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Sample records for acid gaba glutamate

  1. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways. PMID:26620318

  2. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  3. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  4. Lesions of nucleus accumbens affect morphine-induced release of ascorbic acid and GABA but not of glutamate in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ji Y; Yang, Jing Y; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian Y; Song, Wu; Su, Guang Y; Dong, Ying X; Wu, Chun F

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that local perfusion of morphine causes an increase of extracellular ascorbic acid (AA) levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of freely moving rats. Lines of evidence showed that glutamatergic and GABAergic were associated with morphine-induced effects on the neurotransmission of the brain, especially on the release of AA. In the present study, the effects of morphine on the release of extracellular AA, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) in the NAc following bilateral NAc lesions induced by kainic acid (KA) were studied by using the microdialysis technique, coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) and fluorescent detection (HPLC-FD). The results showed that local perfusion of morphine (100 µM, 1 mM) in NAc dose-dependently increased AA and GABA release, while attenuated Glu release in the NAc. Naloxone (0.4 mM) pretreated by local perfusion to the NAc, significantly blocked the effects of morphine. After NAc lesion by KA (1 µg), morphine-induced increase in AA and GABA were markedly eliminated, while decrease in Glu was not affected. The loss effect of morphine on AA and GABA release after KA lesion could be recovered by GABA agonist, musimol. These results indicate that morphine-induced AA release may be mediated at least by µ-opioid receptor. Moreover, this effect of morphine possibly depend less on the glutamatergic afferents, but more on the GABAergic circuits within this nucleus. Finally, AA release induced by local perfusion of morphine may be GABA-receptor mediated and synaptically localized in the NAc. PMID:20731632

  5. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. PMID:26033549

  6. In vivo measurements of glutamate, GABA, and NAAG in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Laura M; Kontson, Kimberly; West, Jeffrey; Edden, Richard A; Zhu, He; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H; Barker, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    The major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide that modulates the Glu system, may also be altered in schizophrenia. This study investigated GABA, Glu + glutamine (Glx), and NAAG levels in younger and older subjects with schizophrenia. Forty-one subjects, 21 with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls, participated in this study. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to measure GABA, Glx, and NAAG levels in the anterior cingulate (AC) and centrum semiovale (CSO) regions. NAAG in the CSO was higher in younger schizophrenia subjects compared with younger control subjects. The opposite pattern was observed in the older groups. Glx was reduced in the schizophrenia group irrespective of age group and brain region. There was a trend for reduced AC GABA in older schizophrenia subjects compared with older control subjects. Poor attention performance was correlated to lower AC GABA levels in both groups. Higher levels of CSO NAAG were associated with greater negative symptom severity in schizophrenia. These results provide support for altered glutamatergic and GABAergic function associated with illness course and cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The study also highlights the importance of studies that combine MRS measurements of NAAG, GABA, and Glu for a more comprehensive neurochemical characterization of schizophrenia. PMID:23081992

  7. Pharmacological modulation of brain levels of glutamate and GABA in rats exposed to total sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sahar Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate by selected antidepressants and anticonvulsants could play a beneficial role in total sleep deprivation (TSD) caused by depressed mood. In the present study, albino rats were exposed to TSD for five days. On the sixth day, the brains were removed, and GABA and glutamate levels were measured in the prefrontal cortex and thalamus to identify TSD-induced changes in untreated rats and in rats treated with carbamazepine 40 mg/kg intraperitoneally (IP), fluoxetine 20 mg/kg IP, or desipramine 10 mg/kg IP. Carbamazepine and fluoxetine significantly increased GABA and reduced glutamate levels in both brain areas. Desipramine administration did not affect GABA or glutamate concentrations in the tested brain areas; levels were comparable with those induced by TSD without treatment. These results suggest that administration of carbamazepine or fluoxetine could have a beneficial effect by increasing GABA levels during TSD.

  8. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  9. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  10. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  11. Effects of prenatal exposure to 2,4-D/2,4,5-T mixture on postnatal changes in rat brain glutamate, GABA protein, and nucleic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, F.K.; Omer, V.E.V.

    1988-02-01

    The opportunity of maternal exposure to various chemicals in the work place and the general environments have increased, and the fetus and neonate may be at greater risk than the adult. However, the embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of the chlorinated phenoxy herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), the main chemicals in Agent Orange, are well documented only in laboratory animals. The brain of the developing fetus is vulnerable to the toxic effects of the phenoxy herbicides which readily cross the placental barrier and distribute into fetal tissues, including brain. Although the neurochemical basis for the behavioral teratogenicity of the phenoxy herbicides is not know, it was recently reported that non-teratogenic doses of a 1:1 mixture of 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T delayed the ontogeny of dopamine and serotonin in the brain of the developing rate. This communication provides further descriptive information about the ontogeny of rat brain nucleic acid, protein, glutamate and ..gamma..-aminobutyrate (GABA) following in utero exposure to non-teratogenic levels of a 1:1 mixture of 2,4-D/2,4,5-T.

  12. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  13. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  14. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  15. The glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle: function, regional differences in glutamate and GABA production and effects of interference with GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-02-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide information about glutamine transfer. The present review will give information about glutamine trafficking and the tools used to map it as exemplified by discussions of published work employing brain cell cultures as well as intact animals. It will be documented that considerably more glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to glutamatergic than to GABAergic neurons. However, glutamine does have an important role in GABAergic neurons despite their capability of re-utilizing their neurotransmitter by re-uptake. PMID:25380696

  16. Acute Modulation of Cortical Glutamate and GABA Content by Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Richard J; Casazza, Gretchen A; Fernandez, Dione H; Maddock, Michael I

    2016-02-24

    Converging evidence demonstrates that physical activity evokes a brain state characterized by distinctive changes in brain metabolism and cortical function. Human studies have shown that physical activity leads to a generalized increase in electroencephalography power across regions and frequencies, and a global increase in brain nonoxidative metabolism of carbohydrate substrates. This nonoxidative consumption of carbohydrate has been hypothesized to include increased de novo synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, especially glutamate and GABA. Here, we conducted a series of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in human volunteers before and after vigorous exercise (≥80% of predicted maximal heart rate). Results showed that the resonance signals of both glutamate and GABA increased significantly in the visual cortex following exercise. We further demonstrated a similar increase in glutamate following exercise in an executive region, the anterior cingulate cortex. The increase in glutamate was similar when using echo times of 30 and 144 ms, indicating that exercise-related T2 relaxation effects across this range of relaxation times did not account for the findings. In addition, we found preliminary evidence that more physical activity during the preceding week predicts higher resting glutamate levels. Overall, the results are consistent with an exercise-induced expansion of the cortical pools of glutamate and GABA, and add to a growing understanding of the distinctive brain state associated with physical activity. A more complete understanding of this brain state may reveal important insights into mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise in neuropsychiatric disorders, neurorehabilitation, aging, and cognition. PMID:26911692

  17. Presynaptic Na+-dependent transport and exocytose of GABA and glutamate in brain in hypergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Pozdnyakova, N.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and L-glutamate are the most widespread neurotransmitter amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system. GABA is now widely recognized as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. L-glutamate mediates the most of excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the brain. They involved in the main aspects of normal brain function. The nerve terminals (synaptosomes) offer several advantages as a model system for the study of general mechanisms of neurosecretion. Our data allowed to conclude that exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10G for 1 hour) had a profound effect on synaptic processes in brain. Comparative analysis of uptake and release of GABA and glutamate have demonstrated that hypergravity loading evokes oppositely directed alterations in inhibitory and excitatory signal transmission. We studied the maximal velocities of [^3H]GABA reuptake and revealed more than twofold enhancement of GABA transporter activity (Vmax rises from 1.4 |pm 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for animals exposed to hypergravity (P ≤ 0.05)). Recently we have also demonstrated the significant lowering of glutamate transporter activity (Vmax of glutamate reuptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein in the group of animals, exposed to the hypergravity stress (P ≤ 0.05)). Significant changes occurred in release of neurotransmitters induced by stimulating exocytosis with the agents, which depolarized nerve terminal plasma membrane. Depolarization-evoked Ca2+-stimulated release was more abundant for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11,74 ±1,2 % of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively (P≤0.05)) and was essentially less for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%) after exposure of animals to centrifuge induced artificial gravity. Changes observed in depolarization-evoked exocytotic release

  18. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich, Victor L. Jr.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  19. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  20. Proteolysis and bioconversion of cereal proteins to glutamate and γ-Aminobutyrate (GABA) in Rye malt sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Stromeck, Achim; Hu, Ying; Chen, Lingyun; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-02-23

    This study aimed to achieve the conversion of cereal proteins to the alternative end products glutamate or γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). Rye malt, fungal proteases, and lactobacilli were employed to convert wheat gluten or barley proteins. Glutamate and GABA formations were strain-dependent. Lactobacillus reuteri TMW1.106 and Lactobacillus rossiae 34J accumulated glutamate; L. reuteri LTH5448 and LTH5795 accumulated GABA. Glutamate and GABA accumulation by L. reuteri TMW1.106 and LTH5448 increased throughout fermentation time over 96 h, respectively. Peptides rather than amino acids were the main products of proteolysis in all doughs, and barley proteins were more resistant to degradation by rye malt proteases than wheat gluten. However, addition of fungal protease resulted in comparable degradation of both substrates. Glutamate and GABA accumulated to concentrations up to 63 and 90 mmol kg(-1) DM, respectively. Glutamate levels obtained through bioconversion of cereal proteins enable the use of hydrolyzed cereal protein as condiment. PMID:21271723

  1. Linking GABA and glutamate levels to cognitive skill acquisition during development.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin; Krause, Beatrix; King, Andrew J; Near, Jamie; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2015-11-01

    Developmental adjustments in the balance of excitation and inhibition are thought to constrain the plasticity of sensory areas of the cortex. It is unknown however, how changes in excitatory or inhibitory neurochemical expression (glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)) contribute to skill acquisition during development. Here we used single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to reveal how differences in cortical glutamate vs. GABA ratios relate to face proficiency and working memory abilities in children and adults. We show that higher glutamate levels in the inferior frontal gyrus correlated positively with face processing proficiency in the children, but not the adults, an effect which was independent of age-dependent differences in underlying cortical gray matter. Moreover, we found that glutamate/GABA levels and gray matter volume are dissociated at the different maturational stages. These findings suggest that increased excitation during development is linked to neuroplasticity and the acquisition of new cognitive skills. They also offer a new, neurochemical approach to investigating the relationship between cognitive performance and brain development across the lifespan. PMID:26350618

  2. Linking GABA and glutamate levels to cognitive skill acquisition during development

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Beatrix; King, Andrew J.; Near, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Developmental adjustments in the balance of excitation and inhibition are thought to constrain the plasticity of sensory areas of the cortex. It is unknown however, how changes in excitatory or inhibitory neurochemical expression (glutamate, γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA)) contribute to skill acquisition during development. Here we used single‐voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H‐MRS) to reveal how differences in cortical glutamate vs. GABA ratios relate to face proficiency and working memory abilities in children and adults. We show that higher glutamate levels in the inferior frontal gyrus correlated positively with face processing proficiency in the children, but not the adults, an effect which was independent of age‐dependent differences in underlying cortical gray matter. Moreover, we found that glutamate/GABA levels and gray matter volume are dissociated at the different maturational stages. These findings suggest that increased excitation during development is linked to neuroplasticity and the acquisition of new cognitive skills. They also offer a new, neurochemical approach to investigating the relationship between cognitive performance and brain development across the lifespan. Hum Brain Mapp 36:4334–4345, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published byWiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26350618

  3. Production of gaba (γ – Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  4. Glutamate and GABA contributions to medial prefrontal cortical activity to emotion: implications for mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Stan, Ana D; Schirda, Claudiu V; Bertocci, Michele A; Bebko, Genna M; Kronhaus, Dina M; Aslam, Haris A; LaBarbara, Eduard J; Tanase, Costin; Lockovich, Jeanette C; Pollock, Myrna H; Stiffler, Richelle S; Phillips, Mary L

    2014-09-30

    The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (MdPFC) and anterior cingulate cortices (ACC) play a critical role in implicit emotion regulation; however the understanding of the specific neurotransmitters that mediate such role is lacking. In this study, we examined relationships between MdPFC concentrations of two neurotransmitters, glutamate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), and BOLD activity in ACC during performance of an implicit facial emotion-processing task. Twenty healthy volunteers, aged 20-35 years, were scanned while performing an implicit facial emotion-processing task, whereby presented facial expressions changed from neutral to one of the four emotions: happy, anger, fear, or sad. Glutamate concentrations were measured before and after the emotion-processing task in right MdPFC using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). GABA concentrations were measured in bilateral MdPFC after the emotion-processing task. Multiple regression models were run to determine the relative contribution of glutamate and GABA concentration, age, and gender to BOLD signal in ACC to each of the four emotions. Multiple regression analyses revealed a significant negative correlation between MdPFC GABA concentration and BOLD signal in subgenual ACC (p<0.05, corrected) to sad versus shape contrast. For the anger versus shape contrast, there was a significant negative correlation between age and BOLD signal in pregenual ACC (p<0.05, corrected) and a positive correlation between MdPFC glutamate concentration (pre-task) and BOLD signal in pregenual ACC (p<0.05, corrected). Our findings are the first to provide insight into relationships between MdPFC neurotransmitter concentrations and ACC BOLD signal, and could further understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying emotion processing in healthy and mood-disordered individuals. PMID:24973815

  5. Dynamic regulation of glycine–GABA co-transmission at spinal inhibitory synapses by neuronal glutamate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Junya; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, which are accumulated into synaptic vesicles by a common vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VIAAT) and are then co-released. However, the mechanisms that control the packaging of GABA + glycine into synaptic vesicles are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the dynamic control of the GABA–glycine co-transmission by the neuronal glutamate transporter, using paired whole-cell patch recording from monosynaptically coupled cultured spinal cord neurons derived from VIAAT-Venus transgenic rats. Short step depolarization of presynaptic neurons evoked unitary (cell-to-cell) inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). Under normal conditions, the fractional contribution of postsynaptic GABA or glycine receptors to the unitary IPSCs did not change during a 1 h recording. Intracellular loading of GABA or glycine via a patch pipette enhanced the respective components of inhibitory transmission, indicating the importance of the cytoplasmic concentration of inhibitory transmitters. Raised extracellular glutamate levels increased the amplitude of GABAergic IPSCs but reduced glycine release by enhancing glutamate uptake. Similar effects were observed when presynaptic neurons were intracellularly perfused with glutamate. Interestingly, high-frequency trains of stimulation decreased glycinergic IPSCs more than GABAergic IPSCs, and repetitive stimulation occasionally failed to evoke glycinergic but not GABAergic IPSCs. The present results suggest that the enhancement of GABA release by glutamate uptake may be advantageous for rapid vesicular refilling of the inhibitory transmitter at mixed GABA/glycinergic synapses and thus may help prevent hyperexcitability. PMID:23690564

  6. Regulation of GABA-modulin phosphorylation and GABA receptor binding by excitatory amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1987-05-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells phosphorylate numerous proteins including GABA-modulin (GM), which is a putative allosteric modulator of GABA receptors. Cell depolarization and treatment with dicarboxylic excitatory amino acids, which activate PI turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and guanylate cyclase in granule cells increase the phosphorylation of specific proteins. To determine GM phosphorylation by endogenous protein kinases in living granule cell cultures, GM was isolated by immunoprecipitation and reverse-phase HPLC. High K/sup +/, veratridine, glutamate and NMDA treatment stimulated GM phosphorylation over 2-fold. This increase was abolished by the absence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was antagonized by Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and by AVP. The excitatory amino acid action was mimicked by phorbol esters but not by forskolin or by cGMP, and thus may be mediated by an activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, excitatory amino acids increase /sup 3/H-labelled phorbol ester binding sites in granule cell membrane. The same cultures, treated with glutamate or kainate, showed a 50-fold greater efficacy of muscimol for the stimulation of benzodiazepine (BZ) binding. These data-suggest that excitatory amino acid stimulation of neurons triggers PKC translocation and the activated enzyme phosphorylates GM. The extent of GM phosphorylation may regulate the coupling between GABA and BZ binding sites.

  7. Oxytocin regulates changes of extracellular glutamate and GABA levels induced by methamphetamine in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia; Han, Wen-Yan; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Li-Hui; Dong, Ying-Xu; Wang, Fang; Song, Ming; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2012-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, affects adaptive processes of the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the effects of OT on extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) induced by methamphetamine (MAP) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DHC) of freely moving mice, using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The results showed that OT had no effect on basal Glu levels, but attenuated MAP-induced Glu increase in the mPFC and decrease in the DHC. OT increased the basal levels of extracellular GABA in mPFC and DHC of mice, and inhibited the MAP-induced GABA decrease in DHC. Western blot results indicated that OT significantly inhibited the increased glutamatergic receptor (NR1 subunit) levels in the PFC after acute MAP administration, whereas OT further enhanced the elevated levels of glutamatergic transporter (GLT1) induced by MAP in the hippocampus of mice. Atosiban, a selective inhibitor of OT receptor, antagonized the effects of OT. The results provided the first neurochemical evidence that OT, which exerted its action via its receptor, decreased Glu release induced by MAP, and attenuated the changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission partially via regulation of NR1 and GLT1 expression. OT-induced extracellular GABA increase also suggests that OT acts potentially as an inhibitory neuromodulator in mPFC and DHC of mice. PMID:22507692

  8. GABA/glutamate co-release controls habenula output and is modified by antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Piriz, Joaquin; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb), a key regulator of monoaminergic brain regions, is activated by negatively-valenced events. Its hyperactivity is associated with depression. While enhanced excitatory input to the LHb has been linked to depression, little is known about inhibitory transmission. We discovered that GABA is co-released with its functional opponent, glutamate, from long-range basal ganglia inputs (which signal negative events) to limit LHb activity in rodents. At this synapse, the balance of GABA/glutamate signaling is shifted towards reduced GABA in a model of depression and increased GABA by antidepressant treatment. GABA and glutamate co-release therefore controls LHb activity, and regulation of this remarkable form of transmission may be important for determining the impact of negative life events on mood and behavior. PMID:25237099

  9. Glutamate and GABA imbalance promotes neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus after stress

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Wang, He; Liu, Yuan; Li, Ying-yu; Chen, Can; Liu, Liang-ming; Wu, Ya-min; Li, Sen; Yang, Ce

    2014-01-01

    Background People who experience traumatic events have an increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, PTSD-related pathological changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain poorly understood. Material/Methods We investigated the effect of a PTSD-like animal model induced by severe stress. The experimental rats received 20 inescapable electric foot shocks in an enclosed box for a total of 6 times in 3 days. The physiological state (body weight and plasma corticosterone concentrations), emotion, cognitive behavior, brain morphology, apoptosis, and balance of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were observed. Cell damages were examined with histological staining (HE, Nissl, and silver impregnation), while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using an Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) binding and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Results In comparison with the sham litter-mates, the stressed rats showed decreased body weight, inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, increase in freezing response to trauma reminder, hypoactivity and anxiety-like behaviors in elevated plus maze and open field test, poor learning in Morris water maze, and shortened latency in hot-plate test. There were significant damages in the hippocampus but not in the prefrontal cortex. Imbalance between glutamate and GABA was more evident in the hippocampus than in the prefrontal cortex. Conclusions These results suggest that neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus after severe traumatic stress is related to the imbalance between glutamate and GABA. Such modifications may resemble the profound changes observed in PTSD patients. PMID:24675061

  10. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and other glutamate and GABA receptor antibody encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    De Bruijn, Marienke A A M; Titulaer, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few year, antibodies to various central nervous system receptors, particularly the glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, have been found to be associated with autoimmune neurologic disorders. The receptors include the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR), the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and GABA type A and B receptors (respectively GABAAR and GABABR). Compared to the previously described paraneoplastic antibodies directed at intracellular targets, the patients with receptor antibodies are often younger, they less frequently have malignancies, and they respond better to immunotherapy. Many of the patients have limbic encephalitis with amnesia, disorientation, seizures, and psychological or psychiatric symptoms, but those with NMDAR antibodies usually develop a more widespread form of encephalitis, often leading to a decrease in consciousness and requirement for long-term intensive care treatment. The autoantibodies bind directly to the synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors on the membrane surface, and have direct effects on signal transduction in central synapses. These conditions are very important to recognize as the symptoms and complications can be fatal when not treated in time, whereas with immunotherapy many patients recover considerably. PMID:27112679

  11. Differential distribution of glutamate- and GABA-gated chloride channels in the housefly Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Azuma, Masaaki; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-01

    l-Glutamic acid (glutamate) mediates fast inhibitory neurotransmission by affecting glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) in invertebrates. The molecular function and pharmacological properties of GluCls have been well studied, but not much is known about their physiological role and localization in the insect body. The distribution of GluCls in the housefly (Musca domestica L.) was thus compared with the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls). Quantitative PCR and ligand-binding experiments indicate that the GluCl and GABACl transcripts and proteins are predominantly expressed in the adult head. Intense GluCl immunostaining was detected in the lamina, leg motor neurons, and legs of adult houseflies. The GABACl (Rdl) immunostaining was more widely distributed, and was found in the medulla, lobula, lobula plate, mushroom body, antennal lobe, and ellipsoid body. The present findings suggest that GluCls have physiological roles in different tissues than GABACls. PMID:23806605

  12. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude.

    PubMed

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G; Harrison, Paul J; Nobre, Anna C

    2014-06-24

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  13. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G.; Harrison, Paul J.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  14. Effect of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, glutamine and alanine in the rat striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simos S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-01

    Taurine, a non-protein amino acid, acts as an osmoregulator and inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain. Here we studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate and GABA, and their precursors, glutamine and alanine, in the rat striatum and hippocampus. Injections of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg taurine led to a gradual increase in taurine tissue concentrations in both hippocampus and striatum. Glutamate and GABA also increased in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Glutamine increased and alanine decreased markedly in both brain structures. The results corroborate the neuromodulatory role of taurine in the brain. Taurine administration results in an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the glutamatergic (hippocampus) and GABAergic (striatum) brain structures, affecting more markedly the neurotransmitter precursors. PMID:18605241

  15. A Glutamic Acid-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Fermented Foods

    PubMed Central

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound. PMID:22754309

  16. Distribution of immunoreactive GABA and glutamate receptors in the gustatory portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract in rat.

