apamin inhibits exclusively the three cloned SK channel subtypes (SK1, SK2, and SK3) with different affinity, highest for SK2, lowest for SK1, and intermediate for SK3 channels. The high selectivity of apamin made it a valuable tool to study the molecular makeup and function of native SK channels. Three amino acids located in the outer vestibule of the pore are of particular importance for the different apamin sensitivities of SK channels. Chimeric SK1 channels, enabling the homomeric expression of the rat SK1 (rSK1) subunit and containing the core domain (S1-S6) of rSK1, are apamin-insensitive. By contrast, channels formed by the human orthologue human SK1 (hSK1) are sensitive to apamin. This finding hinted at the involvement of regions beyond the pore as determinants of apamin sensitivity, because hSK1 and rSK1 have an identical amino acid sequence in the pore region. Here we investigated which parts of the channels outside the pore region are important for apamin sensitivity by constructing chimeras between apamin-insensitive and -sensitive SK channel subunits and by introducing point mutations. We demonstrate that a single amino acid situated in the extracellular loop between the transmembrane segments S3 and S4 has a major impact on apamin sensitivity. Our findings enabled us to convert the hSK1 channel into a channel that was as sensitive for apamin as SK2, the SK channel with the highest sensitivity.

  7. Thermal shock fracture mechanics analysis of a semi-infinite medium based on the dual-phase-lag heat conduction model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Li, J. E.; Yang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The generalized lagging behaviour in solids is very important in understanding heat conduction in small-scale and high-rate heating. In this paper, an edge crack in a semi-infinite medium subjected to a heat shock on its surface is studied under the framework of the dual-phase-lag (DPL) heat conduction model. The transient thermal stress in the medium without crack is obtained first. This stress is used as the crack surface traction with an opposite sign to formulate the crack problem. Numerical results of thermal stress intensity factor are obtained as the functions of crack length and thermal shock time. Crack propagation predictions are conducted and results based on the DPL model and those based on the classical Fourier heat conduction model are compared. The thermal shock strength that the medium can sustain without catastrophic failure is established according to the maximum local stress criterion and the stress intensity factor criterion. PMID:25663805

  8. The Effect of 3-Thiopheneacetic Acid in the Polymerization of a Conductive Electrotextile for Use in Biosensor Development

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Shannon K.; Alocilja, Evangelyn; Senecal, Andre; Senecal, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to develop an electrotextile using a nonwoven polypropylene fiber platform conformally coated in a conductive, functionalized copolymer of polypyrrole and 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3TAA). The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization process would have an effect on the availability of binding sites in the high-surface area electrotextile for biorecognition elements and (2) how the increase in the concentration of 3TAA would affect the physical characteristics of the coating, resistivity of the sample and availability of binding sites. It was found that the addition of 3TAA to the polymerization process resulted in an increase in the size of the polypyrrole coating, as well as the material resistivity and available binding sites for biorecognition elements. These factors were used to determine which of the tested concentrations was best for biosensor development. A polymer coated membrane sample containing a concentration within the range of 10–50 mg/mL of 3TAA was selected as the best for future biosensor work. PMID:25586259

  9. Laboratory Visualization of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation and Interaction with a Network of Preexisting Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Borglin, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We present optical visualization experiments of hydraulic fracture propagation within transparent rock-analogue samples containing a network of preexisting fractures. Natural fractures and heterogeneities in rock have a great impact on hydraulic fracture propagation and resulting improvements in reservoir permeability. In recent years, many sophisticated numerical simulations on hydraulic fracturing have been conducted. Laboratory experiments on hydraulic fracturing are often performed with acoustic emission (Micro Earthquake) monitoring, which allows detection and location of fracturing and fracture propagation. However, the detected fractures are not necessarily hydraulically produced fractures which provide permeable pathways connected to the injection (and production) well. The primary objectives of our visualization experiments are (1) to obtain quantitative visual information of hydraulic fracture propagation affected by pre-existing fractures and (2) to distinguish fractures activated by the perturbed stress field away from the injected fluid and hydraulically produced fractures. The obtained data are also used to develop and validate a new numerical modeling technique (TOUGH-RBSN [Rigid-Body-Spring-Network] model) for hydraulic fracturing simulations, which is presented in a companion paper. The experiments are conducted using transparent soda-lime glass cubes (10 cm × 10 cm × 10 cm) containing either (1) 3D laser-engraved artificial fractures and fracture networks or (2) a random network of fractures produced by rapid thermal quenching. The strength (and also the permeability for the latter) of the fractures can be altered to examine their impact on hydraulic fracturing. The cubes are subjected to true-triaxial stress within a polyaxial loading frame, and hydraulic fractures are produced by injecting fluids with a range of viscosity into an analogue borehole drilled in the sample. The visual images of developing fractures are obtained both through a port

  10. Understanding Correlations Between Structure and Redox Properties in Aqueously-Dispersible, Electrically-Conductive, Polymer-Acid-Doped Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Jacob Daniel

    kinetics and the propagation of reaction fronts between PANI's electrically insulating and conducting forms. Specifically, PANI-PAAMPSA's switching kinetics are limited by interparticle contacts, suggesting that the reaction front propagates across particles faster than between particles. Following DCA treatment, PANI-PAAMPSA's electrochromic response is hastened, stabilized, and invariant to the original particle size. As-spun films also demonstrate size-exclusivity with respect to the ionic radius of the buffer cation; these size-exclusion effects are eliminated following DCA-treatment, further confirming the significant influence of internal film structure on electrochromic kinetics. Lastly, having established the dependence of redox properties on film structure, the redox chemistries of PANI-PAAMPSA can be manipulated to affect its structural, optical, and electrical properties. By chemically reducing PANI-PAAMPSA films, the electrostatic interaction between PANI and PAAMPSA can be eliminated. PAAMPSA subsequently relaxes in the presence of water vapor, after which the surfaces of the films smoothen dramatically. Following relaxation, the films are chemically oxidized back to their conductive state, during which the optical and electrical properties of the films undergo changes that are directly analogous to those associated with PANI films treated with performance-enhancing DCA. The interrelationships between the structural, optical, electrical, and redox properties of polymer-acid-doped conductive polymers revealed in this work provide novel insight into the behavior of these systems, and will help guide the development of future organic electronic materials.

  11. Determination of γ-hydroxybutyric acid in saliva by capillary electrophoresis coupled with contactless conductivity and indirect UV absorbance detectors.

    PubMed

    Mazina, Jekaterina; Saar-Reismaa, Piret; Kulp, Maria; Kaljurand, Mihkel; Vaher, Merike

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to optimise and validate the methodology for determination of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in saliva by CE combined with a contactless conductivity detector (C(4)D) and indirect UV absorbance detection (λ(ABS) = 210 nm). The optimized BGE, consisting of 8.5 mM maleic acid, 17 mM arginine, 255 μM cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and 15% acetonitrile, was evaluated for the separation of GHB in saliva within 6 min. The performance characteristics of the CE-C(4)D-indirect UV methodology was validated. The instrument detection and quantification limits were 0.49 and 1.6 mg/L for C(4)D, and 5.1 mg/L and 17.0 mg/L for indirect UV, respectively. The linearity was obtained over the range from 2.5 to 400 mg/L for C(4)D and from 12.5 to 400 mg/L for indirect UV. The interday precisions were within 2.3-5.7% and intraday precisions were within 1.6-9.0% for C(4)D as well as 2.1-9.3%, 5.6-10.1% for indirect UV in spiked saliva, respectively. The recoveries were within 87.2-104.4%. The matrix effects were +53.2% for small concentrations up to 25 mg/L for C(4)D and +23.6% for concentrations up to 75 for mg/L for indirect UV detection. No matrix effects were observed for higher concentration levels. In conclusion, CE-C4D-indirect UV can offer a rapid, accurate, sensitive, and definitive method for the determination of GHB abuse in saliva samples as a forensic screening tool.

  12. Foam for fracturing and acid stimulation. Part 2. Job control of a foam operation and a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, D.L.

    1982-02-01

    This 3-part series of works is a comprehensive guide to the background, design and implementation of foamed stimulation for the treatment of oil and gas wells. It is adapted from the foam stimulation training manual developed and in use by Smith Energy Services. The manual is the product of 7 yr research and includes edited material already published, as well as information made available for the first time. This work should allow an interested party to acquire a basic understanding of the principles of foam and how it is utilized successfully as a stimulation medium. The following conclusions are made. Charts can be used onsite to maintain designed parameters during fracturing, if treating conditions are not as anticipated. Equations are used to determine wellhead treating pressures and changes in foam rate and quality. Increasing or decreasing the nitrogen rate maintains foam rate and quality. Increasing or decreasing the water rate maintains foam quality, but changes the frac rate correspondingly. Pumping rates can be changed and foam quality maintained, if there is a partial loss in nitrogen or water rate.

  13. Gout increases risk of fracture: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Lin, Che-Chen; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Po-Hao; Tsai, Chun-Hao

    2016-08-01

    There is still debate on whether high uric acid increases bone mineral density (BMD) against osteoporotic fracture or bone resorption caused by gout inflammation. This study aimed to evaluate whether gout offers a protective effect on bone health or not. We conducted a nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to evaluate the association between gout history and risk factors of fracture.A retrospective cohort study was designed using the claim data from Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID). A total of 43,647 subjects with gout and a cohort of 87,294 comparison subjects without gout were matched in terms of age and sex between 2001 and 2009, and the data were followed until December 31, 2011. The primary outcome of the study was the fracture incidence, and the impacts of gout on fracture risks were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model.After an 11-year follow-up period, 6992 and 11,412 incidents of fracture were reported in gout and comparison cohorts, respectively. The overall incidence rate of fracture in individuals with gout was nearly 23%, which was higher than that in individuals without gout (252 vs 205 per 10,000 person-years) at an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 1.14-1.21). Age, sex, and fracture-associated comorbidities were adjusted accordingly. As for fracture locations, patients with gout were found at significant higher fracture risks for upper/lower limbs and spine fractures. In gout patient, the user of allopurinol or benzbromarone has significantly lower risk of facture than nonusers.Gout history is considered as a risk factor for fractures, particularly in female individuals and fracture sites located at the spine or upper/lower limbs. PMID:27559970

  14. Fatigue Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Morris, James M.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue (or stress) fracture of bone in military recruits has been recognized for many years. Most often it is a metatarsal bone that is involved but the tarsal bones, calcaneus, tibia, fibula, femur, and pelvis are occasionally affected. Reports of such fractures in the ribs, ulna and vertebral bodies may be found in the literature. In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the occurrence of fatigue fractures in the civilian population. Weekend sportsmen, athletes in an early phase of training, and persons engaged in unaccustomed, repetitive, vigorous activity are potential victims of such a fracture. The signs and symptoms, roentgenographic findings, treatment and etiology of fatigue fractures are dealt with in this presentation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:5652745

  15. Enhanced conductivity of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) film by acid treatment for indium tin oxide-free organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Chiao; Huang, Chih-Kuo; Hung, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Mei-Ying

    2016-08-01

    An acid treatment is used in the enhancement of the conductivity of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin film, which is often used as the anode in organic solar cells. There are three types of acid treatment for PEDOT:PSS thin film: hydrochloric, sulfuric, and phosphoric acid treatments. In this study, we examine and compare these three ways with each other for differences in conductivity. Hydrochloric acid results in the highest conductivity enhancement, from 0.3 to 1109 S/cm. We also discuss the optical transmittance, conductivity, surface roughness, surface morphology, and stability, as well as the factors that can influence device efficiency. The devices are fabricated using an acid-treated PEDOT:PSS thin film as the anode. The highest power conversion efficiency was 1.32%, which is a large improvement over that of the unmodified organic solar cell (0.21%). It is comparable to that obtained when using indium tin oxide (ITO) as an electrode, ca. 1.46%.

  16. Fracture dimensions in frac&pack stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.; Economides, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A model is introduced to predict dynamic fracture dimensions in frac&pack stimulation. Design aspects of the two-in-one step treatment techniques, required by soft and high-permeability reservoirs are discussed. A pressure-dependent leakoff model, based on the transient flow of a non-Newtonian fluid displacing a reservoir fluid has been developed and incorporated with fracture mechanics concepts to simulate the entire process of frac&pack treatments including fracture propagation, inflation, proppant packing and closure. Results obtained in this study indicate the considerable difference between traditional fracturing and frac&pack treatments. In the latter, fracture length is much less important than fracture conductivity. This work shows how to terminate the fracture growth at the appropriate time, and how to design frac&packs resulting in fracture widths several times larger than those for traditional fracturing.

  17. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  18. Thermal conductivity and acid dissolution behavior of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics for use in LWR inert matrix fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, P. G.; Lambregts, M. J.; Meyer, M. K.

    2006-02-01

    Dual-phase MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics are proposed for use in inert matrix fuel for disposition of plutonium and minor actinides in existing light water reactors. The concept for use of this composite material was developed with the intent to capitalize on the known advantages of the composite's constituents: high thermal conductivity of MgO, and stability of ZrO 2 in LWR coolant. The study presented in this paper addressed the thermal conductivity and nitric acid solubility of MgO-ZrO 2 ceramics. Thermal analysis, based on experimental and analytical techniques, established that the product of all investigated compositions has the thermal conductivity superior to that of UO 2. Nitric acid dissolution experiments showed that only the free MgO phase dissolves in the nitric acid, leaving behind a porous pellet consisting of a ZrO 2-based solid solution.

  19. The Effect of Microbial Activity on Flow and Transport of an Organic Contaminant in Naturally Fractured Chalk Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, S.; Adar, E.; Ronen, Z.; Yakirevich, A.; Nativ, R.

    2001-12-01

    Low-permeability rock formations, such as chalk, are being selected as hydrogeological barriers for waste disposal sites and industrial areas throughout the world. Many sites constructed on chalk formations have failed due to existing fractures. Subsurface natural or enhanced microbial activity is the main biological process that causes transformation of organic contaminants in groundwater. However, this beneficial activity may result in physical, chemical, geological and biological changes affecting the hydrological properties of the fractured domain. Whereas these effects have been extensively investigated in porous media, they are less familiar in fractured formations, the topic of this work. A set of experiments was designed to quantify 2-D flow distribution along a single fracture and to assess the effect of biodegradation on its hydraulic properties. The experiments were carried out using 20-cm diameter and 30-50-cm long chalk cores, each intersected by a single natural fracture. Flow across the fracture was defined through both direct measurements of the out flux under various (controlled) hydraulic gradients, and through 2-D multi-tracer tests. The 2-D-distribution of flow in the fracture was investigated by injecting four non-reactive tracers (fluorobenzoic acids), each along a different section of the fracture inlet. Similarly, the outflux was sampled from four vertically aligned segments at the fracture outlet. Tracer breakthrough curves, mixing ratios and fluxes were evaluated for quantitative assessment of the 2-D flow distribution within the fracture. Results from the flow experiments suggested deviation from a linear relationship between the flux and the hydraulic gradient for Reynolds numbers exceeding 8, probably due to the increase of inertial forces. In addition, although flow out of the fracture was evenly distributed along the fracture width, different mixing ratios of tracers in neighboring sections were observed probably due to hydrodynamic

  20. Enhancing proton conduction under low humidity by incorporating core-shell polymeric phosphonic acid submicrospheres into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Lingli; Wang, Jingtao; Xu, Tao; Dong, Hao; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2012-09-01

    Polymeric phosphonic acid submicrospheres (PPASs) with carboxylic acid cores and phosphonic acid shells are synthesized by distillation-precipitation polymerization. The structure and composition of PPASs are confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The PPASs are then incorporated into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) to fabricate composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The incorporated PPASs enlarge the ion-channel size of the composite membranes as testified by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), affording significantly enhanced water uptake and water retention. Compared with the membrane containing the polymeric carboxylic acid submicrospheres (PCASs), the PPASs-filled membrane exhibits higher proton conductivity owing to the higher water uptake and water retention of the PPASs and stronger acidity of phosphonic acid. The composite membrane with 15 wt.% PPASs displays the highest proton conductivity of 0.0187 S cm-1 at room temperature and 100% relative humidity (RH). At the RH as low as 20%, this membrane acquires a proton conductivity of 0.0066 S cm-1, 5 times higher than that of the SPEEK control membrane (0.0011 S cm-1) after 90 min testing, at 40 °C.

  1. Which Fractures Are Most Attributable to Osteoporosis?

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, Amy H.; Patkar, Nivedita M.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Delzell, Elizabeth; Gary, Lisa; Kilgore, Meredith; Saag, Kenneth G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Determining anatomic sites and circumstances under which a fracture may be a consequence of osteoporosis is a topic of ongoing debate and controversy that is important to both clinicians and researchers. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review and generated an evidence report on fracture risk based on specific anatomic bone sites as well as fracture diagnosis codes. Using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness process, we convened a multi-disciplinary panel of 11 experts who rated fractures according to their likelihood of being due to osteoporosis based on the evidence report. Fracture sites (as determined by ICD-CM codes) were stratified by four clinical risk factor categories based on age, sex, race/ethnicity (African- American and Caucasian) and presence or absence of trauma. Results Consistent with current clinical experience, the fractures rated most likely due to osteoporosis were the femoral neck, pathologic fractures of the vertebrae, and lumbar and thoracic vertebral fractures. The fractures rated least likely due to osteoporosis were open proximal humerus fractures, skull, and facial bones. The expert panel rated open fractures of the arm (except proximal humerus) and fractures of the tibia/fibula, patella, ribs, and sacrum as being highly likely due to osteoporosis in older Caucasian women but a lower likelihood in younger African American men. Conclusion Osteoporosis attribution scores for all fracture sites were determined by a multidisciplinary expert panel to provide an evidence-based continuum of the likelihood of a fracture being associated with osteoporosis. PMID:21130353

  2. C-terminal Domains of N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid Receptor Modulate Unitary Channel Conductance and Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Bruce A.; Aman, Teresa K.; Amico-Ruvio, Stacy A.; Kussius, Cassandra L.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2012-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NRs) are glutamate-gated calcium-permeable channels that are essential for normal synaptic transmssion and contribute to neurodegeneration. Tetrameric proteins consist of two obligatory GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits, of which GluN2A (2A) and GluN2B (2B) are prevalent in adult brain. The intracellularly located C-terminal domains (CTDs) make a significant portion of mass of the receptors and are essential for plasticity and excitotoxicity, but their functions are incompletely defined. Recent evidence shows that truncation of the N2 CTD alters channel kinetics; however, the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Here we recorded activity from individual NRs lacking the CTDs of N1, 2A, or 2B and determined the gating mechanisms of these receptors. Receptors lacking the N1 CTDs had larger unitary conductance and faster deactivation kinetics, receptors lacking the 2A or 2B CTDs had longer openings and longer desensitized intervals, and the first 100 amino acids of the N2 CTD were essential for these changes. In addition, receptors lacking the CTDs of either 2A or 2B maintained isoform-specific kinetic differences and swapping CTDs between 2A and 2B had no effect on single-channel properties. Based on these results, we suggest that perturbations in the CTD can modify the NR-mediated signal in a subunit-dependent manner, in 2A these effects are most likely mediated by membrane-proximal residues, and the isoform-specific biophysical properties conferred by 2A and 2B are CTD-independent. The kinetic mechanisms we developed afford a quantitative approach to understanding how the intracellular domains of NR subunits can modulate the responses of the receptor. PMID:22948148

  3. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  4. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  5. In situ spazialisation of flow laws in a fractured media with multi-parametric measurements (pressure, deformation, water conductivity) and 2d coupled hydro-mechanical (h.m) modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmoille, A.; Cappa, F.; Guglielmie, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Our field experiments have been realized at the Coaraze experimental site which is located in the external Alps of south-eastern France. This site corresponds to a reservoir made up of a 20 m thick pile of fractured Cretaceous limestone limited at the bottom and the top by an impervious layer. The 19,000 m3 of calcareous rock are drained by a spring which is located on a vertical fault contact between limestone and impervious marls. This fault plays the role of a natural dam for the water stocked in the reservoir. The spring is closed with a water-gate, thus, it’s possible to control the piezometric level in the reservoir by opening or closing the gate. The surface of the massif has been clogged to avoid that some leaks appear during the closure of the water-gate, when the water head is increasing. In a first experiment, we realized some hydraulic tests to characterise the different discontinuity behaviours affecting the massif. Those tests consist in pumping and water injection with for target to evaluate the field of hydraulic conductivity in the different fracture. Pumping has been realized in the discontinuity assumed permeable. Water injection has been realized between inflatable packers in the discontinuity assumed to be low permeable. For the second experimentation, we choose two areas in the field of discontinuity tested in the first phase in order to follow the rock and water behaviour during water pressure elevation in the massif. Thus, we focus our attention on one drain constituted by a tectonic fracture and one stratigraphic joint connected to the drain. During these experiments, we proceed of the following way: we closed the water gate three times for duration of 10 to 15 minutes. Thus, we induce three successive piezometric head elevations in the reservoir. Between the tap closures, the reservoir is drained during about ten minutes. The different parameters are recorded during all the experiments, when the water head is increasing and when it is

  6. Heat Transfer in Heterogeneous Fractured Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisladottir, V. R.; Roubinet, D.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling heat transfer in fracture networks involves simulations of transport processes in individual fractures and ambient matrix and at fracture-matrix interfaces. In typical applications with meter-scale computational domains and millimeter-scale fracture apertures, such fracture-resolving computations can be prohibitively expensive even when nonuniform meshes are used. We develop a heat transfer particle-tracking approach that significantly reduces computational costs. Most particle-tracking methods assume infinite matrix and all of them assume one-dimensional (1D) transport in the matrix blocks. Yet our analytical solution for heat transfer in a single fracture indicates that the 1D assumption is inadequate, leading to large predictive errors. Our approach is mesh-free and takes into account both longitudinal and transversal heat conduction in the matrix. Our model is used to analyze the impact of fracture network topology and matrix block distribution on heat transport in heterogeneous fractured rocks.

  7. Integrated Analysis of Flow, Temperature, and Specific-Conductance Logs and Depth-Dependent Water-Quality Samples from Three Deep Wells in a Fractured-Sandstone Aquifer, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Knutson, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of flow, temperature, and specific-conductance logs and depth-dependent water-quality samples collected under ambient and pumped conditions provided a preliminary delineation of flow zones and water quality in three deep abandoned water-supply wells. The integrated analysis was completed as part of the characterization of a fractured-sandstone aquifer in the mountainous setting of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory in southern Ventura County, California. In the deepest well, which was 1,768 feet deep and had the highest specific capacity (120 gallons per minute per foot), flow zones were detected at 380 feet (base of casing) and at 440, 595, and 770 feet in the open hole. Under ambient conditions, measured flow was downward from the 380- and 440-foot zones to the 595- and 770-foot zones. Under pumped conditions, most of flow was contributed by the 595-foot zone. Flow from the 380- and 440-foot zones appeared to have lower specific conductance and higher trichloroethylene concentrations than that from the 595-foot zone. In the shallowest well, which was reportedly 940 feet deep but only logged to 915 feet due to blockage, flow zones were detected behind the perforated casing and at 867 feet in the open hole. Under ambient conditions, downward and upward flows appeared to exit at a zone behind the perforated casing at 708 feet. Most of the pumped flow was contributed from zones behind the perforated casing between 565 and 708 feet. Pumped flow also was contributed by zones at 867 feet and below the logged depth. Volatile organic compounds were not detected in the ambient and pumped flows. In the third well, which was 1,272 feet deep and had the lowest specific capacity (3.6 gallons per minute per foot), flow zones were detected in the open hole above and just below the water level near 337 feet and at 615, 785, 995, and 1,070 feet. Under ambient conditions, measured flow in well was downward from the shallowmost zones to the 995-foot zone. Fracture zones at

  8. Origins of ultralow thermal conductivity in bulk [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM).

    PubMed

    Pöhls, Jan-Hendrik; Johnson, Michel B; White, Mary Anne

    2016-01-14

    Bulk PCBM has exceptionally low thermal conductivity, 0.07 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. We show that its ultralow thermal conductivity is an intrinsic property. Based on results for thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements down to <2 K, along with Raman spectroscopy and dilatometry, a new model for minimum thermal conductivity was developed. In the model the thermal energy is transferred between entities of phonons oscillating in a range of frequencies, and limited by the atomic density and the phonon mean speed. The model accurately represents the low thermal conductivity for both PCBM and C60/C70.

  9. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists are Associated with Hip Fractures among At-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Douglas A; Kubo, Ai; Zhao, Wei; Quesenberry, Charles

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Drugs that inhibit gastric acid might increase the risk of hip fracture. However, little long-term exposure data exist and no large studies have been conducted in the United States. METHODS We conducted a case-control study using data from an integrated health services organization. We evaluated 33,752 patients with incident diagnoses of hip/femur fractures (cases), 130,471 matched members without fractures (controls), prescription data for use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) (up to 10 years cumulative duration), and confounders. RESULTS Patients with hip fractures were more likely than controls to have previously received ≥2 years supply of PPIs (odds ratio [OR]=1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.21–1.39) or H2RAs (OR=1.18, 95% CI=1.08–1.29). The risk was reduced after medication discontinuation (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.21–1.41 for current PPI users vs. OR=1.09, 95% CI 0.64–1.85 for patients who received their last prescription was 3–5 years ago). Higher dosages (but not increasing cumulative durations) were associated with increased risk (e.g. ≥1.5 pills/day OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.21–1.64; <0.74 pills/day OR=1.12, 95% CI 0.94–1.33). Excess fracture risk for PPI use was only present among persons with at least one other fracture risk factor. CONCLUSION Use of drugs that inhibit gastric acid is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture; however, this association was only found among persons with at least one other risk factor for hip fracture. Acid inhibition might therefore be associated with fracture risk in persons already at risk for osteoporosis, although other confounding cannot be excluded. PMID:20353792

  10. Permeability damage to natural fractures caused by fracturing fluid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.; Sattler, A.R.; Maloney, D.R.; Raible, C.J.

    1988-04-01

    Formation damage studies using artificially fractured, low-permeability sandstone cores indicate that viscosified fracturing fluids can severely restrict gas flow through these types of narrow fractures. These studies were performed in support of the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Extensive geological and production evaluations at the MWX site indicate that the presence of a natural fracture system is largely responsible for unstimulated gas production. The laboratory formation damage studies were designed to examine changes in cracked core permeability to gas caused by fracturing fluid residues introduced into such narrow fractures during fluid leakoff. Polysaccharide polymers caused significant reduction (up to 95%) to gas flow through cracked cores. Polymer fracturing fluid gels used in this study included hydroxypropyl guar, hydroxyethyl cellulose, and xanthan gum. In contrast, polyacrylamide gels caused little or no reduction in gas flow through cracked cores after liquid cleanup. Other components of fracturing fluids (surfactants, breakers, etc.) caused less damage to gas flows. Other factors affecting gas flow through cracked cores were investigated, including the effects of net confining stress and non-Darcy flow parameters. Results are related to some of the problems observed during the stimulation program conducted for the MWX. 24 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Galeazzi fracture.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  12. Electrochemical impedance based chiral analysis of anti-ascorbutic drug: l-Ascorbic acid and d-ascorbic acid using C-dots decorated conductive polymer nano-composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Indu; Kant, Rama

    2016-03-15

    Clinical manifestations owing to l-ascorbic acid for scurvy as comparison to d-ascorbic acid and challenges of chiral purity are overcome by using chiral selective conductive polymer nanocomposite which mimics antibodies and enzymes. A novel chiral selective imprinted polyaniline-ferrocene-sulfonic acid film has been electrochemically fabricated on C-dots modified pencil graphite electrode. The performance of the obtained l-ascorbic acid or d-ascorbic acid chiral selective sensor was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The surface characteristics of the C-dots, chiral sensor before and after the de-doping of chiral d- and l-ascorbic acid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Excellent recognition results were obtained by difference in electron transfer resistance. The proposed chiral sensor is capable of measuring d-ascorbic acid or l-ascorbic acid in aqueous as well as in real and commercial samples within the range of 0.020-0.187 nM and 0.003-0.232 nM with detection limit of 0.00073 nM and 0.00016 nM, respectively. The proposed method has also been examined for the chiral selective recognition of ascorbic acid isomers (d- and l-) quantitatively, in complicated matrices of real samples.

  13. Electrochemical impedance based chiral analysis of anti-ascorbutic drug: l-Ascorbic acid and d-ascorbic acid using C-dots decorated conductive polymer nano-composite electrode.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Indu; Kant, Rama

    2016-03-15

    Clinical manifestations owing to l-ascorbic acid for scurvy as comparison to d-ascorbic acid and challenges of chiral purity are overcome by using chiral selective conductive polymer nanocomposite which mimics antibodies and enzymes. A novel chiral selective imprinted polyaniline-ferrocene-sulfonic acid film has been electrochemically fabricated on C-dots modified pencil graphite electrode. The performance of the obtained l-ascorbic acid or d-ascorbic acid chiral selective sensor was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The surface characteristics of the C-dots, chiral sensor before and after the de-doping of chiral d- and l-ascorbic acid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Excellent recognition results were obtained by difference in electron transfer resistance. The proposed chiral sensor is capable of measuring d-ascorbic acid or l-ascorbic acid in aqueous as well as in real and commercial samples within the range of 0.020-0.187 nM and 0.003-0.232 nM with detection limit of 0.00073 nM and 0.00016 nM, respectively. The proposed method has also been examined for the chiral selective recognition of ascorbic acid isomers (d- and l-) quantitatively, in complicated matrices of real samples. PMID:26499067

  14. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  15. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel

  16. Injection through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    Tracer tests are conducted in geothermal reservoirs as an aid in forecasting thermal breakthrough of reinjection water. To interpret tracer tests, mathematical models have been developed based on the various transport mechanisms in these highly fractured reservoirs. These tracer flow models have been applied to interpret field tests. The resulting matches between the model and field data were excellent and the model parameters were used to estimate reservoir properties. However, model fitting is an indirect process and the model's ability to estimate reservoir properties cannot be judged solely on the quality of the match between field data and model predictions. The model's accuracy in determining reservoir characteristics must be independently verified in a closely controlled environment. In this study, the closely controlled laboratory environment was chosen to test the validity and accuracy of tracer flow models developed specifically for flow in fractured rocks. The laboratory tracer tests were performed by flowing potassium iodide (KI) through artificially fractured core samples. The tracer test results were then analyzed with several models to determine which best fit the measured data. A Matrix Diffusion model was found to provide the best match of the tracer experiments. The core properties, as estimated by the Matrix Diffusion model parameters generated from the indirect matching process, were then determined. These calculated core parameters were compared to the measured core properties and were found to be in agreement. This verifies the use of the Matrix Diffusion flow model in estimating fracture widths from tracer tests.

  17. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  18. Tracer transport in fractured crystalline rock: Evidence of nondiffusive breakthrough tailing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Extended tailing of tracer breakthrough is often observed in pulse injection tracer tests conducted in fractured geologic media. This behavior has been attributed to diffusive exchange of tracer between mobile fluids traveling through channels in fractures and relatively stagnant fluid between fluid channels, along fracture walls, or within the bulk matrix. We present a field example where tracer breakthrough tailing apparently results from nondiffusive transport. Tracer tests were conducted in a fractured crystalline rock using both a convergent and weak dipole injection and pumping scheme. Deuterated water, bromide, and pentafluorobenzoic acid were selected as tracers for their wide range in molecular diffusivity. The late time behavior of the normalized breakthrough curves were consistent for all tracers, even when the pumping rate was changed. The lack of separation between tracers of varying diffusivity indicates that strong breakthrough tailing in fractured geologic media may be caused by advective transport processes. This finding has implications for the interpretation of tracer tests designed to measure matrix diffusion in situ and the prediction of contaminant transport in fractured rock.

  19. Physical Properties of Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, T. E.; Schmitt, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of fractures on the physical properties of porous media is of considerable interest to oil and gas exploration as well as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage. This work represents an attempt to study the effect fractures have on multiple physical properties of rocks. An experimental technique to make simultaneous electric and ultrasonic measurements on cylindrical core plugs is developed. Aluminum end caps are mounted with ultrasonic transducers to transmit pules along the axis of the cylinder while non-polarizing electrodes are mounted on the sides of the core to make complex conductivity measurements perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Electrical measurements are made by applying a sinusoidal voltage across the measurement circuit that consist of a resister and the sample in series. The magnitude and phase of the signal across the sample is recorded relative to the input signal across a range of frequencies. Synthetic rock analogs are constructed using sintered glass beads with fractures imbedded in them. The fracture location, size and orientation are controlled and each fractured specimen has an unfractured counterpart. Porosity, Permeability, electrical conductivity and ultrasonic velocity measurements are conducted on each sample with the complex electrical conductivities recorded at frequencies from 10hz to 1 Mhz. These measurements allow us to examine the changes induced by these mesoscale fractures on the embedding porous medium. Of particular interest is the effect of fracture orientation on electrical conductivity of the rock. Seismic anisotropy caused by fractures is a well understood phenomenon with many rock physics models dedicated to its understanding. The effect of fractures on electrical conductivity is less well understood with electrical anisotropy scarcely investigated in the literature. None the less, using electrical conductivity to characterize fractures can add an extra constraint to characterization based

  20. Flexible poly(amic acid) conducting polymers: effect of chemical composition on structural, electrochemical, and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Du, Nian; Wong, Cheuk; Feurstein, Michael; Sadik, Omowunmi A; Umbach, Christopher; Sammakia, Bahgat

    2010-09-01

    A new approach for creating flexible, mechanically strong poly(amic acid) (PAA) hybrid copolymers is described. The reduction of gold salts to gold nanoparticles by PAA coupled with its copolymerization in the presence of various silanes (e.g., N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyl] aniline (TMOSPA), 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTMOS), dichlorodimethylsilane (DCMS), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS)) has enabled the design of a series of polymeric films. The resulting poly(amic acid), silane, and gold (PSG) solutions were employed for the fabrication of flexible, ternary polymers with a minimum bend ratio of 3 mm using thermal desolvation and/or wet-phase inversion techniques. By controlling the composition and synthesis conditions, porous PSG films were produced that are flexible or rigid, transparent or opaque, and/or mechanically strong. (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) characterization results showed that the carboxylic acid moieties were retained in the PSG copolymer. Thermal stabilities with degradation characteristics of the polymers were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Although structurally and morphologically different from the parent PAA, copolymerization with silanes had significantly improved the mechanical and interfacial property of the PSG class of films.

