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Sample records for acid fuchsin dye

  1. Nonlinear absorption and photoluminescence emission in nanocomposite films of Fuchsine Basic dye-polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, G.; Louie Frobel, P. G.; Sreeja, S.; Suresh, S. R.; Mayadevi, S.; Muneera, C. I.; Suchand Sandeep, C. S.; Philip, Reji; Mukharjee, Chandrachur

    2011-04-01

    Fuchsine Basic dye-polyvinyl alcohol composite films were fabricated and their structure, nonlinear absorption as well as linear absorption and photoluminescence properties were investigated. Switchover from saturable absorption to two-photon assisted excited state absorption with increase in intensity was observed in the open aperture Z-scan study (Nd:YAG, 532 nm, 7 ns). The effective two-photon absorption coefficient β was found to be several orders higher than that reported for rhodamine B. The dye-polymer films were characterized as nanocomposites with dye microdomains encapsulated between molecules of the amorphous polymer and having average surface roughness as low as ≈0.46 nm. The samples also exhibited intense photoluminescence emission when excited with 534 nm radiation.

  2. Imaging with the fluorogenic dye Basic Fuchsin reveals subcellular patterning and ecotype variation of lignification in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Nikki; Barnes, William J; Richard, Tom L; Anderson, Charles T

    2015-07-01

    Lignin is a complex polyphenolic heteropolymer that is abundant in the secondary cell walls of plants and functions in growth and defence. It is also a major barrier to the deconstruction of plant biomass for bioenergy production, but the spatiotemporal details of how lignin is deposited in actively lignifying tissues and the precise relationships between wall lignification in different cell types and developmental events, such as flowering, are incompletely understood. Here, the lignin-detecting fluorogenic dye, Basic Fuchsin, was adapted to enable comparative fluorescence-based imaging of lignin in the basal internodes of three Brachypodium distachyon ecotypes that display divergent flowering times. It was found that the extent and intensity of Basic Fuchsin fluorescence increase over time in the Bd21-3 ecotype, that Basic Fuchsin staining is more widespread and intense in 4-week-old Bd21-3 and Adi-10 basal internodes than in Bd1-1 internodes, and that Basic Fuchsin staining reveals subcellular patterns of lignin in vascular and interfascicular fibre cell walls. Basic Fuchsin fluorescence did not correlate with lignin quantification by acetyl bromide analysis, indicating that whole-plant and subcellular lignin analyses provide distinct information about the extent and patterns of lignification in B. distachyon. Finally, it was found that flowering time correlated with a transient increase in total lignin, but did not correlate strongly with the patterning of stem lignification, suggesting that additional developmental pathways might regulate secondary wall formation in grasses. This study provides a new comparative tool for imaging lignin in plants and helps inform our views of how lignification proceeds in grasses.

  3. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of acid fuchsin in aqueous solution using separate porous tetragonal-CuFe2O4 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jing, Panpan; Li, Jianan; Pan, Lining; Wang, Jianbo; Sun, Xiaojun; Liu, Qingfang

    2015-03-01

    To develop a new promising magnetic photocatalyst, homogeneous tetragonal-CuFe2O4 (t-CuFe2O4) nanotubes were successfully synthesized via the electrospinning technique followed by heating treatment. The detailed investigation of chemical phase and microstructure reveals that the obtained samples are inversely spinel CuFe2O4 nanotubes with an average diameter of about 272±2nm, which are assembled by numerous CuFe2O4 single crystal nanoparticles with regular polyhedron structure and possess a very outstanding porous feature. Furthermore, element mapping, UV-vis adsorption spectrum, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, and magnetic hysteresis loop indicate that these t-CuFe2O4 nanotubes have uniform component distribution, strong light response in the range of 200 nm-800 nm, considerable specific surface area of 12.8 m(2)/g and porosity of 15.5 nm, and enough magnetization of about 18 emu/g. Therefore, the t-CuFe2O4 nanotubes show an excellent catalytic activity and durability for the photodecomposition of acid fuchsin dye in aqueous solution under a simulated sunlight source. Furthermore, these CuFe2O4 nanotubes could be acted as an eco-friendly and recyclable photocatalyst because they can be efficiently separated from the residual solution. Finally, a mechanism is presented for the significant photocatalytic performance of the porous CuFe2O4 nanotubes.

  4. Functional chitosan-stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron used to remove acid fuchsine with the assistance of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Zechao; Yu, Bing; Chen, Zhengxian; Chen, Zuliang

    2016-01-20

    Chitosan-stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (CS-nZVI) was prepared and used for the removal of acid fuchsine (AF) from aqueous solution with the assistance of ultrasound. More than 98.9% of AF was removed using CS-nZVI, aged CS-nZVI (exposed to air for 2 months), while only 14.6% removal efficiency was achieved after 15 min by chitosan alone with the assistance of ultrasound. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that chitosan polymers were arranged in a homocentric layered structure. Thus, the polymer can prevent the aggregation of nZVI and increase their anti-oxidation capacity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) also suggested that the chitosan used in synthesis may protect nZVI nanoparticles from air oxidation. Different factors impacting on the removal of AF using CS-nZVI showed that the reduction increased when dosage and temperature increased, but decreased when pH and initial concentration rose. Kinetic studies revealed that the removal of AF fitted well to the pseudo-first-order model. The apparent activation energy was 55.34 kJ/mol, indicating a chemically controlled reaction. Finally, the application of CS-nZVI in dyeing wastewater led to a removal efficiency of 99% of AF, while the reuse test confirmed that AF's removal efficiency declined from 99.6 to 39.3% after seven cycles.

  5. Functional chitosan-stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron used to remove acid fuchsine with the assistance of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Zechao; Yu, Bing; Chen, Zhengxian; Chen, Zuliang

    2016-01-20

    Chitosan-stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (CS-nZVI) was prepared and used for the removal of acid fuchsine (AF) from aqueous solution with the assistance of ultrasound. More than 98.9% of AF was removed using CS-nZVI, aged CS-nZVI (exposed to air for 2 months), while only 14.6% removal efficiency was achieved after 15 min by chitosan alone with the assistance of ultrasound. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that chitosan polymers were arranged in a homocentric layered structure. Thus, the polymer can prevent the aggregation of nZVI and increase their anti-oxidation capacity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) also suggested that the chitosan used in synthesis may protect nZVI nanoparticles from air oxidation. Different factors impacting on the removal of AF using CS-nZVI showed that the reduction increased when dosage and temperature increased, but decreased when pH and initial concentration rose. Kinetic studies revealed that the removal of AF fitted well to the pseudo-first-order model. The apparent activation energy was 55.34 kJ/mol, indicating a chemically controlled reaction. Finally, the application of CS-nZVI in dyeing wastewater led to a removal efficiency of 99% of AF, while the reuse test confirmed that AF's removal efficiency declined from 99.6 to 39.3% after seven cycles. PMID:26572450

  6. Synthesis and characterizations of Fe3O4-acid fuchsin tagged poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenarathi, Balakrishnan; Kannammal, Lingasamy; Palanikumar, Shanmugavel; Anbarasan, Ramasamy

    2014-04-01

    Ring opening polymerization (ROP) of caprolactone (CL) was carried out at different experimental conditions such as variation in [M], [M/I] and temperature under N2 atmosphere at 160 °C for 2 h with mild stirring condition by using acid fuchsin (AF) decorated Fe3O4 as a novel chemical initiator with the aid of stannous octoate as an effective catalyst. Thus, prepared polymer nano composite samples were characterised by various analytical techniques such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), vibrating sample measurement (VSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Presence of Fe2p and Fe3p was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. It was found that while increasing the [M/I] the melt transition values were increased. The surface catalytic effect of Fe3O4/AF hybrid system towards the ROP of CL was also studied.

  7. Preparation and characterization of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) nanoparticle decorated graphene sheets and their utilization for the elimination of basic fuchsin and indigo carmine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Belma Zengin; Durmus, Zehra; Durmus, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this study, graphene nano sheets, prepared with chemical oxidation and reduction routes via modified-Hummer method, were successfully decorated with platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) nanoparticles. Structural and morphological features of resulted graphene-metal nanocomposites were characterized with FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TEM methods. Anti-oxidant activity (AOA) values of nanocomposites were determined. The IC50 values of Pt-graphene and Pd-graphene nanocomposites were found to be 46.1 and 90.2 μg/mL, respectively based on the ABTS method and 80.2 and 143.7 μg/mL according to the DPPH method. It was found that the graphene-metal nanocomposites exhibited superior free radical scavenging activity compared to several types of noble metal nano particles although the nanocomposites consist of much lower amount of active metal sites than the nano-crystalline metal powders. It was consequently reported that the graphene-metal nanocomposites could be successfully used for the photocatalytic elimination of fuchsin and indigo carmine dyes under light irradiation.

  8. A histochemical comparison of methylene-blue/acid fuchsin with hematoxylin and eosin for differentiating calcification of stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Kale, A D; Hallikeremath, S R; Kotrashetti, V S

    2012-05-01

    Benign and malignant connective tissue tumors consist of a fibrous component that contains varying amounts of one or more types of bone or other calcified tissue. Diagnosis of these connective tissue tumors often poses challenges for pathologists, because it is difficult to differentiate the organic matrix of osteoid from hyalinized stroma. To establish a definitive diagnosis, it sometimes is advantageous to demonstrate histologically by special staining either the type of calcification or the presence or absence of calcification. We compared the efficacy of methylene blue-acid fuchsin (MB-AF) to hematoxylin and eosin (H-E) for connective tissue tumors suspected to contain calcifications and to devise an optimal staining technique for calcification that would be specific, simple, and cost- and time-effective. We examined 50 benign and 45 malignant connective tissue tumors that were suspected to contain calcifications. Sections were stained with H-E and MB-AF and evaluated. MB-AF stained bone pink, which contrasted with blue soft tissue. After MB-AF staining, osteoid was faint pink in a blue stromal background. Osteoid was not visualized in H-E stained sections; it was stained the same shade of pink as stromal tissue. Dystrophic calcification and cementum could be identified equally well using either staining technique, but contrast was better after H-E staining. MB-AF staining of bone was comparable to H-E staining and could be used effectively to stain bone and osteoid. MB-AF is a simple, single step procedure. It also stains cementum blue with faint blue rimming and dystrophic calcification bluish-pink, but it cannot be used as a specific stain for types of calcification other than bone and osteoid.

  9. Bioremediation of dyes by fungi isolated from contaminated dye effluent sites for bio-usability.

    PubMed

    Rani, Babita; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Jagvijay; Bisht, Sandeep; Teotia, Priyanku; Sharma, Shivesh; Kela, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradation and detoxification of dyes, Malachite green, Nigrosin and Basic fuchsin have been carried out using two fungal isolates Aspergillus niger, and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, isolated from dye effluent soil. Three methods were selected for biodegradation, viz. agar overlay and liquid media methods; stationary and shaking conditions at 25 °C. Aspergillus niger recorded maximum decolorization of the dye Basic fuchsin (81.85%) followed by Nigrosin (77.47%), Malachite green (72.77%) and dye mixture (33.08%) under shaking condition. Whereas, P. chrysosporium recorded decolorization to the maximum with the Nigrosin (90.15%) followed by Basic fuchsin (89.8%), Malachite green (83.25%) and mixture (78.4%). The selected fungal strains performed better under shaking conditions compared to stationary method; moreover the inoculation of fungus also brought the pH of the dye solutions to neutral from acidic. Seed germination bioassay study exhibited that when inoculated dye solutions were used, seed showed germination while uninoculated dyes inhibited germination even after four days of observation. Similarly, microbial growth was also inhibited by uninoculated dyes. The excellent performance of A. niger and P. chrysporium in the biodegradation of textile dyes of different chemical structures suggests and reinforces the potential of these fungi for environmental decontamination.

  10. Bioremediation of dyes by fungi isolated from contaminated dye effluent sites for bio-usability.

    PubMed

    Rani, Babita; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Jagvijay; Bisht, Sandeep; Teotia, Priyanku; Sharma, Shivesh; Kela, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradation and detoxification of dyes, Malachite green, Nigrosin and Basic fuchsin have been carried out using two fungal isolates Aspergillus niger, and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, isolated from dye effluent soil. Three methods were selected for biodegradation, viz. agar overlay and liquid media methods; stationary and shaking conditions at 25 °C. Aspergillus niger recorded maximum decolorization of the dye Basic fuchsin (81.85%) followed by Nigrosin (77.47%), Malachite green (72.77%) and dye mixture (33.08%) under shaking condition. Whereas, P. chrysosporium recorded decolorization to the maximum with the Nigrosin (90.15%) followed by Basic fuchsin (89.8%), Malachite green (83.25%) and mixture (78.4%). The selected fungal strains performed better under shaking conditions compared to stationary method; moreover the inoculation of fungus also brought the pH of the dye solutions to neutral from acidic. Seed germination bioassay study exhibited that when inoculated dye solutions were used, seed showed germination while uninoculated dyes inhibited germination even after four days of observation. Similarly, microbial growth was also inhibited by uninoculated dyes. The excellent performance of A. niger and P. chrysporium in the biodegradation of textile dyes of different chemical structures suggests and reinforces the potential of these fungi for environmental decontamination. PMID:25477943

  11. Bioremediation of dyes by fungi isolated from contaminated dye effluent sites for bio-usability

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Babita; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Jagvijay; Bisht, Sandeep; Teotia, Priyanku; Sharma, Shivesh; Kela, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradation and detoxification of dyes, Malachite green, Nigrosin and Basic fuchsin have been carried out using two fungal isolates Aspergillus niger, and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, isolated from dye effluent soil. Three methods were selected for biodegradation, viz. agar overlay and liquid media methods; stationary and shaking conditions at 25 °C. Aspergillus niger recorded maximum decolorization of the dye Basic fuchsin (81.85%) followed by Nigrosin (77.47%), Malachite green (72.77%) and dye mixture (33.08%) under shaking condition. Whereas, P. chrysosporium recorded decolorization to the maximum with the Nigrosin (90.15%) followed by Basic fuchsin (89.8%), Malachite green (83.25%) and mixture (78.4%). The selected fungal strains performed better under shaking conditions compared to stationary method; moreover the inoculation of fungus also brought the pH of the dye solutions to neutral from acidic. Seed germination bioassay study exhibited that when inoculated dye solutions were used, seed showed germination while uninoculated dyes inhibited germination even after four days of observation. Similarly, microbial growth was also inhibited by uninoculated dyes. The excellent performance of A. niger and P. chrysporium in the biodegradation of textile dyes of different chemical structures suggests and reinforces the potential of these fungi for environmental decontamination. PMID:25477943

  12. The specificity of caries detector dyes in cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Yip, H K; Stevenson, A G; Beeley, J A

    1994-06-11

    The specificity of two caries detector dyes (0.5% basic fuchsin and 1.0% acid red) was investigated in vitro using extracted human permanent and deciduous teeth. Although the dyes stained carious dentine, sound circumpulpal dentine and the enamel-dentine junction could also be stained. Backscattered electron imaging showed that the level of mineralisation in these two parts of the tooth was lower than in normal dentine. Susceptibility to dye staining therefore appears to be a feature of reduced mineral content rather than being specific for a carious lesion. Whilst use of basic fuchsin should be avoided in view of its carcinogenic potential and ability to stain sound coronal dentine, acid red should also be used with caution and its use on the pulpal surface of deep cavity preparations would appear to be contraindicated. Use of these dyes may result in the unnecessary removal of sound dentine.

  13. Mechanical and dye adsorption properties of graphene oxide/chitosan composite fibers prepared by wet spinning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Sun, Jiankun; Du, Qiuju; Zhang, Luhui; Yang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Shaoling; Xia, Yanzhi; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Linhua; Cao, Anyuan

    2014-02-15

    Graphene oxide/chitosan composite fibers were prepared by a wet spinning method, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Experimental results showed that the introduction of graphene oxide at 4 wt% loading can improve the tensile strengths of chitosan fibers. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effect of various parameters, such as the initial pH value, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature on adsorption of fuchsin acid dye. The Langmuir model was used to fit the experimental data of adsorption isotherm, and kinetic studies showed that the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second order model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of fuchsin acid dye on graphene oxide/chitosan fibers was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Our results indicate that the graphene oxide/chitosan fibers have excellent mechanical properties and can serve as a promising adsorbent for the removal of dyes from aqueous solutions.

  14. Study of the release of a microencapsulated acid dye in polyamide dyeing using mixed cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Isabel S C; Castanheira, Elisabete M S; Rocha Gomes, Jaime I N; Real Oliveira, M Elisabete C D

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this work was to increase the retarding effect of the acid dye Telon(®) Blue RR (C.I. Acid Blue 62; DyStar, Frankfurt, Germany) release on polyamide fibres dyeing by encapsulation of the dye in liposomes as an alternative to synthetic auxiliaries, in order to reduce effluent pollution. The retarding effect achieved with the use of mixed cationic liposomes of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB)/soybean lecithin (containing a 10% molar fraction of DODAB) was better in comparison with either pure soybean lecithin liposomes or synthetic auxiliaries. The retarding effect of liposomes on the dye release was analysed through changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the acid dye at different conditions. The effect of temperature (in the range of 25 °C - 70 °C) on the spectroscopic behaviour of the dye in the absence and in presence of polyamide was also studied, in order to simulate the dyeing conditions. Exhaustion curves obtained in dyeing experiments showed that, below 45 °C, the retarding effect of the mixed liposomes (lecithin/DODAB (9:1)) was similar to that of the auxiliaries, but better than the one of pure lecithin liposomes. At higher temperatures (above 45 °C), the system lecithin/DODAB presents a better performance, achieving a higher final exhaustion level when compared with the commercial leveling agent without losing the smoothing effect of lecithin.

  15. Synthesis, characterisation of polyaniline-Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposite and its application for removal of an acid violet 19 dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Manohar R.; Khairnar, Subhash D.; Shrivastava, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The present work deals with the development of a new method for the removal of dyes from an aqueous solution using polyaniline (PANI)-Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposite. It is synthesised in situ through self-polymerisation of monomer aniline. Photocatalytic degradation studies were carried out for cationic acid violet 19 (acid fuchsine) dye using PANI-Fe3O4 nanocomposite in aqueous solution. Different parameters like catalyst dose, contact time and pH have been studied to optimise reaction condition. The optimum conditions for the removal of the dye are initial concentration 20 mg/l, adsorbent dose 6 gm/l, pH 7. The EDS technique gives elemental composition of synthesised PANI-Fe3O4. The SEM and XRD studies were carried for morphological feature characteristics of PANI-Fe3O4 nanocomposite. The VSM (vibrating sample magnetometer) gives magnetic property of PANI-Fe3O4 nanocomposite; also FT-IR analysis gives characteristics frequency of synthesised PANI-Fe3O4. Besides the above studies kinetic study has also been carried out.

  16. Selective staining of animal chromosomes with synthetic dyes following iodine-dye-procedure.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M K

    1975-01-01

    The paper embodies results of the use of 51 synthetic dyes, belonging to different chemical groups for staining of animal chromosomes following iodine-dye procedure. It has been found that some of these dyes can replace gentian violet, crystal violet and safranin when used after this procedure. It has further been found that the fluorescent dyes, acriflavine and acridine yellow can also be used to stain animal chromosomes and that some of the dyes belonging to one chemical group can be successfully used whereas others of the same group are of no use. Dyes of the monoazo group are absolutely useless. Amongst the dyes successfully used, the preparations remain stable when stained with most of them except methyl green, malachite green, brillant green, iodine green and cresyl violet and amongst acid dyes, acid fuchsin. Cytochemical studies presented herein indicate that the components of the animal chromosomes stainable with crystal violet are the nucleic acids and that these substances should be highly polymerised and should not be even in a semi-degraded state. Removal of any one of these nucleic acids makes the chromosomes unstainable with iodine-crystal violet.

  17. Selection for Spontaneous "Escherichia coli" Streptomycin Mutants Using Basic Fuchsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkosz, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    An exercise that uses a common bacterium, E. coli, in great numbers, to detect a demonstrable change in the ability of some cells to become resistant to the common antibiotic streptomycin is presented. The procedure for preparing and pouring the gradient antibiotic plates is provided. The advantages of using the Basic Fuchsin in the agar are…

  18. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN P-12-276) is subject to reporting under...

  4. Chitosan and chemically modified chitosan beads for acid dyes sorption.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Kamari; Wan Saime, Wan Ngah; Lai Ken, Liew

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities of chitosan and chitosan-EGDE (ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) beads for removing Acid Red 37 (AR 37) and Acid Blue 25 (AB 25) from aqueous solution were examined. Chitosan beads were cross-linked with EGDE to enhance its chemical resistance and mechanical strength. Experiments were performed as a function of pH, agitation period and concentration of AR 37 and AB 25. It was shown that the adsorption capacities of chitosan for both acid dyes were comparatively higher than those of chitosan-EGDE. This is mainly because cross-linking using EGDE reduces the major adsorption sites -NH3+ on chitosan. Langmuir isotherm model showed the best conformity compared to Freundlich and BET. The kinetic experimental data agreed very well to the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The desorption study revealed that after three cycles of adsorption and desorption by NaOH and HCl, both adsorbents retained their promising adsorption abilities. FT-IR analysis proved that the adsorption of acid dyes onto chitosan-based adsorbents was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that chitosan and chitosan-EGDE beads were favourable adsorbers and could be employed as low-cost alternatives for the removal of acid dyes in wastewater treatment. PMID:19634439

  5. The Electropolymerization and Characterizations of Acid Red Dye Doped Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Liang, Fei-Yue; Liao, Jia-Xing; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Yi-Ping; Xian, Ze-Yu

    2016-05-01

    The electrochromic properties of an electrochemical polymerized composite consisted of polyaniline doped with acid red dye (PANI-ARD) are reported. The structures of PANIARD were characterized via cycle voltammograms, spectroelectrochemistry and colorimetric analysis. Film of the PANI-ARD composites of different concentrations appears violet, aubergine in the neutral state and darkblue in the oxidized state, which are different from the pure PANI of yellow (-0.8V) and blue (1.0V). The oxidation and reduction response speed of PANI-ARD was a bit lower than those obtained in pure PANI. It is shown that acid dye doping is an effective method to broaden the color change range of the electrochromicmateials.

  6. Caries detector dyes--an in vitro assessment of some new compounds.

    PubMed

    Ansari, G; Beeley, J A; Reid, J S; Foye, R H

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the caries detector dyes, basic fuchsin and acid red, lack specificity. Accordingly, their clinical use can lead to the unnecessary removal of sound tissue. In the present study, the specificity of three further dyes, Carbolan Green, Coomassie Blue and Lissamine Blue was studied. Carious dentine was removed in vitro by means of rotary instruments until the cavities were deemed caries free by conventional clinical criteria. Experimental dyes were applied to the cavity floors, all of which became stained. Stained dentine was removed from half the cavity by means of a burr, the other half remaining as a control. Further stain was then applied and the procedure repeated until no further reduction of the staining of the cavity floor could be achieved. Light microscopy of ground sections of experimental teeth showed that sound tissue had been removed unnecessarily from the experimental half of the cavity due to the lack of specificity of these dyes. This lack of specificity of staining was similar to basic fuchsin and acid red. Only Carbolan Green showed possible differential staining between control and experimental sites, but this was not caries specific. If a clinically useful dye is to be developed, it would need to specifically stain either bacteria in infected dentine and/or the carious degradation products of dentine matrix.

  7. NiO(111) nanosheets as efficient and recyclable adsorbents for dye pollutant removal from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhi; Chen, Lifang; Hu, Juncheng; Richards, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Semiconductor single-crystalline polar NiO(111) nanosheets with well-defined hexagonal holes have been investigated for application in dye adsorption and combustion processes. With regard to adsorption technologies, high surface area metal oxides have an advantage over activated carbon in that the adsorbed species can be combusted and the adsorbent reused in the case of metal oxides while regeneration of activated carbon remains challenging and thus the adsorbent/adsorbate system must be disposed of. Here, three typical textile dyes, reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin red, were studied for removal from wastewater with two NiO systems and activated carbon. These studies revealed that the NiO(111) nanosheets exhibited much more favorable adsorptive properties than conventionally prepared nickel oxide powder (CP-NiO) obtained from thermal decomposition of nickel nitrate. The maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on NiO(111) nanosheets reached 30.4 mg g-1, 35.15 mg g-1 and 22 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid, respectively, while the maximum adsorption capabilities of the three dyes on CP-NiO were only 8.4, 13.2 and 12 mg g-1 for reactive brilliant red X-3B, congo red and fuchsin acid. To simulate the adsorption isotherm, two commonly employed models, the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms, were selected to explicate the interaction of the dye and NiO(111). The isotherm evaluations revealed that the Langmuir model demonstrated better fit to experimental equilibrium data than the Freundlich model. The maximum predicted adsorption capacity was 36.1 mg g-1. In addition, adsorption kinetic data of NiO(111) followed a pseudo-second-order rate for congo red. These studies infer that NiO(111) nanosheets possess desirable properties for application in adsorption and combustion applications.

  8. Salicylic Acid-Based Organic Dyes Acting as the Photosensitizer for Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungjun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Han, Ah-Reum; Ko, Kwan-Woo; Eom, Jin Hee; Namgoong, Sung Keon; Lo, Alvie S V; Gordon, Keith C; Yoon, Sungho; Han, Chi-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    A D-π-A metal-free organic dye, featuring salicylic acid as a novel acceptor/anchoring unit, has been designed, synthesized and applied to dye-sensitized solar cell. The detailed photophysical, electrochemical, photovoltaic and sensitizing properties of the organic dye were investigated, in addition to the computational studies of the dye and dye-(TiO2)6 system. A solar cell device using this new organic dye as a sensitizer produced a solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.49% (J(sc) = 6.69 mAcm-2, V(oc) = 0.74 V and ff = 0.70) under 100 mWcm(-2) simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation, demonstrating that the salicylic acid-based organic dye is a suitable alternative to currently used organometallic dyes.

  9. Salicylic Acid-Based Organic Dyes Acting as the Photosensitizer for Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungjun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Han, Ah-Reum; Ko, Kwan-Woo; Eom, Jin Hee; Namgoong, Sung Keon; Lo, Alvie S V; Gordon, Keith C; Yoon, Sungho; Han, Chi-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    A D-π-A metal-free organic dye, featuring salicylic acid as a novel acceptor/anchoring unit, has been designed, synthesized and applied to dye-sensitized solar cell. The detailed photophysical, electrochemical, photovoltaic and sensitizing properties of the organic dye were investigated, in addition to the computational studies of the dye and dye-(TiO2)6 system. A solar cell device using this new organic dye as a sensitizer produced a solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.49% (J(sc) = 6.69 mAcm-2, V(oc) = 0.74 V and ff = 0.70) under 100 mWcm(-2) simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation, demonstrating that the salicylic acid-based organic dye is a suitable alternative to currently used organometallic dyes. PMID:27483839

  10. Bacterial Decolorization of Textile Azo Dye Acid Orange by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajat Pratap; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Lakhan

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain RMLRT03 with ability to decolorize textile dye Acid Orange dye was isolated from textile effluent contaminated soil of Tanda, Ambedkar Nagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). The decolorization studies were performed in Bushnell and Haas medium (BHM) amended with Acid Orange dye. The bacterial strain was identified as Staphylococcus hominis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence. The bacterial strain exhibited good decolorization ability with glucose and yeast extract supplementation as cosubstrate in static conditions. The optimal condition for the decolorization of Acid Orange dye by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03 strain were at pH 7.0 and 35°C in 60 h of incubation. The bacterial strain could tolerate high concentrations of Acid Orange dye up to 600 mg l-1. The high decolorizing activity under natural environmental conditions indicates that the bacterial strain has practical application in the treatment of dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25253925

  11. Bacterial Decolorization of Textile Azo Dye Acid Orange by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajat Pratap; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Lakhan

    2014-05-01

    A bacterial strain RMLRT03 with ability to decolorize textile dye Acid Orange dye was isolated from textile effluent contaminated soil of Tanda, Ambedkar Nagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). The decolorization studies were performed in Bushnell and Haas medium (BHM) amended with Acid Orange dye. The bacterial strain was identified as Staphylococcus hominis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence. The bacterial strain exhibited good decolorization ability with glucose and yeast extract supplementation as cosubstrate in static conditions. The optimal condition for the decolorization of Acid Orange dye by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03 strain were at pH 7.0 and 35°C in 60 h of incubation. The bacterial strain could tolerate high concentrations of Acid Orange dye up to 600 mg l(-1). The high decolorizing activity under natural environmental conditions indicates that the bacterial strain has practical application in the treatment of dye containing wastewaters.

  12. Hierarchically porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen hybrid materials towards highly efficient and selective adsorption of organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lala; Zhang, Xiaofei; Tang, Yusheng; Su, Kehe; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchically macro/micro-porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen (Si-C-N) hybrid material was presented with novel functionalities of totally selective and highly efficient adsorption for organic dyes. The hybrid material was conveniently generated by the pyrolysis of commercial polysilazane precursors using polydivinylbenzene microspheres as sacrificial templates. Owing to the Van der Waals force between sp-hybridized carbon domains and triphenyl structure of dyes, and electrostatic interaction between dyes and Si-C-N matrix, it exhibites high adsorption capacity and good regeneration and recycling ability for the dyes with triphenyl structure, such as methyl blue (MB), acid fuchsin (AF), basic fuchsin and malachite green. The adsorption process is determined by both surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion. According to the Langmuir model, the adsorption capacity is 1327.7 mg.g-1 and 1084.5 mg.g-1 for MB and AF, respectively, which is much higher than that of many other adsorbents. On the contrary, the hybrid materials do not adsorb the dyes with azo benzene structures, such as methyl orange, methyl red and congro red. Thus, the hierarchically porous Si-C-N hybrid material from a facile and low cost polymer-derived strategy provides a new perspective and possesses a significant potential in the treatment of wastewater with complex organic pollutants.

  13. Hierarchically porous silicon–carbon–nitrogen hybrid materials towards highly efficient and selective adsorption of organic dyes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lala; Zhang, Xiaofei; Tang, Yusheng; Su, Kehe; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchically macro/micro-porous silicon–carbon–nitrogen (Si–C–N) hybrid material was presented with novel functionalities of totally selective and highly efficient adsorption for organic dyes. The hybrid material was conveniently generated by the pyrolysis of commercial polysilazane precursors using polydivinylbenzene microspheres as sacrificial templates. Owing to the Van der Waals force between sp2-hybridized carbon domains and triphenyl structure of dyes, and electrostatic interaction between dyes and Si-C-N matrix, it exhibites high adsorption capacity and good regeneration and recycling ability for the dyes with triphenyl structure, such as methyl blue (MB), acid fuchsin (AF), basic fuchsin and malachite green. The adsorption process is determined by both surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion. According to the Langmuir model, the adsorption capacity is 1327.7 mg·g−1 and 1084.5 mg·g−1 for MB and AF, respectively, which is much higher than that of many other adsorbents. On the contrary, the hybrid materials do not adsorb the dyes with azo benzene structures, such as methyl orange, methyl red and congro red. Thus, the hierarchically porous Si–C–N hybrid material from a facile and low cost polymer-derived strategy provides a new perspective and possesses a significant potential in the treatment of wastewater with complex organic pollutants. PMID:25604334

  14. Hierarchically porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen hybrid materials towards highly efficient and selective adsorption of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lala; Zhang, Xiaofei; Tang, Yusheng; Su, Kehe; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchically macro/micro-porous silicon-carbon-nitrogen (Si-C-N) hybrid material was presented with novel functionalities of totally selective and highly efficient adsorption for organic dyes. The hybrid material was conveniently generated by the pyrolysis of commercial polysilazane precursors using polydivinylbenzene microspheres as sacrificial templates. Owing to the Van der Waals force between sp-hybridized carbon domains and triphenyl structure of dyes, and electrostatic interaction between dyes and Si-C-N matrix, it exhibites high adsorption capacity and good regeneration and recycling ability for the dyes with triphenyl structure, such as methyl blue (MB), acid fuchsin (AF), basic fuchsin and malachite green. The adsorption process is determined by both surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion. According to the Langmuir model, the adsorption capacity is 1327.7 mg·g(-1) and 1084.5 mg·g(-1) for MB and AF, respectively, which is much higher than that of many other adsorbents. On the contrary, the hybrid materials do not adsorb the dyes with azo benzene structures, such as methyl orange, methyl red and congro red. Thus, the hierarchically porous Si-C-N hybrid material from a facile and low cost polymer-derived strategy provides a new perspective and possesses a significant potential in the treatment of wastewater with complex organic pollutants. PMID:25604334

  15. Study on the removal of acid dyes using chitosan as a natural coagulant/coagulant aid.

    PubMed

    Zonoozi, M H; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Arami, M

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan was selected as a natural coagulating agent for the removal of acid dyes (Acid Blue 292; AB292, and Acid Red 398; AR398) from dye-containing solutions. The study was organised in two phases. In phase 1, chitosan was used alone as a natural coagulant for the removal of the dyes. For this purpose, the effect of different parameters including pH, chitosan dosage and initial dye concentration on the dye removal efficiency was examined. In phase 2 of the study, the application of chitosan as a natural coagulant aid in conjunction with polyaluminium chloride (PAC) was assessed. According to the results of phase 1, the best removal efficiencies occurred in an acidic pH range (less than 6) for both of the dyes. Also, excellent dye removal results (about 90%) were achieved with relatively low dosages of chitosan (30-35 mg L(-1) for AB292 and 50-60 mg L(-1) for AR398). However, the initial concentration of the dyes severely influenced the coagulation performance of chitosan, which can constrain the performance of chitosan as a natural coagulant. On the basis of the results of phase 2, chitosan, as a natural coagulant aid, noticeably enhanced the dye removal efficiency of PAC, especially in the case of AB292. Small amounts of chitosan (3 or 5 mg L(-1)) enhanced the dye removal efficiency of PAC up to 2.5 times for AB292.

  16. Permanent hair dye-incorporated hyaluronic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Young; Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Da-Hye; Choi, Ki-Choon

    2013-01-01

    We prepared p-phenylenediamine (PDA)-incorporated nanoparticles using hyaluronic acid (HA). PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles have spherical shapes and sizes were less than 300 nm. The results of FT-IR spectra indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between amine group of PDA and carboxyl group of HA. Furthermore, powder-X-ray diffractogram (XRD) measurement showed that intrinsic crystalline peak of PDA disappeared by formation of nanoparticle with HA at XRD measurement. These results indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation. At drug release study, the higher PDA contents induced faster release rate from nanoparticles. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles showed reduced intrinsic toxicity against HaCaT human keratinocyte cells at MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We suggest that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles are promising candidates for novel permanent hair dye. PMID:23088321

  17. Permanent hair dye-incorporated hyaluronic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Young; Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Da-Hye; Choi, Ki-Choon

    2013-01-01

    We prepared p-phenylenediamine (PDA)-incorporated nanoparticles using hyaluronic acid (HA). PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles have spherical shapes and sizes were less than 300 nm. The results of FT-IR spectra indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between amine group of PDA and carboxyl group of HA. Furthermore, powder-X-ray diffractogram (XRD) measurement showed that intrinsic crystalline peak of PDA disappeared by formation of nanoparticle with HA at XRD measurement. These results indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation. At drug release study, the higher PDA contents induced faster release rate from nanoparticles. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles showed reduced intrinsic toxicity against HaCaT human keratinocyte cells at MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We suggest that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles are promising candidates for novel permanent hair dye.

  18. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara; Suyitno, Arifin, Zainal; Sutanto, Bayu

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, EHOMO and ELUMO was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where Ered = -0.37V, ELUMO = -4.28 eV, Eox = 1.15V, EHOMO = -5.83 eV, and Eband gap = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  19. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors. PMID:26362681

  20. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors.

  1. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  2. Mineralization of sulfonated azo dyes and sulfanilic acid by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Streptomyces chromofuscus.

    PubMed

    Paszczynski, A; Pasti-Grigsby, M B; Goszczynski, S; Crawford, R L; Crawford, D L

    1992-11-01

    Five 14C-radiolabeled azo dyes and sulfanilic acid were synthesized and used to examine the relationship between dye substitution patterns and biodegradability (mineralization to CO2) by a white-rot fungus and an actinomycete. 4-Amino-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(3-sulfo-4-aminophenylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid were used as representative compounds having sulfo groups or both sulfo and azo groups. Such compounds are not known to be present in the biosphere as natural products. The introduction of lignin-like fragments into the molecules of 4-amino-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(3-sulfo-4-aminophenylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid by coupling reactions with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) resulted in the formation of the dyes 4-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(2-sulfo-3'-methoxy-4'-hydroxy-azobenzene-4-azo)-[U-14C]benzenesulf oni c acid, respectively. The synthesis of acid azo dyes 4-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid also allowed the abilities of these microorganisms to mineralize these commercially important compounds to be evaluated. Phanerochaete chrysosporium mineralized all of the sulfonated azo dyes, and the substitution pattern did not significantly influence the susceptibility of the dyes to degradation. In contrast, Streptomyces chromofuscus was unable to mineralize aromatics with sulfo groups and both sulfo and azo groups. However, it mediated the mineralization of modified dyes containing lignin-like substitution patterns. This work showed that lignocellulolytic fungi and bacteria can be used for the biodegradation of anionic azo dyes, which thus far have been considered among the xenobiotic compounds most resistant to biodegradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer for sulfonic acid dyes prepared by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Li, Rong; Tan, Jin; Jiang, Zi-Tao

    2013-03-30

    A novel titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized through sol-gel process with sunset yellow (Sun) as template, without use of functional monomer. MIP was used as a solid-phase extraction material for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in beverages. The results showed that MIP exhibited better selectivity, higher recovery and adsorption capacity for the sulfonic acid dyes compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP). MIP presented highest extraction selectivity to Sun when pH less than or equal to 3. The adsorption capacity was 485.9 mg g(-1), which was larger than that of NIP (384.7 mg g(-1)). The better clean-up ability demonstrated the capability of MIP for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in complicated food samples. The mean recoveries for the sulfonic acid dyes on MIP were from 81.9% to 97.2% in spiked soft drink.

  4. Sulfanilic acid: behavioral change related to azo food dyes in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Goldenring, J R; Batter, D K; Shaywitz, B A

    1982-01-01

    The effects of sulfanilic acid, a major azo food dye metabolite, were studied in normal developing rat pups and pups treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (60HDA). Chronic daily intraperitoneal injection of sulfanilic acid during the first postnatal month elicited hyperactivity and impaired shock escape performance in vehicle pups. No differences were noted in 60HDA treated rat pups receiving sulfanilic acid. These findings, which are similar to the results of our study of chronic administration of a food dye mix, suggest that sulfanilic acid may be one of the causative agents in food dye-induced behavioral changes in developing rats. While our work suggests a significant effect of azo food dyes on the developing rat central nervous system, species differences in parameters such as absorption, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier properties do not permit any extrapolation of these observations to proposed effects in children.

  5. Aerobic biodegradation of azo dye Acid Black-24 by Bacillus halodurans.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus halodurans MTCC 865 was employed for decolorization of textile azo dye, Acid Black-24 (AB-24). Thousand mgl⁻¹ of AB-24 was decolorized with 90% efficiency by the strain within 6 hrs at pH 9 and 37 °C with 5% NaCl under static conditions in screening medium. Decolorization was evaluated by measuring the periodic decrease in absorbance at 557 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of Acid Black-24 was determined by FTIR and HPLC. The FTIR spectrum of the AB-24 dye suggests the presence of azo bond (-N = N-) peak at 1618.28 cm⁻¹. Absence of the azo bond in the degraded sample spectrum indicates biodegradation of the dye. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed degradation of the azo dye, Acid Black-24 by Bacillus halodurans.

  6. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  7. Visualizing acidophilic microorganisms in biofilm communities using acid stable fluorescence dyes.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Sina; Arnold, Thuro; Schweder, Bernd; Bernhard, Gert

    2010-07-01

    Bacteria in acidophilic biofilm communities, i.e. acid streamers and snottites, obtained from a subsurface mine in Königstein were visualized by fluorescence microscopy using four new fluorescent dyes (DY-601XL, V07-04118, V07-04146, DY-613). The pH of the bulk solution in which these bacteria thrive was pH 2.6 to 2.9. The new fluorescent dyes were all able to clearly stain and microscopically visualize in-situ the bacteria within the biofilm community without changing pH or background ion concentration. The commonly used fluorescent dyes DAPI and SYTO 59 were also applied for comparison. Both dyes, however, were not able to visualize any bacteria in-situ, since they were not stable under the very acid conditions. In addition, dye V07-04118 and dye DY-613 also possess the ability to stain larger cells which were presumably eukaryotic origin and may be attributed to yeast cells or amoeba-like cells. PCR analyses have shown that the dominant bacterial species in these acidophilic biofilm communities was a gram negative bacterium of the species Ferrovum myxofaciens. The presented four new dyes are ideal for in-situ investigations of microorganisms occurring in very acid conditions, e.g. in acidophilic biofilm communities when in parallel information on pH sensitive incorporated fluorescent heavy metals should be acquired.

  8. Effect of nucleic acid binding dyes on DNA extraction, amplification, and STR typing.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Kobus, Hilton J; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    We report on the effects of six dyes used in the detection of DNA on the process of DNA extraction, amplification, and detection of STR loci. While dyes can be used to detect the presence of DNA, their use is restricted if they adversely affect subsequent DNA typing processes. Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye, GelGreen™, GelRed™, RedSafe™, SYBR(®) Green I, and EvaGreen™ were evaluated in this study. The percentage of dye removed during the extraction process was determined to be: 70.3% for SYBR(®) Green I; 99.6% for RedSafe™; 99.4% for EvaGreen™; 52.7% for Diamond™ Dye; 50.6% for GelRed™, and; could not be determined for GelGreen™. It was then assumed that the amount of dye in the fluorescent quantification assay had no effect on the DNA signal. The presence of all six dyes was then reviewed for their effect on DNA extraction. The t-test showed no significant difference between the dyes and the control. These extracts were then STR profiled and all dyes and control produced full DNA profiles. STR loci in the presence of GelGreen(TM) at 1X concentration showed increased amplification products in comparison to the control samples. Full STR profiles were detected in the presence of EvaGreen™ (1X), although with reduced amplification products. RedSafe™ (1X), Diamond™ Dye (1X), and SYBR(®) Green I (1X) all exhibited varying degrees of locus drop-out with GelRed™ generating no loci at all. We provide recommendations for the best dye to visualize the presence of DNA profile as a biological stain and its subsequent amplification and detection. PMID:26202628

  9. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange.

  10. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange. PMID:27082258

  11. Removal of acidic indigo carmine textile dye from aqueous solutions using radiation induced cationic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sari, Müfrettin Murat

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the removal of acidic indigo carmine dyes from aqueous solutions using cationic hydrogels. Irradiated hydrogels were investigated as a new sorbent for dye removal from aqueous solution. Poly(N,N-Diethylamino ethyl methacrylate) [poly(DEAEMA)] hydrogels were prepared by radiation polymerisation of N,N-diethylamino ethyl methacrylate [DEAEMA] monomer in the presence of cross-linking agent, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate [EGDMA], and used for the removal of acidic indigo carmine textile dye. The adsorption of dyes was examined using a batch sorption technique. The effects of pH, time and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity of hydrogels were investigated. Maximum gelation ratio was 98.2% at irradiation dose of 5.3 kGy. Maximum equilibrium volume swelling, V/V(0), value was 21.3 at pH 2.8. Maximum amount of adsorbed indigo carmine onto hydrogels was 96.7 mg dye/g gel at pH 2.8, 21 h of adsorption time and 120 mg/L initial dye solution. Swelling and adsorption capacity increased with decreasing of pH. Compared with Congo red, amounts of adsorbed indigo carmine are much higher than those of Congo red. Langmuir isotherm model was the best fit for these poly(DEAEMA) hydrogels-indigo carmine systems.

  12. Wall teichoic acid protects Staphylococcus aureus from inhibition by Congo red and other dyes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Campbell, Jennifer; Kim, Younghoon; Swoboda, Jonathan G.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Walker, Suzanne; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Polyanionic polymers, including lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid, are important determinants of the charged character of the staphylococcal cell wall. This study was designed to investigate the extent to which teichoic acid contributes to protection from anionic azo dyes and to identify barriers to drug penetration for development of new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methods We studied antimicrobial activity of azo dyes against S. aureus strains with or without inhibition of teichoic acid in vitro and in vivo. Results We observed that inhibition of wall teichoic acid expression resulted in an ∼1000-fold increase in susceptibility to azo dyes such as Congo red, reducing its MIC from >1024 to <4 mg/L. Sensitization occurred when the first step in the wall teichoic acid pathway, catalysed by TarO, was inhibited either by mutation or by chemical inhibition. In contrast, genetic blockade of lipoteichoic acid biosynthesis did not confer Congo red susceptibility. Based on this finding, combination therapy was tested using the highly synergistic combination of Congo red plus tunicamycin at sub-MIC concentrations (to inhibit wall teichoic acid biosynthesis). The combination rescued Caenorhabditis elegans from a lethal challenge of S. aureus. Conclusions Our studies show that wall teichoic acid confers protection to S. aureus from anionic azo dyes and related compounds, and its inhibition raises the prospect of development of new combination therapies based on this inhibition. PMID:22615298

  13. Spectrophotometric estimation of tamsulosin hydrochloride by acid-dye method

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Saxena, Prachi; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2011-01-01

    A new spectrophotometric method for the estimation of tamsulosin hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms has been developed and validated. The method is based on reaction between drug and bromophenol blue and complex was measured at 421 nm. The slope, intercept and correlation coefficient was found to be 0.054, -0.020 and 0.999, respectively. Method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, range, precision and accuracy. The developed method can be used to determine drug in both tablet and capsule formulations. Reaction was optimized using three parameters i.e., concentration of the dye, pH of the buffer, volume of the buffer and shaking time. Maximum stability of the chromophore was achieved by using pH 2 and 2 ml volume of buffer. Shaking time kept was 2 min and concentration of the dye used was 2 ml of 0.05% w/v solution. Method was validated in terms of linearity, precision, range, accuracy, LOD and LOQ and stochiometry of the method was also established using Mole ratio and Job's method of continuous variation. The dye benzonoid form (blue color) of dye ionized into quinonoid form (purple color) in presence of buffer and reacts with protonated form of drug in 1:1 ratio and forms an ion-pair complex (yellow color). PMID:23781431

  14. Skin testing of gallic acid-based hair dye in paraphenylenediamine/paratoluenediamine-reactive patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yunseok; Lee, Joon Ho; Kwon, Hyok Bu; An, Susun; Lee, Ai-Young

    2016-07-01

    Incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to para-phenylenediamine (PPD)/paratoluenediamine (PTD) hair dyes is increasing. Hair dyes utilizing gallic acid (GA) may be a safe alternative. However, pretesting is recommended. We investigated the contact sensitivity to ingredients of a dye product; GA, monoethanolamine thioglycolate (MT), l-cystein and ferrous sulfate, and an appropriate pretest method in 31 patients reactive to PPD and/or PTD. An open test was performed with the test dye following the patch test. Subsequently, a use test was performed twice, with a 4-week interval. One subject showed a positive reaction to ferrous sulfate in the patch test. Another subject reacted to the first compound alone in the open test. Thirteen subjects manifesting cutaneous lesions from previous regular hair dyeing, showed reactions at the first use of the test dye; and six had reactions with reduced severity at the second test. GA and MT are safe for use in ACD patients reactive to PPD and/or PTD. For predicting contact allergy to hair dyes, the open test appeared to be a better pretest method than the patch test. PMID:26663148

  15. Effect of a sulfonated azo dye and sulfanilic acid on nitrogen transformation processes in soil.

    PubMed

    Topaç, F Olcay; Dindar, Efsun; Uçaroğlu, Selnur; Başkaya, Hüseyin S

    2009-10-30

    Introduction of organic dyes into soil via wastewater and sludge applications has been of increasing concern especially in developing or under-developed countries where appropriate management strategies are scarce. Assessing the response of terrestrial ecosystems to organic dyes and estimating the inhibition concentrations will probably contribute to soil remediation studies in regions affected by the same problem. Hence, an incubation study was conducted in order to investigate the impact of a sulfonated azo dye, Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and sulfanilic acid (SA), a typical representative of aromatic sulfonated amines, on soil nitrogen transformation processes. The results apparently showed that nitrogen related processes in soil can be used as bioindicators of anthropogenic stress caused by organic dyes. It was found that urease activity, arginine ammonification rate, nitrification potential and ammonium oxidising bacteria numbers decreased by 10-20% and 7-28% in the presence of RB5 (> 20 mg/kg dry soil) and SA (> 8 mg/kg dry soil), respectively. Accordingly, it was concluded that organic dye pollution may restrict the nitrogen-use-efficiency of plants, thus further reducing the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Furthermore, the response of soil microbiota to SA suggested that inhibition effects of the organic dye may continue after the possible reduction of the parent dye to associated aromatic amines.

  16. In vivo diagnostic assessment of dentinal caries utilizing acid red and povidone-iodine dyes.

    PubMed

    Maupomé, G; Hernández-Guerrero, J C; García-Luna, M; Trejo-Alvarado, A; Hernández-Pérez, M; Díez-de-Bonilla, J

    1995-01-01

    In order to compare the clinical utilization of diagnostic dyes to identify carious dentin, the present in vivo study compared two caries-detector dyes, acid red (1% acid red in propylene glycol wt/wt) and povidone-iodine (8% povidone-iodine in water wt/vol). A total of 221 cavities prepared by 19 senior dental students under the supervision of two teachers at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Dental School were used. Dyes were applied double-blind under standardized conditions to at least two teeth of the same patient. Data were analyzed using the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test and a test of proportions. Results showed that molars or premolars did not appear to be positively stained more frequently by one dye or another. Also, 36.7% of teeth tested positive to either one of the two dyes. Prudent utilization of either acid red or povidone-iodine appeared to be equally useful in assisting clinical decisions concerning cavity size while restoring dentinal lesions. However, povidone-iodine may be preferred in clinical settings where acid red is expensive and/or difficult to obtain. Further research is necessary to establish accurately the mechanism of staining by povidone-iodine.

  17. Dyes adsorption using a synthetic carboxymethyl cellulose-acrylic acid adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genlin; Yi, Lijuan; Deng, Hui; Sun, Ping

    2014-05-01

    Removal of noxious dyes is gaining public and technological attention. Herein grafting polymerization was employed to produce a novel adsorbent using acrylic acid and carboxymethyl cellulose for dye removal. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy verified the adsorbent formed under optimized reaction conditions. The removal ratio of adsorbent to Methyl Orange, Disperse Blue 2BLN and malachite green chloride reached to 84.2%, 79.6% and 99.9%, respectively. The greater agreement between the calculated and experimental results suggested that pseudo second-order kinetic model better represents the kinetic adsorption data. Equilibrium adsorptions of dyes were better explained by the Temkin isotherm. The results implied that this new cellulose-based absorbent had the universality for removal of dyes through the chemical adsorption mechanism. PMID:25079652

  18. Biosorption of Acid Blue 290 (AB 290) and Acid Blue 324 (AB 324) dyes on Spirogyra rhizopus.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ayla; Akkaya, Gönül; Turabik, Meral

    2006-07-31

    In this study, the biosorption of Acid Blue 290 and Acid Blue 324 on Spirogyra rhizopus, a green algae growing on fresh water, was studied with respect to initial pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and biosorbent concentration. The optimum initial pH and temperature values for AB 290 and AB 324 biosorption were found to be 2.0, 30 degrees C and 3.0, 25 degrees C, respectively. It was observed that the adsorbed AB 290 and AB 324 amounts increased with increasing the initial dye concentration up to 1500 and 750 mg/L, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data and the isotherm constants were determined by using Polymath 4.1 software. The monolayer coverage capacities of S. rhizopus for AB 290 and AB 324 dyes were found as 1356.6 mg/g and 367.0 mg/g, respectively. The intraparticle diffusion model and the pseudo-second order kinetic model were applied to the experimental data in order to describe the removal mechanism of these acidic dyes by S. rhizopus. The pseudo-second order kinetic model described very well the biosorption kinetics of AB 290 and AB 324 dyes. Thermodynamic studies showed that the biosorption of AB 290 and AB 324 on S. rhizopus was exothermic in nature.

  19. Analysis of acid-generating action of PAG in an EUV resist using acid-sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Biafore, John J.

    2013-03-01

    Researchers are currently examining various methods for determining the quantity of acid generated by a photoacid generator (PAG) and for analyzing acid-generating reactions using acid-sensitive dyes that react with acid and generate a color. Adding an acid-sensitive dye to the resist gives a clear grasp of the acid-generating action. The process involves applying a resist containing an acid-sensitive dye to a quartz substrate; exposing the substrate; and measuring and evaluating the absorbance of a chromogenic substance near 530 nm using a spectroscope. The method determines the rate constant for acid generation (Dill C parameter) during exposure based on the relationship between transmissivity at 530 nm and exposure dose. Using this method, we obtained and compared rate constants for acid generation (C parameters) as part of our study of dependence on the quantity of quencher in the EUV resist. Our results indicate a new model that accounts for the quencher concentration parameter would be useful in analyzing dependence on the quantity of quencher. This paper presents these findings, together with the results of studies of profile simulations using the quencher concentration parameter obtained in the experiments.

  20. Removal of cationic dyes by poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogels in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şolpan, Dilek; Duran, Sibel; Torun, Murat

    2008-04-01

    Poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid (poly(AAm-co-AAc)) hydrogels prepared by irradiating with γ-radiation were used in experiments on swelling, diffusion, and uptake of some cationic dyes such as Safranine-O (SO) and Magenta (M). Poly(AAm-co-AAc) hydrogels irradiated at 8.0 kGy have been used for swelling and diffusion studies in water and cationic dye solutions. The maximum swellings in water, and SO, and M solutions observed are 2700%, 3500%, and 4000%, respectively. Diffusions of water and cationic dyes within hydrogels have been found to be non-Fickian in character. Adsorption of the cationic dyes onto poly(AAm-co-AAc) hydrogels is studied by the batch adsorption technique. The adsorption type was found Langmuir type in the Giles classification system. The moles of adsorbed dye for SO and M per repeating unit in hydrogel (binding ratio, r) have been calculated as 3834×10 -6 and 1323×10 -6, respectively. These results show that poly(AAm-co-AAc) hydrogels can be used as adsorbent for water pollutants such as cationic dyes.

  1. Acid Black 48 dye biosorption using Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized with treated sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Mitter, E K; Corso, C R

    2012-01-01

    The textile industry consumes large quantities of water and chemicals, especially in dyeing and finishing processes. Textile dye adsorption can be accomplished with natural or synthetic compounds. Cell immobilization using biomaterials allows the reduction of toxicity and mechanical resistance and opens spaces within the matrix for cell growth. The use of natural materials, such as sugarcane bagasse, is promising due to the low costs involved. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of sugarcane bagasse treated with either polyethyleneimine (PEI), NaOH or distilled water in the cell immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for textile dye removal. Three different adsorption tests were conducted: treated sugarcane bagasse alone, free yeast cells and bagasse-immobilized yeast cells. Yeast immobilization was 31.34% with PEI-treated bagasse, 8.56% with distilled water and 22.54% with NaOH. PEI-treated bagasse exhibited the best removal rates of the dye at all pH values studied (2.50, 4.50 and 6.50). The best Acid Black 48 adsorption rates were obtained with use of free yeast cells. At pH 2.50, 1 mg of free yeast cells was able to remove 5488.49 g of the dye. The lowest adsorption capacity rates were obtained using treated bagasse alone. However, the use of bagasse-immobilized cells increased adsorption efficiency from 20 to 40%. The use of immobilized cells in textile dye removal is very attractive due to adsorbed dye precipitation, which eliminates the industrial need for centrifugation processes. Dye adsorption using only yeast cells or sugarcane bagasse requires separation methods.

  2. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters.

  3. Membrane-Inspired Acidically Stable Dye-Sensitized Photocathode for Solar Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Click, Kevin A; Beauchamp, Damian R; Huang, Zhongjie; Chen, Weilin; Wu, Yiying

    2016-02-01

    Tandem dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DSPECs) for water splitting are a promising method for sustainable energy conversion but so far have been limited by their lack of aqueous stability and photocurrent mismatch between the cathode and anode. In nature, membrane-enabled subcellular compartmentation is a general approach to control local chemical environments in the cell. The hydrophobic tails of the lipid make the bilayer impermeable to ions and hydrophilic molecules. Herein we report the use of an organic donor-acceptor dye that prevents both dye desorption and semiconductor degradation by mimicking the hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of lipid bilayer membranes. The dual-functional photosensitizer (denoted as BH4) allows for efficient light harvesting while also protecting the semiconductor surface from protons and water via its hydrophobic π linker. The protection afforded by this membrane-mimicking dye gives this system excellent stability in extremely acidic (pH 0) conditions. The acidic stability also allows for the use of cubane molybdenum-sulfide cluster as the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst. This system produces a proton-reducing current of 183 ± 36 μA/cm(2) (0 V vs NHE with 300 W Xe lamp) for an unprecedented 16 h with no degradation. These results introduce a method for developing high-current, low-pH DSPECs and are a significant move toward practical dye-sensitized solar fuel production. PMID:26744766

  4. Membrane-Inspired Acidically Stable Dye-Sensitized Photocathode for Solar Fuel Production.

    PubMed

    Click, Kevin A; Beauchamp, Damian R; Huang, Zhongjie; Chen, Weilin; Wu, Yiying

    2016-02-01

    Tandem dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DSPECs) for water splitting are a promising method for sustainable energy conversion but so far have been limited by their lack of aqueous stability and photocurrent mismatch between the cathode and anode. In nature, membrane-enabled subcellular compartmentation is a general approach to control local chemical environments in the cell. The hydrophobic tails of the lipid make the bilayer impermeable to ions and hydrophilic molecules. Herein we report the use of an organic donor-acceptor dye that prevents both dye desorption and semiconductor degradation by mimicking the hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of lipid bilayer membranes. The dual-functional photosensitizer (denoted as BH4) allows for efficient light harvesting while also protecting the semiconductor surface from protons and water via its hydrophobic π linker. The protection afforded by this membrane-mimicking dye gives this system excellent stability in extremely acidic (pH 0) conditions. The acidic stability also allows for the use of cubane molybdenum-sulfide cluster as the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst. This system produces a proton-reducing current of 183 ± 36 μA/cm(2) (0 V vs NHE with 300 W Xe lamp) for an unprecedented 16 h with no degradation. These results introduce a method for developing high-current, low-pH DSPECs and are a significant move toward practical dye-sensitized solar fuel production.