    PubMed

    King, Michael S

    2003-05-15

    The distribution of glutamate (GLU) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors within the gustatory portion of the rat nucleus of the solitary tract (gNST) was investigated using immunohistochemical, histological and neural tract tracing techniques. Numerous somata throughout the gNST were immunoreactive for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, while few were labeled for kainate receptors. AMPA and NMDA receptors were particularly abundant in the rostral central (RC) subdivision of the gNST, which receives most of the primary afferent input from the oral cavity and contains most of the gNST neurons that project to the parabrachial nuclei (PBN). This finding supports electrophysiological evidence that AMPA and NMDA receptors are involved in responses to orosensory input and indicates that their action may influence ascending taste signals as well. Compared to the ionotropic GLU receptors, few cell bodies were immunoreactive for metabotropic GLU receptors. Somata immunoreactive for GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors were located throughout the nucleus. The densest neuropil labeling was for GABA(A) receptors in the ventral (V) subnucleus, the gNST subdivision that sends output to brainstem oromotor centers. The distributions of immunolabeling for GLU and GABA receptors imply that different functional roles may exist for specific receptors within this nucleus. PMID:12754086

  17. GABA and glutamate in schizophrenia: A 7 T 1H-MRS study

    PubMed Central

    Marsman, Anouk; Mandl, René C.W.; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boer, Vincent O.; Andreychenko, Anna; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S.; Luijten, Peter R.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by loss of brain volume, which may represent an ongoing pathophysiological process. This loss of brain volume may be explained by reduced neuropil rather than neuronal loss, suggesting abnormal synaptic plasticity and cortical microcircuitry. A possible mechanism is hypofunction of the NMDA-type of glutamate receptor, which reduces the excitation of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, resulting in a disinhibition of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons. Disinhibition of pyramidal cells may result in excessive stimulation by glutamate, which in turn could cause neuronal damage or death through excitotoxicity. In this study, GABA/creatine ratios, and glutamate, NAA, creatine and choline concentrations in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices were measured in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at an ultra-high magnetic field strength of 7 T. Significantly lower GABA/Cr ratios were found in patients with schizophrenia in the prefrontal cortex as compared to healthy controls, with GABA/Cr ratios inversely correlated with cognitive functioning in the patients. No significant change in the GABA/Cr ratio was found between patients and controls in the parieto-occipital cortex, nor were levels of glutamate, NAA, creatine, and choline differed in patients and controls in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices. Our findings support a mechanism involving altered GABA levels distinguished from glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, particularly in high functioning patients. A (compensatory) role for GABA through altered inhibitory neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may be ongoing in (higher functioning) patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25379453

  18. Perinatal thiamine restriction affects central GABA and glutamate concentrations and motor behavior of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita Hélen; de Freitas-Silva, Danielle Marra; Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; Pereira, Sílvia Rejane Castanheira; Ribeiro, Ângela Maria

    2016-03-23

    The purposes of the present study were to investigate the effects of perinatal thiamine deficiency, from the 11th day of gestation until the 5th day of lactation, on motor behavior and neurochemical parameters in adult rat offspring, using 3-month-old, adult, male Wistar rats. All rats were submitted to motor tests, using the rotarod and paw print tasks. After behavioral tests, their thalamus, cerebellum and spinal cord were dissected for glutamate and GABA quantifications by high performance liquid chromatography. The thiamine-restricted mothers (RM) group showed a significant reduction of time spent on the rotarod at 25 rpm and an increase in hind-base width. A significant decrease of glutamate concentration in the cerebellum and an increase of GABA concentrations in the thalamus were also observed. For the offspring from control mothers (CM) group there were significant correlations between thalamic GABA concentrations and both rotarod performance and average hind-base width. In addition, for rats from the RM group a significant correlation between stride length and cerebellar GABA concentration was found. These results show that the deficiency of thiamine during an early developmental period affects certain motor behavior parameters and GABA and glutamate levels in specific brain areas. Hence, a thiamine deficiency episode during an early developmental period can induce motor impairments and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter changes that are persistent and detectable in later periods of life. PMID:26836141

  19. NAAG peptidase inhibitor increases dialysate NAAG and reduces glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels in the dorsal hippocampus following fluid percussion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlong; Zhao, Xueren; Van, Ken C; Bzdega, Tomasz; Smyth, Aoife; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan P; Jiang, Jiyao; O'Connor, William T; Berman, Robert F; Neale, Joseph H; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2006-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces a rapid and excessive elevation in extracellular glutamate that induces excitotoxic brain cell death. The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is reported to suppress neurotransmitter release through selective activation of presynaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Therefore, strategies to elevate levels of NAAG following brain injury could reduce excessive glutamate release associated with TBI. We hypothesized that the NAAG peptidase inhibitor, ZJ-43 would elevate extracellular NAAG levels and reduce extracellular levels of amino acid neurotransmitters following TBI by a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated mechanism. Dialysate levels of NAAG, glutamate, aspartate and GABA from the dorsal hippocampus were elevated after TBI as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Dialysate levels of NAAG were higher and remained elevated in the ZJ-43 treated group (50 mg/kg, i.p.) compared with control. ZJ-43 treatment also reduced the rise of dialysate glutamate, aspartate, and GABA levels. Co-administration of the group II mGluR antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) partially blocked the effects of ZJ-43 on dialysate glutamate and GABA, suggesting that NAAG effects are mediated through mGluR activation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of NAAG peptidase may reduce excitotoxic events associated with TBI. PMID:16606367

  20. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies. PMID:24551133

  1. An arylaminopyridazine derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a selective and competitive antagonist at the GABAA receptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Chambon, J P; Feltz, P; Heaulme, M; Restle, S; Schlichter, R; Biziere, K; Wermuth, C G

    1985-01-01

    In view of finding a new gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor ligand we synthesized an arylaminopyridazine derivative of GABA, SR 95103 [2-(carboxy-3'-propyl)-3-amino-4-methyl-6-phenylpyridazinium chloride]. SR 95103 displaced [3H]GABA from rat brain membranes with an apparent Ki of 2.2 microM and a Hill number near 1.0. SR 95103 (1-100 microM) antagonized the GABA-mediated enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting [3H]diazepam binding per se. SR 95103 competitively antagonized GABA-induced membrane depolarization in rat spinal ganglia. In all these experiments, the potency of SR 95103 was close to that of bicuculline. SR 95103 (100 microM) did not interact with a variety of central receptors--in particular the GABAB, the strychnine, and the glutamate receptors--did not inhibit Na+-dependent synaptosomal GABA uptake, and did not affect GABA-transaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities. Intraperitoneally administered SR 95103 elicited clonicotonic seizures in mice (ED50 = 180 mg/kg). On the basis of these results it is postulated that St 95103 is a competitive antagonist of GABA at the GABAA receptor site. In addition to being an interesting lead structure for the search of GABA ligands, SR 95103 could also be a useful tool to investigate GABA receptor subtypes because it is freely soluble in water and chemically stable. Images PMID:2984669

  2. In vivo measurements of limbic glutamate and GABA concentrations in epileptic patients during affective and cognitive tasks: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Gjini, Klevest; Modur, Pradeep; Meier, Kevin T; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Robinson, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Limbic system structures such as the amygdala (AMG) and the hippocampus (HIPP) are involved in affective and cognitive processing. However, because of the limitations in noninvasive technology, absolute concentrations of the neurotransmitters underlying limbic system engagement are not known. Here, we report changes in the concentrations of the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the HIPP and the AMG of patients with nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing surgery for intracranial subdural and depth electrode implantation. We utilized an in-vivo microdialysis technique while subjects were engaged in cognitive tasks with or without emotional content. The performance of an emotion learning task (EmoLearn) was associated with a significant increase in the concentration of glutamate in the HIPP when images with high valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration while processing images with low valence. In addition, significantly decreased levels of glutamate were found in the AMG when images with predominantly low valence content were processed, as compared to its concentration at baseline. The processing of face stimuli with anger/fear content (FaceMatch task) was accompanied with significantly decreased concentrations of GABA in the AMG and HIPP compared to its levels at the baseline. The processing of shapes on the other hand was accompanied with a significantly decreased concentration of the glutamate in the AMG as well as in the HIPP compared to the baseline. Finally, the performance of a nondeclarative memory task (weather prediction task-WPT) was associated with relatively large and opposite changes in the GABA levels compared to the baseline in the AMG (decrease) and the HIPP (increase). These data are relevant for showing an involvement of the amygdala and the hippocampus in emotional processing and provide additional neurochemical clues towards a more refined model of the functional circuitry of the

  3. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed. PMID:24227952

  4. Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhe; Bhandage, Amol K.; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R.; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    The central amygdala (CeA) has a role for mediating fear and anxiety responses. It is also involved in emotional imbalance caused by alcohol abuse and dependence and in regulating relapse to alcohol abuse. Growing evidences suggest that excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) transmissions in the CeA are affected by chronic alcohol exposure. Human post-mortem CeA samples from male alcoholics (n = 9) and matched controls (n = 9) were assayed for the expression level of ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptors subunit mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data revealed that out of the 16 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA [2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA4; one kainate receptor subunit GluK2; one NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor subunit GluN2D and one delta receptor subunit GluD2 were significantly decreased in the CeA of alcoholics. In contrast, of the 19 GABA-A receptor subunits, only the mRNA encoding the α2 subunit was significantly down-regulated in the CeA of the alcoholics as compared with control subjects. Our findings imply that the down-regulation of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits in the CeA of alcoholics may represent one of the molecular substrates underlying the new balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in alcohol dependence. PMID:25278838

  5. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  6. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  7. Competing pathways in the photo-Favorskii rearrangement and release of esters: Studies on fluorinated p-hydroxyphenacyl GABA and glutamate phototriggers

    PubMed Central

    Stensrud, Kenneth; Noh, Jihyun; Kandler, Karl; Wirz, Jakob; Heger, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Three new trifluoromethylated p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) caged γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) derivatives have been examined for their efficacy as photoremovable protecting groups in aqueous solution. By replacing hydrogen with fluorine, e.g., a m-trifluoromethyl or a m-trifluoromethoxy vs. m-methoxy substituents on the pHP chromophore, modest increases in the quantum yields for release of the amino acids GABA and glutamate were realized as well as improved lipophilicity. The pHP triplet undergoes a photo-Favorskii rearrangement with concomitant release of the amino acid substrate. Deprotonation competes with the rearrangement from the triplet excited state and yields the pHP conjugate base that, upon reprotonation, regenerate the starting ketoester, a chemically unproductive or “energy wasting” process. Employing picosecond pump–probe spectroscopy, GABA derivatives 2 – 5 are characterized by short triplet lifetimes, a manifestation of their rapid release of GABA. The bioavailability of released GABA at the GABAA receptor improved when the release took place from m-OCF3 (2) but decreased for m-CF3 (3) when compared with the parent pHP derivative. These studies demonstrate that pKa and lipophilicity exert significant but sometimes opposing influences on the photochemistry and biological activity of pHP phototriggers. PMID:19572582

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals oral Lactobacillus promotion of increases in brain GABA, N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Stanisz, Andrew M; Forsythe, Paul; Bienenstock, John; Stanisz, Greg J

    2016-01-15

    The gut microbiome has been shown to regulate the development and functions of the enteric and central nervous systems. Its involvement in the regulation of behavior has attracted particular attention because of its potential translational importance in clinical disorders, however little is known about the pathways involved. We previously have demonstrated that administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) to healthy male BALB/c mice, promotes consistent changes in GABA-A and -B receptor sub-types in specific brain regions, accompanied by reductions in anxiety and depression-related behaviors. In the present study, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we quantitatively assessed two clinically validated biomarkers of brain activity and function, glutamate+glutamine (Glx) and total N-acetyl aspartate+N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid (tNAA), as well as GABA, the chief brain inhibitory neurotransmitter. Mice received 1×10(9) cfu of JB-1 per day for 4weeks and were subjected to MRS weekly and again 4weeks after cessation of treatment to ascertain temporal changes in these neurometabolites. Baseline concentrations for Glx, tNAA and GABA were equal to 10.4±0.3mM, 8.7±0.1mM, and 1.2±0.1mM, respectively. Delayed increases were first seen for Glx (~10%) and NAA (~37%) at 2weeks which persisted only to the end of treatment. However, Glx was still elevated 4weeks after treatment had ceased. Significantly elevated GABA (~25%) was only seen at 4weeks. These results suggest specific metabolic pathways in our pursuit of mechanisms of action of psychoactive bacteria. They also offer through application of standard clinical neurodiagnostic techniques, translational opportunities to assess biomarkers accompanying behavioral changes induced by alterations in the gut microbiome. PMID:26577887

  9. Shifted pallidal co-release of GABA and glutamate in habenula drives cocaine withdrawal and relapse.

    PubMed

    Meye, Frank J; Soiza-Reilly, Mariano; Smit, Tamar; Diana, Marco A; Schwarz, Martin K; Mameli, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Cocaine withdrawal produces aversive states and vulnerability to relapse, hallmarks of addiction. The lateral habenula (LHb) encodes negative stimuli and contributes to aversive withdrawal symptoms. However, it remains unclear which inputs to LHb promote this and what the consequences are for relapse susceptibility. We report, using rabies-based retrolabeling and optogenetic mapping, that the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN, the mouse equivalent of the globus pallidus interna) projects to an LHb neuronal subset innervating aversion-encoding midbrain GABA neurons. EPN-to-LHb excitatory signaling is limited by GABAergic cotransmission. This inhibitory component decreases during cocaine withdrawal as a result of reduced presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT). This shifts the EPN-to-LHb GABA/glutamate balance, disinhibiting EPN-driven LHb activity. Selective virally mediated VGAT overexpression at EPN-to-LHb terminals during withdrawal normalizes GABAergic neurotransmission. This intervention rescues cocaine-evoked aversive states and prevents stress-induced reinstatement, used to model relapse. This identifies diminished inhibitory transmission at EPN-to-LHb GABA/glutamate synapses as a mechanism contributing to the relapsing feature of addictive behavior. PMID:27348214

  10. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  11. GABA, 5-HT and amino acids in the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and Brachionus rotundiformis.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, W G; Hagiwara, A; Hara, K; Soyano, K; Snell, T W

    2000-11-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) have been shown to increase the reproduction of the Brachionus plicatilis (NH3L strain). In the present study, the endogenous presence of GABA and 5-HT in the rotifers B. plicatilis (NH3L and Kamiura strains) and Brachionus rotundiformis (Langkawi strain) were confirmed by dot blot immunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC showed that GABA and 5-HT concentrations in the three rotifer strains range from 71 to 188 pmol/mg and from 12 to 64 pmol/mg, respectively. A total of 33 amino acids were also detected in B. plicatilis and B. rotundiformis, with glutamic acid, serine, glycine, taurine, threonine, alanine, arginine, proline, valine and isoleucine in high concentrations relative to other amino acids. PMID:11118940

  12. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  13. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  14. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  15. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  16. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  17. Glutamate and GABA concentration changes in the globus pallidus internus of Parkinson's patients during performance of implicit and declarative memory tasks: a report of two subjects.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Gjini, Klevest; Darrow, David; Varga, Georgeta; Robinson, Jennifer L; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2015-03-01

    The basal ganglia, typically associated with motor function, are involved in human cognitive processes, as demonstrated in behavioral, lesion, and noninvasive functional neuroimaging studies. Here we report task-contingent changes in concentrations of the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the globus pallidus internus (GPi) of two patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery by utilizing in-vivo microdialysis measurements during performance of implicit and declarative memory tasks. Performance of an implicit memory task (weather prediction task-WPT) was associated with increased levels of glutamate and GABA in the GPi compared to their concentrations at baseline. On the other hand, performance of a declarative memory task (verbal learning task-VLT) was associated with decreased levels of glutamate and GABA in GPi compared to baseline during the encoding and immediate recall phase with less conclusive results during the delayed recall phase. These results are in line with hypothesized changes in these neurotransmitter levels: an increase of excitatory (Glu) input from subthalamic nucleus (STN) to GPi during implicit memory task performance and a decrease of inhibitory inputs (GABA) from globus pallidus externus (GPe) and striatum to GPi during declarative memory performance. Consistent with our previous report on in-vivo neurotransmitter changes during tasks in STN, these data provide corroborative evidence for the direct involvement of basal ganglia in cognitive functions and complements our model of the functional circuitry of basal ganglia in the healthy and Parkinson's disease affected brain. PMID:25596441

  18. Effects of simulated microgravity on the expression of presynaptic proteins distorting the GABA/glutamate equilibrium--A proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Iqbal, Javed; Liu, Yahui; Su, Rui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity may cause cognition-related changes in the animal nervous system due to the resulting uneven flow of fluids in the body. These changes may restrict the long-term stay of humans in space for various purposes. In this study, a rat tail suspension model (30°) was used to explore the effects of 21 days of prolonged simulated microgravity (SM) on the expression of proteins involved in cognitive functions in the rat hippocampus. SM decreased the content of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased the content of glutamate (Glu) in the rat hippocampus. A comparative (18)O-labeled quantitative proteomics strategy was applied to detect the differential expression of synaptic proteins under SM. Fifty-three proteins were found to be differentially expressed under SM. Microgravity induces difficulty in the formation of the SNARE complex due to the down-regulation of vesicle-associated membrane protein 3(VAMP3) and syntaxin-1A. Synaptic vesicle recycling may also be affected due to the dysregulation of syntaxin-binding protein 5 (tomosyn), rab3A and its effector rim2. Both processes are disturbed, indicating that presynaptic proteins mediate a GABA/Glu imbalance under SM. These findings provide clues for understanding the mechanism of the GABA/Glu equilibrium in the hippocampus induced by microgravity in space and represent steps toward safe space travel. PMID:26359799

  19. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis regulates pollen germination and polarized growth in Picea wilsonii.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Tong; Jing, Yanping; Fan, Lusheng; Wan, Yinglang; Lin, Jinxing

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid found in a wide range of organisms. Recently, GABA accumulation has been shown to play a role in the stress response and cell growth in angiosperms. However, the effect of GABA deficiency on pollen tube development remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that specific concentrations of exogenous GABA stimulated pollen tube growth in Picea wilsonii, while an overdose suppressed pollen tube elongation. The germination percentage of pollen grains and morphological variations in pollen tubes responded in a dose-dependent manner to treatment with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP), a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, while the inhibitory effects could be recovered in calcium-containing medium supplemented with GABA. Using immunofluorescence labeling, we found that the actin cables were disorganized in 3-MP treated cells, followed by the transition of endo/exocytosis activating sites from the apex to the whole tube shank. In addition, variations in the deposition of cell wall components were detected upon labeling with JIM5, JIM7, and aniline blue. Our results demonstrated that calcium-dependent GABA signaling regulates pollen germination and polarized tube growth in P. wilsonii by affecting actin filament patterns, vesicle trafficking, and the configuration and distribution of cell wall components. PMID:23900837

  20. [PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBROVASCULAR EFFECTS OF GLUTAMIC ACID].

    PubMed

    Gan'shina, T S; Kurza, E V; Kurdyumov, I N; Maslennikov, D V; Mirzoyan, R S

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on nonlinear rats subjected to global transient cerebral ischemia revealed the ability of glutamic acid to improve cerebral circulation. Consequently, the excitatory amino acid can produce adverse (neurotoxic) and positive (anti-ischemic) effects in cerebral ischemia. The cerebrovascular effect of glutamic acid in cerebral ischemia is attenuated on the background action of the MNDA receptor blocker MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg intravenously) and eliminated by bicuculline. When glutamic acid is combined with the non-competitive MNDA receptor antagonist MK-801, neither one nor another drug shows its vasodilator effect. The results are indicative of the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory systems on the level of cerebral vessels and once again confirm our previous conclusion about the decisive role of GABA(A) receptors in brain vessels in the implementation of anti-ischemic activity of endogenous compounds (melatonin) and well-known pharmacological substances (mexidol, afobazole), and new chemical compounds based on GABA-containing lipid derivatives. PMID:27455572

  1. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  2. Physiological bases of the K+ and the glutamate/GABA hypotheses of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mangia, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a heterogeneous family of neurological disorders that manifest as seizures, i.e. the hypersynchronous activity of large population of neurons. About 30% of epileptic patients do not respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs. Decades of intense research have elucidated the involvement of a number of possible signaling pathways, however, at present we do not have a fundamental understanding of epileptogenesis. In this paper, we review the literature on epilepsy under a wide-angle perspective, a mandatory choice that responds to the recurrent and unanswered question about what is epiphenomenal and what is causal to the disease. While focusing on the involvement of K+ and glutamate/GABA in determining neuronal hyperexcitability, emphasis is given to astrocytic contribution to epileptogenesis, and especially to loss-of-function of astrocytic glutamine synthetase following reactive astrogliosis, a hallmark of epileptic syndromes. We finally introduce the potential involvement of abnormal glycogen synthesis induced by excess glutamate in increasing susceptibility to seizures. PMID:24818957

  3. Binge Toluene Exposure Alters Glutamate, Glutamine and GABA in the Adolescent Rat Brain as Measured by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Bowen, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of toluene abuse in adolescents, little is known regarding the effect of binge exposure on neurochemical profiles during this developmental stage. In the current study, the effects of binge toluene exposure during adolescence on neurotransmitter levels were determined using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo at 11.7 T. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene (0, 8,000 , or 12,000 ppm) for 15 min twice daily from postnatal day 28 (P28) through P34 and then euthanized either one or seven days later (on P35 or P42) to assess glutamate, glutamine, and GABA levels in intact tissue punches from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior striatum and hippocampus. In the mPFC, toluene reduced glutamate one day after exposure, with no effect on GABA, while after seven days, glutamate was no longer affected but there was an increase in GABA levels. In the hippocampus, neither GABA nor glutamate was altered one day after exposure, whereas seven days after exposure, increases were observed in GABA and glutamate. Striatal glutamate and GABA levels measured after either one or seven days were not altered after toluene exposure. These findings show that one week of binge toluene inhalation selectively alters these neurotransmitters in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats, and that some of these effects endure at least one week after the exposure. The results suggest that age-dependent, differential neurochemical responses to toluene may contribute to the unique behavioral patterns associated with drug abuse among older children and young teens. PMID:21126832

  4. P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity GABA and glutamate transport into rat brain cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, A R; Lobo, M G; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P; Cordeiro, J M

    2015-10-15

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity amino-acid transporters play crucial roles in terminating synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is lack of information about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of amino-acid transport by fast-acting neuromodulators, like ATP. Here, we investigated whether activation of the ATP-sensitive P2X7 receptor modulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake into nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of the rat cerebral cortex. Radiolabeled neurotransmitter accumulation was evaluated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The cell-permeant sodium-selective fluorescent indicator, SBFI-AM, was used to estimate Na(+) influx across plasma membrane. 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-300 μM), a prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist, concentration-dependently decreased [(3)H]GABA (14%) and [(14)C]glutamate (24%) uptake; BzATP decreased transport maximum velocity (Vmax) without affecting the Michaelis constant (Km) values. The selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079 (3 μM), prevented inhibition of [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μM). The inhibitory effect of BzATP coincided with its ability to increase intracellular Na(+) and was mimicked by Na(+) ionophores, like gramicidin and monensin. Increases in intracellular Na(+) (with veratridine or ouabain) or substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)(+) all decreased [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake and attenuated BzATP effects. Uptake inhibition by BzATP (100 μM) was also attenuated by calmidazolium, which selectively inhibits Na(+) currents through the P2X7 receptor pore. In conclusion, disruption of the Na(+) gradient by P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates high-affinity GABA and glutamate uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes. Interference with amino-acid transport efficacy may constitute a novel target for therapeutic management of cortical excitability. PMID

  5. Serotonin as a Modulator of Glutamate- and GABA-Mediated Neurotransmission: Implications in Physiological Functions and in Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ciranna, L

    2006-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS), is involved in a large variety of physiological functions. In several brain regions 5-HT is diffusely released by volume transmission and behaves as a neuromodulator rather than as a “classical” neurotransmitter. In some cases 5-HT is co-localized in the same nerve terminal with other neurotransmitters and reciprocal interactions take place. This review will focus on the modulatory action of 5-HT on the effects of glutamate and γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), which are the principal neurotransmitters mediating respectively excitatory and inhibitory signals in the CNS. Examples of interaction at pre-and/or post-synaptic levels will be illustrated, as well as the receptors involved and their mechanisms of action. Finally, the physiological meaning of neuromodulatory effects of 5-HT will be briefly discussed with respect to pathologies deriving from malfunctioning of serotonin system. PMID:18615128

  6. Leptin signaling in GABA neurons, but not glutamate neurons, is required for reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Zuure, Wieteke A; Roberts, Amy L; Quennell, Janette H; Anderson, Greg M