  1. Fracture healing and lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J Patrick; Manigrasso, Michaele B; Kim, Brian D; Subramanian, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Lipid mediators regulate bone regeneration during fracture healing. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are well-known lipid mediators that regulate inflammation and are synthesized from the Ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 or COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyze the initial enzymatic steps in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, respectively. Inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing in animal models. Genetic ablation of COX-1 does not affect the fracture callus strength in mice, suggesting that COX-2 activity is primarily responsible for regulating fracture healing. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is performed clinically to reduce heterotopic ossification, although clinical evidence that NSAID treatment impairs fracture healing remains controversial. In contrast, inhibition or genetic ablation of 5-LO activity accelerates fracture healing in animal models. Even though prostaglandins and leukotrienes regulate inflammation, loss of COX-2 or 5-LO activity appears to primarily affect chondrogenesis during fracture healing. Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analog treatment, prostaglandin-specific synthase inhibition and prostaglandin or leukotriene receptor antagonism also affect callus chondrogenesis. Unlike the Ω-6-derived lipid mediators, lipid mediators derived from Ω-3 fatty acids, such as resolvin E1 (RvE1), have anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo, RvE1 can inhibit osteoclastogenesis and limit bone resorption. Although Ω-6 and Ω-3 lipid mediators have clear-cut effects on inflammation, the role of these lipid mediators in bone regeneration is more complex, with apparent effects on callus chondrogenesis and bone remodeling. PMID:24795811

  2. Fractures in Tharsis Tholus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In the upper left corner of this VIS image are a series of fractures. Where the fractures are exposed on the surface it is impossible to tell the plane of the fracture; however where the fractures are visible in the cliff wall it is possible to see that the fractures dip to the north. This image shows part of the caldera of Tharsis Tholus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 13.5, Longitude 268.9 East (91.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Fractures of the proximal humerus.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Stig

    2013-10-01

    Fractures of the proximal humerus have been diagnosed and managed since the earliest known surgical texts. For more than four millennia the preferred treatment was forceful traction, closed reduction, and immobilization with linen soaked in combinations of oil, honey, alum, wine, or cerate. The bandages were further supported by splints made of wood or coarse grass. Healing was expected in forty days. Different fracture patterns have been discussed and classified since Ancient Greece. Current classification of proximal humeral fractures mainly relies on the classifications proposed by Charles Neer and the AO/OTA classification. Since the late 1980's it has been known that intra- and inter-observer variation was high within the two systems. I conducted a series of observer studies to qualify the disagreement further and to study to what extent improvement of agreement could be obtained. No clinically significant differences in observer agreement were found at different levels of clinical experience, by reducing the number of categories, or by adding high quality radiographs, CT or 3D CT scans. A consistently low agreement on the Neer classification within and between untrained orthopaedic doctors was found. However, we also found that inter-observer agreement on treatment recommendation was higher than the agreement on the Neer classification. In a randomized trial we found that agreement could improve significantly by training of doctors, especially among specialists. However, classification of proximal humeral fractures remains a challenge for the conduct, reporting, and interpretation of clinical trials. The evidence for the benefits of surgery in complex fractures of the proximal humerus is weak. In three systematic reviews I studied the outcome after locking plate osteosynthesis or reverse arthroplasty in complex fractures patterns. No randomized trials or well-conducted comparative studies were identified. High failure rates suggest that the use of these

  4. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  5. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD.

  6. Well acidizing compositions and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B. L.

    1980-12-23

    Gelled acidic compositions suitable for matrix acidizing or fracture acidizing of subterranean formations are provided comprising water, a water-dispersible polymeric viscosifier such as a polymer of acrylamide, an acid, and a polyphenolic material such as lignite.

  7. Influence of Rock Fabric on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation: Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, S. A.; Desroches, J.; Burghardt, J.; Surdi, A.; Whitney, N.

    2014-12-01

    Massive hydraulic fracturing is required for commercial gas production from unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are often highly fractured and heterogeneous, which may cause significant fracture complexity and also arrest propagation of hydraulic fractures, leading to production decrease. One of the goals of our study was to investigate the influence of rock fabric features on near-wellbore fracture geometry and complexity. We performed a series of laboratory tests on Niobrara outcrop shale blocks with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 36 inches in a true-triaxial loading frame. Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor hydraulic fracture initiation and dynamics of fracture propagation. After the tests, the shape of the created hydraulic fracture was mapped by goniometry technique. To estimate fracture aperture, particles of different sizes were injected with fracturing fluid. In all tests, AE analysis indicated hydraulic fracture initiation prior to breakdown or the maximum of wellbore pressure. In most tests, AE analysis revealed asymmetrical hydraulic fracture shapes. Post-test analysis demonstrated good correspondence of AE results with the actual 3D shape of the fracture surface map. AE analysis confirmed that in some of these tests, the hydraulic fracture approached one face of the block before the maximum wellbore pressure had been reached. We have found that in such cases the propagation of hydraulic fracture in the opposite direction was arrested by the presence of mineralized interfaces. Mapping the distribution of injected particles confirmed the creation of a narrow-width aperture in the vicinity of pre-existing interfaces, restricting fracture conductivity. Based on the results of our study, we concluded that the presence of planes of weakness, such as mineralized natural fractures, can result in the arrest of hydraulic fracture propagation, or in poor fracture geometries with limited aperture, that in turn could lead to high net pressure

  8. Thermal-Conductivity Measurements of Aqueous Orthophosphoric Acid Solutions in the Temperature Range from (293 to 400) K and at Pressures up to 15 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, G. G.; Abdulagatov, I. M.

    2014-02-01

    A new improved guarded parallel-plate thermal-conductivity cell for absolute measurements of corrosive (chemically aggressive) fluids under pressure has been developed. Using the new modified guarded parallel-plate apparatus the thermal conductivity of aqueous orthophosphoric acid solutions was measured over the temperature range from (293 to 400) K and pressures up to 15 MPa. Measurements were made for three compositions of (8 mass%, 15 mass%, and 50 mass%) along three isobars of (0.101, 5, and 15) MPa. The combined expanded uncertainty of the thermal-conductivity measurements at the 95 % confidence level with a coverage factor of is estimated to be 2 %. The uncertainties of the temperature, pressure, and concentration measurements were 15 mK, 0.05 %, and 0.01 %, respectively. The temperature, concentration, and pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of the solution were studied. The measured values of thermal conductivity were compared with the available reported data and the values calculated from various correlation and prediction models. A new wide-range correlation model (extended Jones-Dole type equation with pressure-dependent coefficients) for the (aq) solution was developed using the present experimental data.

  9. Factors Controlling Wellbore Imaging of Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Fahmi, M. M.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    There are many scientific and engineering methods in petroleum industry for collecting data about small fractures in subsurface. The acquired data is predominantly indirect, and constrained by the bounds of technology and the subtle nature of small fractures. Among the various data types, cores and wellbore images reliably provide the data to observe small fractures, and help characterize important fracture properties such as density, geometry and aperture. There is, however, a major uncertainty about how thorough is the illustration of the small fractures in the wellbore electrical images which are widely used instead of cutting core for practical and economical grounds. We present novel results to help with understanding the potential and limits of wellbore electrical imagers to detect small fractures. We compare and discuss observations from high-quality microresistivity images and their equivalent core samples that are obtained from sub-horizontal wells drilled into carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs in eastern Arabia. We observed that the wellbore images give limited and inconsistent fracture sampling. The reduction in fracture sampling is related to the fracture nature that defies the imager-resolution capacity. We propose that the imaging capacity is constrained by: 1) degree of fracture roughness, 2) contrast between resistivity and conductivity of the geologic features, 3) effective stress action that is increasing and decreasing fracture aperture, and 4) fracture intake of drilling fluids under a variable fluid pressure balancing between wellbore and reservoir. The wellbore imaging outcomes influence fracture studies, particularly the areas of measuring static and dynamic properties of reservoir fractures and estimating trends and magnitudes of in situ stress.

  10. On the Continuum Representation of Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Botros, F.; Reeves, D. M.; Pohll, G.

    2006-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Stochastic Continuum (SC) are the two dominant modeling approaches used for simulating of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured media. While the SC approach has several variants, we focus on two methods introduced by Svensson [2001] and McKenna and Reeves [2002] where discrete fracture networks are directly mapped onto a finite-difference grid as grid cell conductivities. These methods combine the merits of each approach; a computationally efficient grid is utilized for the solution of fluid flow, and details of the fracture network are preserved by assigning a permeability contrast between the grid cells representing the rock matrix and fracture cells. In this paper, we focus on several outstanding issues that are associated with SC models: enhanced connectivity between fractures that would otherwise not be in connection in a DFN simulation, the formulation of grid cell conductivity for cells containing multiple fractures, and the influence of grid size. To addresses these issues, both DFN and SC models are used to solve for fluid flow through two-dimensional, randomly generated fracture networks. To minimize connectivity between fractures in the SC model, a percolation algorithm is used to define the hydraulic backbone before fractures are mapped onto a model grid. The effect of grid size is studied by using two different regularly-spaced grids with cell lengths of 1m and 10m. The resultant DFN flow solutions are used as a metric to evaluate different approaches used to assign grid cell conductivity. Results from this study are presented as guidelines for representing fracture networks as grid cell conductivities.

  11. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  12. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in poly-D,L-lactic acid coatings on porous titanium implants conducts bone formation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Thomas; Baas, Jørgen; Nygaard, Jens V; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Hovgaard, Mads B; Foss, Morten; Bünger, Cody; Besenbacher, Flemming; Søballe, Kjeld

    2010-12-01

    It is well established in the field of biomaterials that hydroxyapatite (HA) may provide interesting osteoconductive properties. In this study, we investigated the osseointegrational effect of a 50/50 vol % composite of HA nanoparticles and poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA) coated on model titanium bone implants in an in vivo animal model. The aim is to evaluate how the addition of HA to PDLLA may improve the bone formation and initial fixation of the implant. Two titanium implants coated with the PDLLA/HA composite and pure PDLLA, respectively, were implanted bilaterally in proximal part of humeri with a 2-mm peri-implant gap in 10 sheep. After 12 weeks, the remains of the coatings were present on 20.3 and 19.8% of PDLLA/HA composite- and PDLLA-coated implants, respectively. It was observed that newly formed bone (39.3%) and fibrous tissue (58.3%) had replaced the PDLLA/HA composite, whereas pure PDLLA was replaced almost completely by fibrous tissue (96.2%). Consequently, the PDLLA/HA composite-coated implants were better fixated as confirmed by push-out tests. Using quantification of peri-implant tissue and implant fixation as parameters, the present findings, therefore, clearly reveal that the addition of nanoparticulate HA to a PDLLA coating on titanium implants increases osseointegration.

  13. Characteristic Fracture Spacing in Primary and Secondary Recovery from Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Rossen, W.

    2015-12-01

    We showed previously (Gong and Rossen, 2014a,b) that, if the fracture aperture distribution is broad enough in a naturally fractured reservoir, even one where the fracture network is well-connected, most fractures can be eliminated without significantly affecting the flow through the fracture network. During a waterflood or enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) process, the production of oil depends on the supply of injected water or EOR agent. This suggests that the characteristic fracture spacing for the dual-porosity/dual-permeability simulation of waterflood or EOR in a naturally fractured reservoir should account not for all fractures but only the relatively small portion of the fracture network carrying almost all the injected water or EOR agent. In contrast, in primary production even a relatively small fracture represents an effective path for oil to flow to a production well. Thus in primary production the effective fracture spacing should include all the fractures. This distinction means that the "shape factor" in dual-porosity/dual-permeability reservoir simulators and the repeating unit in homogenization should depend on the process involved: specifically, it should be different for primary and secondary or tertiary recovery. We test this hypothesis in a simple representation of a fractured reservoir with a non-uniform distribution of fracture flow conductivities. We compare oil production, flow patterns in matrix, and the pattern of oil recovery around fractures with and without the "unimportant" fractures present. In primary production, all fractures which are much more permeable than matrix play a significant role in production. The shape factor or repeating-unit size should reflect the entire fracture distribution. In secondary or tertiary production, the role of fractures that carry relatively little flow depends on injection rate, the ratio of flow carried by the different fractures, and the permeability of matrix. In some cases, the appropriate shape

  14. Epidemiology of osteoporotic hip fractures in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Angel Antonio; Ferrandez, Luis; Gil, Enrique; Moreno, Alonso

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a multicentre study, divided into a retrospective and a prospective portion. The retrospective study evaluated osteoporotic hip fractures that occurred during 2002. The prospective study evaluated osteoporotic hip fractures that occurred during May 2003. The study was conducted in 77 hospitals in Spain and comprised patients 60 years of age and over. In the retrospective study we registered 13,195 hip fractures. Of the patients, 74% were women and 26% were men. The mean age was 80.7±8.4 years. The average incidence was 6.94±0.44 hip fractures per 1,000 inhabitants/year (95% CI, 6.07–7.82). In the prospective study, we registered 1,399 hip fractures. This represents a monthly incidence of 0.60±0.04 hip fractures per 1,000 inhabitants/year (95% CI, 0.51–0.69). Of the subjects, 74% were women and 26% were men. The mean age was 81.4±8.1 years. Using these data, we calculated the average annual prevalence in 2003 to be 7.20 fractures per 1,000 inhabitants. Thirty-three percent had previously suffered a hip fracture. Prior to the fracture, only 18% had received medical treatment for osteoporosis. After discharge from the hospital, only 26% were receiving pharmacological treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:16328387

  15. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  16. Updated status of conductance/capacity correlation studies to determine the state-of-health of automotive and stand-by lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, D. O.; Hlavac, M. J.; McShane, S. J.

    1994-02-01

    For the past seven years, Midtronics has developed and manufactured battery conductance testers for determining the condition of automotive batteries. This paper presents a further refinement of the technology. Studies by automobile manufacturers, automotive battery manufacturers, as well as testing by Midtronics and an independent test laboratory have established the utility of conductance technology in evaluating the condition of automotive batteries, even at very low states-of-charge. The use of conductance to determine the state-of-health of stand-by batteries has attracted increasing worldwide interest among both battery manufacturers and users. Attention has focused first on the area of valve-regulated lead/acid batteries (VRBs) for which there are no reliable diagnostics other than a cumbersome discharge test. Several recent studies have demonstrated the validity of conductance testing as an accurate predictor of battery capacity in railroad, electric power utility, stand-by power and telecommunications applications. Other benefits includes: (1) for the first time, tests have resulted in the accumulation and publication of large quantities of actual capacity data for individual valve-regulated cells and batteries that will serve as a standard against which conductance results can be compared; (2) results of these capacity tests have shown both unusually wide-spread capacity variation and significant numbers of premature capacity failures in valve-regulated cells over a wide range of applications in telecommunications, UPS, photovoltaic and railroad signaling systems; these failures have appeared to occur without regard to specific manufacturers, design, application or use environment; (3) in addition, both users and manufacturers have generally become more knowledgeable of performance characteristics, ageing mechanisms and failure modes of valve-regulated cells, so that it is now clearly recognized that the number of serious failure modes significantly

  17. Epidemiology of hip fractures in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Harumi; Owan, Ichiro; Kudoh, Hirohisa; Horizono, Hidehiro; Arakaki, Kaoru; Ikema, Yasunari; Shinjo, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Kaori; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the current incidence of hip fractures in Okinawa prefecture and compared the data with those obtained in our previous study, which was conducted using similar methods in 1987/1988. All patients, aged 50 years or older and residing in Okinawa, admitted to Okinawa hospitals in 2004 for a fresh hip fracture were identified from hospital registries. Details were obtained from the medical records and radiographs of all patients and classified according to fracture type (cervical or trochanteric), age, sex, and fracture location. Subtrochanteric fractures and pathological fractures were excluded. A total of 1,349 patients (242 men and 1,107 women) were admitted for a fresh hip fracture in 2004. Their average age was 76.9 years for men and 82.4 years for women. There were 671 cervical fractures, 654 trochanteric fractures, and 24 unclassified proximal femoral fractures. Comparing the data from 1987/1988 to those from 2004, the total number of hip fractures increased by 188%, from 469 to 1,349. The age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000, standardized to the 2000 US population, were 75.7 and 296.1 in 1987/1988 and 123.6 and 420 in 2004 for men and women, respectively. The incidence rates in all age groups (at 5-year intervals) were higher in 2004 than in 1987/1988, indicating that people 50 years of age or older became more susceptible to hip fractures. Accordingly, the accretion of the hip fracture incidence rate was greater than that which could be explained purely by changes in population size and structure.

  18. Economic viability of geriatric hip fracture centers.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Ahn, Jaimo; Mehta, Samir; Bernstein, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Management of geriatric hip fractures in a protocol-driven center can improve outcomes and reduce costs. Nonetheless, this approach has not spread as broadly as the effectiveness data would imply. One possible explanation is that operating such a center is not perceived as financially worthwhile. To assess the economic viability of dedicated hip fracture centers, the authors built a financial model to estimate profit as a function of costs, reimbursement, and patient volume in 3 settings: an average US hip fracture program, a highly efficient center, and an academic hospital without a specific hip fracture program. Results were tested with sensitivity analysis. A local market analysis was conducted to assess the feasibility of supporting profitable hip fracture centers. The results demonstrate that hip fracture treatment only becomes profitable when the annual caseload exceeds approximately 72, assuming costs characteristic of a typical US hip fracture program. The threshold of profitability is 49 cases per year for high-efficiency hip fracture centers and 151 for the urban academic hospital under review. The largest determinant of profit is reimbursement, followed by costs and volume. In the authors’ home market, 168 hospitals offer hip fracture care, yet 85% fall below the 72-case threshold. Hip fracture centers can be highly profitable through low costs and, especially, high revenues. However, most hospitals likely lose money by offering hip fracture care due to inadequate volume. Thus, both large and small facilities would benefit financially from the consolidation of hip fracture care at dedicated hip fracture centers. Typical US cities have adequate volume to support several such centers.

  19. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2013-01-01

    The most common fracture of the foot is a fracture of the proximal fifth metatarsal. In general, there are 3 types of fractures involving the proximal fifth metatarsal area, including a proximal diaphyseal stress fracture, a Jones fracture, and an avulsion fracture of the tuberosity. Some fractures of the fifth metatarsal heal without difficulty, whereas some have the potential for nonunion or delayed healing. Each fracture has some variation in the anatomical location on the fifth metatarsal, the mechanism of injury, the radiographic findings, and the treatment plan. Avulsion fractures of the tuberosity often heal without difficulty, yet fractures distal to the area of insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon are prone to nonunion and delayed healing (). Differential diagnosis of a fifth metatarsal midfoot injury includes ankle sprains, midfoot sprains, plantar facial ruptures, peroneus tendon ruptures, and other foot fractures.

  20. Gallic acid and exercise training improve motor function, nerve conduction velocity but not pain sense reflex after experimental sciatic nerve crush in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajimoradi, Maryam; Fazilati, Mohammad; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of gallic acid (GA) for 21 days alone and in combination with exercise on nerve conduction velocity and sensory and motor functions in rats with sciatic nerve crush. Materials and Methods: Seventy adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided randomly into 7 groups with 10 in each: 1) Control (Cont), 2) Crushed + Vehicle (Cr +Veh), 3-5) Crushed + gallic acid (Cr+GA) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/2 mL, orally), 6) Crushed + exercise (Cr+Exe), and 7) Crushed + exercise + effective dose of gallic acid (Cr+Exe +GA200) for 21 days. In order to establish an animal model of sciatic nerve crush, equivalent to 7 kg of force pressed on 2-3 mm of sciatic nerve for 30 s, three times with 30 s intervals. Pain sense reflex in hot plate, motor coordination in rotarod, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) in all groups were tested. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test and p<0.05 has assigned as the significant difference. Results: Pain threshold was increased significantly in untreated crushed rats while motor function and SNCV were decreased in all groups with nerve crush (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 vs. control). Pain reflex latency was not changed in treated groups. Motor coordination and SNCV were improved in groups Cr+GA200 and Cr+Exe + GA200 (p<0.05, p<0.01 vs. Cr+Veh). Conclusion: GA, dose-dependently, may have therapeutic potential to improve the peripheral nerve degeneration, which is most likely related, at least in part, to its antioxidant and therapeutic properties. PMID:26445710

  1. Experimental and Analytical Research on Fracture Processes in ROck

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert H.. Einstein; Jay Miller; Bruno Silva

    2009-02-27

    Experimental studies on fracture propagation and coalescence were conducted which together with previous tests by this group on gypsum and marble, provide information on fracturing. Specifically, different fracture geometries wsere tested, which together with the different material properties will provide the basis for analytical/numerical modeling. INitial steps on the models were made as were initial investigations on the effect of pressurized water on fracture coalescence.

  2. Tissue and size-related changes in the fatty acid and stable isotope signatures of the deep sea grenadier fish Coryphaenoides armatus from the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Sharples, Caroline J.; Webster, Lynda; Walsham, Pamela; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Cousins, Nicola J.

    2013-12-01

    Coryphaenoides armatus is a cosmopolitan deep-sea fish that plays a major role in the ecology of abyssal ecosystems. We investigated the trophic ecology and physiology of this species by determining the δ13C, δ15N and fatty acid signatures of muscle, liver and ovary tissues of individuals collected from ∼2700 m to the north and south of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, NE Atlantic. Fatty acid and δ13C data both suggested that C. armatus shows an ontogenetic dietary shift, with the relative contributions of benthic and pelagic prey decreasing and increasing respectively as the animals grow. They also indicated that dietary overlap between animals living to the north and south of the CGFZ increases as they grow, suggesting that larger animals forage over greater distances and are not hindered by the presence of the CGFZ. Comparison of tissue-specific fatty acid signatures with previously published data suggests compositional homeostasis of the fatty acids 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) in the muscle, and 18:1(n-9) in the liver tissues. We ascribe this primarily to strict physiological requirements for these compounds, rather than simply to their abundance in the diet. We pose several speculative mechanisms to explain the observed trends in tissue-specific δ13C and δ15N values, illustrating some of the numerous processes that can influence the isotopic signatures of bulk tissues.

  3. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  4. Hydraulic Fracturing of Heterogeneous Rock Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanchits, Sergey; Burghardt, Jeffrey; Surdi, Aniket

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory studies of hydraulic fracture in homogeneous sandstone blocks with man-made interfaces and heterogeneous shale blocks with weak natural interfaces are reported. Tests were conducted under similar stress conditions, with fluids of different viscosity and at different injection rates. The measurements and analysis allows the identification of fracture initiation and behavior. Fracturing with high-viscosity fluids resulted in stable fracture propagation initiated before breakdown, while fracturing with low-viscosity fluids resulted in unstable fracture propagation initiated almost simultaneously with breakdown. Analysis also allows us to measure the fluid volume entering the fracture and the fracture volume. Monitoring of acoustic emission hypocenter localizations, indicates the development of created fractured area including the intersection with interfaces, fluid propagation along interfaces, crossing interfaces, and approaching the boundaries of the block. We observe strong differences in hydraulic fracture behavior, fracture geometry and fracture propagation speed, when fracturing with water and high-viscosity fluids. We also observed distinct differences between sandstone blocks and shale blocks, when a certain P-wave velocity ray path is intersected by the hydraulic fracture. The velocity increases in sandstones and decreases in shale.

  5. Fracture Union in Closed Interlocking Nail in Humeral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ramji Lal; Ranjan, Rajni; Lal, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fracture shaft humerus is a major cause of morbidity in patients with upper extremity injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of interlocking nail in humeral shaft fractures. Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery in SMS and R Sharda University from January 2010 to November 2013. Seventy-eight patients were recruited from emergency and out-patient department having a close fracture of humerus shaft. All patients were operated under general anesthesia and closed reamed interlocking nailing was done. All patients were followed for 9 months. Results: Out of 78 patients, 69 patients underwent union in 90–150 days with a mean of 110.68 days. Complications found in four patients who had nonunion, and five patients had delayed union, which was treated with bone grafting. All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically for fracture healing, joint movements and implant failure. The results were excellent in 88.46% and good in 6.41% patients. Complete subjective, functional, and clinical recovery had occurred in almost 100% of the patients. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicates that in the presence of proper indications, reamed antegrade intramedullary interlocked nailing appears to be a method of choice for internal fixation of osteoporotic and pathologic fractures. PMID:26021495

  6. Role of Fracture and Repair Type on Pain and Opioid Use After Hip Fracture in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Strike, Sophia A.; Sieber, Frederick E.; Gottschalk, Allan; Mears, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Pain after hip fracture repair is related to worse functional outcomes and higher fracture care costs than that for patients with no or less pain. However, to our knowledge, few studies have examined the roles of hip fracture type or surgical procedure as factors influencing postoperative pain or opioid analgesic requirements. Our goal was to determine whether the type of hip fracture or hip fracture repair affects postoperative pain or opioid analgesic requirements in the elderly patient. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 231 patients ≥65 years old admitted to a hip fracture center for surgical repair. Fracture patterns were classified into femoral neck (FN) versus intertrochanteric (IT), stable versus unstable, and type of surgical repair. Demographic and intraoperative variables, postoperative pain scores, and opioid analgesic use data were collected and analyzed according to the type of hip fracture and type of surgical repair. Results: There were no differences in postoperative pain when comparing FN versus IT fractures, stable versus unstable fractures, or type of surgical repair. Patients with FN fractures had higher analgesic requirements on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. There was no difference in postoperative analgesic requirements among patients with stable versus unstable fractures or type of surgical repair. Otherwise, there were no differences in postoperative pain or opioid analgesic use based on the surgical repair or fracture type. Overall, patients with hip fracture experienced low levels of pain. PMID:24600530

  7. Fractures of the forefoot.

    PubMed

    Mandracchia, Vincent J; Mandi, Denise M; Toney, Patris A; Halligan, Jennifer B; Nickles, W Ashton

    2006-04-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common injuries of various causes. Although not crippling, forefoot fractures can be debilitating if they go undiagnosed or are mistreated. Whenever patients complain of foot pain with ambulation or difficulty ambulating, radiographs should be taken as part of a standard routine to assess for bony pathology. This article discusses the classification and treatment of metatarsal fractures, digital and sesamoid fractures, and open fractures about the forefoot.

  8. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  9. Fracture characteristics of balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc A.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the failure modes of high altitude scientific balloons through an investigation of the fracture characteristics of the thin polyethylene films. Two films were the subject of the evaluation, Winzen Int.'s Stratafilm SF-85 and Raven Industries' Astro-E. Research began with an investigation of the film's cold brittleness point and it's effect on the ultimate strength and elasticity of the polyethylene film. A series of preliminary investigations were conducted to develop an understanding of the material characteristics. The primary focus of this investigation was on the notch sensitivity of the films. Simple stress strain tests were also conducted to enable analysis employing fracture toughness parameters. Studies were conducted on both film types at 23 C (room temperature), -60 C, -90 C, and -120 C.

  10. Fracture toughness of Antrim shale

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Mubeen, A.

    1980-05-01

    Fracture toughness of Antrim shale cores from Dow Chemical's Sanilac County test site in Michigan were measured by the burst test method developed by Clifton et al. (1976). These tests were conducted to establish a preliminary data base to be used for the designing of a bed preparation method and prediction of rock fracture behavior under various loading conditions such as explosives and hydraulic fracturing for in-situ processing of oil shale. The test method was chosen because the thick-walled cylinder provides a loading and specimen configuration similar to in-situ hydraulic fracturing operations and the specimens can be conveniently prepared from diamond drill cores for laboratory tests. Further, the nature of variation of crack tip stress intensity in this specimen is such that K/sub IC/ does not depend on initial crack length, and crack propagation need not be monitored. The test results show that the fracture toughness of typical Antrim shale core range from 930 to 1080 psi ..sqrt..in. while the limestone specimens, a basement rock, range from 1240 to 1430 psi ..sqrt..in. These values are close to that of lean Western oil shale from Anvil point, Colorado (Schmidt, 1977), i.e., 980 psi ..sqrt..in.

  11. Selective perceptions of hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sarge, Melanie A; VanDyke, Matthew S; King, Andy J; White, Shawna R

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) is a focal topic in discussions about domestic energy production, yet the American public is largely unfamiliar and undecided about the practice. This study sheds light on how individuals may come to understand hydraulic fracturing as this unconventional production technology becomes more prominent in the United States. For the study, a thorough search of HF photographs was performed, and a systematic evaluation of 40 images using an online experimental design involving N = 250 participants was conducted. Key indicators of hydraulic fracturing support and beliefs were identified. Participants showed diversity in their support for the practice, with 47 percent expressing low support, 22 percent high support, and 31 percent undecided. Support for HF was positively associated with beliefs that hydraulic fracturing is primarily an economic issue and negatively associated with beliefs that it is an environmental issue. Level of support was also investigated as a perceptual filter that facilitates biased issue perceptions and affective evaluations of economic benefit and environmental cost frames presented in visual content of hydraulic fracturing. Results suggested an interactive relationship between visual framing and level of support, pointing to a substantial barrier to common understanding about the issue that strategic communicators should consider.

  12. Selective perceptions of hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Sarge, Melanie A; VanDyke, Matthew S; King, Andy J; White, Shawna R

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) is a focal topic in discussions about domestic energy production, yet the American public is largely unfamiliar and undecided about the practice. This study sheds light on how individuals may come to understand hydraulic fracturing as this unconventional production technology becomes more prominent in the United States. For the study, a thorough search of HF photographs was performed, and a systematic evaluation of 40 images using an online experimental design involving N = 250 participants was conducted. Key indicators of hydraulic fracturing support and beliefs were identified. Participants showed diversity in their support for the practice, with 47 percent expressing low support, 22 percent high support, and 31 percent undecided. Support for HF was positively associated with beliefs that hydraulic fracturing is primarily an economic issue and negatively associated with beliefs that it is an environmental issue. Level of support was also investigated as a perceptual filter that facilitates biased issue perceptions and affective evaluations of economic benefit and environmental cost frames presented in visual content of hydraulic fracturing. Results suggested an interactive relationship between visual framing and level of support, pointing to a substantial barrier to common understanding about the issue that strategic communicators should consider. PMID:26399946

  13. Origin of C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids in the European atmosphere inferred from year-round aerosol study conducted at a west-east transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.; Oliveira, T.; Pio, C. A.; Hammer, S.; GelencséR, A.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Laj, P.

    2007-12-01

    An atmospheric study of C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids was conducted over two years at seven sites located from the Azores to eastern continental European sites. The lowest concentrations of total C2-C5 diacids are observed at the Azores (Portugal) and at 4360 m elevation in the Alps (˜50 ng m-3), and the highest (400 ng m-3) are observed at the rural K-puszta site (Hungary). Quasi-absent at surface sites, the seasonal cycle of total diacids is characterized by a pronounced summer maximum at elevated sites, the highest summer level (510 ng m-3) being observed at the forested mountain site of Schauinsland (Germany). Whatever site and season, oxalic acid is always the most abundant diacid with a relative abundance higher than 60%. The climatology of C2-C5 diacids in Europe is discussed versus environmental conditions at sites (marine/continental, rural/forested, boundary layer/free troposphere, and winter/summer). Observations are used to discuss the possible sources of C2-C5 diacids, with special emphasis on their primary versus secondary and natural versus anthropogenic origin. At surface sites in winter, fast secondary productions in wood burning plumes in addition to secondary production from volatile organic carbon (VOC) species emitted by vehicles seem to be important contributors. In summer the impact of anthropogenic sources is weakened and biogenic emissions from vegetation (unsaturated fatty acids, isoprene, oxygenated VOCs, and eventually monoterpenes) likely represent major precursors of diacids. At the Azores, diacids are not only related to long-range transport from continents but also to marine biogenic emissions from phytoplankton, particularly in summer.

  14. A numerical approach for pressure transient analysis of a vertical well with complex fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yizhao; Liu, Yuewu; Liu, Wenchao; Han, Guofeng; Niu, Congcong

    2016-08-01

    A new well test model for a vertical fractured well is developed based on a discrete-fracture model in which the fractures are discretized as one dimensional (1-D) entities. The model overcomes the weakness of complex meshing, a large number of grids, and instability in conventional stripe-fracture models. Then, the discrete-fracture model is implemented using a hybrid element finite-element method. Triangular elements are used for matrix and line elements for the fractures. The finite element formulation is validated by comparing with the semi-analytical solution of a single vertical fractured well. The accuracy of the approach is shown through several examples with different fracture apertures, fracture conductivity, and fracture amount. Results from the discrete-fracture model agree reasonably well with the stripe-fracture model and the analytic solutions. The advantages of the discrete-fracture model are presented in mesh generation, computational improvement, and abilities to handle complex fractures like wedge-shaped fractures and fractures with branches. Analytical results show that the number of grids in the discrete-fracture model is 10 % less than stripe-fracture model, and computational efficiency increases by about 50 %. The more fractures there are, the more the computational efficiency increases.

  15. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  16. Hydraulic-fracture propagation in layered rock: experimental studies of fracture containment

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L. W.; Clark, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture geometry is an important concern in the design of a massive hydraulic fracture treatment for improved natural gas recovery from tight gas sands. Possible prediction of vertical fracture growth and containment in layered rock requires an improved understanding of the parameters which may control fracture growth across layer interfaces. We have conducted laboratory hydraulic fracture experiments and elastic finite element studies which show that at least two distinct geologic conditions may inhibit or contain the vertical growth of hydraulic fractures in layered rock; (1) a weak interfacial shear strength of the layers and (2) a compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress in the bounding layer. The second condition is more important and more likely to occur at depth. Variations in the horizontal stress can result from differences in elastic properties of individual layers in a layered rock sequence. A compressional increase in the minimum horizontal stress can occur in going from high shear modulus into low shear modulus layers.