  5. Analysis and Identification of Acid-Base Indicator Dyes by Thin-Layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Daniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a very simple and effective technique that is used by chemists by different purposes, including the monitoring of the progress of a reaction. TLC can also be easily used for the analysis and identification of various acid-base indicator dyes.

  6. Binding of phenazinium dye safranin T to polyriboadenylic acid: spectroscopic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Haque, Lucy; Roy, Snigdha; Das, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report results from experiments designed to explore the association of the phenazinium dye safranin T (ST, 3,7-diamino-2,8-dimethyl-5-phenylphenazinium chloride) with single and double stranded form of polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter poly-A) using several spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that the dye binds to single stranded polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter ss poly-A) with high affinity while it does not interact at all with the double stranded (ds) form of the polynucleotide. Fluorescence and absorption spectral studies reveal the molecular aspects of binding of ST to single stranded form of the polynucleotide. This observation is also supported by the circular dichroism study. Thermodynamic data obtained from temperature dependence of binding constant reveals that association is driven by negative enthalpy change and opposed by negative entropy change. Ferrocyanide quenching studies have shown intercalative binding of ST to ss poly-A. Experiments on viscosity measurements confirm the binding mode of the dye to be intercalative. The effect of [Na⁺] ion concentration on the binding process suggests the role of electrostatic forces in the complexation. Present studies reveal the utility of the dye in probing nucleic acid structure. PMID:24498422

  7. Degradation of reactive, acid and basic textile dyes in the presence of ultrasound and rare earths [Lanthanum and Praseodymium].

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Goyal, Shikha; Patnala, Prem Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of five textile dyes, namely Reactive Red 141 (RR 141), Reactive Blue 21 (RB 21), Acid Red 114 (AR 114), Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) and Basic Violet 16 (BV 16) in aqueous solution has been carried out with ultrasound (US) and in combination with rare earth ions (La(3+) and Pr(3+)). Kinetic analysis of the data showed a pseudo-first order degradation reaction for all the dyes. The rate constant (k), half life (t1/2) and the process efficiency (φ) for various processes in degradation of dyes under different experimental conditions have been calculated. The influence of concentrations of dyes (16-40mg/L), pH (5, 7 and 9) and rare earth ion concentration (4, 12 and 20mg/L) on the degradation of dyes have also been studied. The degradation percentage increased with increasing rare earth amount and decreased with increasing concentration of dyes. Both horn and bath type sonicators were used at 20kHz and 250W for degradation. The sonochemical degradation rate of dyes in the presence of rare earths was related to the type of chromophoric groups in the dye molecule. Degradation sequence of dyes was further examined through LCMS and Raman spectroscopic techniques, which confirmed the sonochemical degradation of dyes to non-toxic end products.

  8. Degradation of reactive, acid and basic textile dyes in the presence of ultrasound and rare earths [Lanthanum and Praseodymium].

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Goyal, Shikha; Patnala, Prem Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of five textile dyes, namely Reactive Red 141 (RR 141), Reactive Blue 21 (RB 21), Acid Red 114 (AR 114), Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) and Basic Violet 16 (BV 16) in aqueous solution has been carried out with ultrasound (US) and in combination with rare earth ions (La(3+) and Pr(3+)). Kinetic analysis of the data showed a pseudo-first order degradation reaction for all the dyes. The rate constant (k), half life (t1/2) and the process efficiency (φ) for various processes in degradation of dyes under different experimental conditions have been calculated. The influence of concentrations of dyes (16-40mg/L), pH (5, 7 and 9) and rare earth ion concentration (4, 12 and 20mg/L) on the degradation of dyes have also been studied. The degradation percentage increased with increasing rare earth amount and decreased with increasing concentration of dyes. Both horn and bath type sonicators were used at 20kHz and 250W for degradation. The sonochemical degradation rate of dyes in the presence of rare earths was related to the type of chromophoric groups in the dye molecule. Degradation sequence of dyes was further examined through LCMS and Raman spectroscopic techniques, which confirmed the sonochemical degradation of dyes to non-toxic end products. PMID:24491599

  9. Sensitizers containing donor cascade and rhodanine-3-acetic acid moieties for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Quan-Ping; Zhang, Lu; Liang, Mao; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song

    2011-01-15

    Three organic dyes with D-{pi}-D-{pi}-A structure based on triarylamine, dimethylarylamine, and rhodanine-3-acetic acid moieties are designed and synthesized. Incorporating thiophene moieties into the system affords sensitizers with high molar extinction coefficients. These dyes were applied into nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} dye-sensitized solar cells through standard operations. For a typical device the maximal monochromatic incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) can reach 73%, with a short-circuit photocurrent density (J{sub sc}) of 7.3 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 636 mV, and a fill factor (ff) of 0.61, corresponding to an overall conversion efficiency ({eta}) of 2.86%. (author)

  10. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition.

  11. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition. PMID:26074308

  12. Exploring the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM to degrade textile dye Direct Blue GLL, mixture of dyes and textile effluent and production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid using waste biomass generated after dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Joshi, Swati M; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. Among all tested microorganisms, isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM effectively decolorized (100%) the dye Direct Blue GLL (DBGLL) and simultaneously it produced (64%) polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DBGLL at 300 mg l(-1) concentration within 24 h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The organism also decolorized three combinations of mixture of dyes. The organism decolorized textile effluent too when it was combined with medium. The organism produced a maximum of 66% and 61% PHD while decolorizing mixture of dyes and textile effluent respectively. Molasses was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The activity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was found to be higher after 24 h of addition of DBGLL. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation, viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase, and azo reductase were found to be induced during decolorization process of DBGLL and mixture of dyes. There was significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DBGLL.

  13. Exploring the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM to degrade textile dye Direct Blue GLL, mixture of dyes and textile effluent and production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid using waste biomass generated after dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Joshi, Swati M; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. Among all tested microorganisms, isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM effectively decolorized (100%) the dye Direct Blue GLL (DBGLL) and simultaneously it produced (64%) polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DBGLL at 300 mg l(-1) concentration within 24 h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The organism also decolorized three combinations of mixture of dyes. The organism decolorized textile effluent too when it was combined with medium. The organism produced a maximum of 66% and 61% PHD while decolorizing mixture of dyes and textile effluent respectively. Molasses was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The activity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was found to be higher after 24 h of addition of DBGLL. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation, viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase, and azo reductase were found to be induced during decolorization process of DBGLL and mixture of dyes. There was significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DBGLL. PMID:20591565

  14. Red cochineal dye (carminic Acid): its role in nature.

    PubMed

    Eisner, T; Nowicki, S; Goetz, M; Meinwald, J

    1980-05-30

    Carminic acid, the well-known red dyestuff from cochineal insects (Dactylopius spp.), is a potent feeding deterrent to ants. This deterrency may be indicative of the natural function of the compound, which may have evolved in cochineals as a chemical weapon against predation. The behavior of an unusual predator is described-the carnivorous caterpillar of a pyralid moth (Laetilia coccidivora)-which is undeterred by carminic acid and feeds on cochineals. The animal has the remarkable habit of utilizing the ingested carminic acid for defensive purposes of its own. PMID:17779027

  15. Degradation of cyanoacrylic acid-based organic sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yang, Xichuan; Cheng, Ming; Zhang, Fuguo; Sun, Licheng

    2013-07-01

    Organic dyes have become widely used in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because of their good performance, flexible structural modifications, and low costs. To increase the photostability of organic dye-based DSSCs, we conducted a full study on the degradation mechanism of cyanoacrylic acid-based organic sensitizers in DSSCs. The results showed that with the synergy between water and UV light, the sensitizer could desorb from the TiO2 surface and the cyanoacrylic acid unit of the sensitizer was transformed into the aldehyde group. It was also observed that the water content had a great effect on the degradation process. Our experiments conducted using (18) O-labeled water demonstrated that the oxygen atom of the aldehyde group identified in the degraded dye came from the solvent water in the DSSCs. Therefore, controlling the water content during DSSC fabrication, good sealing of cells, and filtering the UV light are crucial to produce DSSCs that are more durable and robust.

  16. Citric Acid Fuctionalized Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dye.

    PubMed

    Mahto, Triveni Kumar; Roy, Anurag; Sahoo, Banalata; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this study different magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFe2O4, where M = Fe, Mn, Zn) were synthesized through an aqueous coprecipitation method and then functionalized with citric acid for the degradation of azo dye present in industrial waste water. Here we evaluated the role of citric acid for photocatalytic application. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the catalytic activity in degradation of methyl orange (MO) was evaluated. The rate of MO degradation in different magnetic systems was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of active parameters (pH, initial MO concentration and effect of sunlight) on degradation performance was investigated. For the first time, citric acid chemistry is successfully exploited to develop a photocatalyst that can successfully degrade the dyes. This citric acid functionalized magnetic ferrite nanoparticles are very much effective for photocalytic degradation of dye and also these can be recollected with the help of permanent magnet for successive uses.

  17. HPLC-DAD-MS analysis of dyes identified in textiles from Mount Athos.

    PubMed

    Mantzouris, Dimitrios; Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Valianou, Lemonia; Panayiotou, Costas

    2011-03-01

    Organic colorants contained in 30 textiles (16th to early 20th century) from the monastery of Simonos Petra (Mount Athos) have been investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with diode-array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS). The components of natural dyes identified in samples treated by the standard HCl dyestuff extraction method were: alizarin, apigenin, butein, carminic acid, chrysoeriol, dcII, dcIV, dcVII, ellagic acid, emodin, fisetin, flavokermesic acid, fustin, genistein, haematein derivative (Hae'), indigotin, indirubin, isoliquiritigenin, isorhamnetin, kaempferide, kaempferol, kermesic acid, luteolin, naringenin, purpurin, quercetin, rhamnazin, rhamnetin, sulfuretin, and type B and type C compounds (last two are markers for Caesalpinia trees). Early, semi-synthetic dyes, for example indigo carmine, fuchsin components, and rhodamine B were identified in objects dated late 19th to early 20th century. A dyestuff extraction method which involves use of TFA, instead of HCl, was applied to selected historical samples, showing that the mild method enables efficient extraction of weld (Reseda luteola L.) and dyer's broom (Genista tinctoria L.) glycosides. The marker compound (Hae') for logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum L.) identification after treatment with HCl was investigated by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in negative electrospray ionization (LC-MS-ESI(-)) mode. LC-MS in negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC-MS-APCI(-)) mode was used, probably for the first time, to investigate cochineal (Dactylopius coccus Costa) samples. Positive electrospray ionization (LC-MS-ESI(+)) mode was used for identification of fuchsin components. Detailed HPLC-DAD studies were performed on young fustic (Cotinus coggygria Scop.) and Persian berries (Rhamnus trees). PMID:21271239

  18. A Three‐Component Assembly Promoted by Boronic Acids Delivers a Modular Fluorophore Platform (BASHY Dyes)†

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fábio M. F.; Rosa, João N.; Candeias, Nuno R.; Carvalho, Cátia Parente; Matos, Ana I.; Ventura, Ana E.; Florindo, Helena F.; Silva, Liana C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The modular assembly of boronic acids with Schiff‐base ligands enabled the construction of innovative fluorescent dyes [boronic acid salicylidenehydrazone (BASHY)] with suitable structural and photophysical properties for live cell bioimaging applications. This reaction enabled the straightforward synthesis (yields up to 99 %) of structurally diverse and photostable dyes that exhibit a polarity‐sensitive green‐to‐yellow emission with high quantum yields of up to 0.6 in nonpolar environments. These dyes displayed a high brightness (up to 54 000 m −1 cm−1). The promising structural and fluorescence properties of BASHY dyes fostered the preparation of non‐cytotoxic, stable, and highly fluorescent poly(lactide‐co‐glycolide) nanoparticles that were effectively internalized by dendritic cells. The dyes were also shown to selectively stain lipid droplets in HeLa cells, without inducing any appreciable cytotoxicity or competing plasma membrane labeling; this confirmed their potential as fluorescent stains. PMID:26691630

  19. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150 μg mL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites.

  20. Extractional spectrophotometric analysis of metronidazole, tinidazole, ornidazole and secnidazole bases through acid-dye complexation using bromothymol blue dye.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Khaled M; Salama, Ismail; Mostafa, Samia; El-Sadek, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    An easy, precise and valid extractional-spectrophotometric technique is described for the assessment of metronidazole (MNZ), tinidazole (TNZ), ornidazole (ONZ) and secnidazole (SNZ) in pure state and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The technique includes first the reduction of above cited drugs using HCl and zinc powder, then the formation of intense yellow colored ion-association complex species (1:3 drug/dye) using bromothymol blue (BTB) in a buffered aqueous acidic medium at pH 3-3.50. The colored products are extracted into dichloromethane and quantitatively determined at 416-420 nm. The experimental operating factors influencing the ion-pairs development were studied and optimized to obtain the maximum color intensity. The Beer plots are obeyed in the concentration ranges 2.50-22.50, 2.50-30, 7.50-35 and 5-30 μgml-1 for MNZ, TNZ, ONZ and SNZ, respectively, with correlation coefficients not less than 0.9995. The proposed technique is recommended for the routine quality control analysis of the investigated drugs in commercial tablets with no observed interference from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. Results of such analysis were statistically validated and through recovery studies, showing excellent agreement with those achieved by the reported techniques. PMID:22186332

  1. Detection of acid moisture in photovoltaic modules using a dual wavelength pH-sensitive fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takashi; Iwami, Kentaro; Taguchi, Atsushi; Umeda, Norihiro; Masuda, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    The formation of acetic acid via the penetration of moisture into ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) in photovoltaic (PV) modules is cited as the main reason for PV modules’ degradation. Currently, there is no effective method for detecting acetic moisture in PV modules. We proposed a simple method for detecting acid moisture in PV modules using a dual-wavelength pH-sensitive dye that measures pH by the ratio of the intensities of two peaks in the fluorescence spectra of the dye. We detected the pH change caused by acetic acid with the change in the intensity ratio of the fluorescence spectra of the dried dye. Furthermore, we observed that the dry fluorescent dye is heat resistant to withstand the lamination process for the manufacturing of PV modules, and has good long-term durability.

  2. An insight into the interaction of phenanthridine dyes with polyriboadenylic acid: spectroscopic and thermodynamic approach.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Parveen, Sultana; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash

    2014-01-24

    Interaction of two phenanthridine dyes, namely ethidium bromide (EB) and propidium iodide (PI) with polyriboadenylic acid was investigated using various spectroscopic techniques. They were found to bind only with the single stranded form of the polymer, while no affinity was observed for the double stranded form. Enhanced binding observed for PI compared to EB may be attributed to the presence of external alkyl chain in PI. Thermodynamic studies showed negative enthalpy and negative entropy changes for the binding of both the dyes. Salt dependent studies revealed a lesser electrolytic contribution compared to the nonelectrolytic contribution to the total Gibbs free energy change in each case. This indicated importance of hydrophobic and van der Waal's interaction for the binding process. Overall, the binding data and detail energetics of interaction presented here would be helpful in the design of phenanthridine based molecules that interact with specific RNA structure.

  3. An insight into the interaction of phenanthridine dyes with polyriboadenylic acid: spectroscopic and thermodynamic approach.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Parveen, Sultana; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash

    2014-01-24

    Interaction of two phenanthridine dyes, namely ethidium bromide (EB) and propidium iodide (PI) with polyriboadenylic acid was investigated using various spectroscopic techniques. They were found to bind only with the single stranded form of the polymer, while no affinity was observed for the double stranded form. Enhanced binding observed for PI compared to EB may be attributed to the presence of external alkyl chain in PI. Thermodynamic studies showed negative enthalpy and negative entropy changes for the binding of both the dyes. Salt dependent studies revealed a lesser electrolytic contribution compared to the nonelectrolytic contribution to the total Gibbs free energy change in each case. This indicated importance of hydrophobic and van der Waal's interaction for the binding process. Overall, the binding data and detail energetics of interaction presented here would be helpful in the design of phenanthridine based molecules that interact with specific RNA structure. PMID:24060481

  4. An insight into the interaction of phenanthridine dyes with polyriboadenylic acid: Spectroscopic and thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Parveen, Sultana; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of two phenanthridine dyes, namely ethidium bromide (EB) and propidium iodide (PI) with polyriboadenylic acid was investigated using various spectroscopic techniques. They were found to bind only with the single stranded form of the polymer, while no affinity was observed for the double stranded form. Enhanced binding observed for PI compared to EB may be attributed to the presence of external alkyl chain in PI. Thermodynamic studies showed negative enthalpy and negative entropy changes for the binding of both the dyes. Salt dependent studies revealed a lesser electrolytic contribution compared to the nonelectrolytic contribution to the total Gibbs free energy change in each case. This indicated importance of hydrophobic and van der Waal's interaction for the binding process. Overall, the binding data and detail energetics of interaction presented here would be helpful in the design of phenanthridine based molecules that interact with specific RNA structure.

  5. Degradation of azo dye acid red B on manganese dioxide in the absence and presence of ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jiantuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2003-06-27

    Degradation of azo dye acid red B (ARB) on MnO(2) in the absence and presence of ultrasonic irradiation (sonication) has been investigated. The effect of initial pH, anions (Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-)), and saturated gas (argon/oxygen) has been studied. The experimental results show that decolorization of the dye on MnO(2) is highly pH dependent, with increasing decolorization efficiencies at decreasing pH values. The SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) ions are observed to suppress the adsorption of ARB on MnO(2) dramatically, suggesting competitive nature with the dye. Sonication accelerates decolorization and mineralization of the dye. And oxygen used as saturated gas is more favorable for mineralization of the dye than argon. The average particle diameter of MnO(2) decreases from 47.5 to 3.19 microm after sonication. PMID:12835022

  6. Relation between phase diagram, crystallization, and optical properties of cyanine dye/stearic acid mixed monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Duschl, C.; Kemper, D.; Frey, W.; Meller, P.; Ringsdorf, H.; Knoll, W. Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching )

    1989-06-01

    The phase behavior of cyanine dye monolayers mixed with stearic acid as cosurfactant was investigated at various mole fractions, x, by recording pressure-area isotherms at the water-air interface. The resulting pressure-composition phase diagram shows a eutectic behavior with mixed crystal formation. In the miscibility gap ranging from x {approx} 0.3 to x {approx} 0.95 above the eutectic pressure {pi}{sub e} = 40 mN{center dot}m{sup {minus}1} the two coexisting crystal modifications are characterized (among other techniques) by fluorescence microscopy and, after transfer to a suitable substrate, by electron diffraction. The dye-rich (x = 0.95) crystals show all the characteristic features of the brick-stone arrangement proposed for the molecular packing of the dye chromophores in J aggregates. The x = 0.3 phase boundary with a distinctly different crystal habit is stabilized by the areal match between the chromophore headgroups and the densely packed hydrocarbon chains. These thermodynamic and structural data are discussed in relation to the optical properties of the J-band aggregates.

  7. Aggregation Properties and Liquid Crystal Phase of a Dye Based on Naphthalenetetracarboxylic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasik, Michelle; Collings, Peter

    2007-03-01

    R003 is a dye produced for thin film optical components by Optiva, Inc.^1 made from the sulfonation of the dibenzimidazole derivative of naphthalenetetracarboxylic acid. Its molecular structure is very different from the aggregating food dye previously investigated in our laboratory^2 and R003 forms a liquid crystal phase at significantly lower concentrations. We have performed polarizing microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction experiments in order to determine the phase diagram and aggregate structure. In addition, we have included both translational and orientational entropy in the theoretical analysis of the aggregation process, and have used a more realistic lineshape in analyzing the absorption data. Our results indicate that the ``bond energy'' for molecules in an aggregate is even larger than for the previously studied dye and that the aggregate structure has a cross-sectional area equal to two or three molecular areas rather than one.^1Lazarev, P., N. Ovchinnikova, M. Paukshto, SID Int. Symp. Digest of Tech. Papers, San Jose, California, June XXXII, 571 (2001).^2V. R. Horowitz, L. A. Janowitz, A. L. Modic, P. A. Heiney, and P. J. Collings, Phys. Rev. E 72, 041710 (2005).

  8. Influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid on polymer light-emitting diodes with phosphorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, L.; Zhang, T.; Wang, Y. S.; Xu, X. R.; Jin, Z. S.; Du, Z. L.

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate that hole injection and transport in polymer light-emitting diodes with phosphorescent dye Ir(ppy)3 can be significantly enhanced by doping p-type conductive dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid into poly(vinylcarbazole) (PVK) films at 2wt.%. At the same time, both energy transfer and exciton recombination efficiency are improved because of the open and straight conformation of the PVK molecule in the nanocomposite. The performance of these devices was greatly improved, showing higher luminance, enhanced efficiency, and a lower turn-on voltage.

  9. The effect of high-energy radiation on aqueous solution of Acid Red 1 textile dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földváry, Cs. M.; Wojnárovits, L.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of high-energy radiation on Acid Red 1 (AR1) azo-dye solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. Doses in the order of 10 kGy cause complete decolouration of the 10 -3-10 -4 mol dm -3 solutions; however, for complete mineralization doses higher by 1-2 order of magnitude are needed. Hydrated electrons and H rad atom are more effective in fading reaction, while the rad OH radicals have higher efficiency in mineralization. The HO 2•/O 2•- radical-radical anion pair is rather inefficient in fading reaction.

  10. Cyanomethylbenzoic acid: an acceptor for donor-π-acceptor chromophores used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wanchun; Gupta, Akhil; Kashif, Muhammad Kalim; Duffy, Noel; Bilic, Ante; Evans, Richard A; Spiccia, Leone; Bach, Udo

    2013-02-01

    Sensing the sun: Incorporation of a cyanomethyl benzoic acid electron acceptor into donor-π-acceptor sensitizers for dye-sensitized-solar cell is shown to lead to devices with improved conversion efficiency when compared with more widely used cyanoacetic acid acceptor.

  11. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems.

  12. Fe-tannic acid complex dye as photo sensitizer for different morphological ZnO based DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Çakar, Soner; Özacar, Mahmut

    2016-06-15

    In this paper we have synthesized different morphological ZnO nanostructures via microwave hydrothermal methods at low temperature within a short time. We described different morphologies of ZnO at different Zn(NO3)2/KOH mole ratio. The ZnO nanostructures were characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. All ZnO structures have hexagonal wurtzite type structures. The FESEM images showed various morphologies of ZnO such as plate, rod and nanoparticles. Dye sensitized solar cells have been assembled by these different morphological structures photo electrode and tannic acid or Fe-tannic acid complex dye as sensitizer. We have achieved at maximum efficiencies of photovoltaic cells prepared with ZnO plate in all dye systems. The conversion efficiencies of dye sensitized solar cells are 0.37% and 1.00% with tannic acid and Fe-tannic acid complex dye, respectively. PMID:27043871

  13. Fe-tannic acid complex dye as photo sensitizer for different morphological ZnO based DSSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakar, Soner; Özacar, Mahmut

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have synthesized different morphological ZnO nanostructures via microwave hydrothermal methods at low temperature within a short time. We described different morphologies of ZnO at different Zn(NO3)2/KOH mole ratio. The ZnO nanostructures were characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. All ZnO structures have hexagonal wurtzite type structures. The FESEM images showed various morphologies of ZnO such as plate, rod and nanoparticles. Dye sensitized solar cells have been assembled by these different morphological structures photo electrode and tannic acid or Fe-tannic acid complex dye as sensitizer. We have achieved at maximum efficiencies of photovoltaic cells prepared with ZnO plate in all dye systems. The conversion efficiencies of dye sensitized solar cells are 0.37% and 1.00% with tannic acid and Fe-tannic acid complex dye, respectively.

  14. γ Actinorhodin a natural and attorney source for synthetic dye to detect acid production of fungi

    PubMed Central

    Manikprabhu, Deene; Lingappa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Colors from natural sources are gaining popularity because synthetic colors are carcinogenic. Natural colors are obtained from plants or microorganisms. Pigments produced by microorganisms have advantages over plant pigments, due to their ease of use and reliability. In the present study, a blue pigment producing actinomycete klmp33 was isolated from the Gulbarga region in India. The isolate was identified based on morphologic, microscopic, and biochemical characterization, and 16S rRNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates showed a close relationship with Streptomyces coelicolor. Pigment produced by the isolate was analyzed using UV–visible spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared and liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis, and was identified as γ actinorhodin. γ-Actinorhodin is used as a pH indicator which deviates from acid to non-acid. Moreover, it subrogates synthetic dye. PMID:23961232

  15. [Determination of 22 acidic dyes in edible packagings by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Su, Youzhi; Liu, Jun; Li, Fang; Lei, Hongqin; Li, Yanmei; Liu, Xubin

    2015-04-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of 22 acidic dyes (acid yellow 23, acid red 18, acid blue 7, etc) in edible packagings was developed using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The samples were extracted with acetonitrile-methanol (5:5, v/v) , and then cleaned up with Strata-X-AW solid-phase extractor. The analytes were separated on a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 column (100 mm x 3.0 mm, 1.8 µm) by gradient elution with acetonitrile-10 mmol/L ammonium acetate as the mobile phases. The 22 acidic dyes were determined by electrospray negative ion source (ESI-), and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The qualitative analysis was based on the retention times and characteristic ion pairs consisting of one parent ion and two fragment ions, and the quantitative analysis was carried out by matrix-matched external standard method. The results showed that the calibration curves had good linearity for the 22 acidic dyes, and the correlation coefficients (r2) were larger than 0. 991. The limits of quantitation (LOQs, S/N ≥ 10) were in the range of 0.1-2.0 mg/kg in three different matrices (plant capsule, gelatine capsule, oblatum). The average recoveries were in the range of 78.4%-109.5% for the 22 acidic dyes with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) from 4.6% to 14.5% at three spiked levels (1 x LOQ, 2 x LOQ and 10 x LOQ). This method is suitable for the determination of acidic dyes in edible packagings with the characteristics of high accuracy and precision. PMID:26292405

  16. Performance of mango seed adsorbents in the adsorption of anthraquinone and azo acid dyes in single and binary aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Jiménez, Martín M; Elizalde-González, María P; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia

    2009-12-01

    In this study the husk of mango seed and two carbonaceous adsorbents prepared from it were used to study the adsorption behavior of eight acid dyes. The adsorbed amount in mmol m(-2) decayed asymptotically as the molecular volume and area increased. The interaction between the studied dyes and the mesoporous carbon was governed by the ionic species in solution and the acidic/basic groups on the surface. Less than 50% of the external surface of the microporous carbon became covered with the dyes molecules, though monolayer formation demonstrating specific interactions only with active sites on the surface and the adsorption magnitudes correlated with the shape parameter of the molecule within a particular dye group. The adsorption behavior in mixtures was determined by the molecular volume of the constituents; the greater the molecular volume difference, the greater the effect on the adsorbed amount. We also demonstrated that the raw husk of the mango seed can be used to remove up to 50% from model 50 mg l(-1) solutions of the studied acid dyes.

  17. A high molar extinction coefficient bisterpyridyl homoleptic ru(II) complex with trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid functionality: potential dye for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Adeloye, Adewale O; Olomola, Temitope O; Adebayo, Akinbulu I; Ajibade, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    In our continued efforts in the synthesis of ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes as potential dyes for use in varied applications, such as the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), this work particularly describes the synthesis, absorption spectrum, redox behavior and luminescence properties of a new homoleptic ruthenium(II) complex bearing a simple trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid functionality as the anchoring ligand on terpyridine moiety. The functionalized terpyridine ligand: 4'-(trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-terpyridyl (L1) was synthesized by aryl bromide substitution on terpyridine in a basic reaction condition under palladium carbide catalysis. In particular, the photophysical and redox properties of the complex formulated as: bis-4'-(trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-terpyridyl ruthenium(II) bis-hexafluorophosphate [Ru(L1)(2)(PF(6))(2)] are significantly better compared to those of [Ru(tpy)(2)](2+) and compare well with those of the best emitters of Ru(II) polypyridine family containing tridentate ligands. Reasons for the improved photophysical and redox properties of the complex may be attributed partly to the presence of a substituted α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acid moiety leading to increase in the length of π-conjugation bond thereby enhancing the MLCT-MC (Metal-to-ligand-charge transfer-metal centred) energy gap, and to the reduced difference between the minima of the excited and ground states potential energy surfaces.

  18. A High Molar Extinction Coefficient Bisterpyridyl Homoleptic Ru(II) Complex with trans-2-Methyl-2-butenoic Acid Functionality: Potential Dye for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adeloye, Adewale O.; Olomola, Temitope O.; Adebayo, Akinbulu I.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    In our continued efforts in the synthesis of ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes as potential dyes for use in varied applications, such as the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), this work particularly describes the synthesis, absorption spectrum, redox behavior and luminescence properties of a new homoleptic ruthenium(II) complex bearing a simple trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid functionality as the anchoring ligand on terpyridine moiety. The functionalized terpyridine ligand: 4′-(trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-terpyridyl (L1) was synthesized by aryl bromide substitution on terpyridine in a basic reaction condition under palladium carbide catalysis. In particular, the photophysical and redox properties of the complex formulated as: bis-4′-(trans-2-methyl-2-butenoic acid)-terpyridyl ruthenium(II) bis-hexafluorophosphate [Ru(L1)2(PF6)2] are significantly better compared to those of [Ru(tpy)2]2+ and compare well with those of the best emitters of Ru(II) polypyridine family containing tridentate ligands. Reasons for the improved photophysical and redox properties of the complex may be attributed partly to the presence of a substituted α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acid moiety leading to increase in the length of π-conjugation bond thereby enhancing the MLCT-MC (Metal-to-ligand-charge transfer-metal centred) energy gap, and to the reduced difference between the minima of the excited and ground states potential energy surfaces. PMID:22489165

  19. DFT and ab initio study of structure of dyes derived from 2-hydroxy and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Teimouri, Abbas; Najafi Chermahini, Alireza; Shahraki, Maryam

    2008-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural, infrared spectra and visible spectra of a series of azo dyes preparation of salicylic acid and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid derivatives as the coupling component. The preparation of these azo dyes with salicylic acid and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid derivatives (salicylic acid, methyl salicylate, ethyl salicylate, butyl salicylate, methyl 2,4-dihydroxy benzoate, ethyl 2,4-dihydroxy benzoate, salicylaldehyde, salicylamide, 2,4-dihydroxy benzamide, salicylaldoxime) have been investigated theoretically by performing HF and DFT levels of theory using the standard 6-31G* basis set. The optimized geometries and calculated vibrational frequencies are evaluated via comparison with experimental values. The vibrational spectral data obtained from solid phase FT-IR spectra are assigned modes based on the results of the theoretical calculations. The observed spectra are found to be in good agreement with the calculations.

  20. Kinetic and equilibrium studies on the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto activated carbon cloth.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Numan; Bayram, Edip; Ayranci, Erol

    2006-09-01

    Removal of acid dyes Acid Blue 45, Acid Blue 92, Acid Blue 120 and Acid Blue 129 from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto high area activated carbon cloth (ACC) was investigated. Kinetics of adsorption was followed by in situ UV-spectroscopy and the data were treated according to pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that the adsorption process of these dyes onto ACC follows the pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms were derived at 25 degrees C on the basis of batch analysis. Isotherm data were treated according to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The fits of experimental data to these equations were examined. PMID:16563617

  1. Investigation of citric acid-glycerol based pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels for dye removal applications: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Franklin, D S; Guhanathan, S

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are three dimensional polymeric structure with segments of hydrophilic groups. The special structure of hydrogels facilitates the diffusion of solutes into the interior network and possess numerous ionic and non-ionic functional groups, which can absorb or trap ionic dyes from waste water. The present investigation was devoted to the synthesis of a series of citric acid and glycerol based pH sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels using a solventless green approach via condensation polymerization in the presence of acidic medium. The formations of hydrogels were confirmed using various spectral investigations viz., FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR. The thermal properties of various hydrogels have been studied using TGA, DTA and DSC analysis. The rationalized relationship was noticed with increasing of pH from 4.0 to 10.0. The surface morphologies of hydrogels were analyzed using SEM technique which was well supported from the results of swelling studies. Methylene blue has been selected as a cationic dye for its removal from various environmental sources using pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels. The results of dye removal revealed that glycerol based biopolymeric hydrogels have shown an excellent dye removal capacity. Hence, the synthesized pH sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels have an adaptability with pH tuned properties might have greater potential opening in various environmental applications viz., metal ion removal, agrochemical release, purification of water, dye removal etc.

  2. Holographic gratings recorded in poly(lactic acid)/azo-dye films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiasso, Javier; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    Diffraction gratings were recorded in biodegradable polymer films of poly(lactic acid) doped with the photoisomerisable azo-dye (Disperse Orange 3). It is shown that the diffraction efficiency of the recorded grating can be improved by 220% via an all-optical treatment. This all-optical treatment consists of a pre-irradiation of the sample with the writing laser beam at high power during a short period of time, preventing damage of the material, followed by a much longer inscription at relatively low power. Furthermore, it is shown that the addition of a small amount of 0.05 wt% of multi-walled carbon nanotubes to the photoresponsive polymer increases the maximum diffraction efficiency as well as the remanent efficiency by 20%. Finally, this last photoresponsive nano-composite is also sensitive to the pre-irradiation treatment.

  3. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  4. Formic acid enhanced effective degradation of methyl orange dye in aqueous solutions under UV-Vis irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Bai, Renbi

    2016-09-15

    Developing efficient technologies to treat recalcitrant organic dye wastewater has long been of great research and practical interest. In this study, a small molecule, formic acid (FA), was applied as a process enhancer for the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye as a model recalcitrant organic pollutant in aqueous solutions under the condition of UV-Vis light irradiation and air aeration at the ambient temperature of 25 °C. It was found that the decolouration of the dye solutions can be rapidly achieved, reducing the time, for example, from around 17.6 h without FA to mostly about less than 2 h with the presence of FA. The mineralization rate of MO dye reached as high as 81.8% in 1.5 h in the case of initial MO dye concentration at 25 mg L(-1), which is in contrast to nearly no mineralization of the MO dye for a similar system without the FA added. The study revealed that the generation of the H2O2 species in the system was enhanced and the produced OH radicals effectively contributed to the degradation of the MO dye. Process parameters such as the initial concentration of MO dye, FA dosage and solution pH were all found to have some effect on the degradation efficiency under the same condition of UV-Vis light irradiation and air aeration. The MO dye degradation performance was found to follow a first-order reaction rate to the MO dye concentration in most cases and there existed a positive correlation between the reaction rate constant and the initial FA concentration. Compared to the traditional H2O2/UV-Vis oxidation system, the use of FA as a process-enhancing agent can have the advantages of low cost, easy availability, and safe to use. The study hence demonstrates a promising approach to use a readily available small molecule of FA to enhance the degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants, such as MO dye, especially for their pre-treatment. PMID:27258621

  5. Determination of nucleic acids with a near infrared cyanine dye using resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zheng, Hong; Li, Ling; Wu, Yuqin; Chen, Jinlong; Zhuo, Shujuan; Zhu, Changqing

    2006-06-01

    A new method for the determination of nucleic acids has been developed based on the enhancement effect of resonance light scattering (RLS) with a cationic near infrared (NIR) cyanine dye. Under the optimal conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity at 823 nm is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acids in the range of 0-400 ng mL -1 for both calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and fish sperm DNA (FS DNA), 0-600 ng mL -1 for snake ovum RNA (SO RNA). The detection limits are 3.5 ng mL -1, 3.4 ng mL -1 and 2.9 ng mL -1 for CT DNA, FS DNA and SO RNA, respectively. Owing to performing in near infrared region, this method not only has high sensitivity endowed by RLS technique but also avoids possible spectral interference from background. It has been applied to the determination of nucleic acids in synthetic and real samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  6. The adsorption of cationic dye from aqueous solution onto acid-activated andesite.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Hsu, Hsin-Chieh; Su, Ting-Yi; Lin, Keng-Yu; Lin, Chien-Ming; Dai, Tzong-Hung

    2007-08-25

    The adsorption of cationic dye (i.e., methylene blue) onto acid-activated andesite in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to its kinetics as a function of agitation speed, initial adsorbate concentration, pH, and adsorbent mass. It was found that the resulting acid-activated adsorbent possessed a mesoporous structure with BET surface areas at around 60m(2)/g. The surface characterization of acid-activated andesite was also performed using the zeta-potential measurements, indicating that the charge sign on the surface of the andesite should be negative in a wide pH range (i.e., 3-11). Furthermore, a simplified kinetic model, pseudo-second-order, was tested to investigate the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue onto the clay samples treated under different process conditions. It was found that the adsorption process could be well described with the model. The adsorption capacity parameter of the model obtained in the present work was significantly in line with the process parameters.

  7. The adsorption of cationic dye from aqueous solution onto acid-activated andesite.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Hsu, Hsin-Chieh; Su, Ting-Yi; Lin, Keng-Yu; Lin, Chien-Ming; Dai, Tzong-Hung

    2007-08-25

    The adsorption of cationic dye (i.e., methylene blue) onto acid-activated andesite in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to its kinetics as a function of agitation speed, initial adsorbate concentration, pH, and adsorbent mass. It was found that the resulting acid-activated adsorbent possessed a mesoporous structure with BET surface areas at around 60m(2)/g. The surface characterization of acid-activated andesite was also performed using the zeta-potential measurements, indicating that the charge sign on the surface of the andesite should be negative in a wide pH range (i.e., 3-11). Furthermore, a simplified kinetic model, pseudo-second-order, was tested to investigate the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue onto the clay samples treated under different process conditions. It was found that the adsorption process could be well described with the model. The adsorption capacity parameter of the model obtained in the present work was significantly in line with the process parameters. PMID:17363150

  8. Dye-loaded zeolite L @silica core-shell composite functionalized with europium(III) complexes for dipicolinic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yige; Yue, Yuping; Li, Huanrong; Zhao, Qi; Fang, Yi; Cao, Pengpeng

    2011-01-01

    Novel core-shell composites have been developed by immobilization of non-luminescent europium(III) complexes onto the surface of silica shells that are coated on the surface of luminescent dye-loaded zeolite L nano-crystals. The obtained core-shell composites were used for the ratiometric detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA) molecules. The dyes located in the channels of the zeolite L host are protected from any interaction with the environment of the particles and therefore provide a stable reference signal which can eliminate the need for instrument-specific calibration curves for DPA quantification in an analyte.

  9. Carcinogenicity of azo dyes: Acid Black 52 and Yellow 3 in hamsters and rats. Volume 2. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Plankenhorn, L.J.

    1983-09-30

    This document is an appendix to a study concerning the carcinogenicity of the azo dyes acid-black-52 and yellow-3 in male and female hamsters and rats and contains individual histopathology studies of both dyes. Histopathological features were reported in tabular form for the skin, mammary gland, muscle, salivary gland, mandibular lymph node, sciatic nerve, thymus, larynx, thyroid, parathyroid, trachea, bronchus, esophagus, adrenal, stomach, duodenum, jejunem, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum, mesenteric lymph node, lung, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidney, heart, urinary bladder, seminal vesicle, prostate, testis, cerebrum, cerebellum, pituitary, sternabrae, femur, bone marrow, and nasal cavity.

  10. Removal of reactive dyes from textile wastewater by immobilized chitosan upon grafted Jute fibers with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud S.

    2015-10-01

    Jute fibers were grafted with acrylic acid by gamma irradiation technique. Chitosan was immobilized upon the grafted Jute fibers to be used as an adsorbent for waste reactive dye. The treated Jute fibers were characterized by using of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of Jute treatment on its thermal stability by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and its mechanical properties were investigated. The adsorption isotherm and the different factors affecting the dye adsorption such as pH and contact time were also studied. It was found that the dye adsorption was enhanced in the low pH range and increased with increasing of the contact time, regardless of temperature change.

  11. Removal of malachite green dye from wastewater by different organic acid-modified natural adsorbent: kinetics, equilibriums, mechanisms, practical application, and disposal of dye-loaded adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Zeng, Guangming; Leng, Lijian; Peng, Xin; Liao, Kailingli; Peng, Lijuan; Xiao, Zhihua

    2014-10-01

    Natural adsorbent (Cinnamomum camphora sawdust) modified by organic acid (oxalic acid, citric acid, and tartaric acid) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for the removal of hazardous malachite green (MG) dye in aqueous media in a batch process. The extent of MG adsorption onto modified sawdust increased with increasing organic acid concentrations, pH, contact time, and temperature but decreased with increasing adsorbent dosage and ionic strength. Kinetic study indicated that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model could best describe the adsorption kinetics of MG. Equilibrium data were found to fit well with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the three kinds of organic acid-modified sawdust was 280.3, 222.8, and 157.5 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the sorption of MG was an endothermic process. The adsorption mechanism, the application of adsorbents in practical wastewater, the prediction of single-stage batch adsorption system, and the disposal of depleted adsorbents were also discussed.

  12. Acrylic acid grafted cellulosic Luffa cylindrical fiber for the removal of dye and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Agarwal, Shilpi; Singh, Prerna; Pathania, Deepak

    2013-10-15

    Acrylic acid grafted cellulosic Luffa cylindrical fiber was utilized for the removal of methylene blue and metal ions from the water system using batch process. The grafted sample used was found to demonstrate a maximum grafting efficiency of 90.8% under concentrations of 0.432×10(-3) mol/L, temperature of 35 °C, time of 60 min and pH of 7.0 respectively. The remarkable improvement in thermal properties of the grafted sample was observed. The formation of new bands in FTIR spectra of grafted sample confirmed the grafting of acrylic acid onto the cellulosic fiber. The maximum adsorption capacity of dye onto adsorbent was observed to be 62.15 mg g(-1) at 175 min. A maximum removal of 45.8% was observed for Mg(2+) as compared to other metal ions. High values of correlation coefficient for methylene blue (0.995) and metal ions such as Mg(2+) (0.996), Ni(2+) (0.995), Zn(2+) (0.996) confirmed the applicability of Langmuir isotherm that assumed a monolayer coverage and uniform activity distribution on the adsorbent surface.

  13. Impacts of dyebath auxiliaries on the reductive discoloration of Acid Orange 7 dye by high-carbon iron filings.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raja; Sinha, Alok

    2016-01-01

    This study proposed that the physicochemical effects of common dyebath auxiliaries on the bulk dye solution as well as on the iron surface can influence the reductive discoloration of effluent containing Acid Orange 7 (AO7) dye using high-carbon iron filings. Sodium chloride increased the discoloration rate because of the pitting corrosion on the iron surface, triggered by chloride anion. 'Salting out' effect of ammonium sulfate improved the reaction rate up to a certain concentration, beyond which it could compete with dye molecules for the reactive sites, as revealed by formed sulfite and sulfide. Urea drastically reduced the discoloration rates by its chaotropic effect on the bulk solution and by wrapping around the iron surface. Organic acids, namely acetic acid and citric acid, stimulated iron corrosion to improve the discoloration rates. The discoloration reaction was biphasic with an initial fast reaction phase, where in every case more than 70% discoloration was observed within 5 min of reaction, preceding a slow reaction phase. The experimental data could be well described using biphasic kinetics equation (R(2)> 0.997 in all cases) and a biphasic equation was developed considering the individual impact of co-existing auxiliaries on AO7 discoloration.

  14. Impacts of dyebath auxiliaries on the reductive discoloration of Acid Orange 7 dye by high-carbon iron filings.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raja; Sinha, Alok

    2016-01-01

    This study proposed that the physicochemical effects of common dyebath auxiliaries on the bulk dye solution as well as on the iron surface can influence the reductive discoloration of effluent containing Acid Orange 7 (AO7) dye using high-carbon iron filings. Sodium chloride increased the discoloration rate because of the pitting corrosion on the iron surface, triggered by chloride anion. 'Salting out' effect of ammonium sulfate improved the reaction rate up to a certain concentration, beyond which it could compete with dye molecules for the reactive sites, as revealed by formed sulfite and sulfide. Urea drastically reduced the discoloration rates by its chaotropic effect on the bulk solution and by wrapping around the iron surface. Organic acids, namely acetic acid and citric acid, stimulated iron corrosion to improve the discoloration rates. The discoloration reaction was biphasic with an initial fast reaction phase, where in every case more than 70% discoloration was observed within 5 min of reaction, preceding a slow reaction phase. The experimental data could be well described using biphasic kinetics equation (R(2)> 0.997 in all cases) and a biphasic equation was developed considering the individual impact of co-existing auxiliaries on AO7 discoloration. PMID:27642841

  15. Decolorization and degradation of Disperse Blue 79 and Acid Orange 10, by Bacillus fusiformis KMK5 isolated from the textile dye contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Yogesh M; Pawar, Shrikant P; Gawai, Kachru R; Lokhande, Pradeep D; Shouche, Yogesh S; Kodam, Kisan M

    2008-12-01

    The release of azo dyes into the environment is a concern due to coloration of natural waters and due to the toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of the dyes and their biotransformation products. The dye degrading bacterial strain KMK 5 was isolated from the textile dyes contaminated soil of Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra, India. It was identified as Bacillus fusiformis based on the biochemical and morphological characterization as well as 16S rDNA sequencing. KMK 5 could tolerate and degrade azo dyes, Disperse Blue 79 (DB79) and Acid Orange 10 (AO10) under anoxic conditions. Complete mineralization of DB79 and AO10 at the concentration of 1.5g/l was observed within 48h. This degradation potential increased the applicability of this microorganism for the dye removal.

  16. Biodegradation of azo dyes acid red 183, direct blue 15 and direct red 75 by the isolate Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Pareek, Nidhi; Prasad, R; Singh, R P

    2014-07-01

    Soils contaminated with dyes were collected and screened for obtaining potential fungal strains for the degradation of azo dyes. A strain that demonstrated broad spectrum ability for catabolizing different azo dyes viz. Acid Red 183 (AR 183), Direct Blue 15 (DB 15) and Direct Red 75 (DR 75) at 100 mg L(-1) concentration was subsequently identified as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 based on 18S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain has shown remarkably higher levels of degradation (95-100%) for almost all the dyes within 120 h at 30°C at pH 7.0. Notable levels of manganese peroxidase (659.4 ± 20 UL(-1)) during dye decolorization indicated the involvement of this enzyme in the decolorization process. The dyes following decolorization were catabolized as evident by spectroscopic analyses.

  17. Textile dye dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hatch, K L; Maibach, H I

    1995-04-01

    The literature concerning textile dye dermatitis published during the last decade was reviewed. Sixty-one cases of dye-allergic contact dermatitis in which the presentation or course of the dermatitis was unusual or the dye allergen was one not previously reported have been described. The four new dye allergens discovered were Disperse Blue 106, Disperse Blue 85, Disperse Brown 1, and Basic Red 46. The incidence of dye dermatitis varied from 1% to 15.9% depending on the country, patient sample, and number of dyes in the patch test series. The 10 new dye allergens discovered in these studies were Disperse Blue 153, Disperse Orange 13, Basic Black 1, Basic Brown 1, the acid dyes Supramine Yellow and Supramine Red, the direct dye Diazol Orange, the basic dye Brilliant Green, Turquoise Reactive, and Neutrichrome Red. Disperse Blue 106 and Disperse Blue 124 were shown to be the strongest clothing dye sensitizers to date. Standard screening patch test series were found to be inadequate for the detection of textile dye sensitivity; therefore textile dye patch test series should be used. It is difficult to determine whether the incidence of dye dermatitis is increasing or decreasing because controlled epidemiologic studies are lacking, but data suggest that textile dye sensitivity is more common than previously believed.

  18. Removal of Acid Black 194 dye from water by electrocoagulation with aluminum anode.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jorge; Villegas, Loreto; Peralta-Hernández, Juan M; Salazar González, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Application of an electrocoagulation process (EC) for the elimination of AB194 textile dye from synthetic and textile wastewater (effluent) contaminated with AB194 dye, was carried out using aluminum anodes at two different initial pH values. Tafel studies in the presence and absence of the dye were performed. The aluminum species formed during the electrolysis were quantified by atomic absorption, and the flocs formed in the process were analyzed by HPLC-MS. Complete removal of AB194 from 1.0 L of solution was achieved applying low densities current at initial pH values of 4.0 and 8.0. The removal of AB194 by EC was possible with a short electrolysis time, removing practically 100% of the total organic carbon content and chemical oxygen demand. The final result was completely discolored water lacking dye and organic matter. An effluent contaminated with 126 mg L(-1) AB194 dye from a Chilean textile industry was also treated by EC under optimized experimental conditions, yielding discolored water and considerably decreasing the presence of organic compounds (dye + dyeing additives), with very low concentrations of dissolved Al(3+). Analysis of flocs showed the presence of the original dye without changes in its chemical structure.

  19. Removal of Acid Black 194 dye from water by electrocoagulation with aluminum anode.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jorge; Villegas, Loreto; Peralta-Hernández, Juan M; Salazar González, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Application of an electrocoagulation process (EC) for the elimination of AB194 textile dye from synthetic and textile wastewater (effluent) contaminated with AB194 dye, was carried out using aluminum anodes at two different initial pH values. Tafel studies in the presence and absence of the dye were performed. The aluminum species formed during the electrolysis were quantified by atomic absorption, and the flocs formed in the process were analyzed by HPLC-MS. Complete removal of AB194 from 1.0 L of solution was achieved applying low densities current at initial pH values of 4.0 and 8.0. The removal of AB194 by EC was possible with a short electrolysis time, removing practically 100% of the total organic carbon content and chemical oxygen demand. The final result was completely discolored water lacking dye and organic matter. An effluent contaminated with 126 mg L(-1) AB194 dye from a Chilean textile industry was also treated by EC under optimized experimental conditions, yielding discolored water and considerably decreasing the presence of organic compounds (dye + dyeing additives), with very low concentrations of dissolved Al(3+). Analysis of flocs showed the presence of the original dye without changes in its chemical structure. PMID:26745322

  20. Mechanism of action of a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate ingredients in the treatment of dental hypersensitivity. Part III: Prevention of dye penetration through dentin vs a calcium- and phosphate-free control.

    PubMed

    Winston, Anthony E; Charig, Andrew J; Thong, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the pain of dental hypersensitivity resulting from gum recession is from the movement of fluid within the exposed tubules of dentin, causing changes in pressure on the nerve within the pulpal cavity. One method of treating hypersensitivity is to occlude the tubules, preventing fluid movement. This article discusses the use of a dye penetration technique, which establishes this mechanism of action for a desensitizing fluoride toothpaste containing calcium and phosphate. Two groups of intact teeth were perfectly sealed with enamel paint. Windows 100-micro to 200-micro deep were opened on opposite sides of each tooth at the dentin-enamel junction and briefly etched using 20% polyacrylic acid. One batch of teeth was treated eight times for 30 mins each with a 1:3 slurry of the desensitizing toothpaste and another set with a similar slurry prepared from a calcium- and phosphate-free control. A 0.85% aqueous solution of acid red fuchsin dye was applied to each window and allowed to dry. After a brief rinse, the teeth were sectioned across the windows. Almost no dye penetration was seen in teeth treated with the desensitizing toothpaste; however, extensive penetration through the dentin was visible in the control-treated teeth. The differences in dye penetration for the two sets of teeth were significant by both subjective (P < .001) and objective (P < .01) measures. Tubule occlusion because of calcium and phosphate ions from the desensitizing toothpaste accounts for its tooth desensitizing efficacy.

  1. High performance degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7 and sulfanilic acid in a laboratory scale reactor after seeding with cultured bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Michael F; Kinkle, Brian K; Bishop, Paul L

    2003-06-01

    Bacterial strains 1CX and SAD4i--previously isolated from the mixed liquor of a municipal sewage treatment plant--are capable of degrading the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and sulfanilic acid, respectively. A rotating drum bioreactor (RDBR), operating under continuous flow and nutrient conditions designed to simulate the effluent from a dye manufacturing plant, was seeded with strains 1CX and SAD4i, forming a biofilm capable of degrading AO7 and sulfanilic acid. In addition, an RDBR containing a pre-existing biofilm capable of degrading AO7, but not sulfanilic acid, was seeded with strain SAD4i alone. Strain SAD4i was incorporated into the existing biofilm and degraded the sulfanilic acid resulting from the degradation of AO7 by indigenous members of the biofilm. The ability to seed a bioreactor with bacterial strains capable of degrading azo dyes, and resulting by-products, in a mixed microbial community suggests that this process could have commercial applications.

  2. Biocompatibility of the vital dye Acid Violet-17 on retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tura, Ayşegül; Alt, Aizhan; Lüke, Julia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Haritoglou, Christos; Meyer, Carsten H; Nassar, Khaled; Lüke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the viability and differentiation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after exposure to the vital dye Acid Violet-17 (AV-17). Methods Bovine RPE cells were incubated with AV-17 (0.0625–0.5 mg/mL) for 30 seconds or 5 minutes. Viability was determined by live/dead staining, cleaved CASP3 immunostainings, and MTT test. Actin cytoskeleton was visualized by Alexa 488-phalloidin. Immunocytochemistry was performed to determine the levels of ZO-1, CTNNB1, and KRT19. Results Exposure to AV-17 at the concentrations of 0.25–0.5 mg/mL resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in viability, the loss of ZO-1 from tight junctions, translocation of CTNNB1 into the cytoplasm and nucleus, disarrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, and a slight increase in KRT19. Conclusion AV-17 at a concentration <0.125 mg/mL is likely to be well tolerated by the RPE cells, whereas the concentrations from 0.25 mg/mL onward can reduce viability and induce dedifferentiation particularly after long-term exposure. PMID:27536056

  3. Superior adsorption performance for triphenylmethane dyes on 3D architectures assembled by ZnO nanosheets as thin as ∼1.5nm.

    PubMed

    Pei, Cuijin; Han, Guoping; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Hua; Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lijuan; Yang, Heqing; Liu, Shengzhong

    2016-11-15

    The 3-dimensional hierarchical ZnO flower-like architectures have been synthesized in a Zn(Ac)2·2H2O-Na2SeO3-KBH4-pyridine solvothermal system at 100°C for 24h. The flower-like architecture is assembled from ZnO nanosheets with a thickness of ∼1.5nm, and the flower-like architecture specific surface area is 132m(2)/g. When the ZnO flower-like architecture is used as the adsorbent for acid fuschin (AF), malachite green (MG), basic fuchsin (BF), congo red (CR) and acid red (AR) in water, the adsorption capacities for AF, MG, BF, CR and AR are 7154.9, 2587.0, 1377.9, 85.0 and 38.0mg/g, respectively. Evidently, the as-obtained ZnO flower-like architectures show excellent adsorption performances for triphenylmethane dyes, and the adsorption capacity of 7154.9mg/g for AF is the highest of all adsorbents for dyes. The adsorption mechanism can be attributed to the electrostatic attraction and the formation of ion-association complex between triphenylmethane dyes and ZnO hierarchical flower-like architectures. PMID:27493012

  4. Post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 using aerobic moving bed biofilm process: enhanced removal of aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Koupaie, E Hosseini; Moghaddam, M R Alavi; Hashemi, S H

    2011-11-15

    The application of aerobic moving bed biofilm process as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 was investigated in this study. The main objective of this work was to enhance removal of anaerobically formed the dye aromatic metabolites. Three separate sequential treatment systems were operated with different initial dye concentrations of 100, 500 and 1000 mg/L. Each treatment system consisted of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (An-SBR) followed by an aerobic moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (MB-SBBR). Up to 98% of the dye decolorization and more than 80% of the COD removal occurred anaerobically. The obtained results suggested no significant difference in COD removal as well as the dye decolorization efficiency using three An-SBRs receiving different initial dye concentrations. Monitoring the dye metabolites through HPLC suggested that more than 80% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was completely removed in the aerobic biofilm reactors. Based on COD analysis results, at least 65-72% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment systems. According to the measured biofilm mass and also based on respiration-inhibition test results, increasing the initial dye concentration inhibited the growth and final mass of the attached-growth biofilm in MB-SBBRs.

  5. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  6. Production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid by using waste biomass of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM generated after degradation of textile dye Direct Red 5B.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jadhav, Mital U; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. The isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM was found to decolorize dye Direct Red 5B (DR5B) and simultaneously it produced polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DR5B at 500mgl(-1) concentration within 24h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The medium contains carbon source as a molasses which was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates obtained revealed the compound as a polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid. The activity of PHA synthase was found more at 24h after dye addition. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation include veratrol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase and azo reductase was found to be induced during decolorization process. The FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DR5B. The GC-MS analysis of product obtained led to the identification of two metabolites after biotransformation of dye as p-amino benzenesulfonic acid and naphthalene-1-ol.

  7. Production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid by using waste biomass of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM generated after degradation of textile dye Direct Red 5B.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jadhav, Mital U; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. The isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM was found to decolorize dye Direct Red 5B (DR5B) and simultaneously it produced polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DR5B at 500mgl(-1) concentration within 24h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The medium contains carbon source as a molasses which was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates obtained revealed the compound as a polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid. The activity of PHA synthase was found more at 24h after dye addition. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation include veratrol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase and azo reductase was found to be induced during decolorization process. The FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DR5B. The GC-MS analysis of product obtained led to the identification of two metabolites after biotransformation of dye as p-amino benzenesulfonic acid and naphthalene-1-ol. PMID:20031399

  8. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-11-05

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively.