    2013-11-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin acts in the brain to modulate the central driver of fertility: the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal system. This effect is indirect, as GnRH neurons do not express leptin receptors (LEPRs). Here we test whether GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons provide the intermediate pathway between the site of leptin action and the GnRH neurons. Leptin receptors were deleted from GABA and glutamate neurons using Cre-Lox transgenics, and the downstream effects on puberty onset and reproduction were examined. Both mouse lines displayed the expected increase in body weight and region-specific loss of leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. The GABA neuron-specific LEPR knock-out females and males showed significantly delayed puberty onset. Adult fertility observations revealed that these knock-out animals have decreased fecundity. In contrast, glutamate neuron-specific LEPR knock-out mice displayed normal fertility. Assessment of the estrogenic hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation in females showed that leptin action on GABA neurons is not necessary for estradiol-mediated suppression of tonic luteinizing hormone secretion (an indirect measure of GnRH neuron activity) but is required for regulation of a full preovulatory-like luteinizing hormone surge. In conclusion, leptin signaling in GABAergic (but not glutamatergic neurons) plays a critical role in the timing of puberty onset and is involved in fertility regulation throughout adulthood in both sexes. These results form an important step in explaining the role of central leptin signaling in the reproductive system. Limiting the leptin-to-GnRH mediators to GABAergic cells will enable future research to focus on a few specific types of neurons. PMID:24198376

  7. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission. PMID:24398941

  8. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  9. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-07-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were calledhyperexcitability disorders. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as "anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes." An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  10. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step. PMID:23322022

  11. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-08-10

    The interaction of TH-GABA and UC-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system TH-GABA and UC-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between TH-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for TH-GABA-lipids or UC-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, US -alanine and glycine displaced TH-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 M were required and in the partition system TH-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  12. Convulsant and subconvulsant doses of norfloxacin in the presence and absence of biphenylacetic acid alter extracellular hippocampal glutamate but not gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Smolders, I; Gousseau, C; Marchand, S; Couet, W; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    2002-02-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABA(A) receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  13. Betaxanthin formation and free amino acids in hairy roots of Beta vulgaris var. lutea depending on nutrient medium and glutamate or glutamine feeding.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Hartmut; Mäck, Gisela

    2004-05-01

    Feeding of amino acids to hairy roots of the yellow beet (Beta vulgaris var. lutea) usually results in the formation of the respective betaxanthins. One exception is (S)-glutamate whose feeding leads to an increase in the betaxanthin vulgaxanthin I (glutamine as amino-acid moiety) instead of vulgaxanthin II (glutamate as amino-acid moiety). To elucidate this phenomenon, hairy roots were cultivated in modified standard medium and (S)-glutamate was fed. Under most nutrient conditions tested, glutamine and vulgaxanthin I in the tissue dominated over glutamate and vulgaxanthin II. Glutamate, opposed to glutamine, was readily metabolized so that its concentration was lower than that of glutamine. Maximum concentrations of glutamate were reached when the activity of glutamine synthetase was low. Even then, however, vulgaxanthin II stayed on a low level. In contrast, the level of vulgaxanthin I increased with increasing concentrations of glutamine in the tissue. Also 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was a major amino acid in the hairy roots. Its concentration reached maximum levels when (S)-glutamate, a GABA precursor, was fed, or when sucrose, the C source of the roots, was replaced by glucose. The respective GABA-betaxanthin, however, was hardly detectable. When both (S)-glutamate and glucose were supplied, the GABA concentration exceeded that of all other amino acids. Only then the GABA-betaxanthin could be characterized in small amounts. Interestingly, the level of the main betaxanthin, miraxanthin V, consisting of betalamic acid and dopamine, was most markedly reduced by a replacement of sucrose with glucose. We conclude that the reaction of betalamic acid with glutamate and GABA was considerably lower than with glutamine and dopamine, irrespective of the concentration of the amino acid in the tissue. Possible reasons will be discussed, also with respect to the occurrence of species-specific patterns of betaxanthins. PMID:15231409

  14. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  15. A pilot integrative genomics study of GABA and glutamate neurotransmitter systems in suicide, suicidal behavior, and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yin, Honglei; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Galfalvy, Hanga; Huang, Yung-Yu; Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Dwork, Andrew J; Burke, Ainsley; Arango, Victoria; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, Joseph John

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glutamate are the major inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system, respectively, and have been associated with suicidal behavior and major depressive disorder (MDD). We examined the relationship between genotype, brain transcriptome, and MDD/suicide for 24 genes involved in GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. In part 1 of the study, 119 candidate SNPs in 24 genes (4 transporters, 4 enzymes, and 16 receptors) were tested for associations with MDD and suicidal behavior in 276 live participants (86 nonfatal suicide attempters with MDD and 190 non-attempters of whom 70% had MDD) and 209 postmortem cases (121 suicide deaths of whom 62% had MDD and 88 sudden death from other causes of whom 11% had MDD) using logistic regression adjusting for sex and age. In part 2, RNA-seq was used to assay isoform-level expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of 59 postmortem samples (21 with MDD and suicide, 9 MDD without suicide, and 29 sudden death non-suicides and no psychiatric illness) using robust regression adjusting for sex, age, and RIN score. In part 3, SNPs with subthreshold (uncorrected) significance levels below 0.05 for an association with suicidal behavior and/or MDD in part 1 were tested for eQTL effects in prefrontal cortex using the Brain eQTL Almanac (www.braineac.org). No SNPs or transcripts were significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. However, a protein coding transcript (ENST00000414552) of the GABA A receptor, gamma 2 (GABRG2) had lower brain expression postmortem in suicide (P = 0.01) and evidence for association with suicide death (P = 0.03) in a SNP that may be an eQTL in prefrontal cortex (rs424740, P = 0.02). These preliminary results implicate GABRG2 in suicide and warrant further investigation and replication in larger samples. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892569

  16. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  17. Cortical Gene Expression After a Conditional Knockout of 67 kDa Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Parvalbumin Neurons.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Danko; Yoshihara, Toru; Kawabata, Rika; Matsubara, Takurou; Tsubomoto, Makoto; Minabe, Yoshio; Lewis, David A; Hashimoto, Takanori

    2016-07-01

    In the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the enzyme primarily responsible for cortical GABA synthesis, is reduced in the subset of GABA neurons that express parvalbumin (PV). This GAD67 deficit is accompanied by lower cortical levels of other GABA-associated transcripts, including GABA transporter-1, PV, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin receptor kinase B, somatostatin, GABAA receptor α1 subunit, and KCNS3 potassium channel subunit mRNAs. In contrast, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), another enzyme for GABA synthesis, are not altered. We tested the hypothesis that this pattern of GABA-associated transcript levels is secondary to the GAD67 deficit in PV neurons by analyzing cortical levels of these GABA-associated mRNAs in mice with a PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout. Using in situ hybridization, we found that none of the examined GABA-associated transcripts had lower cortical expression in the knockout mice. In contrast, PV, BDNF, KCNS3, and GAD65 mRNA levels were higher in the homozygous mice. In addition, our behavioral test battery failed to detect a change in sensorimotor gating or working memory, although the homozygous mice exhibited increased spontaneous activities. These findings suggest that reduced GAD67 expression in PV neurons is not an upstream cause of the lower levels of GABA-associated transcripts, or of the characteristic behaviors, in schizophrenia. In PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout mice, increased levels of PV, BDNF, and KCNS3 mRNAs might be the consequence of increased neuronal activity secondary to lower GABA synthesis, whereas increased GAD65 mRNA might represent a compensatory response to increase GABA synthesis. PMID:26980143

  18. Impact of Precooling and Controlled-Atmosphere Storage on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Accumulation in Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Molin; Ndeurumio, Kessy H; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Zhuoyan

    2016-08-24

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruit cultivars 'Chuliang' and 'Shixia' were analyzed for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation after precooling and in controlled-atmosphere storage. Fruit were exposed to 5% O2 plus 3%, 5%, or 10% CO2 at 4 °C, and GABA and associated enzymes, aril firmness, and pericarp color were measured. Aril softening and pericarp browning were delayed by 5% CO2 + 5% O2. GABA concentrations and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) activities declined during storage at the higher-CO2 treatments. However, GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T; EC 2.6.1.19) activities in elevated CO2-treated fruit fluctuated during storage. GABA concentrations increased after precooling treatments. GAD activity and GABA-T activity were different between cultivars after precooling. GABA concentrations in fruit increased after 3 days of 10% CO2 + 5% O2 treatment and then declined as storage time increased. GABA accumulation was associated with stimulation of GAD activity rather than inhibition of GABA-T activity. PMID:27412947

  19. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  20. Circadian Control of the Daily Plasma Glucose Rhythm: An Interplay of GABA and Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Foppen, Ewout; Schalij, Ingrid; Van Heijningen, Caroline; van der Vliet, Jan; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian biological clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), imposes its temporal structure on the organism via neural and endocrine outputs. To further investigate SCN control of the autonomic nervous system we focused in the present study on the daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is an important target area of biological clock output and harbors the pre-autonomic neurons that control peripheral sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. Using local administration of GABA and glutamate receptor (ant)agonists in the PVN at different times of the light/dark-cycle we investigated whether daily changes in the activity of autonomic nervous system contribute to the control of plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations. Activation of neuronal activity in the PVN of non-feeding animals, either by administering a glutamatergic agonist or a GABAergic antagonist, induced hyperglycemia. The effect of the GABA-antagonist was time dependent, causing increased plasma glucose concentrations only when administered during the light period. The absence of a hyperglycemic effect of the GABA-antagonist in SCN-ablated animals provided further evidence for a daily change in GABAergic input from the SCN to the PVN. On the other hand, feeding-induced plasma glucose and insulin responses were suppressed by inhibition of PVN neuronal activity only during the dark period. These results indicate that the pre-autonomic neurons in the PVN are controlled by an interplay of inhibitory and excitatory inputs. Liver-dedicated sympathetic pre-autonomic neurons (responsible for hepatic glucose production) and pancreas-dedicated pre-autonomic parasympathetic neurons (responsible for insulin release) are controlled by inhibitory GABAergic contacts that are mainly active during the light period. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic pre-autonomic PVN neurons also receive excitatory inputs, either from the

  1. Relationship between transcranial magnetic stimulation measures of intracortical inhibition and spectroscopy measures of GABA and glutamate+glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Sara; Beaulé, Vincent; Proulx, Sébastien; de Beaumont, Louis; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Doyon, Julien; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Lassonde, Maryse

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can provide an index of intracortical excitability/inhibition balance. However, the neurochemical substrate of these measures remains unclear. Pharmacological studies suggest the involvement of GABAA and GABAB receptors in TMS protocols aimed at measuring intracortical inhibition, but this link remains inferential. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) permits measurement of GABA and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) concentrations in the human brain and might help in the direct empirical assessment of the relationship between TMS inhibitory measures and neurotransmitter concentrations. In the present study, MRS-derived relative concentrations of GABA and Glx measured in the left M1 of healthy participants were correlated with TMS measures of intracortical inhibition. Glx levels were found to correlate positively with TMS-induced silent period duration, whereas no correlation was found between GABA concentration and TMS measures. The present data demonstrate that specific TMS measures of intracortical inhibition are linked to shifts in cortical Glx, rather than GABA neurotransmitter levels. Glutamate might specifically interact with GABAB receptors, where higher MRS-derived Glx concentrations seem to be linked to higher levels of receptor activity. PMID:23221412

  2. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  3. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylation in Chlorella12

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. R.; Stiller, Mary

    1970-01-01

    The decarboxylation of endogenous free glutamic acid by Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Marburg strain, was induced by a variety of metabolic poisons, by anaerobic conditions, and by freezing and thawing the cells. The rate of decarboxylation was proportional to the concentration of inhibitor present. Possible mechanisms which relate the effects of the various conditions on glutamate decarboxylation and oxygen consumption by Chlorella are discussed. Images PMID:5429350

  4. Elevated spectroscopic glutamate/gamma-amino butyric acid in rats bred for learned helplessness.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Alexander; Mahlstedt, Magdalena M; Vollmayr, Barbara; Henn, Fritz A; Ende, Gabriele

    2007-09-17

    The theory of depression is dominated by the monoamine hypothesis but there is increasing evidence that beyond monoamines, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of depression. In this study, the effect of alterations of GABA and Glu were investigated in the congenital learned helplessness paradigm. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is an important monitoring tool to bridge the findings in clinical and preclinical studies. We found increased Glu/GABA ratios in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of placebo-treated (saline intraperitoneally) congenital learned helplessness rats versus wild-type rats, and a treatment-induced (desipramine 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally or electroconvulsive shock) decrease of this monoamine ratio in both brain regions. Our results corroborate previous findings of an amino-acid influence on the pathomechanisms of mood disorders. PMID:17712276

  5. β-Hydroxybutyrate is the preferred substrate for GABA and glutamate synthesis while glucose is indispensable during depolarization in cultured GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lund, Trine M; Obel, Linea F; Risa, Øystein; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    The ketogenic diet has multiple beneficial effects not only in treatment of epilepsy, but also in that of glucose transporter 1 deficiency, cancer, Parkinson's disease, obesity and pain. Thus, there is an increasing interest in understanding the mechanism behind this metabolic therapy. Patients on a ketogenic diet reach high plasma levels of ketone bodies, which are used by the brain as energy substrates. The interaction between glucose and ketone bodies is complex and there is still controversy as to what extent it affects the homeostasis of the neurotransmitters glutamate, aspartate and GABA. The present study was conducted to study this metabolic interaction in cultured GABAergic neurons exposed to different combinations of (13)C-labeled and unlabeled glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate. Depolarization was induced and the incorporation of (13)C into glutamate, GABA and aspartate was analyzed. The presence of β-hydroxybutyrate together with glucose did not affect the total GABA content but did, however, decrease the aspartate content to a lower value than when either glucose or β-hydroxybutyrate was employed alone. When combinations of the two substrates were used (13)C-atoms from β-hydroxybutyrate were found in all three amino acids to a greater extent than (13)C-atoms from glucose, but only the (13)C contribution from [1,6-(13)C]glucose increased upon depolarization. In conclusion, β-hydroxybutyrate was preferred over glucose as substrate for amino acid synthesis but the total content of aspartate decreased when both substrates were present. Furthermore only the use of glucose increased upon depolarization. PMID:21684314

  6. [Effect of vitamin B3-active compounds on the content of free and combined gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain of mice].

    PubMed

    Rozanov, V A; Reĭtarova, T E

    1983-01-01

    The bound and free GABA and glutamic acid content in the brain of F1 (CBA X C57B1/6) hybrid mice was investigated by the Eliott method. A tendency to a decrease of GABA and glutamate content in the brain with their practically constant bound/free ratio was observed 24 h after calcium-D-pantothenate injections (150 mumole/kg, 9 injections for 3 days). Calcium-D-homopantothenate injected in the same way caused a significant decrease in the GABA content, and a sharp drop of the bound/free GABA ratio. The effect is not associated with the influence of calcium ions in the composition of the injected compounds. PMID:6140785

  7. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu. PMID:24616376

  8. Differential expression of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors at neocortical glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals

    PubMed Central

    Bragina, Luca; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Bassi, Silvia; Milanese, Marco; Bonanno, Giambattista; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (Glu) receptors (mGluRs) and GABAB receptors are highly expressed at presynaptic sites. To verify the possibility that the two classes of metabotropic receptors contribute to axon terminals heterogeneity, we studied the localization of mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7, and GABAB1 in VGLUT1-, VGLUT2-, and VGAT- positive terminals in the cerebral cortex of adult rats. VGLUT1-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (∼5%), mGluR5 (∼6%), mGluR2/3 (∼22%), mGluR7 (∼17%), and GABAB1 (∼40%); VGLUT2-positive terminals expressed mGluR1α (∼10%), mGluR5 (∼11%), mGluR2/3 (∼20%), mGluR7 (∼28%), and GABAB1 (∼25%); whereas VGAT-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (∼27%), mGluR5 (∼24%), mGluR2/3 (∼38%), mGluR7 (∼31%), and GABAB1 (∼19%). Control experiments ruled out the possibility that postsynaptic mGluRs and GABAB1 might have significantly biased our results. We also performed functional assays in synaptosomal preparations, and showed that all agonists modify Glu and GABA levels, which return to baseline upon exposure to antagonists. Overall, these findings indicate that mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7, and GABAB1 expression differ significantly between glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals, and that the robust expression of heteroreceptors may contribute to the homeostatic regulation of the balance between excitation and inhibition. PMID:26388733

  9. Disruption of pknG enhances production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing glutamate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a building block of the biodegradable plastic polyamide 4, is synthesized from glucose by Corynebacterium glutamicum that expresses Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) B encoded by gadB. This strain was engineered to produce GABA more efficiently from biomass-derived sugars. To enhance GABA production further by increasing the intracellular concentration of its precursor glutamate, we focused on engineering pknG (encoding serine/threonine protein kinase G), which controls the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Odh) in the tricarboxylic acid cycle branch point leading to glutamate synthesis. We succeeded in expressing GadB in a C. glutamicum strain harboring a deletion of pknG. C. glutamicum strains GAD and GAD ∆pknG were cultured in GP2 medium containing 100 g L−1 glucose and 0.1 mM pyridoxal 5′-phosphate. Strain GAD∆pknG produced 31.1 ± 0.41 g L−1 (0.259 g L−1 h−1) of GABA in 120 hours, representing a 2.29-fold higher level compared with GAD. The production yield of GABA from glucose by GAD∆pknG reached 0.893 mol mol−1. PMID:24949255

  10. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  11. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  12. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  13. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  14. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  15. Reactive oxygen species induced by presynaptic glutamate receptor activation is involved in [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain cortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A; Krupko, O; Himmelreich, N

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a response to presynaptic glutamate receptor activation, and the role of ROS in neurotransmitter (GABA) release. Experiments were performed with rat brain cortical synaptosomes using glutamate, NMDA and kainate as agonists of glutamate receptors. ROS production was evaluated with the fluorogenic compound dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA), and GABA release was studied using synaptosomes loaded with [(3)H]GABA. All agonists were found to stimulate ROS production, and specific antagonists of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors, dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-done (CNQX), significantly inhibited the ROS increase. Spontaneous as well as agonist-evoked ROS production was effectively attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a commonly used potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, that suggests a high contribution of NADPH-oxidase to this process. The replacement of glucose with pyruvate or the simultaneous presence of both substrates in the medium led to the decrease in spontaneous and NMDA-evoked ROS production, but to the increase in ROS production induced by kainate. Scavenging of agonist-evoked ROS production by a potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was tightly correlated with the inhibition of agonist-evoked GABA release. Together, these findings show that the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors induces an increase in ROS production, and there is a tight correlation between ROS production and GABA secretion. The pivotal role of kainate/AMPA receptors in ROS production is under discussion. PMID:22864357

  16. A glutamic acid decarboxylase (CgGAD) highly expressed in hemocytes of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the reaction converting the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), not only functions in nervous system, but also plays important roles in immunomodulation in vertebrates. However, GAD has rarely been reported in invertebrates, and never in molluscs. In the present study, one GAD homologue (designed as CgGAD) was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The full length cDNA of CgGAD was 1689 bp encoding a polypeptide of 562 amino acids containing a conserved pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain. CgGAD mRNA and protein could be detected in ganglion and hemocytes of oysters, and their abundance in hemocytes was unexpectedly much higher than those in ganglion. More importantly, CgGAD was mostly located in those granulocytes without phagocytic capacity in oysters, and could dynamically respond to LPS stimulation. Further, after being transfected into HEK293 cells, CgGAD could promote the production of GABA. Collectively, these findings suggested that CgGAD, as a GABA synthase and molecular marker of GABAergic system, was mainly distributed in hemocytes and ganglion and involved in neuroendocrine-immune regulation network in oysters, which also provided a novel insight to the co-evolution between nervous system and immune system. PMID:27208883

  17. Changes in GABA and glutamate concentrations during memory tasks in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing DBS surgery.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Robert J; Darrow, David P; Meier, Kevin T; Robinson, Jennifer; Schiehser, Dawn M; Glahn, David C; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Until now direct neurochemical measurements during memory tasks have not been accomplished in the human basal ganglia. It has been proposed, based on both functional imaging studies and psychometric testing in normal subjects and in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), that the basal ganglia is responsible for the performance of feedback-contingent implicit memory tasks. To measure neurotransmitters, we used in vivo microdialysis during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. We show in the right subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients with PD a task-dependent change in the concentrations of glutamate and GABA during an implicit memory task relative to baseline, while no difference was found between declarative memory tasks. The five patients studied had a significant decrease in the percent concentration of GABA and glutamate during the performance of the weather prediction task (WPT). We hypothesize, based on current models of basal ganglia function, that this decrease in the concentration is consistent with expected dysfunction in basal ganglia networks in patients with PD. PMID:24639638

  18. Changes in GABA and glutamate concentrations during memory tasks in patients with Parkinson’s disease undergoing DBS surgery

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Robert J.; Darrow, David P.; Meier, Kevin T.; Robinson, Jennifer; Schiehser, Dawn M.; Glahn, David C.; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Until now direct neurochemical measurements during memory tasks have not been accomplished in the human basal ganglia. It has been proposed, based on both functional imaging studies and psychometric testing in normal subjects and in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), that the basal ganglia is responsible for the performance of feedback-contingent implicit memory tasks. To measure neurotransmitters, we used in vivo microdialysis during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. We show in the right subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients with PD a task-dependent change in the concentrations of glutamate and GABA during an implicit memory task relative to baseline, while no difference was found between declarative memory tasks. The five patients studied had a significant decrease in the percent concentration of GABA and glutamate during the performance of the weather prediction task (WPT). We hypothesize, based on current models of basal ganglia function, that this decrease in the concentration is consistent with expected dysfunction in basal ganglia networks in patients with PD. PMID:24639638

  19. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...