  17. Theory of matrix and fracture flow regimes in unsaturated, fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The flow behavior of a two-dimensional, unsaturated fracture-matrix system is characterized by a critical flux q*{sub f} = {phi}(S{sub s} {minus} S{sub i})D{sub m} where {phi} is matrix porosity, S{sub s} maximum matrix saturation, S{sub i} initial saturation, and D{sub m} matrix imbibition diffusivity constant. If the flux q{sub f} into the fracture satisfies q{sub f} {much_gt} q*{sub f}, the flow field is fracture-dominated; whereas, if q{sub f} {much_lt} q*{sub f}, the flow is matrix-dominated, and the system behaves as a single equivalent medium with capillary equilibrium between fracture and matrix. If the fracture entrance is ponded, the critical fracture hydraulic conductivity K*{sub f}, or corresponding critical aperture 2b* from the ``cubic law,`` controls the flow behavior instead of the critical flux. Rocks with fracture apertures 2b that are sufficiently large, b{sup 3} {much_gt} b*{sup 3}, have flow that is fracture-dominated while rocks with small aperture fractures, b{sup 3} {much_lt} b*{sup 3}, will be matrix-dominated. Numerical modeling verifies the theory and tests approximate analytical solutions predicting fracture front movement. 15 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Approach for computing 1D fracture density: application to fracture corridor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viseur, Sophie; Chatelée, Sebastien; Akriche, Clement; Lamarche, Juliette

    2016-04-01

    Fracture density is an important parameter for characterizing fractured reservoirs. Many stochastic simulation algorithms that generate fracture networks indeed rely on the determination of a fracture density on volumes (P30) to populate the reservoir zones with individual fracture surfaces. However, only 1D fracture density (P10) are available from subsurface data and it is then important to be able to accurately estimate this entity. In this paper, a novel approach is proposed to estimate fracture density from scan-line or well data. This method relies on regression, hypothesis testing and clustering techniques. The objective of the proposed approach is to highlight zones where fracture density are statistically very different or similar. This technique has been applied on both synthetic and real case studies. These studies concern fracture corridors, which are particular tectonic features that are generally difficult to characterize from subsurface data. These tectonic features are still not well known and studies must be conducted to better understand their internal spatial organization and variability. The presented synthetic cases aim at showing the ability of the approach to extract known features. The real case study illustrates how this approach allows the internal spatial organization of fracture corridors to be characterized.

  19. Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments in intact and pre-fractured rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.D.; Rummel, F.; Jung, R.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory hydraulic fracturing experiments were conducted to investigate two factors which could influence the use of the hydrofrac technique for in-situ stress determinations; the possible dependence of the breakdown pressure upon the rate of borehole pressurization, and the influence of pre-existing cracks on the orientation of generated fractures. The experiments have shown that while the rate of borehole pressurization has a marked effect on breakdown pressures, the pressure at which hydraulic fractures initiate (and thus tensile strength) is independent of the rate of borehole pressurization when the effect of fluid penetration is negligible. Thus, the experiments indicate that use of breakdown pressures rather than fracture initiation pressures may lead to an erroneous estimate of tectonic stresses. A conceptual model is proposed to explain anomalously high breakdown pressures observed when fracturing with high viscosity fluids. In this model, initial fracture propagation is presumed to be stable due to large differences between the borehole pressure and that within the fracture. In samples which contained pre-existing fractures which were 'leaky' to water, we found it possible to generate hydraulic fractures oriented parallel to the direction of maximum compression if high viscosity drilling mud was used as the fracturing fluid. ?? 1977.

  20. [Fractures of the forefoot].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common and comprise approximately two thirds of all foot fractures. Forefoot fractures are caused by direct impact or the effect of indirect force. The forces exerted can range from repetitive minor load (stress fractures) to massive destructive forces (complex trauma). The clinical course in forefoot fractures is typically more favourable than in fractures of the mid- and hindfoot. The incidence of complications like infection or pseudarthrosis is low. Exceptions are rare fractures of the proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal and the sesamoids with higher pseudarthrosis rates. Malunited metatarsal fractures can cause painful conditions that should even be treated operatively. Differences in structure and function of the different forefoot areas and specific fracture types require an adapted management of these special injuries.

  1. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in

  2. Epidemiology of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel Ari

    2014-05-01

    As the world population of older adults-in particular those over age 85-increases, the incidence of fragility fractures will also increase. It is predicted that the worldwide incidence of hip fractures will grow to 6.3 million yearly by 2050. Fractures result in significant financial and personal costs. Older adults who sustain fractures are at risk for functional decline and mortality, both as a function of fractures and their complications and of the frailty of the patients who sustain fractures. Identifying individuals at high risk provides an opportunity for both primary and secondary prevention.

  3. Biodistribution of Fracture-Targeted GSK3β Inhibitor-Loaded Micelles for Improved Fracture Healing.

    PubMed

    Low, Stewart A; Galliford, Chris V; Yang, Jiyuan; Low, Philip S; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2015-10-12

    Bone fractures constitute a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly. Complications associated with osteoporosis drugs and the age of the patient slow bone turnover and render such fractures difficult to heal. Increasing the speed of fracture repair by administration of a fracture-targeted bone anabolic agent could find considerable application. Aspartic acid oligopeptides are negatively charged molecules at physiological pH that adsorb to hydroxyapatite, the mineral portion of bone. This general adsorption is the strongest where bone turnover is highest or where hydroxyapatite is freshly exposed. Importantly, both of these conditions are prominent at fracture sites. GSK3β inhibitors are potent anabolic agents that can promote tissue repair when concentrated in a damaged tissue. Unfortunately, they can also cause significant toxicity when administered systemically and are furthermore difficult to deliver due to their strong hydrophobicity. In this paper, we solve both problems by conjugating the hydrophobic GSK3β inhibitor to a hydrophilic aspartic acid octapeptide using a hydrolyzable bond, thereby generating a bone fracture-targeted water-soluble form of the drug. The resulting amphiphile is shown to assemble into micelles, extending its circulation time while maintaining its fracture-targeting abilities. For measurement of pharmacokinetics, an 125I was introduced at the location of the bromine in the GSK3β inhibitor to minimize any structural differences. Biodistribution studies demonstrate a greater than 4-fold increase in fracture accumulation over healthy bone. PMID:26331790

  4. Biodistribution of fracture-targeted GSK3β inhibitor-loaded micelles for improved fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Low, Stewart A.; Galliford, Chris V.; Yang, Jiyuan; Low, Philip S.; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2016-01-01

    Bone fractures constitute a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly. Complications associated with osteoporosis drugs and the age of the patient slow bone turnover and render such fractures difficult to heal. Increasing the speed of fracture repair by administration of a fracture-targeted bone anabolic agent could find considerable application. Aspartic acid oligopeptides are negatively charged molecules at physiological pH that adsorb to hydroxyapatite, the mineral portion of bone. This general adsorption is the strongest where bone turnover is highest or where hydroxyapatite is freshly exposed. Importantly, both of these conditions are prominent at fracture sites. GSK3β inhibitors are potent anabolic agents that can promote tissue repair when concentrated in a damaged tissue. Unfortunately, they can also cause significant toxicity when administered systemically and are furthermore difficult to deliver due to their strong hydrophobicity. In this paper, we solve both problems by conjugating the hydrophobic GSK3β inhibitor to a hydrophilic aspartic acid octapeptide using a hydrolyzable bond, thereby generating a bone fracture-targeted water-soluble form of the drug. The resulting amphiphile is shown to assemble into micelles, extending its circulation time while maintaining its fracture-targeting abilities. For measurement of pharmacokinetics, an 125I was introduced at the location of the bromine in the GSK3β inhibitor to minimize any structural differences. Biodistribution studies demonstrate a greater than 4-fold increase in fracture accumulation over healthy bone. PMID:26331790

  5. Acid-resistant calcium silicate-based composite implants with high-strength as load-bearing bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chung-Kai; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2016-09-01

    To achieve the excellent mechanical properties of biodegradable materials used for cortical bone graft substitutes and fracture fixation devices remains a challenge. To this end, the biomimetic calcium silicate/gelatin/chitosan oligosaccharide composite implants were developed, with an aim of achieving high strength, controlled degradation, and superior osteogenic activity. The work focused on the effect of gelatin on mechanical properties of the composites under four different kinds of mechanical stresses including compression, tensile, bending, and impact. The evaluation of in vitro degradability and fatigue at two simulated body fluid (SBF) of pH 7.4 and 5.0 was also performed, in which the pH 5.0 condition simulated clinical conditions caused by bacterial induced local metabolic acidosis or tissue inflammation. In addition, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sued to examine osteogenic activity. Experimental results showed that the appropriate amount of gelatin positively contributed to failure enhancement in compressive and impact modes. The 10wt% gelatin-containing composite exhibits the maximum value of the compressive strength (166.1MPa), which is within the reported compressive strength for cortical bone. The stability of the bone implants was apparently affected by the in vitro fatigue, but not by the initial pH environments (7.4 or 5.0). The gelatin not only greatly enhanced the degradation of the composite when soaked in the dynamic SBF solution, but effectively promoted attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and formation of mineralization of hMSCs. The 10wt%-gelatin composite with high initial strength may be a potential implant candidate for cortical bone repair and fracture fixation applications. PMID:27254281

  6. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  7. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Reaction with Shale in Experiments at Unconventional Gas Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, A. N.; Hakala, A.; Jarvis, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the marked increase in hydraulic fracturing for unconventional natural gas production over the past decade, reactions between hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFF) and shale reservoirs remain poorly reported in the scientific literature. Shale-HFF interaction could cause mineral dissolution, releasing matter from the shale, or mineral precipitation that degrades reservoir permeability. Furthermore, data are limited on whether scale inhibitors are effective at preventing mineral precipitation and whether these inhibitors adversely affect reservoir fluid chemistry and permeability. To investigate HFF-rock interaction within shale reservoirs, we conducted flow-through experiments exposing Marcellus Shale to synthetic HFF at reservoir conditions (66oC, 20MPa). Outcrop shale samples were cored, artificially fractured, and propped open with quartz sand. Synthetic HFFs were mixed with chemical additives similar to those used for Marcellus Shale gas wells in Ohio and Southwestern Pennsylvania (FracFocus.org). We evaluated differences between shale reactions with HFF made from natural freshwater and reactions with HFF made from synthetic produced water (designed to simulate produced water that is diluted and re-used for subsequent hydraulic fracturing). We also compared reactions with HFFs including hydrochloric acid (HCl) to represent the initial acid stage, and HFFs excluding HCl. Reactions were determined through changes in fluid chemistry and X-ray CT and SEM imaging of the shale before and after experiments. Results from experiments with HFF containing HCl showed dissolution of primary calcite, as expected. Experiments using HFF made from synthetic produced water had significant mineral precipitation, particularly of barium and calcium sulfates. X-ray CT images from these experiments indicate precipitation of minerals occurred either along the main fracture or within smaller splay fractures, depending on fluid composition. These experiments suggest that HFF

  8. Combining pH and electrical conductivity measurements to improve titrimetric methods to determine ammonia nitrogen, volatile fatty acids and inorganic carbon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Charnier, C; Latrille, E; Lardon, L; Miroux, J; Steyer, J P

    2016-05-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA), inorganic carbon (IC) and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) are key variables in the current context of anaerobic digestion (AD). Accurate measurements like gas chromatography and infrared spectrometry have been developed to follow the concentration of these compounds but none of these methods are affordable for small AD units. Only titration methods answer the need for small plant monitoring. The existing methods accuracy was assessed in this study and reveals a lack of accuracy and robustness to control AD plants. To solve these issues, a new titrimetric device to estimate the VFA, IC and TAN concentrations with an improved accuracy was developed. This device named SNAC (System of titration for total ammonia Nitrogen, volatile fatty Acids and inorganic Carbon) has been developed combining the measurement of electrical conductivity and pH. SNAC were tested on 24 different plant samples in a range of 0-0.16 mol.L(-1) TAN, 0.01-0.21 mol.L(-1) IC and 0-0.04 mol.L(-1) VFA. The standard error was about 0.012 mol.L(-1) TAN, 0.015 mol.L(-1) IC and 0.003 mol.L(-1) VFA. The coefficient of determination R(2) between the estimated and reference data was 0.95, 0.94 and 0.95 for TAN, IC and VFA respectively. Using the same data, current methods based on key pH points lead to standard error more than 14.5 times higher on VFA and more than 1.2 times higher on IC. These results show that SNAC is an accurate tool to improve the management of AD plant.

  9. Near-tip-screenout hydraulic fracturing of oil wells in the Bach Ho field, offshore Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, L.V.; San, N.T.; Shelomentsev, A.G.; Tronov, J.A.; Lam, D.D.; Thomas, R.L.; Fox, T.; Bisdikian, C.

    1995-10-01

    The first hydraulic fracturing of wells in Vietnam were successfully performed Offshore in the Bach Ho (White Tiger) Oil Field. Near-tip-screenouts rather than tip-screenout treatments were performed. The goal of the project was to improve production from existing wells rather than drill new wells and reduce the cost per barrel produced. This case study involves wells with multiple perforated zones completed in the Oligocene sandstone. Zones were selectively fractured in order to optimize production. A detailed description candidate selection, design, execution and evaluation processes are presented. The Bach Ho field has been producing for 8 years but not at its potential due to various reasons including drilling and completion fluid damage. Although acidizing was an option for damage removal, hydraulic fracturing was selected as a way to bypass near-wellbore damage and generate a negative skin. Production simulators were used to quantify post-frac production. Due to suspected high closure stress, high strength proppant was selected and ramped in a high temperature fracturing fluid. Calibration treatments were conducted on several wells to quantify fluid leak-off, fracture height and Young`s modulus. Based on the results of the calibration treatment, fracture designs were modified. As predicted by computer simulation, near-tip-screenouts occurred as planned. The treatments were performed using a work boat with skid pumping/blending equipment, a computer monitoring/operation center and a laboratory. Strict QC procedures were followed to ensure the quality of all products. Post-frac well tests results and production data are presented. Overall, the fracturing campaign was very successful with wells showing negative skins and up to a five fold increase of production in agreement with systems analysis predictions.

  10. Electrically conductive proppant and methods for detecting, locating and characterizing the electrically conductive proppant

    SciTech Connect

    Cannan, Chad; Bartel, Lewis; Palisch, Terrence; Aldridge, David

    2015-01-13

    Electrically conductive proppants and methods for detecting, locating, and characterizing same are provided. The electrically conductive proppant can include a substantially uniform coating of an electrically conductive material having a thickness of at least 500 nm. The method can include injecting a hydraulic fluid into a wellbore extending into a subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to open a fracture therein, injecting into the fracture a fluid containing the electrically conductive proppant, electrically energizing the earth at or near the fracture, and measuring three dimensional (x, y, and z) components of electric and magnetic field responses at a surface of the earth or in an adjacent wellbore.

  11. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  12. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  13. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    The metatarsal bones are the long bones in your foot that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that happens with repeated injury or stress. Stress fractures are caused ...

  14. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  15. Displaced patella fractures.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Displaced patella fractures often result in disruption of the extensor mechanism of the knee. An intact extensor mechanism is a requirement for unassisted gait. Therefore, operative treatment of the displaced patella fracture is generally recommended. The evaluation of the patella fracture patient includes examination of extensor mechanism integrity. Operative management of patella fractures normally includes open reduction with internal fixation, although partial patellectomy is occasionally performed, with advancement of quadriceps tendon or patellar ligament to the fracture bed. Open reduction with internal fixation has historically been performed utilizing anterior tension band wiring, although comminution of the fracture occasionally makes this fixation construct inadequate. Supplementation or replacement of the tension band wire construct with interfragmentary screws, cerclage wire or suture, and/or plate-and-screw constructs may add to the stability of the fixation construct. Arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint is very common after healing of patella fractures, and substantial functional deficits may persist long after fracture healing has occurred.

  16. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  17. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Jitendra P.; Bosak, Andrea L.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  18. The slow and the quick anion conductance in whole guard cells: their voltage-dependent alternation, and the modulation of their activities by abscisic acid and CO2.

    PubMed

    Raschke, Klaus; Shabahang, Mahbobeh; Wolf, Rupert

    2003-08-01

    We explored the functioning of the slowly activating anion conductance, S-type or SLAC, and of the quickly activating anion conductance, R-type or QUAC, in whole guard cells of Vicia faba L.; details of QUAC activity had not previously been demonstrated in guard cells possessing their walls. The discontinuous single-electrode voltage-clamp method was used to record current responses to voltage pulses and voltage ramps as well as the free-running membrane voltage. At all voltages tested between -200 and 60 mV, SLAC activated with two components, one had a time constant similar to 7 s, the other similar to 40 s. The current-voltage relationship resembled that obtained by patch-clamp experiments. In pulse experiments and 1-s ramps, QUAC activity appeared with half-maximum activation near -50 mV and full activation above -10 mV; it inactivated with a half-time of approximately 10 s. Inactivation of QUAC at -40 mV led to the appearance of SLAC. After deactivation of SLAC at -200 mV, QUAC could be activated again. We concluded that voltage-dependent interchanges between SLAC and QUAC had occurred. Frequently, SLAC and QUAC were active simultaneously in the same cell. Abscisic acid (ABA, 20 microM) activated SLAC as well as QUAC. External Ca2+ was not required, but enhanced the activation of QUAC. Rises in the partial pressure of CO2, in the range between 0 and 700 microbar, caused rapid and reversible increases in the activity of SLAC (and outward currents of K+). QUAC also responded to CO2, however in an unpredictable manner (either by increased or by decreased activity). Oscillations in the free-running membrane voltage arose either spontaneously or after changes in CO2. They were correlated with periodic activations and inactivations of QUAC and required the simultaneous activity of an electrogenic pump.

  19. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  20. Hydraulic fracture design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Advani, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    This research and development investigation, sponsored by US DOE and the oil and gas industry, extends previously developed hydraulic fracture geometry models and applied energy related characteristic time concepts towards the optimal design and control of hydraulic fracture geometries. The primary objective of this program is to develop rational criteria, by examining the associated energy rate components during the hydraulic fracture evolution, for the formulation of stimulation treatment design along with real-time fracture configuration interpretation and control.

  1. Hydraulic fracture design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Advani, S.H.

    1992-06-01

    This research and development investigation, sponsored by US DOE and the oil and gas industry, extends previously developed hydraulic fracture geometry models and applied energy related characteristic time concepts towards the optimal design and control of hydraulic fracture geometries. The primary objective of this program is to develop rational criteria, by examining the associated energy rate components during the hydraulic fracture evolution, for the formulation of stimulation treatment design along with real-time fracture configuration interpretation and control.

  2. Clavicle fractures: individualizing treatment for fracture type.

    PubMed

    Housner, Jeffrey A; Kuhn, John E

    2003-12-01

    Clavicle fractures are common injuries in both children and adults. In most cases, the diagnosis can be made readily from the patient's history and physical examination. X-rays are helpful to confirm the diagnosis, to assess the severity of the fracture, and to follow interval healing. Most fractures are treated nonoperatively, and surgical intervention is typically reserved for unstable distal clavicle fractures. Nonoperative options involve either a sling-and-swathe or figure-of-eight splint. Return-to-play decisions should be individualized based on the age of the patient, location and severity of the fracture, degree of clinical and radiographic healing, and the sport in which the athlete will be participating.

  3. Fabrication of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)-based hybrid proton-conducting membranes containing carboxyl or amino acid-functionalized titania by in situ sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yongheng; Xu, Tao; He, Guangwei; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wu, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Functionalized titania are used as fillers to modify the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane for improved proton conductivity and methanol barrier property. The functionalized titania sol which contains proton conductive carboxylic acid groups or amino acid groups are derived from a facile chelation method using different functional additives. Then the novel SPEEK/carboxylic acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TC) and SPEEK/amino acid-functionalized titania (SPEEK/TNC) hybrid membranes are fabricated via in situ sol-gel method. The anti-swelling property and thermal stability of hybrid membranes are enhanced owing to the formation of electrostatic force between SPEEK and titania nanoparticles. The hybrid membranes exhibit higher proton conductivity than plain SPEEK membrane because more proton transfer sites are provided by the functionalized titania nanoparticles. Particularly, the proton conductivity of SPEEK/TNC membrane with 15% filler content reaches up to 6.24 × 10-2 S cm-1, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the pure SPEEK membrane. For methanol permeability, the SPEEK/TNC membranes possess the lowest values because the acid-base interaction between sulfonic acid groups in SPEEK and amino groups in functionalized titania leads to a more compact membrane structure.

  4. Hydraulic Fracturing Mineback Experiment in Complex Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. J.; McLennan, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (or "fracking") for the recovery of gas and liquids from tight shale formations has gained much attention. This operation which involves horizontal well drilling and massive hydraulic fracturing has been developed over the last decade to produce fluids from extremely low permeability mudstone and siltstone rocks with high organic content. Nearly thirteen thousand wells and about one hundred and fifty thousand stages within the wells were fractured in the US in 2011. This operation has proven to be successful, causing hundreds of billions of dollars to be invested and has produced an abundance of natural gas and is making billions of barrels of hydrocarbon liquids available for the US. But, even with this commercial success, relatively little is clearly known about the complexity--or lack of complexity--of the hydraulic fracture, the extent that the newly created surface area contacts the high Reservoir Quality rock, nor the connectivity and conductivity of the hydraulic fractures created. To better understand this phenomena in order to improve efficiency, a large-scale mine-back experiment is progressing. The mine-back experiment is a full-scale hydraulic fracture carried out in a well-characterized environment, with comprehensive instrumentation deployed to measure fracture growth. A tight shale mudstone rock geologic setting is selected, near the edge of a formation where one to two thousand feet difference in elevation occurs. From the top of the formation, drilling, well logging, and hydraulic fracture pumping will occur. From the bottom of the formation a horizontal tunnel will be mined using conventional mining techniques into the rock formation towards the drilled well. Certain instrumentation will be located within this tunnel for observations during the hydraulic fracturing. After the hydraulic fracturing, the tunnel will be extended toward the well, with careful mapping of the created hydraulic fracture. Fracturing fluid will be

  5. Fracture-controlled nitrate and atrazine transport in four Iowa till units.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Martin F; Simpkins, William W; Horton, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Fractures in till may provide pathways for agricultural chemicals to contaminate aquifers and surface waters. This study was conducted to quantify the influence of fractures on solute fate and transport using three conservative and two nonconservative tracers. The conservative tracers were potassium bromide (KBr), pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid disodium salt (PIPES); the nonconservative tracers were nitrate and atrazine [6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine]. Three sites in Iowa were investigated, including four late Wisconsinan and Pre-Illinoian tills. Laboratory tracer experiments were conducted using eight large (0.4-0.45 m long by 0.43 m in diameter), undisturbed columns of till collected from depths of 1 to 28 m. The tills were densely fractured, with fracture spacing ranging from 3.8 to 10.4 cm. First arrival velocities of Br- ranged from 0.004 to 64.8 m d(-1), 10 to 100 times faster than predicted for unfractured media. Nitrate behaved as a conservative tracer in weathered till columns, but degraded during experiments using deeper tills. Sorption caused retardation of atrazine in the shallowest four columns. Atrazine degradation occurred in deeper columns as demonstrated by deviations between atrazine and the conservative tracers. Mobile-immobile model (MIM) simulations estimated first-order exchange coefficients (alpha) ranging from 1 x 10(-8) to 1.7 x 10(-2) s(-1), sorption coefficients (K(d)) for atrazine ranging from 2.6 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-3) m3 kg(-1), and degradation half-lives ranging from 0.24 to 67 d (nitrate) and 1.6 to 277 d (atrazine). This study suggests that aquifers and surface waters associated with thin, fractured till units may be vulnerable to contamination, yet deeper aquifers may be protected by these materials due to increased residence times provided by matrix diffusion.

  6. Permeability tensor and representative elementary volume of fractured rock masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Guan; Peng, Jun; Wang, Xiaojiang; Liu, Guang; Hou, Di

    2013-11-01

    Based on a simulation of three-dimensional fracture networks and a superposition principle of liquid dissipation energy for fractured rock masses, a model of the fracture permeability tensor is proposed. An elastic constitutive model of rock fractures, considering fracture closure and dilation during shearing, is also proposed, based on the dilation angle of the fracture. Algorithms of flow-path searching and calculation of the effective flow coefficients for fracture networks are presented, together with a discussion on the influence of geometric parameters of the fractures (trace length, spacing, aperture, orientation and the number of fracture sets) on magnitude, anisotropy of hydraulic permeability and the size of a representative elementary volume (REV). The anisotropy of hydraulic permeability of fractured rock masses is mainly affected by orientation and the number of fracture sets, and the REV size is mainly influenced by trace length, spacing and the number of fracture sets. The results of studies on REV size and the influence of in-situ stress on hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass on the slope of Jinping-I hydropower station, China, are presented using the developed models and methods. The simulation results agreed well with the results obtained from field water-pressure measurements, with an error of less than 10 %.

  7. Fracture Characterization in the Astor Pass Geothermal Field, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. C.; Reeves, D. M.; Pohll, G.; Lyles, B. F.; Cooper, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Astor Pass geothermal field, near Pyramid Lake, NV, is under study as a site of potential geothermal energy production. Three wells have been completed in the graben of this typical Basin and Range geologic setting. Lithologies include a layer of unconsolidated sediment (basin fill) underlain by various tertiary volcanic units and granodiorite and metavolcanic basement rock. Characterization of fractures within the relatively impermeable rock matrix is being conducted for the three wells. Statistical analysis of fracture orientation, densities, and spacing obtained from borehole imaging logs is used to determine stress orientation and to generate a statistically equivalent Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) model. Fractures at depth are compared to fracture data collected in nearby outcrops of the same lithologic stratigraphy. Fracture geometry and density is correlated to mechanically discrete layers within the stratigraphy to test whether variations in fracturing can be attributed to variations in Young's modulus. Correlation of fracture geometry and densities with spinner flowmeter logs and distributed temperature sensor records are made in an effort to identify potential flowing fracture zones intersecting the borehole. Mean fracture aperture is obtained from open fracture counts and reservoir-scale transmissivity values (computed from a 30 day pump test) in the absence of readily available aperture data. The goal of this thorough fracture characterization is to create a physically relevant model which may be coupled with a multipurpose fluid flow and thermal simulator for investigation of geothermal reservoir behavior, particularly at the borehole scale.

  8. A novel conducting poly(p-aminobenzene sulphonic acid)-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive determination of Sudan I and its application for detection in food stuffs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bang Lin; Luo, Jun Hua; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2015-04-15

    In the present work, a new method for the determination of Sudan I has been developed based on a conducting poly(p-aminobenzene sulphonic acid) (poly(p-ABSA)) film modified electrode. The new electrochemical sensor showed strong accumulation ability and excellent electrocatalytic activity for Sudan I. Electrochemical oxidation signal of Sudan I at the poly(p-ABSA) modified glassy carbon electrode (poly(p-ABSA)/GCE) was significantly increased when compared to that at the bare GCE. The experimental conditions such as amount of alcohol, pH of buffer solution, accumulation time, and instrumental parameters for square wave anodic stripping voltammetry were optimised for the determination of Sudan I. Under optimum conditions, the linear regression equation of Sudan I was ip=1.868+0.1213c (ip: μA, c: μgL(-1), R=0.9981) from 1 to 500 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.3 μg L(-1). Finally, this sensor was successfully employed to detect Sudan I in some hot chili and ketchup samples. PMID:25466064

  9. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, David B; Martins, Samuel C V; Cavalcanti, João Henrique F; Daloso, Danilo M; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions.

  10. Influence of humic acid applications on modulus of rupture, aggregate stability, electrical conductivity, carbon and nitrogen content of a crusting problem soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, İ.; Şeker, C.

    2015-11-01

    Soil structure is often said to be the key to soil productivity since a fertile soil, with desirable soil structure and adequate moisture supply, constitutes a productive soil. Soil structure influences soil water movement and retention, erosion, crusting, nutrient recycling, root penetration and crop yield. The objective of this work is to study humic acid (HA) application on some physical and chemical properties in weakly structured soils. The approach involved establishing a plot experiment in laboratory conditions. Different rates of HA (control, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 %) were applied to soil during three incubation periods (21, 42 and 62 days). At the end of the each incubation period, the changes in physicochemical properties were measured. Generally, HA addition increased electrical conductivity values during all incubation periods. HA applications decreased soil modulus of rupture. Application of HA at the rate of 4 % significantly increased soil organic carbon contents. HA applications at the rate of 4 % significantly increased both mean soil total nitrogen content and aggregate stability after three incubation periods (p < 0.05). Therefore, HA has the potential to improve the structure of soil in the short term.

  11. Enhanced Photosynthesis and Growth in atquac1 Knockout Mutants Are Due to Altered Organic Acid Accumulation and an Increase in Both Stomatal and Mesophyll Conductance.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, David B; Martins, Samuel C V; Cavalcanti, João Henrique F; Daloso, Danilo M; Martinoia, Enrico; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; DaMatta, Fábio M; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2016-01-01

    Stomata control the exchange of CO2 and water vapor in land plants. Thus, whereas a constant supply of CO2 is required to maintain adequate rates of photosynthesis, the accompanying water losses must be tightly regulated to prevent dehydration and undesired metabolic changes. Accordingly, the uptake or release of ions and metabolites from guard cells is necessary to achieve normal stomatal function. The AtQUAC1, an R-type anion channel responsible for the release of malate from guard cells, is essential for efficient stomatal closure. Here, we demonstrate that mutant plants lacking AtQUAC1 accumulated higher levels of malate and fumarate. These mutant plants not only display slower stomatal closure in response to increased CO2 concentration and dark but are also characterized by improved mesophyll conductance. These responses were accompanied by increases in both photosynthesis and respiration rates, without affecting the activity of photosynthetic and respiratory enzymes and the expression of other transporter genes in guard cells, which ultimately led to improved growth. Collectively, our results highlight that the transport of organic acids plays a key role in plant cell metabolism and demonstrate that AtQUAC1 reduce diffusive limitations to photosynthesis, which, at least partially, explain the observed increments in growth under well-watered conditions. PMID:26542441

  12. Drought tolerance, xylem sap abscisic acid and stomatal conductance during soil drying: a comparison of canopy trees of three temperate deciduous angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, Nancy J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.

    1998-07-01

    Patterns of water relations, xylem sap abscisic acid concentration ([ABA]) and stomatal aperture were characterized and compared in drought-sensitive black walnut (Juglans nigra L.), less drought-sensitive sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and drought-tolerant white oak (Quercus alba L.) trees co-occurring in a second-growth forest in Missouri, USA. There were strong correlations among reduction in predawn leaf water potential, increased xylem sap [ABA] and stomatal closure in all species. Stomatal conductance was more closely correlated with xylem sap ABA concentration than with ABA flux or xylem sap pH and cation concentrations. In isohydric black walnut, increased concentrations of ABA in the xylem sap appeared to be primarily of root origin, causing stomatal closure in response to soil drying. In anisohydric sugar maple and white oak, however, there were reductions in midday leaf water potential associated with stomatal closure, making it uncertain whether drought-induced xylem sap ABA was of leaf or root origin. The role of root-originated xylem sap ABA in these species as a signal to the shoot of the water status of the roots is, therefore, less certain.

  13. Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

    2006-10-31

    ) that allow for the easy removal of calcium waste from the well. Physical and chemical analysis of core samples taken from prospective geologic formations for the acid dissolution process confirmed that many of the limestone samples readily dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid. Further, some samples contained oily residues that may help to seal the walls of the final cavern structure. These results suggest that there exist carbonate rock formations well suited for the dissolution technology and that the presence of inert impurities had no noticeable effect on the dissolution rate for the carbonate rock. A sensitivity analysis was performed for characteristics of hydraulic fractures induced in carbonate formations to enhance the dissolution process. Multiple fracture simulations were conducted using modeling software that has a fully 3-D fracture geometry package. The simulations, which predict the distribution of fracture geometry and fracture conductivity, show that the stress difference between adjacent beds is the physical property of the formations that has the greatest influence on fracture characteristics by restricting vertical growth. The results indicate that by modifying the fracturing fluid, proppant type, or pumping rate, a fracture can be created with characteristics within a predictable range, which contributes to predicting the geometry of storage caverns created by acid dissolution of carbonate formations. A series of three-dimensional simulations of cavern formation were used to investigate three different configurations of the acid-dissolution process: (a) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole and no fracture; (b) injection into an open borehole with production from that same borehole, with an open fracture; and (c) injection into an open borehole connected by a fracture to an adjacent borehole from which the fluids are produced. The two-well configuration maximizes the overall mass transfer from the rock to the

  14. Simulating conservative tracers in fractured till under realistic timescales.

    PubMed

    Helmke, M F; Simpkins, W W; Horton, R

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-fracture and dual-porosity models are infrequently used to simulate solute transport through fractured unconsolidated deposits, despite their more common application in fractured rock where distinct flow regimes are hypothesized. In this study, we apply four fracture transport models--the mobile-immobile model (MIM), parallel-plate discrete-fracture model (PDFM), and stochastic and deterministic discrete-fracture models (DFMs)--to demonstrate their utility for simulating solute transport through fractured till. Model results were compared to breakthrough curves (BTCs) for the conservative tracers potassium bromide (KBr), pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid (PIPES) in a large-diameter column of fractured till. Input parameters were determined from independent field and laboratory methods. Predictions of Br BTCs were not significantly different among models; however, the stochastic and deterministic DFMs were more accurate than the MIM or PDFM when predicting PFBA and PIPES BTCs. DFMs may be more applicable than the MIM for tracers with small effective diffusion coefficients (De) or for short timescales due to differences in how these models simulate diffusion or incorporate heterogeneities by their fracture networks. At large scales of investigation, the more computationally efficient MIM and PDFM may be more practical to implement than the three-dimensional DFMs, or a combination of model approaches could be employed. Regardless of the modeling approach used, fractures should be incorporated routinely into solute transport models in glaciated terrain. PMID:16324009

  15. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures redux.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Gordon, P; Ward, L

    2008-02-01

    Osteoporosis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly. This fact is largely due to fractures of the proximal femur and spine. As recently recognized, vertebral fractures are as much a threat to health and longevity as fractures of the proximal femur. In recent decades, the development of tools to evaluate fracture risk as well as medications to treat osteoporosis has altered the management of people who are at fracture risk. At the same time identification and management procedures concerning spinal fracturing are not very clear. Besides there is not even clear consensus about what exactly constitutes a vertebral fracture, particularly those of minor degree. While height loss is a simple and valuable tool to detect vertebral fractures, it is neither sensitive nor specific enough to replace radiographs. Some 65% of fractures cause no symptoms. Often vertebral fractures are misdiagnosed, especially if they have occurred silently and if the opportunity for diagnosis arises fortuitously. It is to the patient's benefit that radiologists report and physicians identify vertebral fractures evident on a chest or other radiograph, no matter how incidental to the immediate clinical indication for the examination. Technological evolution now allows dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry machines to be used to take spine images while doing a densitometry. The images are adequate, even if not of high radiographic quality, and, more important, the patient undergoes a smaller radiation dose than with conventional spinal radiographs. Such technology may promote fracture recognition. The recognition of vertebral fractures, as well as the prevention and treatment of further fractures, will likely do much to reduce both the burden of osteoporosis-related morbidity and mortality, as well as fracture-related costs to healthcare systems.