  9. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-01-01

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively. PMID:23369579

  10. Efficient removal of malachite green dye using biodegradable graft copolymer derived from amylopectin and poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Pal, Aniruddha; Ghorai, Soumitra; Mandre, N R; Pal, Sagar

    2014-10-13

    This article reports on the application of a high performance biodegradable adsorbent based on amylopectin and poly(acrylic acid) (AP-g-PAA) for removal of toxic malachite green dye (MG) from aqueous solution. The graft copolymer has been synthesized and characterized using various techniques including FTIR, GPC, SEM and XRD analyses. Biodegradation study suggests that the co-polymer is biodegradable in nature. The adsorbent shows excellent potential (Qmax, 352.11 mg g(-1); 99.05% of MG has been removed within 30 min) for removal of MG from aqueous solution. It has been observed that point to zero charge (pzc) of graft copolymer plays significant role in adsorption efficacy. The adsorption kinetics and isotherm follow pseudo-second order and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. Thermodynamics parameters suggest that the process of dye uptake is spontaneous. Finally desorption study shows excellent regeneration efficiency of adsorbent.

  11. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2–Acetic Acid Interface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC. PMID:27110318

  12. Variability in antioxidant/detoxification enzymes of Labeo rohita exposed to an azo dye, acid black (AB).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satinder; Kaur, Arvinder

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate effect of a highly toxic azo dye, acid black (AB) (CI: 20470, 96 h LC50=10 mg/L) on the biochemical responses of Labeo rohita. Antioxidant/detoxification enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), acid phosphatase (AcP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) were determined in liver, kidney, gill, muscle and brain of L. rohita after 96 h exposure to 6 mg/L (LC10), 8 mg/L (LC30) and 10 mg/L (LC50) of dye with an aim to find out the target tissue and biomarker enzyme for AB. The fish were then kept for a recovery period of 90 days, and activity of the selected enzymes was determined at the end of this period. Present dye altered the activities of all these enzymes in the selected tissues of the experimental fish in a dose-dependent manner. SOD was the maximally affected enzyme, and liver was the most affected tissue. The results indicate that AB is very toxic to L. rohita as there was a significant effect of even 6 mg/L dose of the dye and the toxicity prolonged for a long time because the fish was not able to recover from the stress even 90 days after the exposure. The study suggests that SOD can be used as a biomarker enzyme and liver is the target tissue for AB.

  13. Mineralization of the textile dye acid yellow 42 by solar photoelectro-Fenton in a lab-pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Carolina; Romero, Julio; Villegas, Loreto; Cornejo-Ponce, Lorena; Salazar, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    A complete mineralization of a textile dye widely used in the Chilean textile industry, acid yellow 42 (AY42), was studied. Degradation was carried out in an aqueous solution containing 100mgL(-1) of total organic carbon (TOC) of dye using the advanced solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) process in a lab-scale pilot plant consisting of a filter press cell, which contains a boron doped diamond electrode and an air diffusion cathode (BDD/air-diffusion cell), coupled with a solar photoreactor for treat 8L of wastewater during 270min of electrolysis. The main results obtained during the degradation of the textile dye were that a complete transformation to CO2 depends directly on the applied current density, the concentration of Fe(2+) used as catalyst, and the solar radiation intensity. The elimination of AY42 and its organic intermediates was due to hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between electrogenerated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The application of solar radiation in the process (SPEF) yield higher current efficiencies and lower energy consumptions than electro-Fenton (EF) and electro-oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (E OH2O2) by the additional production of hydroxyl radicals from the photolysis of Fe(III) hydrated species and the photodecomposition of Fe(III) complexes with organic intermediates. Moreover, some products and intermediates formed during mineralization of dye, such as inorganic ions, carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds were determined by photometric and chromatographic methods. An oxidation pathway is proposed for the complete conversion to CO2.

  14. Mineralization of the textile dye acid yellow 42 by solar photoelectro-Fenton in a lab-pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Carolina; Romero, Julio; Villegas, Loreto; Cornejo-Ponce, Lorena; Salazar, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    A complete mineralization of a textile dye widely used in the Chilean textile industry, acid yellow 42 (AY42), was studied. Degradation was carried out in an aqueous solution containing 100mgL(-1) of total organic carbon (TOC) of dye using the advanced solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) process in a lab-scale pilot plant consisting of a filter press cell, which contains a boron doped diamond electrode and an air diffusion cathode (BDD/air-diffusion cell), coupled with a solar photoreactor for treat 8L of wastewater during 270min of electrolysis. The main results obtained during the degradation of the textile dye were that a complete transformation to CO2 depends directly on the applied current density, the concentration of Fe(2+) used as catalyst, and the solar radiation intensity. The elimination of AY42 and its organic intermediates was due to hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between electrogenerated H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The application of solar radiation in the process (SPEF) yield higher current efficiencies and lower energy consumptions than electro-Fenton (EF) and electro-oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (E OH2O2) by the additional production of hydroxyl radicals from the photolysis of Fe(III) hydrated species and the photodecomposition of Fe(III) complexes with organic intermediates. Moreover, some products and intermediates formed during mineralization of dye, such as inorganic ions, carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds were determined by photometric and chromatographic methods. An oxidation pathway is proposed for the complete conversion to CO2. PMID:26971051

  15. A new morphological approach for removing acid dye from leather waste water: preparation and characterization of metal-chelated spherical particulated membranes (SPMs).

    PubMed

    Şenay, Raziye Hilal; Gökalp, Safiye Meriç; Türker, Evren; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Aslan, Ahmet; Akgöl, Sinan

    2015-03-15

    In this study, p(HEMA-GMA) poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) spherical particulated membranes (SPMs) were produced by UV-photopolymerization and the synthesized SPMs were coupled with iminodiacetic acid (IDA). Finally the novel SPMs were chelated with Cr(III) ions as ligand and used for removing acid black 210 dye. Characterizations of the metal-chelated SPMs were made by SEM, FTIR and swelling test. The water absorption capacities and acid dye adsorption properties of the SPMs were investigated and the results were 245.0, 50.0, 55.0 and 51.9% for p(HEMA), p(HEMA-GMA), p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA and p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs respectively. Adsorption properties of the p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs were investigated under different conditions such as different initial dye concentrations and pH. The optimum pH was observed at 4.3 and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined as 885.14 mg/g at about 8000 ppm initial dye concentration. The concentrations of the dyes were determined using a UV/Vis Spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 435 nm. Reusability of p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs was also shown for five adsorption-desorption cycles without considerable decrease in its adsorption capacity. Finally, the results showed that the metal-chelated p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA SPMs were effective sorbent systems removing acid dye from leather waste water.

  16. Response surface optimization of acid red 119 dye from simulated wastewater using Al based waterworks sludge and polyaluminium chloride as coagulant.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, S Sadri; Moghaddam, M R Alavi; Arami, M

    2011-04-01

    In this research, the performance of Polyaluminium Chloride (PAC) and Polyaluminium Chloride sludge (PACS) as coagulants for acid red 119 (AR119) dye removal from aqueous solutions were compared. The sample of PACS was collected from "Baba Sheikh Ali" water treatment plant (Isfahan, Iran) where PAC is used as a coagulant in the coagulation/flocculation process. A response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the simple and combined effects of the operating variables including initial pH, coagulant dosage and initial dye concentration and to optimize the operating conditions of the treatment process. Results reveal that the optimal conditions for dye removal were initial pH 3.42, coagulant dosage of 4.55 g dried PACS/L and initial dye concentration of 140 mg/L for PACS, while the optimal initial pH, coagulant dosage and initial dye concentration for PAC were 3.8, 57 mg/L and 140 mg/L, respectively. Under these optimal values of process parameters, the dye removal efficiency of 94.1% and 95.25% was observed for PACS and PAC, respectively. Although lower amount of PAC in comparison with PACS was needed for specific dye removal, the reuse of PACS as a low-cost material can offer some advantages such as high efficiency for AR119 dye removal and economic savings on overall water and wastewater treatment plant operation costs. PMID:21216522

  17. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase from the thermophilic bacterium Rhodothermus marinus JCM9785: characteristics and role in trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline catabolism.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Ishikura, Masaru; Koyanagi, Takashi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Suye, Shin-ichiro

    2015-05-01

    A gene from the thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium Rhodothermus marinus JCM9785, encoding a dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase homologue, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was a highly thermostable dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase that retained more than 80% of its activity after incubation for 10 min at up to 70 °C. When enzyme-catalyzed dehydrogenation of several D-amino acids was carried out using 2,6-dichloroindophenol as the electron acceptor, D-phenylalanine was the most preferable substrate among the D-amino acids tested. Immediately upstream of the dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase gene (dadh) was a gene encoding a 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase homologue (hypE). That gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the gene product exhibited strong 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase activity. Reverse transcription PCR and quantitative real-time PCR showed that the six genes containing the dadh and hypE genes were arranged in an operon and were required for catabolism of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline in R. marinus. This is the first description of a dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase (Dye-DADH) with broad substrate specificity involved in trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline catabolism. PMID:25472442

  18. Decatungstate acid improves the photo-induced electron lifetime and retards the recombination in dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Yang, Yulin; Fan, Ruiqing; Liu, Jian; Jiang, Yanxia; Yang, Bin; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-10-14

    Decatungstate acid (DA) was utilized to modify TiO2 in the photoanode of dye sensitized solar cells. The photo-induced electron lifetime was evidently improved and the recombination was greatly inhibited. DA can introduce levels of impurities and lower the Fermi level through a doping effect and thus increase the photocurrent. Moreover, the improved charge carrier density can be found through external electric field surface photovoltage and Mott-Schottky plots. A 22.94% enhancement in photocurrent was achieved with little degradation in photovoltage, leading to a 10.28% increase in optic-to-electric power conversion efficiency. PMID:27550800

  19. Interactions of cyanine dyes with nucleic acids. XXIV. Aggregation of monomethine cyanine dyes in presence of DNA and its manifestation in absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogul'chansky, T. Yu; Losytskyy, M. Yu; Kovalska, V. B.; Yashchuk, V. M.; Yarmoluk, S. M.

    2001-06-01

    Absorption, fluorescence emission and excitation spectra of benzothiazole cyanine dyes — thiazole orange (TO) and 7-methyl-6-(3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylidenmethyl) [1,3] dioxolo [4',5':4,5] benzo [d] [1,3] thiazolium methylmethosulfate (Cyan 13) — were investigated over a wide concentration range. The dyes form aggregates with a 'sandwich'-like structure in water solution. At low dye to DNA concentrations ratios, Cyan 13 and TO monomers appear to interact with the DNA. On increasing the dye to DNA concentrations ratio, free dye molecules aggregate with the DNA-bound ones. The spectra of the free dye aggregates and the aggregates formed on the DNA, are characterized by an anomalously large (more than 100 nm) Stokes shift. This suggests, that the π-electron systems of the aggregates undergo substantial changes in excited state, compared to those of the monomers. The formation of aggregates consisting of the free and DNA-bound dye molecules can be explained using the half-intercalation model of the interaction of the cyanine dye monomers with the DNA.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of sildenafil citrate in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation using some chromotropic acid azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Y. M.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Youssef, A. F. A.; Senosy, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Two simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the quantitative determination of the drug sildenafil citrate (SC), Viagra, in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations, through ion-associate formation reactions (method A) with mono-chromotropic acid azo dyes, chromotrope 2B (I) and chromotrope 2R (II) and ion-pair reactions (method B) with bi-chromotropic acid azo dyes, 3-phenylazo-6-o-carboxyphenylazo-chromotropic acid (III), bis-3,6-(o-hydroxyphenylazo)-chromotropic acid (IV), bis-3,6-(p-N,N-dimethylphenylazo)-chromotropic acid (V) and 3-phenylazo-6-o-hydroxyphenylazo-chromotorpic acid (VI). The reaction products, extractable in methylene chloride, were quantitatively measured at 540, 520, 540, 570, 600 and 575 nm using reagents, I-VI, respectively. The reaction conditions were studied and optimized. Beer's plots were linear in the concentration ranges 3.3-87.0, 3.3-96.0, 5.0-115.0, 2.5-125.0, 8.3-166.7 and 0.8-15.0 μg mL -1 with corresponding molar absorptivities 1.02 × 10 4, 8.34 × 10 3, 6.86 × 10 3, 5.42 × 10 3, 3.35 × 10 3 and 2.32 × 10 4 L mol -1 cm -1 using reagents I-VI, respectively. The limits of detection and Sandell's sensitivities were calculated. The methods were successfully applied to the analysis of commercial tablets (Vigoran) and the recovery study reveals that there is no interference from the common excipients that are present in tablets. Statistical comparison of the results was performed with regard to accuracy and precision using Student's t- and F-tests at 95% confidence level. There is no significant difference between the reported and proposed methods with regard to accuracy and precision.

  1. Ecofriendly decolorisation of Cr-complex dye Acid Black 172 by a newly isolated Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Sheng; Li, Gang; Yang, Yu-Yi; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain DY1 was newly isolated from soil with rotten wood and identified as a member of the genus Pseudomonas based on 16S rDNA and biochemical tests. Acid Black 172, a water soluble Cr-complex dye, was then selected as a model dye to investigate the decolorisation ability of the strain. It was observed that the growth of the strain was not inhibited by high dose of metal ions (10 mM), and efficient decolorisation was still observed when high concentrations of Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Ca(2+) existed. The optimal decolorising conditions obtained from Taguchi design were as follows: temperature 37˚C, pH 7.0, Fe(3+) and proline concentrations of 7 mM and 3.0 g/L, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, 94.5% of Acid Black 172 (100 mg/L) could be decolorised by the strain in 24 h. The kinetics of the decolorisation best fitted the first order kinetic model (R(2)=0.981). Besides, the phytotoxicity study demonstrated a good detoxification by the strain. This work has a certain practical value in microbial decolorisation of textile wastewater.

  2. Investigation on solar photocatalytic degradation of various dyes in the presence of Er(3+):YAlO(3)/ZnO-TiO(2) composite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Jia; Xie, Yingpeng; Li, Chengwu; Han, Guangxi; Zhang, Liquan; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2010-01-01

    In this work, Er(3+):YAlO(3)/ZnO-TiO(2) and ZnO-TiO(2) composites were prepared by the ultrasonic dispersion and liquid boiling method. In succession, they were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Acid red B as a model dye compound was degraded under solar light irradiation to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the Er(3+):YAlO(3)/ZnO-TiO(2) and ZnO-TiO(2) composites. We found that the photocatalytic activity of ZnO-TiO(2) composite can be enhanced by adding an appropriate amount of Er(3+):YAlO(3). We reviewed influencing factors, such as Er(3+):YAlO(3) content, heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the photocatalytic activity of the Er(3+):YAlO(3)/ZnO-TiO(2) composites. In addition, the effects of solar light irradiation time, dye initial concentration, Er(3+):YAlO(3)/ZnO-TiO(2) amount and solution acidity on the photocatalytic degradation of acid red B dye in aqueous solution were investigated in detail. Simultaneously, the degradation and comparison of other dyes such as methyl orange (MO), rhodamine B (RM-B), azo fuchsine (AF), congo red (CG-R) and methyl blue (MB) were also reviewed. In addition, we attempted to explore both the principle of possible excitation of Er(3+):YAlO(3)/ZnO-TiO(2) under solar light irradiation and the mechanism of photocatalytic degradation.

  3. Biodegradation of C.I. Acid Red 1 by indigenous bacteria Stenotrophomonas sp. BHUSSp X2 isolated from dye contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Lata; Tiwary, Dhanesh; Mishra, Pradeep Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A significant proportion of xenobiotic recalcitrant azo dyes are being released in environment during carpet dyeing. The bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas sp. BHUSSp X2 was isolated from dye contaminated soil of carpet industry, Bhadohi, India. The isolated bacterial strain was identified morphologically, biochemically, and on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The isolate decolorized 97 % of C.I. Acid Red 1 (Acid RED G) at the concentration of 200 mg/l within 6 h under optimum static conditions (temperature -35 °C, pH 8, and initial cell concentration 7 × 10(7) cell/ml). Drastic reduction in dye degradation rate was observed beyond initial dye concentration from 500 mg/l (90 %), and it reaches to 25 % at 1000 mg/l under same set of conditions. The analysis related to decolorization and degradation was done using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, HPLC, and FTIR, whereas the GC-MS technique was utilized for the identification of degradation products. Phytotoxicity analysis revealed that degradation products are less toxic as compared to the original dye.

  4. Molecular design of boronic acid-functionalized squarylium cyanine dyes for multiple discriminant analysis of sialic acid in biological samples: selectivity toward monosaccharides controlled by different alkyl side chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Kazuki; Colyer, Christa L; Sebaiy, Mahmoud; Zhou, Jin; Maeda, Takeshi; Nakazumi, Hiroyuki; Shibukawa, Masami; Saito, Shingo

    2015-02-01

    We designed a new series of boronic acid-functionalized squarylium cyanine dyes (SQ-BA) with different lengths of alkyl chain residues, suitable for multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) of sialic acid (Neu5Ac) in biological samples. The SQ-BA dyes form aggregates based on hydrophobic interactions, which result in quenched fluorescence in aqueous solutions. When the boronic acid binds with saccharides, the fluorescence intensity increases as a result of dissociation to the emissive monomeric complex. We inferred that different dye aggregate structures (H-aggregates and J-aggregates) were induced depending on the alkyl chain length, so that monosaccharides would be recognized in different ways (especially, multipoint interaction with J-aggregates). A distinctive emission enhancement of SQ-BA dyes with shorter-alkyl-chains in the presence of Neu5Ac was observed (2.4-fold fluorescence enhancement; with formation constant 10(1.7) M(-1)), with no such enhancement for SQ-BA dyes with longer-alkyl-chain. In addition, various enhancement factors for other monosaccharides were observed depending on the alkyl chain length. Detailed thermodynamic and NMR studies of the SQ-BA complexes revealed the unique recognition mechanism: the dye aggregate with a shorter-alkyl-chain causes the slipped parallel structure and forms a stable 2:1 complex with Neu5Ac, as distinct from longer-alkyl-chain dyes, which form a 1:1 monomeric complex. MDA using the four SQ-BA dyes was performed for human urine samples, resulting in the successful discrimination between normal and abnormal Neu5Ac levels characteristic of disease. Thus, we successfully controlled various responses to similar monosaccharides with a novel approach that chemically modified not the boronic acid moiety itself but the length of the alkyl chain residue attached to the dye in order to generate specificity.

  5. Biodegradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 by Nasturtium officinale: Study of Some Physiological Responses and Metabolic Fate of Dye.

    PubMed

    Torbati, S; Movafeghi, A; Khataee, A R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of aquatic vascular plant, Nasturtium officinale, for degradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92). The effect of operational parameters such as initial dye concentration, plant biomass, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of biological decolorization process was determined. The reusability of the plant in long term repetitive operations confirmed the biological degradation process. The by-products formed during biodegradation process were identified by GC-MS technique. The effects of the dye on several plant physiological responses such as photosynthetic pigments content and antioxidant enzymes activity were investigated. The content of chlorophyll and carotenoids was significantly reduced at 20 mg/L of the dye. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were remarkably increased in the plant root verifying their importance in plant tolerance to the dye contamination.

  6. Biodegradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 by Nasturtium officinale: Study of Some Physiological Responses and Metabolic Fate of Dye.

    PubMed

    Torbati, S; Movafeghi, A; Khataee, A R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of aquatic vascular plant, Nasturtium officinale, for degradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92). The effect of operational parameters such as initial dye concentration, plant biomass, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of biological decolorization process was determined. The reusability of the plant in long term repetitive operations confirmed the biological degradation process. The by-products formed during biodegradation process were identified by GC-MS technique. The effects of the dye on several plant physiological responses such as photosynthetic pigments content and antioxidant enzymes activity were investigated. The content of chlorophyll and carotenoids was significantly reduced at 20 mg/L of the dye. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were remarkably increased in the plant root verifying their importance in plant tolerance to the dye contamination. PMID:25409244

  7. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Azo Dyes Using Recyclable Silver Nanoparticles Immobilized on Tannic Acid-Grafted Eggshell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liang, Miao; Liu, Mingyue; Su, Rongxin; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a facile one-step synthesis of a novel nanocomposite catalytic film was developed based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized in tannic acid-modified eggshell membrane (Tan-ESM). Tannic acid, as a typical plant polyphenol from oak wood, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both the reductant and the stabilizer during the synthesis of AgNPs. The morphology, constitution, and thermal stability of the resulting AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites were fully characterized to explain the excellent catalytic efficiency of AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites. These composite catalysts were applied to the degradation of azo dyes which exhibited the high catalytic activity toward Congo red and methyl orange according to the kinetic curves. More importantly, they can be easily recovered and reused for many times because of their good stability.

  8. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interactions between cationic (C.I. Basic Blue 9) and anionic (C.I. Acid Blue 25) dyes in adsorption onto extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanic in single and binary system.

    PubMed

    Ben Douissa, Najoua; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanica was used as an adsorbent for removal of a cationic (Basic blue 9, BB) and anionic textile dye (Acid blue 25, AB) from aqueous solution in single dye system. Characterization of the extracted cellulose and extracted cellulose-dye systems were performed using several techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and Boehm acid-base titration method. Adsorption tests showed that the extracted cellulose presented higher adsorption of BB than AB in single dye system, revealing that electrostatic interactions are responsible, in the first instance, for the dye-adsorbent interaction. In single dye systems, the extracted cellulose presented the maximum adsorption capacities of BB and AB at 0.955 mmol.g(-1) and 0.370 mmol.g(-1), respectively. Adsorption experiments of AB dye on extracted cellulose saturated by BB dye exhibited the release of the latter dye from the sorbent which lead to dye-dye interaction in aqueous solution due to electrostatic attraction between both species. Interaction of BB and AB dyes were investigated using spectrophotometric analysis and results demonstrated the formation of a molecular complex detected at wavelengths 510 and 705 nm when anionic (AB) and cationic (BB) dye were taken in equimolar proportions. The adsorption isotherm of AB, taking into account the dye-dye interaction was investigated and showed that BB dye was released proportionately by AB equilibrium concentration. It was also observed that AB adsorption is widely enhanced when the formation of the molecular complex is disadvantaged.

  9. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interactions between cationic (C.I. Basic Blue 9) and anionic (C.I. Acid Blue 25) dyes in adsorption onto extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanic in single and binary system.

    PubMed

    Ben Douissa, Najoua; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanica was used as an adsorbent for removal of a cationic (Basic blue 9, BB) and anionic textile dye (Acid blue 25, AB) from aqueous solution in single dye system. Characterization of the extracted cellulose and extracted cellulose-dye systems were performed using several techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and Boehm acid-base titration method. Adsorption tests showed that the extracted cellulose presented higher adsorption of BB than AB in single dye system, revealing that electrostatic interactions are responsible, in the first instance, for the dye-adsorbent interaction. In single dye systems, the extracted cellulose presented the maximum adsorption capacities of BB and AB at 0.955 mmol.g(-1) and 0.370 mmol.g(-1), respectively. Adsorption experiments of AB dye on extracted cellulose saturated by BB dye exhibited the release of the latter dye from the sorbent which lead to dye-dye interaction in aqueous solution due to electrostatic attraction between both species. Interaction of BB and AB dyes were investigated using spectrophotometric analysis and results demonstrated the formation of a molecular complex detected at wavelengths 510 and 705 nm when anionic (AB) and cationic (BB) dye were taken in equimolar proportions. The adsorption isotherm of AB, taking into account the dye-dye interaction was investigated and showed that BB dye was released proportionately by AB equilibrium concentration. It was also observed that AB adsorption is widely enhanced when the formation of the molecular complex is disadvantaged. PMID:27148723

  10. Optically transparent hydrogels from an auxin-amino-acid conjugate super hydrogelator and its interactions with an entrapped dye.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Amarendar; Sharma, Aashish; Srivastava, Aasheesh

    2012-06-11

    Low-molecular-weight organic hydrogelators (LMHGs) that can rigidify water into soft materials are desirable in various applications. Herein, we report the excellent hydrogelating properties of a simple synthetic auxin-amino-acid conjugate, naphthalene-1-acetamide of L-phenylalanine (1-NapF, M(w)=333.38 Da), which gelated water even at 0.025 wt %, thereby making it the most-efficient LMHG known. Optically transparent gels that exhibited negligible scattering in the range 350-900 nm were obtained. A large shift from the theoretical pK(a) value of the gelator was observed. The dependence of the minimum gelator concentration (MGC) and the gel-melting temperatures on the pH value indicated the importance of H-bonding between the carboxylate groups on adjacent phenylalanine molecules in the gelator assembly. FTIR spectroscopy of the xerogels showed a β-sheet-like assembly of the gelator. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that π stacking of the aromatic residues was also partly involved in the gelator assembly. TEM of the xerogel showed the presence of a dense network of thin, high-aspect-ratio fibrillar assemblies with diameters of about 5 nm and lengths that exceeded a few microns. Rheology studies showed the formation of stable gels. The entrapment of water-soluble dyes afforded extremely fluorescent gels that involved the formation of J-aggregates by the dye within gel. A strong induced-CD band established that the RhoB molecules were interacting closely with the chiral gelator aggregates. H-bonding and electrostatic interactions, rather than intercalation, seemed to be involved in RhoB binding. The addition of chaotropic reagents, as well as increasing the pH value, disassembled the gel and promoted the release of the entrapped dye with zero-order kinetics. PMID:22532500

  11. Toxicity of the azo dyes Acid Red 97 and Bismarck Brown Y to Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis).

    PubMed

    Soriano, Jeriel J; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Norman, Grant; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valérie S

    2014-03-01

    Azo compounds are used in a variety of industrial applications, such as textile colorant. Azo dyes have been found to contaminate aquatic environments and it has been shown that these compounds could potentially be toxic or induce endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. However, there are few data available on the toxicity of these dyes, specifically Acid Red 97 (AR97) and Bismarck Brown Y (BBY). The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity and the endocrine-disrupting properties of AR97 and BBY in frogs. As fugacity modeling predicted that both compounds would sorb to sediment, sediment exposures were performed using a geometric range of concentrations (0, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm). Both AR97 and BBY dyes were not lethal to Silurana tropicalis embryos; however, BBY significantly induced malformations. Gene expression analysis of oxidative stress and mutagen-related genes was performed in BBY-treated larvae. There were significant two-fold increases of the tumor-suppressing protein p53 and heat shock protein 70 mRNA at 1,000 ppm suggesting that BBY induces cellular stress in early S. tropicalis development. Transcripts of the heat shock protein 90 did not change. Furthermore, reproductive-related genes were assessed and a 2.1-fold change was observed in the mRNA of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein while steroid 5 alpha-reductase type 2 and androgen receptor transcript levels did not vary among treatments. In conclusion, high concentrations of BBY lead to increased developmental defects in frog embryogenesis and early larval development.

  12. Development of a pH sensor based on a nanostructured filter adding pH-sensitive fluorescent dye for detecting acetic acid in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Takashi; Itayama, Tomohiro; Nagasaki, Hideaki; Iwami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Chizuko; Hara, Yukiko; Masuda, Atsushi; Umeda, Norihiro

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid formed via the hydrolysis of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as an encapsulant in photovoltaic (PV) modules causes a decrease in the conversion efficiency of such modules by grid corrosion. Here, a nondestructive and simple optical method for evaluating the condition of PV modules is proposed. This method uses a dual-wavelength pH-sensitive fluorescent dye to detect acetic acid in PV modules using a change in pH. The change in pH induced by the formation of acetic acid is detected by the change in the ratio of the fluorescent intensities of two peaks of the dye. A pH-sensitive fluorescent dye showed sensitivity for small amounts of acetic acid such as that produced from EVA. Furthermore, a membrane filter dyed with a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye was confirmed to detect acetic acid in aged EVA after a damp-heat test (85 °C, 85%) for 5000 h in PV modules.

  13. Photo-induced interaction of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots with cyanine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelbar, Mostafa F.; Fayed, Tarek A.; Meaz, Talaat M.; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M.

    2016-11-01

    The photo-induced interaction of three different sizes of thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) with two monomethine cyanine dyes belonging to the thiazole orange (TO) family has been studied. Positively charged cyanines interact with QDs surface which is negatively charged due to capping agent carboxylate ions. The energy transfer parameters including Stern-Volmer constant, Ksv, number of binding sites, n, quenching sphere radius, r, the critical energy transfer distance, R0, and energy transfer efficiencies, E have been calculated. The effect of structure and the number of aggregating molecules have been studied as a function of CdTe QDs particle size. Combining organic and inorganic semiconductors leads to increase of the effective absorption cross section of the QDs which can be utilized in novel nanoscale designs for light-emitting, photovoltaic and sensor applications. A synthesized triplet emission of the studied dyes was observed using CdTe QDs as donors and this is expected to play a potential role in molecular oxygen sensitization and in photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications.

  14. Enhancement of zinc oxide-mediated solar light decoloration of Acid Yellow 99 dye by addition of β-CD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchaimuthu, Sakthivel; Rajalakshmi, Subramanian; Kannan, Nagarathinam; Velusamy, Ponnusamy

    2015-06-01

    In the current work, the commercially available ZnO photocatalyst was used to investigate the photodecoloration of Acid yellow 99 (AY99) dye under solar light radiation. Promising enhancement of photodecoloration of AY99 dye was also achieved by the addition of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with the ZnO (ZnO-β-CD). The effects of process parameters such as initial concentration, pH, catalyst loading, and illumination time on the extent of decoloration were investigated. The optimum catalyst loading was observed at 2.0 g/L. The higher photoactivity of ZnO-β-CD/solar light system than ZnO/solar light system can be ascribed due to the ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) from β-CD to ZnII. The complexation patterns have been confirmed with UV-visible and FT-IR spectroscopy and the interaction between ZnO and β-CD has been characterized by FE-SEM, powder XRD analysis, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

  15. Evaluation of antioxidant enzymes activities and identification of intermediate products during phytoremediation of an anionic dye (C.I. Acid Blue 92) by pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Fatemeh; Movafeghi, Ali; Khataee, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    The potential of pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris) for phytoremediation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92) was evaluated. The effects of various experimental parameters including pH, temperature, dye concentration and plant weight on dye removal efficiency were investigated. The results showed that the optimal condition for dye removal were pH 3.5 and temperature 25 degree C. Moreover, the absolute dye removal enhanced with increase in the initial dye concentration and plant weight. Pennywort showed the same removal efficiency in repeated experiments (four runs) as that obtained from the first run (a 6-day period). Therefore, the ability of the plant in consecutive removal of AB92 confirmed the biodegradation process. Accordingly, a number of produced intermediate compounds were identified. The effect of treatment on photosynthesis and antioxidant defense system including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase in plant roots and leaves were evaluated. The results revealed a reduction in photosynthetic pigments content under dye treatments. Antioxidant enzyme responses showed marked variations with respect to the plant organ and dye concentration in the liquid medium. Overall, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activity under AB92 stress in the roots was much higher than that in the leaves. Nevertheless, no significant increase in malondialdehyde content was detected in roots or leaves, implying that the high efficiency of antioxidant system in the elimination of reactive oxygen species. Based on these results, pennywort was founded to be a capable species for phytoremediation of AB92-contaminated water, may be effective for phytoremediation dye-contaminated polluted aquatic ecosystems.

  16. Evaluation of antioxidant enzymes activities and identification of intermediate products during phytoremediation of an anionic dye (C.I. Acid Blue 92) by pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Fatemeh; Movafeghi, Ali; Khataee, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    The potential of pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris) for phytoremediation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92) was evaluated. The effects of various experimental parameters including pH, temperature, dye concentration and plant weight on dye removal efficiency were investigated. The results showed that the optimal condition for dye removal were pH 3.5 and temperature 25 degree C. Moreover, the absolute dye removal enhanced with increase in the initial dye concentration and plant weight. Pennywort showed the same removal efficiency in repeated experiments (four runs) as that obtained from the first run (a 6-day period). Therefore, the ability of the plant in consecutive removal of AB92 confirmed the biodegradation process. Accordingly, a number of produced intermediate compounds were identified. The effect of treatment on photosynthesis and antioxidant defense system including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase in plant roots and leaves were evaluated. The results revealed a reduction in photosynthetic pigments content under dye treatments. Antioxidant enzyme responses showed marked variations with respect to the plant organ and dye concentration in the liquid medium. Overall, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activity under AB92 stress in the roots was much higher than that in the leaves. Nevertheless, no significant increase in malondialdehyde content was detected in roots or leaves, implying that the high efficiency of antioxidant system in the elimination of reactive oxygen species. Based on these results, pennywort was founded to be a capable species for phytoremediation of AB92-contaminated water, may be effective for phytoremediation dye-contaminated polluted aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24552049

  17. Sonophotocatalytic degradation of dye C.I. Acid Orange 7 by TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles immobilized on corona pretreated polypropylene non-woven fabric.

    PubMed

    Marković, Darka; Šaponjić, Zoran; Radoičić, Marija; Radetić, Tamara; Vodnik, Vesna; Potkonjak, Branislav; Radetić, Maja

    2015-05-01

    This study discusses the possibility of using corona pre-treated polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric as a support for immobilization of colloidal TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles in order to remove dye C.I. Acid Orange 7 from aqueous solution. Dye removal efficiency by sonocatalysis, photocatalysis and sonophotocatalysis was evaluated on corona pre-treated fabric loaded with TiO2 nanoparticles, corona pre-treated fabric double loaded with TiO2 nanoparticles and corona pre-treated fabrics loaded with TiO2 nanoparticles before and after deposition of Ag nanoparticles. In addition, the stability of PP non-woven fabric during these processes was investigated. The substrates were characterized by SEM, EDX and AAS analyses. The change of the dye concentration was evaluated by UV-VIS spectrophotometry. Unlike sonocatalysis and photocatalysis, complete dye removal from both solution and non-woven fabric was obtained already after 240-270 min of sonophotocatalysis. Corona pre-treated PP non-woven fabric loaded with Ag nanoparticles prior to deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles provided excellent degradation efficiency and superior reusability. Sonophotocatalytic degradation of dye in the presence of all investigated samples was the most prominent in acidic conditions. Although this nanocomposite system ensured fast discoloration of dye solution, TOC values of water measured after sonophotocatalysis were not satisfactory because of PP degradation. Therefore, it is suggested to include TOC evaluation in each case study where different supports for TiO2 nanoparticles are used since these nanoparticles may guarantee the dye removal from solution but the stability of support could be problematic causing even more serious environmental impact.

  18. Inhibition of acidic corrosion of carbon steel by some mono and bis azo dyes based on 1,5 dihydroxynaphihalene.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Metwally; Moustafa, Moustafa E

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition of the corrosion of carbon steel in hydrochloric acid solution by some mono- and bis-azo dyes based on 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene was studied in relation to the concentration of inhibitors using weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The percentage inhibition efficiency calculated from two methods is in a good agreement with each other. The inhibition mechanism of the additives was ascribed to the formation of complex compound adsorbed on the metal surface. The adsorption process follows Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The formation of the complex compound was studied by conductometric and potentiometric titrations. The stability constants of the Fe-complexes were determined using the latter technique and related to the inhibition efficiency.

  19. Time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry method development for high-sensitivity analysis of acid dyes in nylon fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanzhen; Li, Min; Garcia, Roberto; Crawford, Anne; Beck, Keith; Hinks, David; Griffis, Dieter P

    2012-11-20

    A minimally destructive technique for the determination of dyes in finished fibers provides an important tool for crime scene and other forensic investigations. The analytical power and the minimal sample consumption of time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometric (TOF-SIMS) analysis provides the ability to obtain definitive molecular and elemental information relevant to fiber identification, including identification of dyes, from a very small volume of sample. For both fiber surface analysis and, with the aid of cryomicrotomy, fiber cross-section analysis, TOF-SIMS was used to identify various dyes in finished textile fibers. The analysis of C.I. Acid Blue 25 in nylon is presented as a representative example. The molecular ion of C.I. Acid Blue 25 with lower than 3% on weight-of-fiber (owf) dye loading cannot be identified on dyed nylon surfaces by TOF-SIMS using a Bi(3)(+) primary ion beam. Sputtering with C(60)(+) provided the ability to remove surface contamination as well as at least partially remove Bi-induced damage, resulting in a greatly improved signal-to-noise ratio for the Acid Blue 25 molecular ion. The use of C(60)(+) for damage removal in a cyclic manner along with Bi for data acquisition provided the ability to unambiguously identify Acid Blue 25 via its molecular ion at a concentration of 0.1% owf from both fiber surfaces and cross sections. PMID:23113618

  20. Textile dye decolorization using cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Amit; Madamwar, Datta

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacterial cultures isolated from sites polluted by industrial textile effluents were screened for their ability to decolorize cyclic azo dyes. Gloeocapsa pleurocapsoides and Phormidium ceylanicum decolorized Acid Red 97 and FF Sky Blue dyes by more than 80% after 26 days. Chroococcus minutus was the only culture which decolorized Amido Black 10B (55%). Chlorophyll a synthesis in all cultures was strongly inhibited by the dyes. Visible spectroscopy and TLC confirmed that color removal was due to degradation of the dyes.

  1. Interaction of cyanine dyes with nucleic acids. XXVI. Intercalation of the trimethine cyanine dye Cyan 2 into double-stranded DNA: study by spectral luminescence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmoluk, S. M.; Lukashov, S. S.; Losytskyy, M. Yu; Akerman, B.; Kornyushyna, O. S.

    2002-12-01

    The interaction between double-stranded (ds) DNA and the cyanine dye Cyan 2 has been studied with spectral luminescence methods. Binding constant values have been determined by fluorescence titration and dye distribution in the two-phase system ethyl acetate-water (3.6×10 4 and 1.5×10 4 M -1, respectively). Cyan 2 exhibits a small specificity for guanine-cytosine (GC) sequences in total DNA and synthetic polydeoxynucleotides poly(dA/dT) and poly(dGdC/dGdC). The DNA complexes with Cyan 2 are stable at high-ionic strength solution when NaCl is added. The dye molecule complexed with DNA is apparently shielded from the anionic quencher—iodide ion. The negative linear dichroism of the visible absorption band of aligned Cyan 2-DNA complexes indicates that the bound dye lies almost perpendicularly to the DNA helix axis. The linear dichroism of the absorption band at 260 nm suggests a considerable change in the DNA B-form. The results are consistent with an intercalative binding interaction between Cyan 2 and ds DNA.

  2. Synthesis of interpenetrating network hydrogel from poly(acrylic acid-co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and sodium alginate: modeling and kinetics study for removal of synthetic dyes from water.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidyadhar; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2013-10-15

    Several interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were made by free radical in situ crosslink copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) and hydroxy ethyl methacrylate in aqueous solution of sodium alginate. N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) was used as comonomer crosslinker for making these crosslink hydrogels. All of these hydrogels were characterized by carboxylic content, FTIR, SEM, XRD, DTA-TGA and mechanical properties. Swelling, diffusion and network parameters of the hydrogels were studied. These hydrogels were used for adsorption of two important synthetic dyes, i.e. Congo red and methyl violet from water. Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics of dye adsorption by these hydrogels were also studied.

  3. Tricolour fluorescence detection of sequence-specific DNA with a new molecular beacon and a nucleic acid dye TOTO-3.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhang, Cuiling; Chen, Lu; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2012-12-21

    We have developed a tricolor fluorescence quantitative method for sequence-specific DNA detection using a new molecular beacon (MB) and a nucleic acid dye TOTO-3. This new MB is designed with two fluorophores of FAM and TAMRA instead of one fluorophore and one quencher of traditional MB, and a nucleotide with guanine base is attached directly to FAM as a quencher. In the absence of target DNA, MBs are in the stem-loop state. The fluorescence of FAM is absorbed by TAMRA, and the fluorescence of TAMRA is quenched by guanine base. Meanwhile, the interaction between TOTO-3 and MBs is very weak. In the presence of target DNA, MBs hybridize with target DNA to form a double-stranded structure. TAMRA is separated from FAM and guanine base, and the fluorescence of FAM and TAMRA recovers simultaneously. At the same time TOTO-3 binds to double-stranded DNA, the fluorescence of TOTO-3 significantly enhances. In this strategy, the false-positive signals of MBs caused by non-specific interactions can be distinguished by the change of the ratio of the total fluorescence intensities of FAM and TAMRA to that of TOTO-3 at different concentrations of target DNA. In the simple sample, the detection of target DNA can be achieved with the total fluorescence intensity of three dyes, which results in a significant improvement of the detection sensitivity. In the complex sample, the detection of target DNA can be achieved with the fluorescence intensity of TOTO-3 which can overcome the false-positive signals of MBs and improve the detection accuracy.

  4. Infra Red Dye and Endostar Loaded Poly Lactic Acid Nano Particles as a Novel Theranostic Nanomedicine for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Du, Yang; Jing, Lijia; Liang, Xiaolong; Li, Yaqian; Li, Xiaofeng; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Endostar, a novel recombinant human endostatin, has been proven to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and is utilized as an anticancer drug. While free drugs can display limited efficacy, nanoscaled anticancer drugs have been fabricated and proven to possess superior therapeutic effects. Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a FDA-approved biomaterial displaying excellent biocompatibility and low toxicity. In this study, Endostar-loaded PLA nanoparticles (EPNPs) were first prepared, and a near-infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW, was conjugated to the surface for detecting nanoparticle biodistribution through fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) using an orthotopic breast tumor mouse model. The antitumor efficacy of EPNPs was examined using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and immunohistology. To further improve the antitumor effects, we combined EPNPs with zoledronic acid monohydrate (ZA), which is known to decrease the tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and inhibit tumor progression. We found that EPNPs decreased human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) viability by inhibiting tumor growth gene expression more significantly than free Endostar in vitro. In vivo, EPNPs displayed better tumor growth inhibitory effects compared with free Endostar, and the combination of EPNPs with ZA exhibited more significant antitumor effects. As confirmed by CD31 and CD11b immunohistochemistry, the combination of EPNPs and ZA showed synergistic effects in reducing tumor angiogenesis and TAM accumulation in tumor regions. Taken together, this study presents a novel and effective form of nanoscaled Endostar for the treatment of breast cancer that displays synergistic antitumor effects in combination with ZA. PMID:27280247

  5. Cooperative proton transfer and tunneling in dye doped benzoic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaud, Ch.; Trommsdorff, H. P.

    1999-06-01

    In seleno-indigo doped benzoic acid crystals, the energy level structure of a pair of benzoic acid dimers coupled to the impurity center is characterized by optical spectroscopy and transient hole burning in electric fields. The lowest energy states involve degenerate, polar proton configurations. Proton tunneling lifts this degeneracy. The tunneling matrix element for proton transfer in a benzoic acid dimer equals 6.5±1.5 GHz, a value comparable to those found with other guest molecules. Relaxation between the two ground state levels involves the concerted motion of four protons and determines the intensity distribution of the fine structure observed in hole burning.

  6. In vivo diagnostic assessment of dentinal caries by junior and senior students using red acid dye.

    PubMed

    Tassery, H; Déjou, J; Chafaie, A; Camps, J

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to determine and compare the ability of inexperienced junior dental students (Fourth-year) and senior students (Fifth-year) versus a dental school instructor to identify demineralized dentine with the aid of a caries-disclosing solution and secondly to evaluate an eventual improvement of the caries diagnosis accuracy of junior (Fourth-year) and senior (Fifth-year) dental students. Three successive stages were used to check the ability of the dental students to diagnose and excavate the de-mineralized dentine. This study pointed out that 96% of junior dental students versus a teacher failed to remove all of the demineralized dentine without the use of a caries detector at the first stage and 79% at the second stage in the same condition. 100% of senior students versus a teacher, also failed to diagnose dental caries without a caries detector, but only at the first stage. However, at the second stage, unlike the junior students, all of the senior students were able to remove all of the demineralized dentine. Without the use of a caries detector dye, the risks of the dental students leaving demineralized dentine are high. This technique may be particularly helpful for the fourth-year students who are performing their first restorative treatment.

  7. Method for colorimetric detection of double-stranded nucleic acid using leuco triphenylmethane dyes.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shigehiko; Sano, Sotaro; Takahashi, Koji; Jikihara, Takaaki

    2015-03-15

    Because loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) can amplify substantial amounts of DNA under isothermal conditions, its applications for simple genetic testing have attracted considerable attention. A positive LAMP reaction is indicated by the turbidity caused by by-products or by the color change after adding a metallochromic indicator to the reaction solution, but these methods have certain limitations. Leuco crystal violet (LCV), a colorless dye obtained after sodium sulfite treatment of crystal violet (CV), was used as a new colorimetric method for detecting LAMP. LCV is reconverted into CV through contact with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Therefore, the positive reaction of LAMP is indicated by color change from colorless to violet. The assay is sensitive enough to detect LAMP products, with a detection limit of 7.1 ng/μl for dsDNA. It is also highly selective to dsDNA, and interference with single-stranded DNA and deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) is not observed. LCV facilitates direct colorimetric detection of the main product rather than a by-product of the LAMP reaction; therefore, this method can be used under various reaction conditions such as those with added pyrophosphatase in solution. This colorimetric LAMP detection method using LCV is useful for point-of-care genetic testing given its simplicity. PMID:25575759

  8. Investigations on the growth, optical, thermal, dielectric, and laser damage threshold properties of crystal violet dye-doped potassium acid phthalate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. Babu; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-03-01

    Influence of crystal violet dye with different concentration on potassium acid phthalate single crystal grown by conventional method has been studied. No change has been observed in the structure, whereas changes have been observed in the external morphology of the crystal when the dyes are incorporated in the crystal lattice. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses show the onset decomposition temperatures to be at 302, 285, 284, and 285 °C for pure, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mol% crystal violet-doped potassium acid phthalate crystals, respectively. The dielectric measurement was carried out on the grown crystals as a function of frequency at various temperatures. In addition, strong luminescent emission bands at 638, 648, and 640 nm were observed in which the relative intensity was found to be reversed as a result of doping concentration. The laser damage threshold value significantly increased for dye-doped crystal in comparison with pure crystal which may make it suitable for the solid-state dye laser applications.

  9. Combined humic acid adsorption and enhanced Fenton processes for the treatment of naphthalene dye intermediate wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lin; Zhu, Nanwen; Wang, Liang; Bing, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Xiaoliang

    2011-12-30

    In this work, an humic acid adsorption with an enhanced Fenton oxidation was employed to treat the real effluent originating from the 1-diazo-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid (1,2,4-Acid) production plant. In a first step, humic acid with MgSO(4) was selected as adsorbent and precipitant for physicochemical pretreatment, the synergetic effect had led to 39% of COD removal and 89% of colour removal. A multi-staged Fenton oxidation process with inner circulation was introduced subsequently. The TOC, COD, 1,2,4-Acid, NH(4)(+)-N, SS and colour were reduced from 3024 mg/L, 12,780 mg/L, 9103 mg/L, 110 mg/L, 240 mg/L and 25,600 (multiple) to 46 mg/L, 210 mg/L, 21 mg/L, 16 mg/L, 3 mg/L and 25 through the combined process, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide consumed per kg COD had saved up to 36% when two-staged Fenton process with inner circulation (flow-back to influent ratio: 3) was applied. Influence of H(2)O(2) concentration, flow-back to influent ratio and staged Fenton mode were investigated in detail in order to find out the optimal operating parameters. The kinetics of 1,2,4-Acid degradation by two-staged Fenton process was investigated. The evolution of the main intermediates during the degradation process was conducted using the LC-(ESI)-TOF-MS technique, and the results showed a staged degradation pathway from the ring opening of naphthalene compounds to the formation of benzene compounds and carboxyl acids. The combined process had been proved effective in both technical and economic aspects.

  10. Photo-degradation of acid green dye over Co-ZSM-5 catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation technique.

    PubMed

    El-Bahy, Zeinhom M; Mohamed, Mohamed M; Zidan, Farouk I; Thabet, Mohamed S

    2008-05-01

    Co-ZSM-5 catalysts with different Co-loadings (2-30wt.%) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method. The prepared solid catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, in situ FTIR of pyridine adsorption and surface area measurements. The XRD data presented disintegration in the zeolitic crystalline structure accompanied by an increase in particle size of the prepared solids. New phases, Co(3)O(4) and Co(2)SiO(4), were detected with increasing the Co-loading, which indicate the strong interaction of cobalt ions with the ZSM-5 zeolite. FTIR study proved the presence of Co ions in stabilized sites inside the ZSM-5 framework. The in situ FTIR of adsorbed pyridine determined the type and relative strength of acidity on the surface of the prepared solids. The acidity switched from B-acid sites to L-acid sites with impregnation of cobalt ions in ZSM-5 zeolite. The acidity decreased with increasing Co-loading, which might be due to the destruction of zeolite framework and presence of new phases such as cobalt silicate and cobalt oxide on the surface. The surface texture characteristics changed with the promotion of ZSM-5 by cobalt ions, since a decrease of surface area, mean pore radius and pore volume was observed. The assessment of the catalytic activity was performed by the use of the photo-degradation of acid green (AG) dye as a probe reaction in presence of H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. The pH value controlled the degradation rate since a gradual increase of AG degradation rate was observed with increasing pH value and the optimum H(2)O(2) concentration was 61.6 mmol/l. It was found that, the AG degradation rate increased until an optimum value of Co-loading (ca. 10 wt.%), beyond which a monotonic decrease of reaction rate was recognized. The experimental data pointed to the importance of both the cobalt moieties and the zeolite framework structure in the AG degradation reaction. PMID:17904732

  11. Acid‐Responsive Absorption and Emission of 5‐N‐Arylaminothiazoles: Emission of White Light from a Single Fluorescent Dye and a Lewis Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kirara; Guo, Jing‐Dong; Sasamori, Takahiro; Tokitoh, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solutions of 5‐N‐arylaminothiazoles containing pyridyl groups exhibited clear halochromism and halofluorism upon addition of Brønsted and Lewis acids. The addition of triflic acid to solutions of 5‐N‐arylaminothiazoles in Et2O induced bathochromic shifts of the absorption and emission bands. DFT calculations suggested that the spectral changes arise from the protonation of the pyridyl group of the thiazoles in Et2O. Single‐crystal X‐ray diffraction analysis of a thiazole and its protonated form revealed the change of the conformation around the thiazole ring. The emission of white light was accomplished from a single fluorescent dye by adjusting the ratio of dye and B(C6F5)3, whereby the International Commission on Illumination coordinates showed a linear change from blue to orange. PMID:27777834

  12. Enhancement of azo dye Acid Orange 7 removal in newly developed horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Tee, Heng-Chong; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Mohd Nawi, Mohd Asri; Adnan, Rohana

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface-flow (HSF) constructed wetland incorporating baffles was developed to facilitate upflow and downflow conditions so that the treatment of pollutants could be achieved under multiple aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions sequentially in the same wetland bed. The performances of the baffled and conventional HSF constructed wetlands, planted and unplanted, in the removal of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) were compared at the hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 5, 3 and 2 days when treating domestic wastewater spiked with AO7 concentration of 300 mg/L. The planted baffled unit was found to achieve 100%, 83% and 69% AO7 removal against 73%, 46% and 30% for the conventional unit at HRT of 5, 3 and 2 days, respectively. Longer flow path provided by baffled wetland units allowed more contact of the wastewater with the rhizomes, microbes and micro-aerobic zones resulting in relatively higher oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and enhanced performance as kinetic studies revealed faster AO7 biodegradation rate under aerobic condition. In addition, complete mineralization of AO7 was achieved in planted baffled wetland unit due to the availability of a combination of aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions.

  13. High performance quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells based on poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woosung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    A stable quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) with a novel amphiphilic polymer gel electrolyte (APGE) based on poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is fabricated. The APGE could be readily prepared by a simple method at low temperature of 50 °C and exhibits a quasi-solid property, high conductivity, and long-term stability. The 20 and 40 wt% APGE-based DSCs show high photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 7.5 and 7.4%, respectively, under AM 1.5 simulated sunlight, which is comparable to the liquid electrolyte-based DSC with the efficiency of 7.6%. The 40 wt% APGE-based DSC maintains 95% of the initial performance after 60 days in practical conditions. It is also noteworthy that the APGE endows with higher short-circuit current density than the liquid electrolyte. Different natures of the APGE from the typical polymer gel electrolytes have been elucidated by the I- V measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrophoretic measurements, and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Mechanism of azo dye degradation in Advanced Oxidation Processes: Degradation of Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop and its parent compounds in aqueous solution by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálfi, Tamás; Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2011-03-01

    Mechanistic studies were made on hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron reaction with Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop (SPADNS) as model azo dye in dilute aqueous solution. SPADNS contains 4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid part and 4-sulfophenylazo group. To establish the details of the reaction mechanism the reactions of two simpler molecules without 4-sulfophenylazo part were also studied: one of them contained one (in position 4, II), the other two (in positions 4 and 5, III) -OH groups. Hydroxyl radicals react with these molecules with radical addition to the naphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid part. The adduct hydroxycyclohexadienyl type radical decays in radical-radical reactions, or undergoes a (pH dependent) water elimination to yield naphthoxy radical. The radical decay takes place on the ms timescale. Degradation efficiencies are 0.6-0.8. Hydrated electron in the case of the two simpler molecules reacts with the rings, while in the case of dye with the azo bond. Electron scavenging is followed by protonation, this reaction in the case of II and III yields cyclohexadienyl, while with the dye hydrazo radical. The efficiency of degradation with II and III is 0.2-0.6, while for SPADNS it is close to 1.

  15. Application of the novel nucleic acid dyes YOYO-1, YO-PRO-1, and PicoGreen for flow cytometric analysis of marine prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Marie, D; Vaulot, D; Partensky, F

    1996-05-01

    Novel blue light-excited fluorescent dyes for nucleic acids (YOYO-1, YO-PRO-1, and PicoGreen) were tested on cultures of Escherichia coli and of a variety of marine prokaryotes. Results of flow cytometric DNA analyses were compared with those obtained with the UV-excited dyes bis-benzimide Hoechst 33342 or 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). YOYO-1, YO-PRO-1, and PicoGreen can be used only on aldehyde-fixed cells and need to be supplemented with cofactors such as potassium, citrate, or EDTA. They are highly sensitive to ionic strength. Consequently, seawater culture samples cannot be stained directly with these dyes and require at least a 10-fold dilution with distilled water to obtain reliable fluorescence signals. After treatment with RNase, coefficients of variation for the G1 peak of the DNA distributions of the different strains tested with YOYO-1 or PicoGreen indicated in general an improvement over Hoechst 33342 staining. These novel dyes can be used to enumerate prokaryotic cells by flow cytometry, as demonstrated with E. coli. However, their sensitivity to ionic strength makes them unsuitable for cell cycle analysis in natural samples.

  16. Label-free and sensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acid, based on combination of a graphene oxid /SYBR green I dye platform and polymerase assisted signal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Xing, Da

    2012-12-01

    A new label-free isothermal fluorescence amplification detection for nucleic acid has been developed. In this paper, we first developed a novel sensitive and specific detection platform with an unmodified hairpin probe (HP) combination of the graphene oxid (GO)/ SYBR green I dye (SG), which was relied on the selective principle of adsorption and the high quenching efficiency of GO. Then for the application of this new strategy, we used Mirco RNA-21 (Mir-21) as the target to evaluate this working principle of our design. When the target was hybridizing with the HP and inducing its conformation of change, an efficient isothermal circular strand-displacement polymerization reaction was activating to assist the first signal amplification. In this format, the formed complex conformation of DNA would interact with its high affinity dye, then detached from the surface of GO after incubating with the platform of GO/intercalating dye. This reaction would accompany with obvious fluorescence recovery, and accomplish farther signal enhancement by a mass of intercalating dye inserting into the minor groove of the long duplex replication product. By taking advantage of the multiple amplification of signal, this method exerted substantial enhancement in sensitivity and could be used for rapid and selective detection of Mir-21 with attomole range. It is expected that this cost-effective GO based sensor might hold considerable potential to apply in bioanalysis studies.

  17. Dye Painting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Ann

    This resource provides practical instructions for applying color and design directly to fabric. Basic information about the dye painting process is given. The guide addresses the technical aspects of fabric dye and color use and offers suggestions for fabric manipulation and dye application in order to achieve various design effects. This…

  18. Efficient Acid-catalyzed 18F/19F Fluoride Exchange of BODIPY Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Klubnick, Jenna A.; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine containing fluorochromes represent important validation agents for PET imaging agents as they can be easily rapidly validated in cells by fluorescence imaging. In particular, the 18F-labeled BODIPY-FL fluorophore has emerged as an important platform but little is known about alternative 18F-labeling strategies or labeling on red shifted fluorophores. Here we explore the acid-catalyzed 18F/19F exchange on a range of commercially available N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester and maleimide BODIPY fluorophores. We show this method to be a simple and efficient 18F-labeling strategy for a diverse span of fluorescent compounds, including a BODIPY modified PARP-1 inhibitor, and amine- and thiol-reactive BODIPY fluorophores. PMID:24596307

  19. Dye-coated europium monosulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Srotoswini; Dollahon, Norman R.; Stoll, Sarah L.

    2011-05-15

    Nanoparticles of EuS were synthesized using europium dithiocarbamate complexes. The resulting nanoparticles were coated with the dye, 1-pyrene carboxylic acid and the resulting material was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the relative energy of the conduction band edge to the excited state energy of the dye. -- Graphical abstract: Dye sensitized magnetic semiconductor materials were prepared by synthesizing EuS nanoparticles using single source precursors and coating with the dye, 1-pyrene carboxylic acid. Display Omitted highlights: > Synthesized EuS nanoparticles, 11{+-}2.4 nm characterized using XRD, TEM, and UV-vis. spect. > Grafted a dye to the surface and characterized the product using XRD, FTIR, UV-vis., and TEM. > Studied the photophysical properties using fluorescence spectroscopy. > Determined the relative dye excited state to the conduction band of the semiconductor.