  20. Detection and transfer of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermen...

  1. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway. PMID:26838342

  2. Valproic acid: brain and plasma levels of the drug and its metabolites, anticonvulsant effects and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nau, H; Löscher, W

    1982-03-01

    The slow onset and carry-over effect of valproic acid (VPA) therapy observed in some clinical as well as experimental animal studies have been examined by parallel pharmacokinetic and pharmacological investigations in a mouse model. VPA was rapidly transferred into brain and was cleared from that tissue with rates which exceeded plasma clearance rates. Of several VPA metabolites present in plasma, only one could be found in the brain: 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid. This metabolite was cleared from plasma and from brain slower than the parent drug. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations were increased within 15 min after VPA injection and remained significantly elevated for at least 8 h. A similar time course was found in regard to the increase of the electroconvulsive threshold (maximal seizures) induced by VPA administration. The activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase rose parallel to the elevation of brain GABA levels, whereas the activity of GABA aminotransferase was not affected. Whereas the rapid onset of the effect on electroconvulsive threshold and on GABA metabolism can be explained by the rapid entrance of VPA into brain, the carry-over effects observed correlated with the kinetics of the metabolite 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid better than with those of VPA due to the persistence of this metabolite in brain. PMID:6801254

  3. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  4. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  5. γ-Amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit and transporter expression in the gonad and liver of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Biggs, Katie; Seidel, Jason S; Wilson, Alex; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    γ-Amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system. GABA receptors and synthesizing enzymes have also been localized to peripheral tissues including the liver, oviduct, uterus and ovary of mammals but the distribution and role of GABA in peripheral tissues of fish has not been fully investigated. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine if mRNA encoding GABA synthesizing enzymes (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67; gad65 and gad67), GABA transporters, and GABAA receptor subunits are localized to liver and gonad of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) (FHM) (2) investigate the effects of GABA on ovarian 17β-estradiol (E2) production, and (3) measure transcript responses in the ovary after in vitro incubation to GABA. Real-time PCR assays were developed for gad65, gad67, vesicular GABA transporter (vgat) and GABA transporter 1 (gat1), and select GABAA receptor subunits (gabra1, gabra5, gabrb1, gabrb2, gabrg1, gabrg2). All transcripts were localized to the brain as expected; however transcripts were also detected in the liver, ovary, and testis of FHMs. In the female liver, gad65 mRNA was significantly higher in expression compared to the male liver. Transcripts for gad67 were the highest in the brain>gonad>liver and in the gonads, gad67 was significantly higher in expression than gad65 mRNA. In the liver and gonad, the relative abundance of the subunits followed a general trend of gabrb1>gabrb2=gabrg1=gabrg2>gabra1=gabra5. To explore the effects of GABA in the ovary, tissue explants from reproductive female FHMs were treated with GABA (10(-10), 10(-8) and 10(-6)M) for 12h. GABA had no significant effect on 17β-estradiol production or on mRNA abundance for genes involved in ovarian steroidogenesis (e.g., 11βhsd, cyp17, cyp19a). There was a significant decrease in estrogen receptor 2a (esr2a) mRNA with 10(-10)M GABA. This study begins to investigate the GABA system in non-neural tissues of

  6. Pregnenolone sulfate restores the glutamate-nitric-oxide-cGMP pathway and extracellular GABA in cerebellum and learning and motor coordination in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Usano, Alba; Cauli, Omar; Agusti, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-02-19

    Around 40% of cirrhotic patients show minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), with mild cognitive impairment which reduces their quality of life and life span. Treatment of MHE is unsatisfactory, and there are no specific treatments for the neurological alterations in MHE. Hyperammonemia is the main contributor to neurological alterations in MHE. New agents acting on molecular targets involved in brain mechanisms leading to neurological alterations are needed to treat MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning of a Y-maze task by impairing the glutamate-nitric-oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum, in part by enhancing GABA(A) receptor activation, which also induces motor in-coordination. Acute pregnenolone sulfate (PregS) restores the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in hyperammonemic rats. This work aimed to assess whether chronic treatment of hyperammonemic rats with PregS restores (1) motor coordination; (2) extracellular GABA in cerebellum; (3) learning of the Y-maze task; (4) the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Chronic intracerebral administration of PregS normalizes motor coordination likely due to extracellular GABA reduction. PregS restores learning ability by restoring the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to both enhanced NMDA receptor activation and reduced GABA(A) receptor activation. Similar treatments would improve cognitive and motor alterations in patients with MHE. PMID:24256194

  7. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  8. Neuropharmacological and neurobiological relevance of in vivo ¹H-MRS of GABA and glutamate for preclinical drug discovery in mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Waschkies, Conny F; Bruns, Andreas; Müller, Stephan; Kapps, Martin; Borroni, Edilio; von Kienlin, Markus; Rudin, Markus; Künnecke, Basil

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)) is a translational modality with great appeal for neuroscience since the two major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate, and GABA, can be noninvasively quantified in vivo and have served to explore disease state and effects of drug treatment. Yet, if (1)H-MRS shall serve for decision making in preclinical pharmaceutical drug discovery, it has to meet stringent requirements. In particular, (1)H-MRS needs to reliably report neurobiologically relevant but rather small changes in neurometabolite levels upon pharmacological interventions and to faithfully appraise target engagement in the associated molecular pathways at pharmacologically relevant doses. Here, we thoroughly addressed these matters with a three-pronged approach. Firstly, we determined the sensitivity and reproducibility of (1)H-MRS in rat at 9.4 Tesla for detecting changes in GABA and glutamate levels in the striatum and the prefrontal cortex, respectively. Secondly, we evaluated the neuropharmacological and neurobiological relevance of the MRS readouts by pharmacological interventions with five well-characterized drugs (vigabatrin, 3-mercaptopropionate, tiagabine, methionine sulfoximine, and riluzole), which target key nodes in GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Finally, we corroborated the MRS findings with ex vivo biochemical analyses of drug exposure and neurometabolite concentrations. For all five interventions tested, (1)H-MRS provided distinct drug dose-effect relationships in GABA and glutamate over preclinically relevant dose ranges and changes as low as 6% in glutamate and 12% in GABA were reliably detected from 16 mm(3) volumes-of-interest. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the value and limitation of quantitative (1)H-MRS of glutamate and GABA for preclinical pharmaceutical research in mental disorders. PMID:24694923

  9. Disorders of glutamate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kelly, A; Stanley, C A

    2001-01-01

    The significant role the amino acid glutamate assumes in a number of fundamental metabolic pathways is becoming better understood. As a central junction for interchange of amino nitrogen, glutamate facilitates both amino acid synthesis and degradation. In the liver, glutamate is the terminus for release of ammonia from amino acids, and the intrahepatic concentration of glutamate modulates the rate of ammonia detoxification into urea. In pancreatic beta-cells, oxidation of glutamate mediates amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. In the central nervous system, glutamate serves as an excitatory neurotransmittor. Glutamate is also the precursor of the inhibitory neurotransmittor GABA, as well as glutamine, a potential mediator of hyperammonemic neurotoxicity. The recent identification of a novel form of congenital hyperinsulinism associated with asymptomatic hyperammonemia assigns glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase a more important role than previously recognized in beta-cell insulin secretion and hepatic and CNS ammonia detoxification. Disruptions of glutamate metabolism have been implicated in other clinical disorders, such as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, confirming the importance of intact glutamate metabolism. This article will review glutamate metabolism and clinical disorders associated with disrupted glutamate metabolism. PMID:11754524

  10. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production

    PubMed Central

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  11. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  12. Dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin in germinated buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Wu, Tongjiao; Li, Huiying; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijie

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, the dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat were evaluated during germination. The results showed that SAEW treatment (pH 5.83, ACC of 20.3 mg/L) could promote the accumulation of GABA and rutin in germinated buckwheat. The GABA and rutin contents of SAEW-germinated buckwheat reached 143.20 and 739.9 mg/100 g respectively, which is significantly higher than those of control (P<0.05). Moreover, SAEW treatment could increase the activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and thus result in the GABA and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat. The results suggested that SAEW treatment could promote the rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat by influencing phenylpropanoid secondary metabolic pathway instead of the inhibition of rutin degrading enzyme (RDE) activity. In addition, SAEW treatment had no adverse impact on the sprouts growth and could reduce the microbial populations of germinated buckwheat during germination. PMID:26868552

  13. Long-term depression of glutamate-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid release in cerebellum by insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alamancos, M A; Torres-Aleman, I

    1993-01-01

    We tested the possibility that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) acts as a neuromodulator in the adult cerebellar cortex since previous observations indicated that IGF-I is located in the olivo-cerebellar system encompassing the inferior olive and Purkinje cells. We found that conjoint administration of IGF-I and glutamate through a microdialysis probe stereotaxically implanted into the cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei greatly depressed the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which normally follows a glutamate pulse. This inhibition was dose-dependent and long-lasting. Moreover, the effect was specific for glutamate since KCl-induced GABA release was not modified by IGF-I. Basic fibroblast growth factor, another growth-related peptide present in the cerebellum, did not alter the response of GABA to glutamate stimulation. In addition, electrical stimulation of the inferior olivary complex significantly raised IGF-I levels in the cerebellar cortex. Interestingly, when the inferior olive was stimulated in conjunction with glutamate administration, GABA release by cerebellar cells in response to subsequent glutamate pulses was depressed in a manner reminiscent of that seen after IGF-I. These findings indicate that IGF-I produces a long-lasting depression of GABA release by Purkinje cells in response to glutamate. IGF-I might be present in climbing fiber terminals and/or cells within the cerebellar cortex and thereby might affect Purkinje cell function. Whether this IGF-I-induced impairment of glutamate stimulation of Purkinje cells underlies functionally plastic processes such as long-term depression is open to question. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8346260

  14. Influence of exposure period on in vivo hippocampal glutamate and GABA release in rats chronically exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Lasley, S M; Green, M C; Gilbert, M E

    1999-08-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that continual exposure to 0.2% lead (Pb) beginning at birth diminishes depolarization-induced hippocampal glutamate (GLU) and GABA release in vivo. The present study sought to extend these findings by examining Pb-induced changes as a function of exposure period. Rats were continually exposed to 0.2% Pb in the drinking water beginning at conception (Gestational-Life, GL) or two weeks after weaning (Wean-Life, WL), while exposure in a third group was begun at conception but terminated at weaning (Gestational-Wean, GW). Hippocampal transmitter release was induced in adult animals by perfusion of 150 mM K+ in the presence of Ca+2 (total release) through a microdialysis probe in one test session, followed by perfusion through a contralateral probe in the absence of Ca+2 (Ca+2-independent release) in the second session. Decreases in total GLU and GABA release were observed in the GL and WL groups compared to controls over the first 20-min after initiation of high K+, decrements that could be attributed to exposure-induced reductions in Ca+2-dependent release. The pattern of Pb-induced changes in the GL group is similar to that observed previously in a group continuously exposed from birth, indicating that gestational exposure did not further enhance the impact of Pb beginning at birth when exposure in both groups extends into adulthood. Similar responses were also found in the WL group, indicating that exposure during early development is not a requirement to induce changes in GLU and GABA release. Pb-induced decreases in response were also seen in the GW group: a decrease in Ca+2-dependent GLU release was observed, while decrements in total and Ca+2-dependent GABA release were similar to those in the GL and WL groups. Thus, exposure limited to early development is also sufficient to produce deficits in evoked transmitter release. In addition, the exposure-induced decreases in GLU responses correspond to Pb-induced impairments in long

  15. Acid Stimulation (Sour Taste) Elicits GABA and Serotonin Release from Mouse Taste Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijen A.; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    Several transmitter candidates including serotonin (5-HT), ATP, and norepinephrine (NE) have been identified in taste buds. Recently, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as well as the associated synthetic enzymes and receptors have also been identified in taste cells. GABA reduces taste-evoked ATP secretion from Receptor cells and is considered to be an inhibitory transmitter in taste buds. However, to date, the identity of GABAergic taste cells and the specific stimulus for GABA release are not well understood. In the present study, we used genetically-engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably co-expressing GABAB receptors and Gαqo5 proteins to measure GABA release from isolated taste buds. We recorded robust responses from GABA biosensors when they were positioned against taste buds isolated from mouse circumvallate papillae and the buds were depolarized with KCl or a stimulated with an acid (sour) taste. In contrast, a mixture of sweet and bitter taste stimuli did not trigger GABA release. KCl- or acid-evoked GABA secretion from taste buds was Ca2+-dependent; removing Ca2+ from the bathing medium eliminated GABA secretion. Finally, we isolated individual taste cells to identify the origin of GABA secretion. GABA was released only from Presynaptic (Type III) cells and not from Receptor (Type II) cells. Previously, we reported that 5-HT released from Presynaptic cells inhibits taste-evoked ATP secretion. Combined with the recent findings that GABA depresses taste-evoked ATP secretion [1], the present results indicate that GABA and 5-HT are inhibitory transmitters in mouse taste buds and both likely play an important role in modulating taste responses. PMID:22028776

  16. An analysis of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K G; Dreksler, S

    1979-03-01

    The binding of [3H]GABA to membranes prepared from human brains obtained post morten was examined. This binding was independent of patient sex, age (16--80 years), postmortem interval (4--33 h) or storage time when frozen (0-64 months). In preparations from cerebellar cortex various compounds displaced [3H]GABA binding with the following order of potency: muscimol greater than 3-aminopropanesulfonic acid greater than GABA greater than imidazoleacet acid greater than delta-amino-n-valeric acid greater than 3-hydroxyGABA greater than bicuculline. Other compounds active 'in vitro' included strychnine, homocarnosine and some (e.g. clozapine, thioridazine, pimozide) but not all (chlorpromazine, haloperiodol) neuroleptics. Compounds inactive 'in vitro' included aminooxyacetic acid, baclofen, picrotoxin, anticholinergics, metrazole, anticonvulsants and naloxone. Triton X-100 augmented the [3H]GABA binding (25 nM) by about 10--20-fold in most brain regions. [3H]GABA binding (IC50) was altered in Huntington's chorea and Reye's syndrome, but not in schizophrenics (4-neuroleptic-treated patients) or sudden infant death syndrome. The data presented strongly support the proposal that the measurement of [3H]GABA binding in postmortem human brain offers a reflection of the state of the physiologically relevant GABA receptor. PMID:218679

  17. Vesicular Glutamate (VGluT), GABA (VGAT), and Acetylcholine (VAChT) Transporters in Basal Forebrain Axon Terminals Innervating the Lateral Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    HENNY, PABLO; JONES, BARBARA E.

    2008-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) is known to play important roles in cortical activation and sleep, which are likely mediated by chemically differentiated cell groups including cholinergic, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and other unidentified neurons. One important target of these cells is the lateral hypothalamus (LH), which is critical for arousal and the maintenance of wakefulness. To determine whether chemically specific BF neurons provide an innervation to the LH, we employed anterograde transport of 10,000 MW biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) together with immunohistochemical staining of the vesicular transporter proteins (VTPs) for glutamate (VGluT1, -2, and -3), GABA (VGAT), or acetylcholine (ACh, VAChT). In addition, we applied triple staining for the postsynaptic proteins (PSPs), PSD-95 with VGluT or Gephyrin (Geph) with VGAT, to examine whether the BDA-labeled varicosities may form excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the LH. Axons originating from BDA-labeled neurons in the magnocellular preoptic nucleus (MCPO) and substantia innominata (SI) descended within the medial forebrain bundle and extended collateral varicose fibers to contact LH neurons. In the LH, the BDA-labeled varicosities were immunopositive (+) for VAChT (~10%), VGluT2 (~25%), or VGAT (~50%), revealing an important influence of newly identified glutamatergic together with GABAergic BF inputs. Moreover, in confocal microscopy, VGluT2+ and VGAT+ terminals were apposed to PSD-95+ and Geph+ profiles respectively, indicating that they formed synaptic contacts with LH neurons. The important inputs from glutamatergic and GABAergic BF cells could thus regulate LH neurons in an opposing manner to stimulate vs. suppress cortical activation and behavioral arousal reciprocally. PMID:16572456

  18. Simultaneous detection of resolved glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid at 4 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiani; Yang, Shaolin; Xuan, Yang; Jiang, Quan; Yang, Yihong; Haacke, E. Mark

    2007-04-01

    A new approach is introduced to simultaneously detect resolved glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) using a standard STEAM localization pulse sequence with the optimized sequence timing parameters. This approach exploits the dependence of the STEAM spectra of the strongly coupled spin systems of Glu, Gln, and GABA on the echo time TE and the mixing time TM at 4 T to find an optimized sequence parameter set, i.e., {TE, TM}, where the outer-wings of the Glu C4 multiplet resonances around 2.35 ppm, the Gln C4 multiplet resonances around 2.45 ppm, and the GABA C2 multiplet resonance around 2.28 ppm are significantly suppressed and the three resonances become virtual singlets simultaneously and thus resolved. Spectral simulation and optimization were conducted to find the optimized sequence parameters, and phantom and in vivo experiments (on normal human brains, one patient with traumatic brain injury, and one patient with brain tumor) were carried out for verification. The results have demonstrated that the Gln, Glu, and GABA signals at 2.2-2.5 ppm can be well resolved using a standard STEAM sequence with the optimized sequence timing parameters around {82 ms, 48 ms} at 4 T, while the other main metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCho), and creatine (tCr), are still preserved in the same spectrum. The technique can be easily implemented and should prove to be a useful tool for the basic and clinical studies associated with metabolism of Glu, Gln, and/or GABA.

  19. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  20. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  1. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  2. A tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that affects tomato fruit amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Christopher J; Thomas, Benjamin; Baxter, Charles J; Smith, J Andrew C; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2015-03-01

    Vacuolar accumulation of acidic metabolites is an important aspect of tomato fruit flavour and nutritional quality. The amino acids Asp and Glu accumulate to high concentrations during ripening, while γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) shows an approximately stoichiometric decline. Given that GABA can be catabolised to form Glu and subsequently Asp, and the requirement for the fruit to maintain osmotic homeostasis during ripening, we hypothesised the existence of a tonoplast transporter that exports GABA from the vacuole in exchange for import of either Asp or Glu. We show here that the tomato vacuolar membrane possesses such a transport property: transport of Glu across isolated tonoplast vesicle membranes was trans-stimulated in counterexchange mode by GABA, Glu and Asp. We identified SlCAT9 as a candidate protein for this exchanger using quantitative proteomics of a tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction. Transient expression of a SlCAT9-YFP fusion in tobacco confirmed a tonoplast localisation. The function of the protein was examined by overexpression of SlCAT9 in transgenic tomato plants. Tonoplast vesicles isolated from transgenic plants showed higher rates of Glu and GABA transport than wild-type (WT) only when assayed in counterexchange mode with Glu, Asp, or GABA. Moreover, there were substantial increases in the content of all three cognate amino acids in ripe fruit from the transgenic plants. We conclude that SlCAT9 is a tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that strongly influences the accumulation of these amino acids during fruit development. PMID:25602029

  3. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mariko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate) of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via reactions catalyzed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase, GABA transaminase, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development. PMID:26322056

  4. Brain infection with Staphylococcus aureus leads to high extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Dahlberg, Daniel; Mariussen, Espen; Goverud, Ingeborg Løstegaard; Antal, Ellen-Ann; Tønjum, Tone; Maehlen, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcal brain infections may cause mental deterioration and epileptic seizures, suggesting interference with normal neurotransmission in the brain. We injected Staphylococcus aureus into rat striatum and found an initial 76% reduction in the extracellular level of glutamate as detected by microdialysis at 2 hr after staphylococcal infection. At 8 hr after staphylococcal infection, however, the extracellular level of glutamate had increased 12-fold, and at 20 hr it had increased >30-fold. The extracellular level of aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) also increased greatly. Extracellular Zn(2+) , which was estimated at ∼2.6 µmol/liter in the control situation, was increased by 330% 1-2.5 hr after staphylococcal infection and by 100% at 8 and 20 hr. The increase in extracellular glutamate, aspartate, and GABA appeared to reflect the degree of tissue damage. The area of tissue damage greatly exceeded the area of staphylococcal infiltration, pointing to soluble factors being responsible for cell death. However, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 ameliorated neither tissue damage nor the increase in extracellular neuroactive amino acids, suggesting the presence of neurotoxic factors other than glutamate and aspartate. In vitro staphylococci incubated with glutamine and glucose formed glutamate, so bacteria could be an additional source of infection-related glutamate. We conclude that the dramatic increase in the extracellular concentration of neuroactive amino acids and zinc could interfere with neurotransmission in the surrounding brain tissue, contributing to mental deterioration and a predisposition to epileptic seizures, which are often seen in brain abscess patients. PMID:25043715

  5. Frontal Glutamate and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels and Their Associations With Mismatch Negativity and Digit Sequencing Task Performance in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Laura M.; Summerfelt, Ann; Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Du, Xiaoming; Chiappelli, Joshua J.; Krishna, Nithin; West, Jeffrey; Muellerklein, Florian; Kochunov, Peter; Hong, L. Elliot

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) is a biomarker for schizophrenia thought to reflect glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function and excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission balance. However, the association of glutamate level with MMN has not been directly examined in patients with schizophrenia, to our knowledge. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to MMN and digit sequencing task (DST) performance, an assessment of verbal working memory, in schizophrenia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Fifty-three control participants from the community and 45 persons with schizophrenia from outpatient clinics completed an electroencephalographic session for MMN, magnetic resonance spectroscopy for glutamate and GABA, and a DST. The study dates were July 2011 to May 2014, and the dates of our analysis were May 2014 to August 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Glutamate, GABA, the ratio of glutamine to glutamate, MMN amplitude, and DST. Structural equation modeling was used to test the effects of neurochemistry and MMN amplitude on DST performance. RESULTS The 45 persons with schizophrenia were a mean (SD) of 37.7 (12.8) years and the control participants were 37.1 (13.1) years. The schizophrenia group had a mean (SD) of 14.7 (12.1) years of illness. Mismatch negativity amplitude (F = 4.39, P = .04) and glutamate (F = 9.69, P = .002) were reduced in the schizophrenia group. Smaller MMN amplitude was significantly associated with lower GABA level (P = .008), lower glutamate level (P = .05), and higher ratio of glutamine to glutamate (P = .003). Reduced MMN amplitude was linked to poor verbal working memory in schizophrenia (P = .002). Modeling revealed that a proxy of glutamatergic function, indexed by the ratio of glutamine to glutamate, influenced a path from the ratio of glutamine to glutamate to MMN to verbal working memory (P = .38 [root-mean-square error of approximation, P < .001] by χ2 test

  6. Pregnenolone Sulfate Restores the Glutamate-Nitric-Oxide-cGMP Pathway and Extracellular GABA in Cerebellum and Learning and Motor Coordination in Hyperammonemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Around 40% of cirrhotic patients show minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), with mild cognitive impairment which reduces their quality of life and life span. Treatment of MHE is unsatisfactory, and there are no specific treatments for the neurological alterations in MHE. Hyperammonemia is the main contributor to neurological alterations in MHE. New agents acting on molecular targets involved in brain mechanisms leading to neurological alterations are needed to treat MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning of a Y-maze task by impairing the glutamate-nitric-oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum, in part by enhancing GABAA receptor activation, which also induces motor in-coordination. Acute pregnenolone sulfate (PregS) restores the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in hyperammonemic rats. This work aimed to assess whether chronic treatment of hyperammonemic rats with PregS restores (1) motor coordination; (2) extracellular GABA in cerebellum; (3) learning of the Y-maze task; (4) the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Chronic intracerebral administration of PregS normalizes motor coordination likely due to extracellular GABA reduction. PregS restores learning ability by restoring the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to both enhanced NMDA receptor activation and reduced GABAA receptor activation. Similar treatments would improve cognitive and motor alterations in patients with MHE. PMID:24256194

  7. POSTTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION OF GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE 67 BY INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA: Evidence for the involvement of dopamine D1 receptor signaling$

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Kumar, Ganesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with sleep apnea leads to cardio-respiratory morbidities. Previous studies have shown that IH alters the synthesis of neurotransmitters including catecholamines and neuropeptides in brainstem regions associated with regulation of cardio-respiratory functions. GABA, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has been implicated in cardio-respiratory control. GABA synthesis is primarily catalyzed by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Here, we tested the hypothesis that IH like its effect on other transmitters also alters GABA synthesis. The impact of IH on GABA synthesis was investigated in pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells, a neuronal cell line which is known to express active form of GAD67 in the cytosolic fraction and also assessed the underlying mechanisms contributing to IH-evoked response. Exposure of cell cultures to IH decreased GAD67 activity and GABA level. IH-evoked decrease in GAD67 activity was due to increased cAMP - protein kinase A (PKA) - dependent phosphorylation of GAD67, but not as a result of changes in either GAD67 mRNA or protein expression. PKA inhibitor restored GAD67 activity and GABA levels in IH treated cells. PC12 cells express dopamine 1 receptor (D1R), a G-protein coupled receptor whose activation increased adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Treatment with either D1R antagonist or AC inhibitor reversed IH-evoked GAD67 inhibition. Silencing D1R expression with siRNA reversed cAMP elevation and GAD67 inhibition by IH. These results provide evidence for the role of D1R-cAMP-PKA signaling in IH mediated inhibition of GAD67 via protein phosphorylation resulting in down regulation of GABA synthesis. PMID:20969567

  8. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  9. Rat hippocampal glutamate and GABA release exhibit biphasic effects as a function of chronic lead exposure level.