  16. Bone mineral density testing after fragility fracture

    PubMed Central

    Posen, Joshua; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Sale, Joanna; Bogoch, Earl R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the proportion of patients with fragility fractures who can be expected to have low bone mineral density (BMD) at the time of fracture and to assist FPs in deciding whether to refer patients for BMD testing. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched from the earliest available dates through September 2009. Study selection English-language articles reporting BMD test results of patients with fragility fractures who were managed in an orthopedic environment (eg, fracture clinic, emergency management by orthopedic surgeons, inpatients) were eligible for review. While the orthopedic environment has been identified as an ideal point for case finding, FPs are often responsible for investigation and treatment. Factors that potentially influenced BMD test results (eg, selection of fracture types, exclusion criteria) were identified. Studies with 2 or more selection factors of potential influence were flagged, and rates of low BMD were calculated including and excluding these studies. Synthesis The distribution of the proportion of persons with low BMD was summarized across studies using descriptive statistics. We calculated lower boundaries on this distribution, using standard statistical thresholds, to determine a lower threshold of the expected rate of low BMD. Conclusion Family physicians evaluating patients with fragility fractures can expect that at least two-thirds of patients with fragility fractures who are older than 50 years of age will have low BMD (T score ≤ −1.0). With this a priori expectation, FPs might more readily conduct a fracture risk assessment and pursue warranted fracture risk reduction strategies following fragility fracture. PMID:24336562

  17. Determination of the spectrum of low molecular mass organic acids in urine by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity and ultraviolet photometric detection--an efficient tool for monitoring of inborn metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Tůma, Petr; Samcová, Eva; Stulík, Karel

    2011-01-24

    A mixture of 29 organic acids (OAs) occurring in urine was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) and UV photometric detection. The optimized analytical system involved a 100 cm long polyacrylamide-coated capillary (50 μm i.d.) and the background electrolyte of 20mM 2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid (MES)/NaOH+10% (v/v) methanol, pH 6.0 (pH is related to the 20mM MES/NaOH buffer in water). The LOD values obtained by C(4)D for the OAs which do not absorb UV radiation range from 0.6 μM (oxalic acid) to 6.8 μM (pyruvic acid); those obtained by UV photometry for the remaining OAs range from 2.9 μM (5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid) to 10.2 μM (uric acid). The repeatability of the procedure developed is characterized by the coefficients of variation, which vary between 0.3% (tartaric acid) and 0.6% (5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid) for the migration time and between 1.3% (tartaric acid) and 3.5% (lactic acid) for the peak area. The procedure permitted quantitation of 20 OAs in a real urine sample and was applied to monitoring of the occurrence of the inborn metabolic fault of methylmalonic aciduria. PMID:21168555

  18. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  19. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  20. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    quantify the distribution of apertures and the nature of the asperities. Low resolution images of fluids in a sample with a shear fracture were performed and they provide the confidence that flow patterns and saturations could be determined in the future. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective is to understand the impact of the fracture, its topology and occupancy on the nature of mass transfer between the matrix and the fracture. Counter-current imbibition next to the fracture was observed and quantified, including the influence of formation layering.

  1. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    quantify the distribution of apertures and the nature of the asperities. Low resolution images of fluids in a sample with a shear fracture were performed and they provide the confidence that flow patterns and saturations could be determined in the future. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective is to understand the impact of the fracture, its topology and occupancy on the nature of mass transfer between the matrix and the fracture. Counter-current imbibition next to the fracture was observed and quantified, including the influence of formation layering.

  2. Investigating the role of hydromechanical coupling on flow and transport in shallow fractured-rock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, Evan; Boutt, David

    2014-06-01

    Fractured-rock aquifers display spatially and temporally variable hydraulic conductivity generally attributed to variable fracture intensity and connectivity. Empirical evidence suggests fracture aperture and hydraulic conductivity are sensitive to in situ stress. This study investigates the sensitivity of fractured-rock hydraulic conductivity, groundwater flow paths, and advection-dominated transport to variable shear and normal fracture stiffness magnitudes for a range of deviatoric stress states. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductivity are solved for analytically using empirical hydromechanical coupling equations; groundwater flow paths and ages are then solved for numerically using groundwater flow and advection-dispersion equations in a traditional Toth basin. Results suggest hydraulic conductivity alteration is dominated by fracture normal closure, resulting in decreasing hydraulic conductivity and increasing groundwater age with depth, and decreased depth of long flow paths with decreasing normal stiffness. Shear dilation has minimal effect on hydraulic conductivity alteration for stress states investigated here. Results are interpreted to suggest that fracture normal stiffness influences hydraulic conductivity of hydraulically active fractures and, thus, affects flow and transport in shallow (<1 km) fractured-rock aquifers. It is suggested that observed depth-dependent hydraulic conductivity trends in fractured-rock aquifers throughout the world may be partly a manifestation of hydromechanical phenomena.

  3. Epidemiology of clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Postacchini, Franco; Gumina, Stefano; De Santis, Pierfrancesco; Albo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of 535 isolated clavicle fractures treated in a hospital of a large metropolis during an 11-year period was performed. Data regarding patient's age and sex, side involved, mechanism of injury, and season in which the fracture occurred were obtained from the clinical records. Radiographic classification was performed with the Allman system. Clavicle fractures represented 2.6% of all fractures and 44% of those in the shoulder girdle. Most patients were men (68%), and the left side was involved in 61% of cases. Fractures of the middle third of the clavicle, which were the most common (81%), were displaced in 48% of cases and comminuted in 19%. Fractures of the medial third were the least common (2%). The prevalence of midclavicular fractures was found to decrease progressively with age, starting from the first decade of life when they represented 88.2% of all clavicle fractures and were undisplaced in 55.5% of cases. In adults, the incidence of displaced fractures, independent of location, was higher than that of undisplaced fractures. Traffic accidents were the most common cause of the injury. In the period under study, the incidence of fractures showed no significant change over time and no seasonal variation. PMID:12378163

  4. Subsurface fracture spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Hill, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to document and analyze the unique set of data on subsurface fracture characteristics, especially spacing, provided by the US Department of Energy's Slant Hole Completion Test well (SHCT-1) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Two hundred thirty-six (236) ft (71.9 m) of slant core and 115 ft (35.1 m) of horizontal core show irregular, but remarkably close, spacings for 72 natural fractures cored in sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group. Over 4200 ft (1280 m) of vertical core (containing 275 fractures) from the vertical Multiwell Experiment wells at the same location provide valuable information on fracture orientation, termination, and height, but only data from the SHCT-1 core allow calculations of relative fracture spacing. Within the 162-ft (49-m) thick zone of overlapping core from the vertical and deviated wellbores, only one fracture is present in vertical core whereas 52 fractures occur in the equivalent SHCT-1 core. The irregular distribution of regional-type fractures in these heterogeneous reservoirs suggests that measurements of average fracture spacing'' are of questionable value as direct input parameters into reservoir engineering models. Rather, deviated core provides data on the relative degree of fracturing, and confirms that cross fractures can be rare in the subsurface. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Atraumatic sternum fracture

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsen, Sebastian Ørskov; Madsen, Christina Friis

    2014-01-01

    The spine, pelvic bones and long bones of the lower extremities are common sites for insufficiency fractures. Cases of sternum insufficiency fractures have rarely been reported among elderly patients. Insufficiency fractures tend to occur in bones with decreased mechanical strength especially among elderly patients, in postmenopausal women and patients with underlying diseases. We describe a case of spontaneous sternum insufficiency fracture in a healthy man, with no known risk factors to fracture, or previous history of fractures. Sternum insufficiency fracture is a rare cause of chest pain. This case serves to remind the emergency physician to remain vigilant for other non-cardiac, non-pulmonary and non-traumatic causes of chest pain, especially among patients with known risk factors such as osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and patients on long-term steroid treatment. If diagnosed correctly, these patients can be discharged and treated as outpatients as this case emphasises. PMID:25326566

  6. [Fractures of carpal bones].

    PubMed

    Lögters, T; Windolf, J

    2016-10-01

    Fractures of the carpal bones are uncommon. On standard radiographs fractures are often not recognized and a computed tomography (CT) scan is the diagnostic method of choice. The aim of treatment is to restore pain-free and full functioning of the hand. A distinction is made between stable and unstable carpal fractures. Stable non-displaced fractures can be treated conservatively. Unstable and displaced fractures have an increased risk of arthritis and non-union and should be stabilized by screws or k‑wires. If treated adequately, fractures of the carpal bones have a good prognosis. Unstable and dislocated fractures have an increased risk for non-union. The subsequent development of carpal collapse with arthrosis is a severe consequence of non-union, which has a heterogeneous prognosis.

  7. Posterior malleolus fracture.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Todd A; Lien, John; Kadakia, Anish R

    2013-01-01

    Posterior malleolus fractures are a common component of ankle fractures. The morphology is variable; these fractures range from small posterolateral avulsion injuries to large displaced fracture fragments. The integrity of the posterior malleolus and its ligamentous attachment is important for tibiotalar load transfer, posterior talar stability, and rotatory ankle stability. Fixation of posterior malleolus fractures in the setting of rotational ankle injuries has certain benefits, such as restoring articular congruity and rotatory ankle stability, as well as preventing posterior talar translation, but current indications are unclear. Fragment size as a percentage of the anteroposterior dimension of the articular surface is often cited as an indication for fixation, although several factors may contribute to the decision, such as articular impaction, comminution, and syndesmotic stability. Outcome studies show that, in patients with ankle fractures, the presence of a posterior malleolus fracture negatively affects prognosis. Notable variability is evident in surgeon practice. PMID:23281469

  8. Modern Workflows for Fracture Rock Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T.

    2015-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) is a numerical simulation approach that represents a conducting fracture network using geologically realistic geometries and single-conductor hydraulic and transport properties. In terms of diffusion analogues, equivalent porous media derive from heat conduction in continuous media, while DFN simulation is more similar to electrical flow and diffusion in circuits with discrete pathways. DFN modeling grew out of pioneering work of David Snow in the late 1960s with additional impetus in the 1970's from the development of the development of stochastic approaches for describing of fracture geometric and hydrologic properties. Research in underground test facilities for radioactive waste disposal developed the necessary linkages between characterization technologies and simulation as well as bringing about a hybrid deterministic stochastic approach. Over the past 40 years DFN simulation and characterization methods have moved from the research environment into practical, commercial application. The key geologic, geophysical and hydrologic tools provide the required DFN inputs of conductive fracture intensity, orientation, and transmissivity. Flow logging either using downhole tool or by detailed packer testing identifies the locations of conducting features in boreholes, and image logging provides information on the geology and geometry of the conducting features. Multi-zone monitoring systems isolate the individual conductors, and with subsequent drilling and characterization perturbations help to recognize connectivity and compartmentalization in the fracture network. Tracer tests and core analysis provide critical information on the transport properties especially matrix diffusion unidentified conducting pathways. Well test analyses incorporating flow dimension boundary effects provide further constraint on the conducting geometry of the fracture network.

  9. Structural requisites of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid analogues for activity on native rat skeletal muscle chloride conductance and on heterologously expressed CLC-1

    PubMed Central

    Liantonio, Antonella; De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Didonna, Maria Paola; Loiodice, Fulvio; Fracchiolla, Giuseppe; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Bonerba, Elisabetta; Traverso, Sonia; Elia, Laura; Picollo, Alessandra; Pusch, Michael; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2003-01-01

    The 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (CPP) modulates in a stereoselective manner the macroscopic chloride conductance (gCl), the electrical parameter sustained by the CLC-1 channel, of skeletal muscle. In order to determine the structural requirements for modulating native gCl and to identify high-affinity ligands, the effects of newly synthesised CPP analogues have been evaluated on gCl of rat EDL muscle fibres by means of the two-microelectrode current-clamp technique. Each type of the following independent modification of CPP structure led to a three- to 10-fold decrease or to a complete lack of gCl-blocking activity: replacement of the electron-attractive chlorine atom of the aromatic ring, substitution of the oxygen atom of the phenoxy group, modification at the chiral centre and substitution of the carboxylic function with a phosphonate one. The analogues bearing a second chlorophenoxy group on the asymmetric carbon atom showed a significant gCl-blocking activity. Similar to racemate CPP, the analogue with this group, spaced by an alkyl chain formed by three methylenic groups, blocked gCl by 45% at 100 μM. These latter derivatives were tested on heterelogously expressed CLC-1 performing inside-out patch-clamp recordings to further define how interaction between drug and channel protein could take place. Depending on the exact chemical nature of modification, these derivatives strongly blocked CLC-1 with KD values at −140 mV ranging from about 4 to 180 μM. In conclusion, we identified four molecular determinants pivotal for the interaction with the binding site on muscle CLC-1 channels: (a) the carboxylic group that confers the optimal acidity and the negative charge; (b) the chlorophenoxy moiety that might interact with a hydrophobic pocket; (c) the chiral centre that allows the proper spatial disposition of the molecule; (d) an additional phenoxy group that remarkably stabilises the binding by interacting with a second hydrophobic pocket. PMID:12890704

  10. Fractal Analysis of Permeability of Unsaturated Fractured Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoping; Shi, Wei; Huang, Lili

    2013-01-01

    A physical conceptual model for water retention in fractured rocks is derived while taking into account the effect of pore size distribution and tortuosity of capillaries. The formula of calculating relative hydraulic conductivity of fractured rock is given based on fractal theory. It is an issue to choose an appropriate capillary pressure-saturation curve in the research of unsaturated fractured mass. The geometric pattern of the fracture bulk is described based on the fractal distribution of tortuosity. The resulting water content expression is then used to estimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the fractured medium based on the well-known model of Burdine. It is found that for large enough ranges of fracture apertures the new constitutive model converges to the empirical Brooks-Corey model. PMID:23690746

  11. A semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Wu, Yonghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks. The model dynamically couples an analytical dual-porosity model with a numerical discrete fracture model. The small-scale fractures with the matrix are idealized as a dual-porosity continuum and an analytical flow solution is derived based on source functions in Laplace domain. The large-scale fractures are represented explicitly as the major fluid conduits and the flow is numerically modeled, also in Laplace domain. This approach allows us to include finer details of the fracture network characteristics while keeping the computational work manageable. For example, the large-scale fracture network may have complex geometry and varying conductivity, and the computations can be done at predetermined, discrete times, without any grids in the dual-porosity continuum. The validation of the semi-analytical model is demonstrated in comparison to the solution of ECLIPSE reservoir simulator. The simulation is fast, gridless and enables rapid model setup. On the basis of the model, we provide detailed analysis of the flow behavior of a horizontal production well in fractured reservoir with multi-scale fracture networks. The study has shown that the system may exhibit six flow regimes: large-scale fracture network linear flow, bilinear flow, small-scale fracture network linear flow, pseudosteady-state flow, interporosity flow and pseudoradial flow. During the first four flow periods, the large-scale fracture network behaves as if it only drains in the small-scale fracture network; that is, the effect of the matrix is negligibly small. The characteristics of the bilinear flow and the small-scale fracture network linear flow are predominantly determined by the dimensionless large-scale fracture conductivity. And low dimensionless fracture conductivity will generate large pressure drops in the large-scale fractures surrounding the wellbore. With

  12. Effects of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and PIP gene expression of tomato seedlings subject to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y Y; Yan, F; Hu, L P; Zhou, X T; Zou, Z R; Cui, L R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) on photosynthesis, plant growth, and the expression of two aquaporin genes in tomato seedlings under control and salinity conditions were investigated. Exogenous ALA application significantly improved net photosynthetic rate (Pn), total chlorophyll content, and plant biomass accumulation of tomato seedlings under salinity stress. As revealed by real-time PCR analyses, after treatment with ALA alone, expression of both LePIP1 and LePIP2 in the two tomato cultivars was up-regulated at 2 h and subsequently decreased to normal levels. Under salinity stress, transcript levels of LePIP1 in both leaves and roots of salt-sensitive cultivars (cv. Zhongza No.9) increased significantly and were considerably higher than in cultivars exposed to ALA alone. In contrast, the expression levels of LePIP1 and LePIP2 in cvs. Jinpeng No.1 cultivars were slightly lower under salinity stress than under ALA treatment. In addition, transcript levels of both LePIP1 and LePIP2 in the roots of Jinpeng No. 1 cultivars were considerably lower than those in the roots of Zhongza No. 9 cultivars under salinity stress, regardless of ALA supplementation, implying that Jinpeng No. 1 cultivars had a better capacity to maintain membrane intrinsic protein stability. Further, ALA application distinctly counteracted the up- or down-regulation of LePIP1 and LePIP2 in both cultivars under salinity stress, in accordance with the improvements instomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and Pn of tomato leaves. The results presented here indicate that ALA controls aquaporin expression, thus, presumably ALA regulates water homeostasis and enhances salt tolerance of tomato seedlings. PMID:26125845

  13. Effects of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and PIP gene expression of tomato seedlings subject to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y Y; Yan, F; Hu, L P; Zhou, X T; Zou, Z R; Cui, L R

    2015-06-11

    The effects of exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) on photosynthesis, plant growth, and the expression of two aquaporin genes in tomato seedlings under control and salinity conditions were investigated. Exogenous ALA application significantly improved net photosynthetic rate (Pn), total chlorophyll content, and plant biomass accumulation of tomato seedlings under salinity stress. As revealed by real-time PCR analyses, after treatment with ALA alone, expression of both LePIP1 and LePIP2 in the two tomato cultivars was up-regulated at 2 h and subsequently decreased to normal levels. Under salinity stress, transcript levels of LePIP1 in both leaves and roots of salt-sensitive cultivars (cv. Zhongza No.9) increased significantly and were considerably higher than in cultivars exposed to ALA alone. In contrast, the expression levels of LePIP1 and LePIP2 in cvs. Jinpeng No.1 cultivars were slightly lower under salinity stress than under ALA treatment. In addition, transcript levels of both LePIP1 and LePIP2 in the roots of Jinpeng No. 1 cultivars were considerably lower than those in the roots of Zhongza No. 9 cultivars under salinity stress, regardless of ALA supplementation, implying that Jinpeng No. 1 cultivars had a better capacity to maintain membrane intrinsic protein stability. Further, ALA application distinctly counteracted the up- or down-regulation of LePIP1 and LePIP2 in both cultivars under salinity stress, in accordance with the improvements instomatal conductance, transpiration rate, and Pn of tomato leaves. The results presented here indicate that ALA controls aquaporin expression, thus, presumably ALA regulates water homeostasis and enhances salt tolerance of tomato seedlings.

  14. [Fracture endoprosthesis of distal humerus fractures].

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Wegmann, K; Burkhart, K J

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of choice for fractures of the distal humerus is double plate osteosynthesis. Due to anatomical preshaped angle stable plates the primary stability and management of soft tissues has been improved. However, osteoporotic comminuted fractures in the elderly are often not amenable to stable osteosynthesis and total elbow arthroplasty has been established as an alternative therapy. Although complication rates have been reduced, complications of total elbow arthroplasty are still much more frequent than in total hip replacement. Furthermore, patients are advised not to exceed a weight bearing of 5 kg. Therefore, the indications for elbow arthroplasty must be evaluated very strictly and should be reserved for comminuted distal humeral fractures in the elderly with poor bone quality that are not amenable to stable osteosynthesis or for simple fractures in cases of preexisting symptomatic osteoarthritis. This article introduces and discusses modern concepts of elbow arthroplasty, such as modular convertible prosthesis systems, hemiarthroplasty and radial head replacement in total elbow arthroplasty.

  15. Cerberus Fossae Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 October 2003

    The fractured surface of the Cerberus region southeast of the Elysium volcanoes provides an impressive example of the powerful tectonic forces that have shaped the region. Both the smooth lava plains and the mountains that poke through the lava are subject to the extensional forces that rip open the landscape. The fractures are radial to the Elysium complex, suggesting a relationship to the volcanic processes that have built it.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 160.6 East (199.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Numerical Simulation Study on the Hydraulic Behavior in Closed Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Shu, L.; Wen, Z.; Wu, G.; Zhang, X.; Hu, B. X.

    2015-12-01

    As the main repositories for groundwater in karst systems, fractures involve the movement and storage of groundwater. Fundamentally, Navier-Stokes (NS) Equations is used to describe flow in fractures. However, due to the complexity of Navier-Stokes Equations, it is rarely applied to solve fracture flow problems. Thus, based on some simplifications, Stokes equations, Reynolds equations and Cubic Law (CL) are derived to describe fracture flow. The validity of the three simplified equations were extensively studies. Among the three simplified equations of NS, CL is the simplest and used to describe flow in open, smooth and paralleled fractures. In the previous work, most researchers focused on the open fractures. But it's the closed fractures exist widely in the field not the open fractures. The objective of this paper aims to check the validity of CL in closed fractures with different apertures and widths of fracture. After comparing the experimental results and simulations results from the COMSOL Multiphysics (FEM), this software was applied to solve the 3D or 2D NS equations in the closed fractures. The results obtained from NS simulation results and calculation results from CL were compared to indicate the degree of the validity of CL in application. A critical velocity was proposed to illustrate the validity of CL in closed fractures. Furthermore, the impacts of aperture size, width of fracture size, and velocity magnitude on both the hydraulic conductivity and velocity profile were also analyzed. The results showed the CL was capable of describing flow in closed fractures when the velocity was less than the critical velocity varying from 0.02 to 30.08cm/s. The ratio of NS results and CL results was between 0.9 and 2, with velocity varying from 0 to 40cm/s. The discrepancy between NS equation and CL increased with Reynolds number, increased with aperture size and decreased with width of fracture.

  17. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  18. Fracture corridors in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelée, Sébastien; Lamarche, Juliette; Gauthier, Bertrand D. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among fractures, Fracture Corridors (FC) are anomalous structures made of highly persistent fracture clusters having a strong effect on multi-phase fluid flow in the subsurface. While mechanical and geological conditions for diffuse fracture systems are well constrained, FC genetic conditions remain a matter of questioning. FC can be localized in larger structures such as folds and fault zones but recent studies suggest that a large amount of fractures and FC also arise as distributed in the host rock and formed in tabular layers during burial with early rock mechanical differentiation. In addition, while the mechanical stratigraphy is of prime importance for fracture stratigraphy, it is still unknown which factor prevails on FC genesis among the local versus regional stress-state, the host rock mechanical stratigraphy or the sedimentary facies. We present a study of fractures in a 400×300 m wide quarry (Calvisson, SE France) dug in homogeneous marly limestones of Hauterivian age. The quarry exhibits diffuse fractures as well as 16 FC. The aim of this study is to reveal the genetics factor for FC development, their global geometry and internal morphologic variations, but also to clear the impact of fracture corridors on diffuse fracture. For that, we measured >2500 fractures (strike, dip, spacing, filling, aperture, etc.) and studied microstructures in 80 thin sections. We calculated fracture density and acquired LiDAR data with >90 million points with a resolution of 4 to 15mm. Diffuse fractures are organized as two perpendicular sets, a main set NE-SW-trending and minor set NW-SE-trending. The FC have the same trend, but the NW-SE trend prevail on the NE-SW one. The LiDAR acquisition allows to visualize the 3D lateral continuity with corridors with a minimal extension of 30m. We distinguish 4 internal morphologic types in FC, depending on fracture morphology, occurrence of breccia and number of zones. The types may occur in a single FC with a lateral transition

  19. Fracture behavior of cemented sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasabi, Ahmad Othman

    While fracture mechanics for cementitious materials and composites in the past three decades have developed mainly in concrete applications, it has not yet gained its rightful place in the geotechnical field. There are many examples in the geotechnical literature, especially those related to brittle and stiff soils, where traditional approaches of analysis have proven to be inadequate. While geotechnical problems are inherently complex in nature, using the finite element method (FEM) with fracture mechanics (FM) have been shown to provide powerful analytical tool that could be used to investigate and solve many problems in geomechanics and geotechnical engineering. This thesis addresses the application of FM concepts and theories in analysis of cemented soils. In addition to theoretical aspects, experiments were conducted to evaluate the application of FM to cemented soils. Three point bending beam tests with crack mouth opening displacements (CMOD) conducted on cemented sand samples showed that fracture parameters, such as CMOD, indeed could play an important role in investigation of such soils. Using this unambiguous material parameter, field engineers might have a reliable measure that could prove to be useful in stability assessment of earth structures and soil structure system. By studying size effect on cemented sand, strong relationship was established between critical CMOD and failure, which might be a very useful index and analysis tool in geotechnical engineering practice.

  20. Stress fractures in athletes.

    PubMed

    Fredericson, Michael; Jennings, Fabio; Beaulieu, Christopher; Matheson, Gordon O

    2006-10-01

    A stress fracture is a partial or complete bone fracture that results from repeated application of stress lower than the stress required to fracture the bone in a single loading. Otherwise healthy athletes, especially runners, sustain stress injuries or fractures. Prevention or early intervention is the preferable treatment. However, it is difficult to predict injury because runners vary with regard to biomechanical predisposition, training methods, and other factors such as diet, muscle strength, and flexibility. Stress fractures account for 0.7% to 20% of all sports medicine clinic injuries. Track-and-field athletes have the highest incidence of stress fractures compared with other athletes. Stress fractures of the tibia, metatarsals, and fibula are the most frequently reported sites. The sites of stress fractures vary from sport to sport (eg, among track athletes, stress fractures of the navicular, tibia, and metatarsal are common; in distance runners, it is the tibia and fibula; in dancers, the metatarsals). In the military, the calcaneus and metatarsals were the most commonly cited injuries, especially in new recruits, owing to the sudden increase in running and marching without adequate preparation. However, newer studies from the military show the incidence and distribution of stress fractures to be similar to those found in sports clinics. Fractures of the upper extremities are relatively rare, although most studies have focused only on lower-extremity injuries. The ulna is the upper-extremity bone injured most frequently. Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of stress injuries. Plain radiography is useful when positive, but generally has low sensitivity. Radionuclide bone scanning is highly sensitive, but lacks specificity and the ability to directly visualize fracture lines. In this article, we focus on magnetic resonance imaging, which provides highly sensitive and specific evaluation for bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction as well

  1. A Hierarchical Approach to Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Taasan, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    Recent research conducted under NASA LaRC's Creativity and Innovation Program has led to the development of an initial approach for a hierarchical fracture mechanics. This methodology unites failure mechanisms occurring at different length scales and provides a framework for a physics-based theory of fracture. At the nanoscale, parametric molecular dynamic simulations are used to compute the energy associated with atomic level failure mechanisms. This information is used in a mesoscale percolation model of defect coalescence to obtain statistics of fracture paths and energies through Monte Carlo simulations. The mathematical structure of predicted crack paths is described using concepts of fractal geometry. The non-integer fractal dimension relates geometric and energy measures between meso- and macroscales. For illustration, a fractal-based continuum strain energy release rate is derived for inter- and transgranular fracture in polycrystalline metals.

  2. The hydraulic fracturing of geothermal formations

    SciTech Connect

    Naceur, K. Ben; Economides, M.J.; Schlumberger, Dowell

    1988-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been attempted in geothermal formations as a means to stimulate both production and injection wells. Since most geothermal formations contain fissures and on occasion massive natural fissures, the production behavior of the man-made fractures results in certain characteristic trends. A model is offered that allows the presence of a finite or infinite conductivity fracture intercepting a fissured medium. The method is based on a numerical discretization of the formation allowing transient interporosity flow. Type curves for pressure drawdown and cumulative production are given for infinite acting and closed reservoirs. Since most of the fissured formations exhibit a degree of anisotropy, the effects of the orientation of the hydraulic fracture with respect to the fissure planes, and of the ratio between the directional permeabilities are then discussed. Guidelines are offered as to the size of appropriate stimulation treatments based on the observed fissured behavior of the reservoir.

  3. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer in a Heterogeneous Fracture Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisladottir, V. R.; Roubinet, D.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy harvesting requires extraction and injection of geothermal fluid. Doing so in an optimal way requires a quantitative understanding of site-specific heat transfer between geothermal fluid and the ambient rock. We develop a heat transfer particle-tracking approach to model that interaction. Fracture-network models of heat transfer in fractured rock explicitly account for the presence of individual fractures, ambient rock matrix, and fracture-matrix interfaces. Computational domains of such models span the meter scale, whereas fracture apertures are on the millimeter scale. The computations needed to model these multi-scale phenomenon can be prohibitively expensive, even for methods using nonuniform meshes. Our approach appreciably decreases the computational costs. Current particle-tracking methods usually assume both infinite matrix and one-dimensional (1D) heat transfer in the matrix blocks. They rely on 1D analytical solutions for heat transfer in a single fracture, which can lead to large predictive errors. Our two-dimensional (2D) heat transfer simulation algorithm is mesh-free and takes into account both longitudinal and transversal heat conduction in the matrix. It uses a probabilistic model to transfer particle to the appropriate neighboring fracture unless it returns to the fracture of origin or remains in the matrix. We use this approach to look at the impact of a fracture-network topology (e.g. the importance of smaller scale fractures), as well as the matrix block distribution on the heat transport in heterogeneous fractured rocks.

  4. Streaming potential modeling in fractured rock: Insights into the identification of hydraulically active fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubinet, D.; Linde, N.; Jougnot, D.; Irving, J.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous field experiments suggest that the self-potential (SP) geophysical method may allow for the detection of hydraulically active fractures and provide information about fracture properties. However, a lack of suitable numerical tools for modeling streaming potentials in fractured media prevents quantitative interpretation and limits our understanding of how the SP method can be used in this regard. To address this issue, we present a highly efficient two-dimensional discrete-dual-porosity approach for solving the fluid flow and associated self-potential problems in fractured rock. Our approach is specifically designed for complex fracture networks that cannot be investigated using standard numerical methods. We then simulate SP signals associated with pumping conditions for a number of examples to show that (i) accounting for matrix fluid flow is essential for accurate SP modeling and (ii) the sensitivity of SP to hydraulically active fractures is intimately linked with fracture-matrix fluid interactions. This implies that fractures associated with strong SP amplitudes are likely to be hydraulically conductive, attracting fluid flow from the surrounding matrix.

  5. Denosumab for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures in post-menopausal women: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Scotland, Graham; Waugh, Norman; Royle, Pamela; McNamee, Paul; Henderson, Rob; Hollick, Rosemary

    2011-11-01

    costs. Utility weights were used to adjust time spent in fracture states, allowing QALYs to be estimated. The base-case analysis was conducted for women aged 70 years with a T-score of -2.5 or less and no prior fracture, and women aged 70 years with a T-score of -2.5 or less with a prior fragility fracture. Subgroup analyses based on T-score and independent clinical risk factors were also undertaken. Applying a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of £30 000 per QALY, the manufacturer's results suggested that denosumab would offer a cost-effective alternative to all treatment comparators for the primary and secondary prevention of fractures. The ERG was concerned about an assumption that denosumab would be administered in general practice at the average cost of two standard GP visits a year. As a result, the ERG requested some further sensitivity analysis and undertook some further modelling, applying an assumption that denosumab would be provided primarily in secondary care. This modification altered the cost effectiveness of denosumab versus 'no treatment' (in women with no prior fragility fracture) and zoledronic acid. The NICE Appraisal Committee concluded that, as a treatment option for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures, denosumab should be recommended only in post-menopausal women at increased risk of fracture who cannot comply with the special instructions for administering oral bisphosphonates, or have an intolerance of, or contraindication to, those treatments. For primary prevention, the Appraisal Committee also stipulated specific levels of fracture risk at which denosumab is recommended.

  6. Field fracturing multi-sites project. Annual report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Field Fracturing Multi-Sites Project (M-Site) is to conduct experiments to definitively determine hydraulic fracture dimensions using remote well and treatment well diagnostic techniques. In addition, experiments are to be conducted to provide data that will resolve significant unknowns with regard to hydraulic fracture modeling, fracture fluid rheology and fracture treatment design. These experiments will be supported by a well-characterized subsurface environment, as well as surface facilities and equipment conducive to acquiring high-quality data. The primary Project goal is to develop a fully characterized, tight reservoir-typical, field-scale hydraulic fracturing test site to diagnose, characterize, and test hydraulic fracturing technology and performance. It is anticipated that the research work being conducted by the multi-disciplinary team of GRI and DOE contractors will lead to the development of a commercial fracture mapping tool/service.