  20. Solar photocatalysis for treatment of Acid Yellow-17 (AY-17) dye contaminated water using Ag@TiO2 core-shell structured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Ankita; Shetty K, Vidya

    2013-08-01

    Wastewater released from textile industries causes water pollution, and it needs to be treated before discharge to the environment by cost effective technologies. Solar photocatalysis is a promising technology for the treatment of dye wastewater. The Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles comprising of Ag core and TiO2 shell (Ag@TiO2) have unique photocatalytic property of inhibition of electron-hole recombination and visible light absorption, which makes it a promising photocatalyst for use in solar photocatalysis and with higher photocatalytic rate. Therefore, in the present work, the Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized by one pot method with postcalcination step has been used for the degradation of Acid Yellow-17 (AY-17) dye under solar light irradiation. The Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The catalyst has been found to be very effective in solar photocatalysis of AY-17, as compared to other catalysts. The effects of pH, catalyst loading, initial dye concentration, and oxidants on photocatalysis were also studied. The optimized parameters for degradation of AY-17 using Ag@TiO2 were found to be pH 3, dye/catalyst ratio of 1:10 (g/g), and 2 g/L of (NH4)2S2O8 as oxidant. Efficient decolorization and mineralization of AY-17 was achieved. The kinetics of color, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand removal followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Ag@TiO2 catalyst can be reused thrice without much decline in efficiency. The catalyst exhibited its potential as economic photocatalyst for treatment of dye wastewater.

  1. Early myocardial ischaemia: evaluation of the histochemical haematoxylin-basic fuchsin-picric acid (HBFP) staining technique.

    PubMed

    Van Reempts, J; Borgers, M; Reneman, R S

    1976-03-01

    A series of experiments, carried out to evaluate the histochemical method for the morphological diagnosis of early stages of myocardial ischaemis (HBFP) is reported. The experiments were performed on dog hearts in which ischaemia was induced by coronary artery ligation for different periods of time. The original procedure or modifications of the HBFP-technique, including different staining, rinsing, and differentiation times, the use of different commercial brands of chemicals and preparatory changes of routine histological procedures such as fixation, embedding, cutting, and mounting, did not give satisfactory results. False positive and negative staining was frequent. Very equivocal results were obtained on serial sections of ischaemic tissue samples. Therefore this method was regarded as unreliable and non-reproducible.

  2. Extremely enhanced photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells by sintering mesoporous TiO2 photoanodes with crystalline titania chelated by acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo-Tau; Chou, Ya-Hui; Liu, Jin-Yan

    2016-04-01

    The study presents a significant improvement on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) through incorporating the crystalline titania chelated by acetic acid (TAc) into the mesoporous TiO2 photoanodes. The effects of TAc on the blocking layer, mesoporous TiO2 layer, and post-treatment have been investigated. The TAc blocking layer displays compact construction, revealing superior response time and resistance to suppress dark current compared to the blocking layer made from titanium(IV) isopropoxide (TTIP). The power conversion efficiency of DSSCs with the TAc treatment can reach as high as 10.49%, which is much higher than that of pristine DSSCs (5.67%) and that of DSSCs treated by TTIP (7.86%). We find that the TAc incorporation can lead to the decrease of charge transfer resistance and the increase of dye adsorption. The result may be attributed to the fact that the TAc possesses high crystallinity, exposed (101) planes, and acid groups chelated on surface, which are favorable for dye attachment and strong bonding at the FTO/TiO2 and the TiO2/TiO2 interfaces, These improvements result in the remarkable increase of photocurrent and thereby that of power conversion efficiency.

  3. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines.

  4. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines. PMID:27430566

  5. Characteristics of nanostructure dye-sensitized solar cells using food dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinnezhad, M.; Rouhani, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were prepared using various food dyes. Food dyes are economically superior to organometallic dyes since they are nontoxic and inexpensive. The spectrophotometric evaluation of chosen food dyes in solution and on a TiO2 substrate show that the dyes form J-aggregation on the photoelectrode substrate. Oxidation of potential measurements for used food dyes ensured an energetically permissible and thermodynamically favorable charge transfer throughout the continuous cycle of a photo-electric conversion. The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on food dyes was studied. The results illustrate that the dye containing carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid as the acceptor group gave the maximum conversion efficiency 4.20%.

  6. Characteristics of nanostructure dye-sensitized solar cells using food dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinnezhad, M.; Rouhani, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were prepared using various food dyes. Food dyes are economically superior to organometallic dyes since they are nontoxic and inexpensive. The spectrophotometric evaluation of chosen food dyes in solution and on a TO2 substrate show that the dyes form J-aggregation on the photoelectrode substrate. Oxidation of potential measurements for used food dyes ensured an energetically permissible and thermodynamically favorable charge transfer throughout the continuous cycle of a photo-electric conversion. The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on food dyes was studied. The results illustrate that the dye containing carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid as the acceptor group gave the maximum conversion efficiency 4.20%.

  7. The improvement of solar photocatalytic activity of ZnO by doping with Er3+:Y3Al5O12 during dye degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L. N.; Li, Y.; Wang, J.; Kong, Y. M.; Zhai, Y.; Wang, B. X.; Li, K.; Zhang, X. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Er3+:Y3Al5O12, an upconversion luminescence agent, which is able to transform the visible light to ultraviolet light, was synthesized by nitrate-citric acid method. And then, a novel photocatalyst, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO composites, was prepared by ultrasonic dispersing and liquid boil method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structural morphology and surface properties of the Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO. Azo Fuchsine dye was selected as target organic pollutant to inspect the photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO. The key parameters affecting the photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO, such as Er3+:Y3Al5O12 content, heat-treatment temperature and heat-treatment time, were studied. In addition, the effects of dye initial concentration, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO amount and solar light irradiation time were also reviewed, as well as the photocatalytic activity in degradation of other organic dyes were compared. It was found that the photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO was much superior to pure ZnO under the same conditions. Thus, the Er3+:Y3Al5O12/ZnO is a useful photocatalyst for the wastewater treatment because it can efficiently utilize solar light by converting visible light into ultraviolet light.

  8. Simultaneous dyeing and antibacterial finishing for cotton cellulose using a new reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Farouk, R; Gaffer, H E

    2013-08-14

    Simultaneous dyeing and antibacterial finishing for cotton fabric using a new antibacterial reactive dye having a modified chemical structure to the commercial reactive dye CI Reactive Red 198 were studied. This modification was carried out by replacing metanilic acid in the commercial dye with 4-amino-N-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide (sulfadimidine). Optimum exhaustion and fixation values were achieved at 60 g/l sodium sulphate and 20 g/l sodium carbonate for both dyes. The modified dye exhibited higher substantivity, exhaustion and fixation efficiency compared to the commercial dye. Antibacterial activities of the dyed samples at different concentrations of both dyes were studied against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. The cotton dyed with the modified dye shows higher antibacterial efficacy compared to the dyed cotton fabric using the commercial dye, especially on gram negative (E. coli) bacteria. All the reactive dyeings also exhibited high fastness properties.

  9. Highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection of specific DNA sequences with molecular beacons and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dongshan; Zhai, Kun; Xiang, Wenjun; Wang, Lianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescence method of quantitative detection for specific DNA sequence is developed based on molecular beacon (MB) and nucleic acid dye SYBR Green I by synchronous fluorescence analysis. It is demonstrated by an oligonucleotide sequence of wild-type HBV (target DNA) as a model system. In this strategy, the fluorophore of MB is designed to be 6-carboxyfluorescein group (FAM), and the maximum excitation wavelength and maximum emission wavelength are both very close to that of SYBR Green I. In the presence of targets DNA, the MBs hybridize with the targets DNA and form double-strand DNA (dsDNA), the fluorophore FAM is separated from the quencher BHQ-1, thus the fluorophore emit fluorescence. At the same time, SYBR Green I binds to dsDNA, the fluorescence intensity of SYBR Green I is significantly enhanced. When targets DNA are detected by synchronous fluorescence analysis, the fluorescence peaks of FAM and SYBR Green I overlap completely, so the fluorescence signal of system will be significantly enhanced. Thus, highly sensitive fluorescence quantitative detection for DNA can be realized. Under the optimum conditions, the total fluorescence intensity of FAM and SYBR Green I exhibits good linear dependence on concentration of targets DNA in the range from 2×10(-11) to 2.5×10(-9)M. The detection limit of target DNA is estimated to be 9×10(-12)M (3σ). Compared with previously reported methods of detection DNA with MB, the proposed method can significantly enhance the detection sensitivity.

  10. Lewis acid-assisted isotopic 18F-19F exchange in BODIPY dyes: facile generation of positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality agents for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Lin, Tzu-Pin; Li, Dan; Leamer, Lauren; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo; Gabbaï, François P; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful technique for imaging biological pathways in vivo, particularly those that are key targets in disease processes. In contrast, fluorescence imaging has demonstrated to be a superior method for image-guided surgery, such as tumor removal. Although the integration of PET and optical imaging could provide an attractive strategy for patient management, there is a significant shortage of established platforms/methods for PET/optical probe construction. In this study, various reaction conditions were explored to develop a simple and fast method allowing for the introduction of [(18)F]-fluoride into BODIPY dyes. Through a systematic optimization of the reaction conditions, we found that BODIPY dyes, including commercial amine-reactive BODIPY succinimidyl esters, may be converted into their radioactive analogues in the matter of minutes via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid such as SnCl4. An integrin-targeting RGD peptide was also conjugated with [(18)F]BODIPY® R6G , derived from the commercially available BODIPY® R6G fluorescent tag, to provide a [(18)F]-RGD conjugate in 82% yield. In vivo evaluation of this imaging probe showed a discernible tumor uptake in the U87MG xenograft model. The dual modality imaging properties of the probe was confirmed by ex vivo fluorescence and microPET imaging experiments. In summary, in the matter of minutes, BODIPY dyes were converted into their "hot" radioactive analogues via a (18)F-(19)F isotopic exchange reaction promoted by a Lewis acid. This approach, which can be applied to commercial BODIPY dyes, provides easy access to positron emission tomography/fluorescence dual modality imaging agents. PMID:23471211

  11. Determination of a solvent hydrogen-bond acidity scale by means of the solvatochromism of pyridinium-N-phenolate betaine dye 30 and PCM-TD-DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis; Laurence, Christian; Planchat, Aurélien; Reichardt, Christian; Sraïdi, Khadija

    2014-05-01

    Empirical parameters of solvents describing their hydrogen-bond (HB) acidity (e.g., the Kamlet-Taft α parameter) are often difficult to determine for new solvents because they are not directly related to a single definition process. Here, we propose a simple method based on one probe, the betaine dye 30, and one reference process, the solvatochromism of this dye, measured by its first electronic transition energy, ET(30). These ET(30) values are calculated within the time-dependent density functional theory framework, using a polarizable continuum solvent model (PCM). The part of ET(30) values that is not included in the PCM calculation is taken as the HB component of the measured ET(30) values, allowing us to deduce a solvent HB acidity parameter α1. The validity of this simple model is assessed by good linear correlations between α1 and a variety of solute properties mainly depending on the solvent's HB acidity. The quality of fit observed with α1 is at least comparable with that obtained by previous solvent HB acidity scales. The simplicity of our method is illustrated by the determination of α1 and of its companion, the electrostatic solvent parameter ES, for some new green solvents derived from glycerol. PMID:24702635

  12. From force-fields to photons: MD simulations of dye-labeled nucleic acids and Monte Carlo modeling of FRET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldner, Lori

    2012-02-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful technique for understanding the structural fluctuations and transformations of RNA, DNA and proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a window into the nature of these fluctuations on a different, faster, time scale. We use Monte Carlo methods to model and compare FRET data from dye-labeled RNA with what might be predicted from the MD simulation. With a few notable exceptions, the contribution of fluorophore and linker dynamics to these FRET measurements has not been investigated. We include the dynamics of the ground state dyes and linkers in our study of a 16mer double-stranded RNA. Water is included explicitly in the simulation. Cyanine dyes are attached at either the 3' or 5' ends with a 3 carbon linker, and differences in labeling schemes are discussed.[4pt] Work done in collaboration with Peker Milas, Benjamin D. Gamari, and Louis Parrot.

  13. Molecular Engineering of Thiazole Orange Dye: Change of Fluorescent Signaling from Universal to Specific upon Binding with Nucleic Acids in Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Jing; Deng, Qiang; Hou, Jin-Qiang; Hu, Dong-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Ya; Zhang, Kun; Luyt, Leonard G; Wong, Wing-Leung; Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2016-04-15

    The universal fluorescent staining property of thiazole orange (TO) dye was adapted in order to be specific for G-quadruplex DNA structures, through the introduction of a styrene-like substituent at the ortho-position of the TO scaffold. This extraordinary outcome was determined from experimental studies and further explored through molecular docking studies. The molecular docking studies help understand how such a small substituent leads to remarkable fluorescent signal discrimination between G-quadruplex DNA and other types of nucleic acids. The results reveal that the modified dyes bind to the G-quadruplex or duplex DNA in a similar fashion as TO, but exhibit either enhanced or quenched fluorescent signal, which is determined by the spatial length and orientation of the substituent and has never been known. The new fluorescent dye modified with a p-(dimethylamino)styryl substituent offers 10-fold more selectivity toward telomeric G-quadruplexes than double-stranded DNA substrates. In addition, native PAGE experiments, FRET, CD analysis, and live cell imaging were also studied and demonstrated the potential applications of this class of thiazole-orange-based fluorescent probes in bioassays and cell imaging.

  14. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of acid dye using Ni-TiO2 with the energy supplied by solar cell: mechanism and economical studies.

    PubMed

    Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim; Pirkarami, Azam; Soleimani, Majid; Bahmaei, Manochehr

    2013-05-30

    This paper reports an investigation into the effect of a number of operating factors on the removal of Acid Red 88 from an aqueous solution through photoelectrocatalysis: photocatalyst dose, dye concentration, pH, bias potential, and electrolyte concentration. The photocatalyst was Ni-TiO2 applied in suspension to the solution to achieve a larger catalyst surface area. The optimum values for photocatalyst dose, dye concentration, and electrolyte concentration turned out to be 0.6 mg L(-1), 50 mg L(-1), and 5 mg L(-1), respectively. Also, the best pH was found to be 7, and bias potential proved to be best at 1.6 V. The aqueous solution was characterized for its COD and TOC. Photocatalyst efficiency was evaluated using SEM and XRD techniques. The characterization of the post-treatment product using FT-IR, HPLC, and GC-MS studies revealed intermediate compounds. A pathway was proposed for the degradation of the dye. The energy required by the experiment was supplied by solar cells, meaning the money that would have otherwise been spent on electricity was saved. Cost analysis was also done for the treatment process. PMID:23562912

  15. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of acid dye using Ni-TiO2 with the energy supplied by solar cell: mechanism and economical studies.

    PubMed

    Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim; Pirkarami, Azam; Soleimani, Majid; Bahmaei, Manochehr

    2013-05-30

    This paper reports an investigation into the effect of a number of operating factors on the removal of Acid Red 88 from an aqueous solution through photoelectrocatalysis: photocatalyst dose, dye concentration, pH, bias potential, and electrolyte concentration. The photocatalyst was Ni-TiO2 applied in suspension to the solution to achieve a larger catalyst surface area. The optimum values for photocatalyst dose, dye concentration, and electrolyte concentration turned out to be 0.6 mg L(-1), 50 mg L(-1), and 5 mg L(-1), respectively. Also, the best pH was found to be 7, and bias potential proved to be best at 1.6 V. The aqueous solution was characterized for its COD and TOC. Photocatalyst efficiency was evaluated using SEM and XRD techniques. The characterization of the post-treatment product using FT-IR, HPLC, and GC-MS studies revealed intermediate compounds. A pathway was proposed for the degradation of the dye. The energy required by the experiment was supplied by solar cells, meaning the money that would have otherwise been spent on electricity was saved. Cost analysis was also done for the treatment process.

  16. Charge-Transfer Complexation at Carminic Acid-CdS Interface and Its Impact on the Efficiency of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Naila; Shah, Syed Mujtaba; Munir, Shamsa; Hana, Amina; Jabeen, Uzma; Nosheen, Erum; Habib, Banafsha; Khan, Arif Ullah; Hassan, Zubair; Siddiq, Muhammad; Hussain, Hazrat

    2015-04-01

    We report for the first time charge-transfer complex formation at the interface of carminic acid and cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles. The complex formation was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles were synthesized by the wet chemical method and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Carminic acid, in different concentrations, was chemisorbed on the surface of CdS nanoparticles. Grafting of carminic acid on CdS was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Energy levels of the highest occupied molecular orbitals and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) of both carminic acid and CdS nanoparticles matched well for the injection of electron from LUMO of carminic acid to the conduction band of cadmium sulfide. The photoactive nanohybrid material was used in dye-sensitized solar cells. The efficiency of carminic acid functionalized CdS nanoparticles was found to be double the value obtained for the reference device and remained constant over a certain concentration range owing to the complex formation at the interface. However, raising the concentration of carminic acid beyond 2.5 × 10-5 M resulted in a decrease in efficiency. This was ascribed to charge recombination due to the presence of ungrafted carminic acid molecules.

  17. Three Highly Stable Cobalt MOFs Based on "Y"-Shaped Carboxylic Acid: Synthesis and Absorption of Anionic Dyes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Han, Li-Juan; Jia, Hai-Lang; Shen, Kang; Wang, Ting; Zheng, He-Gen

    2016-09-01

    Three Co(II) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized employing a rational design approach. On the basis of the different structures of three complexes, we tested their absorption properties toward two anionic dyes. The absorption results indicate that not only uncoordinated functional groups in the structure play an important role in adsorbing capacity but also physical forces can affect absorbing ability. Water stability testing shows that three crystals display high stability in aqueous solutions with different pH values. To our delight, the framework integrity of three complexes can be well-retained even after absorbing dyes. PMID:27525379

  18. [Rapid screening of 28 acidic artificial dyes in fishery products by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingya; Zhou, Yong; Dai, Yifei; Huang, Li; Zhao, Qiaoling

    2015-08-01

    An analytical method was established for the simultaneous determination of 28 acidic artificial dyes in fishery products by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF MS). The analytes in fishery products were extracted with ethyl alcohol containing 20% (v/v) ammonia water and 10% (v/v) water. Then the extract solution was purified according to amination adsorbent matrix dispersion method. The compounds were separated by an Eclipse Plus-C18 column with acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid-5 mmol/L ammonium acetate solution as the mobile phases, and measured by UPLC-Q-TOF MS with electrospray ionization in negative mode. As a result, the limits of quantification ( LOQs, S/N = 10) of the target compounds were 20-100 µg/kg in fishery products. The 28 analytes behaved linearly in wide-range with the correlation coefficients more than 0. 991 as well as the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas less than 5.61% (n = 6). The average recoveries of the 28 analytes spiked at three levels were ranged from 70. 24% to 106. 47% with RSDs of 5.62%-9.65% (n = 6). This method can be applied to the analysis of the 28 acidic artificial dyes in fishery products due to its fastness, simplicity and relatively high sensitivity. PMID:26749858

  19. [Rapid screening of 28 acidic artificial dyes in fishery products by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingya; Zhou, Yong; Dai, Yifei; Huang, Li; Zhao, Qiaoling

    2015-08-01

    An analytical method was established for the simultaneous determination of 28 acidic artificial dyes in fishery products by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF MS). The analytes in fishery products were extracted with ethyl alcohol containing 20% (v/v) ammonia water and 10% (v/v) water. Then the extract solution was purified according to amination adsorbent matrix dispersion method. The compounds were separated by an Eclipse Plus-C18 column with acetonitrile and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid-5 mmol/L ammonium acetate solution as the mobile phases, and measured by UPLC-Q-TOF MS with electrospray ionization in negative mode. As a result, the limits of quantification ( LOQs, S/N = 10) of the target compounds were 20-100 µg/kg in fishery products. The 28 analytes behaved linearly in wide-range with the correlation coefficients more than 0. 991 as well as the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the peak areas less than 5.61% (n = 6). The average recoveries of the 28 analytes spiked at three levels were ranged from 70. 24% to 106. 47% with RSDs of 5.62%-9.65% (n = 6). This method can be applied to the analysis of the 28 acidic artificial dyes in fishery products due to its fastness, simplicity and relatively high sensitivity.

  20. Influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid on charge transport and luminescent properties of polymer light-emitting diodes with fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lei; Bera, Debasis; Jin, Zhen-Sheng; Du, Zu-Liang; Xu, Zheng; Teng, Feng; Liu, Wei

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss the influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid (DNTA) on charge transport and luminescent properties of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) doped with fluorescent dye. Photoluminescence results confirm the efficient energy transfer from PVK to 4-(dicyanom-ethylene)-2- t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) and tris-(8-hydroxtquinoline) aluminum (Alq 3) in a DNTA-doped device. The device showed lower turn-on voltages and higher charge current by doping with DNTA, which also caused a shift in the exciton's recombination region.

  1. Improving optical absorptivity of natural dyes for fabrication of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmatzadeh, Reza; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and cheap dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using natural dyes from Pastinaca sativa and Beta vulgaris. Natural dyes are environmentally and economically superior to ruthenium-based dyes because they are nontoxic and cheap. However, the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on natural dyes is low. One way to improve the DSSC performance is to enhance the absorptivity of extracted dyes. We investigated the influence of various factors in the extraction process, such as utilization of different extraction approaches, the acidity of extraction solvent, and different compounds of solvents on the optical absorption spectra. It was found that we could considerably enhance the optical absorptivity of dye and consequently the performance of DSSC by choosing a proper mixture of ethanol and water for extracting solvent and also the acidity of dye solution.

  2. Poly (Acrylamide-co-Acrylic Acid) Hydrogel Induced by Glow-Discharge Electrolysis Plasma and Its Adsorption Properties for Cationic Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Yang, Gege; Pan, Yuanpei; Lu, Quanfang; Yang, Wu; Gao, Jinzhang

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(AM-co-AA)) hydrogel was prepared in an aqueous solution by using glow-discharge electrolysis plasma (GDEP) induced copolymerization of acrylamide (AM) and acrylic acid (AA), in which N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) was used as a crosslinker. A mechanism for the synthesis of P(AM-co-AA) hydrogel was proposed. To optimize the synthesis condition, the following parameters were examined in detail: the discharge voltage, discharge time, the content of the crosslinker, and the mass ratio of AM to AA. The results showed that the optimum pH range for cationic dyes removal was found to be 5.0-10.0. The P(AM-co-AA) hydrogel exhibits a very high adsorption potential and the experimental adsorption capacities for Crystal violet (CV) and Methylene blue (MB) were 2974.3 mg/g and 2303.6 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption process follows a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. In addition, the adsorption mechanism of P(AM-co-AA) hydrogel for cationic dyes was also discussed.

  3. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of acid Orange 52 dye biosorption by Paulownia tomentosa Steud. leaf powder as a low-cost natural biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih; Saygideger, Saadet D

    2010-07-01

    The biosorption of Acid Orange 52 onto the leaf powder of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied in a batch adsorption system to estimate the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as a function of solution pH, biosorbent concentration, dye concentration, biosorbent size, temperature and contact time. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for modeling the biosorption equilibrium. The experimental equilibrium data could be well interpreted by the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms with maximum adsorption capacity of 10.5 mg g(-1). In order to state the sorption kinetics, the fits of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were investigated. It was obtained that the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second order rate kinetics. Thermodynamic studies indicated that this system was exothermic process. The results revealed that P. tomentosa leaf powder could be an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of wastewater containing Acid Orange 52. PMID:20194017

  4. Complexation induced fluorescence and acid-base properties of dapoxyl dye with γ-cyclodextrin: a drug-binding application using displacement assays.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kaushik; Mallick, Suman; Koner, Apurba L

    2015-06-28

    Host-guest complexation of dapoxyl sodium sulphonate (DSS), an intramolecular charge transfer dye with water-soluble and non-toxic macrocycle γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), has been investigated in a wide pH range. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence measurements confirm the positioning of DSS into the hydrophobic cavity of γ-CD. A large fluorescence enhancement ca. 30 times, due to 1 : 2 complex formation and host-assisted guest-protonation have been utilised for developing a method for the utilisation of CD based drug-delivery applications. A simple fluorescence-displacement based approach is implemented at physiological pH for the assessment of binding strength of pharmaceutically useful small drug molecules (ibuprofen, paracetamol, methyl salicylate, salicylic acid, aspirin, and piroxicam) and six important antibiotic drugs (resazurin, thiamphenicol, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, kanamycin, and sorbic acid) with γ-CD. PMID:26028009

  5. On-column labeling of gram-positive bacteria with a boronic acid functionalized squarylium cyanine dye for analysis by polymer-enhanced capillary transient isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shingo; Massie, Tara L; Maeda, Takeshi; Nakazumi, Hiroyuki; Colyer, Christa L

    2012-03-01

    A new asymmetric, squarylium cyanine dye functionalized by boronic acid ("SQ-BA") was designed and synthesized for on-capillary labeling of gram-positive bacteria to provide for high sensitivity detection by way of a modified form of capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF). The CE-based separation employed a polymer-enhanced buffer with capillary transient isotachophoresis in a new hybrid method dubbed "PectI." It was found that the addition of various monosaccharides to SQ-BA in a batch aqueous solution greatly enhanced the emission of the boronic acid functionalized dye by a factor of up to 18.3 at a long wavelength (λ(ex) = 630 nm, λ(em) = 660 nm) with a high affinity constant (K = ~10(2.80) M(-1)) superior to other sugar probes. Semiempirical quantum mechanics calculations suggest that the mechanism for this high enhancement may involve the dissociation of initially nonemissive dye associates (stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond) upon complex formation with sugars. The fluorescence emission of SQ-BA was also significantly enhanced in the presence of a gram-positive bacterial spore, Bacillus globigii (Bg), which serves as a simulant of B. anthracis (or anthrax) and which possesses a peptidoglycan (sugar)-rich spore coat to provide ample sites for interaction with the dye. Several peaks were observed for a pure Bg sample even with polyethyleneoxide (PEO) present in the CE separation buffer, despite the polymer's previously demonstrated ability to focus microoorganisms to a single peak during migration. Likewise, several peaks were observed for a Bg sample when capillary transient isotachophoresis (ctITP) alone was employed. However, the new combination of these techniques as "PectI" dramatically and reproducibly focused the bacteria to a single peak with no staining procedure. Using PectI, the trace detection of Bg spores (corresponding to approximately three cells per injection) along with separation efficiency

  6. Dye Painting with Fiber Reactive Dyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin-Murray, Betsy

    1977-01-01

    In her description of how to use dyes directly onto fabrics the author lists materials to be used, directions for mixing dyes, techniques for applying dyes, references for additional reading and sources for dye materials. Preceding the activity with several lessons in design and other textile techniques with the dye process will ensure a…

  7. A simple chip free-flow electrophoresis for monosaccharide sensing via supermolecule interaction of boronic acid functionalized quencher and fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Yang; Dong, Jing-Yu; Wang, Hou-Yu; Li, Si; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-08-01

    Here, a simple micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) was developed for fluorescence sensing of monosaccharide via supermolecule interaction of synthesized boronic acid functionalized benzyl viologen (ο-BBV) and fluorescent dye. The μFFE contained two open electrode cavities and an ion-exchange membrane was sandwiched between two polymethylmethacrylate plates. The experiments demonstrated the following merits of developed μFFE: (i) up to 90.5% of voltage efficiency due to high conductivity of ion-exchange membrane; (ii) a strong ability against influence of bubble produced in two electrodes due to open design of electrode cavities; and (iii) reusable and washable separation chamber (45 mm × 17 mm × 100 μm, 77 μL) avoiding the discard of μFFE due to blockage of solute precipitation in chamber. Remarkably, the μFFE was first designed for the sensing of monosaccharide via the supermolecule interaction of synthesized ο-BBV, fluorescent dye, and monosaccharide. Under the optimized conditions, the minimum concentration of monosaccharide that could be detected was 1 × 10(-11) M. Finally, the developed device was used for the detection of 0.3 mM glucose spiked in human urine. All of the results demonstrated the feasibility of monosaccharide detection via the μFFE. PMID:23712879

  8. Microchip electrophoresis with background electrolyte containing polyacrylic acid and high content organic solvent in cyclic olefin copolymer microchips for easily adsorbed dyes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuan; Sun, Ping; Yang, Shenghong; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Jing; Li, Fengyun; Pu, Qiaosheng

    2016-07-29

    Plastic microchips can significantly reduce the fabrication cost but the adsorption of some analytes limits their application. In this work, background electrolyte containing ionic polymer and high content of organic solvent was adopted to eliminate the analyte adsorption and achieve highly efficient separation in microchip electrophoresis. Two dyes, rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and rhodamine B (RhB) were used as the model analytes. By using methanol as the organic solvent and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a multifunctional additive, successful separation of the two dyes within 75μm id. microchannels was realized. The role of PAA is multiple, including viscosity regulator, selectivity modifier and active additive for counteracting analyte adsorption on the microchannel surface. The number of theoretical plate of 7.0×10(5)/m was attained within an effective separation distance of 2cm using background electrolyte consisting 80% methanol, 0.36% PAA and 30mmol/L phosphate at pH 5.0. Under optimized conditions, relative standard deviations of Rh6G and RhB detection (n=5) were no more than 1.5% for migration time and 2.0% for peak area, respectively. The limit of detection (S/N=3) was 0.1nmol/L for Rh6G. The proposed technique was applied in the determination of both Rh6G and RhB in chilli powder and lipstick samples with satisfactory recoveries of 81.3-103.7%. PMID:27371017

  9. Kinetics of the Reaction of Pyrogallol Red, a Polyphenolic Dye, with Nitrous Acid: Role of ŸNO and ŸNO2.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Estefania; Reyes, Jael; Montupil, Elisa; Bridi, Raquel; Lissi, Eduardo; Denicola, Ana; Rubio, María Angélica; López-Alarcón, Camilo

    2015-06-08

    In the present work we studied the reaction under gastric conditions of pyrogallol red (PGR), a polyphenolic dye, with nitrous acid (HONO). PGR has been used as a model polyphenol due to its strong UV-visible absorption and its high reactivity towards reactive species (radicals and non-radicals, RS). The reaction was followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A clear decrease of the PGR absorbance at 465 nm was observed, evidencing an efficient bleaching of PGR by HONO. In the initial stages of the reaction, each HONO molecule nearly consumed 2.6 PGR molecules while, at long reaction times, ca. 7.0 dye molecules were consumed per each reacted HONO. This result is interpreted in terms of HONO recycling. During the PGR-HONO reaction, nitric oxide was generated in the micromolar range. In addition, the rate of PGR consumption induced by HONO was almost totally abated by argon bubbling, emphasising the role that critical volatile intermediates, such as ŸNO and/or nitrogen dioxide (ŸNO2), play in the bleaching of this phenolic compound.

  10. Microchip electrophoresis with background electrolyte containing polyacrylic acid and high content organic solvent in cyclic olefin copolymer microchips for easily adsorbed dyes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuan; Sun, Ping; Yang, Shenghong; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Jing; Li, Fengyun; Pu, Qiaosheng

    2016-07-29

    Plastic microchips can significantly reduce the fabrication cost but the adsorption of some analytes limits their application. In this work, background electrolyte containing ionic polymer and high content of organic solvent was adopted to eliminate the analyte adsorption and achieve highly efficient separation in microchip electrophoresis. Two dyes, rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and rhodamine B (RhB) were used as the model analytes. By using methanol as the organic solvent and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a multifunctional additive, successful separation of the two dyes within 75μm id. microchannels was realized. The role of PAA is multiple, including viscosity regulator, selectivity modifier and active additive for counteracting analyte adsorption on the microchannel surface. The number of theoretical plate of 7.0×10(5)/m was attained within an effective separation distance of 2cm using background electrolyte consisting 80% methanol, 0.36% PAA and 30mmol/L phosphate at pH 5.0. Under optimized conditions, relative standard deviations of Rh6G and RhB detection (n=5) were no more than 1.5% for migration time and 2.0% for peak area, respectively. The limit of detection (S/N=3) was 0.1nmol/L for Rh6G. The proposed technique was applied in the determination of both Rh6G and RhB in chilli powder and lipstick samples with satisfactory recoveries of 81.3-103.7%.

  11. Treatment of Acne Vulgaris With Salicylic Acid Chemical Peel and Pulsed Dye Laser: A Split Face, Rater-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lekakh, Olga; Mahoney, Anne Marie; Novice, Karlee; Kamalpour, Julia; Sadeghian, Azeen; Mondo, Dana; Kalnicky, Cathy; Guo, Rong; Peterson, Anthony; Tung, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pulsed dye laser (PDL) has been used to treat acne lesions and scar erythema by interrupting superficial vasculature. Salicylic acid chemical peels are employed chiefly due to their lipophilic, comedolytic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Although studies have looked at peels and laser therapy independently in acne management, we examined these treatments in combination. Our primary objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of concurrent use of salicylic acid peels with PDL versus salicylic acid peels alone in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Methods: Adult patients with moderate to severe acne were included. Subjects received a total of 3 treatments at 3-week intervals. Per randomized split-face treatment, at week 0, one half of the subject’s face was treated with PDL (595 nm) followed by whole face application of a 30% salicylic acid peel. At weeks 3 and 6, the treatments were repeated. At 0 and 9 weeks, patients were assessed with the Global Evaluation Acne (GEA) scale and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Nineteen subjects were enrolled, and 18 completed the study. Significant improvement in acne was seen in both the combined (laser and peel) and chemical peel alone treatment arms (P < .0005 and P = .001). Using the GEA scale score, compared to week 0, the mean difference in acne improvement at week 9 was -1.61 in the combination therapy group versus -1.11 in the peel only group. Based on the GEA scale scoring, a statistically significant greater difference in acne improvement was seen, from week 0 to week 9, in the combination treatment group compared with the peel only group (P = .003). Conclusion: While acne subjects had significant benefit from the salicylic acid peel alone, they experienced greater significant benefit from PDL treatment used in conjunction with salicylic acid peels. The adjunctive utilization of PDL to salicylic acid peel therapy can lead to better outcomes in acne

  12. Biodegradation of leuco derivatives of triphenylmethane dyes by Sphingomonas sp. CM9.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Li, Liguan; Du, Hongwei; Jiang, Lijuan; Zhang, Qiong; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Lin; Yang, Liuyan

    2011-09-01

    A leuco derivatives of triphenylmethane dyes degrading bacterium, strain CM9, was isolated from an aquafarm field. Based on morphology, physiologic tests, 16S rDNA sequence, and phylogenetic characteristics, it was identified as Sphingomonas sp. This strain was capable of degrading leucomalachite green (LMG), leucocrystal violet and leucobasic fuchsin completely. The relationship between bacterium growth and LMG degradation suggested that strain CM9 could use LMG as the sole source of carbon. The most LMG degradation activity of CM9 crude extract was observed at pH 7.0 and at 30°C. Many metal ions had little inhibition effect on the degradation activity of the crude extract. CM9 also showed strong decolorization of triphenylmethane dyes to their leuco derivatives. GC/MS analysis detected two novel metabolic products, methylbenzene and 4-aminophenol, during the LMG degradation by CM9.

  13. Evaluation of genotoxicity and pro-oxidant effect of the azo dyes: acids yellow 17, violet 7 and orange 52, and of their degradation products by Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Hedi; Corroler, David; Barillier, Daniel; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir, Leila; Mosrati, Ridha

    2007-09-01

    Acids yellow 17, violet 7 and orange 52, very important commercial azo dyes used in the textile, food, paper and cosmetic industries, were degraded by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 at concentrations up to 100mg/l. The culture media was completely decolorized under static incubation for 60 h, this faster than under continuous shaking incubation. SOS chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37, with and without metabolic activation (S-9 preparations), was used to assess genotoxicity potential of these dyes before and after biodegradation. None of these dyes or their metabolites was found to be genotoxic in the absence of "Araclor-Induced rat liver microsome" preparations (S-9). However, in presence of the preparation S-9, the genotoxicity of the biodegradation products was highlighted. Metabolites resulting from static cultures were more genotoxic than those obtained in shaken conditions. In addition to genotoxic effects, metabolites have shown a significant ability to induce the formation of superoxide free radical anion (O(2)(*-)). The toxicities generated by the pure azo dyes and the pure azo-reduction products (sulfanilic acid, N,N'-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 4'-aminoacetanilid) were compared. These results suggest that P. putida mt-2 degrades the studied azo dyes in two steps: an azo-reduction followed by an oxygen-dependent metabolization. Some of the derived metabolites would be responsible of genotoxicity and metabolic toxicity.

  14. pH-Insensitive FRET voltage dyes.

    PubMed

    Maher, Michael P; Wu, Nyan-Tsz; Ao, Hong

    2007-08-01

    Many high-throughput ion channel assays require the use of voltage-sensitive dyes to detect channel activity in the presence of test compounds. Dye systems employing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between 2 membrane-bound dyes are advantageous in combining high sensitivity, relatively fast response, and ratiometric output. The most widely used FRET voltage dye system employs a coumarin fluorescence donor whose excitation spectrum is pH dependent. The authors have validated a new class of voltage-sensitive FRET donors based on a pyrene moiety. These dyes are significantly brighter than CC2-DMPE and are not pH sensitive in the physiological range. With the new dye system, the authors demonstrate a new high-throughput assay for the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family. They also introduce a novel method for absolute calibration of voltage-sensitive dyes, simultaneously determining the resting membrane potential of a cell. PMID:17517905

  15. Studies on the influence of power ultrasound on dye penetration in leather dyeing using photomicrographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, V; Swaminathan, G; Rao, P G

    2005-10-01

    The use of power ultrasound in enhancing diffusion rate in various chemical as well as physical processes is gaining in importance. The influence of power ultrasound in the leather dyeing process on enhancing the penetration of dye through the leather matrix was studied. The penetration of dye through a leather cross-section for a given time in the presence and absence of an ultrasonic field (33 kHz, 150 W) was studied by photomicrographic analysis using a stereomicroscope. Different types of black dyes, such as Acid black 1, Metal complex black 194 and Direct black 155, were used for dyeing leather in the present study. Photomicrographic analysis of a cross-section of dyed leather indicated better penetration of dyes through the leather matrix with the use of ultrasound than without it. Therefore, the results indicate that ultrasound helps to improve the diffusion of dye and to reduce diffusional resistance in the leather dyeing process.

  16. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-01

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it.

  17. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye.

    PubMed

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-01

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it. PMID:25875031

  18. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye.

    PubMed

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-01

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it.

  19. Effects of Dye Structure in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Anna R.

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are photovoltaic devices that may compete with standard silicon solar cells due to their ease of construction and lower cost [32]. Ruthenium dye structures, such as N3 (Ru -- (4,4' -- dicarboxylic acid -- 2,2' -- bipyridine)2(NCS)2), have shown promise for collection efficiencies near silicon photovoltaic levels [20, 33]. DSSCs have not achieved the reproducibility and maximum efficiency of silicon solar cells [33, 34]. Altering ligands on the dye molecules may affect the energies of light that are absorbed by the DSSC. Photovoltaic testing, including current versus voltage tests, of DSSCs with both narrow band monochromated light sources and broadband (AM1.5 solar simulator) allows comparison between maximum efficiency, short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, and spectral response (SR) for the dye molecules. By studying how the efficiency and power output change with different dye structures, the nature of how to increase efficiency of the DSSC can be addressed. Conjugation length of the ligands in ruthenium dye molecules can be shown, through square-well and Huckel theory calculations, to have a role in changing the HOMO-LUMO gap of the molecules and the absorption of specific wavelengths of light by the DSSC. The efficiency, max power, short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and SR were all measured for the DSSCs at wavelengths from 350 nm to 690 nm using a monochromated light source. Measurements taken at 20 nm steps reveal trends in the photon acceptance for dye molecules that can be linked to the conjugation length of the ligands in the dye through the SR. The change in the SR centroid and UV-VIS measurements indicate a trend toward increasing optimal wavelength with increasing conjugation length in the dye molecules; however these trends are not as pronounced as theoretical calculations for the dyes. This difference in wavelength shift occurs due to the theoretical calculations accounting for only the ligands

  20. Electrodegradation of the Acid Green 28 dye using Ti/β-PbO2 and Ti-Pt/β-PbO2 anodes.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Kallyni; Bocchi, Nerilso; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Biaggio, Sonia R; Iniesta, Jesús; Montiel, Vicente

    2016-12-01

    The statistical Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is applied to investigate the effect of different parameters (current density, j, NaCl concentration, [NaCl], pH, and temperature, θ) and their interactions on the electrochemical degradation of the Acid Green (AG) 28 dye using a Ti/β-PbO2 or Ti-Pt/β-PbO2 anode in a filter-press reactor. LC/MS is employed to identify intermediate compounds. For both anodes, the best experimental conditions are j = 50 mA cm(-2), [NaCl] = 1.5 g L(-1), pH = 5, and θ = 25 °C. After 3 h of electrolysis, a dye solution treated under these conditions presents the following parameters: electric charge per unit volume of the electrolyzed solution required for 90% decolorization (Q(90)) of 0.34-0.37 A h L(-1), %COD removal of ∼100%, specific energy consumption of 18-20 kW h m(-3), and %TOC removal of 32-33%. No loss of the β-PbO2 film is observed during all the experiments. The β-PbO2 films present excellent stability for solutions with pH ≥ 5 ([Pb(2+)] < 0.5 mg L(-1)). Chloroform is the only volatile organic halo compound present in the treated solution under those optimized conditions. Hydroxylated anthraquinone derivatives, aromatic chloramines, and naphthoquinones are formed during the electrolyses. The Ti/β-PbO2 and Ti-Pt/β-PbO2 anodes show significantly better performance than a commercial DSA anode for the electrochemical degradation of the AG 28 dye. The Ti/β-PbO2 anode, prepared as described in this work, is an excellent option for the treatment of textile effluents because of its low cost of fabrication and good performance. PMID:27604754

  1. Electrodegradation of the Acid Green 28 dye using Ti/β-PbO2 and Ti-Pt/β-PbO2 anodes.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Kallyni; Bocchi, Nerilso; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Biaggio, Sonia R; Iniesta, Jesús; Montiel, Vicente

    2016-12-01

    The statistical Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is applied to investigate the effect of different parameters (current density, j, NaCl concentration, [NaCl], pH, and temperature, θ) and their interactions on the electrochemical degradation of the Acid Green (AG) 28 dye using a Ti/β-PbO2 or Ti-Pt/β-PbO2 anode in a filter-press reactor. LC/MS is employed to identify intermediate compounds. For both anodes, the best experimental conditions are j = 50 mA cm(-2), [NaCl] = 1.5 g L(-1), pH = 5, and θ = 25 °C. After 3 h of electrolysis, a dye solution treated under these conditions presents the following parameters: electric charge per unit volume of the electrolyzed solution required for 90% decolorization (Q(90)) of 0.34-0.37 A h L(-1), %COD removal of ∼100%, specific energy consumption of 18-20 kW h m(-3), and %TOC removal of 32-33%. No loss of the β-PbO2 film is observed during all the experiments. The β-PbO2 films present excellent stability for solutions with pH ≥ 5 ([Pb(2+)] < 0.5 mg L(-1)). Chloroform is the only volatile organic halo compound present in the treated solution under those optimized conditions. Hydroxylated anthraquinone derivatives, aromatic chloramines, and naphthoquinones are formed during the electrolyses. The Ti/β-PbO2 and Ti-Pt/β-PbO2 anodes show significantly better performance than a commercial DSA anode for the electrochemical degradation of the AG 28 dye. The Ti/β-PbO2 anode, prepared as described in this work, is an excellent option for the treatment of textile effluents because of its low cost of fabrication and good performance.

  2. Double D-π-A dye linked by 2,2'-bipyridine dicarboxylic acid: influence of para- and meta-substituted carboxyl anchoring group.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Paramaguru; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Gao, Peng; Rajalingam, Renganathan; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2015-04-01

    Starting from 2,2'-bipyridine dicarboxylic acid, two new (D-π-A)2 sensitizers, including m-DA with the carboxyl anchoring group substituted meta to the donor-bridge moiety and p-DA with a para-substituted anchoring group, were synthesized in order to evaluate the impact of the position of the anchoring group on the optical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. p-DA exhibits red-shifted absorption behavior compared to m-DA, owing to the more efficiently extended π-conjugation with para substitution. Both m-DA and p-DA are adsorbed on the mesoporous TiO2 surface by using both of their carboxylic acid groups in a bianchoring mode, which is confirmed through attenuated total reflectance FTIR analysis. Red-shifted absorption of p-DA assists the achievement of a red-shifted incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and a higher short-circuit current density than m-DA. The photogenerated electron lifetime in TiO2 is also found to be higher for para substituted p-DA than the meta-substituted m-DA, which results in a higher open-circuit voltage. All of the results suggest that dicarboxyl-2,2'-bipyridine can be used as an acceptor for metal-free organic sensitizers. However, the anchoring segments should be adjusted to the favorable position of the corresponding donor-bridge moieties for better conjugation.

  3. The effect of ligand substitution and water co-adsorption on the adsorption dynamics and energy level matching of amino-phenyl acid dyes on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Manzhos, Sergei; Segawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    We perform a comparative theoretical analysis of adsorption of dyes NK1 (2E,4E-2-cyano-5-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)penta-2,4-dienoic acid) and NK7 (2E,4E-2-cyano-5-(4-diphenylaminophenyl)penta-2,4-dienoic acid) on clean and water-covered anatase (101) surfaces of TiO(2). Ligand substitution away from the anchoring group changes the energy level matching between the dye's LUMO and the oxide's conduction band. Monodentate binding and bidentate binding configurations of the dyes to TiO(2) are found to have similar adsorption energies even though the injection from the bidentate mode is found to dominate. Water has a strong effect on adsorption, inducing deprotonation and affecting strongly and differently between the dyes the energy level matching, leading to a shut-off of the injection from NK7 of bidentate adsorption configuration. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show a strong effect of nuclear motion on energy levels, specifically, increasing the driving force for injection in the monodentate regime.

  4. Interactions of Enolizable Barbiturate Dyes.

    PubMed

    Schade, Alexander; Schreiter, Katja; Rüffer, Tobias; Lang, Heinrich; Spange, Stefan

    2016-04-11

    The specific barbituric acid dyes 1-n-butyl-5-(2,4-dinitro-phenyl) barbituric acid and 1-n-butyl-5-{4-[(1,3-dioxo-1H-inden-(3 H)-ylidene)methyl]phenyl}barbituric acid were used to study complex formation with nucleobase derivatives and related model compounds. The enol form of both compounds shows a strong bathochromic shift of the UV/Vis absorption band compared to the rarely coloured keto form. The keto-enol equilibria of the five studied dyes are strongly dependent on the properties of the environment as shown by solvatochromic studies in ionic liquids and a set of organic solvents. Enol form development of the barbituric acid dyes is also associated with alteration of the hydrogen bonding pattern from the ADA to the DDA type (A=hydrogen bond acceptor site, D=donor site). Receptor-induced altering of ADA towards DDA hydrogen bonding patterns of the chromophores are utilised to study supramolecular complex formation. As complementary receptors 9-ethyladenine, 1-n-butylcytosine, 1-n-butylthymine, 9-ethylguanidine and 2,6-diacetamidopiridine were used. The UV/Vis spectroscopic response of acid-base reaction compared to supramolecular complex formation is evaluated by (1)H NMR titration experiments and X-ray crystal structure analyses. An increased acidity of the barbituric acid derivative promotes genuine salt formation. In contrast, supramolecular complex formation is preferred for the weaker acidic barbituric acid. PMID:26945529

  5. Process parameters for decolorization and biodegradation of orange II (Acid Orange 7) in dye-simulated minimal salt medium and subsequent textile effluent treatment by Bacillus cereus (MTCC 9777) RMLAU1.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant

    2013-11-01

    In this study, Bacillus cereus isolate from tannery effluent was employed for orange II dye decolorization in simulated minimal salt broth and textile effluent. Most of the physicochemical parameters of textile effluent were above the permissible limits. The strain was highly tolerant to dye up to 500 mg l(-1). Increasing dye concentration exerted inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth and decolorization. The maximum decolorization of initial 100 mg dye l(-1) was achieved at optimum pH 8.0 and 33 °C under static culture conditions during 96-h incubation. Supplementation with optimized glucose (0.4%, w/v) and ammonium sulfate (0.1%, w/v) with 3.0% B. cereus inoculum further enhanced dye decolorization to highest 68.5% within 96-h incubation. A direct correlation was evident between bacterial growth and dye decolorization. Under above optimized conditions, 24.3% decolorization of unsterilized real textile effluent by native microflora was achieved. The effluent decolorization enhanced substantially to 37.1% with B. cereus augmentation and to 40.5% when supplemented with glucose and ammonium sulfate without augmentation. The maximum decolorization of 52.5% occurred when textile effluent was supplemented with optimized exogenous carbon and nitrogen sources along with B. cereus augmentation. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified sulfanilic acid as orange II degradation product. Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy of metabolic products indicated the presence of amino and hydroxyl functional groups. This strain may be suitably employed for in situ decolorization of textile industrial effluent under broad environmental conditions.

  6. Toxicity of imine-iminium dyes and pigments: electron transfer, radicals, oxidative stress and other physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2014-08-01

    Although conjugation is well known as an important contributor to color, there is scant recognition concerning involvement of imine and iminium functions in the physiological effects of this class of dyes and pigments. The group includes the dyes methylene blue, rhodamine, malachite green, fuchsin, crystal violet, auramine and cyanins, in addition to the pigments consisting of pyocyanine, phthalocyanine and pheophytin. The physiological effects consist of both toxicity and beneficial aspects. The unifying theme of electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress is used as the rationale in both cases. Toxicity is frequently prevented or alleviated by antioxidants. The apparent dichotomy of methylene blue action as both oxidant and antioxidant is rationalized based on similar previous cases. This mechanistic approach may have practical benefit. This review is important in conveying, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for toxicity based on electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress arising from imine-iminium.

  7. Toxicity of imine-iminium dyes and pigments: electron transfer, radicals, oxidative stress and other physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2014-08-01

    Although conjugation is well known as an important contributor to color, there is scant recognition concerning involvement of imine and iminium functions in the physiological effects of this class of dyes and pigments. The group includes the dyes methylene blue, rhodamine, malachite green, fuchsin, crystal violet, auramine and cyanins, in addition to the pigments consisting of pyocyanine, phthalocyanine and pheophytin. The physiological effects consist of both toxicity and beneficial aspects. The unifying theme of electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress is used as the rationale in both cases. Toxicity is frequently prevented or alleviated by antioxidants. The apparent dichotomy of methylene blue action as both oxidant and antioxidant is rationalized based on similar previous cases. This mechanistic approach may have practical benefit. This review is important in conveying, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for toxicity based on electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress arising from imine-iminium. PMID:24852913

  8. Preparation and characterization of polylactic acid microspheres containing water-soluble dyes using a novel w/o/w emulsion solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Yoshida, K; Goto, S

    1996-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres containing soluble dyes as water-soluble model compounds were prepared using the water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation method. Addition of electrolytes such as NaCl or CaCl2 into the external aqueous phase significantly improved brilliant blue (BB) entrapment efficiency compared to the case of no additives. NaCl was the most effective for obtaining high entrapment efficiency (80-90% of theoretical BB content). The average diameter of the obtained microspheres was in the region of 10-20 microns in all cases. PLA microspheres containing 5 and 10% (w/w) BB exhibited the so-called burst release. The release rate decreased with decrease in the internal aqueous droplet volume in the preparation process. In particular, with PLA microspheres containing 5% (w/w) BB, those prepared with the smallest internal droplet volume (63 microliter), the initial burst release was reduced significantly, and 50% (w/w) of the loaded BB remained in the microspheres for 7 days. PMID:8999126

  9. Degradation efficiencies of azo dye Acid Orange 7 by the interaction of heat, UV and anions with common oxidants: persulfate, peroxymonosulfate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Wang, Ping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Liang; Zhang, Wenyi; Shao, Xueting; Niu, Rui

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, the degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by three common peroxides (persulfate (PS), peroxymonosulfate (PMS) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))) under various activation conditions, i.e., heat (25-80 degrees C), UV light (254 nm), or anions (SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), CO(3)(2-), HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-), and Cl(-)), was investigated. The order of AO7 degradation efficiencies by heat activation is PS>PMS>H(2)O(2). PS oxidation activated by heat (>50 degrees C) is an effective degradation technology, while PMS and H(2)O(2) are hardly activated. When assisted by UV, peroxides could all be activated and degrade AO7 quickly. The order is PS>H(2)O(2)>PMS. We activated peroxides, for the first time, by using some anions and compared the subsequently degradation efficiencies of AO7. It was found that PMS could be activated by some anions, but PS and H(2)O(2) cannot. The activation efficiencies of PMS by SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) are negligible, whereas remarkable by HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-), Cl(-) and CO(3)(2-). For HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-) and Cl(-), the activation efficiencies become higher with the increase of anion concentration. For CO(3)(2-), however, the activation efficiency is higher at lower concentration.

  10. Effects of hydrochloric acid treatment of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/nanofibers bilayer film on the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lixin; Du, Pingfan; Shao, Xiaoli; Cao, Houbao; Hui, Quan; Xiong, Jie

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/TiO{sub 2} nanofibers bilayer film was fabricated for DSSC. ► The effects of HCl treated TiO{sub 2} on the performance of DSSC were investigated. ► The potential methods of improving conversion efficiency are suggested. - Abstract: The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles/nanofibers bilayer film has been fabricated via spin coating and electrospinning followed by calcination. The TiO{sub 2} bilayer film with thickness of about 6.0 μm is composed of anatase TiO{sub 2} phase. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) were assembled by hydrochloric acid (HCl) treated TiO{sub 2} film. The results of the photocurrent action spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and I–V curves showed that each photovoltaic parameter of DSSC increased with the concentration of HCl increasing, and reached a maximum value and afterwards decreased. The maximum incident monochromatic photo-to-electron conversion efficiency (at 350 nm) and maximum overall conversion efficiency (η) of 0.05 M HCl treated TiO{sub 2} based DSSC were enhanced to 48.0% and 4.75%, which were respectively increased by 14% and 6.3% than those of DSSC based on untreated TiO{sub 2} film.

  11. Self-quenched covalent fluorescent dye-nucleic acid conjugates as polymeric substrates for enzymatic nuclease assays.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagstrom, James E; Budker, Vladimir G

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescent method is described for assessing nuclease activity. The technique is based on the preparation of quenched fluorophore-nucleic acid covalent conjugates and their subsequent dequenching due to degradation by nucleases. The resulting fluorescence increase can be measured by a spectrofluorometer and exhibits subpicogram per milliliter sensitivity level for RNase A and low picogram per milliliter level for DNase I. The method is adaptable for quantitative nuclease inhibitor testing.

  12. Carminic acid dye from the homopteran Dactylopius coccus hemolymph is consumed during treatment with different microbial elicitors.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, Fidel de la Cruz; de Muñoz, Fernando García-Gil; Rojas-Martínez, Alberto; Hernández-Martínez, Salvador; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto

    2003-09-01

    The activation of Dactylopius coccus (Costa) hemolymph with microbial polysaccharide molecules was studied. Hemolymph incubated in the presence of laminarin, zymosan, and N-acetyl glucosamine produced a dark fibrillar precipitated, and the red pigment (carminic acid) was consumed (measured spectrophotometrically at 495 nm). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) did not induce any response. The reaction was inhibited with millimolar concentrations of serine and cysteine protease inhibitors, EGTA and phenyl thiourea. It was also diminished by prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors: dexamethasone, acetylsalicylic acid, and indomethacin. However, Mg2+ chelator EDTA did not inhibit hemolymph activation. Hemolymph proteins were depleted from soluble phase during treatment with laminarin, but a group of around 34 kDa remained unmodified. These results showed that D. coccus hemolymph is activated by microbial elicitors, its activation depends on eicosanoids, and suggest participation of a prophenoloxidase (PPO)-like activation system that could consume carminic acid. We are currently dissecting the molecular factors involved in D. coccus hemolymph activation to determine homologies and differences with other arthropods immune response pathways. PMID:12942514

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of SC-NTR: a subsidiary dye of allura red AC dye (FD&C red no. 40).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Goda, Y; Noguchi, H; Yamada, T; Yoshihira, K; Takeda, M

    1994-01-01

    A major subsidiary dye in US certified Allura Red AC dye (FD&C Red No. 40) has been isolated by preparative high performance liquid chromatography. The paper chromatographic properties of the isolated dye indicate that it is the dye designated as SC-NTR in a previous paper (Marmion 1971). Spectroscopic analysis of the isolated dye is consistent with the disodium salt of 6-hydroxy-5-(2-methoxy-5-methyl-3-sulphophenylazo)-2-naphthalen esulphonic acid, which is an azo-coupling product between the meta-isomer of cresidine-p-sulphonic acid (CSA) and Schaeffer's salt (SS).

  14. Shape-persistent macrocycles functionalised with coumarin dyes: acid-controlled energy- and electron-transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Giansante, Carlo; Ceroni, Paola; Venturi, Margherita; Balzani, Vincenzo; Sakamoto, Junji; Schlüter, A Dieter

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the spectroscopic properties (absorption spectra, emission spectra, emission lifetimes) of three triads in CH(2)Cl(2): C2-M-C2, C343-M-C343, and C2-M-C343, in which M is a shape-persistent macrocyclic hexagonal backbone composed of two 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) units embedded in opposing sides, and C2 and C343 are coumarin 2 and coumarin 343, respectively. All the components are strongly fluorescent species (Phi=0.90, 0.79, and 0.93 for M, C2, and C343, respectively, as established by investigating suitable model compounds). In each triad excitation of M leads to almost quantitative energy transfer to the lowest coumarin-localised excited state. Upon addition of acid, the two bpy units of the M component undergo independent protonation leading to monoprotonated (e.g., C2-MH(+)-C2) and diprotonated (e.g., C2-M2 H(+)-C2) species. Further addition of acid leads to protonation of the coumarin component so that each triad is involved in four protonation equilibria. Protonation causes strong (and reversible, upon addition of base) changes in the absorption and fluorescence properties of the triads because of inversion of the excited-state order and/or the occurrence of electron-transfer quenching processes.