    PubMed

    Lasley, S M; Gilbert, M E

    2002-03-01

    Previous work has suggested that the lead (Pb) exposure-induced decrease in K(+)-evoked hippocampal glutamate (GLU) release is an important factor in the elevated threshold and diminished magnitude reported for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in exposed animals. In addition, complex dose-effect relationships between Pb exposure level and LTP have been reported. This investigation was conducted to determine the effects of Pb on hippocampal GLU and GABA release as a function of exposure level. Rats were continuously exposed to 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0% Pb in the drinking water beginning at gestational day 15-16. Hippocampal transmitter release was induced in adult males by perfusion of 150 mM K(+) in the presence of Ca(+2) (total release) through a microdialysis probe in one test session, followed by perfusion through a contralateral probe in the absence of Ca(+2) (Ca(+2)-independent release) in the second session. Chronic exposure produced decreases in total K(+)-stimulated hippocampal GLU and GABA release at exposure levels of 0.1-0.5% Pb. Maximal effects were seen in the 0.2% group (blood Pb = 40 microg/100 ml), and changes in total release could be directly traced to alterations in the Ca(+2)-dependent component. However, these effects were less evident in the 0.5% group and were no longer present in the 1.0% Pb group, thus defining U-shaped dose-effect relationships. Moreover, in the absence of Ca(+2) in the dialysis perfusate, K(+)-induced release was elevated in the 2 highest exposure groups, suggesting a Pb(+2)-induced enhancement in evoked release. This pattern of results indicates the presence of 2 actions of Pb on in vivo transmitter release: a more potent suppression of stimulated release seen at lower exposure levels (27-62 microg/100 ml) combined with Ca+2-mimetic actions to independently induce exocytosis that is exhibited at higher exposure levels (> or =62 microg/100 ml). Furthermore, significant similarities in the dose-effect relationships

  10. S-(N, N-diethylcarbamoyl)glutathione (carbamathione), a disulfiram metabolite and its effect on nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex dopamine, GABA, and glutamate: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Faiman, Morris D; Kaul, Swetha; Latif, Shaheen A; Williams, Todd D; Lunte, Craig E

    2013-12-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), used for the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) for over six decades, most recently has shown promise for treating cocaine dependence. Although DSF's mechanism of action in alcohol abuse is due to the inhibition of liver mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), its mechanism of action in the treatment of cocaine dependence is unknown. DSF is a pro-drug, forming a number of metabolites each with discrete pharmacological actions. One metabolite formed during DSF bioactivation is S-(N, N-diethylcarbamoyl) glutathione (carbamathione) (carb). We previously showed that carb affects glutamate binding. In the present studies, we employed microdialysis techniques to investigate the effect of carb administration on dopamine (DA), GABA, and glutamate (Glu) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), two brain regions implicated in substance abuse dependence. The effect of DSF on DA, GABA, and Glu in the NAc also was determined. Both studies were carried out in male rats. Carb (20, 50, 200 mg/kg i v) in a dose-dependent manner increased DA, decreased GABA, and had a biphasic effect on Glu, first increasing and then decreasing Glu in both the NAc and mPFC. These changes all occurred concurrently. After carb administration, NAc and mPFC carb, as well as carb in plasma, were rapidly eliminated with a half-life for each approximately 4 min, while the changes in DA, GABA, and GLu in the NAc and mPFC persisted for approximately two hours. The maximal increase in carb (Cmax) in the NAc and mPFC after carb administration was dose-dependent, as was the area under the curve (AUC). DSF (200 mg/kg i p) also increased DA, decreased GABA, and had a biphasic effect on Glu in the NAc similar to that observed in the NAc after carb administration. When the cytochrome P450 inhibitor N-benzylimidazole (NBI) (20 mg/kg i p) was administered before DSF dosing, no carb could be detected in the NAc and plasma and also no changes in NAc DA, GABA

  11. The importance of glutamate, glycine, and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transport and regulation in manganese, mercury and lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Aschner, Michael . E-mail: michael.aschner@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-05-01

    Historically, amino acids were studied in the context of their importance in protein synthesis. In the 1950s, the focus of research shifted as amino acids were recognized as putative neurotransmitters. Today, many amino acids are considered important neurochemicals. Although many amino acids play a role in neurotransmission, glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are among the more prevalent and better understood. Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and Gly and GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the central nervous system, are known to be tightly regulated. Prolonged exposure to environmental toxicants, such as manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb), however, can lead to dysregulation of these neurochemicals and subsequent neurotoxicity. While the ability of these metals to disrupt the regulation of Glu, Gly and GABA have been studied, few articles have examined the collective role of these amino acids in the respective metal's mechanism of toxicity. For each of the neurotransmitters above, we will provide a brief synopsis of their regulatory function, including the importance of transport and re-uptake in maintaining their optimal function. Additionally, the review will address the hypothesis that aberrant homeostasis of any of these amino acids, or a combination of the three, plays a role in the neurotoxicity of Mn, Hg, or Pb.

  12. Contents of Neo-flavored Tea (GABA Kintaro) Containing γ-Aminobutyric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Yoshiya

    The contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), catechins, theaflavins, caffeine and pheophorbide-a in neo-flavored tea (GABA Kintaro tea) were analyzed. 1)The amounts of GABA were increased over 1.5mg/g by means of infrared ray irradiation with agitation treatment. 2)There was a tendency for the amount of catechins to be decreased by this treatment, whereas the amount of theaflavins tended to increase with the same treatment. The composition of these contents in this GABA Kintaro tea was almost the same as that of black tea. 3)There was a tendency for the amount of caffeine to be decreased by this treatment. 4)There was a tendency for the amount of pheophorbide-a to be increased by this treatment. 5)The result of this study showed that the amounts of GABA and theaflavins in this GABA Kintaro tea were higher than ordinary green tea but contained few catechins.It became clear that the amount of pheophorbide-a in this GABA Kintaro tea was less than the standard value established in processed chlorella.

  13. Therapeutic Effects of Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition. PMID:24984001

  14. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate.

    PubMed

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  15. GABA Production in Lactococcus lactis Is Enhanced by Arginine and Co-addition of Malate

    PubMed Central

    Laroute, Valérie; Yasaro, Chonthicha; Narin, Waranya; Mazzoli, Roberto; Pessione, Enrica; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Loubière, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis NCDO 2118 was previously selected for its ability to decarboxylate glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an interesting nutritional supplement able to improve mood and relaxation. Amino acid decarboxylation is generally considered as among the biochemical systems allowing lactic acid bacteria to counteracting acidic stress and obtaining metabolic energy. These strategies also include arginine deiminase pathway and malolactic fermentation but little is known about their possible interactions of with GABA production. In the present study, the effects of glutamate, arginine, and malate (i.e., the substrates of these acid-resistance pathways) on L. lactis NCDO 2118 growth and GABA production performances were analyzed. Both malate and arginine supplementation resulted in an efficient reduction of acidity and improvement of bacterial biomass compared to glutamate supplementation. Glutamate decarboxylation was limited to narrow environmental conditions (pH < 5.1) and physiological state (stationary phase). However, some conditions were able to improve GABA production or activate glutamate decarboxylation system even outside of this compass. Arginine clearly stimulated glutamate decarboxylation: the highest GABA production (8.6 mM) was observed in cultures supplemented with both arginine and glutamate. The simultaneous addition of arginine, malate, and glutamate enabled earlier GABA production (i.e., during exponential growth) at relatively high pH (6.5). As far as we know, no previous study has reported GABA production in such conditions. Although further studies are needed to understand the molecular basis of these phenomena, these results represent important keys suitable of application in GABA production processes. PMID:27458444

  16. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  17. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  18. Centrifuge-induced hypergravity: [ 3H]GABA and L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake, exocytosis and efflux mediated by high-affinity, sodium-dependent transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T. A.; Himmelreich, N. H.

    The effects of centrifuge-induced hypergravity on the presynaptic events have been investigated in order to provide further insight into regulation of glutamate and GABA neurotransmission and correlation between excitatory and inhibitory responses under artificial gravity conditions. Exposure of animals to hypergravity (centrifugation of rats at 10 G for 1 h) has been found to cause changes in the synaptic processes of brain, in particular neurotransmitter release and uptake in rat brain synaptosomes. Hypergravity loading resulted in more than two-fold enhancement of GABA transporter activity ( Vmax increased from 1.4 ± 0.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the control group to 3.3 ± 0.59 nmol/min/mg of protein for the animals exposed to hypergravity ( P ⩽ 0.05)). The maximal velocity of L-[ 14C]glutamate uptake decreased from 12.5 ± 3.2 to 5.6 ± 0.9 nmol/min/mg of protein under artificial gravity conditions. Depolarization-evoked exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters has also changed in response to hypergravity. It increased for GABA (7.2 ± 0.54% and 11.74 ± 1.2% of total accumulated label for control and hypergravity, respectively ( P ⩽ 0.05)), but reduced for glutamate (14.4 ± 0.7% and 6.2 ± 1.9%, for control and hypergravity, respectively). Thus, comparative analysis of the neurotransmitter uptake and release has demonstrated that short-term centrifuge-induced 10 G hypergravity loading intensified inhibitory and attenuated excitatory processes in nerve terminals. The activation or reduction of neurotransmitter uptake appeared to be coupled with similarly directed alterations of the neurotransmitter release.

  19. Antiepileptic Potential of Matrine via Regulation the Levels of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamic Acid in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-01-01

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug. PMID:24317434

  20. How Imaging Glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric Acid, and Dopamine Can Inform the Clinical Treatment of Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Hillmer, Ansel T; Mason, Graeme F; Fucito, Lisa M; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Cosgrove, Kelly P

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have dramatically advanced our understanding of the neurochemical basis of alcohol dependence, a major public health issue. In this paper, we review the research generated from neurochemical specific imaging modalities including magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography in studies of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. We focus on studies interrogating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and dopamine, as these are prominent neurotransmitter systems implicated in alcohol dependence. Highlighted findings include diminished dopaminergic functioning and modulation of the GABA system by tobacco smoking during alcohol withdrawal. Then, we consider how these findings impact the clinical treatment of alcohol dependence and discuss directions for future experiments to address existing gaps in the literature, for example, sex differences and smoking comorbidity. These and other considerations provide opportunities to build upon the current neurochemistry imaging literature of alcohol dependence and withdrawal, which may usher in improved therapeutic and relapse prevention strategies. PMID:26510169

  1. Differential maturation of vesicular glutamate and GABA transporter expression in the mouse auditory forebrain during the first weeks of hearing.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Troy A; Clause, Amanda R; Takahata, Toru; Hackett, Nicholas J; Polley, Daniel B

    2016-06-01

    Vesicular transporter proteins are an essential component of the presynaptic machinery that regulates neurotransmitter storage and release. They also provide a key point of control for homeostatic signaling pathways that maintain balanced excitation and inhibition following changes in activity levels, including the onset of sensory experience. To advance understanding of their roles in the developing auditory forebrain, we tracked the expression of the vesicular transporters of glutamate (VGluT1, VGluT2) and GABA (VGAT) in primary auditory cortex (A1) and medial geniculate body (MGB) of developing mice (P7, P11, P14, P21, adult) before and after ear canal opening (~P11-P13). RNA sequencing, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were combined to track changes in transporter expression and document regional patterns of transcript and protein localization. Overall, vesicular transporter expression changed the most between P7 and P21. The expression patterns and maturational trajectories of each marker varied by brain region, cortical layer, and MGB subdivision. VGluT1 expression was highest in A1, moderate in MGB, and increased with age in both regions. VGluT2 mRNA levels were low in A1 at all ages, but high in MGB, where adult levels were reached by P14. VGluT2 immunoreactivity was prominent in both regions. VGluT1 (+) and VGluT2 (+) transcripts were co-expressed in MGB and A1 somata, but co-localization of immunoreactive puncta was not detected. In A1, VGAT mRNA levels were relatively stable from P7 to adult, while immunoreactivity increased steadily. VGAT (+) transcripts were rare in MGB neurons, whereas VGAT immunoreactivity was robust at all ages. Morphological changes in immunoreactive puncta were found in two regions after ear canal opening. In the ventral MGB, a decrease in VGluT2 puncta density was accompanied by an increase in puncta size. In A1, perisomatic VGAT and VGluT1 terminals became prominent around the neuronal somata. Overall, the

  2. Low dose of L-glutamic acid attenuated the neurological dysfunctions and excitotoxicity in bilateral common carotid artery occluded mice.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Muthiah; Abdul, Khadar K; Justin, Antony

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, produces excitotoxicity through its agonistic action on postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, resulting in neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that the administration of low doses of glutamate in cerebral ischemia could attenuate the excitotoxicity in neurons through its autoreceptor regulatory mechanism, and thereby control neurodegeneration. To test the hypothesis, the effect of L-glutamic acid (L-GA) 400 μmol/l/kg was evaluated in a bilateral common carotid artery occlusion-induced global ischemic mouse model. Memantine was used as a positive control. Global ischemia in mice was induced by occlusion of both the common carotid artery (bilateral common carotid artery occlusion) for 20 min, followed by reperfusion injury. L-GA was infused slowly through the tail vein 30 min before the surgery and every 24 h thereafter until the end of the experiment. The time-dependent change in cerebral blood flow was monitored using a laser Doppler image analyzer. The neurotransmitters glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the neurobiochemicals ATP, glutathione, and nitric oxide were measured in the different regions of brain at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after reperfusion injury. L-GA increased locomotor activity, muscle coordination, and cerebral blood flow in ischemic mice at 72 h after ischemic insult. L-GA reduced glutamate levels in the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus at 72 h, whereas GABA levels were elevated in all three brain regions studied. Further, L-GA elevated glutathione levels and attenuated nitric oxide levels, but failed to restore ATP levels 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion. We conclude that the gradual reduction of glutamate along with elevation of GABA in different brain regions could have contributed toward the neuroprotective effect of L-GA. Hence, a slow infusion of a low dose of L-GA could be beneficial in controlling excitotoxicity-induced neurodegeneration following ischemia

  3. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  4. Impact of exogenous GABA treatments on endogenous GABA metabolism in anthurium cut flowers in response to postharvest chilling temperature.

    PubMed

    Aghdam, Morteza Soleimani; Naderi, Roohangiz; Jannatizadeh, Abbasali; Babalar, Mesbah; Sarcheshmeh, Mohammad Ali Askari; Faradonbe, Mojtaba Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Anthurium flowers are susceptible to chilling injury, and the optimum storage temperature is 12.5-20 °C. The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt pathway may alleviate chilling stress in horticultural commodities by providing energy (ATP), reducing molecules (NADH), and minimizing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this experiment, the impact of a preharvest spray treatment with 1 mM GABA and postharvest treatment of 5 mM GABA stem-end dipping on GABA shunt pathway activity of anthurium cut flowers (cv. Sirion) in response to cold storage (4 °C for 21 days) was investigated. GABA treatments resulted in lower glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and higher GABA transaminase (GABA-T) activities in flowers during cold storage, which was associated with lower GABA content and coincided with higher ATP content. GABA treatments also enhanced accumulation of endogenous glycine betaine (GB) in flowers during cold storage, as well as higher spathe relative water content (RWC). These findings suggest that GABA treatments may alleviate chilling injury of anthurium cut flowers by enhancing GABA shunt pathway activity leading to provide sufficient ATP and promoting endogenous GB accumulation. PMID:27135813

  5. A neuronal disruption in redox homeostasis elicited by ammonia alters the glycine/glutamate (GABA) cycle and contributes to MMA-induced excitability.

    PubMed

    Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Gabbi, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Della-Pace, Iuri Domingues; Rodrigues, Fernanda Silva; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Paula; da Silveira Junior, Mauro Eduardo Porto; da Silva, Luís Roberto Hart; Grisólia, Alan Barroso Araújo; Braga, Danielle Valente; Dobrachinski, Fernando; da Silva, Anderson Manoel Herculano Oliveira; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Marchesan, Sara; Furian, Ana Flavia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2016-06-01

    Hyperammonemia is a common finding in children with methylmalonic acidemia. However, its contribution to methylmalonate-induced excitotoxicty is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms by which ammonia influences in the neurotoxicity induced by methylmalonate (MMA) in mice. The effects of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl 3, 6, and 12 mmol/kg; s.c.) on electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral convulsions induced by MMA (0.3, 0.66, and 1 µmol/2 µL, i.c.v.) were observed in mice. After, ammonia, TNF-α, IL1β, IL-6, nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Methyl-Tetrazolium (MTT) reduction, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity levels were measured in the cerebral cortex. The binding of [(3)H]flunitrazepam, release of glutamate-GABA; glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and neuronal damage [opening of blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cellular death volume] were also measured. EEG recordings showed that an intermediate dose of NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) increased the duration of convulsive episodes induced by MMA (0.66 μmol/2 μL i.c.v). NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) administration also induced neuronal ammonia and NOx increase, as well as mitochondrial ROS generation throughout oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) to DCF-RS, followed by GS and GAD inhibition. The NH4Cl plus MMA administration did not alter cytokine levels, plasma fluorescein extravasation, or neuronal damage. However, it potentiated DCF-RS levels, decreased the ΔΨ potential, reduced MTT, inhibited SDH activity, and increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. NH4Cl also altered the GABA cycle characterized by GS and GAD activity inhibition, [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding, and GABA release after MMA injection. On the basis of our findings, the changes in ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) levels elicited by ammonia alter the glycine/glutamate

  6. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain. PMID:21437781

  7. Neonatal hyperammonemia: the N-carbamoyl-L-glutamic acid test.

    PubMed

    Guffon, Nathalie; Schiff, Manuel; Cheillan, David; Wermuth, Bendicht; Häberle, Johannes; Vianey-Saban, Christine

    2005-08-01

    In a prospective study, patients with a suspected urea cycle defect underwent oral N-carbamoyl-L-glutamic acid loading testing. In patients with subsequently confirmed N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency, hyperammonemia normalized within 8 hours. This test may be useful in the early diagnosis of patients with suspected urea cycle disorders. PMID:16126063

  8. Synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Tijs M; Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Franssen, Maurice C R; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2011-06-20

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the intermediate 3-cyanopropanoic amide was achieved from glutamic acid 5-methyl ester in an 86 mol% yield and from glutamine in a 56 mol % yield. 3-Cyanopropanoic acid can be converted into succinonitrile, with a selectivity close to 100% and a 62% conversion, by making use of a palladium(II)-catalyzed equilibrium reaction with acetonitrile. Thus, a new route to produce biobased 1,4-diaminobutane has been discovered. PMID:21557494

  9. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN...

  14. Propofol differentially inhibits the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine in the spinal dorsal horn of rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yong, Zheng; Mi, Weidong; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol) is an intravenous anesthetic that is commonly used for the general anesthesia. It is well known that the spinal cord is one of the working targets of general anesthesia including propofol. However, there is a lack of investigation of the effects of propofol on spinal dorsal horn which is important for the sensory transmission of nociceptive signals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing dosage of propofol on the release of glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in the spinal dorsal horn. Materials and Methods: The efflux of Glu, GABA or Gly in the spinal dorsal horn of rats was detected using transverse spinal microdialysis under an awake condition and various depths of propofol anesthesia. The infusion rates of propofol were, in order, 400 µg/(kg·min), 600 µg/(kg·min) and 800 µg/(kg·min), with a 20 min infusion period being maintained at each infusion rate. Results: Propofol decreased the glutamate efflux within spinal dorsal horn in a dose-dependent manner, and the maximum decrease was 56.8 ± 6.0% at high-dose propofol infusion producing immobility. The inhibitory GABA and Gly efflux was also decreased about 15–20% at low-dose propofol infusion only producing sedation, but did not continue to drop with higher doses of propofol. Conclusion: Propofol decreased both excitatory and inhibitory amino acids efflux in spinal dorsal horn, and the preferential suppression of the excitatory amino acid might be associated with the analgesic effect of propofol. PMID:26557972

  15. Cloning of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rho 1 cDNA: a GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, G R; Lu, L; O'Hara, B F; Kasch, L M; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Donovan, D M; Shimada, S; Antonarakis, S E; Guggino, W B; Uhl, G R

    1991-01-01

    Type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. We have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence in 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABAA subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA rho 1, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family. Images PMID:1849271

  16. Possible role for glutamic acid decarboxylase in fibromyalgia symptoms: a conceptual model for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Caris T; Carter, Lawrence P

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition of chronic generalized musculoskeletal pain that is thought to be a disorder of central pain sensitization. A number of neurotransmitters in the ascending and descending pain pathways have been implicated in FM including glutamate and GABA. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to GABA and decreased expression or activity of this enzyme could result in an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the ascending and descending pain pathways. Specifically, the expression and activity of the predominant isoform of GAD (GAD65) is influenced by several factors that are associated with FM such as female sex, poor diet, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and stress. We hypothesize that decreased GAD expression and/or activity plays a role in the development and exacerbation of FM leading to impairments in the three common domains of FM symptomatology: increased pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia), disrupted sleep, and disturbances in mood (anxiety and depression). There are several lines of evidence that appear to support a role of GAD in FM. First, the defining symptom of FM is pain and GAD65 knockout mice have been shown to exhibit supraspinal hyperalgesia. Second, GAD has been implicated in disorders of muscle stiffness and rigidity and morning stiffness is a common symptom of FM. Third, stress, depression, and anxiety, which are often comorbid with FM, decrease GAD activity. Fourth, FM is associated with poor sleep, specifically disrupted non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and the pharmacological induction of NREM sleep is associated with the activation of GAD-containing neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus. Fifth, FM is more commonly diagnosed in women than men and the activity of GAD is reduced by low levels of its cofactor pyroxidine, which is less well-absorbed by women and can be further lowered by diet, tobacco, and alcohol intake. Sixth, FM patients tend to be

  17. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut. PMID:25365864

  18. L-DOPA Reverses the Increased Free Amino Acids Tissue Levels Induced by Dopamine Depletion and Rises GABA and Tyrosine in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; García-Sanz, Patricia; Herranz, Antonio S; Asensio, María-José; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-07-01

    Perturbations in the cerebral levels of various amino acids are associated with neurological disorders, and previous studies have suggested that such alterations have a role in the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the direct effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment, that produces dyskinesia, on neural tissue amino acid concentrations have not been explored in detail. To evaluate whether striatal amino acid concentrations are altered in peak dose dyskinesia, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian mice were treated chronically with L-DOPA and tissue amino acid concentrations were assessed by HPLC analysis. These experiments revealed that neither 6-OHDA nor L-DOPA treatment are able to alter glutamate in the striatum. However, glutamine increases after 6-OHDA and returns back to normal levels with L-DOPA treatment, suggesting increased striatal glutamatergic transmission with lack of dopamine. In addition, glycine and taurine levels are increased following dopamine denervation and restored to normal levels by L-DOPA. Interestingly, dyskinetic animals showed increased levels of GABA and tyrosine, while aspartate striatal tissue levels are not altered. Overall, our results indicate that chronic L-DOPA treatment, besides normalizing the altered levels of some amino acids after 6-OHDA, robustly increases striatal GABA and tyrosine levels which may in turn contribute to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. PMID:26966009

  19. Pharmacodynamic effects and possible therapeutic uses of THIP, a specific GABA-agonist.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A V; Svendsen, O; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1982-10-22

    THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) is a potent and specific GABA receptor agonist which does not influence the GABA uptake system or GABA metabolizing enzymes. The specificity for the GABA receptor is also demonstrated by lack of action on monoaminergic, cholinergic, histaminergic or opiate receptors. Since in recent years GABA receptor stimulants-among others THIP--have become available many have speculated as to what clinical indication GABA-ergic stimulation might be an important element. The first suggestion was that GABA-ergic drugs by an inhibitory effect on the dopamine neurons would improve the antischizophrenic effect of neuroleptics and improve tardive dyskinesia. Furthermore, studies on brains of deceased Parkinson and Huntington's chorea patients have demonstrated a low level of GABA and its synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the basal ganglia. Also in epilepsy and diseases with dementia a deficit in the GABA system has been proposed. Therefore a therapeutic strategy for these diseases may be supplementary treatment with drugs which increase GABA receptor activity. Furthermore, recent results in humans have shown that GABA agonists perhaps also could be of benefit in mania and depressions. When considering the neurophysiological elements of nociception and muscle tone it is also reasonable to suggest that GABA-ergic stimulation may reduce pain perception and muscle tone. PMID:6292818

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  1. Glial GABA, synthesized by monoamine oxidase B, mediates tonic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Woo, Junsung; Chun, Ye-Eun; Chun, Heejung; Jo, Seonmi; Bae, Jin Young; An, Heeyoung; Min, Joo Ok; Oh, Soo-Jin; Han, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Taekeun; Kim, Young Soo; Bae, Yong Chul; Lee, C Justin