  7. Natural fracturing, by depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, John; Laubach, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Natural opening-mode fractures commonly fall upon a spectrum whose end-members are veins, which have wide ranges of sizes and are mostly or thoroughly cemented, and joints, which have little opening displacement and little or no cement. The vein end-member is common in metamorphic rocks, whose high temperature and pressure of formation place them outside typical reservoir settings; conversely, many uncemented joints likely form near the surface and so too have limited relevance to subsurface exploration. Sampling of cores retrieved from tight-gas sandstone reservoirs suggest that it is intermediate fractures, not true joints or veins, that provide natural porosity and permeability. Such fractures have abundant pore space among fracture-bridging cements, which may hold fractures open despite varying states of stress through time. Thus the more sophisticated our understanding of the processes that form veins and joints, i.e., how natural fracturing varies by depth, the better our ability to predict intermediate fractures. Systematic differences between veins and joints, in terms of size-scaling and lateral and stratigraphic spatial arrangement, have been explained in the literature by the mechanical effects of sedimentary layering, which likely exert more control over fracture patterns at shallower depths. Thus stratabound joints commonly have narrow size ranges and regular spacing; non-stratabound veins have a wide range of sizes and spacings. However, new fieldwork and careful literature review suggest that the effects of mechanical layering are only half the story. Although atypical, veins may be highly stratabound and yet spatially clustered; non-stratabound fractures may nonetheless feature narrow size ranges. These anomalous fracture arrangements are better explained by the presence of precipitating cements during fracture opening than by mechanical layering. Cement is thought to be highly important for fracture permeability, but potential effects of

  8. Multiple noncontiguous spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R L; Reid, D C; Saboe, L A

    1991-02-01

    The data from a prospective study of 508 spine injuries were reviewed to determine the incidence of multiple noncontiguous spine fractures. All patients were examined at admission and at 1 and 2 years postinjury. This series identified 77 (15.2%) multilevel fractures. Motor vehicle accidents were the primary cause of these fractures. The incidence of neurologic injury was not significantly different between multiple noncontiguous and single fractures. Failure to use seat belts and ejection from the vehicle were the main factors associated with multiple noncontiguous spine injuries. Seven major fracture patterns were identified, which accounted for 60% of these injuries. The prognosis for multilevel spine fractures was not significantly worse that that for single-level injuries. PMID:2011766

  9. The importance of previous fracture site on osteoporosis diagnosis and incident fractures in women.

    PubMed

    Morin, Suzanne N; Lix, Lisa M; Leslie, William D

    2014-07-01

    Previous fracture increases the risk of subsequent fractures regardless of the site of the initial fracture. Fracture risk assessment tools have been developed to guide clinical management; however, no discrimination is made as to the site of the prior fracture. Our objective was to determine which sites of previous nontraumatic fractures are most strongly associated with a diagnosis of osteoporosis, defined by a bone mineral density (BMD) T-score of ≤ -2.5 at the femoral neck, and an incident major osteoporotic fracture. Using administrative health databases, we conducted a retrospective historical cohort study of 39,991 women age 45 years and older who had BMD testing with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Logistic regression and Cox proportional multivariate models were used to test the association of previous fracture site with risk of osteoporosis and incident fractures. Clinical fractures at the following sites were strongly and independently associated with higher risk of an osteoporotic femoral neck T-score after adjustment for age: hip (odds ratio [OR], 3.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.04-4.21), pelvis (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.66-3.0), spine (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.77-2.62), and humerus (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.49-2.02). Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age and femoral neck BMD, showed the greatest increase in risk for a major osteoporotic fracture for women who had sustained previous fractures of the spine (hazard ratio [HR], 2.08; 95% CI, 1.72-2.53), humerus (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.44-2.01), patella (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.10-2.18), and pelvis (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.04-2.02). In summary, our results confirm that nontraumatic fractures in women are associated with osteoporosis at the femoral neck and that the site of previous fracture impacts on future osteoporotic fracture risk, independent of BMD.

  10. A 12-year ecological study of hip fracture rates among older Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ding-Cheng; Lee, Yow-Shan; Wu, Ya-Ju; Tsou, Hsiao-Hui; Chen, Cheng-Ting; Hwang, Jawl-Shan; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2013-11-01

    Hip fracture rates in Taiwan are among the highest in the world. The aim of this study was to describe the trends of hip fracture hospitalizations among Taiwanese elderly (aged ≥ 65 years) and the trends of antiosteoporosis medication expenditure from 1999 to 2010. We conducted an ecological study using inpatient health care-utilization data from the Department of Health, and medication expenditure data from the IMS Health, Taiwan. The International Classification of Disease, Clinical Modification, 9th version, code 820 was used to identify hip fracture hospitalizations. Medications included alendronate, calcitonin, ibandronate, raloxifene, strontium ranelate, teriparatide, and zoledronic acid. Year 2010 was assigned as the reference point for age-standardized rates, currency exchange (to the US dollar), and discount rates. Over the 12-year study period, age-standardized hip fracture hospitalizations decreased by 2.7 % annually (p for trend < 0.001) for Taiwanese elders. The decline was more obvious among those aged ≥75 years (6.1 %). However, the number of hip fracture hospitalizations increased from 14,342 to 18,023. Total hospitalization costs increased by US$0.6 ± 0.2 million annually (p for trend = 0.002); however, the per capita costs decreased by US$23.0 ± 8.0 (p for trend = 0.017). The total medication expenditure increased 7.2-fold, from US$8.1 million to US$58.9 million, accounting for an increase in the overall pharmaceutical market by fivefold, from 3.4 to 15.9 ‰ (both p for trend < 0.001). From 1999 to 2010, there was a decline in hip fracture rates among elderly Taiwanese adults with a concomitant increase in antiosteoporosis medication expenditure.

  11. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%–30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%–42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes. PMID:26828525

  12. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A

    2016-01-28

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%-30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%-42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes.

  13. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  14. Investigation of post hydraulic fracturing well cleanup physics in the Cana Woodford Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rong

    Hydraulic fracturing was first carried out in the 1940s and has gained popularity in current development of unconventional resources. Flowing back the fracturing fluids is critical to a frac job, and determining well cleanup characteristics using the flowback data can help improve frac design. It has become increasingly important as a result of the unique flowback profiles observed in some shale gas plays due to the unconventional formation characteristics. Computer simulation is an efficient and effective way to tackle the problem. History matching can help reveal some mechanisms existent in the cleanup process. The Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology (FAST) Consortium at Colorado School of Mines previously developed a numerical model for investigating the hydraulic fracturing process, cleanup, and relevant physics. It is a three-dimensional, gas-water, coupled fracture propagation-fluid flow simulator, which has the capability to handle commonly present damage mechanisms. The overall goal of this research effort is to validate the model on real data and to investigate the dominant physics in well cleanup for the Cana Field, which produces from the Woodford Shale in Oklahoma. To achieve this goal, first the early time delayed gas production was explained and modeled, and a simulation framework was established that included all three relevant damage mechanisms for a slickwater fractured well. Next, a series of sensitivity analysis of well cleanup to major reservoir, fracture, and operational variables was conducted; five of the Cana wells' initial flowback data were history matched, specifically the first thirty days' gas and water producing rates. Reservoir matrix permeability, net pressure, Young's modulus, and formation pressure gradient were found to have an impact on the gas producing curve's shape, in different ways. Some moderately good matches were achieved, with the outcome of some unknown reservoir information being proposed using the

  15. [Femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Gierer, P; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of femoral neck fractures increases exponentially with rising age. Young patients are rarely affected but when they are it is mostly due to high energy accidents, whereas older patients suffer from femoral neck fractures by low energy trauma due to osteoporotic changes of the bone mineral density. Treatment options have not essentially changed over the last few years. Non-operative treatment may be a choice in non-dislocated and impacted fractures. Due to the high risk of secondary fracture displacement prophylactic screw osteosynthesis is recommended even in Garden type I fractures. Osteosynthetic fracture stabilization with cannulated screws or angle stable sliding screws, is usually applied in non-displaced fractures and fractures in younger patients. Older patients need rapid mobilization after surgery; therefore, total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty are commonly used with a low incidence of secondary complications. In addition to sufficient operative treatment a guideline conform osteoprosis therapy should be initiated for the prophylaxis of further fractures and patients should undertake a suitable rehabilitation.

  16. Pathological fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  17. Fracture detection logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Benzing, William M.

    1992-06-09

    A method and apparatus by which fractured rock formations are identified and their orientation may be determined includes two orthogonal motion sensors which are used in conjunction with a downhole orbital vibrator. The downhole vibrator includes a device for orienting the sensors. The output of the sensors is displayed as a lissajou figure. The shape of the figure changes when a subsurface fracture is encountered in the borehole. The apparatus and method identifies fractures rock formations and enables the azimuthal orientation of the fractures to be determined.

  18. Prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis and hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Duque, G; Demontiero, O; Troen, B R

    2009-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health issue worldwide, with significant economic consequences and adverse impacts on the quality of life. Hip fractures are the most devastating complication of osteoporosis, are likely to increase exponentially with an increasingly aged population, are associated with high recurrence rate, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of hip fractures, the assessment of fracture risk, fall prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis with emphasis on evidence for hip fracture reduction among the various agents currently available. The aim is to provide recommendations to optimize hip fracture prevention and treatment. Ample evidence exists in the literature of many other risk factors independent from bone mineral density that increase fracture risk. These clinical risk factors have been validated in large cohorts and are incorporated into clinical tools that are invaluable in treatment decisions. In addition, strategies to prevent or reduce falls are integral to comprehensive osteoporosis management. Vitamin D combined with calcium has a role in primary prevention. Alendronate, residronate, strontium and zoledronic acid have proven efficacy in primary and secondary hip fracture prevention. An aggressive approach to investigate, assess and manage an individual's fracture risk and fall risk is paramount to reduce the high morbidity and mortality associated with hip fractures. The choice of therapy should be determined by the patient's calculated fracture risk and efficacy of the potential treatment, including long term compliance associated with the agent of choice. PMID:19277006

  19. Longitudinal stress fracture of the femur: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bilreiro, Carlos; Bahia, Carla; Castro, Miguel Oliveira e

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an 80 year old woman with hip pain, caused by a longitudinal femoral insufficiency stress fracture, depicted with radiographs, CT and MR. This type of fracture is very rare, with only a few cases reported. We conducted a literature review and compared the findings with the present case. PMID:27069976

  20. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  1. Pneumothorax complicating isolated clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Hani, Redouane; Ennaciri, Badr; Jeddi, Idriss; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Isolated clavicle fractures are among the commonest of traumatic fractures in the emergency department. Complications of isolated clavicle fractures are rare. Pneumothorax has been described as a complication of a fractured clavicle only rarely in English literature. In all the reported cases, the pneumothorax was treated by a thoracostomy and the clavicle fracture was treated conservatively. In our case, the pneumothorax required a chest drain insertion and the clavicle fracture was treated surgically with good result.

  2. [Research conducted at the Stefan S. Nicolau Institute of Virology of Bucharest in the area of nucleic acids and genetic engineering].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A brief review is done of some of the most important studies realised by the "Stefan S. Nicolau" Institute researchers in the field of nucleic acids. It is worth mentioning among these the investigations about interactions between nucleic acids and some biologically active substances, the recombinant DNA, as well as the most recent works on DNA-DNA hybridization in the avidine-biotine system. PMID:2699967

  3. Experimental assessment of the sealing effectiveness of rock fracture grouting

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, A.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the effectiveness of cement grouts as sealants of fractures in rock. Laboratory experiments have been conducted on seven 15-cm granite cubes containing saw cuts, three 23-cm diameter andesite cores containing induced tension cracks, and one 15-cm diameter marble core containing a natural fracture. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the fractures is determined under a range of normal stresses, applied in loading and unloading cycles, from 0 to 14 MPa (2000 psi). Grout is injected through an axial borehole, at a pressure of 1.2 to 8.3 MPa (180 to 1200 psi), pressure selected to provide a likely groutable fracture aperture, while the fracture is stressed at a constant normal stress. The fracture permeability is measured after grouting. Flow tests on the ungrouted samples confirm the inverse relation between normal stress and fracture permeability. The equivalent aperture determined by these tests is a reliable indicator of groutability. Postgrouting permeability measurements as performed here, and frequently in practice, can be misleading, since incomplete grouting of fractures can result in major apparent reductions in permeability. The apparent permeability reduction is caused by grouting of a small area of a highly preferential flowpath directly adjacent to the hole used for grouting and for permeability testing. Experimental results confirm claims in the literature that ordinary portland cement inadequately penetrates fine fractures.

  4. Cadmium Exposure and Risk of Any Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xianlin; Niu, Yuming; Ding, Qingyang; Yin, Xinhai; Huang, Guanglei; Peng, Juxiang; Song, Jukun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several observational studies have investigated the relation between cadmium exposure and risk of any fracture. However, the results from epidemiological studies for the association are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between cadmium exposure and risk of any fracture. The pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and Embase databases from 1966 to June 2015. Seven articles involving 21,941 fracture cases and 504,346 participants were included. The meta-analysis showed that the pooled relative risk of any fracture for the highest versus lowest category of cadmium concentration was 1.30 (95% confidence interval = 1.13–1.49). In subgroup analyses, the significant association remained consistent when stratified by study type, geographical region, method of cadmium exposure assessment, and gender. Our meta-analysis showed that a high cadmium exposure may be a risk factor for any fracture. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the heterogeneity among studies and existence of publication bias. Additional large, high-quality prospective studies are needed to evaluate the association between cadmium exposure and the risk of development of fracture. PMID:26962791

  5. Laboratory testing of cement grouting of fractures in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, C.J.; Daemen, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    Fractures in the rock mass surrounding a repository and its shafts, access drifts, emplacement rooms and holes, and exploratory or in-situ testing holes, may provide preferential flowpaths for the flow of groundwater or air, potentially containing radionuclides. Such cracks may have to be sealed. The likelihood that extensive or at least local grouting will be required as part of repository sealing has been noted in numerous publications addressing high level waste repository closing. The objective of this work is to determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing (grouting) in welded tuff. Experimental work includes measurement of intact and fracture permeability under various normal stresses and injection pressures. Grout is injected into the fractures. The effectiveness of grouting is evaluated in terms of grout penetration and permeability reduction, compared prior to and after grouting. Analysis of the results include the effect of normal stress, injection pressure, fracture roughness, grout rheology, grout bonding, and the radial extent of grout penetration. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders with three types of fractures: (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural fractures, and (3) sawcuts. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and of the fractures is measured under a range of normal stresses. The surface topography of the fracture is mapped, and the results are used to determine aperture distributions across the fractures. 72 refs., 76 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. Osteosynthesis of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Umberto; Iundusi, Riccardo; Lecce, Domenico; Tempesta, Valerio; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Rao, Cecilia; Cerocchi, Irene; Gasbarra, Elena

    2011-04-01

    The deepening knowledge about bone pathophysiology, together with the development of less invasive bone implants, fitted for the treatment of fragility fractures, the continuous advances in the creation of osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterials, the availability of bone active agents, capable of modulating fracture healing, actually represent the orthopaedic "weapons" to improve the surgical outcome and quality of life in patients with osteoporosis.

  7. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  8. Laboratory data in support of hydraulically fracturing EGSP NY well No. 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    By the results in this report, it appears that the Devonian shale formation in the EGSP NY No. 3 well maybe successfully hydraulically fractured using nitrogen foam as a fracturing fluid. However, overall success will be dependent on the degree of natural fracturing within the formation. Then, an induced fracture linking the areas of natural gas concentration to the wellbore can provide sufficient fracture conductivity for commercial production levels. If extensive fluid loss is experienced during treatment, irreparable damage to the fracture faces, both induced and natural, may limit the overall well productivity. 6 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  9. The impact of race and fractures on mortality in a postmenopausal Medicaid population.

    PubMed

    Kotzan, J A; Martin, B C; Reeves, J H; Wade, W

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to model fractures and survival by age and race in a large postmenopausal Medicaid population. All Georgia Medicaid claims were abstracted for the years 1992, 1993, and 1994. Claims for postmenopausal women (> or =50 years of age) were retained, and patients with fractures were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for fracture. A survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier estimators to evaluate the effect of fracture, age, and race on 3-year survival. A total of 159,400 white and black postmenopausal women were identified. The cohort with fracture totaled 5933 patients, with femoral fractures constituting 46% of all fractures. Discounting those with fracture before the study, the fracture incidence was approximately 1.2% in this postmenopausal female cohort. The survival analysis suggested that after age was accounted for, black postmenopausal women had a 42% increased risk of death within 3 years of fracture, compared with 13% for white women. However, postmenopausal black women were approximately 50% less likely to experience a fracture, and postmenopausal black women without fracture had better survival rates than comparable white women. Mortality crossover and the diminished likelihood of fracture mask the true nature of fracture survival in postmenopausal black women. Postmenopausal black women with fracture are at greater risk of dying than their white counterparts.

  10. The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Hemond, H.F.; Charles, D.F.; Norton, S.A.

    1993-03-05

    A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

  11. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  12. Diplopia following midfacial fractures.

    PubMed

    al-Qurainy, I A; Stassen, L F; Dutton, G N; Moos, K F; el-Attar, A

    1991-10-01

    Over a period of 2 years, 363 patients who had sustained a total of 438 midfacial fractures due to blunt trauma received a full ophthalmological examination within 1 week of injury. Of these, 72 patients (19.8%) developed diplopia. Diplopia was most common following road traffic accidents (31%) and least common with simple falls (10%). Blow-out fractures of the orbit led to double vision in 58% of cases. Eighty two percent of patients recovered from diplopia within 6 months of injury; only 1 patient required squint surgery for double vision. The principal risk factors for diplopia comprise road traffic accidents, blow-out fractures and comminuted malar fractures. Early surgical reconstruction of midfacial fractures with conservative management of concomitant motility disorders has, in our series, resulted in very few patients having diplopia in the long term. PMID:1742259

  13. Hydraulic fracturing of jointed formations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, H.D.; Fehler, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Measured by volume, North America's largest hydraulic fracturing operations have been conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico to create geothermal energy reservoirs. In the largest operation 21,000 m/sup 3/ of water were injected into jointed granitic rock at a depth of 3.5 km. Microearthquakes induced by this injection were measured with geophones placed in five wells drilled into, or very close, to the reservoir, as well as 11 surface seismometers. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. A coupled rock mechanics/fluid flow model provides much of the explanation. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60 degrees to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. These results are qualitatively similar to the controversial process known as ''Kiel'' fracturing, in which sequential injections and shut-ins are repeated to create dendritic fractures for enhanced oil and gas recovery. However, we believe that the explanation is shear slippage of pre-existing joints and stress redistribution, not proppant bridging and fluid blocking as suggested by Kiel. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Biomechanics of frontal skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Delye, Hans; Verschueren, Peter; Depreitere, Bart; Verpoest, Ignaas; Berckmans, Daniel; Vander Sloten, Jos; Van Der Perre, Georges; Goffin, Jan

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether an energy failure level applies to the skull fracture mechanics in unembalmed post-mortem human heads under dynamic frontal loading conditions. A double-pendulum model was used to conduct frontal impact tests on specimens from 18 unembalmed post-mortem human subjects. The specimens were isolated at the occipital condyle level, and pre-test computed tomography images were obtained. The specimens were rigidly attached to an aluminum pendulum in an upside down position and obtained a single degree of freedom, allowing motion in the plane of impact. A steel pendulum delivered the impact and was fitted with a flat-surfaced, cylindrical aluminum impactor, which distributed the load to a force sensor. The relative displacement between the two pendulums was used as a measure for the deformation of the specimen in the plane of impact. Three impact velocity conditions were created: low (3.60+/-0.23 m/sec), intermediate (5.21+/-0.04 m/sec), and high (6.95+/-0.04 m/sec) velocity. Computed tomography and dissection techniques were used to detect pathology. If no fracture was detected, repeated tests on the same specimen were performed with higher impact energy until fracture occurred. Peak force, displacement and energy variables were used to describe the biomechanics. Our data suggests the existence of an energy failure level in the range of 22-24 J for dynamic frontal loading of an intact unembalmed head, allowed to move with one degree of freedom. Further experiments, however, are necessary to confirm that this is a definitive energy criterion for skull fracture following impact. PMID:17970621

  15. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Liu, Ken C

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  16. Discrete fracture simulations of the hydrogeology at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, J.L.

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue Project site at Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia to investigate and simulate radionuclide migration in fractured rocks. Discrete fracture simulations were conducted within a cubic volume (180-m edge length) of fractured Cahill Formation schist oriented with one major axis parallel to the trend of the Koongarra Fault. Five hundred fractures are simulated within this domain. The fractures have a mean orientation parallel to the idealized plane of the Koongarra Fault dipping 55{degrees} SE. Simple flow modeling of this fracture network was conducted by assigning constant head boundaries to upgradient and downgradient vertical faces of the cube, which trend parallel to the fault. No-flow boundaries were assigned to all other faces. The fracture network allows hydraulic communication across the block, in spite of relatively low fracture density across the block.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED BEDROCK FOR STEAM INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most difficult setting in which to conduct groundwater remediation is that where chlorinated solvents have penetrated fractured bedrock. To demonstrate the potential viability of steam injection as a means of groundwater clean-up in this type of environment, steam will be in...

  18. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Economic burden of osteoporotic fractures in Austria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Osteoporotic fractures impose a huge economic burden on society. Though several cost of illness studies from other countries exist, no equivalent study has been conducted in Austria. Our study aims at assessing costs resulting from osteoporotic fractures in Austria in the year 2008 from a societal perspective. Methods We took both direct and indirect costs into consideration. Direct costs encompass medical costs such as expenses for pharmaceuticals, inpatient and outpatient medical care costs, as well as other medical services (e.g., occupational therapies). Non-medical direct costs include transportation costs and medical devices (e.g., wheel chairs or crutches). Indirect costs refer to costs of productivity losses due to absence of work. Moreover, we included costs for early retirement and opportunity costs of informal care provided by family members. For our analysis, we combined data of official statistics, expert estimates as well as unique patient surveys that are currently conducted in the course of an international osteoporotic fracture study in Austria. Results For the year 2008, the total annual financial burden incurred by osteoporotic fractures in Austria amounted to approx. €685.2 million, the largest fraction of which was due to the opportunity cost of family care (30.2%), followed by costs for hospitalization (26.6%). Conclusions The financial burden of osteoporotic fractures in Austria is substantial. Our findings may have implications for future economic analyses, and also support health care authorities in their decision making. PMID:22827971

  20. Acute compartment syndrome in patients with tibia fractures transferred for definitive fracture care.

    PubMed

    Prasarn, Mark L; Ahn, Jaimo; Achor, Timothy S; Paul, Omesh; Lorich, Dean G; Helfet, David L

    2014-04-01

    We sought to determine if patients evaluated at an outside institution for a tibia fracture and transferred to a referral hospital for fracture management were at risk for having acute compartment syndrome (ACS) on arrival. We conducted a database search for cases in which patients were referred for definitive fixation of tibia fractures, and on initial evaluation at our institution were diagnosed with ACS that necessitated fasciotomy. Incidence, demographics, fracture type, early complications, and factors that predict ACS were evaluated. Between 1996 and 2008, 9 patients (6 men, 3 women; mean age, 44.4 years) were transferred for definitive fixation of a tibia fracture and on presentation had ACS of the involved extremity (1.0% of all tibia fractures treated during this period). Two of the 9 patients developed contractures. Seven of the 9 patients had a good clinical result, and there were no amputations. There is increased risk for ACS in all patients with musculoskeletal trauma, irrespective of age, sex, fracture type, or injury mechanism. Given this risk, physicians must closely monitor patients. A patient should not be transferred until a fasciotomy is performed, if there is a significant risk of developing compartment syndrome prior to or during transport.

  1. Bone imaging and fracture risk assessment in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Sophie A; Nickolas, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    Fractures are more common and are associated with greater morbidity and morality in patients with kidney disease than in members of the general population. Thus, it is troubling that in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients there has been a paradoxical increase in fracture rates over the past 20 years compared to the general population. Increased fracture incidence in CKD patients may be driven in part by the lack of screening for fracture risk. In the general population, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the clinical standard to stratify fracture risk, and its use has contributed to decreases in fracture incidence. In contrast, in CKD, fracture risk screening with DXA has been uncommon due to its unclear efficacy in predicting fracture and its inability to predict type of renal osteodystrophy. Recently, several prospective studies conducted in patients across the spectrum of kidney disease have demonstrated that bone mineral density measured by DXA predicts future fracture risk and that clinically relevant information regarding fracture risk is provided by application of the World Health Organization cutoffs for osteopenia and osteoporosis to DXA measures. Furthermore, novel high-resolution imaging tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have been used to elucidate the effects of kidney disease on cortical and trabecular microarchitecture and bone strength and to identify potential targets for strategies that protect against fractures. This review will discuss the updated epidemiology of fractures in CKD, fracture risk screening by DXA, and the utility of state-of-the art imaging methods to uncover the effects of kidney disease on the skeleton. PMID:25744703

  2. Proton-conducting membrane based on epoxy resin-poly(vinyl alcohol)-sulfosuccinic acid blend and its nanocomposite with sulfonated multiwall carbon nanotubes for fuel-cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, Nitul; Das, Gautam; Yoon, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    A blend of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGB) in the presence of sulfosuccinic acid (SSA) was investigated as hydrolytically-stable proton-conducting membrane. The PVA modification was carried out by varying the DGB:SSA ratio (20:20, 10:20, and 5:20). A nanocomposite of the blend (20:20) was prepared with sulfonated multiwall carbon nanotubes (viz., 1, 3 and 5 wt%). The water uptake behavior and the proton conductivity of the prepared membranes were evaluated. The ionic conductivity of the membranes and the water uptake behavior depended on the s-MWCNT and the DGB contents. The ionic conductivity showed an enhancement for the blend and for the nanocomposite membrane as compared to the pristine polymer.

  3. In situ freeze-capturing of fracture water using cryogenic coring

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Wang, Joseph S.Y.; Zacny, Kris

    2004-01-29

    Current methods do not allow for sampling of in situ water from unsaturated fractures in low-moisture environments. A novel cryogenic coring technique based on the method developed by Simon and Cooper (1996) is used to collect in situ water in unsaturated fractures. This method uses liquid nitrogen as the drilling fluid, which can freeze the fracture water in place while coring. Laboratory experiments are conducted to demonstrate that water in an unsaturated fracture can be frozen and collected using cryogenic coring.

  4. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

  5. Measurements of groundwater velocity in discrete rock fractures.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, Kent; Bickerton, Greg; Lapcevic, Pat; Voralek, John; Ross, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    Estimating groundwater velocity in fracture networks using a Darcy or cubic law calculation is complicated by the wide distribution of fracture aperture often found in these systems and by the difficulty in measuring hydraulic head in discrete fracture features. Although difficult to conduct in a fractured rock setting, the point dilution method can be utilized to collect direct measurements of groundwater velocity in individual fractures. To compare measured against calculated velocities, more than 100 point dilution experiments were conducted within a 35 x 35 m area of a single fracture and in discrete fracture features within a fracture network at a larger scale. The dilution experiments were conducted by isolating a fracture feature in a borehole, measuring the hydraulic aperture, and measuring the decay of an injected tracer due to the advective groundwater flux across the fracture. Groundwater velocity was estimated using the hydraulic aperture and the rate of decay of the injected tracer. Estimates of the local hydraulic gradient were calculated via the cubic law using the velocity estimate and the hydraulic aperture. The results of the tests conducted in the single fracture show variable (1 to 33 m/day) but on average higher velocities in comparison to that measured during a natural gradient tracer experiment conducted previously (in which the effects of matrix diffusion were accounted for) and to that which would be calculated using the cubic law. Based on these results, it was determined that the best estimate of the average groundwater velocity, at the scale of the measurement area used for the cubic law calculations, could only be obtained using the largest apertures in the aperture distribution. Variability of the velocity measurements was also observed over time. Increases in velocity were attributed to the effect of rainfall although concurrent increases in hydraulic gradient were not detected (likely within the tolerance of the measuring devices

  6. Understanding Hydraulic Fracture Stimulations in Oil-Gas Developments Using Microseismicity (M<0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbancic, T.; Baig, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    effectiveness of different stimulation programs, and define the "effective fracture zone" associated with the stimulation. Knowledge of the effective fracture zone can then be used to estimate the Stimulated Reservoir Area (SRA) or Volume (SRV) associated with the treatment program and enable enhanced calculations of productivity. Using Hudson plots, changes in fracture behaviour from an opening dominated, fracture-extension regime to an ineffective closure-dominant regime, can identify Points of Diminishing Returns (PDR) as temporal points where continued stimulation of the reservoir with the same pumping regime will no longer extend the fracture network. Understanding when a fracture stage reaches a PDR enables engineers to adjust treatment plans to re-initiate fracture extension, achieve better proppant distribution or design future fracture networks to realize higher conductivity. This ability to integrate microseismic analysis with knowledge of the fracture treatment program serves as an invaluable tool for engineers who are trying to design and perform optimal fracture stimulations.

  7. Metatarsal shaft fractures and fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, Gary B; Wright, Rick W

    2006-01-01

    Metatarsal fractures represent a relatively common injury, especially in athletes. The pertinent anatomy, evaluation, diagnosis, classification, and treatment of acute and chronic (stress) metatarsal shaft fractures are discussed. Fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal, which are unique and important injuries, are also discussed. Treatment remains relatively straightforward for the traumatic metatarsal injury, whereas traditional stress fractures typically heal with decreased activity. The problematic proximal fifth metatarsal fracture (Jones fracture) frequently requires surgical intervention in patients who want to avoid non-weight-bearing cast immobilization. The authors' current treatment for this fracture includes the option of intramedullary fixation versus cast immobilization.

  8. Mixed-Mode Fracture Behavior and Related Surface Topography Feature of a Typical Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Xie, H. P.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2016-08-01

    The geo-mechanical properties of reservoirs, especially the morphology of the rock surface and the fracture properties of rocks, are of great importance in the modeling and simulation of hydraulic processes. To better understand these fundamental issues, five groups of mixed-mode fracture tests were conducted on sandstone using edge-cracked semi-circular bend specimens. Accordingly, the fracture loads, growth paths and fracture surfaces for different initial mixities of the mixed-mode loadings from pure mode I to pure mode II were then determined. A surface topography measurement for each rough fracture surface was conducted using a laser profilometer, and the fractal properties of these surfaces were then investigated. The fracture path evolution mechanism was also investigated via optical microscopy. Moreover, the mixed-mode fracture strength envelope and the crack propagation trajectories of sandstone were theoretically modeled using three widely accepted fracture criteria (i.e., the MTS, MSED and MERR criterions). The published test results in Hasanpour and Choupani (World Acad Sci Eng Tech 41:764-769, 2008) for limestone were also theoretically investigated to further examine the effectiveness of the above fracture criteria. However, none of these criteria could accurately predict the fracture envelopes of both sandstone and limestone. To better estimate the fracture strength of mixed-mode fractures, an empirical maximum tensile stress (EMTS) criterion was proposed and found to achieve good agreement with the test results. Finally, a uniformly pressurized fracture model was simulated for low pressurization rates using this criterion.

  9. First European Report of Social Wasps Trapped in Response to Acetic acid, Isobutanol, 2-Methyl-2-propanol, and Heptyl butyrate in Tests Conducted in Hungary

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five species of social wasps were captured in trapping tests in Hungary that evaluated the attractiveness of acetic acid, isobutanol, 2-methyl-2-propanol, and heptyl butyrate to social wasps. Both Vespula vulgaris (L.) and Vespula germanica (Fabr.), were captured in traps baited with isobutanol, t...

  10. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  11. Periprosthetic patellar fractures.

    PubMed

    Adigweme, Obinna O; Sassoon, Adam A; Langford, Joshua; Haidukewych, George J

    2013-10-01

    Periprosthetic patellar fractures represent a spectrum of injuries to a patient with a total knee arthroplasty. They range in severity from an inconsequential injury, which does not compromise function, to a severely debilitating injury that may require advanced reconstructive measures. This article will outline the epidemiology and risk factors associated with periprosthetic patellar fractures. Treatment options as they relate to injury mechanism, fracture severity, patellar component stability, and remaining bone stock will also be discussed. Finally, a review of the current literature regarding the results of treatment will be presented.

  12. A prototype radar fracture mapping system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a prototype radar system for fracture detection have been completed. This system uses directional antennas for both the transmitter and the receiver in a single tool which provides both the distance and the direction of a fracture in a downhole application. Electronic circuits in the system generate 50 kW peak power impulse with -100 dbm minimum detectable sensitivity. Unique downhole sampling and uphole data reconstruction techniques are used to obtain high frequency data using standard logging cable. In a recent test conducted in a lake, radar returns from a target were clearly observed. Problems encountered in the prototype and the future test plans are discussed.

  13. Surgery for scapula process fractures

    PubMed Central

    Anavian, Jack; Wijdicks, Coen A; Schroder, Lisa K; Vang, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Background Generally, scapula process fractures (coracoid and acromion) have been treated nonoperatively with favorable outcome, with the exception of widely displaced fractures. Very little has been published, however, regarding the operative management of such fractures and the literature that is available involves very few patients. Our hypothesis was that operative treatment of displaced acromion and coracoid fractures is a safe and effective treatment that yields favorable surgical results. Methods We reviewed 26 consecutive patients (27 fractures) treated between 1998 and 2007. Operative indications for these process fractures included either a painful nonunion, a concomitant ipsilateral operative scapula fracture, ≥ 1 cm of displacement on X-ray, or a multiple disruption of the superior shoulder suspensory complex. All patients were followed until they were asymptomatic, displayed radiographic fracture union, and had recovered full motion with no pain. Patients and results 21 males and 5 females, mean age 36 (18–67) years, were included in the study. 18 patients had more than one indication for surgery. Of the 27 fractures, there were 13 acromion fractures and 14 coracoid fractures. 1 patient was treated for both a coracoid and an acromion fracture. Fracture patterns for the acromion included 6 acromion base fractures and 7 fractures distal to the base. Coracoid fracture patterns included 11 coracoid base fractures and 3 fractures distal to the base. Mean follow-up was 11 (2–42) months. All fractures united and all patients had recovered full motion with no pain at the time of final follow-up. 3 patients underwent removal of hardware due to irritation from hardware components that were too prominent. There were no other complications. Interpretation While most acromion and coracoid fractures can be treated nonoperatively with satisfactory results, operative management may be indicated for displaced fractures and double lesions of the superior shoulder

  14. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  15. Effect of Surface Wettability on Nonlinear Flow in a Rough-Walled Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Yeo, I.; Park, J.; Lee, K.