  15. Ultrasound for wool dyeing and finishing.

    PubMed

    McNeil, S J; McCall, R A

    2011-01-01

    The effects of ultrasound at 35-39 kHz on several wool dyeing and finishing processes have been investigated as a way of reducing environmental impact. Ultrasound improved the effectiveness of cleaning scoured wool in water and to a lesser extent in water-nonionic surfactant. Scanning electron microscopy did not indicate any surface damage. Fluorescence microscopy revealed increased levels of sulphydryl groups on the wool surface suggesting ultrasound caused the removal of thioester-bound lipids. Ultrasound pre-treatment increased the effectiveness of subsequent oxidative-reductive bleaching, but had no effect on the uptake of acid levelling and acid milling dyes. The pre-treatment retarded the uptake of reactive dye, possibly by increasing the crystallinity of the fibre or removing surface bound lipids. Ultrasound did not improve dyeing under conditions that are currently used in industry, but did show potential to reduce the chemical and energy requirements of dyeing wool with reactive and acid milling dyes, but not acid levelling dyes. PMID:20675174

  16. Energy Transfer of CdSe/ZnS Nanocrystals Encapsulated with Rhodamine-Dye Functionalized Poly(acrylic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Rebecca C.; Snee, Preston T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy transfer between a CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal (NC) donor and a rhodamine isothiocyanate (RITC) acceptor has been achieved via a functionalized poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) encapsulating layer over the surface of the NC. The modification of PAA with both N-octylamine (OA) and 5-amino-1-pentanol (AP), [PAA-OA-AP], allows for the simultaneous water-solubilization and functionalization of the NCs, underscoring the ease of synthesizing NC-acceptor conjugates with this strategy. Photophysical studies of the NC-RITC constructs showed that energy transfer is efficient, with kFRET approaching 108 s−1. The ease of the covalent conjugation of molecules to NCs with PAA-OA-AP coating, together with efficient energy transfer, makes the NCs encapsulated with PAA-OA-AP attractive candidates for sensing applications. PMID:24926175

  17. Studies on Dyeing Process Variables for Salt Free Reactive Dyeing of Glycine Modified Cationized Cotton Muslin Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Kar, Tapas Ranjan; Mukhopadhyay, Asis; Shome, Debashis; Konar, Adwaita

    2015-04-01

    Bleached cotton muslin fabric with or without pre-oxidized with NaIO4 (oxy-cotton) was chemically modified with glycine (amino acid) by pad dry calendar process to investigate the changes in textile properties and its dyeability with reactive dye. This glycine modified cotton incorporates new functional groups producing -NH3 + or -C=NH+ -ion (cationic groups) in acid bath to obtain cationized cotton making it amenable to a newer route of salt free reactive dyeing in acid bath. In the present work the process variables of reactive dyeing in the salt free acid bath for dyeing of amine (glycine) modified cationized cotton were studied and optimized. The present study also includes thorough investigation of changes in important textile related properties and dyeability with reactive dye after such chemical modifications. Between oxidized and unoxidized cotton muslin fabric, unoxidized cotton fabric shows better reactive dye uptake in both conventional alkaline bath dyeing and nonconventional salt free acid bath dyeing particularly for high exhaustion class of reactive dye with acceptable level of colour fastness and overall balance of other textile related properties. Moreover, application of dye fixing agent further improves surface colour depth (K/S) of the glycine treated cotton fabric for HE brand of reactive dyes. Corresponding reaction mechanisms for such modifications were supported by FTIR spectroscopy. Finally unoxidized cotton and pre-oxidized cotton further treated with glycine (amino acid) provide a new route of acid bath salt free reactive dyeing showing much higher dye uptake and higher degree of surface cover with amino acid residue anchored to modified cotton.

  18. Safer staining method for acid fast bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R C; Zabrowarny, L A

    1993-01-01

    To develop a method for staining acid fast bacilli which excluded highly toxic phenol from the staining solution. A lipophilic agent, a liquid organic detergent, LOC High Studs, distributed by Amway, was substituted. The acid fast bacilli stained red; nuclei, cytoplasm, and cytoplasmic elements stained blue on a clear background. These results compare very favourably with acid fast bacilli stained by the traditional method. Detergents are efficient lipophilic agents and safer to handle than phenol. The method described here stains acid fast bacilli as efficiently as traditional carbol fuchsin methods. LOC High Suds is considerably cheaper than phenol. Images PMID:7687254

  19. Safer staining method for acid fast bacilli.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R C; Zabrowarny, L A

    1993-06-01

    To develop a method for staining acid fast bacilli which excluded highly toxic phenol from the staining solution. A lipophilic agent, a liquid organic detergent, LOC High Studs, distributed by Amway, was substituted. The acid fast bacilli stained red; nuclei, cytoplasm, and cytoplasmic elements stained blue on a clear background. These results compare very favourably with acid fast bacilli stained by the traditional method. Detergents are efficient lipophilic agents and safer to handle than phenol. The method described here stains acid fast bacilli as efficiently as traditional carbol fuchsin methods. LOC High Suds is considerably cheaper than phenol.

  20. Preparation of mesoporous poly (acrylic acid)/SiO2 composite nanofiber membranes having adsorption capacity for indigo carmine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ran; Jia, Min; Li, Fengting; Wang, Hongtao; Zhang, Bingru; Qiao, Junlian

    2012-03-01

    Mesoporous poly (acrylic acid)/SiO2 (PAA/SiO2) composite nanofiber membranes functionalized with mercapto groups were fabricated by a sol-gel electrospinning method, and their adsorption capacity for indigo carmine was investigated. The membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. SEM and TEM observation results showed that the PAA/SiO2 fibers had diameters between 400-800 nm and mesopores with an average pore size of 3.88 nm. The specific surface area of the mesoporous nanofiber membranes was 514.89 m2/g. The characteristic peaks for mercapto group vibration in FTIR and Raman spectra demonstrated that the mercapto groups have been incorporated into the silica skeleton. The adsorption isotherm data of indigo carmine on the membranes fit well with Redlich-Peterson model, and the maximum adsorption capacity calculated was 523.11 mg/g. It was found that the removal rate of indigo carmine by the membranes reached a maximum of 98% in 90 min and the adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model. The high adsorption capacity of PAA/SiO2 nanofiber membrane makes it a promising adsorbent for indigo carmine removal from the wastewater.

  1. A novel, sensitive and label-free loop-mediated isothermal amplification detection method for nucleic acids using luminophore dyes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Wei, Sim Xiao; Ying, Jean Liew Zhi; Safavieh, Mohammadali; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-12-15

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has been widely rendered for nucleic acid testing. Here, we integrate loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with ECL technique for DNA detection and quantification. The target LAMP DNA bound electrostatically with [Ru(bpy)3](+2) on the carbon electrode surface, and an ECL reaction was triggered by tripropylamine (TPrA) to yield luminescence. We illustrated this method as a new and highly sensitive strategy for the detection of sequence-specific DNA from different meat species at picogram levels. The proposed strategy renders the signal amplification capacities of TPrA and combines LAMP with inherently high sensitivity of the ECL technique, to facilitate the detection of low quantities of DNA. By leveraging this technique, target DNA of Sus scrofa (pork) meat was detected as low as 1pg/µL (3.43×10(-1)copies/µL). In addition, the proposed technique was applied for detection of Bacillus subtilis DNA samples and detection limit of 10pg/µL (2.2×10(3)copies/µL) was achieved. The advantages of being isothermal, sensitive and robust with ability for multiplex detection of bio-analytes makes this method a facile and appealing sensing modality in hand-held devices to be used at the point-of-care (POC). PMID:27393827

  2. Histotopographical study of human periocular elastic fibers using aldehyde-fuchsin staining with special reference to the sleeve and pulley system for extraocular rectus muscles.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Hajime; Murakami, Gen; Ohtsuka, Aiji; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Takashi; Tatsumi, Haruyuki

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed configuration of periocular elastic fibers. Semiserial paraffin sections were made using 40 whole orbital contents from 27 elderly cadavers and stained by the aldehyde-fuchsin method. Periocular tissues were classified into three types according to directions of the elastic fibers, i.e., tissues containing anteroposteriorly running elastic fibers, those with mediolateral fibers, and those with meshwork of fibers. Anteroposterior elastic fiber-dominant tissue was seen in the upper eyelid and newly defined pulley plate for the medial and lateral recti (MR, LR). Mediolateral fibers were predominant in the central part of the inferior rectus pulley. In the pulley plates for the MR and LR, anteroposteriorly running fibers encased the striated muscle. Tenon's capsule and the epimysium of the recti were mediolateral fiber-dominant. However, at the entrance of the muscle terminal where Tenon's capsule reflects and continues to the epimysium, composite elastic fibers provided a meshwork-like skeleton. The elastic mesh was also seen around the lacrimal canaliculi. The pulley for the recti seemed to be composed of two parts--a connective tissue plate encasing the recti and specialized Tenon's capsule at an entrance or porta of the muscle. For both parts, elastic fibers were major functional components. The anteroposterior elastic fibers in the MR and LR pulley plates, especially, seemed to receive anteroposteriorly directed stress and tension from these striated muscles. The elastic interfaces seemed to prevent any concentration of stress that would interfere with periocular striated muscle functions, including hypothetical active pulleys.

  3. Complete degradation of the azo dye Acid Orange-7 and bioelectricity generation in an integrated microbial fuel cell, aerobic two-stage bioreactor system in continuous flow mode at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Eustace; Keshavarz, Taj; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the commercially used model azo dye Acid Orange-7 (AO-7) was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates using an integrated microbial fuel cell (MFC) and aerobic bioreactor system. The integrated bioreactor system was operated at ambient temperature and continuous-flow mode. AO-7 loading rate was varied during experiments from 70gm(-3)day(-1) to 210gm(-3)day(-1). Colour and soluble COD removal rates reached>90% under all AO-7 loading rates. The MFC treatment stage prompted AO-7 to undergo reductive degradation into its constituent aromatic amines. HPLC-MS analysis of metabolite extracts from the aerobic stage of the bioreactor system indicated further oxidative degradation of the resulting aromatic amines into simpler compounds. Bioluminescence based Vibrio fischeri ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that aerobic stage effluent exhibited toxicity reductions of approximately fivefold and ten-fold respectively compared to the dye wastewater influent and MFC-stage effluent.

  4. Efficient synthesis of triarylamine-based dyes for p-type dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wild, Martin; Griebel, Jan; Hajduk, Anna; Friedrich, Dirk; Stark, Annegret; Abel, Bernd; Siefermann, Katrin R

    2016-01-01

    The class of triarylamine-based dyes has proven great potential as efficient light absorbers in inverse (p-type) dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). However, detailed investigation and further improvement of p-type DSSCs is strongly hindered by the fact that available synthesis routes of triarylamine-based dyes are inefficient and particularly demanding with regard to time and costs. Here, we report on an efficient synthesis strategy for triarylamine-based dyes for p-type DSSCs. A protocol for the synthesis of the dye-precursor (4-(bis(4-bromophenyl)amino)benzoic acid) is presented along with its X-ray crystal structure. The dye precursor is obtained from the commercially available 4(diphenylamino)benzaldehyde in a yield of 87% and serves as a starting point for the synthesis of various triarylamine-based dyes. Starting from the precursor we further describe a synthesis protocol for the dye 4-{bis[4'-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl]amino}benzoic acid (also known as dye P4) in a yield of 74%. All synthesis steps are characterized by high yields and high purities without the need for laborious purification steps and thus fulfill essential requirements for scale-up. PMID:27196877

  5. Efficient synthesis of triarylamine-based dyes for p-type dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Martin; Griebel, Jan; Hajduk, Anna; Friedrich, Dirk; Stark, Annegret; Abel, Bernd; Siefermann, Katrin R.

    2016-01-01

    The class of triarylamine-based dyes has proven great potential as efficient light absorbers in inverse (p-type) dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). However, detailed investigation and further improvement of p-type DSSCs is strongly hindered by the fact that available synthesis routes of triarylamine-based dyes are inefficient and particularly demanding with regard to time and costs. Here, we report on an efficient synthesis strategy for triarylamine-based dyes for p-type DSSCs. A protocol for the synthesis of the dye-precursor (4-(bis(4-bromophenyl)amino)benzoic acid) is presented along with its X-ray crystal structure. The dye precursor is obtained from the commercially available 4(diphenylamino)benzaldehyde in a yield of 87% and serves as a starting point for the synthesis of various triarylamine-based dyes. Starting from the precursor we further describe a synthesis protocol for the dye 4-{bis[4′-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl]amino}benzoic acid (also known as dye P4) in a yield of 74%. All synthesis steps are characterized by high yields and high purities without the need for laborious purification steps and thus fulfill essential requirements for scale-up. PMID:27196877

  6. Efficient synthesis of triarylamine-based dyes for p-type dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Griebel, Jan; Hajduk, Anna; Friedrich, Dirk; Stark, Annegret; Abel, Bernd; Siefermann, Katrin R.

    2016-05-01

    The class of triarylamine-based dyes has proven great potential as efficient light absorbers in inverse (p-type) dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). However, detailed investigation and further improvement of p-type DSSCs is strongly hindered by the fact that available synthesis routes of triarylamine-based dyes are inefficient and particularly demanding with regard to time and costs. Here, we report on an efficient synthesis strategy for triarylamine-based dyes for p-type DSSCs. A protocol for the synthesis of the dye-precursor (4-(bis(4-bromophenyl)amino)benzoic acid) is presented along with its X-ray crystal structure. The dye precursor is obtained from the commercially available 4(diphenylamino)benzaldehyde in a yield of 87% and serves as a starting point for the synthesis of various triarylamine-based dyes. Starting from the precursor we further describe a synthesis protocol for the dye 4-{bis[4‧-(2,2-dicyanovinyl)-[1,1‧-biphenyl]-4-yl]amino}benzoic acid (also known as dye P4) in a yield of 74%. All synthesis steps are characterized by high yields and high purities without the need for laborious purification steps and thus fulfill essential requirements for scale-up.

  7. Microbiological assessment of dentin stained with a caries detector dye.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, M A; Munshi, A K

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess microbiologically the efficacy of 1% acid red in propylene glycol dye to stain carious dentin. Thirty teeth with primary carious lesions involving dentin were chosen. Cavity preparation using the conventional visual and tactile criteria was done and the dye was applied to the prepared cavity. Dentin samples were collected, from carious dentin prior to cavity preparation, dye stained areas and unstained areas. The total colony forming units (CFU) in each sample were then assessed microbiologically. The results showed a highly significant difference in the total colony forming units in dye stained and dye unstained dentin samples. The 1% acid red dye in propylene glycol dye was found to be effective as an adjunctive aid in the diagnosis of carious dentin.

  8. Equilibrium, kinetics and mechanism modeling and simulation of basic and acid dyes sorption onto jute fiber carbon: Eosin yellow, malachite green and crystal violet single component systems.

    PubMed

    Porkodi, K; Vasanth Kumar, K

    2007-05-01

    Batch experiments were carried out for the sorption of eosin yellow, malachite green and crystal violet onto jute fiber carbon (JFC). The operating variables studied are the initial dye concentration, initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. Experimental equilibrium data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherm by non-linear regression method. Langmuir isotherm was found to be the optimum isotherm for eosin yellow/JFC system and Freundlich isotherm was found to be the optimum isotherm for malachite green/JFC and crystal violet/JFC system at equilibrium conditions. The sorption capacities of eosin yellow, malachite green and crystal violet onto JFC according to Langmuir isotherm were found to 31.49 mg/g, 136.58 mg/g, 27.99 mg/g, respectively. A single stage batch adsorber was designed for the adsorption of eosin yellow, malachite green and crystal violet onto JFC based on the optimum isotherm. A pseudo second order kinetic model well represented the kinetic uptake of dyes studied onto JFC. The pseudo second order kinetic model successfully simulated the kinetics of dye uptake process. The dye sorption process involves both surface and pore diffusion with predominance of surface diffusion at earlier stages. A Boyd plot confirms the external mass transfer as the rate limiting step in the dye sorption process. The influence of initial dye concentration on the dye sorption process was represented in the form of dimensionless mass transfer numbers (Sh/Sc(0.33)) and was found to be agreeing with the expression:

  9. Alkali, thermo and halo tolerant fungal isolate for the removal of textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree

    2010-11-01

    In the present study potential of a fungal isolate Aspergillus lentulusFJ172995, was investigated for the removal of textile dyes. The removal percentages of dyes such as Acid Navy Blue, Orange-HF, Fast Red A, Acid Sulphone Blue and Acid Magenta were determined as 99.43, 98.82, 98.75, 97.67 and 69.98, respectively. None of the dyes inhibited the growth of A. lentulus. Detailed studies on growth kinetics, mechanism of dye removal and effect of different parameters on dye removal were conducted using Acid Navy Blue dye. It was observed that A. lentulus could completely remove Acid Navy Blue even at high initial dye concentrations, up to 900 mg/L. Highest uptake capacity of 212.92 mg/g was observed at an initial dye concentration of 900 mg/L. Dye removing efficiency was not altered with the variation of pH; and biomass production as well as dye removal was favored at higher temperatures. Dye removal was also efficient even at high salt concentration. Through growth kinetics studies it was observed that the initial exponential growth phase coincided with the phase of maximal dye removal. Microscopic studies suggest that bioaccumulation along with biosorption is the principle mechanism involved in dye removal by A. lentulus. Thus, it is concluded that being alkali, thermo and halo tolerant, A. lentulus isolate has a great potential to be utilized for the treatment of dye bearing effluents which are usually alkaline, hot and saline.

  10. Significant Influences of Elaborately Modulating Electron Donors on Light Absorption and Multichannel Charge-Transfer Dynamics for 4-(Benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-ylethynyl)benzoic Acid Dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erfeng; Yao, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yiqiang; Shao, Guosheng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-20

    4-(Benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-ylethynyl)benzoic acid (BTEBA) as a promising electron acceptor has been used in the highly efficient organic dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) recently. Because of its strong electron-deficient character, BTEBA could bring forth a remarkable decline in the energy level of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and further reduce the energy gap of dye molecules significantly. In this contribution, two metal-free organic dyes WEF1 and WEF2 were synthesized by simply combining BTEBA with two slightly tailored electron-releasing moieties: 4-hexylphenyl substituted indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b']dithiophene (IDT) and cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophene[2',1':4,5]thieno[2,3-d]thiophene (CPDTDT), which were screened rationally from an electron-donor pool via computational simulation. With respect to those of WEF1, WEF2-sensitized solar cells demonstrate a far better short-circuit photocurrent density (JSC) and open-circuit photovoltage (VOC), resulting in a ∼50% improved power conversion efficiency of 10.0% under irradiance of 100 mW cm(-2) AM1.5G sunlight. We resorted to theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, steady-state, and time-resolved spectroscopic methods to shed light on the fatal influences of elaborately modulating electron donors on light absorption, interfacial energetics, and multichannel charge-transfer dynamics.

  11. Kinetics of anaerobic biodecolourisation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Yemashova, N; Fedorovich, V

    2006-01-01

    Kinetics of anaerobic biodecolourisation (methanogenic environment) of four azo dyes (Acid Orange 6, Acid Orange 7, Methyl Orange and Methyl Red) was investigated with regard to their electrochemical properties as well as under variation of dye and sludge concentrations, pH and temperature. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a correlation between the potential of irreversible reduction peak of the dye and its first-order decolorisation constant. For each dye tested, this decolourisation constant was adversely proportional to dye concentration (0.086-1.7 mM) and had a saturation (hyperbolic) dependency on sludge concentration (0.04-1.1 g VSS/l), a bell-shape dependency on pH (4.0-9.0) and Arrhenius dependency on temperature (24-40 degrees C). Transfer from methanogenic to sulphate reducing environment led to an increase of decolorisation constant for all the dyes investigated due to the abundant presence of sulphide as a reducing agent in the reaction medium. Similar transfer to a denitrifying environment resulted in an almost complete decease of decolourisation because nitrate easily outcompetes azo dyes as an electron acceptor.

  12. Alcian yellow as a fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Stockert, J C; Del Castillo, P; Armas-Portela, R

    1989-01-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of the cationic dye Alcian yellow are described. Under ultraviolet excitation, the chromatin and basophilic cytoplasm from cell smears show a blue-white emission, which depends on the presence of nucleic acids. Glycosaminoglycans-containing structures (mast cell granules, cartilage matrix) appear brightly fluorescent. The excitation at 320 less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 340 nm is the most suitable, and the emission wavelength shows dependence on the dye concentration.

  13. Effective removal of cationic dyes using carboxylate-functionalized cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Han; Zhou, Yanmei; Yu, Fang; Wang, Enze; Min, Yinghao; Huang, Qi; Pang, Lanfang; Ma, Tongsen

    2015-12-01

    A novel carboxylate-functionalized adsorbent (CNM) based on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was prepared and adsorptive removal of multiple cationic dyes (crystal violet, methylene blue, malachite green and basic fuchsin) were investigated. The maximum cationic dyes uptakes ranged from 30.0 to 348.9mgg(-1) following the order of: CNM>CNCs>raw cellulose. Furthermore, the removal of crystal violet by CNM was investigated representatively where kinetics, thermodynamics and isotherm analysis were employed to explain in-depth information associated with the adsorption process. The adsorption kinetics fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model and thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Meanwhile, isothermal study demonstrated a monolayer adsorption behavior following the Langmuir model with a calculated maximum absorption capacity of 243.9mgg(-1), which is higher than those of many other reported adsorbents. These findings prefigure the promising potentials of CNM as a versatile adsorbent for the efficient removal of cationic dyes from wastewater. PMID:26298027

  14. Cloth dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... poisonous ingredient in most household cloth dyes. Most common household cloth dyes are made from nonpoisonous substances, such as: Mild soaps Pigments Salts Although these substances are generally considered not dangerous, ...

  15. Enzymatic decolorization of spent textile dyeing baths composed by mixtures of synthetic dyes and additives.

    PubMed

    Ciullini, Ilaria; Gullotto, Antonella; Tilli, Silvia; Sannia, Giovanni; Basosi, Riccardo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2012-10-01

    The effects of different components of real dyeing bath formulations, such as the equalizing and fixing additives-acids, salts, and surfactants-on the decolorization catalyzed by Funalia trogii enzymatic extracts, were investigated to understand their influence on the recalcitrance to biodegradation of this type of wastewater. The decolorization of selected dyes and dye mixtures after tissue dyeing was performed in the presence/absence of auxiliary compounds. All spent dyeing baths were enzymatically decolorized to different extents, by the addition of extracts containing laccase only or laccase plus cellobiose dehydrogenase. Whereas surfactant auxiliaries, in some instances, inhibit the decolorization of spent dyeing baths, in several occurrences the acid/salt additives favor the enzymatic process. In general, the complete spent dyeing formulations are better degraded than those containing the dyes only. The comparison of extracellular extracts obtained from spent straws from the commercial growth of Pleurotus sp. mushrooms with those from F. trogii reveals similar decolorization extents thus allowing to further reduce the costs of bioremediation.

  16. Effect of electron withdrawing unit for dye-sensitized solar cell based on D-A-π-A organic dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Dong Yuel; Chang, Dong Min; Kim, Young Sik

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • To gain the red-shifted absorption spectra, withdrawing unit was substituted in dye. • By the introduction of additional withdrawing unit, LUMOs level of dye are decreased. • Decreasing LUMOs level of dye caused the red-shifted absorption spectra of dye. • Novel acceptor, DCRD, showed better photovoltaic properties than cyanoacetic acid. - Abstract: In this work, two novel D-A-π-A dye sensitizers with triarylamine as an electron donor, isoindigo and cyano group as electron withdrawing units and cyanoacetic acid and 2-(1,1-dicyanomethylene) rhodanine as an electron acceptor for an anchoring group (TICC, TICR) were designed and investigated with the ID6 dye as the reference. The difference in HOMO and LUMO levels were compared according to the presence or absence of isoindigo in ID6 (TC and ID6). To gain insight into the factors responsible for photovoltaic performance, we used density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Owing to different LUMO levels for each acceptor, the absorption band and molar extinction coefficient of each dye was different. Among the dyes, TICR showed more red-shifted and broader absorption spectra than other dyes and had a higher molar extinction coefficient than the reference. It is expected that TICR would show better photovoltaic properties than the other dyes, including the reference dye.

  17. [Enhanced biodecolourization of azo dyes by the catalysis of anthraquinone dyes intermediators].

    PubMed

    Su, Yan-Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Lü, Hong; Li, Li-Hua

    2008-07-01

    Enhanced biodecolourization of azo dyes by suspended and immobilized quinone-reducing community using kinds of anthraquinone dyes intermediators as redox mediators was investigated. The suspended bacterium community could enhance the biodecolourization of many kinds of azo dyes using bromoamine acid (BAA) as a redox mediator, the optimum conditions for Acid Red 3R were as follows: pH 6-9, glucose, BAA and initial dye concentrations 400-600 mg/L, 19-34.2 mg/L and < or = 900 mg/L, respectively. Under these conditions, the maximal decolourization rate was about 95%, which is reached within 7 h for suspended cells and 14 h for immobilized cells. However, the latter needed 38-57 mg/L BAA as a redox mediator. In addition, after 7 cycles without BAA addition, the decolourization rate of Acid Red 3R by immobilized cells retained over 85%.

  18. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1998-07-21

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a cationic chain. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye. 10 figs.

  19. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a cationic chain. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  20. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    2000-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a cationic chain. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  1. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1994-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a polycationic chain of at least two positive charges. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  2. Molecular design and photovoltaic performance of organic dyes containing phenothiazine for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyo Jeong; Nam, Jung Eun; Sim, Kyoseung; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Jae Hong; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2014-10-01

    We synthesized novel organic photosensitizers based on fluorine-substituted phenothiazine with thiophene bridge units in the chromophore for application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Furthermore, organic dyes with different acceptors exhibited higher molar extinction coefficients, and better light absorption at longer wavelengths. The photovoltaic properties of organic dyes composed of different acceptors in their chromophores were measured to identify their effects on the DSSC performance. The organic dye, PFSCN2 containing multi-cyanoacrylic acid as the electron acceptor, showed a power conversion efficiency of 4.67% under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW/cm2). The retarded recombination kinetics from TiO2 electrode to electrolyte enhanced the electron life time of the organic dye, PFSCN2 in the photoanode of the DSSC. This was confirmed with impedance analysis.

  3. Laser ablation of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, M.; Stuke, M.

    1992-01-01

    High density 50 μs pulses of the UV dyes PPF, POPOP and BBO and of two dyes in the visible region, Xanthen N92 and Fluorol 7GA were generated by laser ablation. Dye powders were pressed with 7800 kp/cm 2 in round pellets which were ablated by exposure to KrF excimer laser radiation (248 nm) at a fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2. The ablation cloud was optically activated with a XeCl excimer laser. Its fluorescence spectrum was measured and was identified as a dye vapour fluorescence spectrum by comparison to conventional dye solution and dye vapour spectra. The dye cloud is not deflected in an electric field (10 6 V/m). By changing the delay time between the ablation laser and the focused activation laser, the velocity distribution of the ablated dye was measured. Its maximum is at 600 m/s for PPF. Knowing the thickness of the ablated dye layer per shot (300 Å) and the size of the ablation cloud (pictures of a video camera), one can estimate the maximum density of the dye in the gas pulse to be 10 -5 mol/ l in the range of concentration of lasing dyes. However, no lasing was observed up to now.

  4. The Relative Location of the Dye Staining Endpoint Indicated With Polypropylene Glycol-Based Caries Dye versus Conventional Propylene Glycol-Based Caries Dye

    PubMed Central

    Boston, Daniel W; Jefferies, Steven R; Gaughan, John P

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study determined the difference in the location of the caries dye staining endpoint of 1% Acid Red dye in propylene glycol versus that of 1% Acid Red dye in polypropylene glycol. Methods Freshly extracted permanent molar crowns with primary occlusal carious lesions were chisel-split axially to expose the lesion in cross-section on both halves. One half was stained with propylene glycol-based dye and the other with polypropylene glycol-based dye. For the control group, both halves were stained with propylene glycol-based dye. The dye staining front was marked on digital images of the stained split surfaces, and the images were aligned using reference notches. The distance between the marked staining front lines was measured in five locations, and the measurement protocol was repeated. Weighted averages and a 95% confidence interval for the distance between marked staining front lines were calculated for the control and experimental groups. Results The weighted average distance for the experimental group (0.298 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.240 mm – 0.357 mm) was about four times that of the control group (0.070 mm, 95% confidence interval 0.051 mm – 0.089 mm). Generally, the marked staining line for the polypropylene glycol-based dye specimens was located shallow (occlusal) to the propylene glycol-based staining line (range −0.12 mm to 0.66 mm). Conclusions The staining endpoint of 1% Acid Red dye in polypropylene glycol is shallower than that of 1% Acid Red dye in propylene glycol. The method is useful for comparing staining endpoints of caries dye formulations. (Eur J Dent 2008;2:29–36) PMID:19212506

  5. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing. PMID:26964959

  6. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing.

  7. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths < 400 nm) and emit photons in the long-wavelength ultraviolet, visible, and, when dissolved in some solvents, near-infrared regions. In addition, these dyes can be excited by two-photon absorption at near-infrared wavelengths (600 to 800 nm) to produce fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields

  8. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and complex formation between thiazole orange and various dye-DNA conjugates: implications in signaling nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Massey, Melissa; Krull, Ulrich J

    2006-07-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was investigated between the intercalating dye thiazole orange (TO), and the dyes Cyanine 3 (Cy3), Cyanine 5 (Cy5), Carboxytetramethyl Rhodamine (TAMRA), Iowa Black FQ (IabFQ), and Iowa Black RQ (IabRQ), which were covalently immobilized at the end of dsDNA oligonucleotides. In addition to determining that TO was an effective energy donor, FRET efficiency data obtained from fluorescence lifetime measurements indicated that TO intercalated near the middle of the 19mer oligonucleotide sequence that was used in this study. Discrepancies in FRET efficiencies obtained from intensity and lifetime measurements led to the investigation of non-fluorescent complex formation between TAMRA and modified TO. The hydrophobicity of TO was modified by the addition of either an alkyl or polyethylene glycol (PEG) side-chain to study effects of dimer and aggregate formation. It was found that at stoichiometric excesses of modified TO, fluorescence quenching of TAMRA was observed, and that this could be correlated to the hydrophobicity of a TO-chain species. The TAMRA:TO-chain association constant for the TO-alkyl system was 0.043+/-0.002 M(-1), while that obtained for the TO-PEG was 0.037+/-0.002 M(-1). From the perspective of method development for the transduction of hybridization events, we present and evaluate a variety of schemes based on energy transfer between TO and an acceptor dye, and discuss the implications of complex formation in such schemes.

  9. Removal of an anionic dye by adsorption/precipitation processes using alkaline white mud.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mao-Xu; Lee, Li; Wang, Hai-Hua; Wang, Zheng

    2007-11-19

    Alkaline white mud (AWM) has been investigated as a low-cost material for removal of an anionic dye, acid blue 80. The effects of contact time, initial pH of dye solution, AWM dosage, and the presence of inorganic anion sulphate or phosphate ion on removal of the dye were evaluated. The results show that AWM could be used as an effective material for removal of acid blue 80 in a pre or main process, particularly at high dye concentration (>300 mgL(-1)), reaching maximum removal efficiency of 95%. At low dye concentration, surface adsorption is mainly responsible for the dye removal, while chemical precipitation of the dye anions with soluble Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) may play a dominant role for the dye removal at high concentration, producing much less sludge than conventional adsorption method. Solution pH has only a limited effect on the dye removal due to high alkalinity and large pH buffer capacity of AWM suspension and thereby pH is not a limiting factor in pursuing high dye removal. The presence of SO(4)(2-) could reduce the dye removal by AWM only when SO(4)(2-) concentration is beyond 0.7 mmolL(-1). The dye removal may be significantly suppressed by the presence of phosphate with increasing concentration, and the reduction in the dye removal is much larger at high dye concentrations than at low ones. PMID:17532132

  10. Mediator-assisted decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes/dye mixture by Cyathus bulleri laccase.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Meenu; Mishra, Saroj; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2008-12-01

    Laccase from basidiomycete fungus Cyathus bulleri was evaluated for its ability to decolorize a number of reactive and acidic dyes in the presence of natural and synthetic mediators. The extent of decolorization was monitored at different mediator/dye concentrations and incubation time. Among the synthetic mediators, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) was effective at low mediator/dye ratios and resulted in 80-95% decolorization at rates that varied from 226 +/- 4 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for Reactive Orange 1 to 1,333 +/- 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for Reactive Red 198. Other synthetic mediators like 1-hydroxybenzotriazole and violuric acid showed both concentration- and time-dependent increases in percent decolorization. Natural mediators like vanillin, on the other hand, were found to be less effective on all the dyes except Reactive Orange 1. Computed rates of decolorization were about twofold lower than that with ABTS. The laccase-ABTS system also led to nearly 80% decolorization for the simulated dye mixture. No clear correlation between laccase activity on the mediator and its ability to decolorize dyes was found, but pH had a significant effect: Optimum pH for decolorization coincided with the optimum pH for mediator oxidation. The treated samples were also evaluated for toxicity in model microbial systems. The laccase-mediator system appears promising for treatment of textile wastewaters.

  11. Bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising thiophene-2-acetonitrile as π-spacer and malonic acid as electron acceptor for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Gachumale Saritha; Ramkumar, Sekar; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Anandan, Sambandam

    2015-06-01

    Two new bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising the identical π-spacer (thiophene-2-acetonitrile) and electron acceptor (malonic acid) but different aryl amine as electron donors (diphenylamine and carbazole) were synthesized, characterized and fabricated metal free dye-sensitized solar cell devices. The intra molecular charge transfer property and electrochemical property of these dyes were investigated by molecular absorption, emission, cyclic voltammetric experiments and in addition, quantum chemical calculation studies were performed to provide sufficient driving force for the electron injection into the conduction band of TiO2 which leads to efficient charge collection. Among the fabricated devices, carbazole based device exhibits high current conversion efficiency (η = 4.7%) with a short circuit current density (JSC) 15.3 mA/cm2, an open circuit photo voltage (VOC) of 0.59 V and a fill factor of 0.44 under AM 1.5 illumination (85 mW/cm2) compared to diphenylamine based device.

  12. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor for decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye acid red 18: comparison of using two types of packing media.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    Two integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (FB-SBBR) were operated to evaluate decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Volcanic pumice stones and a type of plastic media made of polyethylene were used as packing media in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Decolorization of AR18 in both reactors followed first-order kinetic with respect to dye concentration. More than 63.7% and 71.3% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate (1N-4S), as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Based on statistical analysis, performance of FB-SBBR2 in terms of COD removal as well as biodegradation of 1N-4S was significantly higher than that of FB-SBBR1. Spherical and rod shaped bacteria were the dominant species of bacteria in the biofilm grown on the pumice stones surfaces, while, the biofilm grown on surfaces of the polyethylene media had a fluffy structure.

  13. Investigation of Changes in the Microscopic Structure of Anionic Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Acrylic acid) Microgels in the Presence of Cationic Organic Dyes toward Precisely Controlled Uptake/Release of Low-Molecular-Weight Chemical Compound.

    PubMed

    Kureha, Takuma; Shibamoto, Takahisa; Matsui, Shusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke

    2016-05-10

    Changes in a microscopic structure of an anionic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgel were investigated using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS). The scattering profiles of the microgels were analyzed in a wide scattering vector (q) range of 0.07 ≤ q/nm(-1) ≤ 20. In particular, the microscopic structure of the microgel in the presence of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G (R6G) was characterized in terms of its correlation length (ξ), which represents the length scale of the spatial correlation of the network density fluctuations, and characteristic distance (d*), which originated from the local packing of isopropyl groups of two neighboring chains. In the presence of cationic R6G, ξ exhibited a divergent-like behavior, which was not seen in the absence of R6G, and d* was decreased with decreasing the volume of the microgel upon increasing temperature. At the same time, the amount of R6G adsorbed per unit mass of the microgel increased upon heating. These results suggested that a coil-to-globule transition of the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) chains in the present anionic microgel occurred because of efficiently screened, thus, short ranged electrostatic repulsion between the charged groups, and hydrophobic interaction between the isopropyl groups in the presence of cationic R6G. The combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the cationic dye and the microgel affected the separation and volume transition behavior of the microgel. PMID:27101468

  14. Assessment upon azo dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation by Proteus hauseri.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Meng-Meng; Chang, Chang-Tang; Ding, Yongtao; Lin, Kae-Long; Chiou, Chyow-San; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Xu, Huizhong

    2010-06-01

    This study explored dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation of indigenous Proteus hauseri ZMd44 for dye-bearing wastewater treatment. Chemical structures of azo dyes apparently affected the performance of dye biodecolorization. Additions of diazo dye C.I. reactive blue 160 (RBu160) stimulated simultaneous dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation of ZMd44 in single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, high-level additions of RBu160 repressed capabilities of power production in MFC due to competition of electrons used for reductive decolorization. Decolorized intermediates of RBu160-phenyl methadiamine and 5-sulfoanthranilic acid as electron shuttles might mediate electron transport for current generation in MFC.

  15. Dye-promoted precipitation of serum proteins. Mechanism and application.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-11-01

    Immobilized dyes have been used primarily for purification of nucleotide dependent enzymes and proteins from plasma and other sources. Due to their low costs, high protein binding capacity and resistance to degradation dyes bear the potential as ligand for affinity separation of proteins on a large scale. In this paper dyes have been used for precipitation of proteins. Using albumin, prealbumin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein and immunoglobulin G as model proteins we could demonstrate that dye-promoted precipitation depends on several factors which include the structure of the dye, the pH of the solution, the dye/protein molar ratio and the intrinsic properties of the proteins. It revealed that most of the dyes tested were endowed with the precipitating potential. The efficacy of precipitation was found to increase with the complexity of the dye structure. However, the amount of a dye required for total precipitation was found to be different for a given protein. Electrostatic as well as hydrophobic forces are involved in the mechanism of precipitation. It was demonstrated that by optimizing the conditions, mixtures of proteins can be resolved by dye-promoted precipitation. The high sensitivity of the reaction offers the possibility of using this method for rapid concentration of very diluted protein solutions. PMID:1367693

  16. Energy Antenna for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dong Yuel; Chang, Dong Min; Kim, Young Sik

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the placement of acceptor in dual donor based dye sensitizers (TPA-PTZ-CN, PTZ-TPA-CN). Triphenylamine (TPA) and phenothiazine (PTZ) are well known as electron donors and cyanoacetic acid (CN) is a known electron acceptor. The absorption spectrum of the dyes showed different form because of the different energy levels of molecular orbital (MO) of each dye and intramolecular energy transfer (EnT). The absorption spectrum of PTZ-TPA-CN was broader than that of TPA-PTZ-CN and its molar extinction coefficient was also higher than TPA-PTZ-CN. Because of its enhanced panchromatic absorption spectra, PTZ-TPA-CN showed better photovoltaic properties than the other dyes did. This work presents that optimizing the placement of acceptor in dual donor based dye would give good photovoltaic properties for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC).

  17. Effect of some process parameters in enzymatic dyeing of wool.

    PubMed

    Tzanov, Tzanko; Silva, Carla Joana; Zille, Andrea; Oliveira, Jovita; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2003-10-01

    This article reports on the dyeing of wool using an enzymatic system comprising laccase; dye precursor, 2,5-diaminobenzenesulfonic acid; and dye modifiers, catechol and resorcinol. Enzymatic dyeing was performed as a batchwise process at the temperature and pH of maximum enzyme activity. The effects of the process variables reaction time, enzyme, and modifier concentration on fabric color were studied, according to an appropriate experimental design. Different hues and depths of shades could be achieved by varying the concentration of the modifiers and the time of laccase treatment. The duration of the enzymatic reaction appeared to be the most important factor in the dyeing process. Thus, the dyeing process, performed at low temperature and mild pH, was advantageous in terms of reduced enzyme and chemical dosage.

  18. Natural Dye Extracted from Vitex negundo as a Potential Alternative to Synthetic Dyes for Dyeing of Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Swamy, Venkataramanappa; Gowda, Kurikempanadoddi Ninge; Sudhakar, Rajagopal

    2016-04-01

    Since the last decade, the application of natural dyes on textile material has been gaining popularity all over the world, possibly because of the increasing awareness of issues concerning the environment, ecology and pollution control. The present paper investigates extraction of natural dye from leaves of the plant Vitex negundo, which is an abundant, cheap, and readily available agricultural by-product. Water extracts from V. negundo was used to dye silk fabrics. Optimum extraction conditions included pH 9, duration 120 min, and temperature 90 °C. Optimum dyeing conditions included dyeing pH 5 and duration of 60 min. Potash alum, tannic and tartaric acid were used as mordants, all of which are benign to human health and the environment. Color strength and color coordinates in terms of L*, a*, b*, C, and h were examined. A range of shades were obtained when fabrics were dyed with different mordants and mordanting techniques. The extracted dye was tested for some of the eco-parameters using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and GC/MS. The test results were compared with set standards to determine the eco-friendliness of natural dye. Their concentrations were found to be lower than the stipulated limits. Dyed samples were tested for antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The dyed silk fabrics showed acceptable fastness properties and were also found to possess antibacterial activity. It can be concluded that the abundantly available agricultural by-product V. negundo has great potential to be effectively utilized as a natural dye for silk.

  19. Structure-performance correlations of organic dyes with an electron-deficient diphenylquinoxaline moiety for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Sie-Rong; Lee, Chuan-Pei; Yang, Po-Fan; Liao, Chia-Wei; Lee, Mandy M; Su, Wei-Lin; Li, Chun-Ting; Lin, Hao-Wu; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Sun, Shih-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The high performances of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on seven new dyes are disclosed. Herein, the synthesis and electrochemical and photophysical properties of a series of intentionally designed dipolar organic dyes and their application in DSSCs are reported. The molecular structures of the seven organic dyes are composed of a triphenylamine group as an electron donor, a cyanoacrylic acid as an electron acceptor, and an electron-deficient diphenylquinoxaline moiety integrated in the π-conjugated spacer between the electron donor and acceptor moieties. The DSSCs based on the dye DJ104 gave the best overall cell performance of 8.06 %; the efficiency of the DSSC based on the standard N719 dye under the same experimental conditions was 8.82 %. The spectral coverage of incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiencies extends to the onset at the near-infrared region due to strong internal charge-transfer transition as well as the effect of electron-deficient diphenylquinoxaline to lower the energy gap in these organic dyes. A combined tetraphenyl segment as a hydrophobic barrier in these organic dyes effectively slows down the charge recombination from TiO2 to the electrolyte and boosts the photovoltage, comparable to their Ru(II) counterparts. Detailed spectroscopic studies have revealed the dye structure-cell performance correlations, to allow future design of efficient light-harvesting organic dyes.

  20. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used.

  1. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used. PMID:25967675

  2. Natural dye extracted from karkadah and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells: experimental and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reda, S M; Soliman, K A

    2016-02-01

    This work presents an experimental and theoretical study of cyanidin natural dye as a sensitizer for ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells. ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using ammonia and oxalic acid as a capping agent. The calculated average size of the synthesized ZnO with different capping agents was found to be 32.1 nm. Electronic properties of cyanidin and delphinidin dye were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT with a B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. By comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data, the cyanidin dye can be used as a sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. An efficiency of 0.006% under an AM-1.5 illumination at 100  mW/cm(2) was attained. The influence of dye adsorption time on the solar cell performance is discussed.

  3. Natural dye extracted from karkadah and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells: experimental and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reda, S M; Soliman, K A

    2016-02-01

    This work presents an experimental and theoretical study of cyanidin natural dye as a sensitizer for ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells. ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using ammonia and oxalic acid as a capping agent. The calculated average size of the synthesized ZnO with different capping agents was found to be 32.1 nm. Electronic properties of cyanidin and delphinidin dye were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT with a B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. By comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data, the cyanidin dye can be used as a sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. An efficiency of 0.006% under an AM-1.5 illumination at 100  mW/cm(2) was attained. The influence of dye adsorption time on the solar cell performance is discussed. PMID:26836089

  4. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  5. Mutagenicity testing of some commonly used dyes.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, K T; Fulk, G E; Andrews, A W

    1981-01-01

    Seventeen commonly used dyes and 16 of their metabolites or derivatives were tested in the Salmonella-mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutagens active with and without added Aroclor-induced rat liver microsome preparations (S9) were 3-aminopyrene, lithol red, methylene blue (USP), methyl yellow, neutral red, and phenol red. Those mutagenic only with S9 activation were 4-aminopyrazolone, 2,4-dimethylaniline, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl red, and 4-phenyl-azo-1-naphthylamine. Orange II was mutagenic only without added S9. Nonmutagenic azo dyes were allura red, amaranth, ponceau R, ponceau SX, sunset yellow, and tartrazine. Miscellaneous dyes not mutagenic were methyl green, methyl violet 2B, and nigrosin. Metabolites of the azo dyes that were not mutagenic were 1-amino-2-naphthol hydrochloride, aniline, anthranilic acid, cresidine salt, pyrazolone T,R-amino salt (1-amino-2-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic disodium salt), R-salt, Schaeffer's salt (2-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid, sodium salt), sodium naphthionate, sulfanilamide, and sulfanilic acid. 4-Amino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid sodium salt was also not mutagenic. Fusobacterium sp. 2 could reductively cleave methyl yellow to N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine which was then activated to a mutagen. PMID:7039509

  6. Graft polymerization using radiation-induced peroxides and application to textile dyeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Ichiro; Katsumura, Yosuke; Kudo, Hisaaki; Soeda, Shin

    2011-02-01

    To improve the dyeing affinity of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber, surface treatment by radiation-induced graft polymerization was performed. Methyl methacrylate (MMA), acrylic acid (AA) and styrene (St) were used as the monomers. The grafting yields as a function of storage time after irradiation were examined. Although the grafting yield of St after the sulfonation processing was quite low compared with those of MMA and AA, it was successfully dyed to a dark color with a cationic dye. Some acid dyes can dye the grafted fiber with AA. The acid dye is distributed to the amorphous domains of the AA grafted fiber. The dyeing concentration depended on the grafting yield, and the higher the grafting yield the darker the dye color.

  7. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. . Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  8. Third row metal complexes as an alternative dye in dye sensitized solar cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Ramelan, A. H.; Badriyah, I.; Kristy, I. O.; Dewi, N. S.; Rahardjo, S. B.

    2013-10-01

    Copper(II), Cobalt (II) and Iron (II) complexes as photosensitizer on Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) had been investigated. The aim of this research is to find out the respond addition of those dyes on FTO/TiO2 (FTO = fluorine Tin Oxide) thin film to visible light and the effect of various third row complexes to DSSC performance. Slip casting method was used to fabricate FTO/TiO2 and FTO/carbon thin film. The result from FTO/TiO2 UV-Vis spectra show no absorption on visible light. Dye solution was synthesized from free metal ions of Cu(II), Co(II), and Fe(II) in methanol with diphenylamine (dpa), 2,2,bypiridine (bpy), 1,10, phenathroline (phen), 4,4'-dicarboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine (dcbq), and anthocyanin (ant) ligands, respectively. UV-Vis spectrophotometry was used to identify FTO/TiO2/dye with various sensitizer dyes. The performance of DSSC was determined by I (current) - V (voltage) curve using Keithley 2602 A System Source. In this research, DSSCs are able to convert photon energy become electrical energy. Dye used in DSSC is greatly effect in photon to current efficiency (IPCE). The greater absorption in visible region of alternative dye used gains higher IPCE spectra. TiO2 character can help spread the absorption in whole visible region. The nanosize mesoporous TiO2 of TiO2/SiPA/CoII-PAR (SiPA = silylpropilamine) have greater value than P25 TiO2/SiPA-CoII-PAR. The SiPA/FeII-PAR and SiPA/CoII-PAR dyes are better dye than tpa.

  9. Detection and identification of dyes in blue writing inks by LC-DAD-orbitrap MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiran; Luo, Yiwen; Yang, Xu; Xiang, Ping; Shen, Min

    2016-04-01

    In the field of forensic questioned document examination, to identify dyes detected in inks not only provides a solid foundation for ink discrimination in forged contents identification, but also facilitates the investigation of ink origin or the study regarding ink dating. To detect and identify potential acid and basic dyes in blue writing inks, a liquid chromatography-diode array detection-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-Orbitrap MS) method was established. Three sulfonic acid dyes (Acid blue 1, Acid blue 9 and Acid red 52) and six triphenylmethane basic dyes (Ethyl violet, Crystal violet, Methyl violet 2B, Basic blue 7, Victoria blue B and Victoria blue R) were employed as reference dyes for method development. Determination of the nine dyes was validated to evaluate the instrument performance, and it turned out to be sensitive and stable enough for quantification. The method was then applied in the screening analysis of ten blue roller ball pen inks and twenty blue ballpoint pen inks. As a result, including TPR (a de-methylated product of Crystal violet), ten known dyes and four unknown dyes were detected in the inks. The latter were further identified as a de-methylated product of Victoria blue B, Acid blue 104, Acid violet 49 and Acid blue 90, through analyzing their characteristic precursor and product ions acquired by Orbitrap MS with good mass accuracy. The results showed that the established method is capable of detecting and identifying potential dyes in blue writing inks. PMID:26894843

  10. Dye system for dye laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P.R.

    1991-05-21

    This patent describes a dye of the DCM family, (2-methyl-6-(2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  11. Dye system for dye laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A dye of the DCM family, [2-methyl-6-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl]-4H-pyran -4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  12. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics.

    PubMed

    Al-Etaibi, Alya M; Alnassar, Huda S; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated. PMID:27367659

  13. Transition-metal-free visible-light photoredox catalysis at room-temperature for decarboxylative fluorination of aliphatic carboxylic acids by organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinxin; Meng, Chunna; Yuan, Xiaoqian; Jia, Xiaotong; Qian, Xuhong; Ye, Jinxing

    2015-07-28

    We report herein an efficient, general and green method for decarboxylative fluorination of aliphatic carboxylic acids. By using a transition-metal-free, organocatalytic photoredox system, the reaction of various aliphatic carboxylic acids with the Selectfluor reagent afforded the corresponding alkyl fluorides in satisfactory yields under visible light irradiation at room temperature.

  14. Alkali, thermo and halo tolerant fungal isolate for the removal of textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Prachi; Malik, Anushree

    2010-11-01

    In the present study potential of a fungal isolate Aspergillus lentulusFJ172995, was investigated for the removal of textile dyes. The removal percentages of dyes such as Acid Navy Blue, Orange-HF, Fast Red A, Acid Sulphone Blue and Acid Magenta were determined as 99.43, 98.82, 98.75, 97.67 and 69.98, respectively. None of the dyes inhibited the growth of A. lentulus. Detailed studies on growth kinetics, mechanism of dye removal and effect of different parameters on dye removal were conducted using Acid Navy Blue dye. It was observed that A. lentulus could completely remove Acid Navy Blue even at high initial dye concentrations, up to 900 mg/L. Highest uptake capacity of 212.92 mg/g was observed at an initial dye concentration of 900 mg/L. Dye removing efficiency was not altered with the variation of pH; and biomass production as well as dye removal was favored at higher temperatures. Dye removal was also efficient even at high salt concentration. Through growth kinetics studies it was observed that the initial exponential growth phase coincided with the phase of maximal dye removal. Microscopic studies suggest that bioaccumulation along with biosorption is the principle mechanism involved in dye removal by A. lentulus. Thus, it is concluded that being alkali, thermo and halo tolerant, A. lentulus isolate has a great potential to be utilized for the treatment of dye bearing effluents which are usually alkaline, hot and saline. PMID:20708386

  15. Power ultrasound-assisted cleaner leather dyeing technique: influence of process parameters.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Venkatasubramanian; Rao, Paruchuri Gangadhar

    2004-03-01

    The application of power ultrasound to leather processing has a significant role in the concept of "clean technology" for leather production. The effect of power ultrasound in leather dyeing has been compared with dyeing in the absence of ultrasound and conventional drumming. The power ultrasound source used in these experiments was ultrasonic cleaner (150 W and 33 kHz). The effect of various process parameters such as amount of dye offer, temperature, and type of dye has been experimentally found out. The effect of presonication of dye solution as well as leather has been studied. Experiments at ultrasonic bath temperature were carried out to find out the combined thermal as well as stirring effects of ultrasound. Dyeing in the presence of ultrasound affords about 37.5 (1.8 times) difference as increase in % dye exhaustion or about 50% decrease in the time required for dyeing compared to dyeing in the absence of ultrasound for 4% acid red dye. About 29 (1.55 times) increase in % dye exhaustion or 30% reduction in time required for dyeing was observed using ultrasound at stationary condition compared with conventional dynamic drumming conditions. The effect of ultrasound at constant temperature conditions with a control experiment has also been studied. The dye exhaustion increases as the temperature increases (30-60 degrees C) and better results are observed at higher temperature due to the use of ultrasound. Presonication of dye solution or crust leather prior to the dyeing process has no significant improvement in dye exhaustion, suggesting ultrasound effect is realized when it is applied during the dyeing process. The results indicate that 1697 and 1416 ppm of dye can be reduced in the spent liquor due to the use of ultrasound for acid red (for 100 min) and acid black (for 3 h) dyes, respectively, thereby reducing the pollution load in the effluent stream. The color yield of the leather as inferred from the reflectance measurement indicates that dye offer can

  16. Diode-pumped dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukova, O. A.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Petukhov, V. A.; Semenov, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    This letter reports diode pumping for dye lasers. We offer a pulsed dye laser with an astigmatism-compensated three-mirror cavity and side pumping by blue laser diodes with 200 ns pulse duration. Eight dyes were tested. Four dyes provided a slope efficiency of more than 10% and the highest slope efficiency (18%) was obtained for laser dye Coumarin 540A in benzyl alcohol.

  17. Hair dye poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: Arsenic Bismuth Denatured alcohol Lead ( lead poisoning ) Mercury Pyrogallol Silver Hair dyes may contain other harmful ... bleeding and infection. Continued exposure to lead or mercury can lead to permanent brain and nervous system ...

  18. Dye removal using modified copper ferrite nanoparticle and RSM analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Niyaz Mohammad; Soltani-Gordefaramarzi, Sajjad; Sadeghi-Kiakhani, Moosa

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, copper ferrite nanoparticle (CFN) was synthesized, modified by cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, and characterized. Dye removal ability of the surface modified copper ferrite nanoparticle (SMCFN) from single system was investigated. The physical characteristics of SMCFN were studied using Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Acid Blue 92, Direct Green 6, Direct Red 23, and Direct Red 80 were used as model compounds. The effect of operational parameters (surfactant concentration, adsorbent dosage, dye concentration, and pH) on dye removal was evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the analysis of the dye removal data. The experimental checking in these optimal conditions confirms good agreements with RSM results. The results showed that the SMCFN being a magnetic adsorbent might be a suitable alternative to remove dyes from colored aqueous solutions. PMID:23852534

  19. The use of a caries detector dye in cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Kidd, E A; Joyston-Bechal, S; Smith, M M; Allan, R; Howe, L; Smith, S R

    1989-08-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the conventional visual and tactile method of detecting carious dentine during cavity preparation using a mirror, probe and excavator with a visual method enhanced by a dye. The dye, 1% acid red in propylene glycol, was used on 100 cavities prepared by dental students and passed as clinically satisfactory by their teachers. Results showed dye stain at the enamel-dentine junction in 57 cavities (57%) which had been assessed as caries-free in this area using conventional visual and tactile means. Subsequent laboratory work on extracted carious teeth confirmed histologically that the dye stains demineralised dentine. If clinicians consider it important to render the enamel-dentine junction caries-free, it might be prudent to use the dye as an aid to diagnosis in this area.

  20. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric identification of dyes and pigments.

    PubMed

    Soltzberg, L J; Hagar, Amanda; Kridaratikorn, Supicha; Mattson, Anne; Newman, Richard

    2007-11-01

    We have used MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to characterize a selection of dyes from the Schweppe dye collection and pigments from the Tate Gallery collection. MALDI-TOF mass spectra of such samples are easily obtained and, through observation of both positive and negative ion spectra, provide a convenient, versatile method for dye characterization and identification. Such pairs of positive and negative ion spectra immediately distinguish between acidic and basic dyes and provide the characteristic mass of either the molecular ion or a simply related fragment ion. This approach is especially useful in situations where very small amounts of analyte are available, as in museum research and forensic analysis. In the case of textile dyes, we have carried out identification on material from single fibers and, with insoluble pigments, have begun to identify components of historically important pastel sticks from submicrogram samples.

  1. Dye Application, Manufacture of Dye Intermediates and Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, H. S.; Mock, G. N.

    It is difficult if not impossible to determine when mankind first systematically applied color to a textile substrate. The first colored fabrics were probably nonwoven felts painted in imitation of animal skins. The first dyeings were probably actually little more than stains from the juice of berries. Ancient Greek writers described painted fabrics worn by the tribes of Asia Minor. But just where did the ancient craft have its origins? Was there one original birthplace or were there a number of simultaneous beginnings around the world?

  2. [Predicting biodegradability from the electrochemical characteristic of azo dyes].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-bo; Zhou, Ji-ti; Wang, Dong; Tian, Cun-ping; Ge, Jun; Wang, Ping; Yu, Hui

    2006-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to study some electrochemical factors affecting the bacterial reduction (cleavage) of four azo dyes. And a common mixed culture was used as test organism and the reduction of azo dyes Acid Yellow 4, 11, 17 and Acid Yellow Bis was studied. It was found that the azo dyes were reduced at different rates,which could be correlated with the reduction potential of the azo compounds in cyclic voltammetric experiments. Acid Yellow Bis (Er = -616.75 mV) was reduced at the highest rate of 0.01209 mol x (L x h)(-1), Acid Yellow 11 (Er = -593.25 mV) at 0.01040 mol x (L x h)(-1) and Acid Yellow 4 (Er = - 513 mV) at 0.007575 mol x (L x h)(-1). It is showed that the reduction potential is a preliminary tool to predict the decolorization capacity of oxidative and reductive biocatalysts.