    2014-11-15

    GABA is the major inhibitory transmitter in the brain and is released not only from a subset of neurons but also from glia. Although neuronal GABA is well known to be synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the source of glial GABA is unknown. After estimating the concentration of GABA in Bergmann glia to be around 5-10 mM by immunogold electron microscopy, we demonstrate that GABA production in glia requires MAOB, a key enzyme in the putrescine degradation pathway. In cultured cerebellar glia, both Ca(2+)-induced and tonic GABA release are significantly reduced by both gene silencing of MAOB and the MAOB inhibitor selegiline. In the cerebellum and striatum of adult mice, general gene silencing, knock out of MAOB or selegiline treatment resulted in elimination of tonic GABA currents recorded from granule neurons and medium spiny neurons. Glial-specific rescue of MAOB resulted in complete rescue of tonic GABA currents. Our results identify MAOB as a key synthesizing enzyme of glial GABA, which is released via bestrophin 1 (Best1) channel to mediate tonic inhibition in the brain. PMID:25239459

  2. Simultaneous and selective production of levan and poly(gamma-glutamic acid) by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ing-Lung; Yu, Yun-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis(natto) Takahashi, used to prepare the fermented soybean product natto, was grown in a basal medium containing 5% (w/w) sucrose and 1.5% (w/w) L-glutamate and produced 58% (w/w) poly(gamma-glutamic acid) and 42% (w/w) levan simultaneously. After 21 h, 40-50 mg levan ml-1 had been produced in medium containing 20% (w/w) sucrose but without L-glutamate. In medium containing L-glutamic acid but without sucrose, mainly poly(gamma-glutamic acid) was produced. PMID:15703872

  3. Selective antagonism of the GABA(A) receptor by ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Halliwell, R F

    1997-10-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) synergistically inhibit y-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of these two drugs on other neuronal ligand-gated ion channels. 2. Agonist-evoked depolarizations were recorded from rat vagus and optic nerves in vitro by use of an extracellular recording technique. 3. GABA (50 microM)-evoked responses, in the vagus nerve in vitro, were inhibited by bicuculline (0.3-10 microM) and picrotoxin (0.3-10 microM), with IC50 values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.2 microM (1.1-1.4) and 3.6 microM (3.0-4.3), respectively, and were potentiated by sodium pentobarbitone (30 microM) and diazepam (1 microM) to (mean+/-s.e.mean) 168+/-18% and 117+/-4% of control, respectively. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.5 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by MDL 72222 (1 microM) to 10+/-4% of control; DMPP (10 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by hexamethonium (100 microM) to 12+/-5% of control, and alphabetaMeATP (30 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by PPADS (10 microM) to 21+/-5% of control. Together, these data are consistent with activation of GABA(A), 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors, respectively. 4 Ciprofloxacin (10-3000 microM) inhibited GABA(A)-mediated responses in the vagus nerve with an IC50 (and 95% CI) of 202 microM (148-275). BPAA (1-1000 microM) had little or no effect on the GABA(A)-mediated response but concentration-dependently potentiated the effects of ciprofloxacin by up to 33,000 times. 5. Responses mediated by 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors in the vagus nerve and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the optic nerve were little or unaffected by ciprofloxacin (100 microM), BPAA (100 microM) or the combination of these drugs (both at 100 microM). 6. GABA (1 mM)-evoked responses in the optic nerve were inhibited by bicuculline with an IC50 of 3.6 microM (2.8-4.5), a value not significantly different

  4. Insect Herbivory-Elicited GABA Accumulation in Plants is a Wound-Induced, Direct, Systemic, and Jasmonate-Independent Defense Response

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sandra S.; Reichelt, Michael; Mekonnen, Dereje W.; Ludewig, Frank; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The non-proteinogenic amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is present in all organisms analyzed so far. In invertebrates GABA acts as a neurotransmitter; in plants different functions are under discussion. Among others, its involvement in abiotic stress reactions and as a defensive compound against feeding insects is suggested. GABA is synthesized from glutamate by glutamate decarboxylases and degraded by GABA-transaminases. Here, in Arabidopsis thaliana, gad1/2 double mutants showing reduced GABA concentrations as well as GABA-enriched triple mutants (gad1/2 x pop2-5) were generated and employed for a systematic study of GABA induction, accumulation and related effects in Arabidopsis leaves upon herbivory. The results demonstrate that GABA accumulation is stimulated by insect feeding-like wounding by a robotic caterpillar, MecWorm, as well as by real insect (Spodoptera littoralis) herbivory. Higher GABA levels in both plant tissue and artificial dietary supplements in turn affect the performance of feeding larvae. GABA enrichment occurs not only in the challenged but also in adjacent leaf. This induced response is neither dependent on herbivore defense-related phytohormones, jasmonates, nor is jasmonate induction dependent on the presence of GABA. Thus, in Arabidopsis the rapid accumulation of GABA very likely represents a general, direct and systemic defense reaction against insect herbivores. PMID:26734035

  5. The inhibitory role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immunomodulation of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Zhaoqun; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter to suppress the immune-mediated pro-inflammatory reactions, and it has been used in the treatment of many inflammation-related diseases in vertebrates, while its immunomodulatory role in invertebrates has never been reported. In the present study, GABA was found to exist in the hemolymph of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and its concentration decreased slightly from 8.00 ± 0.37 μmol L(-1) at normal condition to 7.73 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1) at 6 h after LPS stimulation, and then increased to 9.34 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1), 8.86 ± 0.68 μmol L(-1) at 12 h and 48 h, respectively. After LPS stimulation, the mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (CgIL-17 and CgTNF) and immune effectors (CgSOD and CgBPI), and the protein expression of NOS increased significantly, and these increased trends were remarkably inhibited by GABA stimulation. At the same time, the phagocytosis rate and apoptosis rate of immunocytes also increased obviously after LPS stimulation, whereas the increase was repressed with the addition of GABA. The results collectively demonstrated that GABA was an indispensable inhibitory agent for both humoral and cellular immune response, which mainly functioned at the late phase of immune response to avoid the excess immune reactions and maintain the immune homeostasis. PMID:26975413

  6. Guanidino acids act as rho1 GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, Mary; Gavande, Navnath; Wong, Kit Yee; Park, Anna; Premoli, Isabella; Mewett, Kenneth N; Allan, Robin D; Duke, Rujee K; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2009-10-01

    GABA(C) receptors play a role in myopia, memory-related disorders and circadian rhythms signifying a need to develop potent and selective agents for this class of receptors. Guanidino analogs related to glycine, beta-alanine and taurine were evaluated at human rho(1)GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using 2-electrode voltage clamp methods. Of the 12 analogs tested, 8 analogs were active as antagonists and the remaining were inactive. (S)-2-guanidinopropionic acid (IC(50) = 2.2 microM) and guanidinoacetic acid (IC(50) = 5.4 microM; K (B) = 7.75 microM [pK (B) = 5.11 +/- 0.06]) were the most potent being competitive antagonists at this receptor. In contrast, the beta-alanine and GABA guanidino analogs showed reduced activity, indicating the distance between the carboxyl carbon and terminal nitrogen of the guanidino group is critical for activity. Substituting the C2-position of guanidinoacetic acid with various alkyl groups reduced activity indicating that steric effects may impact on activity. The results of this study contribute to the structure-activity-relationship profile required in developing novel therapeutic agents. PMID:19387831

  7. The dissolution of natural and artificial dusts in glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhang; Faqin, Dong; Xiaochun, He

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the characteristics of natural dusts, industrial dusts, and artificial dusts, such as mineral phases, chemical components, morphological observation and size. Quartz and calcite are the main phases of natural dusts and industrial dusts with high SiO2 and CaO and low K2O and Na2O in the chemical composition. The dissolution and electrochemical action of dusts in glutamic acid liquor at the simulated human body temperature (37 °C) in 32 h was investigated. The potential harm that the dust could lead to in body glutamic acid acidic environment, namely biological activity, is of great importance for revealing the human toxicological mechanism. The changes of pH values and electric conductivity of suspension of those dusts were similar, increased slowly in the first 8 h, and then the pH values increased rapidly. The total amount of dissolved ions of K, Ca, Na, and Mg was 35.4 to 429 mg/kg, particularly Ca was maximal of 20 to 334 mg/kg. The total amount of dissolved ions of Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Ba was 0.18 to 5.59 mg/kg and in Al and Si was 3.0 to 21.7 mg/kg. The relative solubility order of dusts in glutamic acid is wollastonite > serpentine > sepiolite, the cement plant industrial dusts > natural dusts > power plant industrial dusts. The wollastonite and cement plant industrial dusts have the highest solubility, which also have high content of CaO; this shows that there are a poorer corrosion-resisting ability and lower bio-resistibility. Sepiolite and power plant industrial dusts have lowest solubility, which also have high content of SiO2; this shows that there are a higher corrosion-resisting ability and stronger bio-resistibility.

  8. Effect of diphenylhydantoin on gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinate activity in rat Purkinje cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, E; Gabra-Sanders, T

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of diphenylhydantoin (DPH) upon the levels of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinic dehydrogenase in rat Purkinje cells. DPH was administered over 26 days in chronic experiments using controls receiving the same injection vehicle without DPH. Animals in this group received daily 1.25 mg/kg body weight, 12.5 mg/kg body weight, and 50 mg/kg body weight DPH. Acute experiments were carried out over the course of not more than four days, three groups of animals receiving 75 mg/kg body weight, 87.5 mg/kg body weight, and 100 mg/kg body weight DPH. No effect upon succinic dehydrogenase could be demonstrated at any dose level. There was a significant progressive loss of GABA with increasing dosage of DPH. Images PMID:903771

  9. Guinea Pig Horizontal Cells Express GABA, the GABA-Synthesizing Enzyme GAD65, and the GABA Vesicular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenying; Hirano, Arlene A.; Stella, Salvatore L.; Bitzer, Michaela; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is likely expressed in horizontal cells of all species, although conflicting physiological findings have led to considerable controversy regarding its role as a transmitter in the outer retina. This study has evaluated key components of the GABA system in the outer retina of guinea pig, an emerging retinal model system. The presence of GABA, its rate-limiting synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67 isoforms), the plasma membrane GABA transporters (GAT-1 and GAT-3), and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry with well-characterized antibodies. The presence of GAD65 mRNA was also evaluated by using laser capture microdissection and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Specific GABA, GAD65, and VGAT immunostaining was localized to horizontal cell bodies, as well as to their processes and tips in the outer plexiform layer. Furthermore, immunostaining of retinal whole mounts and acutely dissociated retinas showed GAD65 and VGAT immunoreactivity in both A-type and B-type horizontal cells. However, these cells did not contain GAD67, GAT-1, or GAT-3 immunoreactivity. GAD65 mRNA was detected in horizontal cells, and sequencing of the amplified GAD65 fragment showed approximately 85% identity with other mammalian GAD65 mRNAs. These studies demonstrate the presence of GABA, GAD65, and VGAT in horizontal cells of the guinea pig retina, and support the idea that GABA is synthesized from GAD65, taken up into synaptic vesicles by VGAT, and likely released by a vesicular mechanism from horizontal cells. PMID:20235161

  10. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media. PMID:26574908

  11. A patch clamp study of the effects of ciprofloxacin and biphenyl acetic acid on rat hippocampal neurone GABAA and ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1995-12-01

    The neurotoxic effects of 4-quinolones alone and in combination with certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be related to an interaction at GABAA and/or ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the present study, the effects of the fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, alone and in combination with the NSAID, biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA), were examined on GABAA-, NMDA-, AMPA-, and kainate-evoked current responses recorded from cultured rat hippocampal neurones, using the whole cell patch clamp technique. GABA-evoked currents were reversibly inhibited by bicuculline (3 microM) and ciprofloxacin (100 microM) to 11 +/- 5 and 38 +/- 7% of control, respectively. BPAA (100 microM) had little affect on the GABA current (the response was 82 +/- 4% of control) but enhanced the inhibitory potency of ciprofloxacin by approx. 3000-fold. The antagonist effects of ciprofloxacin (30 microM) and ciprofloxacin (0.03 microM) together with BPAA (100 microM) on the GABA-evoked current were not voltage-dependent. Whole cell currents evoked by NMDA, AMPA or kainate were little influenced by ciprofloxacin (100 microM), BPAA (100 microM), or ciprofloxacin plus BPAA (both at 100 microM); the responses being > or = 90% of control in all cases. These data suggest that the proconvulsant effects of quinolones when combined with BPAA may be related to antagonism of central GABAA receptors but not to an interaction at ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:8788959

  12. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  13. Diffuse perineuronal nets and modified pyramidal cells immunoreactive for glutamate and the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit form a unique entity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Härtig, Wolfgang; Bringmann, Andreas; Grosche, Jens; Wohlfarth, Kai; Zuschratter, Werner; Brückner, Gert

    2003-12-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) consisting of polyanionic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) and other extracellular matrix components create an exceptional microenvironment around certain types of neurons. In rat neocortex, three types of PNs can be distinguished after staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) by their different morphological structure: lattice-like PNs associated with subpopulations of nonpyramidal neurons, weakly labeled PNs showing a pyramidal morphology, and diffuse PNs that possess a thick, strongly labeled matrix sheath located mainly in layer VIb above the white matter. The type of neuron surrounded by diffuse nets has not been described so far. This study is focused on the cytochemical and morphological characteristics of neurons associated with diffusely contoured PNs in rat parietal cortex using immunocytochemical staining, intracellular injection, and retrograde tracing methods. Cells surrounded by diffuse PNs were glutamate-immunoreactive in contrast to nonpyramidal, net-associated neurons that showed immunoreactivity for GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1b. Both groups of PN-ensheathed cells were mostly immunoreactive for the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit. Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons surrounded by diffuse PNs displayed the morphological properties of modified pyramidal cells with intracortical main axons. Many neurons with diffuse PNs were retrogradely labeled over a long distance after Fluoro-Gold tracer injection in the parietal cortex, but remained unlabeled after intrathalamic injection. We conclude that neurons associated with diffuse PNs are a subpopulation of glutamatergic modified pyramidal cells that could act as excitatory long-range intracortically projecting neurons. PMID:14769362

  14. Brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) detection in vivo with the J-editing (1) H MRS technique: a comprehensive methodological evaluation of sensitivity enhancement, macromolecule contamination and test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Shungu, Dikoma C; Mao, Xiangling; Gonzales, Robyn; Soones, Tacara N; Dyke, Jonathan P; van der Veen, Jan Willem; Kegeles, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Abnormalities in brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. However, in vivo GABA detection by (1) H MRS presents significant challenges arising from the low brain concentration, overlap by much stronger resonances and contamination by mobile macromolecule (MM) signals. This study addresses these impediments to reliable brain GABA detection with the J-editing difference technique on a 3-T MR system in healthy human subjects by: (i) assessing the sensitivity gains attainable with an eight-channel phased-array head coil; (ii) determining the magnitude and anatomic variation of the contamination of GABA by MM; and (iii) estimating the test-retest reliability of the measurement of GABA with this method. Sensitivity gains and test-retest reliability were examined in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), whereas MM levels were compared across three cortical regions: DLPFC, the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the occipital cortex (OCC). A three-fold higher GABA detection sensitivity was attained with the eight-channel head coil compared with the standard single-channel head coil in DLPFC. Despite significant anatomical variation in GABA + MM and MM across the three brain regions (p < 0.05), the contribution of MM to GABA + MM was relatively stable across the three voxels, ranging from 41% to 49%, a non-significant regional variation (p = 0.58). The test-retest reliability of GABA measurement, expressed as either the ratio to voxel tissue water (W) or to total creatine, was found to be very high for both the single-channel coil and the eight-channel phased-array coil. For the eight-channel coil, for example, Pearson's correlation coefficient of test vs. retest for GABA/W was 0.98 (R(2)  = 0.96, p = 0.0007), the percentage coefficient of variation (CV) was 1.25% and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.98. Similar reliability was also found for the co-edited resonance

  15. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1a1 Mediates a GABA Synthesis Pathway in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X.; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J.; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B.

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here we show that GABA corelease in dopamine neurons does not utilize the conventional GABA synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol at binge drinking blood alcohol concentrations and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction. PMID:26430123

  16. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  17. In vivo effects of ketamine on glutamate-glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carolyn I; Kegeles, Lawrence S; Levinson, Amanda; Ogden, R Todd; Mao, Xiangling; Milak, Matthew S; Vermes, Donna; Xie, Shan; Hunter, Liane; Flood, Pamela; Moore, Holly; Shungu, Dikoma C; Simpson, Helen B

    2015-08-30

    We previously reported the rapid and robust clinical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions in a proof-of-concept crossover trial in unmedicated adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the concurrent neurochemical effects of ketamine versus saline infusions using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) during the clinical proof-of-concept crossover trial. Levels of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the excitatory neurochemicals glutamate+glutamine (Glx) were acquired in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), a region implicated in OCD pathology. Seventeen unmedicated OCD adults received two intravenous infusions at least 1 week apart, one of saline and one of ketamine, while lying supine in a 3.0 T GE MR scanner. The order of each infusion pair was randomized. Levels of GABA and Glx were measured in the MPFC before, during, and after each infusion and normalized to water (W). A mixed effects model found that MPFC GABA/W significantly increased over time in the ketamine compared with the saline infusion. In contrast, there were no significant differences in Glx/W between the ketamine and saline infusions. Together with earlier evidence of low cortical GABA in OCD, our findings suggest that models of OCD pathology should consider the role of GABAergic abnormalities in OCD symptomatology. PMID:26104826

  18. GABA System in Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders: A Mini Review on Third-Generation Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation neuroimaging research has been enriched by advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measuring the concentration of important neurotrasmitters, such as the inhibitory amino acid GABA. Here, we performed a systematic mini-review on brain MRS studies measuring GABA concentration in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). We wondered whether multimodal investigations could overcome intrinsic technical limits of MRS giving a broader view of mental disorders pathogenesis. In SZ, unimodal studies gave mixed results, as increased, decreased, or unaltered GABA levels were reported depending on region, disease phase, and treatment. Conversely, multimodal results showed reduced level of glutamate, but not of GABA, in patients mirrored by in vitro biochemical findings revealing hippocampal reduction in glutamate signaling in SZ, and no deficits in GABA synthesis. Moreover, a mouse model confirmed the unique pathological characteristic of glutamate function in SZ. Unimodal studies in BD revealed again, inconsistent results, while no multimodal investigations including MRS on GABA exist. In MDD, unimodal studies could not differentiate patients from controls nor characterize high-risk subjects and remitted patients. However, a multimodal study combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and MRS revealed that cingulate cortex activity is related to glutamate, N-acetylaspartate levels and anhedonia in patients, and to GABA concentration in healthy subjects, improving the distinction between MDD and physiology. Overall, our results show that unimodal studies do not indicate GABA as a biomarker for the psychiatric disorders considered. Conversely, multimodal studies can widen the understanding of the link between psychopathology, genetics, neuroanatomy, and functional-biochemical brain activity in mental disorders. Although scarce, multimodal approaches seem promising for moving from GABA MRS

  19. GABA System in Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders: A Mini Review on Third-Generation Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Third-generation neuroimaging research has been enriched by advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measuring the concentration of important neurotrasmitters, such as the inhibitory amino acid GABA. Here, we performed a systematic mini-review on brain MRS studies measuring GABA concentration in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). We wondered whether multimodal investigations could overcome intrinsic technical limits of MRS giving a broader view of mental disorders pathogenesis. In SZ, unimodal studies gave mixed results, as increased, decreased, or unaltered GABA levels were reported depending on region, disease phase, and treatment. Conversely, multimodal results showed reduced level of glutamate, but not of GABA, in patients mirrored by in vitro biochemical findings revealing hippocampal reduction in glutamate signaling in SZ, and no deficits in GABA synthesis. Moreover, a mouse model confirmed the unique pathological characteristic of glutamate function in SZ. Unimodal studies in BD revealed again, inconsistent results, while no multimodal investigations including MRS on GABA exist. In MDD, unimodal studies could not differentiate patients from controls nor characterize high-risk subjects and remitted patients. However, a multimodal study combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and MRS revealed that cingulate cortex activity is related to glutamate, N-acetylaspartate levels and anhedonia in patients, and to GABA concentration in healthy subjects, improving the distinction between MDD and physiology. Overall, our results show that unimodal studies do not indicate GABA as a biomarker for the psychiatric disorders considered. Conversely, multimodal studies can widen the understanding of the link between psychopathology, genetics, neuroanatomy, and functional–biochemical brain activity in mental disorders. Although scarce, multimodal approaches seem promising for moving from GABA

  20. Stability of Poly(α-L Glutamic Acid).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Peter; Chen, Y. Z.; Prohofsky, E. W.

    1996-03-01

    For the protein to go to their folded biologically active state, it must first undergo formation of the stabilizing α-helix structure. Taking the repeating unit cells of Glutamic acid in an α-helix structure, the analysis can be made of the vibrational dynamics of the Poly(α-L Glutamic acid). The method used was mean field, modified, self-consistent phonon theory (MSPA) developed by Prohofsky et al. The modes contributing to the fluctuations of the α-helix hydrogen bonds were analyzed yielding the break down probability from the room temperature to the critical temperature Tc where the hydrogen bond probability is over 0.5. The inverse proportionality of the opening bond probability to the relaxation time τ * was then used to compare our results to ultra sonic and electric-field jump experiments. These experiments were done at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 310 K. The data obtained from these experiments agrees well with the temperature dependent MSPA open bond probabilities with correlation constant of (1.6 ± 0.1)x10e-8. Our calculation also yielded critical melting temperature of Tc=332 K.

  1. Mutations in y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase genes in plants or Pseudomonas syringae reduce bacterial virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a bacterial pathogen of Arabidopsis and tomato that grows in the apoplast. The non-protein amino acid '-amino butyric acid (GABA) is produced by Arabidopsis and tomato and is the most abundant amino acid in the apoplastic fluid of tomato. The DC3000 genome h...