    2005-12-01

    The understanding of flow behavior in rock fractures is essential to the analysis of water flow, solute transport and DNAPL migration and remediation in rock fractures. DNAPL migration and remediation in rock fractures has been an emerging issue due to its serious contamination problem and the difficulty in dealing with DNAPL trapped in rock fractures. It has been reported that while DNAPL migrates through rock fractures, DNAPL may be trapped on rock surfaces due to variable apertures and dead-end fractures, and may also change the surface wettability of rock fractures from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. In this study, the effect of surface wettability on water flow in rock fractures has been investigated. A glass replica of a real rough-walled fracture was made, and the fracture surface was brushed with corn oil to make the fracture surface hydrophobic. The corn oil was wiped off with tissues many times, to eliminate the oil remnants on the surface. Flow tests were conducted on the oil-wet fracture surface. Then, the surface was completely washed out with the cleaning agents to make the fracture surface hydrophilic, which was confirmed through contact angle measurements. Flow tests were repeated for the water-wet fracture surface. Flow tests were also carried out for a parallel glass plate fracture over the same water- and oil-wet surface conditions as in the rough fracture. In the parallel plate fracture, the hydraulic aperture from the oil-wet surface was only two percent higher that that of the water-wet surface, which indicated that the initial aperture of the fracture might not decrease by the corn-oil coating. Both oil- and water-wet surfaces of the parallel plate showed a linear flow regime, up to Reynolds number of 400. In the case of the rough fracture, the hydraulic aperture of the oil-wet fracture surface was smaller than that of the water-wet fracture surface. For the water-wet fracture surface, the non-linear flow started at Reynolds number less than 30

  16. Clogging of fractured formations by biocolloids suspended in reclaimed wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C.; Masciopinto, C.; La Mantia, R.; Manariotis, I. D.

    2009-12-01

    Two pilot-scale fractured filters consisting of horizontal limestone slabs were employed to investigate fracture aperture clogging due to deposition of biocolloids suspended in reclaimed wastewater. To better understand the behavior of real fractured aquifers, the filters intentionally were not “clean”. The fracture apertures were randomly spread with soil deposits and both filters were pre-flooded with reclaimed wastewater to simulate the field conditions of the Nardò fractured aquifer in the Salento area, Italy, where due to artificial groundwater recharge the fractures are not “clean”. One of the filters was injected with secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant collected prior to the chlorination step, and the other with exactly the same effluent, which was further treated in a commercial membrane reactor. Consequently, the organic and pathogen concentrations were considerably higher in the secondary effluent than the membrane reactor effluent. The injected wastewater was continuously recirculated. The pathogen removal by the filter was more significant for the secondary wastewater than the cleaner membrane reactor effluent. A simple mathematical model was developed to describe fracture clogging. The results suggest that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured filters can be significantly reduced from the retention of viable and inactivated biocolloids originating from reclaimed wastewater. Fracture aperture clogging is strongly related to the chemical oxygen demand of the reclaimed wastewater injected. Schematic diagram of the experimental setup.

  17. Conservative treatment of a femoral neck fracture following nail removal.

    PubMed

    Legnani, Claudio; Dondi, Alessandra; Pietrogrande, Luca

    2013-07-01

    With increased longevity, the management of fragility fractures in the elderly is becoming more frequent. In particular, hip fractures have considerable importance due to the significant morbidity and mortality. A 67-year-old woman underwent intramedullary nail (IMN) removal inserted for a pertrochanteric fracture that had occurred 20 months earlier. This was indicated due to continuous discomfort related to the protruding apex of the implant over the great trochanter. Due to pain persistence two days after surgery, a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed, documenting a minimally displaced impacted subcapital femoral neck fracture. Conservative management with close radiographic follow-up was conducted. After six months, the patient had returned to previous daily activities and a satisfactory range of motion was achieved without pain on walking. The purpose of our paper is to discuss the decision of removing hardware in the elderly osteoporotic patient and to analyze the possibility to conservatively treat an impacted minimally displaced subcapital fracture occurring after the removal of an IMN inserted previously for the treatment of a trochanteric fracture. In the elderly population with decreased bone quality, the removal of intramedullary implants of the proximal femur should be carefully evaluated, and osteoporotic patients undergoing reduction and fixation of femoral fractures should be encouraged to start antiosteoporotic therapy (bisphosphonate, teriparatide) to reduce the risk of further bone loss. Conservative treatment should be considered for the management of lesser symptomatic minimally displaced impacted fractures, where the inherent stability of the fracture allows rapid healing without further surgical attempts.

  18. Treating Tibia Fractures With Far Cortical Locking Implants.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher; Christensen, Thomas; Bottlang, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Dan; Kubiak, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional plating, the relatively new technology of far cortical locking (FCL) allows for more flexible fixation. Increased flexibility of FCL constructs is thought to better stimulate secondary osteosynthesis and lead to improved healing for certain fracture patterns. We conducted a study to compare healing rates and complications of tibial fractures treated with FCL or standard plating techniques. Twenty-two patients with fractures of the tibia (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 41ABC, 42C, 43C) were included in the study. Twelve tibia fractures were treated with FCL and 10 with standard plating (locking or nonlocking). Mean follow-up was 47 weeks in the FCL group and 41 weeks in the control group. The fracture healing rate was 92% in the FCL group and 100% in the control group (difference not statistically significant). Of note, there were 2 open fractures in the FCL group and 0 in the control group. The groups had similar complication rates. Our study data suggest FCL implants are not inferior to conventional plating techniques. Given that FCL-treated fractures tended to be more complex, the groups' similar fracture healing rates may indicate improved fracture healing with FCL technology, but this possibility requires further investigation. PMID:26991582

  19. Evaluation of borehole electromagnetic and seismic detection of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.; Suhler, S.A.; Owen, T.E.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of downhole high-frequency techniques for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. The first method used an electromagnetic wave at 30 to 300 MHz, vhf frequencies. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole vhf radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole. Similar experiments were also conducted using seismic waves at 4.5 to 6 KHz. The transmitter and the receiver in this case were located in separate boreholes. During this experiment, reflections from the slot were obtained only with the transducers oriented for shear wave illumination and detection. These results suggest that a high-frequency shear wave can also be used to detect fractures away from a borehole.

  20. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... that surgery can allow faster and more reliable healing. In children, the fracture involves the part of ... will use a special walking boot as the healing progresses. You will need to learn: How to ...

  1. Fracture Characterization of Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, K. L.; Agrawal, P.; Ostrowski, D. R.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2015-07-01

    NASA ARC has been tasked with understanding the behavior of ~100m asteroids entering the atmosphere and quantifying the impact hazard. As part of this task, we report the initial results of a survey of the fracture properties of meteorites.

  2. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Doug; Leggett, Jim

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  3. Management of condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Montazem, André H; Anastassov, George

    2009-03-01

    Management of condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy. While it appears that many condylar fractures can be managed nonsurgically, recognition of cases that require surgical intervention and selection of an appropriate procedure are paramount to success in treating these injuries. There are a variety of special considerations that are peculiar to the condylar region. This article discusses anatomic considerations, classification of condylar fractures, indications for surgery, treatment options, and complications. The goals of treatment include restoration of function and esthetics. Careful consideration and attention to the principles of fracture management, and the role of the condyle as an articulating unit and growth center, must be taken into account for the successful management of these injuries.

  4. Etiology of zygomatic fractures.

    PubMed

    Cotter, C J; Ogunbowale, A; Beirne, C

    2005-01-01

    We report on the etiology of zygomatic fractures in an Irish population. More than half of these injuries are related to interpersonal assault. Treatment of these injuries places a considerable burden on the health service. PMID:16445148

  5. Sprains, Strains and Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... are useful for finding soft issue injuries (including torn ligaments) and stress fractures. Treatment will depend on ... weeks. Professional athletes may undergo surgery to repair torn ligaments. Oral anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen, ...

  6. Lisfranc (Midfoot) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken or ligaments that support the midfoot are torn. The severity of the injury can vary from ... bones are broken (fractured) or the ligaments are torn (ruptured). Injuries can vary, from a simple injury ...

  7. Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

    MedlinePlus

    ... place and the fragments are severely out of alignment. A large bump over the fracture site may ... bone fragments are first repositioned into their normal alignment, and then held in place with special screws ...

  8. Hay balers' fractures.

    PubMed

    Mayba, I I

    1984-03-01

    Two cases of fractures of the sternum and T12 vertebra are presented, which appear to be a characteristic combination of injuries to farmers when hay bales fall on them. The mechanism of injury proposed is a severe forward flexion, producing vertebral collapse at the dorsolumbar junction, and fracture of the sternum from direct trauma against the steering wheel. These fractures should always be suspected in persons injured while baling hay. It is proposed to call this complex of injuries hay balers' fractures. Preventive measures suggested are: operator caution when hay bales are lifted; addition of locks to the loader forks; increasing the size of the loader, or placing a screen or cage over the operators to keep hay bales from falling on them.

  9. Adult orbital trapdoor fracture.

    PubMed

    Kum, Clarissa; McCulley, Timothy J; Yoon, Michael K; Hwang, Thomas N

    2009-01-01

    Trapdoor fractures occur almost exclusively in the pediatric population. The authors describe an adult with an entrapped inferior rectus muscle sheath in a trapdoor fracture. A 37-year-old man presented with persistent diplopia 3 weeks after blunt right orbital trauma. The only abnormal findings on clinical examination were limited vertical ductions. No bony defect or displacement was evident on CT. However, several small pockets of air were visible adjacent to the inferior rectus muscle. On surgical exploration, a linear nondisplaced orbital floor fracture was confirmed, and the entrapped inferior rectus muscle was released. One month postoperatively, extraocular motility had improved with no diplopia in primary or reading positions. This case demonstrates that trapdoor fractures can occur in adults and should be considered when suggestive findings are encountered. Clinicians should be aware of this because timely diagnosis and treatment might achieve more favorable outcomes.

  10. Hay balers' fractures.

    PubMed

    Mayba, I I

    1984-03-01

    Two cases of fractures of the sternum and T12 vertebra are presented, which appear to be a characteristic combination of injuries to farmers when hay bales fall on them. The mechanism of injury proposed is a severe forward flexion, producing vertebral collapse at the dorsolumbar junction, and fracture of the sternum from direct trauma against the steering wheel. These fractures should always be suspected in persons injured while baling hay. It is proposed to call this complex of injuries hay balers' fractures. Preventive measures suggested are: operator caution when hay bales are lifted; addition of locks to the loader forks; increasing the size of the loader, or placing a screen or cage over the operators to keep hay bales from falling on them. PMID:6708148

  11. Veining Failure and Hydraulic Fracturing in Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the hydraulic fracturing, the pressurized fluid creates new fractures and reactivates existing natural fractures forming a highly conductive Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) around the borehole. We extend the previous work on Lyons sandstone and pyrophyllite to anisotropic shale from the Wolfcamp formation. We divide the rock anisotropy into two groups: a) conventional and b) unconventional (shaly) anisotropy. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), compressional velocity anisotropy, and SEM analysis are used to identify three causes of anisotropy: bedding planes, clay lamination, and calcite veins. Calcite vein is a subsequently filled with calcite bonded weakly to the matrix. Velocity anisotropy and visual observations demonstrate the calcite filled veins to be mostly subparallel to the fabric direction. Brazilian tests are carried out to observe the fracture initiation and propagation under tension. High speed photography (frame rate 300,000 frame/sec) was used to capture the failure. Strain gauges and Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors recorded the deformation leading up to and during failure. SEM imaging and surface profilometry were employed to study the post-failure fracture system and failed surface topology. Fracture permeability was measured as a function of effective stress. Brazilian tests on small disks containing a centered single vein revealed the shear strength of the veins. We interpret the strain data and number, frequency, and amplitude of AE events which are correlated well with the observed fracture process zone, surface roughness, and permeability. The unpropped fracture has enhanced permeability by two orders of magnitude. The observed anisotropic tensile failure seems to have a universal trend with a minimum strength occurring at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis. The veins at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis were easily activated at 30% of the original failure load. The measured strength of the vein is as low as 6

  12. SIZE SCALING RELATIONSHIPS IN FRACTURE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas H. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    The research conducted under DOE grant DE-FG26-98FT40385 provides a detailed assessment of size scaling issues in natural fracture and active fault networks that extend over scales from several tens of kilometers to less than a tenth of a meter. This study incorporates analysis of data obtained from several sources, including: natural fracture patterns photographed in the Appalachian field area, natural fracture patterns presented by other workers in the published literature, patterns of active faulting in Japan mapping at a scale of 1:100,000, and lineament patterns interpreted from satellite-based radar imagery obtained over the Appalachian field area. The complexity of these patterns is always found to vary with scale. In general,but not always, patterns become less complex with scale. This tendency may reverse as can be inferred from the complexity of high-resolution radar images (8 meter pixel size) which are characterized by patterns that are less complex than those observed over smaller areas on the ground surface. Model studies reveal that changes in the complexity of a fracture pattern can be associated with dominant spacings between the fractures comprising the pattern or roughly to the rock areas bounded by fractures of a certain scale. While the results do not offer a magic number (the fractal dimension) to characterize fracture networks at all scales, the modeling and analysis provide results that can be interpreted directly in terms of the physical properties of the natural fracture or active fault complex. These breaks roughly define the size of fracture bounded regions at different scales. The larger more extensive sets of fractures will intersect and enclose regions of a certain size, whereas smaller less extensive sets will do the same--i.e. subdivide the rock into even smaller regions. The interpretation varies depending on the number of sets that are present, but the scale breaks in the logN/logr plots serve as a guide to interpreting the

  13. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  14. Thermodynamic transient behavior of a geothermal fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Ascencio, F.; Samaniego, F.; Cinco-Ley, H.; Rivera, J.

    1995-01-26

    This paper presents a space integrated zero dimensional model that describes the thermodynamic behavior of a geothermal fracture undergoing exploitation. The main assumptions involved are: fluid and energy entering the fracture come from the surrounding matrix, fracture of infinite conductivity, and that the steam and water phases are gravitationally segregated and in thermodynamic equilibrium. The nonlinear equations of mass and energy conservation are numerically solved. A sensitivity analysis on the main parameters that affect this problem was carried out. Water recharge is described by a linear infinite aquifer, and heat flow from the matrix to the fluid was also considered by means of a linear infinite system. The behavior of the system is clearly described for conditions of exploitation in the steam, in the water, or mixed completion in both steam and water zones.

  15. Orthobiologics in the augmentation of osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Watson, J Tracy; Nicolaou, Daemeon A

    2015-02-01

    Many orthobiologic adjuvants are available and widely utilized for general skeletal restoration. Their use for the specific task of osteoporotic fracture augmentation is less well recognized. Common conductive materials are reviewed for their value in this patient population including the large group of allograft adjuvants categorically known as the demineralized bone matrices (DBMs). Another large group of alloplastic materials is also examined-the calcium phosphate and sulfate ceramics. Both of these materials, when used for the proper indications, demonstrate efficacy for these patients. The inductive properties of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and platelet concentrates show no clear advantages for this group of patients. Systemic agents including bisphosphonates, receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) inhibitors, and parathyroid hormone augmentation all demonstrate positive effects with this fracture cohort. Newer modalities, such as trace ion bioceramic augmentation, are also reviewed for their positive effects on osteoporotic fracture healing. PMID:25431160

  16. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  17. Interlaminar fracture of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has been found to be a useful tool for understanding composite delamination. Analyses for calculating strain energy release rates associated with delamination growth have been developed. These analyses successfully characterized delamination onset and growth for particular sources of delamination. Low velocity impact has been found to be the most severe source of composite delamination. A variety of test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness are being developed to identify new composite materials with enhanced delamination resistance.

  18. Laboratory Scale Hydraulic Fracture and Proppant Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, M. D.; Rao, R. R.; Bolintineanu, D.; Lechman, J. B.; Bauer, S. J.; Quintana, E.

    2015-12-01

    A series of fracture and proppant injection tests have been conducted on Marcellus shale from an outcrop in Pennsylvania at the laboratory scale. The shale outcrop was recently exposed by new construction and shows little sign of weathering. Specimens 3 inches in diameter and nominally 6 inches long were cored (parallel to bedding) from blocks taken from the outcrop. A 3 inch hole was then cored down the center of the specimen and "cased" with 0.25 inch high pressure tubing, leaving 0.75 inches of space at the bottom of the borehole uncased. Specimens were then loaded under in an axisymmetric extension stress state and hydraulically fractured in order to generate the appropriate fracture orientation to represent the opening of a fracture in a typical long horizontal well, where fractures are "disks on a string." After fracture with water, while still under stress, a guar/proppant mixture was injected into the specimen to investigate the distribution of proppant in the fracture. Silicon carbide particles were used as proppant to assist in proppant visualization in microCT scans performed after the test was completed. Corresponding numerical analyses (using the finite element method) of the flow path and particle transport are underway, coupled with idealized flow experiments to validate the codes being used to model the particle transport. Some of the meshes being used were developed directly from CT scans. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-6111 A.

  19. Microbial processes in fractured rock environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinner, Nancy E.; Eighmy, T. Taylor; Mills, M.; Coulburn, J.; Tisa, L.

    Little is known about the types and activities of microbes in fractured rock environments, but recent studies in a variety of bedrock formations have documented the presence of a diverse array of prokaryotes (Eubacteria and Archaea) and some protists. The prokaryotes appear to live in both diffusion-dominated microfractures and larger, more conductive open fractures. Some of the prokaryotes are associated with the surfaces of the host rock and mineral precipitates, while other planktonic forms are floating/moving in the groundwater filling the fractures. Studies indicate that the surface-associated and planktonic communities are distinct, and their importance in microbially mediated processes occurring in the bedrock environment may vary, depending on the availability of electron donors/acceptors and nutrients needed by the cells. In general, abundances of microbes are low compared with other environments, because of the paucity of these substances that are transported into the deeper subsurface where most bedrock occurs, unless there is significant pollution with an electron donor. To obtain a complete picture of the microbes present and their metabolic activity, it is usually necessary to sample formation water from specific fractures (versus open boreholes), and fracture surfaces (i.e., cores). Transport of the microbes through the major fracture pathways can be rapid, but may be quite limited in the microfractures. Very low abundances of small ( 2-3 μm) flagellated protists, which appear to prey upon planktonic bacteria, have been found in a bedrock aquifer. Much more research is needed to expand the understanding of all microbial processes in fractured rock environments.

  20. Monitoring hydraulic fracturing with seismic emission volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Tang, Y.; Chen, H.; TAO, K.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have made it possible to access the reservoirs that are not available for massive production in the past. Hydraulic fracturing is designed to enhance rock permeability and reservoir drainage through the creation of fracture networks. Microseismic monitoring has been proven to be an effective and valuable technology to image hydraulic fracture geometry. Based on data acquisition, seismic monitoring techniques have been divided into two categories: downhole and surface monitoring. Surface monitoring is challenging because of the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio of the raw data. We applied the techniques used in earthquake seismology and developed an integrated monitoring system for mapping hydraulic fractures. The system consists of 20 to 30 state-of-the-art broadband seismographs, which are generally about hundreds times more sensible than regular geophones. We have conducted two experiments in two basins with very different geology and formation mechanism in China. In each case, we observed clear microseismic events, which may correspond to the induced seismicity directly associated with fracturing and the triggered ones at pre-existing faults. However, the magnitude of these events is generally larger than magnitude -1, approximately one to two magnitudes larger than those detected by downhole instruments. Spectrum-frequency analysis of the continuous surface recordings indicated high seismic energy associated with injection stages. The seismic energy can be back-projected to a volume that surrounds each injection stage. Imaging seismic emission volume (SEV) appears to be an effective way to map the stimulated reservior volume, as well as natural fractures.

  1. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Guk; Shin, Dong-Eun

    2015-01-01

    The most common fractures of the spine are associated with the thoracolumbar junction. The goals of treatment of thoracolumbar fracture are leading to early mobilization and rehabilitation by restoring mechanical stability of fracture and inducing neurologic recovery, thereby enabling patients to return to the workplace. However, it is still debatable about the treatment methods. Neurologic injury should be identified by thorough physical examination for motor and sensory nerve system in order to determine the appropriate treatment. The mechanical stability of fracture also should be evaluated by plain radiographs and computed tomography. In some cases, magnetic resonance imaging is required to evaluate soft tissue injury involving neurologic structure or posterior ligament complex. Based on these physical examinations and imaging studies, fracture stability is evaluated and it is determined whether to use the conservative or operative treatment. The development of instruments have led to more interests on the operative treatment which saves mobile segments without fusion and on instrumentation through minimal invasive approach in recent years. It is still controversial for the use of these treatments because there have not been verified evidences yet. However, the morbidity of patients can be decreased and good clinical and radiologic outcomes can be achieved if the recent operative treatments are used carefully considering the fracture pattern and the injury severity. PMID:25705347

  2. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  3. Fracture toughness of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Lulu; Fan, Feifei; Zeng, Zhi; Peng, Cheng; Loya, Phillip E; Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Jiangnan; Zhang, Xingxiang; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Zhu, Ting; Lou, Jun

    2014-04-29

    Perfect graphene is believed to be the strongest material. However, the useful strength of large-area graphene with engineering relevance is usually determined by its fracture toughness, rather than the intrinsic strength that governs a uniform breaking of atomic bonds in perfect graphene. To date, the fracture toughness of graphene has not been measured. Here we report an in situ tensile testing of suspended graphene using a nanomechanical device in a scanning electron microscope. During tensile loading, the pre-cracked graphene sample fractures in a brittle manner with sharp edges, at a breaking stress substantially lower than the intrinsic strength of graphene. Our combined experiment and modelling verify the applicability of the classic Griffith theory of brittle fracture to graphene. The fracture toughness of graphene is measured as the critical stress intensity factor of and the equivalent critical strain energy release rate of 15.9 J m(-2). Our work quantifies the essential fracture properties of graphene and provides mechanistic insights into the mechanical failure of graphene.

  4. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  5. Computer Simulation of Fracture in Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are of interest to the aerospace community primarily for their thermal properties, notably their low thermal conductivities. While the gels are typically fragile, recent advances in the application of conformal polymer layers to these gels has made them potentially useful as lightweight structural materials as well. In this work, we investigate the strength and fracture behavior of silica aerogels using a molecular statics-based computer simulation technique. The gels' structure is simulated via a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) algorithm, which produces fractal structures representing experimentally observed aggregates of so-called secondary particles, themselves composed of amorphous silica primary particles an order of magnitude smaller. We have performed multi-length-scale simulations of fracture in silica aerogels, in which the interaction b e e n two secondary particles is assumed to be described by a Morse pair potential parameterized such that the potential range is much smaller than the secondary particle size. These Morse parameters are obtained by atomistic simulation of models of the experimentally-observed amorphous silica "bridges," with the fracture behavior of these bridges modeled via molecular statics using a Morse/Coulomb potential for silica. We consider the energetics of the fracture, and compare qualitative features of low-and high-density gel fracture.

  6. Appropriate Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Lullo, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Many years ago when the author assumed the role of assistant principal for school climate, discipline, and attendance, he inherited many school policies and guidelines that were outdated, unfair, and without merit in the current school climate. Because the school conduct code had not been revised since the school opened in 1960, many of the…

  7. Analytical solutions of solute transport in a fracture-matrix system with different reaction rates for fracture and matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Jin, Menggui

    2016-08-01

    This study deals with the problem of reactive solute transport in a fracture-matrix system using both analytical and numerical modeling methods. The groundwater flow velocity in the fracture is assumed to be high enough (no less than 0.1 m/day) to ensure the advection-dominant transport in the fracture. The problem includes advection along the fracture, transverse diffusion in the matrix, with linear sorption as well as first-order reactions operative in both the fracture and the matrix. A constant-concentration boundary condition and a decay source boundary condition in the fracture are considered. With a constant-concentration source, we obtain closed-form analytical solutions that account for the transport without reaction as well as steady-state solutions with different first-order reactions in the two media. With a decay source, a semi-analytical solution is obtained. The analytical and semi-analytical solutions are in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation results obtained using COMSOL Multiphysics. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to assess the relative importance of matrix diffusion coefficient, fracture aperture, and matrix porosity. We conclude that the first-order reaction as well as the matrix diffusion in the fractured rock would decrease the solute peak concentration and shorten the penetration distance into the fracture. The solutions can be applied to assess the spatial-temporal distribution of concentrations in the fracture and the matrix as well as to assess the contaminant mass stored in the rock matrix. All of these are useful for designing remediation plans for contaminated fractured rocks or for risk assessment of contaminated fracture-matrix systems.

  8. From fractures to flow: A field-based quantitative analysis of an outcropping carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, F.; Alessandroni, M.; Antonellini, M.; Tondi, E.; Giorgioni, M.

    2010-07-01

    Fractures can play an important role in the fluid storage-migration properties of fault damage zones. In this present contribution, we document the role exerted by fractures on fluid flow in carbonate damage zones of hydrocarbon-bearing, km-long, oblique-slip normal faults with 10's of m-throw. The carbonate fault damage zones were analysed by mean of scan line surveys conducted in both tar-free and tar-rich outcrops. In this way, the relationships among the individual fracture characteristics (length, spacing, aperture, orientation, connectivity and distance from slip surfaces pertaining to small faults of the fault damage zones) and hydrocarbons have been established. Data obtained by scan line surveys were also used to compute the amount of fracture porosity, the degree of fracture connectivity and, based upon simple assumptions, the orientation of the local σhmax at times of faulting. Additionally, scan line surveys were also carried out along outcrops exposing unfaulted carbonate host rocks. The results of our computation are consistent with a carbonate host rock made up of a quite isotropic fracture array comprised of isolated and coupled fractures, in which individual fracture sets have negative exponential spacing distributions. In terms of fluid flow, the fracture array of the carbonate host rock enhances the fluid storage. Conversely, the fracture array of the fault damage zones is characterized by a pronounced anisotropy due to interconnected fractures, which enhance the fluid migration. Fractures in the fault damage zones include those inherited from background deformation and others related to the faulting processes. The latter fracture sets are characterized by power law spacing distributions. In conclusion, counter-intuitively, both fracture length and fracture spacing do not have any correlation with hydrocarbons in the fault damage zones. On the contrary, fracture anisotropy, fracture spread and fracture orientation are positively correlated with

  9. Calculation Method and Distribution Characteristics of Fracture Hydraulic Aperture from Field Experiments in Fractured Granite Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yang-Bing; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yan, E.-Chuan; Chen, Gang; Lü, Fei-fei; Ji, Hui-bin; Song, Kuang-Yin

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the fracture hydraulic aperture and its relation to the mechanical aperture and normal stress is urgently needed in engineering construction and analytical research at the engineering field scale. A new method based on the in situ borehole camera measurement and borehole water-pressure test is proposed for the calculation of the fracture hydraulic aperture. This method comprises six steps. The first step is to obtain the equivalent hydraulic conductivity of the test section from borehole water-pressure tests. The second step is a tentative calculation to obtain the qualitative relation between the reduction coefficient and the mechanical aperture obtained from borehole camera measurements. The third step is to choose the preliminary reduction coefficient for obtaining the initial hydraulic aperture. The remaining three steps are to optimize, using the genetic algorithm, the hydraulic apertures of fractures with high uncertainty. The method is then applied to a fractured granite engineering area whose purpose is the construction of an underground water-sealed storage cavern for liquefied petroleum gas. The probability distribution characteristics of the hydraulic aperture, the relationship between the hydraulic aperture and the mechanical aperture, the hydraulic aperture and the normal stress, and the differences between altered fractures and fresh fractures are all analyzed. Based on the effects of the engineering applications, the method is proved to be feasible and reliable. More importantly, the results of the hydraulic aperture obtained in this paper are different from those results elicited from laboratory tests, and the reasons are discussed in the paper.

  10. Characterization of the fracture toughness of micro-sized tungsten single crystal notched specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, Stefan; Motz, Christian; Pippan, Reinhard

    2012-05-01

    Fracture experiments using micrometer-sized notched cantilevers were conducted to investigate the possibility of determining fracture mechanical parameters for the semi-brittle material tungsten. The experiments were also used to improve the understanding of semi-brittle fracture processes for which single crystalline tungsten serves as a model material. Due to the large plastic zone in relation to the micrometer sample size, linear elastic fracture mechanics is inapplicable and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has to be applied. Conditional fracture toughness values J Q were calculated from corrected force vs. displacement diagrams. Crack growth was accessible by direct observation of in-situ experiments as well as with the help of unloading compliances. As a further tool, fracture toughness can be determined via crack tip opening displacement. The micro samples behave more ductile and exhibit higher fracture toughness values compared to macro-sized single crystals and fail by stable crack propagation.

  11. Fracture Intersection Waves: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, B.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Fractures and fracture intersections are found nearly everywhere on earth and have also been observed on planetary surfaces within our solar system. The presence of fracture intersections adds complexity to the three-dimensional flow paths through rock and alters the scattered seismic wave field in a manner that does not occur for single fractures or parallel sets of fractures. A main challenge in working with intersecting fractures is how to determine the properties of intersections, whether intersections act as barriers to flow or as highly conductive paths. In this study, we determine theoretically and experimentally that the existence and velocity of intersection waves depends on the specific stiffness of the intersection which is stress dependent. It is well known that a single block supports a wedge wave along the corner or edge of a block. Conceptually, an intersection between two orthogonal fractures can be represented as four blocks coupled along their edges or as the coupling of four wedge waves. In this study, displacement discontinuity boundary conditions (discontinuity in displacement with continuity in stress) were used to represent the coupling among the blocks that form the fractures and the fracture intersection. Based on this approach, intersection waves were derived that are dispersive and range in velocity from a single wedge-mode to the bulk shear wave velocity. For low intersection stiffness, an intersection wave travels at the single wedge wave velocity because the intersection behaves as a free surface. As the intersection stiffness increases, the intersection wave velocity increases continuously to the Rayleigh velocity when two of the blocks forming the intersection are coupled. Finally, the intersection wave velocity increases continuously to the bulk shear wave velocity as coupling between all four blocks approaches the condition of a welded interface as the stiffness of the intersection and fractures increases. The velocity of the

  12. Electrodeless conductivity.

    PubMed

    Light, T S; McHale, E J; Fletcher, K S

    1989-01-01

    Electrodeless conductivity is a technique for measuring the concentration of electrolytes in solution and utilizes a probe consisting of two toroids in close proximity, both of which are immersed in the solution. In special cases, the toroids may be mounted externally on insulated pipes carrying the solution. One toroid radiates an alternating electric field in the audiofrequency range and the other acts as a receiver to pick up the small current induced by the ions moving in a conducting loop of solution. Coatings which would foul contacting electrodes, such as suspensions, precipitates or oil, have little or no effect. Applications are chiefly to continuous measurement in the chemical processing industries, including pulp and paper, mining and heavy chemical production. The principles and practical details of the method are reviewed and cell-diameter, wall, and temperature effects are discussed. PMID:18964695

  13. Modeling Electric Current Flow in 3D Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, S.; Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a variety of research fields and applications such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon extraction and long-term storage of toxic waste. As fractures are highly conductive structures in comparison to the surrounding rock, their presence can be either an advantage or a drawback. For hydrocarbon extraction, fractures allow for quick and easy access to the resource whereas for toxic waste storage their presence increases the risk of leakage and migration of pollutants. In both cases, the identification of fracture network characteristics is an essential step. Recently, we have developed an approach for modeling electric current flow in 2D fractured media. This approach is based on a discrete-dual-porosity model where fractures are represented explicitly, the matrix is coarsely discretized into blocks, and current flow exchange between the fractures and matrix is analytically evaluated at the fracture-scale and integrated at the block-scale [1]. Although this approach has shown much promise and has proven its efficiency for 2D simulations, its extension to 3D remains to be addressed. To this end, we assume that fractures can be represented as two-dimensional finite planes embedded in the surrounding matrix, and we express analytically the distribution of electric potential at the fracture scale. This fracture-scale expression takes into account the electric-current-flow exchange with the surrounding matrix and flow conservation is enforced at the fracture intersections. The fracture-matrix exchange is then integrated at the matrix-block scale where the electric current flow conservation at the block boundaries is formulated with a modified finite volume method. With the objective of providing a low-computational-cost modeling approach adapted to 3D simulations in fractured media, our model is (i) validated and compared to existing modeling approaches and, (ii) used to evaluate the impact of the presence of fractures on

  14. Geophysical characterization of fractured bedrock at Site 8, former Pease Air Force Base, Newington, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, Thomas J.; Degnan, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Borehole-geophysical logs collected from eight wells and direct-current resistivity data from three survey lines were analyzed to characterize the fractured bedrock and identify transmissive fractures beneath the former Pease Air Force Base, Newington, N.H. The following logs were used: caliper, fluid temperature and conductivity, natural gamma radiation, electromagnetic conductivity, optical and acoustic televiewer, and heat-pulse flowmeter. The logs indicate several foliation and fracture trends in the bedrock. Two fracture-correlated lineaments trending 28? and 29?, identified with low-altitude aerial photography, are coincident with the dominant structural trend. The eight boreholes logged at Site 8 generally have few fractures and have yields ranging from 0 to 40 gallons per minute. The fractures that probably resulted in high well yields (20?40 gallons per minute) strike northeast-southwest or by the right hand rule, have an orientation of 215?, 47?, and 51?. Two-dimensional direct-current resistivity methods were used to collect detailed subsurface information about the overburden, bedrock-fracture zone depths, and apparent-dip directions. Analysis of data inversions from data collected with dipole-dipole and Schlumberger arrays indicated electrically conductive zones in the bedrock that are probably caused by fractured rock. These zones are coincident with extensions of fracture-correlated lineaments. The fracture-correlated lineaments and geophysical-survey results indicate a possible northeast-southwest anisotropy to the fractured rock.

  15. The influence of fracture anisotropy on CO2 flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Clare E.; Wightman, Ruth; Ringrose, Philip S.

    2013-04-01

    gas mitigation through geological storage of carbon dioxide is dependent on rock formations storing CO2 effectively. Secure containment for periods of 100 × 105 years nee7ds to be verifiable. The effectiveness of geological storage is reliant on the chemical and physical properties of the geological storage complex and its ability to inhibit migration of CO2. Petroleum reservoir data and field evidence show that fracture networks often act as pathways for fluid movement, potentially allowing fluids to migrate to the surface within the time scale of interest. We demonstrate the importance of predicting the effects of fracture networks on flow, using a case study from the In Salah CO2 storage site, and show how fracture permeability is closely controlled by the stress regime determining the conductive fracture network. Our results demonstrate that fracture network prediction combined with present-day stress analysis can be used to successfully predict CO2 movement in the subsurface.

  16. Water infiltration and intermittent flow in rough-walled fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Su, G.