  3. Effect of hair dyes and bleach on the hair protein patterns as revealed by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Komoriya, H; Bunai, Y; Yamada, S; Jiang, X Y; Ohya, I

    1991-06-01

    The effect of hair dyes, i.e., temporary, semi-permanent, or permanent hair dyes, or hair bleach on the isoelectric focusing (IEF) hair protein patterns was studied. A permanent hair dye (metallic, alkaline oxidative, or acidic oxidative) and hair bleach induced changes in the IEF hair protein patterns and in the intensity of hair protein bands. The changes in the IEF patterns, caused by the alkaline oxidative dye or the bleach, are considered to result from the combined effect of an alkaline agent and an oxidative agent in the alkaline oxidative dye and in the hair bleach.

  4. Effect of hair dyes and bleach on the hair protein patterns as revealed by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Komoriya, H; Bunai, Y; Yamada, S; Jiang, X Y; Ohya, I

    1991-06-01

    The effect of hair dyes, i.e., temporary, semi-permanent, or permanent hair dyes, or hair bleach on the isoelectric focusing (IEF) hair protein patterns was studied. A permanent hair dye (metallic, alkaline oxidative, or acidic oxidative) and hair bleach induced changes in the IEF hair protein patterns and in the intensity of hair protein bands. The changes in the IEF patterns, caused by the alkaline oxidative dye or the bleach, are considered to result from the combined effect of an alkaline agent and an oxidative agent in the alkaline oxidative dye and in the hair bleach. PMID:1889397

  5. The spectroscopic manifestation of the interaction of some cyanine dyes with BSA and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Nizomov, Negmat; Rahimov, Sherzod I.; Khodjayev, Gayrat; Khakimova, Dilorom P.

    2010-02-01

    The spectral-luminescent characteristics of cyanine dye Cyan 40 and thiazole orange at interaction with biomacromolecules bovine serum albumin and deoxyribonucleic acid was studied. It is shown that presence of biomacromolecules in solution of the studied species leads to the change of spectral-luminescent characteristics of the dyes Cyan 40 and TO. The observed phenomena in absorption spectrum and fluorescence of the studied dyes is explained by complex formation between dye and biological macromolecules. The binding parameters: a binding constant (K) and quantity of the binding sites (N) the studied dyes with biomacromolecules are determined.

  6. Spectroscopic and photoelectrochemical studies of metal-free dyes for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhern, Kacie Ryan

    In this dissertation, we present a series of novel chalcogenorhodamine dyes bearing phosphonic acids and carboxylic acids for sensitizers of nanocrystalline TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). We studied the effect of surface-attachment functionality and aggregation on the persistence, electron transfer reactivity, and overall photoelectrochemical performance of the dyes on TiO2 for DSCs. The dyes were constructed around a 3,6-bis(dimethylamino)chalcogenoxanthylium core and varied in the 9-substituent: 5-carboxythien-2-yl in dyes 1-E (E = O, Se), 2-carboxythien-3-yl in dyes 2-E (E = Se), 5-phosphonothien-2-yl in dyes 3-E (E = O, Se), 4-carboxyphenyl in dyes 4-E (E = O, S), and 4-phosphonophenyl in dyes 5-E (E = O, Se). Monolayers of 1-E, 3-E, 4-E, and 5-E on nanocrystalline TiO2 films consisted of both H-aggregated and non-aggregated dyes, whereas 2-E underwent little or no aggregation upon adsorption. With the exception of 2-E, surface coverages of dyes and the extent of H-aggregation varied minimally with surface-attachment functionality, structure of the 9-aryl group, and identity of the chalcogen heteroatom. Carboxylic acid-functionalized dyes 1-E and 4-E desorbed rapidly and completely from TiO2 into acidified CH3CN, but phosphonic acid-functionalized dyes 3-E and 5-E persisted on TiO2 for days. We used transient absorption spectroscopy to characterize excited-state electron injection from a 1-Se, 2-Se, and 3-Se to TiO2. Injection of electrons from photoexcited dyes into TiO2 yielded the dication radical (1-Se +, 2-Se+, and 3-Se +) and an associated transient absorption at wavelengths shorter than 540 nm, the amplitude of which was proportional to the quantum yield of electron injection (Qinj). Our data reveal the Qinj for H-aggregated 1-Se was approximately 2-fold greater than Q inj for non-aggregated 1-Se and approximately 3-fold greater than Qinj for non-aggregated 2-Se. Additionally, the Qinj from H-aggregated 3-Se was (2.0 +/- 1.3)-fold greater

  7. Decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2008-07-01

    Wastewaters from textile processing and dye-stuff manufacture industries contain substantial amounts of salts in addition to azo dye residues. To examine salinity effects on dye-degrading bacteria, a study was carried out with four azo dyes in the presence of varying concentrations of NaCl (0-100 g l(-1)) with a previously isolated bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens strain AS96. Under static, low oxygen conditions, the bacterium decolorized 100 mg dye l(-1) at salt concentrations up to 60 g NaCl l(-1). There was an inverse relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction and salt concentration over the range between 5 and 60 g NaCl l(-1) and at dye concentrations between 100 and 500 mg l(-1). The addition of either glucose (C source) or NH(4)NO(3) (N source) to the medium strongly inhibited the decolorization process, while yeast extract (4 g l(-1)) and Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O (1 g l(-1)) both enhanced decolorization rates. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated the presence of 1-amino-2-naphthol, sulfanilic acid and nitroaniline as the major metabolic products of the azo dyes, which could be further degraded by a shift to aerobic conditions. These findings show that Shewanella could be effective for the treatment of dye-containing industrial effluents containing high concentrations of salt.

  8. Monitoring the Wet-Heat Inactivation Dynamics of Single Spores of Bacillus Species by Using Raman Tweezers, Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy, and Nucleic Acid Dye Fluorescence Microscopy▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Kong, Lingbo; Wang, Guiwen; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic processes during wet-heat treatment of individual spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, and Bacillus subtilis at 80 to 90°C were investigated using dual-trap Raman spectroscopy, differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, and nucleic acid stain (SYTO 16) fluorescence microscopy. During spore wet-heat treatment, while the spores' 1:1 chelate of Ca2+ with dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) was released rapidly at a highly variable time Tlag, the levels of spore nucleic acids remained nearly unchanged, and the Tlag times for individual spores from the same preparation were increased somewhat as spore levels of CaDPA increased. The brightness of the spores' DIC image decreased by ∼50% in parallel with CaDPA release, and there was no spore cortex hydrolysis observed. The lateral diameters of the spores' DIC image and SYTO 16 fluorescence image also decreased in parallel with CaDPA release. The SYTO 16 fluorescence intensity began to increase during wet-heat treatment at a time before Tlag and reached maximum at a time slightly later than Trelease. However, the fluorescence intensities of wet-heat-inactivated spores were ∼15-fold lower than those of nutrient-germinated spores, and this low SYTO 16 fluorescence intensity may be due in part to the low permeability of the dormant spores' inner membranes to SYTO 16 and in part to nucleic acid denaturation during the wet-heat treatment. PMID:21602365

  9. Rapid Dye Regeneration Mechanism of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jiwon; Park, Young Choon; Han, Sang Soo; Goddard, William A; Lee, Yoon Sup; Kim, Hyungjun

    2014-12-18

    During the light-harvesting process of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the hole localized on the dye after the charge separation yields an oxidized dye, D(+). The fast regeneration of D(+) using the redox pair (typically the I(-)/I3(-) couple) is critical for the efficient DSSCs. However, the kinetic processes of dye regeneration remain uncertain, still promoting vigorous debates. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to determine that the inner-sphere electron-transfer pathway provides a rapid dye regeneration route of ∼4 ps, where penetration of I(-) next to D(+) enables an immediate electron transfer, forming a kinetic barrier. This explains the recently reported ultrafast dye regeneration rate of a few picoseconds determined experimentally. We expect that our MD based comprehensive understanding of the dye regeneration mechanism will provide a helpful guideline in designing TiO2-dye-electrolyte interfacial systems for better performing DSSCs. PMID:26273975

  10. Certain tricyclic and pentacyclic-hetero nitrogen rhodol dyes

    DOEpatents

    Haugland, Richard P.; Whitaker, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes based on the rhodol structure are provided. The new reagents contain functional groups capable of forming a stable fluorescent product with functional groups typically found in biomolecules or polymers including amines, phenols, thiols, acids, aldehydes and ketones. Reactive groups in the rhodol dyes include activated esters, isothiocyanates, amines, hydrazines, halides, acids, azides, maleimides, aldehydes, alcohols, acrylamides and haloacetamides. The products are detected by their absorbance or fluorescence properties. The spectral properties of the fluorescent dyes are sufficiently similar in wavelengths and intensity to fluorescein or rhodamine derivatives as to permit use of the same equipment. The dyes, however, show less spectral sensitivity to pH in the physiological range than does fluorescein, have higher solubility in non-polar solvents and have improved photostability and quantum yields.

  11. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Peme, Thabo; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-09-02

    The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS), Amaranth (AM), Allura Red (AR), Tartrazine (TZ) and Fast Green (FG), for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I(-)) ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms.

  12. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  13. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  14. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  15. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment.

  16. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment. PMID:27486044

  17. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  18. Hair care and dyeing.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia can be effectively camouflaged or worsened through the use of hair care techniques and dyeing. Proper hair care, involving hair styling and the use of mild shampoos and body-building conditioners, can amplify thinning scalp hair; however, chemical processing, including hair dyeing, permanent waving, and hair straightening, can encourage further hair loss through breakage. Many patients suffering from alopecia attempt to improve their hair through extensive manipulation, which only increases problems. Frequent haircuts to minimize split ends, accompanied by gentle handling of the fragile fibers, is best. This chapter offers the dermatologist insight into hair care recommendations for the alopecia patient. PMID:26370650

  19. Hair care and dyeing.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia can be effectively camouflaged or worsened through the use of hair care techniques and dyeing. Proper hair care, involving hair styling and the use of mild shampoos and body-building conditioners, can amplify thinning scalp hair; however, chemical processing, including hair dyeing, permanent waving, and hair straightening, can encourage further hair loss through breakage. Many patients suffering from alopecia attempt to improve their hair through extensive manipulation, which only increases problems. Frequent haircuts to minimize split ends, accompanied by gentle handling of the fragile fibers, is best. This chapter offers the dermatologist insight into hair care recommendations for the alopecia patient.

  20. Dye filled security seal

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Dennis C. W.

    1982-04-27

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member.

  1. Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension peroxidase: purification, characterization and application for dye decolorization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductase enzymes produced by most organisms. In this study, a peroxidase was purified from Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension by using anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose), affinity chromatography (Con A-agarose) and preparative SDS-PAGE. The obtained enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of 70 kDa. Surprisingly, this purified peroxidase also had polyphenol oxidase activity. However, the biochemical characteristics were only studied in term of peroxidase because similar experiments in term of polyphenol oxidase have been reported in our pervious publication. The optimal pH of the purified peroxidase was 5.0 and its activity was retained at pH values between 5.0–10.0. The enzyme was heat stable over a wide range of temperatures (0–60°C), and less than 50% of its activity was lost at 70°C after incubation for 30 min. The enzyme was completely inhibited by β-mercaptoethanol and strongly inhibited by NaN3; in addition, its properties indicated that it was a heme containing glycoprotein. This peroxidase could decolorize many dyes; aniline blue, bromocresol purple, brilliant green, crystal violet, fuchsin, malachite green, methyl green, methyl violet and water blue. The stability against high temperature and extreme pH supported that the enzyme could be a potential peroxidase source for special industrial applications. PMID:23402438

  2. Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension peroxidase: purification, characterization and application for dye decolorization.

    PubMed

    Chanwun, Thitikorn; Muhamad, Nisaporn; Chirapongsatonkul, Nion; Churngchow, Nunta

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductase enzymes produced by most organisms. In this study, a peroxidase was purified from Hevea brasiliensis cell suspension by using anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose), affinity chromatography (Con A-agarose) and preparative SDS-PAGE. The obtained enzyme appeared as a single band on SDS-PAGE with molecular mass of 70 kDa. Surprisingly, this purified peroxidase also had polyphenol oxidase activity. However, the biochemical characteristics were only studied in term of peroxidase because similar experiments in term of polyphenol oxidase have been reported in our pervious publication. The optimal pH of the purified peroxidase was 5.0 and its activity was retained at pH values between 5.0-10.0. The enzyme was heat stable over a wide range of temperatures (0-60°C), and less than 50% of its activity was lost at 70°C after incubation for 30 min. The enzyme was completely inhibited by β-mercaptoethanol and strongly inhibited by NaN3; in addition, its properties indicated that it was a heme containing glycoprotein. This peroxidase could decolorize many dyes; aniline blue, bromocresol purple, brilliant green, crystal violet, fuchsin, malachite green, methyl green, methyl violet and water blue. The stability against high temperature and extreme pH supported that the enzyme could be a potential peroxidase source for special industrial applications. PMID:23402438

  3. Application of Partial Least Square (PLS) Analysis on Fluorescence Data of 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-Sulfonic Acid, a Polarity Dye, for Monitoring Water Adulteration in Ethanol Fuel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Keshav; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescence characteristic of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) in ethanol-water mixture in combination with partial least square (PLS) analysis was used to propose a simple and sensitive analytical procedure for monitoring the adulteration of ethanol by water. The proposed analytical procedure was found to be capable of detecting even small adulteration level of ethanol by water. The robustness of the procedure is evident from the statistical parameters such as square of correlation coefficient (R(2)), root mean square of calibration (RMSEC) and root mean square of prediction (RMSEP) that were found to be well with in the acceptable limits.

  4. Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... including aromatic amines that were found to cause cancer in animals. In the mid- to late 1970s, however, manufacturers changed the components in dye products to eliminate some of these chemicals ... in hair dyes can cause cancer. Given the widespread use of hair dye products, ...

  5. Dyes extracted from Trigonella seeds as photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batniji, Amal; Abdel-Latif, Monzir S.; El-Agez, Taher M.; Taya, Sofyan A.; Ghamri, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the extract of Trigonella seeds was used as sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The natural dye was extracted from the seeds using water and alcohol as solvents for the raw material. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of Trigonella extract solution and dye adsorbed on TiO2 film were measured. DSSCs sensitized by Trigonella extracted using water as a solvent exhibited better performance with efficiency of 0.215 %. The performance of the fabricated DSSCs was attempted to enhance by acid treatment of the FTO substrates with HNO3, H3PO4, and H2SO4. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the fabricated cells was also carried out.

  6. Synthesis, linear optical, non-linear optical, thermal and mechanical characterizations of dye-doped semi-organic NLO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesha Bamini, N.; Vidyalakshmy, Y.; Choedak, Tenzin; Kejalakshmy, N.; Muthukrishnan, P.; Ancy, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Organic laser dyes Coumarin 485, Coumarin 540 and Rhodamine 590 Chloride were used to dope potassium acid phthalate crystals (KAP). Dye-doped KAP crystals with different dye concentrations such as 0.01 mM, 0.03 mM, 0.05 mM, 0.07 mM and 0.09 mM (in the KAP growth solution) were grown. The linear optical, non-linear optical, mechanical and thermal characterizations of dye-doped KAP crystals were studied and compared to understand the effect of dye and dye concentration on the KAP crystal. Absorption and emission studies of KAP and dye-doped KAP single crystals indicated the inclusion of the dye into the KAP crystal lattice. The effect of dye and its concentration on the SHG efficiency of the KAP crystal was studied using the Kurtz and Perry powder technique. It was observed that the absorption maximum wavelength and concentration of the dye used for doping the KAP single crystal decided the SHG efficiency of the dye-doped KAP single crystals. The mechanical hardness of the dye-doped and undoped (pure) KAP single crystals were studied using the Vickner’s microhardness test. It was observed that doping the KAP crystals with the laser dyes changed them from softer material to harder material. Etching studies showed an improvement in the optical quality of the KAP crystal after doping with laser dyes.

  7. Degradation of various dyes using Laccase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dhaarani, S; Priya, A K; Rajan, T Vel; Kartic, D Navamani

    2012-10-01

    Disposal of untreated dyeing effluent in water bodies, from textile industries, cause serious environmental and health hazards. The chemical structures of dye molecules are designed to resist fading on exposure to light or chemical attack, and they prove to be quite resistant towards microbial degradation. Therefore, current conventional biological processes may not be able to meet wastewater discharge criteria and reuse. An enzymatic treatment undergoes oxidative cleavage avoiding formation of toxic amines. Laccase is a multi-copper containing protein that catalyzes the oxidation of a wide range of aromatic substrates concomitantly with the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. UV visible spectral analysis of various synthetic dyes was performed in the study and wavelengths of maximum absorbance determined. Laccase enzyme was obtained from the fungi Pleorotus ostreatus. The enzyme showed high efficiency against Malachite Green, Basic Red and Acid Majanta with decolorization capacities of 97%, 94% and 94% respectively. Further, these dyes can be used for optimization of degradation parameters and analysis of degradation products.

  8. Starburst triarylamine based dyes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhijun; Zhang, Qiong; Wu, Wenjun; Pei, Hongcui; Liu, Bo; Tian, He

    2008-05-16

    We report here on the synthesis and photophysical/electrochemical properties of a series of novel starburst triarylamine-based organic dyes (S1, S2, S3, and S4) as well as their application in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 solar cells (DSSCs). For the four designed dyes, the starburst triarylamine group and the cyanoacetic acid take the role of electron donor and electron acceptor, respectively. It was found that the introduction of starburst triarylamine group to form the D-D-pi-A configuration brought about superior performance over the simple D-pi-A configuration, in terms of bathochromically extended absorption spectra, enhanced molar extinction coefficients and better thermo-stability. Moreover, the HOMO and LUMO energy levels tuning can be conveniently accomplished by alternating the donor moiety, which was confirmed by electrochemical measurements and theoretical calculations. The DSSCs based on the dye S4 showed the best photovoltaic performance: a maximum monochromatic incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 85%, a short-circuit photocurrent density (J(sc)) of 13.8 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit photovoltage (V(oc)) of 0.63 V, and a fill factor (ff) of 0.69, corresponding to an overall conversion efficiency of 6.02% under 100 mW cm(-2) irradiation. This work suggests that the dyes based on starburst triphenylamine donor are promising candidates for improvement of the performance of the DSSCs.

  9. Treatment of direct blending dye wastewater and recycling of dye sludge.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Hui; Li, Ming-Li; Yuan, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A new sorbent material, barium sulfate-Direct Blending Yellow D-3RNL hybrid (BSD), was synthesized and characterized by various methods. Both the anionic dyes, Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B and Weak Acid Green GS were hardly adsorbed by the BSD material, while the sorption of Ethyl Violet (EV) and Victoria Blue B were extremely obvious. The sorption of cationic dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model, which depended on the electric charge attraction. The saturation amount of EV adsorbed onto the BSD material approached to 39.36 mg/g. The sorption of EV changed little with pH from 3 to 12 while it increased with increasing levels of electrolyte. A dye wastewater sampled from Jinjiang Chemicals was treated, and the color removal rate was more than the COD removal rate. In addition, the cationic dye-BSD sludge was utilized as a colorant fill-in coating. The light stability and thermal stability of the colorant was measured and exhibited good features. This work provided a simple and eco-friendly method for dye wastewater treatment with recycling of waste.

  10. Alzheimer's Dye Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) scientists have developed a new dye that could offer noninvasive early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, a discovery that could aid in monitoring the progression of the disease and in studying the efficacy of new treatments to stop it. The work is published in Angewandte Chemie. Today, doctors can only…

  11. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  12. Key factors regarding decolorization of synthetic anthraquinone and azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Boonyakamol, A; Imai, T; Chairattanamanokorn, P; Higuchi, T; Sekine, M

    2009-07-01

    The factors affecting decolorization of anthraquinone dye represented by Reactive Blue 4 (RB4) and azo dye represented by Methyl Orange (MO) were studied in batch experiments under mesophilic (35 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic conditions. The results indicated differences in decolorization properties of the dyes with different chromophore structures. In abiotic conditions, MO could be decolorized by a physicochemical reaction when it was sterilized at 121 degrees C together with sludge cells or glucose. RB4 only showed absorption onto the cell mass. The presence of a redox mediator accelerated the decolorizing reaction when supplied together with glucose in the presence of sterilized sludge cells. In biotic conditions, the results indicated that the biological activity of microorganisms was an important factor in decolorization. The main factor involved in decolorization was the conversion of cosubstrate as electron donor, which reacted with dye as an electron acceptor in electron transfer. Redox mediators, anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid, and anthraquinone could accelerate decolorization even if a small amount (0.2 mM) was applied. On the other hand, a high concentration of redox mediator (1.0 mM) had an inhibitory effect on decolorization especially under thermophilic conditions. In addition, the decolorization of dye was accelerated by increasing treatment temperature, as shown in biotic treatments. Based on these results, increasing the treatment temperature could be used to improve the decolorizing process of textile dye wastewater treatment, especially for recalcitrant dyes such as anthraquinone.

  13. Degradation of Synthetic Dyeing Wastewater by Underwater Electrical Discharge Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D. Kim, S.; I. Jang, D.; J. Lim, B.; B. Lee, S.; S. Mok, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Electrical discharge treatments of synthetic dyeing wastewater were carried out with two different systems: underwater pulsed electrical discharge (UPED) and underwater dielectric barrier discharge (UDBD). Reactive Blue 4 (RB4) and Acid Red 4 (AR4) were used as model contaminants for the synthetic wastewater. The performance of the aforementioned systems was compared with respect to the chromaticity removal and the energy requirement. The results showed that the present electrical discharge systems were very effective for degradation of the dyes. The dependences of the dye degradation rate on treatment time, initial dye concentration, electrical energy, and the type of working gas including air, O2, and N2 were examined. The change in the initial dye concentration did not largely affect the degradation of either RB4 or AR4. The energy delivered to the UPED system was only partially utilized for generating reactive species capable of degrading the dyes, leading to higher energy requirement than the UDBD system. Among the working gases, the best performance was observed with O2. As the degradation proceeded, the concentration of total dissolved solids and the solution conductivity kept increasing while pH showed a decreasing trend, revealing that the dyes were effectively mineralized.

  14. Biosorption of water-soluble dyes on magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum cells.

    PubMed

    Safaríková, M; Ptácková, L; Kibriková, I; Safarík, I

    2005-05-01

    Brewer's yeast (bottom yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum) cells were magnetically modified using water based magnetic fluid stabilized with perchloric acid. Magnetically modified yeast cells efficiently adsorbed various water soluble dyes. The dyes adsorption can be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic cells differed substantially for individual dyes; the highest value was found for aniline blue (approx. 220 mg per g of dried magnetic adsorbent). PMID:15811411

  15. Reuse of reactive dyes for dyeing of jute fabric.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S N; Pan, N C; Day, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the work was to find out suitable method of dyeing so that costly reactive dye can be reused without draining them. The bleached jute fabric was dyed with four different class of reactive dyes namely, cold brand, hot brand, vinyl sulphone and high exhaustion (HE) brand. It is found that the two-step two-bath method of reactive dyeing, where exhaustion and fixation step is separated, is most ideal for reuse of dye bath. Separate original samples produced K/S value same as that of original sample and the K/S value of separate reuse sample varied from 50% to 80% of the original sample depending on the class of dye. In case of same bath method, colour yield of original reuse samples varies from only 10% to maximum 30% of the original samples depending on the class of dyes. Reuse of reactive dyes following separate bath method is particularly suitable for higher depth of shade (4% and above). This process not only utilises costly reactive dyes to the maximum extent but it also produces low water pollution as the effluent contain minimum amount of dye. So the process is economic and eco-friendly as well.

  16. Phenyl-ring rotational disorder in the two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded structure of the 1:1 proton-transfer salt of the diazo-dye precursor 4-(phenyldiazenyl)aniline (aniline yellow) with L-tartaric acid.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D; Young, David J

    2010-07-01

    In the structure of the 1:1 proton-transfer compound from the reaction of L-tartaric acid with the azo-dye precursor aniline yellow [4-(phenyldiazenyl)aniline], namely 4-(phenyldiazenyl)anilinium (2R,3R)-3-carboxy-2,3-dihydroxypropanoate, C(12)H(12)N(3)(+) x C(4)H(5)O(6)(-), the asymmetric unit contains two independent 4-(phenyldiazenyl)anilinium cations and two hydrogen L-tartrate anions. The structure is unusual in that all four phenyl rings of the two cations have identical rotational disorder with equal occupancy of the conformations. The two hydrogen L-tartrate anions form independent but similar chains through head-to-tail carboxyl-carboxylate O-H...O hydrogen bonds [graph set C(7)], which are then extended into a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded sheet structure through hydroxy O-H...O hydrogen-bonded links. The anilinium groups of the 4-(phenyldiazenyl)anilinium cations are incorporated into the sheets and also provide internal hydrogen-bonded extensions, while their aromatic tails are layered in the structure without significant association except for weak pi-pi interactions [minimum ring centroid separation = 3.844 (3) A]. The hydrogen L-tartrate residues of both anions exhibit the common short intramolecular hydroxy-carboxylate O-H...O hydrogen bonds. This work provides a solution to the unusual disorder problem inherent in the structure of this salt, as well as giving another example of the utility of the hydrogen tartrate anion in the generation of sheet substructures in molecular assembly processes.

  17. Monofunctional Carbocyanine Dyes for Bio- and Bioorthogonal Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Fangwei; Weissleder, Ralph; Hilderbrand, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    A facile synthetic route to prepare monofunctional carbocyanine dyes for biological application is developed. Three pentamethine carbocyanine dyes have been successfully modified with a variety of functional groups such as: carboxylic acids, azides, or alkynes. The new dyes are characterized by strong NIR fluorescence emission, high extinction coefficients and good quantum yields. The azide and alkyne dyes have potential utility as components in bioorthogonal labeling schemes via [2+3] dipolar cycloaddition “click” reactions. The application of one derivative, CyAM-5 alkyne, for bioorthogonal labeling is demonstrated. Fluorescence microscopy shows coupling of CyAM-5 alkyne to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells preincubated with azide modified glycans. PMID:19053316

  18. Photoinduced anisotropy in rigid dye solutions for transient polarization holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, T.; Nikolova, L.; Tomova, N.; Dragostinova, V.

    1986-08-01

    The photochromic properties of three rigid dyes solutions were assessed experimentally. The dyes, susceptible to induced photooptical anisotropy, are candidates as recording media for transient polarization holography. Attention is focused on the transitions from singlet to triplet states in fluorescein/orthoboric acid (FOA), isomeric transformations in methyl red/polymer matrices, and molecular reorientations in methyl orange/polyvinylalchol (MOP) in response to degenerate four-wave mixing laser hologroaphy. Various combinations of linear, orthogonal and circular polarizations were tested. All three dye/matrix systems resisted fatigue past 10,000 erasure cycles, with the FOA system exhibiting the shortest response time, 0.1 sec. The MOP mixture displayed a diffraction efficiency of nearly 35 percent. Techniques for accelerating the recording processes for using the dyes in holography to study phenomena such as energy transfer and wavefront reversal are discussed.

  19. Adsorption mechanism for xanthene dyes to cellulose granules.

    PubMed

    Tabara, Aya; Yamane, Chihiro; Seguchi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    The xanthene dyes, erythrosine, phloxine, and rose bengal, were adsorbed to charred cellulose granules. The charred cellulose granules were preliminarily steeped in ionic (NaOH, NaCl, KOH, KCl, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)), nonionic (glucose, sucrose, and ethanol), and amphipathic sucrose fatty acid ester (SFAE) solutions, and adsorption tests on the dye to the steeped and charred cellulose granules were conducted. Almost none of the dye was adsorbed when the solutions of ionic and amphipathic molecules were used, but were adsorbed in the case of steeping in the nonionic molecule solutions. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and the Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) profiles of SFAE which was adsorbed to the charred cellulose granules and extracted by ethyl ether suggested the presence of hydrophobic sites on the surface of the charred cellulose granules. We confirmed that the xanthene dyes could bind to the charred cellulose granules by ionic and hydrophobic bonds.

  20. Decolorization of azo dyes in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yang; Rabaey, Korneel; Rozendal, René A; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg

    2009-07-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitously used in the textile industry. These dyes need to be removed from the effluent prior to discharge to sewage due to their intense color and toxicity. In this study we investigated the use of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) to abioticlly cathodic decolorization of a model azo dye, Acid Orange 7 (AO7), where the process was driven by microbial oxidation of acetate atthe anode. Effective decolorization of AO7 at rates up to 264 +/- 0.03 mol m(-3) NCC d(-1) (net cathodic compartment, NCC) was achieved at the cathode, with concomitant energy recovery. The AO7 decolorization rate was significantly enhanced when the BES was supplied with power, reaching 13.18 +/- 0.05 mol m(-3) NCC d(-1) at an energy consumption 0.012 +/- 0.001 kWh mol(-1) AO7 (at a controlled cathode potential of -400 mV vs SHE). Compared with conventional anaerobic biological methods, the required dosage of organic cosubstrate was significantly reduced in the BES. A possible cathodic reaction mechanism for the decolorization of AO7 is suggested based on the decolorization products identified: the azo bond of AO7 was cleaved at the cathode, resulting in the formation of the colorless sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphthol.

  1. Dye removal from textile dye wastewater using recycled alum sludge.

    PubMed

    Chu, W

    2001-09-01

    The removal of dyes from textile dying wastewater by recycled alum sludge (RAS) generated by the coagulation process itself was studied and optimized. One hydrophobic and one hydrophilic dye were used as probes to examine the performance of this process. It was found that RAS is a good way of removing hydrophobic dye in wastewater, while simultaneously reducing the fresh alum dosage, of which one third of the fresh alum can be saved. The back-diffusion of residued dye from the recycling sludge is detected but is easily controlled as long as a small amount of fresh alum is added to the system. The use of RAS is not recommended for the removal of hydrophilic dyes, since the high solubility characteristics of such dyes can cause deterioration in the water quality during recycling.

  2. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  3. Azacoumarin dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue-green to near ultraviolet region.

  4. Azaquinolone dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.1, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue to near ultraviolet region.

  5. Experimental study of dye removal from industrial wastewater by membrane technologies of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Currently, biological method has been utilized in the treatment of wastewater -containing synthetic dyes used by textile industries in Iraq. The present work was devoted to study the operating feasibility using reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems as an alternative treatment method of wastewater discharged from Iraqi textile mills. Acid red, reactive black and reactive blue dyes were selected, based on the usage rate in Iraq. Effects of dye concentration, pH of solution, feed temperature, dissolved salts and operating pressure on permeate flux and dye rejection were studied. Results at operating conditions of dye concentration = 65 mg/L, feed temperature = 39°C and pressure = 8 bar showed the final dye removal with RO membrane as 97.2%, 99.58% and 99.9% for acid red, reactive black and reactive blue dyes, respectively. With NF membrane, the final dye removal were as 93.77%, 95.67%, and 97% for red, black and blue dyes, respectively. The presence of salt (particularly NaCl) in the dye solution resulted in a higher color removal with a permeate flux decline. It was confirmed that pH of solution had a positive impact on dye removal while feed temperature showed a different image. A comparison was made between the results of dye removal in biological and membrane methods. The results showed that membrane method had higher removal potential with lower effective cost. The present study indicates that the use of NF membrane in dye removal from the effluent of Iraqi textile mills is promising. PMID:23369335

  6. Dyeing fabrics with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivas, Georgia

    2002-06-01

    Traditionally, in textile dyeing, metals have been used as mordants or to improve the color produced by a natural or synthetic dye. In biomedical research and clinical diagnostics gold colloids are used as sensitive signals to detect the presence of pathogens. It has been observed that when metals are finely divided, a distinct color may result that is different from the color of the metal in bulk. For example, when gold is finely divided it may appear black, ruby or purple. This can be seen in biomedical research when gold colloids are reduced to micro-particles. Bright color signals are produced by few nanometer-sized particles. Dr. William Todd, a researcher in the Department of Veterinary Science at the Louisiana State University, developed a method of dyeing fabrics with metals. By using a reagent to bond the metal particles deep into the textile fibers and actually making the metal a part of the chemistry of the fiber. The chemicals of the fabric influence the resulting color. The combination of the element itself, the size of the particle, the chemical nature of the particle and the interaction of the metal with the chemistry of the fabric determine the actual hue. By using different elements, reagents, textiles and solvents a broad range of reproducible colors and tones can be created. Metals can also be combined into alloys, which will produce a variety of colors. The students of the ISCC chapter at the Fashion Institute of Technology dyed fabric using Dr. Todd's method and created a presentation of the results. They also did a demonstration of dyeing fabrics with metals.

  7. Microwave assisted dyeing of polyester fabrics with disperse dyes.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Saleh Mohammed; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed; Elnagdi, Mohamed Hilmy

    2013-09-09

    Dyeing of polyester fabrics with thienobenzochromene disperse dyes under conventional and microwave heating conditions was studied in order to determine whether microwave heating could be used to enhance the dyeability of polyester fabrics. Fastness properties of the dyed samples were measured. All samples dyed with or without microwave heating displayed excellent washing and perspiration fastness. The biological activities of the synthesized dyes against Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, yeast and fungus were also evaluated.

  8. Microbial conversion of selected azo dyes and their breakdown products.

    PubMed

    Yemashova, N; Kalyuzhnyi, S

    2006-01-01

    Four selected azo dyes (acid orange 6, acid orange 7, methyl orange and methyl red) were completely decolourised in the presence of anaerobic granular sludge, while only methyl red was degraded in aerobic conditions using a conventional activated sludge. Additional experiments with culture broth devoid of cells showed that anaerobic decolourisation of azo dyes was performed by extracellular reducing agents produced by anaerobic bacteria. This was further confirmed by abiotic experiments with sulphide and NADH. The presence of redox mediators such as riboflavin led to dramatic acceleration of the anaerobic biodecolourisation process. The azo dye reduction products were found to be sulphanilic acid and 4-aminoresorcinol for acid orange 6; sulphanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphthol for acid orange 7; N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine and sulphanilic acid for methyl orange; and N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine and anthranilic acid for methyl red. Anaerobic toxicity assays showed that the azo dyes were more toxic than their breakdown products (aromatic amines), except 1-amino-2-naphthol. In the presence of activated sludge, only anthranilic acid was completely mineralised while sulphanilic acid was persistent. 4-aminoresorcinol, 1-amino-2-naphthol and N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine underwent autooxidation in aerobic conditions yielding coloured polymeric products. On the contrary, in the presence of granular methanogenic sludge, 4-aminoresorcinol, 1-amino-2-naphthol and anthranilic acid were quantitatively methanised, sulphanilic acid was partially (70%) mineralised while N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine was only demethylated producing 1,4-phenylenediamine as an end product.

  9. Cold Pad-Batch dyeing method for cotton fabric dyeing with reactive dyes using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Memon, Muhammad Hanif; Khatri, Awais; Tanwari, Anwaruddin

    2011-11-01

    Reactive dyes are vastly used in dyeing and printing of cotton fibre. These dyes have a distinctive reactive nature due to active groups which form covalent bonds with -OH groups of cotton through substitution and/or addition mechanism. Among many methods used for dyeing cotton with reactive dyes, the Cold Pad Batch (CPB) method is relatively more environment friendly due to high dye fixation and non requirement of thermal energy. The dyed fabric production rate is low due to requirement of at least twelve hours batching time for dye fixation. The proposed CPB method for dyeing cotton involves ultrasonic energy resulting into a one third decrease in batching time. The dyeing of cotton fibre was carried out with CI reactive red 195 and CI reactive black 5 by conventional and ultrasonic (US) method. The study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy not only shortens the batching time but the alkalis concentrations can considerably be reduced. In this case, the colour strength (K/S) and dye fixation (%F) also enhances without any adverse effect on colour fastness of the dyed fabric. The appearance of dyed fibre surface using scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed relative straightening of fibre convolutions and significant swelling of the fibre upon ultrasonic application. The total colour difference values ΔE (CMC) for the proposed method, were found within close proximity to the conventionally dyed sample.

  10. PicoGreen dye as an active medium for plastic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, C.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex thin films are used as a host material for laser dyes. We tested PicoGreen dye, which is commonly used for the quantification of single and double stranded DNA, for its applicability as lasing medium. PicoGreen dye exhibits enhanced fluorescence on intercalation with DNA. This enormous fluorescence emission is amplified in a planar microcavity to achieve yellow lasing. Here the role of DNA is not only a host medium, but also as a fluorescence dequencher. With the obtained results we have ample reasons to propose PicoGreen dye as a lasing medium, which can lead to the development of DNA based bio-lasers.

  11. The aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solution as an active laser medium

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A I; Saletskii, A M

    2000-11-30

    The spectral, luminescent, and lasing properties of aqueous solutions of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G with additions of anion polyelectrolytes - polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids - are studied. It is found that the energy and spectral properties of lasing of these solutions depend on the ratio of concentrations of polyelectrolyte and molecules. It is also found that the lasing parameters of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions can be controlled by changing the structure of the molecular system. The variation in the structure of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in an almost five-fold increase in the lasing efficiency compared to that in aqueous dye solutions. (lasers, active media)

  12. Dye decolorization and detoxification by laccase immobilized on porous glass beads.

    PubMed

    Champagne, P-P; Ramsay, J A

    2010-04-01

    The decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes by fungal laccase immobilized on porous glass beads were evaluated. Anthraquinone (Reactive blue 19 and Dispersed blue 3) and indigoid (Acid blue 74) dyes were degraded more rapidly than the azo dyes (Acid red 27 and Reactive black 5). There was no dye sorption to the enzyme bed when decolorization rates were high (>12 microM dye/U-h) but at moderate rates (8 to>0.06 microM/U-h), there was a transient color which disappeared upon prolonged exposure. With Reactive black 5, permanent adsorption occurred most likely because laccase had been totally inactivated. Although laccase treatment was more efficient at decolorizing the anthraquinone dyes, their toxicity (as determined by the Microtox assay) increased while the less efficiently decolorized solutions of azo and indigoid dyes became less toxic. These results demonstrate the potential and limitations of using immobilized laccase to enzymatically decolorize a range of different dye classes and reduce dye toxicity in a single step.

  13. Membrane perturbation: studies employing a calcium-sensitive dye, arsenazo III, in liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, G; Collins, T; Evers, A; Dunham, P

    1976-01-01

    A metallochromic dye, arsenazo III [2,7-bis-(2-arsonophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid], has been incorporated into the aquenous interspaces of multilamellar liposomes. multilamellar liposomes. Addition of Ca produced no shift in the absorbance spectrum of dye captured by liposomes, whereas disruption of liposomes by Triton X-100, followed by Ca, produced the spectrum chracteristic of the dye-Ca complex: evidence of latency. Addition of excess ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) reversed the spectal shift. Differences between spectra obtained in this sequence yielded dye efflus. To measure Ca efflux, difference spectra (+/-EGTA) were obtained from cationic liposomes containing Ca after detergent lysis (sensitivity less than 10 mmol/ml). Since liposomes were impermeable either to dye or Ca until perturbed, it was possible to test a variety of membrane-active steroids (diethylstilbesterol, deoxycorticosterone, etiocholanolone) for their capacity to provoke dye efflux from liposomes; preincorporation of cortisol stablized liposomes against dye leak. Immunoglobulin-coated liposomes containing dye were taken up by phagocytes of Mustelus canis, and phagocytic vacuoles stained red-purple after ingestions. Liposomes containing the calcium-sensitive dye constitute a simple, accurate means for determining membrane perturbation and Ca fluxes; their uptake by cells or organelles remains to be exploited further. PMID:1061152

  14. [Case of urticaria due to cochineal dye in red-colored diet].

    PubMed

    Kotobuki, Yorihisa; Azukizawa, Hiroaki; Nishida, Youko; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro; Yoshikawa, Kunihiko

    2007-12-01

    We herein describe a 33-year-old female who recurrently exhibited urticaria accompanied by vomiting, diarrhea and dyspnea after taking red-colored food. From her history, we suspected the cochineal dye, the commonly used natural red dye in red-colored food and beverage, to be the cause of her symptoms. Oral provocation test using cochineal dye-stained red-colored boiled-fish-paste induced urticaria and respiratory symptoms. Furthermore the prick tests and the scratch tests with cochineal dye and carminic acid, the major ingredient of cochineal dye, were also positive. These results indicate that type 1 allergy to cochineal dye caused urticaria in this patient. Thereafter, she avoided the foods containing a cochineal dye and showed a complete clinical remission. Recently, the number of literatures described about increased incidence of type 1 allergy to cochineal dye. As the usage of cochineal dye is increasing in the Japanese market, we should keep in mind that cochineal dye can be a cause of urticaria in daily practice. PMID:18195555

  15. Selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes from aqueous solution on polydopamine microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianwei; Xin, Qianqian; Wu, Xuechen; Chen, Zhonghui; Yan, Ya; Liu, Shujun; Wang, Minghuan; Xu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) microspheres, synthesized by a facile oxidation polymerization route, were evaluated as a potential adsorbent for selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes. The adsorption processes towards nine water-soluble dyes (anionic dyes: methyl orange (MO), eosin-Y (EY), eosin-B (EB), acid chrome blue K (ACBK), neutral dye: neutral red (NR), and cationic dyes: rhodamine B (RhB), malachite green (MG), methylene blue (MB), safranine T (ST)) were thoroughly investigated. The adsorption selectivity of organic dyes onto PDA microspheres was successfully applied for the separation of dyes mixtures. Various influential factors such as solution pH, temperature, and contact time were employed to ascertain the optimal condition for adsorption of representative organic dyes including MB, MG and NR. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were used to fit the adsorption kinetics process. Five isothermal adsorption models (Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich, Temkin, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura) were used to investigate the adsorption thermodynamics properties. The results showed that the PDA microspheres owned good selective adsorption ability towards cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics process conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the Langmuir isotherm model was more appropriate for tracing the adsorption behavior than other isotherm models. Thus, we can conclude PDA microspheres may be a high-efficiency selective adsorbent towards some cationic dyes.

  16. Selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes from aqueous solution on polydopamine microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianwei; Xin, Qianqian; Wu, Xuechen; Chen, Zhonghui; Yan, Ya; Liu, Shujun; Wang, Minghuan; Xu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine (PDA) microspheres, synthesized by a facile oxidation polymerization route, were evaluated as a potential adsorbent for selective adsorption and separation of organic dyes. The adsorption processes towards nine water-soluble dyes (anionic dyes: methyl orange (MO), eosin-Y (EY), eosin-B (EB), acid chrome blue K (ACBK), neutral dye: neutral red (NR), and cationic dyes: rhodamine B (RhB), malachite green (MG), methylene blue (MB), safranine T (ST)) were thoroughly investigated. The adsorption selectivity of organic dyes onto PDA microspheres was successfully applied for the separation of dyes mixtures. Various influential factors such as solution pH, temperature, and contact time were employed to ascertain the optimal condition for adsorption of representative organic dyes including MB, MG and NR. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were used to fit the adsorption kinetics process. Five isothermal adsorption models (Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich, Temkin, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura) were used to investigate the adsorption thermodynamics properties. The results showed that the PDA microspheres owned good selective adsorption ability towards cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics process conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the Langmuir isotherm model was more appropriate for tracing the adsorption behavior than other isotherm models. Thus, we can conclude PDA microspheres may be a high-efficiency selective adsorbent towards some cationic dyes. PMID:26407057

  17. Surface Treatment for Effective Dye Adsorption on Nanocrystalline TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Masatoshi; Han, Chen; Han, Liyuan

    2012-10-01

    To improve the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) by controlling dye adsorption on TiO2 surface, the effect of surface treatments on the properties of [NBu4]2[Ru(Htcterpy)(NCS)3] (black dye; [NBu4]: tetrabutylammonium cation; H3tcterpy: 4,4',4''-tricarboxy-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) on nanocrystalline TiO2 films was investigated by analysis of the photovoltaic performance and the electron transport properties. Although the surface treatments do not affect on the condition band edge of TiO2, the amount of dye on TiO2 increases. The enhancement of dye adsorption by treatment of TiO2 in HCl solution is more effective than that by dipping the dye solution containing deoxycholic acid (DCA) as additive. But the charge recombination between an electron in TiO2 and I3- in the electrolyte can be reduced by the DCA treatment.

  18. Degradation of azo dyes by oxidative processes--laccase and ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Michael M; Gübitz, Georg M; Rehorek, Astrid

    2008-07-01

    Azo dyes are of synthetic origin and their environmental fate is not well understood. They are resistant to direct aerobic bacterial degradation and form potentially carcinogenic aromatic amines by reduction of the azo group. This study shows that applying the oxidative processes of enzymatic treatment with laccase and ultrasound treatment, both alone and in combination, leads to dye degradation. Laccase treatment degraded both Acid Orange and Direct Blue dyes within 1-5 h but failed in the case of Reactive dyes, whereas ultrasound degraded all the dyes investigated (3-15 h). When applied as multi-stage combinations the treatments showed synergistic effects for dye degradation compared with individual treatments. Bulk light absorption (UV-Vis) and ion pairing HPLC were used for process monitoring. Additionally, mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the structures of intermediates arising from ultrasound treatment.

  19. The Chemistry of Plant and Animal Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequin-Frey, Margareta

    1981-01-01

    Provides a brief history of natural dyes. Chemical formulas are provided for flavonoids, luteolin, genistein, brazilin, tannins, terpenes, naphthoquinone, anthraquinone, and dyes with an alkaloid structure. Also discusses chemical background of different dye processes. (CS)

  20. Biosorption and biodegradation of a sulfur dye in high-strength dyeing wastewater by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thai Anh; Fu, Chun-Chieh; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2016-11-01

    The ability of the bacterial strain Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans to remove sulfur blue 15 (SB15) dye from water samples was examined. This bacterium could not only oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid but also promote the attachment of the cells to the surface of sulfidic particles, therefore serving as an efficient biosorbent. The biosorption isotherms were better described by the Langmuir equation than by the Freundlich or Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Also, the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. At pH 8.3 and SB15 concentrations up to 2000 mg L(-1) in the biomass/mineral salt solution, the dye removal and decolorization were 87.5% and 91.4%, respectively, following the biosorption process. Biodegradation was proposed as a subsequent process for the remaining dye (250-350 mg L(-1)). A central composite design was used to analyze independent variables in the response surface methodology study. Under the optimal conditions (i.e., initial dye concentration of 300 mg L(-1), initial biomass concentration of 1.0 g L(-1), initial pH of 11.7, and yeast extract dose of 60 mg L(-1)), up to 50% of SB15 was removed after 4 days of biodegradation. PMID:27486930

  1. Biosorption and biodegradation of a sulfur dye in high-strength dyeing wastewater by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thai Anh; Fu, Chun-Chieh; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2016-11-01

    The ability of the bacterial strain Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans to remove sulfur blue 15 (SB15) dye from water samples was examined. This bacterium could not only oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid but also promote the attachment of the cells to the surface of sulfidic particles, therefore serving as an efficient biosorbent. The biosorption isotherms were better described by the Langmuir equation than by the Freundlich or Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Also, the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. At pH 8.3 and SB15 concentrations up to 2000 mg L(-1) in the biomass/mineral salt solution, the dye removal and decolorization were 87.5% and 91.4%, respectively, following the biosorption process. Biodegradation was proposed as a subsequent process for the remaining dye (250-350 mg L(-1)). A central composite design was used to analyze independent variables in the response surface methodology study. Under the optimal conditions (i.e., initial dye concentration of 300 mg L(-1), initial biomass concentration of 1.0 g L(-1), initial pH of 11.7, and yeast extract dose of 60 mg L(-1)), up to 50% of SB15 was removed after 4 days of biodegradation.

  2. Synthesis, biological activity and dyeing performance of some novel azo disperse dyes incorporating pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines for dyeing of polyester fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Ahmed Z.; Aboul-Fetouh, Mahmoud S.; Nassar, Hesham S.

    2012-02-01

    Several novel pyrazolopyrimidine azo compounds were achieved from diazotization of 4-aminoacetanilide and coupling with malononitrile and then refluxed with hydrazine hydrate to furnish 3,5-diamino-4-(4-acetamidophenylazo)-1H-pyrazole. The later compound was diazotized and coupled with substituted α-cyanocinnamate, α-cyanocinnamonitrile, 2-cyano-3-ethoxyacrylic acid ethyl ester, chalcones and ethylacetoacetate to produce novel dyestuffs. Structures of the dyes were fully characterized by using FT-IR, 1H NMR, mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The dyes were applied to polyester fiber, affording satisfactory results and showed biological activity towards various microorganisms.

  3. Multilayer Dye Aggregation at Dye/TiO2 Interface via π…π Stacking and Hydrogen Bond and Its Impact on Solar Cell Performance: A DFT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Xiaogang; Rao, Weifeng; Li, Jingfa

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer dye aggregation at the dye/TiO2 interface of dye-sensitized solar cells is probed via first principles calculations, using p-methyl red azo dye as an example. Our calculations suggest that the multilayer dye aggregates at the TiO2 surface can be stabilized by π…π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compared with previous two-dimensional monolayer dye/TiO2 model, the multilayer dye aggregation model proposed in this study constructs a three-dimensional multilayer dye/TiO2 interfacial structure, and provides a better agreement between experimental and computational results in dye coverage and dye adsorption energy. In particular, a dimer forms by π…π stacking interactions between two neighboring azo molecules, while one of them chemisorbs on the TiO2 surface; a trimer may form by introducing one additional azo molecule on the dimer through a hydrogen bond between two carboxylic acid groups. Different forms of multilayer dye aggregates, either stabilized by π…π stacking or hydrogen bond, exhibit varied optical absorption spectra and electronic properties. Such variations could have a critical impact on the performance of dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27767196

  4. Biological decolorization of xanthene dyes by anaerobic granular biomass.

    PubMed

    Apostol, Laura Carmen; Pereira, Luciana; Pereira, Raquel; Gavrilescu, Maria; Alves, Maria Madalena

    2012-09-01

    Biodegradation of a xanthene dyes was investigated for the first time using anaerobic granular sludge. On a first screening, biomass was able to decolorize, at different extents, six azo dye solutions: acid orange 7, direct black 19, direct blue 71, mordant yellow 10, reactive red 2 and reactive red 120 and two xanthene dyes--Erythrosine B and Eosin Y. Biomass concentration, type of electron donor, induction of biomass with dye and mediation with activated carbon (AC) were variables studied for Erythrosine B (Ery) as model dye. Maximum color removal efficiency was achieved with 4.71 g VSS L⁻¹, while the process rates were independent of the biomass concentration above 1.89 g VSS L⁻¹. No considerable effects were observed when different substrates were used as electron donors (VFA, glucose or lactose). Addition of Ery in the incubation period of biomass led to a fivefold increase of the decolorization rate. The rate of Ery decolorization almost duplicated in the presence of commercial AC (0.1 g L⁻¹ AC₀). Using different modified AC samples (from the treatment of AC₀), a threefold higher rate was obtained with the most basic one, AC(H₂), as compared with non-mediated reaction. Higher rates were obtained at pH 6.0. Chemical reduction using Na₂S confirmed the recalcitrant nature of this dye. The results attest that decolorization of Ery is essentially due to enzymatic and adsorption phenomena.

  5. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-04-01

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence

  6. Dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Di

    2010-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO(2), ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed. PMID:20480003

  7. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Di

    2010-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed. PMID:20480003

  8. Removal of dissolved textile dyes from wastewater by a compost sorbent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsui, L.S.; Roy, W.R.; Cole, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential for treating dye-contaminated waste streams by sorption using compost as a low-cost sorbent. A mature, thermophilic compost sample was used to sorb CI Acid Black 24, CI Acid Orange 74, CI Basic Blue 9, CI Basic Green 4, CI Direct Blue 71, CI Direct Orange 39, CI Reactive Orange 16 and CI Reactive Red 2 from solution using a batch-sorption method. With the exception of the two reactive dyes, the sorption kinetics were favourable for a continuous-flow treatment process with the compost-dye mixtures reaching a steady state within 3-5 h. Based on limited comparisons, the affinity of the compost for each dye appeared to be competitive with other non-activated carbon sorbents. The results suggest that additional research on using compost as a sorbent for dye-contaminated solutions is warranted.

  9. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    PubMed

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer. PMID:6993608

  10. Carcinogenicity of hair dye components.

    PubMed

    Van Duuren, B L

    1980-03-01

    The available animal carcinogenicity data on hair dye components was reviewed. From this review it became clear that certain hair dye components, some of which are still in hair dye formulations now on the market, are animal carcinogens. The compounds of concern that are still in use are: 3-amino-4-methoxyaniline, 2-nitro-4-aminoaniline and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyaniline. Certain azo dyes formerly used, and related compounds still in use, contain the benzidine moiety. Two of these compounds, Direct Blue 6 and Direct Black 38, have been shown to be metabolized in animals to the human carcinogen benzidine. Furthermore, skin absorption studies carried out with radiolabeled hair dye components applied to animal or human skin have conclusively shown that these compounds are systemically absorbed and excreted. Known cocarcinogens such as catechol and pyrogallol, which enhance benzo(a)pyrene carcinogenicity on mouse skin, are used as hair dye components. It is not known whether such compounds will enhance the carcinogenicity of substituted aniline hair dye chemicals. The available epidemiologic data are not sufficient to link hair dye use with an increased incidence in human cancer.

  11. Oxazine dye-conjugated dna oligonucleotides: Förster resonance energy transfer in view of molecular dye-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Kupstat, Annette; Ritschel, Thomas; Kumke, Michael U

    2011-12-21

    In this work, the photophysical properties of two oxazine dyes (ATTO 610 and ATTO 680) covalently attached via a C6-amino linker to the 5'-end of short single-stranded as well as double-stranded DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA, respectively) of different lengths were investigated. The two oxazine dyes were chosen because of the excellent spectral overlap, the high extinction coefficients, and the high fluorescence quantum yield of ATTO 610, making them an attractive Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair for bioanalytical applications in the far-red spectral range. To identify possible molecular dye-DNA interactions that cause photophysical alterations, we performed a detailed spectroscopic study, including time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements. As an effect of the DNA conjugation, the absorption and fluorescence maxima of both dyes were bathochromically shifted and the fluorescence decay times were increased. Moreover, the absorption of conjugated ATTO 610 was spectrally broadened, and a dual fluorescence emission was observed. Steric interactions with ssDNA as well as dsDNA were found for both dyes. The dye-DNA interactions were strengthened from ssDNA to dsDNA conjugates, pointing toward interactions with specific dsDNA domains (such as the top of the double helix). Although these interactions partially blocked the dye-linker rotation, a free (unhindered) rotational mobility of at least one dye facilitated the appropriate alignment of the transition dipole moments in doubly labeled ATTO 610/ATTO 680-dsDNA conjugates for the performance of successful FRET. Considering the high linker flexibility for the determination of the donor-acceptor distances, good accordance between theoretical and experimental FRET parameters was obtained. The considerably large Förster distance of ~7 nm recommends the application of this FRET pair not only for the detection of binding reactions between nucleic acids in living cells but

  12. NIR fluorescent dyes: versatile vehicles for marker and probe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Chapman, Gala; Beckford, Garfield; Henary, Maged

    2013-02-01

    The use of the NIR spectral region (650-900 nm) is advantageous due to the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR chromophores. Near-Infrared (NIR) dyes are increasingly used in the biological and medical field. The binding characteristics of NIR dyes to biomolecules are possibly controlled by several factors, including hydrophobicity, size and charge just to mention a few parameters. Binding characteristics of symmetric carbocyanines and found that the hydrophobic nature of the NIR dye is only partially responsible for the binding strength. Upon binding to biomolecules significant fluorescence enhancement can be observed for symmetrical carbocyanines. This fluorescence amplification facilitates the detection of the NIR dye and enhances its utility as NIR reporter. This manuscript discusses some probe and marker applications of such NIR fluorescent dyes. One application discussed here is the use of NIR dyes as markers. For labeling applications the fluorescence intensity of the NIR fluorescent label can significantly be increased by enclosing several dye molecules in nanoparticles. To decrease self quenching dyes that have relatively large Stokes' shift needs to be used. This is achieved by substituting meso position halogens with amino moiety. This substitution can also serve as a linker to covalently attach the dye molecule to the nanoparticle backbone. We report here on the preparation of NIR fluorescent silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles that are modified with aminoreactive moieties can be used as bright fluorescent labels in bioanalytical applications. A new bioanalytical technique to detect and monitor the catalytic activity of the sulfur assimilating enzyme using NIR dyes is reported as well. In this spectroscopic bioanalytical assay a family of Fischer based n-butyl sulfonate substituted dyes that exhibit distinct variation in absorbance and fluorescence properties and strong binding to serum albumin as its

  13. Direct identification of early synthetic dyes: FT-Raman study of the illustrated broadside prints of José Gaudalupe Posada (1852-1913)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, F.; Mauck, K.; Chefitz, M.; Freeman, R.

    2010-09-01

    Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy was used for the non-invasive, direct identification of colorants used to dye historical printed papers, overcoming obstacles such as low concentration of the dye, faded colors and fluorescence interference of the aged paper substrate. Based on a newly created FT-Raman reference database of 20 widely used dyes in the 19th century paper industry, the detectability of these dyes on aged biomaterials was determined by studying dyed paper samples from contemporary dye manuals, and identifying diagnostic peaks detectable on those substrates. Lastly, the method was applied to analyze the colorants used to dye the papers of a group of prints illustrated by the influential Mexico City artist José Guadalupe Posada, active 1876-1913. Unambiguous identification of the synthetic organic colorants Malachite Green (a triarylmethane dye), Orange II and Metanil Yellow (two acid monoazo dyes), Cotton Scarlet (an acid diazo dye), Phloxine (a xanthene dye) and Victoria Blue (a triarylmethane dye) in several of Posada’s prints challenged previous art-historical assumptions that these artworks were colored with natural dyes. The acquired knowledge has important conservation implications given that aniline dyes are sensitive to light and to aqueous treatments otherwise commonly carried out on works of art on paper.