  2. Motor Alterations Induced by Chronic 4-Aminopyridine Infusion in the Spinal Cord In vivo: Role of Glutamate and GABA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Gómez, Rafael; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron (MN) degeneration is the pathological hallmark of MN diseases, a group of neurodegenerative disorders clinically manifested as muscle fasciculations and hyperreflexia, followed by paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. Ample evidence supports a role of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in motor death. In previous work we showed that stimulation of glutamate release from nerve endings by perfusion of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in the rat hippocampus induces seizures and neurodegeneration, and that AMPA infusion in the spinal cord produces paralysis and MN death. On these bases, in this work we have tested the effect of the chronic infusion of 4-AP in the spinal cord, using implanted osmotic minipumps, on motor activity and on MN survival, and the mechanisms underlying this effect. 4-AP produced muscle fasciculations and motor deficits assessed in two motor tests, which start 2–3 h after the implant, which ameliorated spontaneously within 6–7 days, but no neurodegeneration. These effects were prevented by both AMPA and NMDA receptors blockers. The role of GABAA receptors was also explored, and we found that chronic infusion of bicuculline induced moderate MN degeneration and enhanced the hyperexcitation produced by 4-AP. Unexpectedly, the GABAAR agonist muscimol also induced motor deficits and failed to prevent the MN death induced by AMPA. We conclude that motor alterations induced by chronic 4-AP infusion in the spinal cord in vivo is due to ionotropic glutamate receptor overactivation and that blockade of GABAergic neurotransmission induces MN death under chronic conditions. These results shed light on the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the regulation of MN excitability in the spinal cord. PMID:27242406

  3. Effects of NaCl Replacement with Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the Quality Characteristics and Sensorial Properties of Model Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Hyung-Yong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of γ-aminobutylic acid (GABA) on the quality and sensorial properties of both the GABA/NaCl complex and model meat products. GABA/NaCl complex was prepared by spray-drying, and the surface dimensions, morphology, rheology, and saltiness were characterized. For model meat products, pork patties were prepared by replacing NaCl with GABA. For characteristics of the complex, increasing GABA concentration increased the surface dimensions of the complex. However, GABA did not affect the rheological properties of solutions containing the complex. The addition of 2% GABA exhibited significantly higher saltiness than the control (no GABA treatment). In the case of pork patties, sensory testing indicated that the addition of GABA decreased the saltiness intensity. Both the intensity of juiciness and tenderness of patties containing GABA also scored lower than the control, based on the NaCl reduction. These results were consistent with the quality characteristics (cooking loss and texture profile analysis). Nevertheless, overall acceptability of the pork patties showed that up to 1.5%, patties containing GABA did not significantly differ from the control. Consequently, the results indicated that GABA has a potential application in meat products, but also manifested a deterioration of quality by the NaCl reduction, which warrants further exploration. PMID:26761294

  4. GABA-shunt enzymes activity in GH3 cells with reduced level of PMCA2 or PMCA3 isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Antoni

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Suppression of PMCA2 or PMCA3 slows down proliferation of GH3 cells. {yields} PMCA2 suppression lowers the activity of GABA-shunt enzymes. {yields} PMCA3 suppression increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65. {yields} PMCA2 and PMCA3 function appears to be linked to regulation of GABA metabolism. -- Abstract: GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) is important neurotransmitter and regulator of endocrine functions. Its metabolism involves three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67), GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). As many cellular processes GABA turnover can depend on calcium homeostasis, which is maintained by plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs). In excitable cells PMCA2 and PMCA3 isoforms are particularly important. In this study we focused on GABA-metabolizing enzymes expression and activity in rat anterior pituitary GH3 cells with suppressed expression of PMCA2 or PMCA3. We observed that PMCA3-reduced cells have increased GAD65 expression. Suppression of PMCA2 caused a decrease in total GAD and GABA-T activity. These results indicate that PMCA2 and PMCA3 presence may be an important regulatory factor in GABA metabolism. Results suggest that PMCA2 and PMCA3 function is rather related to regulation of GABA synthesis and degradation than supplying cells with metabolites, which can be potentially energetic source.

  5. Effect of GABA on oxidative stress in the skeletal muscles and plasma free amino acids in mice fed high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z X; Xia, S F; Qiao, Y; Shi, Y H; Le, G W

    2015-06-01

    Increased levels of plasma free amino acids (pFAAs) can disturb the blood glucose levels in patients with obesity, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS) and are associated with enhanced protein oxidation. Oxidation of proteins, especially in the muscles, can promote protein degradation and elevate the levels of pFAAs. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a food additive, can reduce high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycaemia; however, the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GABA on protein oxidation and pFAAs changes. One hundred male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups that were fed with control diet, HFD and HFD supplied with 0.2%, 0.12% and 0.06% GABA in drinking water for 20 weeks respectively. HFD feeding led to muscular oxidative stress, protein oxidation, pFAA disorders, hyperglycaemia and augmented plasma GABA levels. Treatment with GABA restored normally fasting blood glucose level and dose-dependently inhibited body weight gains, muscular oxidation and protein degradation. While medium and low doses of GABA mitigated HFD-induced pFAA disorders, the high dose of GABA deteriorated the pFAA disorders. Medium dose of GABA increased the levels of GABA, but high dose of GABA reduced the levels of plasma GABA and increased the activity of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the liver. Therefore, treatment with GABA mitigated HFD-induced hyperglycaemia probably by repairing HFD-induced muscular oxidative stress and pFAA disorders in mice. Our data also suggest that an optimal dose of GABA is crucial for the prevention of excess GABA-related decrease in the levels of pFAA and GABA as well as obesity. PMID:25266692

  6. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  7. γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor subtype inverse agonists as therapeutic agents in cognition.

    PubMed

    Gabriella, Guerrini; Giovanna, Ciciani

    2010-01-01

    The gabaergic system has been identified as a relevant regulator of cognitive and emotional processing. In fact, the discovery that negative allosteric regulators (or inverse agonists) at GABA(A) (γ-aminobutyric acid) α5 subtype receptors improve learning and memory tasks, has further validated this concept. The localization of these extrasynaptic subtype receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, has suggested that they play a key role in the three stages of memory: acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval. The "α5 inverse agonist" binds to an allosteric site at GABA(A) receptor, provoking a reduction of chlorine current, but to elicit this effect, the necessary condition is the binding of agonist neurotransmitter (γ-amino butyric acid) at its orthosteric site. In this case, the GABA(A) receptor is not a "constitutively active receptor" and, however, the presence of spontaneous opening channels for native GABA(A) receptors is rare. Here, we present various classes of nonselective and α5 selective GABA(A) receptor ligands, and the in vitro and in vivo tests to elucidate their affinity and activity. The study of the GABA(A) α5 inverse agonists is one of the important tools, although not the only one, for the development of clinical strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21050918

  8. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  9. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  10. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  11. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3820 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3820 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  14. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  15. 40 CFR 721.3820 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3820 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  16. GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating fava bean (Vicia faba L.) under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was investigated. GABA content, GAD and DAO activity were significantly increased under hypoxia treatment. Glu and polyamine contents enhanced largely and thus supplied as sufficient substrates for GABA formation. In contrast, GABA content decreased, mainly in the embryo, after removing the hypoxia stress. DAO activity, Glu and polyamines contents decreased, while an increment of GAD activity was observed. This indicated that GAD activity can be not only regulated by hypoxia, but by the rapid growth of embryo after the recovery from hypoxia stress. When treated with AG, DAO activity was almost inhibited completely, and the GABA content decreased by 32.96% and 32.07% after treated for 3 and 5 days, respectively. Hence, it can be inferred that about 30% of GABA formed in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was supplied by polyamine degradation pathway. PMID:23017406

  17. SYSTEMIC ADMINISTRATION OF KAINIC ACID INCREASES GABA LEVELS IN PERFUSATE FROM THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF RATS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ventral hippocampi of male, Fischer-344 rats were implanted with microdialysis probes and the effects of systemically administered kainic acid (KA) (8 mg/kg, s.c.) on the in vivo release of amino acids were measured for four hours after administration. n order to measure GABA...

  18. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA. PMID:26471792

  19. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  20. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  1. Determination of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) in Rambutan Fruit cv. Rongrian by HPLC-ELSD and Separation of GABA from Rambutan Fruit Using Dowex 50W-X8 Column.

    PubMed

    Meeploy, Maneerat; Deewatthanawong, Rujira

    2016-03-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was validated for the determination of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in rambutan fruit without any sample pretreatment or derivatization. In the concentration range of 0.05-1.0 mg/mL GABA, the ELSD response was linear with a correlation coefficient (r) >0.999. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were found to be 0.7 and 2.0 µg/mL, respectively. The method enabled the complete separation of GABA in the aqueous extract of rambutan flesh from the impurity peaks at 45.7 min. The recoveries of sample added GABA were obtained in the range of 92.0-99.3%. Intraday and interday relative standard deviations were <5.3%. Repeatability of the extraction process showed the acceptable precision. From the analysis of GABA content in rambutan flesh, 0.71 ± 0.23 mg of GABA was found in 1 g fresh weight. The recovery of GABA after passing through the Dowex 50W-X8 column was 96.65%. The analytical methodology could be potentially applied to the detection and quantification of GABA in other fruits and complex matrices when a sufficient quantity is available. PMID:26590236

  2. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  3. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes.

  4. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes. PMID:27212081

  5. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes. PMID:27212081

  6. The glutamate and neutral amino acid transporter family: physiological and pharmacological implications.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-10-31

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) is composed of five high affinity glutamate transporters, which exhibit the properties of the previously described system XAG-, as well as two Na+-dependent neutral amino acid transporters with characteristics of the so-called "ASC" (alanine, serine and cysteine). The SLC1 family members are structurally similar, with almost identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane topologies. The transporters have eight transmembrane domains and a structure reminiscent of a pore loop between the seventh and eighth domains [Neuron 21 (1998) 623]. However, each of these transporters exhibits distinct functional properties. Glutamate transporters mediate transport of L-Glu, L-Asp and D-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na+ and one 1 H+, and the countertransport of 1 K+, whereas ASC transporters mediate Na+-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. Given the high concentrating capacity provided by the unique ion coupling pattern of glutamate transporters, they play crucial roles in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system (CNS). The regulation and manipulation of their function is a critical issue in the pathogenesis and treatment of CNS disorders involving glutamate excitotoxicity. Loss of function of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), resulting in damage of adjacent motor neurons. The importance of glial glutamate transporters in protecting neurons from extracellular glutamate was further demonstrated in studies of the slc1A2 glutamate transporter knockout mouse. The findings suggest that therapeutic upregulation of GLT1 may be beneficial in a variety of pathological conditions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) but not the glial glutamate transporters may be of therapeutic interest, allowing blockage of glutamate exit from

  7. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  8. Arachidonic acid induces a prolonged inhibition of glutamate uptake into glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barbour, B; Szatkowski, M; Ingledew, N; Attwell, D

    Activation of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors by neurotransmitter glutamate stimulates phospholipase A2 to release arachidonic acid. This second messenger facilitates long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus, possibly by blocking glutamate uptake. We have studied the effect of arachidonic acid on glutamate uptake into glial cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to monitor the uptake electrically. Micromolar levels of arachidonic acid inhibit glutamate uptake, mainly by reducing the maximum uptake rate with only small effects on the affinity for external glutamate and sodium. On removal of arachidonic acid a rapid (5 minutes) phase of partial recovery is followed by a maintained suppression of uptake lasting at least 20 minutes. Surprisingly, the action of arachidonic acid is unaffected by cyclo-oxygenase or lipoxygenase inhibitors suggesting that it inhibits uptake directly, possibly by increasing membrane fluidity. As blockade of phospholipase A2 prevents the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), inhibition of glutamate uptake by arachidonic acid may contribute to the increase of synaptic gain that occurs in LTP. During anoxia, release of arachidonic acid could severely compromise glutamate uptake and thus contribute to neuronal death. PMID:2512508

  9. Synthesis of 4-substituted nipecotic acid derivatives and their evaluation as potential GABA uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hellenbrand, Tim; Höfner, Georg; Wein, Thomas; Wanner, Klaus T

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we disclose the design and synthesis of novel 4-susbtituted nipecotic acid derivatives as inhibitors of the GABA transporter mGAT1. Based on molecular modeling studies the compounds are assumed to adopt a binding pose similar to that of the potent mGAT1 inhibitor nipecotic acid. As substitution in 4-position should not cause an energetically unfavorable orientation of nipecotic acid as it is the case for N-substituted derivatives this is expected to lead to highly potent binders. For the synthesis of novel 4-substituted nipecotic acid derivatives a linear synthetic strategy was employed. As a key step, palladium catalyzed cross coupling reactions were used to attach the required biaryl moieties to the ω-position of the alkenyl- or alkynyl spacers of varying length in the 4-position of the nipecotic acid scaffold. The resulting amino acids were characterized with respect to their binding affinities and inhibitory potencies at mGAT1. Though the biological activities found were generally insignificant to poor, two compounds, one of which possesses a reasonable binding affinity for mGAT1, rac-57, the other a notable inhibitory potency at mGAT4, rac-84, both displaying a slight subtype selectivity for the individual transporters, could be identified. PMID:27039250

  10. GABA as a rising gliotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Lee, C. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter that is known to be synthesized and released from GABAergic neurons in the brain. However, recent studies have shown that not only neurons but also astrocytes contain a considerable amount of GABA that can be released and activate GABA receptors in neighboring neurons. These exciting new findings for glial GABA raise further interesting questions about the source of GABA, its mechanism of release and regulation and the functional role of glial GABA. In this review, we highlight recent studies that identify the presence and release of GABA in glial cells, we show several proposed potential pathways for accumulation and modulation of glial intracellular and extracellular GABA content, and finally we discuss functional roles for glial GABA in the brain. PMID:25565970

  11. Variance analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents from melanotropes of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Borst, J G; Kits, K S; Bier, M

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the variance in the decay of large spontaneous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in melanotropes of Xenopus laevis to obtain information about the number of GABAA receptor channels that bind GABA during the IPSCs. The average decay of the IPSCs is well described by the sum of two exponential functions. This suggests that a three-state Markov model is sufficient to describe the decay phase, with one of the three states being an absorbing state, entered when GABA dissociates from the GABAA receptor. We have compared the variance in the decay of large spontaneous IPSCs with the variance calculated for two different three-state models: a model with one open state, one closed state, and one absorbing state (I), and a model with two open states and one absorbing state (II). The data were better described by the more efficient model II. This suggests that the efficacy of GABA at synaptic GABAA receptor channels is high and that only a small number of channels are involved in generating the GABA-ergic IPSCs. PMID:7918986

  12. Specificity of Aspartate Aminotransferases from Leguminous Plants for 4-Substituted Glutamic Acids 1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Harry C.; Dekker, Eugene E.

    1989-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (glutamate-oxalacetate transaminase) was partially purified from extracts of germinating seeds of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos), soybean (Glycine max), and Sophora japonica. The ability of these enzyme preparations, as well as aspartate aminotransferase purified from pig heart cytosol, to use 4-substituted glutamic acids as amino group donors and their corresponding 2-oxo acids as amino group acceptors in the aminotransferase reaction was measured. All 4-substituted glutamic acid analogs tested were poorer substrates than was glutamate or 2-oxoglutarate. 2-Oxo-4-methyleneglutarate was least effective (lowest relative Vm/Km) as a substrate for the enzyme from peanuts and honey locust, which are the two species studied that accumulate 4-methyleneglutamic acid and 4-methyleneglutamine. Of the different aminotransferases tested, the enzyme from honey locust was the least active with 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-methylglutarate, the corresponding amino acid of which also accumulates in that species. These results suggest that transamination of 2-oxo-4-substituted glutaric acids is not involved in the biosynthesis of the corresponding 4-substituted glutamic acids in these species. Rather, accumulation of certain 4-substituted glutamic acids in these instances may be, in part, the result of the inefficacy of their transamination by aspartate aminotransferase. PMID:16666674

  13. The transporter GAT1 plays an important role in GABA-mediated carbon-nitrogen interactions in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Batushansky, Albert; Kirma, Menny; Grillich, Nicole; Pham, Phuong A.; Rentsch, Doris; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Fait, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthetized in the cytosol prior to delivery to the mitochondria where it is catabolized via the TCA cycle. GABA accumulates under various environmental conditions, but an increasing number of studies show its involvement at the crossroad between C and N metabolism. To assess the role of GABA in modulating cellular metabolism, we exposed seedlings of A. thaliana GABA transporter gat1 mutant to full nutrition medium and media deficient in C and N combined with feeding of different concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) of exogenous GABA. GC-MS based metabolite profiling showed an expected effect of medium composition on the seedlings metabolism of mutant and wild type alike. That being said, a significant interaction between GAT1 deficiency and medium composition was determined with respect to magnitude of change in relative amino acid levels. The effect of exogenous GABA treatment on metabolism was contingent on both the medium and the genotype, leading for instance to a drop in asparagine under full nutrition and low C conditions and glucose under all tested media, but not to changes in GABA content. We additionally assessed the effect of GAT1 deficiency on the expression of glutamate metabolism related genes and genes involved in abiotic stress responses. These results suggest a role for GAT1 in GABA-mediated metabolic alterations in the context of the C-N equilibrium of plant cells. PMID:26483804

  14. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid levels in the auditory pathway of rats with chronic tinnitus: a direct determination using high resolution point-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS)

    PubMed Central

    Brozoski, Thomas; Odintsov, Boris; Bauer, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Damage to the auditory system following high-level sound exposure reduces afferent input. Homeostatic mechanisms appear to compensate for the loss. Overcompensation may produce the sensation of sound without an objective physical correlate, i.e., tinnitus. Several potential compensatory neural processes have been identified, such as increased spontaneous activity. The cellular mechanisms enabling such compensatory processes may involve down-regulation of inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), and/or up-regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, mediated by glutamic acid (Glu). Because central processing systems are integrated and well-regulated, compensatory changes in one system may produce reactive changes in others. Some or all may be relevant to tinnitus. To examine the roles of GABA and Glu in tinnitus, high resolution point-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was used to quantify their levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate body (MGB), and primary auditory cortex (A1) of rats. Chronic tinnitus was produced by a single high-level unilateral exposure to noise, and was measured using a psychophysical procedure sensitive to tinnitus. Decreased GABA levels were evident only in the MGB, with the greatest decrease, relative to unexposed controls, obtained in the contralateral MGB. Small GABA increases may have been present bilaterally in A1 and in the contralateral DCN. Although Glu levels showed considerable variation, Glu was moderately and bilaterally elevated both in the DCN and in A1. In the MGB Glu was increased ipsilaterally but decreased contralaterally. These bidirectional and region-specific alterations in GABA and Glu may reflect large-scale changes in inhibitory and excitatory equilibrium accompanying chronic tinnitus. The present results also suggest that targeting both neurotransmitter systems may be optimal in developing more effective therapeutics

  15. On the regulative role of the glutamate receptor in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Selin, Alexey A; Lobysheva, Natalia V; Nesterov, Semen V; Skorobogatova, Yulia A; Byvshev, Ivan M; Pavlik, Lyubov L; Mikheeva, Irina B; Moshkov, Dmitry A; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the regulative role of the glutamate receptor found earlier in the brain mitochondria. In the present work a glutamate-dependent signaling system with similar features was detected in mitochondria of the heart. The glutamate-dependent signaling system in the heart mitochondria was shown to be suppressed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The GABA receptor presence in the heart mitochondria was shown by golding with the use of antibodies to α- and β-subunits of the receptor. The activity of glutamate receptor was assessed according to the rate of synthesis of hydrogen peroxide. The glutamate receptor in mitochondria could be activated only under conditions of hypoxic stress, which in model experiments was imitated by blocking Complex I by rotenone or fatty acids. The glutamate signal in mitochondria was shown to be calcium- and potential-dependent and the activation of the glutamate cascade was shown to be accompanied by production of hydrogen peroxide. It was discovered that H2O2 synthesis involves two complexes of the mitochondrial electron transfer system - succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and fatty acid dehydrogenase (ETF:QO). Thus, functions of the glutamate signaling system are associated with the system of respiration-glycolysis switching (the Pasteur-Crabtree) under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26812870

  16. Role of proline and GABA in sexual reproduction of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Biancucci, Marco; Mattioli, Roberto; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar; Costantino, Paolo; Trovato, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Two glutamate derivatives, proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), appear to play pivotal roles in different aspects of sexual reproduction in angiosperms, although their precise function in plant reproduction and the molecular basis of their action are not yet fully understood. Proline and GABA have long been regarded as pivotal amino acids in pollen vitality and fertility. Proline may constitute up to 70% of the free amino acid pool in pollen grains and it has been recently shown that Arabidopsis mutants affected in the first and rate-limiting step in proline synthesis produce aberrant and infertile pollen grains, indicating that proline synthesis is required for pollen development and fertility. Concerning GABA, a large body of evidence points to this glutamate derivative as a key determinant of post-pollination fertilization. Intriguingly, proline has also been associated with pollination, another aspect of sexual reproduction, since honeybees were reported to show a strong preference for proline-enriched nectars. In this review, we survey current knowledge on the roles of proline and GABA in plant fertility, and discuss future perspectives potentially capable to improve our understanding on the functions of these amino acids in pollen development, pollination, and pollen tube guidance. PMID:26388884

  17. Role of proline and GABA in sexual reproduction of angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Biancucci, Marco; Mattioli, Roberto; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar; Costantino, Paolo; Trovato, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Two glutamate derivatives, proline and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), appear to play pivotal roles in different aspects of sexual reproduction in angiosperms, although their precise function in plant reproduction and the molecular basis of their action are not yet fully understood. Proline and GABA have long been regarded as pivotal amino acids in pollen vitality and fertility. Proline may constitute up to 70% of the free amino acid pool in pollen grains and it has been recently shown that Arabidopsis mutants affected in the first and rate-limiting step in proline synthesis produce aberrant and infertile pollen grains, indicating that proline synthesis is required for pollen development and fertility. Concerning GABA, a large body of evidence points to this glutamate derivative as a key determinant of post-pollination fertilization. Intriguingly, proline has also been associated with pollination, another aspect of sexual reproduction, since honeybees were reported to show a strong preference for proline-enriched nectars. In this review, we survey current knowledge on the roles of proline and GABA in plant fertility, and discuss future perspectives potentially capable to improve our understanding on the functions of these amino acids in pollen development, pollination, and pollen tube guidance. PMID:26388884

  18. Conformational analysis of glutamic acid: a density functional approach using implicit continuum solvent model.

    PubMed

    Turan, Başak; Selçuki, Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids are constituents of proteins and enzymes which take part almost in all metabolic reactions. Glutamic acid, with an ability to form a negatively charged side chain, plays a major role in intra and intermolecular interactions of proteins, peptides, and enzymes. An exhaustive conformational analysis has been performed for all eight possible forms at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. All possible neutral, zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of glutamic acid structures have been investigated in solution by using polarizable continuum model mimicking water as the solvent. Nine families based on the dihedral angles have been classified for eight glutamic acid forms. The electrostatic effects included in the solvent model usually stabilize the charged forms more. However, the stability of the zwitterionic form has been underestimated due to the lack of hydrogen bonding between the solute and solvent; therefore, it is observed that compact neutral glutamic acid structures are more stable in solution than they are in vacuum. Our calculations have shown that among all eight possible forms, some are not stable in solution and are immediately converted to other more stable forms. Comparison of isoelectronic glutamic acid forms indicated that one of the structures among possible zwitterionic and anionic forms may dominate over the other possible forms. Additional investigations using explicit solvent models are necessary to determine the stability of charged forms of glutamic acid in solution as our results clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding and its type have a major role in the structure and energy of conformers. PMID:25135067

  19. Biochemical and spectroscopic properties of Brucella microti glutamate decarboxylase, a key component of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Gaia; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; Cappadocio, Francesca; Occhialini, Alessandra; De Biase, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In orally acquired bacteria, the ability to counteract extreme acid stress (pH ⩽ 2.5) ensures survival during transit through the animal host stomach. In several neutralophilic bacteria, the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (GDAR) is the most efficient molecular system in conferring protection from acid stress. In Escherichia coli its structural components are either of the two glutamate decarboxylase isoforms (GadA, GadB) and the antiporter, GadC, which imports glutamate and exports γ-aminobutyrate, the decarboxylation product. The system works by consuming protons intracellularly, as part of the decarboxylation reaction, and exporting positive charges via the antiporter. Herein, biochemical and spectroscopic properties of GadB from Brucella microti (BmGadB), a Brucella species which possesses GDAR, are described. B. microti belongs to a group of lately described and atypical brucellae that possess functional gadB and gadC genes, unlike the most well-known “classical” Brucella species, which include important human pathogens. BmGadB is hexameric at acidic pH. The pH-dependent spectroscopic properties and activity profile, combined with in silico sequence comparison with E. coli GadB (EcGadB), suggest that BmGadB has the necessary structural requirements for the binding of activating chloride ions at acidic pH and for the closure of its active site at neutral pH. On the contrary, cellular localization analysis, corroborated by sequence inspection, suggests that BmGadB does not undergo membrane recruitment at acidic pH, which was observed in EcGadB. The comparison of GadB from evolutionary distant microorganisms suggests that for this enzyme to be functional in GDAR some structural features must be preserved. PMID:25853037

  20. Electrochemical synthesis of adiponitrile from the renewable raw material glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-Jun; Huang, Yao-Bing; Fang, Chi; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-04-01

    Current affairs: Adiponitrile, used to produce nylon 6.6, is prepared from the renewable compound glutamic acid by an electrochemical route, involving electro-oxidative decarboxylation and Kolbe coupling reactions. The new route is an example of the use of glutamic acid as a versatile substrate in the transformation of biomass into chemicals. Also, it highlights the use of electrochemical methods in biomass conversion. PMID:22441826

  1. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. PMID:26643381

  2. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Addison

    2004-03-01

    Examples of the industrial synthesis of pure amino acids are presented. The emphasis is on the synthesis of ( S )-glutamic acid and, to a lesser extent, ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine. These amino acids account for about 90% of the total world production of amino acids, ( S )-glutamic acid being used as a flavor-enhancing additive (MSG) for the human diet, and ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine as supplements for the feeding of domestic animals. Examples include chemical, enzymatic, and fermentation synthesis, and two clever continuous processes for the resolution of enantiomers. See Featured Molecules .