    1995-05-01

    Flow visualization experiments were conducted in transparent replicas of natural rough-walled fractures. The fracture was inclined to observe the interplay between capillary and gravity forces. Water was introduced into the fracture by a capillary siphon. Preferential flow paths were observed, where intermittent flow frequently occurred. The water infiltration experiments suggest that intermittent flow in fractures appears to be the rule rather than the exception. In order to investigate the mechanism causing intermittent flow in fractures, parallel plates with different apertures were assembled using lucite and glass. A medium-coarse-fine pore structure is believed to cause the intermittency in flow. Intermittent flow was successfully produced in the parallel plate experiments using the lucite plates. After several trials, intermittent flow was also produced in the glass plates.

  17. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture.

  18. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  19. A 3D POM–MOF composite based on Ni(ΙΙ) ion and 2,2´-bipyridyl-3,3´-dicarboxylic acid: Crystal structure and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Meilin; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Sun, Jingjing; Duan, Xianying

    2013-06-01

    We have succeeded in constructing a 3D POM–MOF, (H[Ni(Hbpdc)(H₂O)₂]₂[PW₁₂O₄₀]·8H₂O)n (H₂bpdc=2,2´-bipyridyl-3,3´-dicarboxylic acid), by the controllable self-assembly of H₂bpdc, Keggin-anions and Ni²⁺ ions based on the electrostatic and coordination interactions. Interestingly, Hbpdc⁻ as polydentate organic ligands and Keggin-anion as polydentate inorganic ligands are covalently linked transition-metal nickel at the same time. The title complex represents a new example of introducing the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid frameworks into POMs chemistry. Based on Keggin-anions being immobilized as part of the metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework, the title complex realizes four approaches in the 1D hydrophilic channel used to engender proton conductivity in MOFs. Its water adsorption isotherm at room temperature and pressure shows that the water content in it was 31 cm³ g⁻¹ at the maximum allowable humidity, corresponding to 3.7 water molecules per unit formula. It exhibits good proton conductivities (10⁻⁴–10⁻³ S cm⁻¹) at 100 °C in the relative humidity range 35–98%. The corresponding activation energy (E{sub a}) of conductivity was estimated to be 1.01 eV. - Graphical abstract: A POM–MOF composite constructed by Keggin-type polyanion, Ni²⁺ and H₂bpdc shows good proton conductivities of 10⁻⁴–10⁻³ S cm⁻¹ at 100 °C under 35–98% RH. - Highlights: • A POM–MOF was constructed by combining metal N-heterocyclic multi-carboxylic acid framework and Keggin anion. • It opens a pathway for design and synthesis of multifunctional hybrid materials based on two building units. • Three types of potential proton-carriers have been assembled in the 1D hydrophilic channels of the POM–MOF. • It achieved such proton conductivities as 10⁻⁴–10⁻³ S cm⁻¹ at 100 °C in the RH range 35–98%.

  20. Effect of isolated fractures on accelerated flow in unsaturated porous rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Nimmo, J.R.; Dragila, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Fractures that begin and end in the unsaturated zone, or isolated fractures, have been ignored in previous studies because they were generally assumed to behave as capillary barriers and remain nonconductive. We conducted a series of experiments using Berea sandstone samples to examine the physical mechanisms controlling flow in a rock containing a single isolated fracture. The input fluxes and fracture orientation were varied in these experiments. Visualization experiments using dyed water in a thin vertical slab of rock were conducted to identify flow mechanisms occurring due to the presence of the isolated fracture. Two mechanisms occurred: (1) localized flow through the rock matrix in the vicinity of the isolated fracture and (2) pooling of water at the bottom of the fracture, indicating the occurrence of film flow along the isolated fracture wall. These mechanisms were observed at fracture angles of 20 and 60 degrees from the horizontal, but not at 90 degrees. Pooling along the bottom of the fracture was observed over a wider range of input fluxes for low-angled isolated fractures compared to high-angled ones. Measurements of matrix water pressures in the samples with the 20 and 60 degree fractures also demonstrated that preferential flow occurred through the matrix in the fracture vicinity, where higher pressures occurred in the regions where faster flow was observed in the visualization experiments. The pooling length at the terminus of a 20 degree isolated fracture was measured as a function of input flux. Calculations of the film flow rate along the fracture were made using these measurements and indicated that up to 22% of the flow occurred as film flow. These experiments, apparently the first to consider isolated fractures, demonstrate that such features can accelerate flow through the unsaturated zone and should be considered when developing conceptual models.

  1. Thrower's fracture of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Dodson, Christopher C; Ilyas, Asif M

    2014-10-01

    Thrower's fractures are spiral fractures of the humerus caused by forceful throwing of a ball. Although these fractures have been cited in the literature, little research exists regarding the significance of stress fractures and fatigue injuries that may precede these injuries. This article presents 3 cases of middle-aged recreational baseball pitchers who sustained mid to distal third spiral humerus fractures, reviews the biomechanics of a thrower's fracture, and provides a detailed review of the literature to help better understand this condition and guide treatment.

  2. Radionuclide Transport in Fracture-Granite Interface Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Mori, A

    2007-09-12

    In situ radionuclide migration experiments, followed by excavation and sample characterization, were conducted in a water-conducting shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland to study diffusion paths of radionuclides in fractured granite. In this work, we employed a micro-scale mapping technique that interfaces laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA/ICP-MS) to measure the fine-scale (micron-range) distribution of actinides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np) in the fracture-granite interface zones. Long-lived {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np were detected in flow channels, as well as in the adjacent rock matrix, using the sensitive, feature-based mapping of the LA/ICP-MS technique. The injected sorbing actinides are mainly located within the advective flowing fractures and the immediately adjacent regions. The water-conducting fracture studied in this work is bounded on one side by mylonite and the other by granitic matrix regions. These actinides did not penetrate into the mylonite side as much as the relatively higher-porosity granite matrix, most likely due to the low porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and diffusivity of the fracture wall (a thickness of about 0.4 mm separates the mylonite region from the fracture) and the mylonite region itself. Overall, the maximum penetration depth detected with this technique for the more diffusive {sup 237}Np over the field experimental time scale of about 60 days was about 10 mm in the granitic matrix, illustrating the importance of matrix diffusion in retarding radionuclide transport from the advective fractures. Laboratory tests and numerical modeling of radionuclide diffusion into granitic matrix was conducted to complement and help interpret the field results. Measured apparent diffusivity of multiple tracers in granite provided consistent predictions for radionuclide transport in the fractured granitic rock.

  3. Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures may occur in the absence of trauma or as a result of low-energy trauma in osteoporotic bone. With a growing geriatric population, the incidence of pelvic insufficiency fracture has increased over the last 3 decades and will continue to do so. These fractures can cause considerable pain, loss of independence, and economic burden to both the patient and the health care system. While many of these injuries are identified and treated based on plain radiographs, some remain difficult to diagnose. The role of advanced imaging in these cases is discussed. In addition to treating the fracture, medical comorbidities contributing to osteoporosis should be identified and corrected. Specific attention has been given to 25-OH serum vitamin D screening and repletion. Treatment generally consists of providing pain control and assisting patients with mobilization while allowing weight bearing as tolerated. In those unable to do so, invasive techniques such as sacroplasty as well as internal fixation may be beneficial. The role of operative fixation in insufficiency fractures is also discussed. PMID:26246940

  4. Frontal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies. PMID:25377971

  5. Comparing proton conductivity of polymer electrolytes by percent conducting volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Proton conductivity of sulfonated polymers plays a key role in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Mass based water uptake and ion exchange capacity of sulfonated polymers have been failed to correlating their proton conductivity. In this paper, we report a length scale parameter, percent conductivity volume, which is rather simply obtained from the chemical structure of polymer to compare proton conductivity of wholly aromatic sulfonated polymer perflurosulfonic acid. Morphology effect on proton conductivity at lower RH conditions is discussed using the percent conductivity volume parameter.

  6. Electrical and Magnetic Imaging of Proppants in Shallow Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, J. L. S.; Murdoch, L. C.; LaBrecque, D. J.; Slack, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an important tool to increase the productivity of wells used for oil and gas production, water resources, and environmental remediation. Currently there are relatively few tools available to monitor the distribution of proppants within a hydraulic fracture, or the propagation of the fracture itself. We have been developing techniques for monitoring hydraulic fractures by injecting electrically conductive, dielectric, or magnetically permeable proppants. We then use the resulting contrast with the enveloping rock to image the proppants using geophysical methods. Based on coupled laboratory and numerical modeling studies, three types of proppants were selected for field evaluation. Eight hydraulic fractures were created near Clemson, SC in May of 2015 by injecting specialized proppants at a depth of 1.5 m. The injections created shallow sub-horizontal fractures extending several meters from the injection point.Each cell had a dense array of electrodes and magnetic sensors on the surface and four shallow vertical electrode arrays that were used to obtain data before and after hydraulic fracturing. Net vertical displacement and transient tilts were also measured. Cores from 130 boreholes were used to characterize the general geometries, and trenching was used to characterize the forms of two of the fractures in detail. Hydraulic fracture geometries were estimated by inverting pre- and post-injection geophysical data. Data from cores and trenching show that the hydraulic fractures were saucer-shaped with a preferred propagation direction. The geophysical inversions generated images that were remarkably similar in form, size, and location to the ground truth from direct observation. Displacement and tilt data appear promising as a constraint on fracture geometry.

  7. Fracture-Flow-Enhanced Solute Diffusion into Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Ye, Ming; Sudicky, E.A.

    2007-12-15

    We propose a new conceptual model of fracture-flow-enhanced matrix diffusion, which correlates with fracture-flow velocity, i.e., matrix diffusion enhancement induced by rapid fluid flow within fractures. According to the boundary-layer or film theory, fracture flow enhanced matrix diffusion may dominate mass-transfer processes at fracture-matrix interfaces, because rapid flow along fractures results in large velocity and concentration gradients at and near fracture-matrix interfaces, enhancing matrix diffusion at matrix surfaces. In this paper, we present a new formulation of the conceptual model for enhanced fracture-matrix diffusion, and its implementation is discussed using existing analytical solutions and numerical models. In addition, we use the enhanced matrix diffusion concept to analyze laboratory experimental results from nonreactive and reactive tracer breakthrough tests, in an effort to validate the new conceptual model.

  8. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  10. From Stochastic toward Deterministic Characterization of Discrete Fracture Network via Thermal Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvari, M.; Jalali, M.; Bayer, P.; Jiménez Parras, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of fractures play an essential role in different disciplines, including hydrogeology, geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in the host rocks. Understanding the physical properties of these planar features would reduce the uncertainty of the numerical models and enhance the reliability of their results. Among the fracture properties, orientation and spacing are relatively easily estimated via borehole logs, core images, and outcrops, whereas the fracture geometry (i.e. length, width, and height) is more difficult to investigate. As the fracture geometry controls the hydraulic and thermal behavior of the fracture network through the strong dependency of the fracture conductivity with fracture aperture, it is possible to estimate these geometrical properties indirectly through hydraulic and thermal tomography investigations. To reach this goal, an innovative approach is introduced for discrete fracture network (DFN) characterization of heterogeneous fractured media via active thermal tracer testing. A synthetic DFN model is constructed based on the geological properties of an arbitrary fracture medium such as fracture orientation, length, spacing and persistency. Different realization are then constructed by considering all the above mentioned fracture properties except the length of fracture segments. Pressure and temperature fields are estimated inside the fracture network by means of an implicit upwind finite difference method, which is used to compute heat tracer travel times between injection and observation points and record the full temperature breakthrough curves at the monitoring points. A trans-dimensional inversion is then adopted to update the lengths fracture segment (add or remove) of the DFN model by comparison between proposed and observed travel times (Figure 1). The resulting assemble of the models can be used as an input geometry for deterministic simulations of fracture

  11. Fracture Genesis and Fracture Filling In Hydrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2009-12-01

    Steady-state models of coupled flow through fractures and porous media predict that millions of years are required to accumulate the very high hydrate saturation (>50%) necessary to form hydraulic fractures by fluid pressure buildup; however, once a fracture system is formed, it will fill with hydrate in roughly 15 kyr. This modeling is a first step towards understanding heterogeneous, fracture-hosted methane hydrate deposits that have been observed in marine hydrate systems worldwide. In fine-grained sediments, methane hydrate is frequently observed in pores as well as in veins and fractures. One possible explanation is hydrate forms in pores and fluid pressure increases until fractures form. Fluid then flows through the fractures and forms hydrate-filled fractures. To study this, we ran 1-D numerical simulations with a prescribed flow rate of methane-charged fluid through a porous medium. As hydrate forms, pores are occluded and permeability is reduced, causing an increase in fluid pressure to maintain the constant flow rate. We assume that hydraulic fractures form when the fluid pressure reaches 90% of the overburden stress. Simulations of Blake Ridge (offshore South Carolina) indicate that fractures occur after 7.4 million years with a hydrate saturation (Sh) of 95% at the base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ). Simulations of Keathley Canyon (Gulf of Mexico) achieve the fracture criterion after 7.9 million years with Sh = 54% at the base of the MHSZ. Once fractures are formed they fill with hydrate after 15,000 years. Our results indicate that the time scale of pressure buildup assuming present-day fluxes is very long, and that lower-permeability sediments require lower hydrate saturations to reach the fracture criterion. However, once fractures form, they are filled with hydrate rapidly. This suggests that fractures may provide short-term migration pathways between higher-permeability layers, but also that additional research is needed to constrain

  12. Estimating fracture geometry in the naturally fractured Antrim Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.W.; Frantz, J.H. Jr.; Hill, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The Antrim Shale of the Michigan Basin has been an active gas play with over 3,500 wells drilled over the last 5 years. There is substantial evidence that the Antrim must be fracture stimulated to be economical and that two-stage treatments provide the best results. However, due to the shallow depths (500-2300 ft) and naturally fractured nature of the Antrim, fracture geometry is complex, and determination of optimal fracture treatments is not straight forward. Because historical field comparisons did not provide insight on the optimal fracture treatments, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) instituted a field-based project for the specific purpose of evaluating the geometry of hydraulic fractures in the Antrim. Open- and cased-hole tests were performed on two separate Antrim wells - a shallow producer (600 {+-} ft) and a deep producer (1550 {+-} ft). Open-hole testing and data collection consisted of in-situ stress and mechanical property testing with Halliburton`s THE{trademark} Tool (9 tests) and a detailed suite of geophysical logs including dipole sonic logs and natural fracture detection logs. Cased-hole testing consisted of pre- and post-fracture injection/falloff tests, minifracture treatments, multiple isotope tracer and tracer logs, and treating pressure and production data analysis. The shallow depths, low in-situ stresses, and extremely fractured nature of the Antrim probably results in the preferential opening of existing fractures instead of the creation of new fracture planes. As a result, the creation of multiple fractures and severe near wellbore tortuosity is likely. Therefore, the natural fractures are responsible for increased leakoff and will greatly impact created fracture geometry. The results also suggest that creating long propped hydraulic fractures in the Antrim is not likely due to the creation of multiple fractures.

  13. Treatment of Clavicle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Paladini, P; Pellegrini, A; Merolla, G; Campi, F; Porcellini, G

    2012-01-01

    Summary Clavicle fractures are very common injuries in adults (2–5%) and children (10–15%) (1) and represent the 44–66% of all shoulder fractures (2). Despite the high frequency the choice of proper treatment is still a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. With this review we wants to focus the attention on the basic epidemiology, anatomy, classification, evaluation and management of surgical treatments in relationship with the gravity of injuries. Both conservative and surgical management are possible, and surgeons must choose the most appropriate management modality according to the biologic age, functional demands, and type of lesion. We performed a review of the English literature thought PubMed to produce an evidence-based review of current concept and management of clavicle fracture. We finished taking a comparison with our survey in order to underline our direct experience. PMID:23905044

  14. Pediatric foot fractures.

    PubMed

    Ribbans, William J; Natarajan, Ramanathan; Alavala, Sairam

    2005-03-01

    Fractures of the foot in children usually have a good prognosis and generally are treated nonoperatively. Displaced fractures of the talus and calcaneus and tarsometatarsal dislocations are rare in children and their outcome is generally good in the younger child. Older adolescents with these injuries need treatment similar to how an adult would be treated for the same injury in order to achieve a good result. Foot fractures in children may pose a diagnostic challenge particularly in the absence of obvious radiographic changes. Repeated clinical examination and judicious use of imaging techniques such as isotope bone scans and magnetic resonance imaging are needed to establish a diagnosis. Knowledge of the anatomy and significance of accessory bones of the foot and disorders of the growing foot skeleton are helpful in managing injuries of child's foot. In this study, we review common injuries of a child's foot and include a discussion on differential diagnosis.

  15. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  16. Fracture of the cuboid.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Joseph; De, Sayan; VanPelt, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Cuboid fracture accounts for a minority of all foot fractures in adults and often is indicative of a multiply injured foot. Understanding the normal anatomy and function of the cuboid and its relation to foot biomechanics is necessary for appropriate management. Clinical evaluation includes history, physical examination, and thorough assessment of the skin and soft tissues. Plain radiographs and CT are helpful in preoperative planning. Cuboid fractures may be managed either nonsurgically (splinting or casting) or surgically (closed reduction and external fixation or open reduction and internal fixation). Careful handling of the soft tissues is important, as is restoration of articular congruity, lateral column length, and a stable midfoot. Postoperative care consists of prolonged immobilization followed by 3 months of progressive weight bearing. Published reports of long-term outcomes and functional postoperative assessments are lacking. PMID:22751166

  17. Fracking, fracture, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Norris, J.; Rundle, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Injections of large volumes of water into tight shale reservoirs allows the extraction of oil and gas not previously accessible. This large volume 'super' fracking induces damage that allows the oil and/or gas to flow to an extraction well. The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for understanding super fracking. We assume that water is injected from a small spherical cavity into a homogeneous elastic medium. The high pressure of the injected water generates hoop stresses that reactivate natural fractures in the tight shales. These fractures migrate outward as water is added creating a spherical shell of damaged rock. The porosity associated with these fractures is equal to the water volume injected. We obtain an analytic expression for this volume. We apply our model to a typical tight shale reservoir and show that the predicted water volumes are in good agreement with the volumes used in super fracking.

  18. Semiautomatic fracture zone tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Matthews, Kara J.; Müller, R. Dietmar; Mazzoni, Aline; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Myhill, Robert; Chandler, Michael T.

    2015-07-01

    Oceanic fracture zone traces are widely used in studies of seafloor morphology and plate kinematics. Satellite altimetry missions have resulted in high-resolution gravity maps in which all major fracture zones and other tectonic fabric can be identified, and numerous scientists have digitized such lineaments. We have initiated a community effort to maintain low-cost infrastructure that allows seafloor fabric lineaments to be stored, accessed, and updated. A key improvement over past efforts is our processing software (released as a GMT5 supplement) that allows for semiautomatic corrections to previously digitized fracture zone traces given improved gridded data sets. Here we report on our seafloor fabric processing tools, which complement our database of seafloor fabric lineations, magnetic anomaly identifications, and plate kinematic models.

  19. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  20. Laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured Climax granite

    SciTech Connect

    Failor, R.; Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Vandergraaf, T.

    1982-06-01

    This report documents our laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured granite cores. To simulate natural conditions, our laboratory studies used naturally fractured cores and natural ground water from the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test Site. For comparison, additional tests used artificially fractured granite cores or distilled water. Relative to the flow of tritiated water, {sup 85}Sr and /sup 95m/Tc showed little or no retardation, whereas {sup 137}Cs was retarded. After the transport runs the cores retained varying amounts of the injected radionuclides along the fracture. Autoradiography revealed some correlation between sorption and the fracture fill material. Strontium and cesium retention increased when the change was made from natural ground water to distilled water. Artificial fractures retained less {sup 137}Cs than most natural fractures. Estimated fracture apertures from 18 to 60 {mu}m and hydraulic conductivities from 1.7 to 26 x 10{sup -3} m/s were calculated from the core measurements.

  1. Characterizing Fractured Rock with Geo-structural and Micro-structural Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dershowitz, William

    2015-04-01

    Fracture spatial structure and hydro-mechanical properties are key to the understanding of fractured rock geomechanical stability, hydrodynamics, and solute transport. This paper presents a quantitative approach to fracture characterization to provide information useful for stability and flow analysis, and for coupled flow/geomechanics. The approach presented is based on the concept of geo-structural, hydro-mechanical, and microstructural models. This approach is applicable for data collected from exposed surfaces (mapping, LiDAR, aero-magnetics), boreholes (core, optical images, and images based on resistivity and geophysical methods), and three dimensional imaging (seismic attributes and microseismics). Examples are presented comparing the results of conventional fracture characterization procedures and the recommended procedure. Fracture characterization for geo-structural fracture models is based on the idea that the geologically based fracture spatial pattern is the key, rather than individual fracture statistics. For example, while fracture intensity statistics can useful, the three dimensional fracture pattern for a bedded sedimentary rock can be better reproduced from the combination of a mechanical bedding model and a correlation between fracture spacing and bed height. In a fracture geo-structural model, the fracture spatial pattern, orientation, and intensity should be characterized in a combination of global and local coordinate systems. While some fracture sets may be oriented relative to the regional tectonics (the global coordinate system), other fracture sets are oriented relative to bedding (a local coordinate system). Fracture hydro-mechanical models define the combination of (a) conductive fractures, (b) flow-barrier fractures, (c) fractures which provide storage porosity, (d) fractures of significance for kinematic stability, and (e) fractures of significance for rock mass strength and deformability. The hydromechanical fractures are a subset of

  2. Evaluation of bone surrogates for indirect and direct ballistic fractures.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia; Andrecovich, Chris; DeMaio, Marlene; Dougherty, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of injury for fractures to long bones has been studied for both direct ballistic loading as well as indirect. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted on both post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) and animal surrogates which have constraints in terms of storage, preparation and testing. The identification of a validated bone surrogate for use in forensic, medical and engineering testing would provide the ability to investigate ballistic loading without these constraints. Two specific bone surrogates, Sawbones and Synbone, were evaluated in comparison to PMHS for both direct and indirect ballistic loading. For the direct loading, the mean velocity to produce fracture was 121 ± 19 m/s for the PMHS, which was statistically different from the Sawbones (140 ± 7 m/s) and Synbone (146 ± 3 m/s). The average distance to fracture in the indirect loading was .70 cm for the PMHS. The Synbone had a statistically similar average distance to fracture (.61 cm, p=0.54) however the Sawbones average distance to fracture was statistically different (.41 cm, p<0.05). Fractures patterns were found to be comparable to the PMHS for tests conducted with Synbones, however the input parameters were slightly varied to produce similar results. The fractures patterns with the Sawbones were not found to be as comparable to the PMHS. An ideal bone surrogate for ballistic testing was not identified and future work is warranted. PMID:26867672

  3. VITAL-Bone Health: rationale and design of two ancillary studies evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or omega-3 fatty acid supplements on incident fractures and bone health outcomes in the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)

    PubMed Central

    LeBoff, Meryl S.; Yue, Amy Y.; Copeland, Trisha; Cook, Nancy R.; Buring, Julie E.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Although vitamin D is widely used to promote skeletal health, definitive data on benefits and risks of supplemental vitamin D alone on bone are lacking. Results from large, randomized controlled trials in the general population are sparse. Data on the effects of supplemental omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) on bone are also limited. Design The VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the role of vitamin D3 (2000 IU/d) and omega-3 FA (1 g/d) supplements in reducing risks of cancer and cardiovascular disease among U.S. men aged ≥50 and women aged ≥55. To comprehensively test effects of supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on skeletal health, the VITAL: Effects on Fractures ancillary study is determining the effects of these supplements on incident fractures among 25,875 participants enrolled in the parent trial. Study investigators adjudicate fractures through detailed review of medical records and radiological images (hip and femur). In a complementary ancillary, VITAL: Effects on Structure and Architecture is determining the effects of supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on bone with detailed phenotyping during in-person visits. Comprehensive assessments of bone density, turnover, structure/architecture, body composition, and physical performance are being performed at baseline and 2 years post-randomization. Conclusion Results from these studies will clarify the relationship between supplemental vitamin D and/or omega-3 FAs on bone health outcomes, and inform clinical care and public health guidelines on the use of supplemental vitamin D for the primary prevention of fractures in women and men. PMID:25623291

  4. Protection of 2-(3-Thienyl)ethanol with 3-Thienylacetic Acid and Hard Cross- Linked Conducting Films by Electropolymerization of the Ester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Dass, Amala; Mulik, Sudir; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia

    2005-01-01

    The ester (compound 1) of 2-(3-thienyl)ethanol (T-etOH) with 3-thienylacetic acid was synthesized as a monomer whose two thiophene groups could be electropolymerized independently, becoming members of different polymer chains in a highly-crosslinked highly-insoluble polymer. Indeed, 1 was electropolymerized successfully alone and together with 3-methylthiophene (3MeT). Films of poly(1) are hard (3H, as opposed to less than 6B for poly(3MeT)), and the close proximity of the polymeric strands creates pi-stacking interactions. The behavior of 1 suggests that by: (a) limiting the potential used for the oxidation of monomeric esters of T-etOH at the foot of their oxidation waves (less than 1.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl); and, (b) compensating for the decrease in the electrogenerated radical concentration by increasing the monomer concentration, practically all esters of T-etOH should be electropolymerizable. This was confirmed by durable film formation from the archetypical ester of T-etOH, the 2-(3-thienyl)ethyl acetate (T-etOAc), whose homo-electropolymerization is reported for the first time.

  5. Drought tolerance, xylem sap abscisic acid and stomatal conductance during soil drying: a comparison of young plants of four temperate deciduous angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, Nancy J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.

    1998-07-01

    Patterns of water relations, xylem sap abscisic acid (ABA) concentration ([ABA]) and stomatal aperture were compared in drought-sensitive black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) and black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.), less drought-sensitive sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and drought-tolerant white oak (Quercus alba L.). Strong correlations among reduction in predawn water potential, increase in xylem sap [ABA] and stomatal closure were observed in all species. Stomatal response was more highly correlated with xylem [ABA] than with ABA flux. Xylem sap pH and ion concentrations appeared not to play a major role in the stomatal response of these species. Stomata were more sensitive to relative changes in [ABA] in drought-sensitive black walnut and black willow than in sugar maple and white oak. In the early stages of drought, increased [ABA] in the xylem sap of black walnut and black willow was probably of root origin and provided a signal to the shoot of the water status of the roots. In sugar maple and white oak, leaf water potential declined with the onset of stomatal closure, so that stomatal closure also may have occurred in response to the change in leaf water potential.

  6. [Supracondylar fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N; Gucev, S; Kirkov, Lj; Dajljevik, S; Ruso, B

    1982-01-01

    In the Department of Pediatric surgery, during the last ten years, 190 patients with supracondylar fractures (second and third degree, according to Bauman's classification) have been treated. The operation was performed in only 5% of all hospitalized cases. There were only one patient with neurological and vascular complications in the early stage, but without any complications in the late stage. The presented cases showed a high percentage of flexion type of fractures. The conservative treatment by a reposition has given the most satisfactory results.

  7. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  8. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  9. Pediatric Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Monson, Laura A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    It is wise to recall the dictum “children are not small adults” when managing pediatric orbital fractures. In a child, the craniofacial skeleton undergoes significant changes in size, shape, and proportion as it grows into maturity. Accordingly, the craniomaxillofacial surgeon must select an appropriate treatment strategy that considers both the nature of the injury and the child's stage of growth. The following review will discuss the management of pediatric orbital fractures, with an emphasis on clinically oriented anatomy and development. PMID:24436730

  10. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  11. Evaluation of a downhole tiltmeter array for monitoring hydraulic fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Engler, B.P.; Branagan, P.T.; Wilmer, R.; Wolhart, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    A series of hydraulic-fracture experiments using a downhole tiltmeter array, called an inclinometer array, was conducted at the Department of Energy (DOE)/Gas Research Institute (GRI) Multi-Site facility in Colorado. The inclinometer array was used to measure the deformation of the reservoir rock in response to hydraulic fracture opening and confirm microseismically measured results. In addition, the inclinometer array was found to be a useful tool for accurately measuring closure stress, measuring residual widths of both propped and unpropped fractures, estimating proppant distribution, and evaluating values of in situ moduli.

  12. A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bimodal, Heterogeneous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdniakov, Sergey; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-01-02

    In this paper, we consider an approach for estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix medium conductivity with spatially distributed sets of inclusions. Estimation of effective conductivity is based on a self-consistent approach introduced by Shvidler (1985). The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated numerically by using a simple system of equations for the main diagonal elements. Verification of the method is done by comparison with theoretical results for special cases and numerical results of Desbarats (1987) and our own numerical modeling. The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D fractured porous medium. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix conductivity and a spatially distributed set of highly conductive fractures. The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated for parallel- and random-oriented sets of fractures. The obtained effective conductivity values coincide with Romm's (1966) and Snow's (1969) theories for infinite fracture length. These values are also physically acceptable for the sparsely-fractured-medium case with low fracture spatial density and finite fracture length. Verification of the effective hydraulic conductivity obtained for a fractured porous medium is done by comparison with our own numerical modeling for a 3D case and with Malkovsky and Pek's (1995) results for a 2D case.

  13. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The three main treatment options for bone fractures are: Casting Open reduction, and internal fixation- this involves a surgery to repair the fracture-frequently, metal rods, screws or plates are used to repair the ...

  14. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  15. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    MedlinePlus

    ... choice depends on many factors, such as the nature of the fracture, your age and activity level, ... causing the cast to loosen. Depending on the nature of the fracture, your doctor may closely monitor ...

  16. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  17. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain More than 40 million people in the United States have osteoporosis (a decrease in the amount ...

  18. Challenges and opportunities for fractured rock imaging using 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Judith; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-02-02

    There is an increasing need to characterize discrete fractures away from boreholes to better define fracture distributions and monitor solute transport. We performed a 3D evaluation of static and time-lapse cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data sets from a limestone quarry in which flow and transport are controlled by a bedding-plane feature. Ten boreholes were discretized using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, and 2D panel measurements were inverted for a 3D distribution of conductivity. We evaluated the benefits of 3D versus 2.5D inversion of ERT data in fractured rock while including the use of borehole regularization disconnects (BRDs) and borehole conductivity constraints. High-conductivity halos (inversion artifacts) surrounding boreholes were removed in static images when BRDs and borehole conductivity constraints were implemented. Furthermore, applying these constraints focused transient changes in conductivity resulting from solute transport on the bedding plane, providing a more physically reasonable model for conductivity changes associated with solute transport at this fractured rock site. Assuming bedding-plane continuity between fractures identified in borehole televiewer data, we discretized a planar region between six boreholes and applied a fracture regularization disconnect (FRD). Although the FRD appropriately focused conductivity changes on the bedding plane, the conductivity distribution within the discretized fracture was nonunique and dependent on the starting homogeneous model conductivity. Synthetic studies performed to better explain field observations showed that inaccurate electrode locations in boreholes resulted in low-conductivity halos surrounding borehole locations. These synthetic studies also showed that the recovery of the true conductivity within an FRD depended on the conductivity contrast between the host rock and fractures. Our findings revealed that the potential exists to improve imaging of fractured

  19. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  20. Fracture analysis lowers expenses and raises production in Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report describes a fracturing treatment used for enhancing petroleum recovery in a tight sand in Wyoming. The treatment calls for a 30,000 gallon pad with linked fluid. The proppant goes into the hole in four stages starting at two pounds per gallon and increasing to four pounds per gallon and six pounds per gallon to finish at eight pounds per gallon. Afterwards, the fracture fluid flows back to the wellbore immediately which helps to reduce proppant settling and achieve conductivity.

  1. Rib fractures in coronary bypass patients: radionuclide detection

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, L.V.; Baisden, C.E.; Symbas, P.N.

    1983-08-01

    Sternal retraction can cause the first rib to be fractured posteriorly, injuring the brachial plexus. The authors conducted bone scans of 24 consecutive open-heart surgery patients and found an unexpectedly high number of rib fractures which in all but one case had not been seen on the chest radiograph. Bone scans are recommended whenever there is unexplained non-incisional pain in a patient who has undergone sternal retraction.

  2. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment guidelines for orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26246944

  3. Clinical consequences of vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1997-08-18

    People with vertebral fractures have greater pain, disability, and healthcare utilization, on average, than those without fractures. Most studies of acute pain and disability have been limited to patients with clinically diagnosed fractures (a subset of all symptomatic patients), representing about one third of all patients with fractures identified radiographically. Acute symptoms vary widely. Some patients experience intolerable pain that can be completely debilitating for several weeks or months, whereas about half of all patients with radiographically identified fractures report having had no symptoms. The reasons for this variability are unknown. Chronic pain and disability among patients with vertebral fractures are significantly greater on average than among people without fractures, even after adjusting for comorbid conditions that are common among the elderly. Similar to acute symptoms, chronic symptoms vary widely and often persist for at least several years. The risk of pain and disability increases progressively with the number and severity of vertebral deformities: the risk is multiplied several times with each additional fracture. On average, physical function is impaired among people with vertebral fractures, whether or not they currently report back pain. Declines in physical function and changes in appearance contribute to social isolation and loss of self-esteem, impairing quality of life. The cumulative impact of vertebral fractures on quality of life may rival that of hip fractures because hip fractures are less frequent and occur later in life. As many as 40% of symptomatic vertebral fractures are initially misdiagnosed, signaling a need for greater awareness among physicians and patients. Prevention of initial vertebral fractures should be actively encouraged; even if the initial fracture is asymptomatic, it indicates a greatly increased risk of subsequent fractures, pain, and physical impairment. PMID:9302895

  4. Talar fractures: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, A L; Morgan, J H

    2001-09-01

    Three case studies of fractures are presented that demonstrate the potential morbidity that these injuries can cause as well as the acceptable outcomes if treated appropriately. Two of the cases are talar fracture dislocations; the third is an osteochondral fracture of the talus. The importance of early treatment with open reduction and internal fixation is demonstrated. Success following surgical intervention in a nonhealed osteochondral fracture of the talus is also demonstrated.