  14. Probes labelled with energy transfer coupled dyes

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.; Ju, J.

    1997-11-18

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids. 7 figs.

  15. Probes labelled with energy transfer coupled dyes

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Glazer, Alexander; Ju, Jingyue

    1997-01-01

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids.

  16. A quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) analysis of triarylmethane dye tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Jarai; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.

    2006-01-01

    Dyes are important hydrological tracers. Many different dyes have been proposed as optimal tracers, but none of these dyes can be considered an ideal water tracer. Some dyes are toxic and most sorb to subsurface materials. The objective of this study was to find the molecular structure of an optimal water tracer. We used QSAR to screen a large number of hypothetical molecules, belonging to the class of triarylmethane dyes, in regard to their sorption characteristics to a sandy soil. The QSAR model was based on experimental sorption data obtained from four triarylmethane dyes: C.I. Food Blue 2 (C.I. 42090; Brilliant Blue FCF), C.I. Food Green 3 (C.I. 42053; FD&C Green No. 3), C.I. Acid Blue 7 (C.I. 42080; ORCOacid Blue A 150%), and C.I. Acid Green 9 (C.I. 42100; ORCOacid Fast Green B). Sorption characteristics of the dyes to the sandy soil were expressed with the Langmuir isotherm. Our premise was that dye sorption can be reduced by attachment of sulfonic acid (SO 3) groups to the triarylmethane template. About 70 hypothetical dyes were created and QSAR were used to estimate sorption characteristics. The results indicated that both the position and the number of SO 3 groups affected dye sorption. Sorption decreased with increasing number of SO 3 groups attached to the molecule. Increasing the number of sulfonic acid groups also decreases the toxicity of the compounds. An optimal triarylmethane water tracer contains 4 to 6 SO 3 groups.

  17. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A.; Hung, S.C.; Ju, J.

    1998-12-29

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures. 22 figs.

  18. Methods of sequencing and detection using energy transfer labels with cyanine dyes as donor chromophores

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    2000-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  19. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    1998-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  20. Enhancement of oxyanion and diatrizoate reduction kinetics using selected azo dyes on Pd-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Danmeng; Chaplin, Brian P; Shapley, John R; Menendez, Nathaniel P; McCalman, Dorrell C; Schneider, William F; Werth, Charles J

    2010-03-01

    Azo dyes are widespread pollutants and potential cocontaminants for nitrate; we evaluated their effect on catalytic reduction of a suite of oxyanions, diatrizoate, and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). The azo dye methyl orange significantly enhanced (less than or equal to a factor of 5.24) the catalytic reduction kinetics of nitrate, nitrite, bromate, perchlorate, chlorate, and diatrizoate with several different Pd-based catalysts; NDMA reduction was not enhanced. Nitrate was selected as a probe contaminant, and a variety of azo dyes (methyl orange, methyl red, fast yellow AB, metanil yellow, acid orange 7, congo red, eriochrome black T, acid red 27, acid yellow 11, and acid yellow 17) were evaluated for their ability to enhance reduction. Hydrogenation energies of azo dyes were calculated using density functional theory and a volcano relationship between hydrogenation energies and reduction rate enhancement was observed. A kinetic model based on Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) theory matched the volcano relationship and suggests sorbed azo dyes enhance reduction kinetics through hydrogen atom shuttling between reduced azo dyes (i.e., hydrazo dyes) and oxyanions or diatrizoate. This is the first research that has identified this synergetic effect, and it has implications for designing more efficient catalysts and reducing Pd costs in water treatment systems.

  1. Quantitative comparison of long-wavelength Alexa Fluor dyes to Cy dyes: fluorescence of the dyes and their bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Berlier, Judith E; Rothe, Anca; Buller, Gayle; Bradford, Jolene; Gray, Diane R; Filanoski, Brian J; Telford, William G; Yue, Stephen; Liu, Jixiang; Cheung, Ching-Ying; Chang, Wesley; Hirsch, James D; Beechem, Joseph M; Haugland, Rosaria P; Haugland, Richard P

    2003-12-01

    Amine-reactive N-hydroxysuccinimidyl esters of Alexa Fluor fluorescent dyes with principal absorption maxima at about 555 nm, 633 nm, 647 nm, 660 nm, 680 nm, 700 nm, and 750 nm were conjugated to antibodies and other selected proteins. These conjugates were compared with spectrally similar protein conjugates of the Cy3, Cy5, Cy5.5, Cy7, DY-630, DY-635, DY-680, and Atto 565 dyes. As N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester dyes, the Alexa Fluor 555 dye was similar to the Cy3 dye, and the Alexa Fluor 647 dye was similar to the Cy5 dye with respect to absorption maxima, emission maxima, Stokes shifts, and extinction coefficients. However, both Alexa Fluor dyes were significantly more resistant to photobleaching than were their Cy dye counterparts. Absorption spectra of protein conjugates prepared from these dyes showed prominent blue-shifted shoulder peaks for conjugates of the Cy dyes but only minor shoulder peaks for conjugates of the Alexa Fluor dyes. The anomalous peaks, previously observed for protein conjugates of the Cy5 dye, are presumably due to the formation of dye aggregates. Absorption of light by the dye aggregates does not result in fluorescence, thereby diminishing the fluorescence of the conjugates. The Alexa Fluor 555 and the Alexa Fluor 647 dyes in protein conjugates exhibited significantly less of this self-quenching, and therefore the protein conjugates of Alexa Fluor dyes were significantly more fluorescent than those of the Cy dyes, especially at high degrees of labeling. The results from our flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry experiments demonstrate that protein-conjugated, long-wavelength Alexa Fluor dyes have advantages compared to the Cy dyes and other long-wavelength dyes in typical fluorescence-based cell labeling applications.

  2. Organic dyes removal using magnetically modified rye straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldikova, Eva; Safarikova, Mirka; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Rye straw, a very low-cost material, was employed as a biosorbent for two organic water-soluble dyes belonging to different dye classes, namely acridine orange (acridine group) and methyl green (triarylmethane group). The adsorption properties were tested for native and citric acid-NaOH modified rye straw, both in nonmagnetic and magnetic versions. The adsorption equilibrium was reached in 2 h and the adsorption isotherms data were analyzed using the Langmuir model. The highest values of maximum adsorption capacities were 208.3 mg/g for acridine orange and 384.6 mg/g for methyl green.

  3. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  4. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  5. Accelerated decolorization of structurally different azo dyes by newly isolated bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2008-02-01

    Wastewater effluents from the textile and other dye-stuff industries contain significant amounts of synthetic dyes that require treatment to prevent groundwater contamination. In research aimed at biotechnology for treatment of azo dyes, this study examined 288 strains of azo-dye degrading bacteria to identify efficient strains and determine incubation times required for decolorization. Initial enrichment cultures were carried out using a mixture of four structurally different dyes (Acid Red 88, Reactive Black 5, Direct Red 81, and Disperse Orange 3) as the sole source of C and N to isolate the bacteria from soil, activated sludge, and natural asphalt. Six strains were selected for further study based on their prolific growth and ability to rapidly decolorize the dyes individually or in mixtures. Treatment times required by the most efficient strain, AS96 (Shewanella putrefaciens) were as short as 4 h for complete decolorization of 100 mg l(-1) of AR-88 and DR-81 dyes under static conditions, and 6 and 8 h, respectively, for complete decolorization of RB-5 and DO-3. To our knowledge, these bacterial strains are the most efficient azo-dye degrading bacteria that have been described and may have practical application for biological treatment of dye-polluted wastewater streams.

  6. Novel D-A-π-A organic dyes based on 3-dimensional triarylamine and benzothiadiazole derivatives for high-performance dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongli; Chen, Huajie; Long, Jun; Wang, Guo; Tan, Songting

    2016-09-01

    Organic dyes with a 3-dimensional (3D) structure is helpful for retarding dyes aggregation and charge recombination as well as improving the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In this contribution, a novel 3D triarylamine derivative (IDTTPA) featuring an indenothiophenene unit has been designed, synthesized, and applied to develop a 3D organic dyes. Two novel D-A-π-A organic dyes (CD1 and CD2) based on IDTTPA as the electron donors, 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole derivatives as the auxiliary acceptors, and formic acid as the anchoring groups have been successfully synthesized and applied in DSSCs. The effects of the fluoro substitute groups on the photophysical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic properties are investigated. The results indicate that the fluoro-containing dye CD2 exhibits higher molar extinction coefficient, stronger light-capturing ability, and better photovoltaic performance than those of CD1 dye without fluoro substitute. Investigation of the DSSCs performance shows that CD2-based DSSCs exhibit a high PCE value of 7.91%, higher than that of CD1-based DSSCs (6.29%), even higher than that of the reference DSSCs based on N719 (7.49%). This works has demonstrated that this kind of 3D unit (IDTTPA) is a strong and promising electron donor unit to develop high efficiency metal-free organic dyes.

  7. Decolorization of azo dyes by Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Congcong; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Geobacter metallireducens was found to be capable of decolorizing several azo dyes with different structures to various extents. Pyruvate, ethanol, acetate, propionate, and benzoate could support 66.3 ± 2.6-93.7 ± 2.1 % decolorization of 0.1 mM acid red 27 (AR27) in 40 h. The dependence of the specific decolorization rate on AR27 concentration (25 to 800 μM) followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K m = 186.9 ± 1.4 μΜ, V max = 0.65 ± 0.02 μmol mg protein(-1) h(-1)). Enhanced AR27 decolorization was observed with the increase of cell concentrations ranging from 7.5 to 45 mgL(-1). AR27 decolorization by G. metallireducens was retarded by the presence of goethite, which competed electrons with AR27 and was reduced to Fe(II). The addition of low concentrations of humic acid (1-100 mgL(-1)) or 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (0.5-50 μM) could improve the decolorization performance of G. metallireducens. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis suggested reductive pathway to be responsible for decolorization. This was the first study on azo dye decolorization by Geobacter strain and might improve our understanding of natural attenuation and bioremediation of environments polluted by azo dyes.

  8. Using protein nanofibrils to remove azo dyes from aqueous solution by the coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Morshedi, Dina; Mohammadi, Zeinab; Akbar Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi; Aliakbari, Farhang

    2013-12-01

    The ever-increasing applications of hazardous azo dyes as industrialized coloring agents have led to serious remediation challenges. In this study, proteinaceous nanofibrils were examined as coagulants for decolorization of azo dyes in aqueous solutions. The results provided some insight regarding the mechanism of dye removal. The strength of nanofibrils to remove dyes from solution was evaluated by remediation of acid red 88, Bismarck brown R, direct violet 51, reactive black 5, and Congo red. However, the efficiency of nanofibrils to coagulate with different dyes was variable (60-98%) and dependent on the structures of dyes and the physicochemical conditions of the solutions. Increasing the temperature or ionic strength declined the coagulation time and induced the rate of dye removal. Changing pH had contradictory effects on the dye removal efficiency which was more affected by the chemical structure of the dye rather than the change in stability of the coagulant. The efficiency of nanofibrils to remove dyes was more than that of charcoal, which is considered as one of the most common substances used for azo dye remediation which may be due to its well dispersion in the aqueous solutions, and slower rates of the coagulation than that of the adsorption process. Furthermore, cytotoxicity was not detected after treating cell cultures with the decolorized solutions. Accordingly, by integrating biological and biophysicochemical processes, proteinaceous nanofibrils can be promising candidates for treatment of colored wastewaters. Ease of production, proper and quick dispersion in water, without the production of dangerous dye by-products and derivatives, are some of the main advantages of nanofibrils. PMID:23999142

  9. Dyeing Properties of Natural Dye Syzygium cuminii on Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Swamy, V.; Ninge Gowda, K. N.; Sudhakar, R.

    2014-04-01

    Dyeing behavior of natural dye extracted from the bark of Syzygium cuminii L has been studied on silk fabric. Colour values and colour co-ordinates were examined in terms of K/S and L* a* b* C and h. A range of shades were obtained by using various mordants and mordanting techniques. Dye was tested for some of the eco-parameters using atomic absorption spectrophotometry and GC/MS. The test results were compared with the set standards to determine the eco-friendliness of natural dye. Their concentrations were much below the stipulated limits. Dyed samples were tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and were found to possess antibacterial activity.

  10. Bichromophoric Dyes for Wavelength Shifting of Dye-Protein Fluoromodules

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ha H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Brotherton, Wendy L.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Zanotti, Kimberly J.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Dye-protein fluoromodules consist of fluorogenic dyes and single chain antibody fragments that form brightly fluorescent noncovalent complexes. This report describes two new bichromophoric dyes that extend the range of wavelengths of excitation or emission of existing fluoromodules. In one case, a fluorogenic thiazole orange (TO) was attached to an energy acceptor dye, Cy5. Upon binding to a protein that recognizes TO, red emission due to efficient energy transfer from TO to Cy5 replaces the green emission observed for monochromophoric TO bound to the same protein. Separately, TO was attached to a coumarin that serves as an energy donor. The same green emission is observed for coumarin-TO and TO bound to a protein, but efficient energy transfer allows violet excitation of coumarin-TO, versus longer wavelength, blue excitation of monochromophoric TO. Both bichromophores exhibit low nanomolar KD values for their respective proteins, >95% energy transfer efficiency and high fluorescence quantum yields. PMID:25679477

  11. Hair dye poisoning and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Bokutz, Munira; Nasir, Nosheen; Mahmood, Faisal; Sajid, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Hair dye ingestion is a rare cause of toxicity in Pakistan. We are presenting the case report of a 55 year old male who presented with accidental hair dye ingestion and developed laryngeal oedema requiring emergent tracheostomy. He had also developed aspiration pneumonitis and chemical oesophagitis. However, the most alarming manifestation was rhabdomyolysis. Hair dye toxicity can be fatal if not recognized early. There is no antidote available. Rhabdomyolysis is a complication and needs to be managed aggressively in order to prevent long term morbidity. PMID:25976581

  12. Triphenylmethane dye-doped gelatin films for low-power optical phase-conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geethakrishnan, T.; Sakthivel, P.; Palanisamy, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) based optical phase-conjugation (OPC) in few triphenylmethane (Acid blue 7, Acid blue 9, Acid blue 1 and Methyl green) dye-doped gelatin films using a 633 nm He-Ne laser radiation of total power 35 mW. Phase-conjugate (PC) reflectivity from the dye films was measured by varying the experimental parameters such as incident angle between the pump-probe beams in the DFWM geometry, dopant concentrations of the gelatin film, probe beam intensity and read-out beam intensity. The maximum PC reflectivity was observed in the Acid blue 7, Acid blue 9, Acid blue 1 and Methyl green sensitized gelatin films were 0.22%, 0.24%, 0.07% and 0.13%, respectively. The origin of the mechanism of the PC wave generation from these dye films is also reported.

  13. Determination of synthetic food dyes by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Shirao, M; Aizawa, M; Nakazawa, H; Sasa, K; Sasagawa, H

    1994-10-01

    A method for the determination of synthetic tar dyes used as food additives using capillary electrophoresis with photodiode-array detection was investigated. The dyes Erythrosine (R-3), Phloxine (R-104), Rose Bengal (R-105), Acid Red (R-106), Amaranth (R-2), New Coccine (R-102) and Allura Red AC (R-40) were separated on a capillary column (50 cm x 75 microns I.D.) and identified from the absorbance spectra of each peak. The electrophoresis buffer used was a mixture of 25 mM sodium phosphate buffer and 25 mM sodium borate buffer (1:1) (pH 8.0) containing 10 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Substitution of beta-cyclodextrin for SDS in the electrolyte buffer was effective for the separation of R-2 and R-102. This modified method could be employed as an additional assay method for these two dyes.

  14. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-05-21

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.

  15. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells with dual-function coadsorbent: reducing the surface concentration of dye-iodine complexes concomitant with attenuated charge recombination.

    PubMed

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad; Khoshroo, Alireza

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, we have investigated the effects of oleic acid as a dual-function coadsorbent on recombination and iodine binding in dye-sensitized solar cells. Oleic acid as a dual-function coadsorbent effectively shields the back electron transfer from TiO2 to I3(-) ions and also reduces the surface concentration of dye-I2 complexes via iodine binding to the unsaturated double bond on oleic acid. It was found that interaction between iodine and the double bond of oleic acid keeps the iodine molecules away from the surface and reduces the recombination rate between injected electrons in a semiconductor and iodine molecules and also increases open-circuit voltage. Furthermore, the interaction between iodine molecules and unexcited dyes affects the UV-Vis spectrum of them and prevents an unfavorable blue shift. Overall, the results point to an improved performance for DSC operation and development.

  16. Decolorization and partial degradation of selected azo dyes by methanogenic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yemashova, Natalia; Telegina, Anna; Kotova, Irina; Netrusov, Alexander; Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey

    2004-10-01

    The toxicity potential and decolorization of three acid azo dyes (Acid Orange 6, Acid Orange 7, and Acid Orange 52) by methanogenic granular sludge from an anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed reactor was assayed. Complete bioreduction was found for all three azo dyes. Sulfanilic acid and 4-aminoresorcinol were detected from the decolorization of Acid Orange 6, sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphtol were detected from the reduction of Acid Orange 7, and sulfanilic acid and N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DMP) were found to be intermediates of Acid Orange 52 degradation. Sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphtol were persistent in the anaerobic conditions, whereas 4-aminoresorcinol was completely mineralized by anaerobic sludge and DMP was transformed into 1,4-phenylenediamine. Enrichment cultures obtained via consecutive passages on basal medium with only azo dye as a carbon and an energy source seemed to be morphologically heterogeneous. Baculiform and coccus cells were found when viewed under a light microscope. Cocci were joined in chains. Because anaerobic sludge contains sulfate-reducing bacteria and therefore may generate sulfide, azo dyes were tested for chemical decolorization by sulfide to compare rates of chemical and biologic reduction.

  17. Decolorization of direct dyes by salt fractionated turnip proteins enhanced in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and redox mediators.

    PubMed

    Matto, Mahreen; Husain, Qayyum

    2007-09-01

    The present paper demonstrates the effect of salt fractionated turnip (Brassica rapa) proteins on the decolorization of direct dyes, used in textile industry, in the presence of various redox mediators. The rate and extent of decolorization of dyes was significantly enhanced by the presence of different types of redox mediators. Six out of 10 investigated compounds have shown their potential in enhancing the decolorization of direct dyes. The performance was evaluated at different concentrations of mediator and enzyme. The efficiency of each natural mediator depends on the type of dye treated. The decolorization of all tested direct dyes was maximum in the presence of 0.6mM redox mediator at pH 5.5 and 30 degrees C. Complex mixtures of dyes were also maximally decolorized in the presence of 0.6mM redox mediator (1-hydroxybenzotriazole/violuric acid). In order to examine the operational stability of the enzyme preparation, the enzyme was exploited for the decolorization of mixtures of dyes for different times in a stirred batch process. There was no further change in decolorization of an individual dye or their mixtures after 60 min; the enzyme caused more than 80% decolorization of all dyes in the presence of 1-hydroxybenzotriazole/violuric acid. However, there was no desirable increase in dye decolorization of the mixtures on overnight stay. Total organic carbon analysis of treated dyes or their mixtures showed that these results were quite comparable to the loss of color from solutions. However, the treatment of such polluted water in the presence of redox mediators caused the formation of insoluble precipitate, which could be removed by the process of centrifugation. The results suggested that catalyzed oxidative coupling reactions might be important for natural transformation pathways for dyes and indicate their potential use as an efficient means for removal of dyes color from waters and wastewaters.

  18. Enzymatic biotransformation of synthetic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Couto, S

    2009-11-01

    Environmental pollution by discharge of dye-containing effluents represents a serious ecological concern in many countries. Public demands for colour-free discharges to receiving waters have made decolouration of a variety of industrial wastewater a top priority. The current existing techniques for dye removal have several drawbacks such as high cost, low efficiency, use of large amounts of chemicals and formation of toxic sub-products. This has impelled the search for alternative methods such as those based on oxidative enzymes. This approach is believed to be a promising technology since it is cost-effective, environmentally friendly and does not produce sludge. Enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes can be described as the conversion of dye molecules by enzymes into simpler and generally colourless molecules. Detailed characterisation of the metabolites produced during enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes as well as ecotoxicity studies is of great importance to assess the effectiveness of the biodegradation process. However, most reports on the biotreatment of dyes mainly deal with decolouration and there are few reports on the reduction in toxicity or on the identification of the biodegradation products. This implies a limitation to assess their true technical potential.

  19. Enzymatic biotransformation of synthetic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Couto, S

    2009-11-01

    Environmental pollution by discharge of dye-containing effluents represents a serious ecological concern in many countries. Public demands for colour-free discharges to receiving waters have made decolouration of a variety of industrial wastewater a top priority. The current existing techniques for dye removal have several drawbacks such as high cost, low efficiency, use of large amounts of chemicals and formation of toxic sub-products. This has impelled the search for alternative methods such as those based on oxidative enzymes. This approach is believed to be a promising technology since it is cost-effective, environmentally friendly and does not produce sludge. Enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes can be described as the conversion of dye molecules by enzymes into simpler and generally colourless molecules. Detailed characterisation of the metabolites produced during enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes as well as ecotoxicity studies is of great importance to assess the effectiveness of the biodegradation process. However, most reports on the biotreatment of dyes mainly deal with decolouration and there are few reports on the reduction in toxicity or on the identification of the biodegradation products. This implies a limitation to assess their true technical potential. PMID:20214593

  20. Dye removal by immobilised fungi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Couto, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Dyes are widely used within the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, printing, textile and leather industries. This has resulted in the discharge of highly coloured effluents that affect water transparency and gas solubility in water bodies. Furthermore, they pose a problem because of their carcinogenicity and toxicity. Therefore, removal of such dyes before discharging them into natural water streams is essential. For this, appropriate treatment technologies are required. The treatment of recalcitrant and toxic dyes with traditional technologies is not always effective or may not be environmentally friendly. This has impelled the search for alternative technologies such as biodegradation with fungi. In particular, ligninolytic fungi and their non-specific oxidative enzymes have been reported to be responsible for the decolouration of different synthetic dyes. Thus, the use of such fungi is becoming a promising alternative to replace or complement the current technologies for dye removal. Processes using immobilised growing cells seem to be more promising than those with free cells, since the immobilisation allows using the microbial cells repeatedly and continuously. This paper reviews the application of fungal immobilisation to dye removal. PMID:19211032

  1. Comprehensive review and compilation of treatment for azo dyes using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Hamidin, Nasrul

    2013-03-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent an emerging technology that focuses on power generation and effluent treatment. This review compiles articles related to MFCs using azo dye as the substrate. The significance of the general components in MFCs and systems of MFCs treating azo dye is depicted in this review. In addition, degradation of azo dyes such as Congo red, methyl orange, active brilliant red X-3B, amaranth, reactive blue 221, and acid orange 7 in MFCs are summarized. Further exploration and operational modification are suggested to address the challenges of complete removal of azo dye with maximum power generation in an MFC. In addition, a sequential treatment system with MFCs is suggested for complete mineralization of azo dye.

  2. Ipomoea dasysperma seed gum: an effective natural coagulant for the decolorization of textile dye solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanghi, Rashmi; Bhattacharya, Bani; Dixit, Awantika; Singh, Vandana

    2006-10-01

    An investigation of dye decolorization from synthetic dye solutions using the non-ionic, water-soluble, high molecular weight seed gums Ipomoea dasysperma and guar gum as coagulants was undertaken. The use of galactomannans derived from plants in this system presents a sustainable method of textile effluent treatment. These natural coagulants extracted from plants proved to be workable alternatives to conventional coagulants like polyaluminum chloride, as they are biodegradable, safe to human health, are cost effective when compared to imported chemicals and have a wider effective dosage range for flocculation of various colloidal suspensions. Coagulant dose and coagulation pH are important factors influencing the mechanism of coagulation. Also the type and chemical structure of the dye plays an important role in the coagulation process. The seed gums alone were found to be effective for decolorization of direct dye and in combination with PAC their coagulation efficiency was well extended even for reactive and acid dyes.

  3. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai, Qinhong; Wong, Chong-Kim; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po-Keung

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 degrees C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4+/-0.6 and 40.7+/-1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e(-) donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  4. Low band gap dyes based on 2-styryl-5-phenylazo-pyrrole: Synthesis and application for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Tsagkournos, D. V.; Balraju, P.; Sharma, G. D.

    A new series of low band gap dyes, C1, C2 and S, based on 2-styryl-5-phenylazo-pyrrole was synthesized. These dyes contain one carboxy, two carboxy and one sulfonic acid anchoring groups, respectively. They were soluble in common organic solvents, showed long-wavelength absorption maximum at ∼620 nm and optical band gap of 1.66-1.68 eV. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of these dyes were investigated and found to be suitable as photosensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The quasi solid state DSSCs with dye S showed a maximum monochromatic incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) of 78% and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.17% under illumination intensity of 100 mW cm -2 (1.5 AM), which is higher than the other dyes (3.26% for C2 and 2.59% for C1). Even though dye S contains one sulfonic acid anchoring group, the higher PCE for the DSSCs based on this dye has been attributed to the higher dye loading at the TiO 2 surface and enhanced electron lifetime in the device, as indicated by absorption spectra and electrochemical impedance spectra measurements. Finally, by increasing the molecular weight of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in electrolyte, the PCE also increases up to 4.8% for the electrolyte with PEO molecular weight of 2.0 × 10 6. This improvement has been attributed to the enhancement in iodide ions diffusion due to the increase in free volume of polymer gel electrolyte.

  5. Theoretical studies on the quinoidal thiophene based dyes for dye sensitized solar cell and NLO applications.

    PubMed

    Nithya, R; Senthilkumar, K

    2014-10-21

    A series of quinoidal thiophene based dye molecules were designed and their optoelectronic properties were studied for dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The efficiency of the designed dye molecules was analyzed using various parameters such as the HOMO-LUMO energy gap, absorption spectra, light harvesting efficiency (LHE), exciton biding energy (Eb) and free energy change for electron injection (ΔG(inject)). The simulated absorption spectra of the quinoidal thiophene molecules show that the electron withdrawing group substituted molecules exhibit dual band characteristics. We found that the cyano-[5'-(4″-amino benzylidene)-5H-thiophen-2'-ylidene] acetic acid based molecules, QT2B, QT4B, QT5 and QT6, are good candidates for DSSC applications. Furthermore, the study on the polarizability and hyperpolarizability of the designed molecules showed that the electron withdrawing group substituted QT2B-X molecules (X = Cl, Br, CF3, CN and NO2) are good candidates for NLO applications.

  6. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell. 6 figs.

  7. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James

    1992-01-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell.

  8. TDDFT screening auxiliary withdrawing group and design the novel D-A-π-A organic dyes based on indoline dye for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenqing; Liu, Yun; Liu, Chunmeng; Lin, Chundan; Shao, Changjin

    2016-10-01

    Based on the experimentally synthesized dye JZ145, we designed a series of novel D-A-π-A dyes SPL201-SPL211 with different π-conjugated bridges and a new auxiliary withdrawing group for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT(TDDFT). The molecular structures, energy levels, absorption spectra, light-harvesting efficiency (LHE), driving force of injection(ΔGinj) and regeneration(ΔGreg), electron dipole moment (μnormal) and lifetime of the first excited state(τ) were all scrutinized in details. Results reveal that the additional withdrawing group A2 and the π-conjugated group di-η-hexyl-substituted cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT) are more promising functional groups for the organic dyes with D-A-π-A structure. We further designed SPL212 and SPL213 by employing indoline group as donor, the above screened functional groups as π-conjugated bridge and additional withdrawing group, biscarbodithiolic acid and dicyanovinyl sulfonic acid groups as acceptor group. We found that SPL212 exhibits not only a higher molar extinction coefficient with an increment of 30.8%, larger excited state lifetime and an obvious redshift of 201 nm but also a broader absorption spectrum covering the entire visible range even up to near-IR of 1200 nm compared to JZ145. So, SPL212 can be used as a promising candidate for DSSCs. In addition, the results also prove that biscarbodithiolic acid may be more favorable than dicyanovinylsulfonic acid as acceptor group in DSSCs.

  9. TDDFT screening auxiliary withdrawing group and design the novel D-A-π-A organic dyes based on indoline dye for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenqing; Liu, Yun; Liu, Chunmeng; Lin, Chundan; Shao, Changjin

    2016-10-01

    Based on the experimentally synthesized dye JZ145, we designed a series of novel D-A-π-A dyes SPL201-SPL211 with different π-conjugated bridges and a new auxiliary withdrawing group for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT(TDDFT). The molecular structures, energy levels, absorption spectra, light-harvesting efficiency (LHE), driving force of injection(ΔGinj) and regeneration(ΔGreg), electron dipole moment (μnormal) and lifetime of the first excited state(τ) were all scrutinized in details. Results reveal that the additional withdrawing group A2 and the π-conjugated group di-η-hexyl-substituted cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT) are more promising functional groups for the organic dyes with D-A-π-A structure. We further designed SPL212 and SPL213 by employing indoline group as donor, the above screened functional groups as π-conjugated bridge and additional withdrawing group, biscarbodithiolic acid and dicyanovinyl sulfonic acid groups as acceptor group. We found that SPL212 exhibits not only a higher molar extinction coefficient with an increment of 30.8%, larger excited state lifetime and an obvious redshift of 201nm but also a broader absorption spectrum covering the entire visible range even up to near-IR of 1200nm compared to JZ145. So, SPL212 can be used as a promising candidate for DSSCs. In addition, the results also prove that biscarbodithiolic acid may be more favorable than dicyanovinylsulfonic acid as acceptor group in DSSCs. PMID:27269476

  10. High performance liquid chromatographic and colorimetric determination of synthetic dyes in gelatin-containing sweets, following polyamide adsorption and ion-pair extraction with tri-n-octylamine.

    PubMed

    Puttemans, M L; Dryon, L; Massart, D L

    1983-07-01

    Dyes are determined in gelatin-containing sweets. The gelatin must be eliminated first because it interferes with the normal ion-pair extraction of dyes with tri-n-octylamine to chloroform. Techniques such as precipitation of gelatin with organic solvents, and acid and enzymatic digestion of gelatin are shown to be unsuccessful because the remaining gelatin still influences the extraction scheme. Positive results are obtained when dyes are adsorbed on polyamide, gelatin is washed away, and dyes are desorbed with a methanol-ammonia mixture. Dyes are identified by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and quantitated by HPLC or colorimetry.

  11. DNA-Dye-Conjugates: Conformations and Spectra of Fluorescence Probes

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Frank R.; Paradas Palomo, Miguel; Sharapa, Dmitry I.; Zozulia, Oleksii; Mokhir, Andriy; Clark, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate DNA-dye and DNA-photosensitizer conjugates, which act as reactants in templated reactions leading to the generation of fluorescent products in the presence of specific desoxyribonucleic acid sequences (targets). Such reactions are potentially suitable for detecting target nucleic acids in live cells by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. The simulations show how the attached dyes/photosensitizers influence DNA structure and reveal the relative orientations of the chromophores with respect to each other. Our results will help to optimize the reactants for the templated reactions, especially length and structure of the spacers used to link reporter dyes or photosensitizers to the oligonucleotides responsible for target recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the structural ensembles obtained from the simulations can be used to calculate steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission spectra. We also show how important quantities describing the quenching of the reporter dye via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be calculated from the simulation data, and we compare these for different relative chromophore geometries. PMID:27467071

  12. DNA-Dye-Conjugates: Conformations and Spectra of Fluorescence Probes.

    PubMed

    Beierlein, Frank R; Paradas Palomo, Miguel; Sharapa, Dmitry I; Zozulia, Oleksii; Mokhir, Andriy; Clark, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Extensive molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to investigate DNA-dye and DNA-photosensitizer conjugates, which act as reactants in templated reactions leading to the generation of fluorescent products in the presence of specific desoxyribonucleic acid sequences (targets). Such reactions are potentially suitable for detecting target nucleic acids in live cells by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. The simulations show how the attached dyes/photosensitizers influence DNA structure and reveal the relative orientations of the chromophores with respect to each other. Our results will help to optimize the reactants for the templated reactions, especially length and structure of the spacers used to link reporter dyes or photosensitizers to the oligonucleotides responsible for target recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the structural ensembles obtained from the simulations can be used to calculate steady-state UV-vis absorption and emission spectra. We also show how important quantities describing the quenching of the reporter dye via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) can be calculated from the simulation data, and we compare these for different relative chromophore geometries. PMID:27467071

  13. Molecular engineering of D-D-π-A type organic dyes incorporating indoloquinoxaline and phenothiazine for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xing; Wang, Xiaoying; Shao, Li; Li, Hongmei; Yan, Rucai; Hou, Linxi

    2016-09-01

    Four metal-free organic dyes QX05-08 based on indoloquinoxaline and phenothiazine have been successfully designed and synthesized for dye-sensitized solar cells. The D-D-π-A type dyes QX07 and QX08 consist of an indoloquinoxaline donor, a phenothiazine donor, a cyanoacrylic acid acceptor/anchoring group and a thiophene or furan π-bridge. Other simple D-π-A type dyes QX05 and QX06 based on indoloquinoxaline and phenothiazine respectively have also been synthesized for comparison. The D-D-π-A type dyes QX07 and QX08 present good balanced structures and show excellent photoelectric properties. Especially, the dye QX07 with a thiophene unit as the π-bridge exhibits the best photovoltaic performances in solar cells. A high power conversion efficiency up to 8.28% with a Jsc of 15.3 mA cm-2 and a Voc of 757 mV have been achieved by the dye QX07 using an iodine electrolyte under standard conditions.

  14. Interaction of Cibacron Blue F3GA with glutamine synthetase: use of the dye as a conformational probe. 2. Studies using isolated dye fractions.

    PubMed

    Federici, M M; Stadtman, E R

    1985-01-29

    By means of column chromatography on silicic acid, commercial preparations of Cibacron Blue F3GA have been resolved into four major subfractions (fractions I-IV). The difference spectrum between free dye and dye bound to any given form of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) is different for each dye fraction. Moreover, uniquely different spectral perturbations are associated with the binding of any one dye fraction to the taut, relaxed, dissociated, or oxidized forms of GS. On the basis of the magnitude of the differences in the difference spectra between free dye and the dye-GS complexes, fraction II is most suitable for monitoring the interconversion of the relaxed and taut forms of GS. Fraction II can also be used to measure the fraction of oxidized (inactive) GS that is present in apparently homogeneous GS preparations. In contrast to the other three fractions, the difference spectrum obtained immediately following the binding of fraction I to GS undergoes a time-dependent change which is associated with the covalent attachment of the dye to the enzymes. Fractions II, III, and IV apparently bind to the nucleotide binding site on GS because the difference spectrum obtained with these fractions can be quenched by the subsequent addition of 1-2 mM ADP. The primary but not the secondary complex formed between GS and fraction I can also be destroyed by ADP.

  15. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  16. Structure-activity relationship study on the bioreduction of azo dyes by Clostridium paraputrificum.

    PubMed

    Moir, D; Masson, S; Chu, I

    2001-03-01

    Seven commercially available, structurally related azo dyes have been bioreduced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium paraputrificum. The rates of reduction of these dyes were found to vary between 24 and 74 nmoles reduced/mg protein/h. Acid red 1 and desmethyl acid red 106 were found to be the most readily reduced, while chromotrope 2R and cibacron brilliant red 3B-A were reduced at the slowest rates. The differences in reduction rates can be rationalized on the basis of structural differences and are consistent with the possible intermediacy of low molecular-weight electron carriers as the mediators of reduction. The incorporation of electron-withdrawing groups into the dyes, even if remotely placed, was found to increase the rate of reduction of dyes under controlled conditions, supporting the inversely proportional relationship between the electron density of the azo bond and the ease of bioreduction.

  17. Sea dye marker provides visibility for 20 hours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Laat, F.

    1966-01-01

    Sea dye marker block releases a visible slick which lasts at least twelve hours. The dye marker uses a fluorescent dye in a heat cured binder which, when immersed in seawater, releases the dye at a controlled rate.

  18. Composition and method of preparation of solid state dye laser rods

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention includes solid polymeric-host laser rods prepared using bulk polymerization of acrylic acid ester comonomers which, when admixed with dye(s) capable of supporting laser oscillation and polymerized with a free radical initiator under mild thermal conditions, produce a solid product having the preferred properties for efficient lasing. Unsaturated polymerizable laser dyes can also be employed as one of the comonomers. Additionally, a method is disclosed which alleviates induced optical stress without having to anneal the polymers at elevated temperatures (>85.degree. C.).

  19. Decolorization of Anthraquinonic Dyes from Textile Effluent Using Horseradish Peroxidase: Optimization and Kinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž.; Prlainović, Nevena Ž.; Stefanović, Andrea B.; Žuža, Milena G.; Čičkarić, Dragana Z.; Mijin, Dušan Ž.; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D.

    2015-01-01

    Two anthraquinonic dyes, C.I. Acid Blue 225 and C.I. Acid Violet 109, were used as models to explore the feasibility of using the horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) in the practical decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes in wastewater. The influence of process parameters such as enzyme concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, dye concentration, and pH was examined. The pH and temperature activity profiles were similar for decolorization of both dyes. Under the optimal conditions, 94.7% of C.I. Acid Violet 109 from aqueous solution was decolorized (treatment time 15 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.4 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 4, and temperature 24°C) and 89.36% of C.I. Acid Blue 225 (32 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.04 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 5, and temperature 24°C). The mechanism of both reactions has been proven to follow the two substrate ping-pong mechanism with substrate inhibition, revealing the formation of a nonproductive or dead-end complex between dye and HRP or between H2O2 and the oxidized form of the enzyme. Both chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon values showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. This study verifies the viability of use of horseradish peroxidase for the wastewaters treatment of similar anthraquinonic dyes. PMID:25685837

  20. Decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes from textile effluent using horseradish peroxidase: optimization and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž; Prlainović, Nevena Ž; Stefanović, Andrea B; Žuža, Milena G; Čičkarić, Dragana Z; Mijin, Dušan Ž; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D

    2015-01-01

    Two anthraquinonic dyes, C.I. Acid Blue 225 and C.I. Acid Violet 109, were used as models to explore the feasibility of using the horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) in the practical decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes in wastewater. The influence of process parameters such as enzyme concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, dye concentration, and pH was examined. The pH and temperature activity profiles were similar for decolorization of both dyes. Under the optimal conditions, 94.7% of C.I. Acid Violet 109 from aqueous solution was decolorized (treatment time 15 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.4 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 4, and temperature 24°C) and 89.36% of C.I. Acid Blue 225 (32 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.04 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 5, and temperature 24°C). The mechanism of both reactions has been proven to follow the two substrate ping-pong mechanism with substrate inhibition, revealing the formation of a nonproductive or dead-end complex between dye and HRP or between H2O2 and the oxidized form of the enzyme. Both chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon values showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. This study verifies the viability of use of horseradish peroxidase for the wastewaters treatment of similar anthraquinonic dyes.

  1. Dye remover poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause breathing difficulty) BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of ... care professional. If the chemical is on the skin or in the ... or a decreased level of alertness) that make it hard to swallow. ...

  2. Dye Sensitized Tandem Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Greg D.

    2009-12-21

    This work provided a new way to look at photoelectrochemical cells and their performance. Although thought of as low efficiency, a the internal efficiency of a 9% global efficiency dye sensitized solar cell is approximately equal to an 18% efficient silicon cell when each is compared to their useful spectral range. Other work undertaken with this contract also reported the first growth oriented titania and perovskite columns on a transparent conducting oxide. Other work has shown than significant performance enhancement in the performance of dye sensitized solar cells can be obtained through the use of coupling inverse opal photonic crystals to the nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cell. Lastly, a quick efficient method was developed to bond titanium foils to transparent conducting oxide substrates for anodization.

  3. Preparation and dyeing of super hydrophilic polyethylene terephthalate fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, D. D.; Zhou, J. F.; Xu, F.; Zhang, F. X.; Zhang, G. X.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the dyeing properties of PET fabrics modified with sulfuric acid was investigated using disperse red E-4B and disperse blue 2BLNG-L at high temperature and high pressure. The results revealed that the sulfuric acid modification improved the K/S value of dyeing PET fabrics, and the modified PET fabric could be dyed uniformly. The a, b, C, L and H of modified PET fabric were almost the same as that of original PET fabric. The water contact angles were still 0o after 10s, indicating that the hydrophilic property of modified PET fabrics still kept excellent. The wash fastness of dyed PET fabrics after modification was generally good.

  4. Feulgen staining of mammalian tissues fixed in picro-formol-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M K

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a highly satisfactory method for in situ localization of DNA in tissues fixed in picro-formol-acetic acid or picro-formol-acetic-chromic acid mixtures following a technique in the Feulgen procedure as devised by the author. Mammalian tissues fixed in these fixatives can be hydrolysed in 6N HCl at 35 degrees C for 10 min, rinsed in water, stained with Schiff reagent after exposing the sections under UV light for 10 min, washed in water, dehydrated through a graduated series of ethanol, cleared in xylol and mounted in DPX. Sections of tissues fixed in picro-formol-acetic-chromic acid mixtures after acid hydrolysis when stained with an aqueous solution of basic fuchsin are also found to be very satisfactory for in situ localization of DNA. PMID:55054

  5. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  6. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  7. Pneumatically tunable optofluidic dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wuzhou; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-02-01

    We presented a tunable optofluidic dye laser with integrated elastomeric air-gap etalon controlled by air pressure. The chip was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via replica molding. It comprises a liquid waveguide and microscale air-gap mirrors providing the feedback. The lasing wavelength is chosen by the interference between two parallel PDMS-air interfaces inside the internal tunable air-gap etalon, of which pneumatic tuning can be realized by inflating the air-gap etalon with compressed air. This dye laser exhibits a pumping threshold of 1.6 μJ/pulse, a lasing linewidth of 3 nm, and a tuning range of 14 nm.

  8. Feasibility of solar-pumped dye lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Kim, Kyung C.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1987-01-01

    Dye laser gains were measured at various pump-beam irradiances on a dye cell in order to evaluate the feasibility of solar pumping. Rhodamine 6G dye was considered as a candidate for the solar-pumped laser because of its high utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. Measurements show that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye.

  9. Adsorption properties of crosslinking carboxymethyl cellulose grafting dimethyldiallylammonium chloride for cationic and anionic dyes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingwen; Gao, Mengfan; Chang, Jiali; Ma, Hongzhu

    2016-10-20

    Novel and efficient microspheres adsorbent (MCA-E0.7/CMC-g- PDMDAAC), based on monochloroacetic acid (MCA) modified epichlorohydrin (ECH) cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), then grafting by dimethyldiallylammonium chloride (DMDAAC), was synthesized and its adsorption properties on cationic and anionic dyes were investigated. The results demonstrated that such MCA-E0.7/CMC-g-PDMDAAC microspheres showed pH-sensitive and could effectively adsorb cationic dye methylene blue (MB) or anionic dye orange II (OR II), at near neutral (pH>4) or acidic (pH<3) condition, respectively. Moreover, it could selectively adsorb the cationic dye MB from the cationic/anionic dye mixture at neutral pH condition. The desorption experiments were mainly performed under acidic (pH 3) or basic (pH 11) condition, over 98.54% of MB and 83.07% of OR II can be desorbed within 20min, respectively. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm provide better correlation with the experimental data for the adsorption of dyes onto MCA-E0.7/CMC-g-PDMDAAC microspheres. PMID:27474569

  10. Kinetics of azoreductase and assessment of toxicity of metabolic products from azo dyes by Pseudomonas luteola.

    PubMed

    Hu, T L

    2001-01-01

    This is a continuous study on a decolorization strain, Pseudomonas luteola, which involves treating seven azo dyes with different structures. This study focuses mainly on determining both the mechanism of decolorization by P. luteola and the activity of azoreductase from P. luteola as well as identifying and assessing the toxicity of metabolic products of azo dyes. The growth of P. luteola reached the stationary phase after shaking incubation for 24 hours. Then, while being kept static, the color of seven tested azo dyes (100 mg/l) could be removed. The proportion of color removal was between 59-99%, which figure is related to the structure of the dye. Monoazo dyes (RP2B, V2RP and Red 22) showed the fastest rate of decolorization, i.e. from 0.23-0.44 mg dye-mg cell-1 hr-1. P. luteola could remove the color of V2RP and a leather dye at a concentration of 200 mg/l, and as to the rest of the azo dyes, it could remove at a concentration of up to 100 mg/l. Decolorization of RP2B and Red 22 required activation energy of 7.00 J/mol and 6.63 J/mole, respectively, indicating that it was easier for azoreductase to decolorize structurally simple dyes. The kinetics of azoreductase towards seven azo dyes suggested a competitive inhibition model be applied. Microtox was used to analyze the toxicity of the metabolic products of azo dyes. EC50 showed differences in toxicity before and after the azo dyes had been metabolized. Analysis revealed significant differences between the results obtained by EC50 with Blue 15 and those obtained with the leather dye, indicating that the toxicities of the metabolic products were increased. The differences obtained by EC50 with Red 22, RP2P and V2RP were small, and Black 22 showed no such difference. Sulfanic acid and orthanilic acid may be the intermediate products of Violet 9 and RP2B, respectively. However, according to FT-IR analysis, aromatic amines were present in the metabolic product.

  11. Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James

    1992-01-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner.

  12. Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner. 9 figs.

  13. Natural dyes versus lysochrome dyes in cheiloscopy: A comparative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Brave, V R; Khanna, Shally

    2010-01-01

    Cheiloscopy is the study of lip prints. Lip prints are genotypically determined and are unique, and stable. At the site of crime, lip prints can be either visible or latent. To develop lip prints for study purpose various chemicals such as lysochrome dyes, fluorescent dyes, etc. are available which are very expensive. Vermilion (Sindoor used by married Indian women) and indigo dye (fabric whitener) are readily available, naturally derived, and cost-effective reagents available in India. Objective: To compare the efficacy of sudan black, vermilion, and indigo in developing visible and latent lip prints made on bone china cup, satin fabric, and cotton fabric. Materials and Methods: Out of 45 Volunteers 15 lip prints were made on bone China cup 15 lip prints on Satin fabric and 15 on Cotton fabric. Sudan black, vermilion and indigo were applied on visible and latent lip prints and graded as good (+,+), fair (+), and poor (-) and statistically evaluated. Results: The vermilion and indigo dye gives comparable results to that of sudan black for developing visible and latent lip prints. PMID:21189984

  14. Identification of natural dyes in archeological Coptic textiles by liquid chromatography with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Orska-Gawryś, Jowita; Surowiec, Izabella; Kehl, Jerzy; Rejniak, Hanna; Urbaniak-Walczak, Katarzyna; Trojanowicz, Marek

    2003-03-14

    Reversed-phase HPLC with diode-array UV-Vis spectrophotometric detection has been used for identification of natural dyes in extracts from wool and silk fibres from archeological textiles. The examined objects originate from 4th to 12th Century Egypt and belong to the collection of Early Christian Art of the National Museum in Warsaw. Extraction from fibres was carried out with HCl solution containing ethanol or with warm pyridine. As the main individual chemical components of natural dyes, anthraquinone, indigoid and flavonoid dyes including alizarin, purpurin, luteolin, apigenin, carminic acid, ellagic acid, gallic acid, laccaic acids A and B and indigotin were found. For pyridine extracts another mobile phase with an optimized gradient of organic modifier concentration was used. With such an eluent the appearance of double peaks for indigotin and indirubin was eliminated. For acidic extraction of dyes from fibres, ethanol was used. Due to its higher boiling point than methanol it evaporates slower from the extraction solution enabling a more efficient extraction of dyes. PMID:12650256

  15. Hair dye toxicity--a review.

    PubMed

    Marzulli, F N; Green, S; Maibach, H I

    1978-01-01

    This article reviews local and systemic effects which relate to hair dye formulation and hair dye ingredient tests and experiences in man and animals. Mutagenic and carcinogenic aspects are discussed. In a very limited way, safety and hazards of using hair dyes are interpreted for consumers. PMID:363966

  16. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 1. Evans blue.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2014-02-01

    The history, origin, identity, chemistry and use of Evans blue dye are described along with the first application to staining by Herbert McLean Evans in 1914. In the 1930s, the dye was marketed under the name, Evans blue dye, which was profoundly more acceptable than the ponderous chemical name. PMID:23957706

  17. Reactive Fluorescent Dyes For Urethane Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Cuddihy, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Molecules of fluorescent dyes chemically bound in urethane conformal-coating materials to enable nondestructive detection of flaws in coats through inspection under ultraviolet light, according to proposal. Dye-bonding technique prevents outgassing of dyes, making coating materials suitable for use where flaw-free coats must be assured in instrumentation or other applications in which contamination by outgassing must be minimized.

  18. Allergic contact dermatitis from azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Su, J C; Horton, J J

    1998-02-01

    Contact allergy to textile dyes usually occurs with disperse dyes of the azo or anthraquinone groups. A case is reported of a woman with clinical features of contact allergy to coloured nylon stockings who had multiple sensitivities to dyes of different azo groups.

  19. Decolorization of the textile dyes by newly isolated bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Jane-Yii; Liou, Dar-Jen; Hwang, Sz-Chwun John

    2003-02-27

    Six bacterial strains with the capability of degrading textile dyes were isolated from sludge samples and mud lakes. Aeromonas hydrophila was selected and identified because it exhibited the greatest color removal from various dyes. Although A. hydrophila displayed good growth in aerobic or agitation culture (AGI culture), color removal was the best in anoxic or anaerobic culture (ANA culture). For color removal, the most suitable pH and temperature were pH 5.5-10.0 and 20-35 degrees C under anoxic culture (ANO culture). More than 90% of RED RBN was reduced in color within 8 days at a dye concentration of 3,000 mg l(-1). This strain could also decolorize the media containing a mixture of dyes within 2 days of incubation. Nitrogen sources such as yeast extract or peptone could enhance strongly the decolorization efficiency. In contrast to a nitrogen source, glucose inhibited decolorization activity because the consumed glucose was converted to organic acids that might decrease the pH of the culture medium, thus inhibiting the cell growth and decolorization activity. Decolorization appeared to proceed primarily by biological degradation.

  20. The Use of Lysosomotropic Dyes to Exclude Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Česen, Maruša Hafner; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Progressive lowering of pH is characteristic for the endocytic pathway and enables efficient degradation of molecules by hydrolytic enzymes at its distal end. The existence of the proton gradient over the endosomal/lysosomal membranes depends on the action of the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). During lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), protons leak through the destabilized membrane, resulting in loss of the pH gradient. Here, we present a protocol showing how this effect can be detected by staining cells with lysosomotropic dyes, which accumulate in acidic organelles after protonation. During LMP, cells lose the ability to retain these dyes and therefore appear pale. Among the most commonly used lysosomotropic dyes are LysoTracker reagents and acridine orange. Cells can be analyzed with a fluorescence microscope; however, flow-cytometric analysis enables fast, objective, and reliable evaluation of differences between samples. Advantages of the technique include the fact that sample preparation is relatively simple and can be scaled-up to test several different compounds or conditions. However, as we will discuss, cells treated with v-ATPase inhibitors also lose the pH gradient across lysosomal membranes and cannot be stained with lysosomotropic dyes, although this is not accompanied by LMP. Therefore, merely observing loss of staining is not in itself a proof of LMP. PMID:27140914

  1. Highly Fluorescent dye-nanoclay Hybrid Materials Made from Different Dye Classes.

    PubMed

    Grabolle, Markus; Starke, Marian; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2016-04-12

    Nanoclays like laponites, which are commercially avaible in large quantities for a very moderate price, provide a facile solubilization strategy for hydrophobic dyes without the need for chemical functionalization and can act as a carrier for a high number of dye molecules. This does not require reactive dyes, amplifies fluorescence signals from individual emitters due to the high number of dyes molecules per laponite disk, and renders hydrophobic emitters applicable in aqueous environments. Aiming at the rational design of bright dye-loaded nanoclays as a new class of fluorescent reporters for bioanalysis and material sciences and the identification of dye structure-property relationships, we screened a series of commercial fluorescent dyes, differing in dye class, charge, and character of the optical transitions involved, and studied the changes of their optical properties caused by clay adsorption at different dye loading concentrations. Upon the basis of our dye loading density-dependent absorption and fluorescence measurements with S2105 and Lumogen F Yellow 083, we could identify two promising dye-nanoclay hybrid materials that reveal high fluorescence quantum yields of the nanoclay-adsorbed dyes of at least 0.20 and low dye self-quenching even at high dye-loading densities of up to 50 dye molecules per laponite platelet. PMID:27007448

  2. Anthraquinone dyes for superhydrophobic cotton.

    PubMed

    Salabert, J; Sebastián, R M; Vallribera, A

    2015-09-28

    Water-repellent, self-cleaning and stain resistant textiles are of interest for industrial applications. Anthraquinone reactive dyes were covalently grafted onto cotton fabric surfaces obtaining bright colors with good wash-fastness properties and giving rise to breathable superhydrophobic textiles with self-cleaning properties.

  3. Anthraquinone dyes for superhydrophobic cotton.

    PubMed

    Salabert, J; Sebastián, R M; Vallribera, A

    2015-09-28

    Water-repellent, self-cleaning and stain resistant textiles are of interest for industrial applications. Anthraquinone reactive dyes were covalently grafted onto cotton fabric surfaces obtaining bright colors with good wash-fastness properties and giving rise to breathable superhydrophobic textiles with self-cleaning properties. PMID:26265296

  4. Elimination of textile dyes using activated carbons prepared from vegetable residues and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Cid, Alejandra-Alicia; Herrera-González, Ana-María; Salazar-Villanueva, Martín; Bautista-Hernández, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, three mesoporous activated carbons prepared from vegetable residues were used to remove acid, basic, and direct dyes from aqueous solutions, and reactive and vat dyes from textile wastewater. Granular carbons obtained by chemical activation at 673 K with phosphoric acid from prickly pear peels (CarTunaQ), broccoli stems (CarBrocQ), and white sapote seeds (CarZapQ) were highly efficient for the removal of dyes. Adsorption equilibrium studies were carried out in batch systems and treated with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from the Langmuir isotherms ranged between 131.6 and 312.5 mg/g for acid dyes, and between 277.8 and 500.0 mg/g for basic dyes at 303 K. Our objective in this paper was to show that vegetable wastes can serve as precursors for activated carbons that can be used for the adsorption of dyes. Specifically CarBrocQ was the best carbon produced for the removal of textile dyes. The color removal of dyes present in textile wastewaters was compared with that of a commercial powdered carbon, and it was found that the carbons produced using waste material reached similar efficiency levels. Carbon samples were characterized by bulk density, point of zero charge, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, methylene blue adsorption isotherms at 303 K, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K (SBET). The results show that the activated carbons possess a large specific surface area (1025-1177 m(2)/g) and high total pore volume (1.06-2.16 cm(3)/g) with average pore size diameters between 4.1 and 8.4 nm. Desorption and regeneration tests were made to test the viability of reusing the activated carbons.

  5. Elimination of textile dyes using activated carbons prepared from vegetable residues and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Cid, Alejandra-Alicia; Herrera-González, Ana-María; Salazar-Villanueva, Martín; Bautista-Hernández, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, three mesoporous activated carbons prepared from vegetable residues were used to remove acid, basic, and direct dyes from aqueous solutions, and reactive and vat dyes from textile wastewater. Granular carbons obtained by chemical activation at 673 K with phosphoric acid from prickly pear peels (CarTunaQ), broccoli stems (CarBrocQ), and white sapote seeds (CarZapQ) were highly efficient for the removal of dyes. Adsorption equilibrium studies were carried out in batch systems and treated with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from the Langmuir isotherms ranged between 131.6 and 312.5 mg/g for acid dyes, and between 277.8 and 500.0 mg/g for basic dyes at 303 K. Our objective in this paper was to show that vegetable wastes can serve as precursors for activated carbons that can be used for the adsorption of dyes. Specifically CarBrocQ was the best carbon produced for the removal of textile dyes. The color removal of dyes present in textile wastewaters was compared with that of a commercial powdered carbon, and it was found that the carbons produced using waste material reached similar efficiency levels. Carbon samples were characterized by bulk density, point of zero charge, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, methylene blue adsorption isotherms at 303 K, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K (SBET). The results show that the activated carbons possess a large specific surface area (1025-1177 m(2)/g) and high total pore volume (1.06-2.16 cm(3)/g) with average pore size diameters between 4.1 and 8.4 nm. Desorption and regeneration tests were made to test the viability of reusing the activated carbons. PMID:27372249

  6. Combined effects of sugarcane bagasse extract and synthetic dyes on the growth and bioaccumulation properties of Pichia fermentans MTCC 189.

    PubMed

    Das, Devlina; Charumathi, D; Das, Nilanjana

    2010-11-15

    Bioaccumulation of synthetic dyes viz. Acid Blue 93, Direct Red 28 and Basic Violet 3 by growing cells of yeast, Pichia fermentans MTCC 189 was investigated in growth media prepared from sugarcane bagasse extract. The maximum dye bioaccumulation was determined at pH 5.0 for all the dyes tested. Two kinetic models viz. Noncompetitive and Uncompetitive models were tested in order to determine the toxic effects of dyes on the specific growth rate of P. fermentans MTCC 189. Basic Violet 3 was found to be more toxic than the other two dyes. The combined effects of sugarcane bagasse extract and initial Basic Violet 3 dye concentrations on the specific growth rate and dye bioaccumulation efficiency of P. fermentans MTCC 189 was investigated and optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). A 2(2) full factorial central composite design was successfully used for analysis of results. The optimum combination predicted via RSM confirmed that P. fermentans MTCC 189 was capable of bioaccumulating Basic Violet 3 dye upto 69.8% in the medium containing 10 mg/L of dye and 24 g/L sugar extracted from sugarcane bagasse.