  5. Return-to-activity levels in 96 athletes with stress fractures of the foot, ankle, and leg: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Heaslet, Michael W; Kanda-Mehtani, Sneh L

    2007-01-01

    Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are common in the athletic population. Because this population is especially eager to return to activity, such fractures can be challenging to treat. If the biomechanical faults are not addressed or gradual return to activity is not monitored appropriately, fractures occasionally recur. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 96 athletes who presented to a podiatric sports medicine practice over the course of 10 years with stress fractures confirmed by radiograph or bone scan. The most common type of fracture sustained by this population was tibial stress fracture, followed by second metatarsal fracture. Marathon training was the most common pre-injury activity overall, although fitness walking was the most common activity among those with metatarsal fractures. This study relates the most common types of stress fractures of the foot, ankle, and leg to certain athletic activities and correlates duration of symptoms before presentation with return-to-activity time.

  6. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Carly W.; Goto, D. M.

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  7. Management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are associated with considerable reduction of quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. The management of patients with vertebral fractures should include treatment for osteoporosis and measures to reduce pain and improve mobility. This article provides information for management and rehabilitation of vertebral fractures based on clinical experience and literature. PMID:20689689

  8. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-06-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  9. Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Architecture in Fractured Bedrock: Implications for Treatment and Plume Longevity.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; White, Erin B; Lavorgna, Graig M; Annable, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Partitioning tracer testing was performed in discrete intervals within a fractured bedrock tetrachloroethene (PCE) dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) source area to assess the fracture flow field and DNAPL architecture. Results confirmed that the partitioning tracer testing was able to identify and quantify low levels of residual DNAPL along flow paths in hydraulically conductive fractures. DNAPL fracture saturations (Sn) ranged from undetectable to 0.007 (DNAPL volume/fracture volume). A comparison of the fracture flow field to the DNAPL distribution indicated that the highest value of Sn was observed in the least transmissive fracture (or fracture zone). Application of a simple ambient dissolution model showed that the DNAPL present in this low transmissivity zone would persist longer than the DNAPL present in more transmissive fractures and would persist for 200 years (in the absence of any degradation reactions). Assessment of PCE mass distribution between the rock matrix and fractures showed that, due to the presence of DNAPL, the rock matrix accounted for less than 10% of the total PCE mass. The evaluation of PCE concentration profiles in the rock matrix and the estimated diffusional flux from the rock matrix suggest that the elevated PCE groundwater concentrations observed in the fractures likely are due to the presence of the residual DNAPL sources and that removal of the residual DNAPL sources within the fractures would result in a significant decrease in dissolved PCE concentrations in the source area.

  10. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... thigh bone. The thigh bone is called the femur. It is part of the hip joint. Hip pain is a related topic. ... to 4 hours. If you have an intertrochanteric fracture (the area below the femur neck), your surgeon will use a special metal ...

  11. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, your surgeon will make a cut to open your fracture. Your surgeon will then use special metal devices to hold your bones in place while they heal. These devices are called ... is open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). In the most ...

  12. Fracture design modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, H.B.; Crichlow, H.B.

    1980-02-07

    A design tool is discussed whereby the various components that enter the design process of a hydraulic fracturing job are combined to provide a realistic appraisal of a stimulation job in the field. An interactive computer model is used to solve the problem numerically to obtain the effects of various parameters on the overall behavior of the system.

  13. Infiltration into Fractured Bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Jones, Robert

    2007-09-01

    One potential consequence of global climate change and rapid changes in land use is an increased risk of flooding. Proper understanding of floodwater infiltration thus becomes a crucial component of our preparedness to meet the environmental challenges of projected climate change. In this paper, we present the results of a long-term infiltration experiment performed on fractured ash flow tuff. Water was released from a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) with a head of {approx}0.04 m, over a period of {approx}800 days. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns not amenable to current infiltration models, which were originally developed for infiltration into soils over a short duration. In particular, we observed that in part of the infiltration plot, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests. We suggest that these anomalies result from increases in fracture permeability during infiltration, which may be caused by swelling of clay fillings and/or erosion of infill debris. Interaction of the infiltration water with subsurface natural cavities (lithophysal cavities) could also contribute to such anomalies. This paper provides a conceptual model that partly describes the observed infiltration patterns in fractured rock and highlights some of the pitfalls associated with direct extension of soil infiltration models to fractured rock over a long period.

  14. Statistical Physics of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Alava, Mikko; Nukala, Phani K; Zapperi, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Disorder and long-range interactions are two of the key components that make material failure an interesting playfield for the application of statistical mechanics. The cornerstone in this respect has been lattice models of the fracture in which a network of elastic beams, bonds, or electrical fuses with random failure thresholds are subject to an increasing external load. These models describe on a qualitative level the failure processes of real, brittle, or quasi-brittle materials. This has been particularly important in solving the classical engineering problems of material strength: the size dependence of maximum stress and its sample-to-sample statistical fluctuations. At the same time, lattice models pose many new fundamental questions in statistical physics, such as the relation between fracture and phase transitions. Experimental results point out to the existence of an intriguing crackling noise in the acoustic emission and of self-affine fractals in the crack surface morphology. Recent advances in computer power have enabled considerable progress in the understanding of such models. Among these partly still controversial issues, are the scaling and size-effects in material strength and accumulated damage, the statistics of avalanches or bursts of microfailures, and the morphology of the crack surface. Here we present an overview of the results obtained with lattice models for fracture, highlighting the relations with statistical physics theories and more conventional fracture mechanics approaches.

  15. Bipartite patella fracture.

    PubMed

    Canizares, George H; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2003-02-01

    Bipartite patella fracture is an uncommon injury that has rarely been described in the literature. It can be quite debilitating in the competitive athlete and is often overlooked by the treating physician. A bone scan can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate treatment often results in a successful outcome.

  16. Dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, T L; Horne, J G

    1980-11-01

    A case of a rare radiocarpal fracture dislocation in a 17-year-old girl, with persisting loss of radiocarpal joint space following reduction under hematoma block, is described. The wrist joint was exposed, and two osteochondral fragments were rotated 90 degrees and secured with 2.7-mm AO screws. Satisfactory healing followed 3 months postinjury.

  17. ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mukul M. Sharma

    2005-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those

  18. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  19. Low electrolytic conductivity standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.C.; Berezansky, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The monitoring and control of the quality of feedwater and boiler water are necessary for power plants. The generation of steam at high temperature and pressure requires that contaminants be strictly limited to very low levels to prevent corrosion and scaling. Standards of low electrolytic conductivity were developed to satisfy the demands of the US Navy and American industry for the measurement of high quality water. The criteria for the selection of appropriate solvent and solutes, based on the principles of equivalent conductivity and Onsager`s limiting law, are described. Dilute solutions of potassium chloride and benzoic acid in 30% n-propanol-water have been chosen as standards. The electrolytic conductivity of both sets of these solutions as a function of molality was determined. Solutions of potassium chloride and of benzoic acid are recommended for use as 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 {micro}S/cm conductivity standards. Solutions prepared from potassium chloride in 30% n-propanol-water have been certified as Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). SRM 3198 and SRM 3199 are certified nominally at 5 and 15 {micro}S/cm, respectively, at 25.000 C.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Capillary Imbibition in Fractured Sandstone under Controlled Fracture Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Karpyn, Z. T.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures serve as primary conduits and have great impact on the migration of injected fluid into fractured permeable media. Appropriate transport properties such as relative permeability and capillary pressures are essential for successful simulation and prediction of multi-phase flow in such systems. However, the lack of thorough understanding of the dynamics governing immiscible displacement in fractured media, limit our ability to properly represent their macroscopic transport properties. The present work is one component of a multi-variable analysis of factors affecting fracture-matrix imbibition, including injection rates, fluid properties, and fracture orientation. We conduct laboratory experiments to monitor spatial and temporal evolution of saturation distributions in fractured sandstone samples. Air-brine, kerosene-brine and mixed oil-brine were used as three different fluid pairs in separate sets of experiments. Results were then mimicked using an automated history matching approach to obtain representative relative permeability and capillary pressure curves to further investigate the interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces, on predictive simulation tests. Sensitive analyses, in combination with direct experimental observation, allowed us to explore the relative importance of injection flow rate, gravity effect, and fluid properties on the evolving imbibition front. High fracture flow rates favor faster recovery from the matrix, at the expense of higher pore volume injected, and generate a sharp saturation transition at the edge of the imbibing front. Water saturation in the imbibed zone remains constant at around 0.5 to 0.6, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium in the mobility of the fluid phases. Liquid-liquid and gas-liquid imbibition results show significant differences in the shape of the imbibing front, breakthrough time, and saturation profiles. Results from this work also assist in the identification of favorable conditions for cocurrent

  1. Conducting a thermal conductivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    A physically transparent approximate theory of phonon decay rates is presented starting from a pair potential model of the interatomic forces in an insulator or semiconductor. The theory applies in the classical regime and relates the 3-phonon decay rate to the third derivative of the pair potential. Phonon dispersion relations do not need to be calculated, as sum rules relate all the needed quantities directly to the pair potential. The Brillouin zone averaged phonon lifetime turns out to involve a dimensionless measure of the anharmonicity multiplied by an effective density of states for 3-phonon decay. Results are given for rare gas and alkali halide crystals. For rare gases, the results are in good agreement with more elaborate perturbation calculations. Comparison to experimental data on phonon linewidths and thermal conductivity are made.

  2. Entablature: fracture types and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. E. S.; Blake, S.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-05-01

    Entablature is the term used to describe zones or tiers of irregular jointing in basaltic lava flows. It is thought to form when water from rivers dammed by the lava inundates the lava flow surface, and during lava-meltwater interaction in subglacial settings. A number of different fracture types are described in entablature outcrops from the Búrfell lava and older lava flows in Þjórsárdalur, southwest Iceland. These are: striae-bearing, column-bounding fractures and pseudopillow fracture systems that themselves consist of two different fracture types—master fractures with dimpled surface textures and subsidiary fractures with curved striae. The interaction of pseudopillow fracture systems and columnar jointing in the entablature produces the chevron fracture patterns that are commonly observed in entablature. Cube-jointing is a more densely fractured version of entablature, which likely forms when more coolant enters the hot lava. The entablature tiers display closely spaced striae and dendritic crystal shapes which indicate rapid cooling. Master fracture surfaces show a thin band with an evolved composition at the fracture surface; mineral textures in this band also show evidence of quenching of this material. This is interpreted as gas-driven filter pressing of late-stage residual melt that is drawn into an area of low pressure immediately preceding or during master fracture formation by ductile extensional fracture of hot, partially crystallised lava. This melt is then quenched by an influx of water and/or steam when the master fracture fully opens. Our findings suggest that master fractures are the main conduit for coolant entering the lava flow during entablature formation.

  3. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: Comparison of methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muldoon, M.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of ???10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head - and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  4. Site characterization in densely fractured dolomite: comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Maureen; Bradbury, Ken R

    2005-01-01

    One of the challenges in characterizing fractured-rock aquifers is determining whether the equivalent porous medium approximation is valid at the problem scale. Detailed hydrogeologic characterization completed at a small study site in a densely fractured dolomite has yielded an extensive data set that was used to evaluate the utility of the continuum and discrete-fracture approaches to aquifer characterization. There are two near-vertical sets of fractures at the site; near-horizontal bedding-plane partings constitute a third fracture set. Eighteen boreholes, including five coreholes, were drilled to a depth of approximately 10.6 m. Borehole geophysical logs revealed several laterally extensive horizontal fractures and dissolution zones. Flowmeter and short-interval packer testing identified which of these features were hydraulically important. A monitoring system, consisting of short-interval piezometers and multilevel samplers, was designed to monitor four horizontal fractures and two dissolution zones. The resulting network consisted of >70 sampling points and allowed detailed monitoring of head distributions in three dimensions. Comparison of distributions of hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity determined by these two approaches suggests that even in a densely fractured-carbonate aquifer, a characterization approach using traditional long-interval monitoring wells is inadequate to characterize ground water movement for the purposes of regulatory monitoring or site remediation. In addition, traditional multiwell pumping tests yield an average or bulk hydraulic conductivity that is not adequate for predicting rapid ground water travel times through the fracture network, and the pumping test response does not appear to be an adequate tool for assessing whether the porous medium approximation is valid.

  5. Foam fracturing aided by sand concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, J.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Foam fracturing is of widespread and growing interest from the Rocky Mountain region to the coastal plains of south Texas and the Appalachian basin. Improvements in technology and the increased availability of nitrogen are among the reasons. A significant development in the technology of this stimulation technique is Dowell's introduction of a sand concentrator that allows a proppant concentration at the perforations of up to 7 ppg of foam. This is a higher concentration in foam than normally can be mixed and pumped by conventional blenders and pumpers. Although the sand concentrator is able to concentrate most types of solid additives under a variety of treating conditions, it is used by Dowell almost exclusively for foam fracturing. Higher sand concentrations in the foam can provide better fracture conductivity and more sustained production increases. Examples of foam fracture treatments with the sand concentrator are given. Each example gives location, formation and perforation, pounds of sand used, highest concentration at perforations, and production (in mcf) before and after treatments.

  6. Preventable mortality in geriatric hip fracture inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, S. M.; Hardy, B. M.; Byth, P. L.; Brown, T. L.; Attia, J.; Balogh, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a high rate of mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip. We aimed to determine the rate of preventable mortality and errors during the management of these patients. A 12 month prospective study was performed on patients aged > 65 years who had sustained a fracture of the hip. This was conducted at a Level 1 Trauma Centre with no orthogeriatric service. A multidisciplinary review of the medical records by four specialists was performed to analyse errors of management and elements of preventable mortality. During 2011, there were 437 patients aged > 65 years admitted with a fracture of the hip (85 years (66 to 99)) and 20 died while in hospital (86.3 years (67 to 96)). A total of 152 errors were identified in the 80 individual reviews of the 20 deaths. A total of 99 errors (65%) were thought to have at least a moderate effect on death; 45 reviews considering death (57%) were thought to have potentially been preventable. Agreement between the panel of reviewers on the preventability of death was fair. A larger-scale assessment of preventable mortality in elderly patients who sustain a fracture of the hip is required. Multidisciplinary review panels could be considered as part of the quality assurance process in the management of these patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:1178–84. PMID:25183587

  7. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads is examined. The central objectives of the project are: (1) to report the current state of the art, and (2) recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest is the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. The authors conducted a survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  8. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. M.; Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.

    1985-01-01

    Current lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads was reviewed. The central objectives of the project were to report the current state of and recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling and forecasting subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest to NASA was the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. A survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology were conducted. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include: development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  9. Explosively produced fracture of oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-10-01

    Explosive cratering experiments were conducted as a part of the research effort to study the explosively produced fracture of oil shale. They were designed to identify and analyze the major factors involved in the fracturing of oil shale, to provide data for the verification of the computer models, and ultimately to lead to the design of a rubble bed for in situ retorting oil shale. The rubble excavated from eight cratering experiments was separated and the volumes of rubble in each screened size category are presented. Also presented are the data from the detailed investigation of the joint/fracture attitudes (strikes and dips) within a crater interior after excavation. The data were tabulated and plotted to allow future comparisons and analyses pertinent to similar experiments. A brief discussion of the experiment site and the graphical representation of the data are included. Finally, since the homogeneity of the oil shale is an important consideration in the selection of a site for these explosive fracture experiments, cores were taken and analyzed. The identification of the geological parameters and their extent and how they delineate the overall characterization of the experiment site, including the subsurface geology, is given. It is shown how the postshot core analysis will indicate how the blast affected the rock.

  10. Fracture investigation in starch-based foods.

    PubMed

    Skamniotis, C G; Patel, Y; Charalambides, M N; Elliott, M

    2016-06-01

    The study of oral processing and specifically cutting of the food piece during mastication can lead towards optimization of products for humans or animals. Food materials are complex biocomposites with a highly nonlinear constitutive response. Their fracture properties have not been largely investigated, while the need for models capable of predicting food breakdown increases. In this study, the blade cutting and the essential work of fracture (EWF) methodologies assessed the fracture behaviour of starch-based pet food. Tensile tests revealed rate-dependent stiffness and stress softening effects, attributed to viscoplasticity and micro-cracking, respectively. Cutting data were collected for 5, 10 and 30 mm s(-1) sample feed rates, whereas the EWF tests were conducted at 1.7, 3.3 and 8.3 mm s(-1) crosshead speeds corresponding to average crack speeds of 4, 7 and 15 mm s(-1), respectively. A reasonable agreement was achieved between cutting and EWF, reporting 1.26, 1.78, 1.76 kJ m(-2) and 1.52, 1.37, 1.45 kJ m(-2) values, respectively, for the corresponding crack speeds. These toughness data were used in a novel numerical model simulating the 'first' bite mastication process. A viscoplastic material model is adopted for the food piece, combined with a damage law that enabled predicting fracture patterns in the product. PMID:27274805

  11. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  12. Static and fatigue fracture characteristics of rubber modified epoxy adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, Y.; Miyazaki, K.; Fujii, T.; Okubo, H.; Nejigaka, K.; Kurosawa, K.

    1993-12-31

    A conventional epoxy adhesive is modified with Closs-linked NBR-COOH to increase the fracture toughness. This paper presents the static and fatigue fracture characteristics of the rubber modified epoxy adhesives under Mode 1 loading. The fracture toughness under static loading is measured using Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens. The energy release rate is used as a parameter of fracture toughness. Rubber contents are 2.8% and 5.5% in weight. Generally, toughened adhesives show relatively large plastic deformation ahead the crack tip. The crack extension is thought to be influenced by loading condition. Namely, monotonous loading up to the final failure gives the toughness which is different from the toughness obtained under loading-unloading condition. Therefore, two loading conditions are adopted under static loading in order to show the effect of loading history. Under cyclic loading, the fatigue crack velocity is measured with respect to number of loading cycles. The effect of rubber content on the fatigue crack growth is examined. The effect of adhesive thickness on both static and fatigue fracture also is examined. All tests are conducted at the laboratory condition at room temperature. Following conclusions are obtained from this study. The rubber modified adhesives show higher fracture toughness and fatigue resistance than unmodified one. Higher rubber content always show higher fracture toughness. The effect of rubber content on the fracture toughness is influenced by adhesive thickness. The observed fracture toughness increases with an increase of adhesive thickness while no effect of adherend thickness is found at the present condition. The stable crack extension force is higher than that at the crack starting moment. Rubber modification reduces the fatigue crack velocity. The fracture surface topology becomes different according to rubber content.

  13. The significance of incomplete skull fracture in the birth injury.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Keun; Yoon, Soo Han

    2010-05-01

    Vaginal delivery is accomplished by the force of the labor overcoming the resistance forces of birth canal. During this process, the fetal head passes through the birth canal and the skull receives pressure on the lateral aspect, resulting in molding, the convex shaping of the cranium. Also, the infant's skull is compressed by the mother's pelvic bony structures. These forces may lead to skull fractures and brain injuries. The hypothesis by the authors is that many skull fractures of the newborn present as incomplete fractures. The bony skull of the newborn is histologically primary bone tissue and which is incomplete in its ossification process. During birth the pressure forces upon the newborn's skull is gradual in one direction, rather than a sudden impact, and therefore it is thought that the skull fracture would be an incomplete fracture. However, it is very hard to ascertain the presence of incomplete fractures especially in incompletely ossified skulls with plain X-ray studies, and therefore it is possible that the real incidence of skull fractures in the newborn are higher than reported in the current and past literature. It is also probable that the external forces upon the skull that are sufficient to cause skull fractures, would also lead to significant brain injury more frequently than actually observed, and subsequently contribute to development of many brain disease later in children. The authors of this study propose that very close examination should be conducted to find incomplete fracture, and increased efforts should be made to establish the presence of possible accompanied brain injuries in babies with incomplete skull fracture. The definitive diagnosis and treatment, as well as close follow up of patients with brain injury will assist the clinician in determining the causes of neurological diseases especially in those with previously unknown etiologies, which may be due to birth injuries. Assistance may be also afforded in the early treatment

  14. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  15. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  16. Tibial Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, John J; Bowman, Eric N; Phillips, Barry B; Weinlein, John C

    2016-10-01

    Tibial stress fractures are common in the athlete. There are various causes of these fractures, the most common being a sudden increase in training intensity. Most of these injuries are treated conservatively; however, some may require operative intervention. Intervention is mostly dictated by location of the fracture and failure of conservative treatment. There are several surgical options available to the treating surgeon, each with advantages and disadvantages. The physician must understand the nature of the fracture and the likelihood for it to heal in a timely manner in order to best treat these fractures in this patient subset. PMID:27637660

  17. Risk factors for fracture in adult kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Kyla L; Zou, Guangyong; Leslie, William D; Hodsman, Anthony B; Lam, Ngan N; McArthur, Eric; Fraser, Lisa-Ann; Knoll, Gregory A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Kim, S Joseph; Garg, Amit X

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the general and transplant-specific risk factors for fractures in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of all adults who received a kidney-only transplant (n = 2723) in Ontario, Canada between 2002 and 2009. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to determine general and transplant-specific risk factors for major fractures (proximal humerus, forearm, hip, and clinical vertebral). The final model was established using the backward elimination strategy, selecting risk factors with a P-value ≤ 0.2 and forcing recipient age and sex into the model. We also assessed risk factors for other fracture locations (excluding major fractures, and fractures involving the skull, hands or feet). RESULTS: There were 132 major fractures in the follow-up (8.1 fractures per 1000 person-years). General risk factors associated with a greater risk of major fracture were older recipient age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) per 5-year increase 1.11, 95%CI: 1.03-1.19] and female sex (aHR = 1.81, 95%CI: 1.28-2.57). Transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of fracture included older donor age (5-year increase) (aHR = 1.09, 95%CI: 1.02-1.17) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) caused by diabetes (aHR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.09-2.72) or cystic kidney disease (aHR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.08-2.78) (compared to glomerulonephritis as the reference cause). Risk factors across the two fracture locations were not consistent (major fracture locations vs other). Specifically, general risk factors associated with an increased risk of other fractures were diabetes and a fall with hospitalization prior to transplantation, while length of time on dialysis, and renal vascular disease and other causes of ESRD were the transplant-specific risk factors associated with a greater risk of other fractures. CONCLUSION: Both general and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with a higher risk of fractures in kidney transplant

  18. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19–2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91–1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30–1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with

  19. The gap junction modifier, GAP-134 [(2S,4R)-1-(2-aminoacetyl)-4-benzamido-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid], improves conduction and reduces atrial fibrillation/flutter in the canine sterile pericarditis model.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Eric I; Liu, Kun; Morgan, Gwen A; Swillo, Robert E; Krueger, Julie A; Gardell, Stephen J; Butera, John; Gruver, Matthew; Kantrowitz, Joel; Feldman, Hal S; Petersen, Jørgen S; Haugan, Ketil; Hennan, James K

    2009-06-01

    Gap junction uncoupling can alter conduction pathways and promote cardiac re-entry mechanisms that potentiate many supraventricular arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL). Our objective was to determine whether GAP-134 [(2S,4R)-1-(2-aminoacetyl)-4-benzamido-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid], a small dipeptide gap junction modifier, can improve conduction and ultimately prevent AF/AFL. In rat atrial strips subjected to metabolic stress, GAP-134 prevented significantly conduction velocity slowing at 10 nM compared with vehicle (p < 0.01). In the canine sterile pericarditis model, conduction time (CT; n = 5), atrial effective refractory period (AERP; n = 3), and AF/AFL duration/inducibility (n = 16) were measured 2 to 3 days postoperatively in conscious dogs. CT was significantly faster after GAP-134 infusion (average plasma concentration, 250 nM) at cycle lengths of 300 ms (66.2 +/- 1.0 versus 62.0 +/- 1.0 ms; p < 0.001) and 200 ms (64.4 +/- 0.9 versus 61.0 +/- 1.3 ms; p < 0.001). No significant changes in AERP were noted after GAP-134 infusion. The mean number of AF/AFL inductions per animal was significantly decreased after GAP-134 infusion (2.7 +/- 0.6 versus 1.6 +/- 0.8; p < 0.01), with total AF/AFL burden being decreased from 12,280 to 6063 s. Western blot experiments showed no change in connexin 43 expression. At concentrations exceeding those described in the AF/AFL experiments, GAP-134 had no effect on heart rate, blood pressure, or any electrocardiogram parameters. In conclusion, GAP-134 shows consistent efficacy on measures of conduction and AF/AFL inducibility in the canine sterile pericarditis model. These findings, along with its oral bioavailability, underscore its potential antiarrhythmic efficacy.

  20. Density-surfactant-motivated removal of DNAPL trapped in dead-end fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, In Wook; Ji, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2003-05-01

    Three kinds of experiments were conducted to test existing methods and develop an effective methodology for the remediation of DNAPL trapped in vertical dead-end fractures. A water-flushing method failed to remove TCE from vertical dead-end fractures where no fluid flow occurs. A water-flushing experiment implies that existing remediation methods, utilizing water-based remedial fluid such as surfactant-enhanced method, have difficulty in removing DNAPL trapped from the vertical downward dead-end fractures, because of no water flow through dead-end fractures, capillary, and gravity forces. Fluid denser than TCE was injected into the fracture network, but did not displace TCE from the vertical dead-end fractures. Based on the analysis of the experiments, the increase in the density of the dense fluid and the addition of surfactant to the dense fluid were suggested, and this composite dense fluid with surfactant effectively removed TCE from the vertical dead-end fractures.

  1. Biomechanical Concepts for Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Bottlang, Michael; Schemitsch, Christine E; Nauth, Aaron; Routt, Milton; Egol, Kenneth A; Cook, Gillian E; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2015-12-01

    Application of the correct fixation construct is critical for fracture healing and long-term stability; however, it is a complex issue with numerous significant factors. This review describes a number of common fracture types and evaluates their currently available fracture fixation constructs. In the setting of complex elbow instability, stable fixation or radial head replacement with an appropriately sized implant in conjunction with ligamentous repair is required to restore stability. For unstable sacral fractures with vertical or multiplanar instabilities, "standard" iliosacral screw fixation is not sufficient. Periprosthetic femur fractures, in particular Vancouver B1 fractures, have increased stability when using 90/90 fixation versus a single locking plate. Far cortical locking combines the concept of dynamization with locked plating to achieve superior healing of a distal femur fracture. Finally, there is no ideal construct for syndesmotic fracture stabilization; however, these fractures should be fixed using a device that allows for sufficient motion in the syndesmosis. In general, orthopaedic surgeons should select a fracture fixation construct that restores stability and promotes healing at the fracture site, while reducing the potential for fixation failure.

  2. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  3. Detailed Mechanistic Investigation of Preferential Flow and Transport in Variably- Saturated Fractured Clayey Till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K. H.; Fluehler, H.; Ernstsen, V.; Klint, K. S.; Therrien, R.

    2008-12-01

    By applying fluorescence imaging with high spatial resolution (1mm2) to tracer distribution in variably saturated fractured clayey till, a mechanistic study of preferential flow and transport were performed. Tracer experiments with two fluorescent tracers, Acid Yellow (AY7) and Sulforhodamine (SB), were conducted for three different rain events under dry and wet conditions, respectively. Two-dimensional vertical apparent concentration distribution profiles of both tracers to depths of 2.8 m were delineated simultaneously using an imaging device. The profiles showed that: i) biopores formed the primarily migration paths in the upper 1.4 meters, ii) only fractures connected to hydraulically active biopores contributed to tracer migration, (iii) dead- end biopores were not active under wet conditions, (iv) under dry conditions, AY7 was displaced piston-flow like down to 20 cm below irrigation level, which was not observed for SB, (v) the highest apparent tracer pixel concentrations (per pixel) are often found in macropores particularly under dry conditions, and (vi) the maximum migration depths observed for SB and AY7 were 1.7 and 3 m below surface, respectively. To achieve a better mechanistic understanding of the different tracer migration pathways for various initial water content, rain intensities, tracer characteristics, geometry of the structural discontinuity setting, and domain properties, a detailed numerical analysis of the tracer experiments using the three-dimensional discrete fracture model HydroGeoSphere was performed. Detailed data on the geometry and hydraulic properties of the different domains of the till (two matrix units, fractures, and biopores), and tracer characteristics were incorporated in the model. Overall, the analysis showed that discontinuities control tracer migration even at high matrix suction values. Hence, the study revealed that, for any risk assessment analysis of these complex media, it is necessary to account for fast flow

  4. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  5. A comparative study of nano-SiO2 and nano-TiO2 fillers on proton conductivity and dielectric response of a silicotungstic acid-H3PO4-poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Gao, Han; Lian, Keryn

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nano-SiO2 and nano-TiO2 fillers on a thin film silicotungstic acid (SiWA)-H3PO4-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) proton conducting polymer electrolyte were studied and compared with respect to their proton conductivity, environmental stability, and dielectric properties, across a temperature range from 243 to 323 K. Three major effects of these fillers have been identified: (a) barrier effect; (b) intrinsic dielectric constant effect; and (c) water retention effect. Dielectric analyses were used to differentiate these effects on polymer electrolyte-enabled capacitors. Capacitor performance was correlated to electrolyte properties through dielectric constant and dielectric loss spectra. Using a single-ion approach, proton density and proton mobility of each polymer electrolyte were derived as a function of temperature. The results allow us to deconvolute the different contributions to proton conductivity in SiWA-H3PO4-PVA-based electrolytes, especially in terms of the effects of fillers on the dynamic equilibrium of free protons and protonated water in the electrolytes.

  6. Borehole sampling of fracture populations - compensating for borehole sampling bias in crystalline bedrock aquifers, Mirror Lake, Grafton County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, G.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Barton, C.C.; Johnson, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The clustering of orientations of hydraulically conductive fractures in bedrock at the Mirror Lake, New Hampshire fractured rock study site was investigated by comparing the orientations of fracture populations in two subvertical borehole arrays with those mapped on four adjacent subvertical roadcuts. In the boreholes and the roadcuts, the orientation of fracture populations appears very similar after borehole data are compensated for undersampling of steeply dipping fractures. Compensated borehole and pavement fracture data indicate a northeast-striking population of fractures with varying dips concentrated near that of the local foliation in the adjacent rock. The data show no correlation between fracture density (fractures/linear meter) and distance from lithologic contacts in both the boreholes and the roadcuts. The population of water-producing borehole fractures is too small (28 out of 610 fractures) to yield meaningful orientation comparisons. However, the orientation of large aperture fractures (which contains all the producing fractures) contains two or three subsidiary clusters in orientation frequency that are not evident in stereographic projections of the entire population containing all aperture sizes. Further, these subsidiary orientation clusters do not coincide with the dominant (subhorizontal and subvertical) regional fracture orientations.

  7. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  8. Laboratory investigation on the effect of in situ stresses on hydraulic fracture containment

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N. R.; Clark, J. A.; Schmidt, R. A.; Huddle, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effect of in situ stress variations on hydraulic fracture containment. Fractures were initiated in layered rock samples with prescribed stress variations, and fracture growth characteristics were determined as a function of stress levels. Stress contrasts of 2-3 MPa were found to be sufficient to restrict fracture growth in laboratory samples of Nevada tuff and Tennessee and Nugget sandstones. The required stress level was found not to depend on mechanical rock properties. However, permeability and the resultant pore pressure effects were found to be important. Tests conducted at bimaterial interfaces between Nugget and Tennessee sandstone show that the resultant stresses set up near the interface due to the applied overburden stress affect the fracture behavior in the same way as the applied confining stresses. These results provide a guideline for determining the in situ stress contrast necessary to contain a fracture in a field treatment.

  9. 3-D Mixed Mode Delamination Fracture Criteria - An Experimentalist's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Many delamination failure criteria based on fracture toughness have been suggested over the past few decades, but most only covered the region containing mode I and mode II components of loading because that is where toughness data existed. With new analysis tools, more 3D analyses are being conducted that capture a mode III component of loading. This has increased the need for a fracture criterion that incorporates mode III loading. The introduction of a pure mode III fracture toughness test has also produced data on which to base a full 3D fracture criterion. In this paper, a new framework for visualizing 3D fracture criteria is introduced. The common 2D power law fracture criterion was evaluated to produce unexpected predictions with the introduction of mode III and did not perform well in the critical high mode I region. Another 2D criterion that has been shown to model a wide range of materials well was used as the basis for a new 3D criterion. The new criterion is based on assumptions that the relationship between mode I and mode III toughness is similar to the relation between mode I and mode II and that a linear interpolation can be used between mode II and mode III. Until mixed-mode data exists with a mode III component of loading, 3D fracture criteria cannot be properly evaluated, but these assumptions seem reasonable.

  10. Identifying connections in a fractured rock aquifer using ADFTs.

    PubMed

    Halihan, Todd; Love, Andrew; Sharp, John M

    2005-01-01

    Fractured rock aquifers are difficult to characterize because of their extremely heterogeneous nature. Developing an understanding of fracture network hydraulic properties in these aquifers is difficult and time consuming, and field testing techniques for determining the location and connectivity of fractures in these aquifers are limited. In the Clare Valley, South Australia, well interference is an important issue for a major viticultural area that uses a fractured aquifer. Five fracture sets exist in the aquifer, all dipping > 25 degrees . In this setting, we evaluate the ability of steady-state asymmetric dipole-flow tests (ADFTs) to determine the connections between a test well and a set of piezometers. The procedure involves dividing a test well into two chambers using a single packer and pumping fluid from the upper chamber to the lower chamber. By conducting a series of tests at different packer elevations, an "input" signal is generated in fracture zones connected to the test well. By monitoring the "output" response of the hydraulic dipole field at piezometers, the connectivity of the fractures between the test well and piezometers can be determined. Results indicate the test well used in this study is connected in a complex three-dimensional geometry, with drawdown occurring above and below areas of potentiometric buildup. The ADFT method demonstrates that the aquifer evaluated in this study cannot be modeled effectively on the well scale using continuum flow models. PMID:15882324

  11. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications

    PubMed Central

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R.; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds. PMID:27403936

  12. Multiple cervical spinous process fractures in a novice golf player.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sei-Yoon; Chung, Sang Ki; Kim, Dong-Yun

    2012-12-01

    Avulsion of spinous process, also called Clay-shoveler's fracture, is most prevalent among those engaged in hard physical labor. To the best of the author's knowledge, only one case of multiple spinous process fractures of the upper thoracic spine in a novice golfer has been reported. A 45-year-old female present