  7. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Lactobacillus paracase CL1107 isolated from deep sea sediment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangdao; Wang, Wei; Liu, Guoguang

    2015-07-01

    Lactobacillus paracase CL1107 capable of removing toxic chromium (Cr(VI)) and Acid Black (ATT) azo dye simultaneously was isolated from deep sea sediment of the North Atlantic. CL1107 exhibited appreciable dye-Cr(VI) bioremoval ability in the pH range from 5 to 7, temperature 25-35 °C and NaCl 0-6% under aerobic conditions. The maximum removal values of Cr(VI) (95.8%) and dye (92.3%) were obtained in the media including only Cr(VI) or dye at initial concentration of 100 mg/L. In the experiments for the simultaneous treatment of both pollutants, the reduction of Cr(VI) and dye was 58.5% and 51.9%, respectively. The azo dye and Cr(VI) reductive activities in strain CL1107 were located in the cell free extract and cell debris, respectively. The mechanisms of azo dye and Cr(VI) reduction were found to be enzyme-mediated. In the treatment of saline tannery wastewater, decolourization of about 76% and 63% Cr(VI) reduction of were achieved. Furthermore, Azo dyes, Cr(VI) and wastewater showed reduced toxicity toward Artemia salina after treatment. These results demonstrate the potential of CL1107 in bioremediation of dye or/and Cr(VI) contamination in salt environments.

  8. Microflora involved in textile dye waste removal.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rahim, Wafaa M; Moawad, Hassan; Khalafallah, M

    2003-01-01

    Textile dyes are heavily used in factories for coloring different cloth materials. This work was designed to identify microorganisms capable of removing textile dyes, either by biodegradation or by biosorption. We expected to isolate microorganisms adapted to high dye concentrations from sites near textile industry complex. An experiment was conducted to study the efficiency of the isolates in removing textile dyes. The tested dyes were used as carbon and nitrogen sources for isolation of soil and/or water microorganisms capable of removing textile dyes wastes from factories effluent. The results indicated the low efficiency of both bacteria and actinomycetes in clean-up the effluent from the waste dyes in 10-21 days. On the other hand six fungal isolates were obtained by plating factory effluent on Martin's medium and media containing dyes as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth. These isolates fell in two genera, Aspergillus and Trichoderma. Results of these studies revealed the potential capacity of these fungi to decolorize the tested dyes in comparatively short time (2-24 hours) indicating strong efficiency of dye bioremediation by the fungal isolates. Since the process involved is mostly fast interaction between the fungal mycelium and the dye in the media, the possible mechanism could be based on a biosorption of such chemicals on the intact fungal biomass, rather than direct biodegradation of the compounds. PMID:12761767

  9. Identification and characterization of artists' red dyes and their mixtures by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Alyson V; Casadio, Francesca; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2007-09-01

    Silver film over nanospheres (AgFONs) were successfully employed as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates to characterize several artists' red dyes including: alizarin, purpurin, carminic acid, cochineal, and lac dye. Spectra were collected on sample volumes (1 x 10(-6) M or 15 ng/microL) similar to those that would be found in a museum setting and were found to be higher in resolution and consistency than those collected on silver island films (AgIFs). In fact, to the best of the authors' knowledge, this work presents the highest resolution spectrum of the artists' material cochineal to date. In order to determine an optimized SERS system for dye identification, experiments were conducted in which laser excitation wavelengths were matched with correlating AgFON localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) maxima. Enhancements of approximately two orders of magnitude were seen when resonance SERS conditions were met in comparison to non-resonance SERS conditions. Finally, because most samples collected in a museum contain multiple dyestuffs, AgFONs were employed to simultaneously identify individual dyes within several dye mixtures. These results indicate that AgFONs have great potential to be used to identify not only real artwork samples containing a single dye but also samples containing dyes mixtures. PMID:17910797

  10. Printing properties of the red reactive dyes with different number sulfonate groups on cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kongliang; Gao, Aiqin; Li, Min; Wang, Xiao

    2014-01-30

    Cellulose fabric is an important printing substrate. Four red azo reactive dyes based on 1-naphthol-8-amino-3,6-disulfonic acid for cotton fabric printing were designed. Their UV-Vis spectra and printing properties for cotton were investigated. The relationship between the chemical structures of the dyes and their printing properties on cotton fabric was discussed. The results show that the color yield (K/S) values of the printed fabrics decreased with the increase of sulfonate groups, but the fixation and penetration of the reactive dyes on cotton fabric increased. The reactive dyes with fewer number sulfonate groups were sensitive to alkaline and urea. Whereas, the reactive dyes with numerous sulfonate groups were not sensitive to urea and had good leveling properties, penetration uniformity, and good wet fastness for cotton fabric. Surface wettability of all cotton fabrics printed with four dyes was excellent. It is possible to print cotton fabric urea-free using the reactive dyes with numerous sulfonate groups.

  11. [Rapid Synthesis of Metal Organic Framework and Its Adsorption Properties on Anonic Dyes].

    PubMed

    Sun, De-shuai; Liu, Ya-li; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Qin, Ting-ting

    2016-03-15

    The waste water containing dyes is difficult to be biochemically treated because of its deep color. Adsorption becomes an important treatment method for this kind of waste water. The iron organic framework was rapidly synthesized at room temperature, and characterized by IR and XRD. Adsorption properties of the materials were tested using four anonic dyes solutions. It was found that the iron organic framework could be formed rapidly, with higher surface area and pore volumes. The pH value of zero point charge was 3.7. The adsorption experiments showed that the iron organic material could remove more dyes in acid solution. The dye adsorption capacity increased with increasing dye concentration. These adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir thermoadsorption equation. The calculated parameter from Langmuir adsorption indicated that the adsorption process could be performed easily. The second order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption data. In addition, the structure of dyes could affect the adsorption process. The metal complex dyes could be quickly removed. PMID:27337895

  12. Probing horseradish peroxidase catalyzed degradation of azo dye from tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Sadhanandam; Anumary, Ayyappan; Ashokkumar, Meiyazhagan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    Biocatalysis based effluent treatment has outclassed the presently favored physico-chemical treatments due to nil sludge production and monetary savings. Azo dyes are commonly employed in the leather industry and pose a great threat to the environment. Here, we show the degradation of C. I. Acid blue 113 using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) assisted with H2O2 as a co-substrate. It was observed that 0.08 U HRP can degrade 3 mL of 30 mg/L dye up to 80% within 45 min with the assistance of 14 μL of H2O2 at pH 6.6 and 30°C. The feasibility of using the immobilized HRP for dye degradation was also examined and the results show up to 76% dye degradation under similar conditions to that of free HRP with the exception of longer contact time of 240 min. Recycling studies reveal that the immobilized HRP can be recycled up to 3 times for dye degradation. Kinetics drawn for the free HRP catalyzed reaction marked a lower K m and higher V max values, which denotes a proper and faster affinity of the enzyme towards the dye, when compared to the immobilized HRP. The applicability of HRP for treating the actual tannery dye-house wastewater was also demonstrated. PMID:23961406

  13. Insight into removal kinetic and mechanisms of anionic dye by calcined clay materials and lime.

    PubMed

    Vimonses, Vipasiri; Jin, Bo; Chow, Christopher W K

    2010-05-15

    Our recent work reported that a mixed adsorbent with natural clay materials and lime demonstrated an enhanced capacity and efficiency to remove anionic Congo Red dye from wastewater. This study aims to investigate the removal kinetic and mechanisms of the mixed materials involved in the decolourisation of the dye to maximise their prospective applications for industrial wastewater treatment. The experimental results showed that dye removal was governed by combined physiochemical reactions of adsorption, ion-exchange, and precipitation. Ca-dye precipitation contributed over 70% total dye removal, followed by adsorption and ion-exchange. The dye removal kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order expression and was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. This study indicated pH was a key parameter to govern the removal mechanisms, i.e. adsorption/coagulation at acidic pH and precipitation at basic condition. Yet, the overall removal efficiency was found to be independent to the operation conditions, resulting in more than 94% dye removal. This work revealed that the mixed clays and lime can be applied as alternative low-cost adsorbents for industrial wastewater treatment. PMID:20079967

  14. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions. PMID:19135790

  15. [Rapid Synthesis of Metal Organic Framework and Its Adsorption Properties on Anonic Dyes].

    PubMed

    Sun, De-shuai; Liu, Ya-li; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Qin, Ting-ting

    2016-03-15

    The waste water containing dyes is difficult to be biochemically treated because of its deep color. Adsorption becomes an important treatment method for this kind of waste water. The iron organic framework was rapidly synthesized at room temperature, and characterized by IR and XRD. Adsorption properties of the materials were tested using four anonic dyes solutions. It was found that the iron organic framework could be formed rapidly, with higher surface area and pore volumes. The pH value of zero point charge was 3.7. The adsorption experiments showed that the iron organic material could remove more dyes in acid solution. The dye adsorption capacity increased with increasing dye concentration. These adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir thermoadsorption equation. The calculated parameter from Langmuir adsorption indicated that the adsorption process could be performed easily. The second order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption data. In addition, the structure of dyes could affect the adsorption process. The metal complex dyes could be quickly removed.

  16. Ketocyanine dyes as sensors for proticity and pH of a medium.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2012-09-01

    Photophysical properties of two structurally similar ketocyanine dyes have been studied in aprotic+protic (dioxane+water, tetrahydrofuran+water) and protic+protic (methanol+water) solvent mixtures. The observed photophysical properties of these dyes show different trends with an increase in solvent polarity (in the E(T)(30) scale) in aprotic and protic media. The H-bonding at the carbonyl centres of the dyes in the excited state presumably plays a role in modifying the emitting state and hence the photophysical properties show similar trend in a protic solvent or in a mixed aprotic+protic solvent at higher percentage of the later. Thus the dyes are supposed to act as useful probes for studying H-bonding ability of a medium. Absorption and fluorescence spectral characteristics of these dyes have been found to get modified in the presence of strong acid. The presence of H(+) ions persists the dyes to exist in equilibrium with the protonated forms having different absorption and fluorescence characteristics. Reversible change of the equilibrium with pH of the medium makes the dyes, particularly the symmetric one, good probes for indicating the pH of the medium.

  17. Anaphylaxis to annatto dye: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nish, W A; Whisman, B A; Goetz, D W; Ramirez, D A

    1991-02-01

    Annatto dye is an orange-yellow food coloring extracted from the seeds of the tree Bixa orellana. It is commonly used in cheeses, snack foods, beverages, and cereals. Previously reported adverse reactions associated with annatto dye have included urticaria and angioedema. We present a patient who developed urticaria, angioedema, and severe hypotension within 20 minutes following ingestion of milk and Fiber One cereal, which contained annatto dye. Subsequent skin tests to milk, wheat, and corn were negative. The patient had a strong positive skin test to annatto dye, while controls had no response. The nondialyzable fraction of annatto dye on SDS-PAGE demonstrated two protein staining bands in the range of 50 kD. Immunoblotting demonstrated patient IgE-specific for one of these bands, while controls showed no binding. Annatto dye may contain contaminating or residual seed proteins to which our patient developed IgE hypersensitivity. Annatto dye is a potential rare cause of anaphylaxis. PMID:1994783

  18. [Leather azo dyes: mutagenic and carcinogenic risks].

    PubMed

    Clonfero, E; Venier, P; Granella, M; Levis, A G

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity data on azo dyes used in the leather industry. Two water soluble benzidine-based dyes were classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). No other dyes have been evaluated by the IARC. Of the 48 azo dyes assayed in the Salmonella/microsome test, 20 gave positive results. Attention is drawn to the important role of the in vivo metabolism of azo compounds, which includes a preliminary reduction of the azo bonds and subsequent release of the aromatic amines of the dye. A useful assay (Prival test) for evaluating the mutagenic properties of azo dyes involves a reductive step that permits the release of any genotoxic agents present in the compounds. A list of leather azo dyes is furnished that are considered as potentially harmful due to the presence of a carcinogenic aromatic amine (benzidine, p-aminobenzene and derivatives) in their formulae.

  19. Study of the influential factors in the simultaneous photocatalytic degradation process of three textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Cristina; Larrechi, M Soledad; Callao, M Pilar

    2009-10-15

    The influence of several factors in the simultaneous photocatalytic degradation of three textile dyes - Acid Red 97, Acid Orange 61 and Acid Brown 425 - has been studied using a fractional factorial design 2(5-1). The considered factors were: the initial concentration of each dye, the catalyst concentration (TiO(2)) and pH. First, we developed a rapid analytical methodology based on recording UV-visible spectra during the degradation process and a data treatment using multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), which enabled the three dyes to be quantified simultaneously despite the overlap of their spectra. The kinetic constant of degradation for each dye in all the experiments was evaluated. In all cases the degradation followed a first order kinetics. For a significance level of 5%, the most important factor in the photodegradation of each dye is the concentration of Acid Red 97, the degradation is more effective at higher pHs and, in the studied range, the concentration of the catalyst is not important.

  20. Dyeing of Jute with Reactive Dyes: Optimisation of the Process Variables and Assessment of Colourfastness Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, A. K.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Guha Roy, T. K.

    2012-08-01

    This paper deals with the studies on the effect of dye concentration, electrolyte (common salt) concentration, dyeing time, dyeing temperature, soda ash concentration, pH of the dye solution and material to liquor ratio (MLR) on colour strength and other colour parameters after being dyed of jute fabrics with reactive dyes, namely, Turquoise blue, Lemon Yellow, Red CN colours. The dye absorption increases with increase in electrolyte (common salt) concentration, dyeing time, dyeing temperature, soda ash concentration, pH and decreases with increase of MLR. Colour fastness to wash, light and rubbing for the dyed samples has been studied and reported. It is observed that reactive dye gives overall good colour fastness to both washing and rubbing. But the light fastness has been found to be moderate only, due to the UV-light initiated fading of jute fibre itself change of the colour substrate, ie, undyed material. This colour fastness has been significantly resolved by post treatment with 1 % benzotriazole.

  1. Characteristics of a Broadband Dye Laser Using Pyrromethene and Rhodamine Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Wheeler, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    A broadband dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with a full-width half-maximum (FWHM) from 592 to 610 nm was created for the use in a dual-pump broadband CARS system called WIDECARS. The desired broadband dye laser was generated with a mixture of Pyrromethene dyes as an oscillator gain medium and a spectral selective optic in the oscillator cavity. A mixture of Rhodamine dyes were used in the amplifier dye cell. To create this laser a study was performed to characterize the spectral behavior of broadband dye lasers created with Rhodamine dyes 590, 610, and 640, Pyrromethene dyes 597 and 650 as well as mixture of these dyes.

  2. DCM-based organic dyes with electron donating groups for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Sik

    2014-07-01

    Herein, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino)styryl]-4H-pyran (DCM)-based dyes with electron donating groups were designed and their electronic and optical properties were investigated theoretically for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Among the dyes, the D1 and D2 dyes were composed of single electron donating group and the D3 and D4 dyes composed of dual donating group. We performed DFT/TDDFT calculations to get insight into the factors responsible for photovoltaic properties as dye sensitizers. It showed that all the dyes in this work are available as dye sensitizers from the energy consideration compared to TiO2 electrode and iodide electrolyte. It also showed that the D3 and D4 dyes produced additional absorption bands by the introduction of dual donor in absorption spectra and the absorption band of the D4 dye is more red-shifted than that of the D3 dye. It is attributed to the fact that the M2 (a coumarin derivative) moiety with stronger electron withdrawing ability stabilized its LUMO level. In terms of molar extinction coefficient and panchromatic feature, we suggest that the D4 dye would show better performance than other dyes in the present study as a dye sensitizer for DSSCs.

  3. Long-Range π-Conjugation in Phenothiazine-containing Donor-Acceptor Dyes for Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Antony, Mini P; Moehl, Thomas; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Moser, Jacques-E; Nair, Shantikumar; Yu, Yong-Jae; Kim, Jong-Hyung; Kay, Kwang-Yol; Jung, Young-Sam; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Grätzel, Carole; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Four organic donor-π-bridge-acceptor dyes containing phenothiazine as a spacer and cyanoacrylic acid as an acceptor were synthesized and tested as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The influence of iodide- and cobalt-based redox electrolytes on the photovoltaic device performance was investigated. In these new dyes, systematic π-conjugation was extended by inserting one or two phenothiazine moieties and investigated within the context of the resulting photoinduced charge-transfer properties. A detailed investigation, including transient absorption spectroscopy and quantum chemical methods, provided important information on the role of extended π-conjugation on the photophysical properties and photovoltaic device performance. Overall, the results showed that the extension of π-conjugation by one phenothiazine unit resulted in the best device performance owing to reduced recombination rates, whereas extension by two phenothiazine units reduced dye adsorption on TiO2 probably owing to the increase in molecular size. The performance of the dyes in DSCs was found to be a complex interaction between dye structure and size. PMID:26616683

  4. Molecular dynamics study of biodegradation of azo dyes via their interactions with AzrC azoreductase.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Hamed; Kay, Maryam; Dehghanian, Fariba; Tavakol, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are one of the most important class of dyes, which have been widely used in industries. Because of the environmental pollution of azo dyes, many studies have been performed to study their biodegradation using bacterial systems. In present work, the AzrC of mesophilic gram-positive Bacillus sp. B29 has been considered to study its interaction with five common azo dyes (orange G, acid red 88, Sudan I, orange I, and methyl red). The molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study the interaction between AzrC and azo dyes. The trajectory was confirmed using root mean square deviation and the root mean square fluctuation analyses. Then, the hydrogen bond and alanine scanning analyses were performed to reveal active site residues. Phe105 (A), Phe125 (B), Phe172 (B), and Pro132 (B) have been found as the most important hydrophobic residues whereas Asn104 (A), Tyr127 (B), and Asn187 (A) have key role in making hydrogen bond. The results of molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area calculations proved that the hydrophobic azo dyes like Acid red 88 binds more tightly to the AzrC protein. The calculated data suggested MR A 121 (B) I as a potential candidate for improving the AzrC-MR interactions.

  5. Adsorption of dissolved Reactive red dye from aqueous phase onto activated carbon prepared from agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaar, S; Kalaamani, P; Porkodi, K; Varadarajan, P R; Subburaam, C V

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of Reactive red dye (RR) onto Coconut tree flower carbon (CFC) and Jute fibre carbon (JFC) from aqueous solution was investigated. Adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations, initial solution pH and adsorbent doses. The kinetic studies were also conducted; the adsorption of Reactive red onto CFC and JFC followed pseudosecond-order rate equation. The effective diffusion coefficient was evaluated to establish the film diffusion mechanism. Quantitative removal of Reactive red dye was achieved at strongly acidic conditions for both the carbons studied. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption capacity were found to be 181.9 and 200 mg/g for CFC and JFC, respectively. The overall rate of dye adsorption appeared to be controlled by chemisorption, in this case in accordance with poor desorption studies.

  6. New physicochemical interpretations for the adsorption of food dyes on chitosan films using statistical physics treatment.

    PubMed

    Dotto, G L; Pinto, L A A; Hachicha, M A; Knani, S

    2015-03-15

    In this work, statistical physics treatment was employed to study the adsorption of food dyes onto chitosan films, in order to obtain new physicochemical interpretations at molecular level. Experimental equilibrium curves were obtained for the adsorption of four dyes (FD&C red 2, FD&C yellow 5, FD&C blue 2, Acid Red 51) at different temperatures (298, 313 and 328 K). A statistical physics formula was used to interpret these curves, and the parameters such as, number of adsorbed dye molecules per site (n), anchorage number (n'), receptor sites density (NM), adsorbed quantity at saturation (N asat), steric hindrance (τ), concentration at half saturation (c1/2) and molar adsorption energy (ΔE(a)) were estimated. The relation of the above mentioned parameters with the chemical structure of the dyes and temperature was evaluated and interpreted.

  7. Effect of pH on the control release of microencapsulated dye in lecithin liposomes. II.

    PubMed

    Baptista, A L F; Coutinho, P J G; Real Oliveira, M E C D; Gomes, J I N Rocha

    2003-05-01

    The objective of our work has been the microencapsulation of dyes with lecithin from soybean, with the formation of liposomes, as a substitute for synthetic auxiliaries so as to improve the quality of the effluent. Current scenarios promote the disintegration and leakage of the liposomes, such as, changes in temperature, pH, and the use of surfactants. Since dyeing process is a mix of all these parameters, we pretended to study each one separately. Changes in pH at constant temperature induce a release of dye similar with changes in temperature. In acid conditions, we found a very fast initial dye release which doesn't occur in basic conditions. Using carboxyfluorescein, as a pH fluorescence probe, we concluded that the liposome membrane doesn't protect the liposome interior from changes on the external pH.

  8. Molecular scale characterization of the titania-dye-solvent interface in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Marquet, Philip; Andersson, Gunther; Snedden, Alan; Kloo, Lars; Atkin, Rob

    2010-06-15

    Charge separation at the dye/titania interface in dye sensitized solar cells is strongly influenced by the thickness and homogeneity of the sensitizing dye layer, as this controls the potential drop across the interface, and the probability of an excited electron being transferred from the dye to the titania. In this study we use atomic force microscopy and the depth profiling method neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (NICISS) to investigate the thickness and homogeneity of N719 dye adsorbed to titania before and after rinsing with pure acetonitrile. Both experimental methods show that the dye layers are closed but inhomogeneous. Inhomogeneity is more pronounced for unrinsed samples. PMID:20297833

  9. Whole-cell fungal transformation of precursors into dyes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemical methods of producing dyes involve extreme temperatures and unsafe toxic compounds. Application of oxidizing enzymes obtained from fungal species, for example laccase, is an alternative to chemical synthesis of dyes. Laccase can be replaced by fungal biomass acting as a whole-cell biocatalyst with properties comparable to the isolated form of the enzyme. The application of the whole-cell system simplifies the transformation process and reduces the time required for its completion. In the present work, four fungal strains with a well-known ability to produce laccase were tested for oxidation of 17 phenolic and non-phenolic precursors into stable and non-toxic dyes. Results An agar-plate screening test of the organic precursors was carried out using four fungal strains: Trametes versicolor, Fomes fomentarius, Abortiporus biennis, and Cerrena unicolor. Out of 17 precursors, nine were transformed into coloured substances in the presence of actively growing fungal mycelium. The immobilized fungal biomass catalyzed the transformation of 1 mM benzene and naphthalene derivatives in liquid cultures yielding stable and non-toxic products with good dyeing properties. The type of fungal strain had a large influence on the absorbance of the coloured products obtained after 48-hour transformation of the selected precursors, and the most effective was Fomes fomentarius (FF25). Whole-cell transformation of AHBS (3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid) into a phenoxazinone dye was carried out in four different systems: in aqueous media comprising low amounts of carbon and nitrogen source, in buffer, and in distilled water. Conclusions This study demonstrated the ability of four fungal strains belonging to the ecological type of white rot fungi to transform precursors into dyes. This paper highlights the potential of fungal biomass for replacing isolated enzymes as a cheaper industrial-grade biocatalyst for the synthesis of dyes and other commercially important

  10. [Adsorption of a dye by sludges and the roles of extracellular polymeric substances].

    PubMed

    Kong, Wang-sheng; Liu, Yan

    2007-12-01

    This paper investigated the adsorption of a dye, acid turquoise blue A, by four kinds of sludges including activated sludge, anaerobic sludge, dried activated sludge, and dried anaerobic sludge, respectively. The roles of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) including the soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) for the biosorption of activated sludge and anaerobic sludge were further studied. Results show that the relation between four kinds of sludge adsorption amount and remained concentration of the dye fitted well both Freundlich model (R2: 0.921-0.995) and Langmuir model (R2: 0.958-0.993), but not quite fitted BET model (R2: 0.07-0.863). The adsorption capability of dried anaerobic sludge ranked the highest, and dried activated sludge was the lowest. According to Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption amount of dried anaerobic, anaerobic, activated, and dried activated sludge was 104 mg/g, 86 mg/g, 65 mg/g, 20 mg/g, respectively. The amount of the dye found in EPS for both activated sludge and anaerobic sludge were over 50%, illustrating that EPS adsorption was predominant in adsorption of the dye by sludge. The amount of adsorbed dye by BEPS was greater than that by SEPS for anaerobic sludge, but for activated sludge the result was quite opposite. The amount of adsorbed dye by unit mass SEPS was much higher than the corresponding values of BEPS for both sludges. The average amount of adsorbed dye by unit mass SEPS was 52 times of the corresponding value of BEPS for activated sludge, and 10 times for anaerobic sludge. The relation between adsorption amount of dye by BEPS from anaerobic sludge and remained concentration of the dye in mixed liquor was best fitted to Langmuir model (R2: 0.9986).

  11. Enhanced Conductivity and Electrochemical Performance of Electrode Material Based on Multifunctional Dye Doped Polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Zang, Limin; Qiu, Jianhui; Yang, Chao; Sakai, Eiichi

    2016-03-01

    Polypyrrole were prepared via in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization in the presence of multisulfonate acid dye (acid violet 19). In this work, acid violet 19 could play the role as dopant, surfactant and physical cross-linker for pyrrole polymerization, and had impact on the morphology, dispersion stability, thermal stability, electrical conductivity and electrochemical behavior of the samples. The thermal stability of the dye doped polypyrrole was enhanced than pure polypyrrole due to the strong interactions between polypyrrole and acid violet 19. The dispersion stability of the samples in water was also improved by incorporating an appropriate amount of acid violet 19. The sample with 20% of acid violet 19 showed granular morphology with the smallest diameter of -50 nm and possessed the maximum electrical conductivity of 39.09 S/cm. The as-prepared multifunctional dye doped polypyrrole samples were used to fabricate electrodes and exhibited a mass specific capacitance of 379-206 F/g in the current density range of 0.2-1.0 A/g. The results indicated that the multifunctional dye could improve the performances of polypyrrole as electrode material for supercapacitors. PMID:27455670

  12. [Benzidine dyes and risk of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, M; Yoshida, O

    1989-12-01

    Until the early 1970's there was little concern about dyes which contain benzidine as an integral part of their chemical structure. Furthermore, use of the finished dyes was not considered dangerous. To ascertain whether azo dyes are associated with risk of development of bladder tumors in workers who handpaint Yuzen-type silk kimonos in Kyoto, we investigated the disintegration of dyes to benzidine. In these studies, we found that in rats and mice benzidine-based dyes are metabolized to benzidine and that the azo linkage of benzidine dyes is reduced by Escherichia coli and soil bacteria. These experimental findings were reported previously. In this report, we outline an approach to these studies. Many of the dyes used to color paper, textiles, lipstick, bait used by fishermen, as well as hair dyes, and dyes used in research, for pharmaceutical products, and by defence personnel for the detection of liquid chemical warfare agents, have been shown to be potentially mutagenic or carcinogenic. We review the literature on these dyes. PMID:2618904

  13. [Benzidine dyes and risk of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, M; Yoshida, O

    1989-12-01

    Until the early 1970's there was little concern about dyes which contain benzidine as an integral part of their chemical structure. Furthermore, use of the finished dyes was not considered dangerous. To ascertain whether azo dyes are associated with risk of development of bladder tumors in workers who handpaint Yuzen-type silk kimonos in Kyoto, we investigated the disintegration of dyes to benzidine. In these studies, we found that in rats and mice benzidine-based dyes are metabolized to benzidine and that the azo linkage of benzidine dyes is reduced by Escherichia coli and soil bacteria. These experimental findings were reported previously. In this report, we outline an approach to these studies. Many of the dyes used to color paper, textiles, lipstick, bait used by fishermen, as well as hair dyes, and dyes used in research, for pharmaceutical products, and by defence personnel for the detection of liquid chemical warfare agents, have been shown to be potentially mutagenic or carcinogenic. We review the literature on these dyes.

  14. DFT and TD-DFT study on geometries, electronic structures and electronic absorption of some metal free dye sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, T.; Aroulmoji, V.; Ravindran, R. Samson; Müller, M.; Ranjitha, S.; Rajarajan, G.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (henna1), 3-(5-((1E)-2-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-dioxonaphthalen-3-yloxy) vinyl) thiophen-2-yl)-2-isocyanoacrylic acid (henna2) and anthocyanin dye sensitizers were studied based on density functional theory (DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP. The Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by using a hybrid method which combines the properties and dynamics of many-body in the presence of time-dependent (TD) potentials, i.e. TDSCF-DFT (B3LYP). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the visible and near-UV regions were plotted and assigned based on TD-DFT calculations. Due to the absorption, bands of the metal-organic compound are n → π* present. The calculated results suggest that the three lowest energy excited states of the investigated dye sensitizers are due to photoinduced electron transfer processes. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer is owing to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The role of linking the henna1 dye with a carboxylic acid via a thiophene bridge was analyzed. The results are that using a stronger π-conjugate bridge as well as a strong donator and acceptor group enhances the efficiency.

  15. Adsorption of organic dyes on TiO2 surfaces in dye-sensitized solar cells: interplay of theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Chiara; Mosconi, Edoardo; Pastore, Mariachiara; Ronca, Enrico; De Angelis, Filippo

    2012-12-14

    First-principles computer simulations can contribute to a deeper understanding of the dye/semiconductor interface lying at the heart of Dye-sensitized Solar Cells (DSCs). Here, we present the results of simulation of dye adsorption onto TiO(2) surfaces, and of their implications for the functioning of the corresponding solar cells. We propose an integrated strategy which combines FT-IR measurements with DFT calculations to individuate the energetically favorable TiO(2) adsorption mode of acetic acid, as a meaningful model for realistic organic dyes. Although we found a sizable variability in the relative stability of the considered adsorption modes with the model system and the method, a bridged bidentate structure was found to closely match the FT-IR frequency pattern, also being calculated as the most stable adsorption mode by calculations in solution. This adsorption mode was found to be the most stable binding also for realistic organic dyes bearing cyanoacrylic anchoring groups, while for a rhodanine-3-acetic acid anchoring group, an undissociated monodentate adsorption mode was found to be of comparable stability. The structural differences induced by the different anchoring groups were related to the different electron injection/recombination with oxidized dye properties which were experimentally assessed for the two classes of dyes. A stronger coupling and a possibly faster electron injection were also calculated for the bridged bidentate mode. We then investigated the adsorption mode and I(2) binding of prototype organic dyes. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and geometry optimizations were performed for two coumarin dyes differing by the length of the π-bridge separating the donor and acceptor moieties. We related the decreasing distance of the carbonylic oxygen from the titania to an increased I(2) concentration in proximity of the oxide surface, which might account for the different observed photovoltaic performances. The interplay between theory

  16. Optical humidity and ammonia gas sensors using Reichardt's dye-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Sadaoka, Y; Sakai, Y; Murata, Y U

    1992-12-01

    Optical intensity reflected at 750 nm by Reichardt's betain dye-polymer (PMMA or PEO) composite increased with an increase in humidity and was not affected by ammonia vapor. For the composites treated with hydrochloric acid, the intensity at around 590 nm decreased with an increase in ammonia concentration, and the sensitivity was enhanced by the presence of water vapor. The treatment with hydrochloric acid induced the formation of phenolic group, O(-)H(+) and N(+)Cl(-) in the dye. The sorption of NH(3) decreases the ionic interactions. PMID:18965589

  17. Batchwise dyeing of bamboo cellulose fabric with reactive dye using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Larik, Safdar Ali; Khatri, Awais; Ali, Shamshad; Kim, Seong Hun

    2015-05-01

    Bamboo is a regenerated cellulose fiber usually dyed with reactive dyes. This paper presents results of the batchwise dyeing of bamboo fabric with reactive dyes by ultrasonic (US) and conventional (CN) dyeing methods. The study was focused at comparing the two methods for dyeing results, chemicals, temperature and time, and effluent quality. Two widely used dyes, CI Reactive Black 5 (bis-sulphatoethylsulphone) and CI Reactive Red 147 (difluorochloropyrimidine) were used in the study. The US dyeing method produced around 5-6% higher color yield (K/S) in comparison to the CN dyeing method. A significant savings in terms of fixation temperature (10°C) and time (15 min), and amounts of salt (10 g/L) and alkali (0.5-1% on mass of fiber) was realized. Moreover, the dyeing effluent showed considerable reductions in the total dissolved solids content (minimum around 29%) and in the chemical oxygen demand (minimum around 13%) for the US dyebath in comparison to the CN dyebath. The analysis of colorfastness tests demonstrated similar results by US and CN dyeing methods. A microscopic examination on the field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the US energy did not alter the surface morphology of the bamboo fibers. It was concluded that the US dyeing of bamboo fabric produces better dyeing results and is a more economical and environmentally sustainable method as compared to CN dyeing method. PMID:25575805

  18. Batchwise dyeing of bamboo cellulose fabric with reactive dye using ultrasonic energy.

    PubMed

    Larik, Safdar Ali; Khatri, Awais; Ali, Shamshad; Kim, Seong Hun

    2015-05-01

    Bamboo is a regenerated cellulose fiber usually dyed with reactive dyes. This paper presents results of the batchwise dyeing of bamboo fabric with reactive dyes by ultrasonic (US) and conventional (CN) dyeing methods. The study was focused at comparing the two methods for dyeing results, chemicals, temperature and time, and effluent quality. Two widely used dyes, CI Reactive Black 5 (bis-sulphatoethylsulphone) and CI Reactive Red 147 (difluorochloropyrimidine) were used in the study. The US dyeing method produced around 5-6% higher color yield (K/S) in comparison to the CN dyeing method. A significant savings in terms of fixation temperature (10°C) and time (15 min), and amounts of salt (10 g/L) and alkali (0.5-1% on mass of fiber) was realized. Moreover, the dyeing effluent showed considerable reductions in the total dissolved solids content (minimum around 29%) and in the chemical oxygen demand (minimum around 13%) for the US dyebath in comparison to the CN dyebath. The analysis of colorfastness tests demonstrated similar results by US and CN dyeing methods. A microscopic examination on the field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that the US energy did not alter the surface morphology of the bamboo fibers. It was concluded that the US dyeing of bamboo fabric produces better dyeing results and is a more economical and environmentally sustainable method as compared to CN dyeing method.

  19. In defence of 'dye therapy'.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, healthcare is facing enormous problems with the continuing rise of drug-resistant infectious diseases. In view of the scarcity of new antimicrobial agents and the withdrawal of many pharmaceutical houses from the fray, alternative approaches are required. One of these is photoantimicrobial chemotherapy, which is highly effective across the range of microbial pathogens and does not suffer from resistance. However, there is a lack of uptake of this approach by healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry alike. It is seldom recalled that, unlike anticancer photodynamic therapy, the development of photoantimicrobial agents has evolved from the antiseptic 'dye therapy' in common use until the widespread introduction of the penicillin class in the mid-1940s. Cationic biological dyes such as methylene blue, crystal violet and acriflavine were effective in local wound therapy and today provide a sound basis for light-activated antimicrobial therapeutics. It is proposed that such 'safe' dyes are introduced as locally administered photoantimicrobials, especially in order to conserve valuable conventional antibacterial drugs. PMID:24795083

  20. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.; Hohman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Injection locking was applied to a cavity-dumped coaxial flashlamp pumped dye laser in an effort to obtain nanosecond duration pulses which have both high energy and narrow-linewidth. In the absence of an injected laser pulse, the cavity-dumped dye laser was capable of generating high energy (approx. 60mJ) nanosecond duration output pulses. These pulses, however, had a fixed center wavelength and were extremely broadband (approx. 6nm FWHM). Experimental investigations were performed to determine if the spectral properties of these outputs could be improved through the use of injection-locking techniques. A parametric study to determine the specific conditions under which the laser could be injection-locked was also carried out. Significant linewidth reduction to 0.0015nm) of the outputs was obtained through injection-locking but only at wavelengths near the peak lasing wavelength of the dye. It was found, however; that by inserting weakly dispersive tuning elements in the laser cavity, these narrow-linewidth outputs could be obtained over a wide (24nm) tuning range. Since the tuning elements had low insertion losses, the tunability of the output was obtained without sacrificing output pulse energy.

  1. In defence of 'dye therapy'.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Worldwide, healthcare is facing enormous problems with the continuing rise of drug-resistant infectious diseases. In view of the scarcity of new antimicrobial agents and the withdrawal of many pharmaceutical houses from the fray, alternative approaches are required. One of these is photoantimicrobial chemotherapy, which is highly effective across the range of microbial pathogens and does not suffer from resistance. However, there is a lack of uptake of this approach by healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry alike. It is seldom recalled that, unlike anticancer photodynamic therapy, the development of photoantimicrobial agents has evolved from the antiseptic 'dye therapy' in common use until the widespread introduction of the penicillin class in the mid-1940s. Cationic biological dyes such as methylene blue, crystal violet and acriflavine were effective in local wound therapy and today provide a sound basis for light-activated antimicrobial therapeutics. It is proposed that such 'safe' dyes are introduced as locally administered photoantimicrobials, especially in order to conserve valuable conventional antibacterial drugs.

  2. Enhancement of solar light photocatalytic activity of TiO2-CeO2 composite by Er3+:Y3Al5O12 in organic dye degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Li, S. G.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Ma, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Er3+:Y3Al5O12, as an upconversion luminescence agent which is able to transform the visible part of the solar light to ultraviolet light, was prepared by nitrate-citrate sol-gel method. A novel solar light photocatalyst, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite was synthesized using ultrasonic treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning election microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structural morphology of the Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite. In order to evaluate the solar light photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite, the Azo Fuchsine dye was used as a model organic pollutant. The progress of the degradation reaction was monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy and ion chromatography. The key influences on the solar light photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 were studied, such as Ti/Ce molar ratio, heat-treatment temperature and heat-treatment time. Otherwise, the effects of initial dye concentration, Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 amount, solar light irradiation time and the nature of the dye on the solar light photocatalytic degradation process were investigated. It was found that the solar light photocatalytic activity of Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2-CeO2 composite was superior to Er3+:Y3Al5O12/TiO2 and Er3+:Y3Al5O12/CeO2 powder in the similar conditions.

  3. Bilberry adulteration using the food dye amaranth.

    PubMed

    Penman, Kerry G; Halstead, Clynton W; Matthias, Anita; De Voss, James J; Stuthe, Julia M U; Bone, Kerry M; Lehmann, Reginald P

    2006-09-20

    Vaccinium myrtillus or bilberry fruit is a commonly used herbal product. The usual method of determining the anthocyanin content is a single-wavelength spectrophotometric assay. Using this method, anthocyanin levels of two extracts were found to be 25% as claimed by the manufacturers. When high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used, however, one extract was found to contain 9% anthocyanins probably not derived from V. myrtillus but from an adulterant. This adulterant was subsequently identified, using HPLC, mass spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance, as amaranth, that is, 3-hydroxy-4-[(4-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl)azo]-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid trisodium salt-a synthetic dark red sulfonic acid based naphthylazo dye. As described in this study, if deliberate adulteration occurs in an extract, a single-wavelength spectrophotometric assay is inadequate to accurately determine the levels of compounds such as anthocyanins. Detection of deliberate adulteration in commercial samples thus requires the use of alternative, more sophisticated, methods of analysis such as HPLC with photodiode array detection as a minimum.

  4. Synthetic dye decolourization by white rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, K; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2003-09-01

    Synthetic dyes are integral part of many industrial products. The effluents generated from textile dyeing units create major environmental problems and issues both in public and textile units. Industrial wastewater treatment is one of the major problems in the present scenario. Though, the physical and chemical methods offer some solutions to the problems, it is not affordable by the unit operators. Biological degradation is recognized as the most effective method for degrading the dye present in the waste. Research over a period of two decades had provided insight into the various aspects of biological degradation of dyes. It is observed that the white rot fungi have a non-specific enzyme system, which oxidizes the recalcitrant dyes. Detailed and extensive studies have been made and process developed for treatment of dye containing wastewaters by white rot fungi and their enzyme systems. An attempt is made to summarize the detailed research contributions on these lines.

  5. Photochemical and lasing properties of pyrromethene dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Guilford, II; Klueva, Oksana; Kumar, Satish; Pacheco, Dennis P.

    2001-04-01

    Pyrromethene dyes, particularly PM 567, have been studied in liquid media using various spectroscopic techniques. Photodecomposition of dyes was monitored by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. In laser flash photolysis experiments on dyes in liquids, phototransients were observed (microsecond time domain) that included dye triplets and at least one other transient of the radical or radical-ion type. Experiments included product studies that allowed identification of major products of photodegradation; an assessment of the effectiveness of known stabilizing additives such as DABCO and butazate was also conducted. Purposes of the work included definition of the roles of energy and electron transfer mechanisms in dye photodegradation and the effects of oxygen or additives in dye media.

  6. Suppression and enhancement of dye lasing and stimulated Raman scattering from various dye-doped liquid spheres.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, H; Tomisawa, H

    1994-09-15

    The observation of suppression or enhancement of dye lasing and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from various dye-doped liquid droplets, in which SRS from the initial pumping wavelength appeared in shorter and longer wavelengths of various dye fluorescence regions, is reported; SRS from the dye-lasing wavelengths (double resonances) and stimulated resonance Raman scattering of dyes are included. Furthermore, the contribution to SRS of the dye fluorescence (depending on dye concentration and different dyes) and dye-lasing suppression that is due to stimulated resonance Raman scattering is also described. PMID:19855533

  7. β-Cyclodextrin as a photosensitizer carrier: effect on photophysical properties and chemical reactivity of squaraine dyes.

    PubMed

    Arun, Kalliat T; Jayaram, Dhanya T; Avirah, Rekha R; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2011-06-01

    With the objective of understanding the utility of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as a carrier system, we have investigated its interactions with a few near-infrared absorbing squaraine dyes (i.e., 1a,b and 2a,b) through absorption and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The addition of β-CD to the phloroglucinol dyes 1a,b resulted in a significant bathochromic shift in absorption, together with a ca. 1.5-2.5-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity, whereas for the aniline-based dyes 2a,b, a hypsochromic shift in the absorption and a ca. 5-12-fold fluorescence enhancement were observed in a 10% (v/v) ethanol/water mixture. Benesi-Hildebrand analysis showed that both the dyes 1a,b and 2a,b form 2:1 stoichiometric complexes with β-CD. The complex formation was confirmed by competitive binding analysis employing adamantyl-1-carboxylic acid (ACA) and adamantyl-1-ammonium chloride (ADAC). The displacement of the dyes 1a,b and 2a,b from the [dye-β-CD] complex by ADAC and ACA unambiguously establishes the encapsulation of these dyes in the hydrophobic nanocavity of β-CD. Uniquely, the formation of the inclusion complexes with β-CD provides unusual protection from nucleophilic attack by aminothiols such as cysteine and glutathione for dyes 1a,b, whereas negligible protection was observed for dyes 2a,b. These results demonstrate the substituent-dependent encapsulation of potentially useful squaraine dyes in β-CD, thereby indicating its potential as a carrier system for the squaraine dyes 1a,b useful in photodynamic therapy.

  8. Targeting tumor hypoxia: a third generation 2-nitroimidazole-indocyanine dye-conjugate with improved fluorescent yield.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feifei; Zanganeh, Saeid; Mohammad, Innus; Dietz, Christopher; Abuteen, Akram; Smith, Michael B; Zhu, Quing

    2015-12-14

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with the rapid proliferation and growth of malignant tumors, and the ability to detect tumor hypoxia is important for predicting tumor response to anti-cancer treatments. We have developed a class of dye-conjugates that are related to indocyanine green (ICG, ) to target tumor hypoxia, based on in vivo infrared fluorescence imaging using nitroimidazole moieties linked to indocyanine fluorescent dyes. We previously reported that linking 2-nitroimidazole to an indocyanine dicarboxylic acid dye derivative () using an ethanolamine linker (ethanolamine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG, ), led to a dye-conjugate that gave promising results for targeting cancer hypoxia in vivo. Structural modification of the dye conjugate replaced the ethanolamine unit with a piperazineacetyl unit and led a second generation dye conjugate, piperzine-2-nitroimidazole-ICG (). This second generation dye-conjugate showed improved targeting of tumor hypoxia when compared with . Based on the hypothesis that molecules with more planar and rigid structures have a higher fluorescence yield, as they could release less absorbed energy through molecular vibration or collision, we have developed a new 2-nitroimidazole ICG conjugate, , with two carbon atoms less in the polyene linker. Dye-conjugate was prepared from our new dye (), and coupled to 2-nitroimidazole using a piperazine linker to produce this third-generation dye-conjugate. Spectral measurements showed that the absorption/emission wavelengths of 657/670 were shifted ∼100 nm from the second-generation hypoxia dye of 755/780 nm. Its fluorescence quantum yield was measured to be 0.467, which is about 5 times higher than that of (0.083). In vivo experiments were conducted with balb/c mice and showed more than twice the average in vivo fluorescence intensity in the tumor beyond two hours post retro-orbital injection as compared with . These initial results suggest that may significantly improve in vivo tumor hypoxia targeting.

  9. The physics of dye laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. C.

    This paper describes a method for the complete analysis of the optical properties of a laser dye. The analysis uses direct measurements of the saturation intensities for absorption and emission. The complete analysis of an ultraviolet laser dye, 3,5,3,5-Tetra-t-butyl-p-sexiphenyl, demonstrates the power of the saturation analysis method. The dye TBS exhibits some unique optical properties which affect its emission wavelength range and photochemistry.

  10. Grating cavity dual wavelength dye laser.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Nava, Oscar Javier; Rodríguez-Montero, Ponciano; Iturbe-Castillo, M David; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2011-02-14

    We report simultaneous dual wavelength dye laser emission using Littman-Metcalf and Littrow cavity configurations with minimum cavity elements. Dual wavelength operation is obtained by laser operation in two optical paths inside the cavity, one of which uses reflection in the circulating dye cell. Styryl 14 laser dye operating in the 910 nm to 960 nm was used in a 15%:85% PC/EG solvent green pumped with a Q-switched doubled Nd3+:YAG laser. PMID:21369171

  11. Phytoremediation of textile dyes and effluents: Current scenario and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Khandare, Rahul V; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation has emerged as a green, passive, solar energy driven and cost effective approach for environmental cleanup when compared to physico-chemical and even other biological methods. Textile dyes and effluents are condemned as one of the worst polluters of our precious water bodies and soils. They are well known mutagenic, carcinogenic, allergic and cytotoxic agents posing threats to all life forms. Plant based treatment of textile dyes is relatively new and hitherto has remained an unexplored area of research. Use of macrophytes like Phragmites australis and Rheum rhabarbarum have shown efficient removal of Acid Orange 7 and sulfonated anthraquinones, respectively. Common garden and ornamental plants namely Aster amellus, Portulaca grandiflora, Zinnia angustifolia, Petunia grandiflora, Glandularia pulchella, many ferns and aquatic plants have also been advocated for their dye degradation potential. Plant tissue cultures like suspension cells of Blumea malcolmii and Nopalea cochenillifera, hairy roots of Brassica juncea and Tagetes patula and whole plants of several other species have confirmed their role in dye degradation. Plants' oxidoreductases such as lignin peroxidase, laccase, tyrosinase, azo reductase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, riboflavin reductase and dichlorophenolindophenol reductase are known as key biodegrading enzymes which break the complex structures of dyes. Schematic metabolic pathways of degradation of different dyes and their environmental fates have also been proposed. Degradation products of dyes and their fates of metabolism have been reported to be validated by UV-vis spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, high performance thin layer chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, gas chromatograph-mass spectroscopy and several other analytical tools. Constructed wetlands and various pilots scale reactors were developed independently using the plants of P. australis, Portulaca grandiflora, G. pulchella

  12. Phytoremediation of textile dyes and effluents: Current scenario and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Khandare, Rahul V; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation has emerged as a green, passive, solar energy driven and cost effective approach for environmental cleanup when compared to physico-chemical and even other biological methods. Textile dyes and effluents are condemned as one of the worst polluters of our precious water bodies and soils. They are well known mutagenic, carcinogenic, allergic and cytotoxic agents posing threats to all life forms. Plant based treatment of textile dyes is relatively new and hitherto has remained an unexplored area of research. Use of macrophytes like Phragmites australis and Rheum rhabarbarum have shown efficient removal of Acid Orange 7 and sulfonated anthraquinones, respectively. Common garden and ornamental plants namely Aster amellus, Portulaca grandiflora, Zinnia angustifolia, Petunia grandiflora, Glandularia pulchella, many ferns and aquatic plants have also been advocated for their dye degradation potential. Plant tissue cultures like suspension cells of Blumea malcolmii and Nopalea cochenillifera, hairy roots of Brassica juncea and Tagetes patula and whole plants of several other species have confirmed their role in dye degradation. Plants' oxidoreductases such as lignin peroxidase, laccase, tyrosinase, azo reductase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, riboflavin reductase and dichlorophenolindophenol reductase are known as key biodegrading enzymes which break the complex structures of dyes. Schematic metabolic pathways of degradation of different dyes and their environmental fates have also been proposed. Degradation products of dyes and their fates of metabolism have been reported to be validated by UV-vis spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, high performance thin layer chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, gas chromatograph-mass spectroscopy and several other analytical tools. Constructed wetlands and various pilots scale reactors were developed independently using the plants of P. australis, Portulaca grandiflora, G. pulchella

  13. Laccase‐catalysed polymeric dye synthesis from plant‐derived phenols for potential application in hair dyeing: Enzymatic colourations driven by homo‐ or hetero‐polymer synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jong‐Rok; Kim, Eun‐Ju; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Park, Hyo‐Keun; Kim, Young‐Mo; Kwon, Jung‐Hee; Kim, Wang‐Gi; Lee, Ji‐Yeon; Chang, Yoon‐Seok

    2010-01-01

    Summary Laccase efficiently catalyses polymerization of phenolic compounds. However, knowledge on applications of polymers synthesized in this manner remains scarce. Here, the potential of laccase‐catalysed polymerization of natural phenols to form products useful in hair dyeing was investigated. All 15 tested phenols yielded coloured products after laccase treatment and colour diversity was attained by using mixtures of two phenolic monomers. After exploring colour differentiation pattern of 120 different reactions with statistical regression analysis, three monomer combinations, namely gallic acid and syringic acid, catechin and catechol, and ferulic acid and syringic acid, giving rise to brown, black, and red materials, respectively, were further characterized because such colours are commercially important for grey hair dyeing. Selected polymers could strongly absorb visible light and their hydrodynamic sizes ranged from 100 to 400 nm. Analyses of enzyme kinetic constants, liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization‐mass spectrometry (ESI‐MS) coupled with collision‐induced dissociation MS/MS indicate that both monomers in reactions involving catechin and catechol, and ferulic acid and syringic acid, are coloured by heteropolymer synthesis, but the gallic acid/syringic acid combination is based on homopolymer mixture formation. Comparison of colour parameters from these three reactions with those of corresponding artificial homopolymer mixtures also supported the idea that laccase may catalyse either hetero‐ or homo‐polymer synthesis. We finally used selected materials to dye grey hair. Each material coloured hair appropriately and the dyeing showed excellent resistance to conventional shampooing. Our study indicates that laccase‐catalysed polymerization of natural phenols is applicable to the development of new cosmetic pigments. PMID:21255331

  14. Laccase-catalysed polymeric dye synthesis from plant-derived phenols for potential application in hair dyeing: Enzymatic colourations driven by homo- or hetero-polymer synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Kim, Eun-Ju; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Park, Hyo-Keun; Kim, Young-Mo; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Wang-Gi; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2010-05-01

    Laccase efficiently catalyses polymerization of phenolic compounds. However, knowledge on applications of polymers synthesized in this manner remains scarce. Here, the potential of laccase-catalysed polymerization of natural phenols to form products useful in hair dyeing was investigated. All 15 tested phenols yielded coloured products after laccase treatment and colour diversity was attained by using mixtures of two phenolic monomers. After exploring colour differentiation pattern of 120 different reactions with statistical regression analysis, three monomer combinations, namely gallic acid and syringic acid, catechin and catechol, and ferulic acid and syringic acid, giving rise to brown, black, and red materials, respectively, were further characterized because such colours are commercially important for grey hair dyeing. Selected polymers could strongly absorb visible light and their hydrodynamic sizes ranged from 100 to 400 nm. Analyses of enzyme kinetic constants, liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) coupled with collision-induced dissociation MS/MS indicate that both monomers in reactions involving catechin and catechol, and ferulic acid and syringic acid, are coloured by heteropolymer synthesis, but the gallic acid/syringic acid combination is based on homopolymer mixture formation. Comparison of colour parameters from these three reactions with those of corresponding artificial homopolymer mixtures also supported the idea that laccase may catalyse either hetero- or homo-polymer synthesis. We finally used selected materials to dye grey hair. Each material coloured hair appropriately and the dyeing showed excellent resistance to conventional shampooing. Our study indicates that laccase-catalysed polymerization of natural phenols is applicable to the development of new cosmetic pigments.

  15. The microbial degradation of azo dyes: minireview.

    PubMed

    Chengalroyen, M D; Dabbs, E R

    2013-03-01

    The removal of dyes in wastewater treatment plants still involves physical or chemical processes. Yet numerous studies currently exist on degradation based on the use of microbes-which is a well-studied field. However progress in the use of biological methods to deal with this environmentally noxious waste is currently lacking. This review focuses on the largest dye class, that is azo dyes and their biodegradation. We summarize the bacteria identified thus far which have been implicated in dye decolorization and discuss the enzymes involved and mechanisms by which these colorants are broken down.

  16. Solvent-free fluidic organic dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Young; Mager, Loic; Cham, Tran Thi; Dorkenoo, Kokou D; Fort, Alain; Wu, Jeong Weon; Barsella, Alberto; Ribierre, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-01

    We report on the demonstration of liquid organic dye lasers based on 9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz), so-called liquid carbazole, doped with green- and red-emitting laser dyes. Both waveguide and Fabry-Perot type microcavity fluidic organic dye lasers were prepared by capillary action under solvent-free conditions. Cascade Förster-type energy transfer processes from liquid carbazole to laser dyes were employed to achieve color-variable amplified spontaneous emission and lasing. Overall, this study provides the first step towards the development of solvent-free fluidic organic semiconducting lasers and demonstrates a new kind of optoelectronic applications for liquid organic semiconductors.

  17. Theoretica Study of Asymmetric Double D-π-A Organic Sensitizers for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dong Yuel; Lee, Gun Hyung; Kim, Young Sik

    2015-03-01

    Three novel dye sensitizers that were based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains with phenoxazine (POZ) and diphenylamine (DPA) as electron donors and cyanoacetic acid (CA) and 2-(1,1- dicyanomethylene) rhodanine (RD) as electron acceptors (DCPR, DRPC, DRPR) were designed, theoretically investigated, and compared with the reference dye based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains (DCPC). Using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we gained insight into the factors responsible for the photovoltaic properties of the dye sensitizers. Due to the different HOMO levels of each donor and the different LUMO levels of each acceptor, the absorption spectrum of each dye showed different shapes. Among the dyes, DRPR showed a broader and more bathochromically shifted absorption band than the other dies. It also showed a higher molar extinction coefficient than that of the reference dye (DCPC). This work suggests optimizing the chain of electron donors and acceptors in dye sensitizers based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains would produce good photovoltaic properties for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  18. Simultaneous removal of cationic and anionic dyes by the mixed sorbent of magnetic and non-magnetic modified sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-xia; Zhu, Jing; Feng, Li-yuan; Chi, Ru-an

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic carboxyl groups modified (MMS) and non-magnetic amine groups modified (AMS) sugarcane bagasse were prepared and mixed to remove cationic and anionic dye simultaneously from aqueous solution. For comparison, the adsorption performances of MMS, AMS and the mixed sorbent for basic magenta (cationic dye) and congo red (anionic dye) were investigated in the binary system. Zeta potential analysis showed that MMS was negatively charged and AMS was positively charged in the investigated pH range. The adsorption capacities of MMS for basic magenta and congo red were 1.24 and 0.04mmolg(-1), while those of AMS were 0.04 and 1.55mmolg(-1), respectively. Both of MMS and AMS had high adsorption capacity and affinity toward opposite-charged dye but low adsorption capacity and affinity toward similar-charged dye. Adsorption experiments in the binary system showed that only the mixed sorbent could remove the two dyes simultaneously from aqueous solution (removal efficiencies >90%). The amounts of basic magenta and congo red absorbed on the mixed sorbent both increased linearly with the increase of their initial concentrations in the investigated range. The dye loaded mixed magnetic and non-magnetic sorbents could be separated by a magnet. MMS and AMS could be regenerated by using acid and alkaline eluents, respectively. After regeneration, the MMS and AMS could be mixed again and used repeatedly. The mixed sorbent had great potential in practical dye waste water treatment.

  19. Simultaneous removal of cationic and anionic dyes by the mixed sorbent of magnetic and non-magnetic modified sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-xia; Zhu, Jing; Feng, Li-yuan; Chi, Ru-an

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic carboxyl groups modified (MMS) and non-magnetic amine groups modified (AMS) sugarcane bagasse were prepared and mixed to remove cationic and anionic dye simultaneously from aqueous solution. For comparison, the adsorption performances of MMS, AMS and the mixed sorbent for basic magenta (cationic dye) and congo red (anionic dye) were investigated in the binary system. Zeta potential analysis showed that MMS was negatively charged and AMS was positively charged in the investigated pH range. The adsorption capacities of MMS for basic magenta and congo red were 1.24 and 0.04mmolg(-1), while those of AMS were 0.04 and 1.55mmolg(-1), respectively. Both of MMS and AMS had high adsorption capacity and affinity toward opposite-charged dye but low adsorption capacity and affinity toward similar-charged dye. Adsorption experiments in the binary system showed that only the mixed sorbent could remove the two dyes simultaneously from aqueous solution (removal efficiencies >90%). The amounts of basic magenta and congo red absorbed on the mixed sorbent both increased linearly with the increase of their initial concentrations in the investigated range. The dye loaded mixed magnetic and non-magnetic sorbents could be separated by a magnet. MMS and AMS could be regenerated by using acid and alkaline eluents, respectively. After regeneration, the MMS and AMS could be mixed again and used repeatedly. The mixed sorbent had great potential in practical dye waste water treatment. PMID:25897851

  20. On the early development of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kloo, Lars

    2013-07-28

    This viewpoint describes the background of the development of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, the impact of the 2006 ChemComm paper by Sun, Hagfeldt and co-workers regarding the D5 D-π-A-family of dyes, some recent developments and possible future challenges to meet.