  3. [Effect of excitant amino acid antagonists on glutamate receptors in the locust and on convulsions induced by glutamate, aspartate, kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice].

    PubMed

    Ryzhov, I V; Slepokurov, M V; Lapin, I P; Mandel'shtam, Iu E; Aleksandrov, V G

    1986-03-01

    All excitatory amino acid antagonists studied: diethyl esters of aspartic (DEEA) and glutamic (DEEG) acids, 2-amino-3-phosphono-propionic acid (APPA) and 2-amino-4-phosphono-butanoic acid (APBA), diminished the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPP) of the locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) muscle fibers and arbitrary blocked glutamate (GLU) and aspartate (ASP) responses. Kynurenine (KYN) and quinolinic (QUI) acid had no effect on EPP even at a concentration of 2 X 10(-2) M. The antagonists were not strictly selective against intracerebroventricularly administered endogenous convulsants: GLU, ASP, KYN and QUI and in simulation of experimental seizures in mice. The antagonists structurally similar to ASP prevented ASP- and KYN-induced seizures in lower doses than GLU derivatives. Anti-KYN, but not anti-QUI DEEA, DEEG, APPA and APBA efficacy suggests that KYN and QUI act on different structures or binding sites. PMID:2869799

  4. Lower Expression of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 67 in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia: Contribution of Altered Regulation by Zif268

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Sohei; Bazmi, H. Holly; Lewis, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may be due at least in part to lower expression of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), a key enzyme for GABA synthesis, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia. The GAD67 promoter region contains a conserved Zif268 binding site, and Zif268 activation is accompanied by increased GAD67 expression. Thus, altered expression of the immediate early gene Zif268 may contribute to lower levels of GAD67 mRNA in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. Method The authors used polymerase chain reaction to quantify GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels in dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex area 9 from 62 matched pairs of schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, and in situ hybridization to assess Zif268 expression at laminar and cellular levels of resolution. The effects of potentially confounding variables were assessed in human subjects, and the effects of antipsychotic treatments were tested in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. The specificity of the Zif268 findings was assessed by quantifying mRNA levels for other immediate early genes. Results GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels were significantly lower and were positively correlated in the schizophrenia subjects. Both Zif268 mRNA-positive neuron density and Zif268 mRNA levels per neuron were significantly lower in the schizophrenia subjects. These findings were robust to the effects of the confounding variables examined and differed from other immediate early genes. Conclusions Deficient Zif268 mRNA expression may contribute to lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia, suggesting a potential mechanistic basis for altered cortical GABA synthesis and impaired cognition in schizophrenia. PMID:24874453

  5. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Höftberger, Romana; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Martínez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Armangue, Thaís; Kruer, Michael C.; Arpa, Javier; Domingo, Julio; Rojc, Bojan; Bataller, Luis; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs) in the paraneoplastic context. Clinical recognition of such cases will lead to prompt tumor diagnosis and appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVE To report the clinical and immunological features of patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and GAD-abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case series study and immunological investigations conducted in February 2014 in a center for autoimmune neurological disorders. Fifteen cases with GAD65-abs evaluated between 1995 and 2013 who fulfilled criteria of definite or possible PNS without concomitant onconeural antibodies were included in this study. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of the clinical records of 15 patients and review of 19 previously reported cases. Indirect immunofluorescence with rat hippocampal neuronal cultures and cell-based assays with known neuronal cell-surface antigens were used. One hundred six patients with GAD65-abs and no cancer served as control individuals. RESULTS Eight of the 15 patients with cancer presented as classic paraneoplastic syndromes (5 limbic encephalitis, 1 paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis, 1 paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, and 1 opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome). When compared with the 106 non-PNS cases, those with PNS were older (median age, 60 years vs 48 years; P = .03), more frequently male (60% vs 13%; P < .001), and had more often coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies, mainly against γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (53%vs 11%; P < .001). The tumors more frequently involved were lung (n = 6) and thymic neoplasms (n = 4). The risk for an underlying tumor was higher if the presentation was a classic PNS, if it was different from stiff-person syndrome or cerebellar ataxia (odds ratio, 10.5; 95%CI, 3.2–34.5), or if the patient had coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies (odds ratio, 6.8; 95%CI, 1.1–40.5). Compared with the current series, the 19 previously

  6. Stimulation of TM3 Leydig cell proliferation via GABAA receptors: A new role for testicular GABA

    PubMed Central

    Geigerseder, Christof; Doepner, Richard FG; Thalhammer, Andrea; Krieger, Annette; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and subtypes of GABA receptors were recently identified in adult testes. Since adult Leydig cells possess both the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors, it is possible that GABA may act as auto-/paracrine molecule to regulate Leydig cell function. The present study was aimed to examine effects of GABA, which may include trophic action. This assumption is based on reports pinpointing GABA as regulator of proliferation and differentiation of developing neurons via GABAA receptors. Assuming such a role for the developing testis, we studied whether GABA synthesis and GABA receptors are already present in the postnatal testis, where fetal Leydig cells and, to a much greater extend, cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage proliferate. Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western blotting and a radioactive enzymatic GAD assay evidenced that fetal Leydig cells of five-six days old rats possess active GAD protein, and that both fetal Leydig cells and cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage possess GABAA receptor subunits. TM3 cells, a proliferating mouse Leydig cell line, which we showed to possess GABAA receptor subunits by RT-PCR, served to study effects of GABA on proliferation. Using a colorimetric proliferation assay and Western Blotting for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we demonstrated that GABA or the GABAA agonist isoguvacine significantly increased TM3 cell number and PCNA content in TM3 cells. These effects were blocked by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, implying a role for GABAA receptors. In conclusion, GABA increases proliferation of TM3 Leydig cells via GABAA receptor activation and proliferating Leydig cells in the postnatal rodent testis bear a GABAergic system. Thus testicular GABA may play an as yet unrecognized role in the development of Leydig cells during the differentiation of the testicular interstitial compartment. PMID:15040802

  7. A Role for GAT-1 in Presynaptic GABA Homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fiorenzo; Melone, Marcello; Fattorini, Giorgia; Bragina, Luca; Ciappelloni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    In monoamine-releasing terminals, neurotransmitter transporters – in addition to terminating synaptic transmission by clearing released transmitters from the extracellular space – are the primary mechanism for replenishing transmitter stores and thus regulate presynaptic homeostasis. Here, we analyze whether GAT-1, the main plasma membrane GABA transporter, plays a similar role in GABAergic terminals. Re-examination of existing literature and recent data gathered in our laboratory show that GABA homeostasis in GABAergic terminals is dominated by the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme and that GAT-1-mediated GABA transport contributes to cytosolic GABA levels. However, analysis of GAT-1 KO, besides demonstrating the effects of reduced clearance, reveals the existence of changes compatible with an impaired presynaptic function, as miniature IPSCs frequency is reduced by one-third and glutamic acid decarboxylases and phosphate-activated glutaminase levels are significantly up-regulated. Although the changes observed are less robust than those reported in mice with impaired dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin plasma membrane transporters, they suggest that in GABAergic terminals GAT-1 impacts on presynaptic GABA homeostasis, and may contribute to the activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory efficacy. PMID:21503156

  8. Biphenylacetic acid enhances the antagonistic action of fluoroquinolones on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Koutsoviti-Papadopoulou, M; Nikolaidis, E; Kounenis, G

    2001-09-01

    This paper examines the effect of biphenylacetic acid on the antagonistic action of norfloxacin and enoxacin on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum. GABA produced transient contractions followed by relaxation. The contractile effect of exogenously applied GABA was concentration-dependent with EC(50)= 9.8 x 10(-6) M. This contractile effect was not significantly modified by biphenylacetic acid, and the EC(50) value for GABA in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid was 1.15 x 10(-5) M. The GABA contractile effect was inhibited, dose-dependently, by either norfloxacin or enoxacin, but only at concentrations higher than 10(-5) M. The response of the ileum to GABA (at EC(50)) was reduced to 35 and 36% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin or enoxacin, respectively. However, in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid, the response of the ileum to GABA was reduced to 2.2% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M enoxacin, while it was completely abolished by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin and the IC(50) values were 5.5 x 10(-7) and 1.5 x 10(-6) M for norfloxacin and enoxacin, respectively. These data show that biphenylacetic acid whilst having no effect at the GABA(A)-mediated contractile response of the guinea-pig ileum, enhances the antagonistic effect of both enoxacin and norfloxacin. This suggests that combined administration of fluoroquinolones and biphenylacetic acid synergistically inhibits GABA(A)-receptors at the intestinal level. PMID:11529690

  9. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  10. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  11. Redirection of Metabolic Flux into Novel Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Production Pathway by Introduction of Synthetic Scaffolds Strategy in Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-01

    In general, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) pathway involves the decarboxylation of glutamate, which is produced from sugar by Corynebacterium fermentation. GABA can be used for the production of pharmaceuticals and functional foods. Due to the increasing demand of GABA, it is essential to create an effective alternative pathway for the GABA production. In this study, Escherichia coli were engineered to produce GABA from glucose via GABA shunt, which consists of succinate dehydrogenase, succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, and GABA aminotransferase. The three enzymes were physically attached to each other through a synthetic scaffold, and the Krebs cycle flux was redirected to the GABA pathway. By introduction of synthetic scaffold, 0.75 g/l of GABA was produced from 10 g/l of glucose at 30 °C and pH 6.5. The inactivation of competing metabolic pathways provided 15.4 % increase in the final GABA concentration. PMID:26667817

  12. Identification of gamma-aminobutyric acid and its binding sites in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, J.M.; Bergstrom, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase were identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The concentration of GABA in C. elegans is approximately 10-fold lower than the concentration of GABA in rat brain. Glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, the GABA anabolic and catabolic enzymes, are also present in C. elegans. Crude membrane fractions were prepared from C. elegans and used to study specific (/sup 3/H) GABA binding sites. GABA binds to C. elegans membranes with high affinity and low capacity. Muscimol is a competitive inhibitor of specific GABA binding with a K/sub I/ value of 120 nM. None of the other GABA agonists or antagonists inhibited greater than 40% of the specific GABA binding at concentrations up to 10/sup -4/M. Thirteen spider venoms were examined as possible GABA agonists or antagonists, the venom from Calilena agelenidae inhibits specific GABA binding with a K/sub I/ value of 6 nl/ml. These results suggest that GABA has a physiological role as a neurotransmitter in C. elegans.

  13. Environmental comparison of biobased chemicals from glutamic acid with their petrochemical equivalents.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Tijs M; Potting, José; Sanders, Johan P M; De Boer, Imke J M

    2011-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of biobased chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. The objective of this paper was to compare the environmental impact of four biobased chemicals from glutamic acid with their petrochemical equivalents, that is, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and succinonitrile (SCN). A consequential life cycle assessment was performed, wherein glutamic acid was obtained from sugar beet vinasse. The removed glutamic acid was substituted with cane molasses and ureum. The comparison between the four biobased and petrochemical products showed that for NMP and NVP the biobased version had less impact on the environment, while for ACN and SCN the petrochemical version had less impact on the environment. For the latter two an optimized scenario was computed, which showed that the process for SCN can be improved to a level at which it can compete with the petrochemical process. For biobased ACN large improvements are required to make it competitive with its petrochemical equivalent. The results of this LCA and the research preceding it also show that glutamic acid can be a building block for a variety of molecules that are currently produced from petrochemical resources. Currently, most methods to produce biobased products are biotechnological processes based on sugar, but this paper demonstrates that the use of amino acids from low-value byproducts can certainly be a method as well. PMID:21870885

  14. [Glutamic acid group poisoning. So-called Chinese restaurant syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rudin, O; Stauffer, E; Cramer, Y; Krämer, M

    1989-01-01

    After eating a soup 10 persons (out of 100) fell sick; within 10 minutes they suffered from nervous muscle convulsions, trembling, mouth desiccation and dilatation of the pupils. The soup contained glutamate as flavour enhancer in an unusually high concentration of 31 grams per litre. PMID:2573344

  15. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Chadi G.; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M.; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Mason, Graeme F.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in MDD we used in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with MDD relative to non-depressed subjects. Method 1H MRS and 13C MRS data were collected on 23 medication-free MDD and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]-glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (VTCAN) for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling, from voxels placed in the occipital cortex. Results Our main finding was that mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was reduced by 26% in MDD subjects (t = 2.57, p = 0.01). Paradoxically we found no difference in the rate of glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). We also found a significant correlation between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle considering the total sample. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities. PMID:25073688

  16. Independent and additive effects of glutamic acid and methionine on yeast longevity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan. PMID:24244480

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency alters levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jadavji, N.M.; Wieske, F.; Dirnagl, U.; Winter, C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is an enzyme key regulator in folate metabolism. Deficiencies in MTHFR result in increased levels of homocysteine, which leads to reduced levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). In the brain, SAM donates methyl groups to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which is involved in neurotransmitter analysis. Using the MTHFR-deficient mouse model the purpose of this study was to investigate levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and amino acid levels in brain tissue. MTHFR deficiency affected levels of both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in within the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mthfr−/− mice had reduced levels of glutamate in the amygdala and γ-aminobutyric acid in the thalamus. The excitatory mechanisms of homocysteine through activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in brain tissue might alter levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid. PMID:26937386

  18. Expression of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Plasma Membrane Transporter-1 in Monkey and Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Giovanni; Rickman, Dennis W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the expression pattern of the predominant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in Old World monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human retina. Methods GAT-1 was localized in retinal sections by using immunohistochemical techniques with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Double-labeling studies were performed with the GAT-1 antibody using antibodies to GABA, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the bipolar cell marker Mab115A10. Results The pattern of GAT-1 immunostaining was similar in human and monkey retinas. Numerous small immunoreactive somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and were present rarely in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of all retinal regions. Medium GAT-1 somata were in the ganglion cell layer in the parafoveal and peripheral retinal regions. GAT-1 fibers were densely distributed throughout the IPL. Varicose processes, originating from both the IPL and somata in the INL, arborized in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), forming a sparse network in all retinal regions, except the fovea. Sparsely occurring GAT-1 processes were in the nerve fiber layer in parafoveal regions and near the optic nerve head but not in the optic nerve. In the INL, 99% of the GAT-1 somata contained GABA, and 66% of the GABA immunoreactive somata expressed GAT-1. GAT-1 immunoreactivity was in all VIP-containing cells, but it was absent in TH-immunoreactive amacrine cells and in Mab115A10 immunoreactive bipolar cells. Conclusions GAT-1 in primate retinas is expressed by amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. The predominant expression of GAT-1 in the inner retina is consistent with the idea that GABA transporters influence neurotransmission and thus participate in visual information processing in the retina. PMID:16565409

  19. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  20. Sequential generation of hydrogen and methane from glutamic acid through combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    Glutamic acid can hardly produce hydrogen via dark- or photo-fermentation without pretreatment. In this study, a novel process of acidogenic pretreatment with bacteria and zeolite treatment for NH4(+) removal was proposed to use glutamic acid as feedstock in photo-fermentation for efficient hydrogen production. Glutamic acid pretreated with acidogenic bacteria produces soluble metabolite products. After zeolite treatment, the acidulated solution, which mainly contains acetate, butyrate, and NH4(+), shows a decrease in NH4(+) concentration from 36.7mM to 3.2mM (NH4(+) removal efficiency of 91.1%). After NH4(+) removal, the treated solution is incubated with photosynthetic bacteria, exhibiting a maximum hydrogen yield of 292.9mL/g(-glutamic acid) during photo-fermentation. The residual solution from photo-fermentation is reused by methanogenic bacteria to produce a maximum methane yield of 102.7mL/g. The heating value conversion efficiency from glutamic acid to gas fuel significantly increases from 18.9% during photo-fermentation to 40.9% in the combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis process. PMID:23347921

  1. NOVEL POLY-GLUTAMIC ACID FUNCTIONALIZED MICROFILTRATION MEMBRANES FOR SORPTION OF HEAVY METALS AT HIGH CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various sorbent/ion exchange materials have been reported in the literature for metal ion entrapment. We have developed a highly innovative and new approach to obtain high metal pick-up utilizing poly-amino acids (poly-L-glutamic acid, 14,000 MW) covalently attached to membrane p...

  2. Pharmacology of Glutamate Transport in the CNS: Substrates and Inhibitors of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAATs) and the Glutamate/Cystine Exchanger System x c -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Richard J.; Patel, Sarjubhai A.

    As the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, l-glutamate participates not only in standard fast synaptic communication, but also contributes to higher order signal processing, as well as neuropathology. Given this variety of functional roles, interest has been growing as to how the extracellular concentrations of l-glutamate surrounding neurons are regulated by cellular transporter proteins. This review focuses on two prominent systems, each of which appears capable of influencing both the signaling and pathological actions of l-glutamate within the CNS: the sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) and the glutamate/cystine exchanger, system x c - (Sx c -). While the family of EAAT subtypes limit access to glutamate receptors by rapidly and efficiently sequestering l-glutamate in neurons and glia, Sxc - provides a route for the export of glutamate from cells into the extracellular environment. The primary intent of this work is to provide an overview of the inhibitors and substrates that have been developed to delineate the pharmacological specificity of these transport systems, as well as be exploited as probes with which to selectively investigate function. Particular attention is paid to the development of small molecule templates that mimic the structural properties of the endogenous substrates, l-glutamate, l-aspartate and l-cystine and how strategic control of functional group position and/or the introduction of lipophilic R-groups can impact multiple aspects of the transport process, including: subtype selectivity, inhibitory potency, and substrate activity.

  3. Adsorption dynamics of L-glutamic acid copolymers at a heptane/water interface.

    PubMed

    Beverung, C J; Radke, C J; Blanch, H W

    1998-02-16

    Random copolymers of glutamic acid (glu-ala, glu-leu, glu-phe, glu-tyr) were employed to investigate the relationship between side chain structure and peptide charge on adsorption behavior at an oil/water boundary. Adsorption of a series of glutamate copolymers at a heptane/water interface was examined by the dynamic pendant-drop method to determine interfacial tension. Incorporation of leucine or phenylalanine into a glutamate copolymer results in greater tension reduction than incorporation of alanine or tyrosine. These effects are amplified at pH values near the isoelectric point of glutamate, where macroscopic adsorbed films of glu-leu and glu-phe exhibit gel-like properties in response to interfacial area compression. Differences in interfacial tension behavior of glu-tyr and glu-phe indicate the importance of the tyrosine p-hydroxyl group on adsorption and aggregation at the oil/water interface. PMID:9540205

  4. [Glutamate metabolism in cerebral cortex obtained from chronic hepatic failure rats].

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Matsumoto, H; Kikuchi, S; Yachi, A

    1986-09-01

    The present investigation was carried out in order to elucidate the amino acid metabolism in hepatic failure with particular emphasis placed on glutamate. For this purpose, chronic hepatic failure models were produced in adult male Wistar rats by successive carbontetrachloride injection (0.20 ml/100 g. B. W., twice/week) for 13 weeks. They were confirmed to develop chemical changes compartible with hepatic failure, showing markedly elevated serum levels of NH3, GOT and ALP. Animals were killed by decapitation during fasting and the brains were removed immediately. After the parietal cortical slices were incubated for 45 min at 37 degrees C together with L-(U-14C) glutamate in O2-saturated Gey's balanced salt solution, they were homogenized in 75% ethanol and deproteinized with water saturated chloroform. The radioactivities of liberated CO2, glutamate and its metabolites (glutamine, aspartate and GABA) obtained from the slices were measured. The amount of radioactivity recovered from CO2, glutamine and aspartate revealed a significant increase (p less than 0.001), while that of glutamate and GABA remained unchanged. The main source of the CO2 is believed to originate from TCA cycle rather than the decarboxylation of glutamate to form GABA, and glutamate forms glutamine when it fixes ammonia. Furthermore, glutamate is converted into aspartate via TCA cycle when the carbon was labeled. Therefore, the results indicate that in chronic hepatic failure brains glutamate metabolism is enhanced through TCA cycle as well as ammonia fixation mechanism. PMID:3790365

  5. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an ∼9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported ∼90 % glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported ∼90 % GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine a glutamatergic or GABAergic

  6. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration-typically 10-12 mM-far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low-typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase

  7. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Jeitner, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration—typically 10–12 mM—far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low—typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate

  8. Wavelength-Selective One- and Two-Photon Uncaging of GABA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized photolabile 7-diethylamino coumarin (DEAC) derivatives of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These caged neurotransmitters efficiently release GABA using linear or nonlinear excitation. We used a new DEAC-based caging chromophore that has a vinyl acrylate substituent at the 3-position that shifts the absorption maximum of DEAC to about 450 nm and thus is named “DEAC450”. DEAC450-caged GABA is photolyzed with a quantum yield of 0.39 and is highly soluble and stable in physiological buffer. We found that DEAC450-caged GABA is relatively inactive toward two-photon excitation at 720 nm, so when paired with a nitroaromatic caged glutamate that is efficiently excited at such wavelengths, we could photorelease glutamate and GABA around single spine heads on neurons in brain slices with excellent wavelength selectivity using two- and one-photon photolysis, respectively. Furthermore, we found that DEAC450-caged GABA could be effectively released using two-photon excitation at 900 nm with spatial resolution of about 3 μm. Taken together, our experiments show that the DEAC450 caging chromophore holds great promise for the development of new caged compounds that will enable wavelength-selective, two-color interrogation of neuronal signaling with excellent subcellular resolution. PMID:24304264

  9. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures. PMID:24929734

  10. Extracellular expression of glutamate decarboxylase B in Escherichia coli to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli overexpressing glutamate decarboxylase GadB can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid with addition of monosodium glutamate. The yield and productivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid might be significantly improved if the overexpressed GadB in E. coli cells can be excreted outside, where it can directly transforms monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, GadB was fused to signal peptides TorA or PelB, respectively, and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). It was found that TorA could facilitate GadB secretion much better than PelB. Conditions for GadB secretion and gamma-aminobutyric acid production were optimized in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB, leading the secretion of more than half of the overexpressed GadB. Fed-batch fermentation for GadB expression and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB was sequentially performed in one fermenter; 264.4 and 313.1 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid were obtained with addition of monosodium glutamate after 36 and 72 h, respectively. PMID:27549808

  11. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  12. Identification and quantitation of new glutamic acid derivatives in soy sauce by UPLC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Frerot, Eric; Chen, Ting

    2013-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an abundant amino acid that lends a characteristic umami taste to foods. In fermented foods, glutamic acid can be found as a free amino acid formed by proteolysis or as a non-proteolytic derivative formed by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to identify different structures of glutamic acid derivatives in a typical fermented protein-based food product, soy sauce. An acidic fraction was prepared with anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by UPLC/MS/MS and UPLC/TOF-MS. α-Glutamyl, γ-glutamyl, and pyroglutamyl dipeptides, as well as lactoyl amino acids, were identified in the acidic fraction of soy sauce. They were chemically synthesized for confirmation of their occurrence and quantified in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Pyroglutamyl dipeptides accounted for 770 mg/kg of soy sauce, followed by lactoyl amino acids (135 mg/kg) and γ-glutamyl dipeptides (70 mg/kg). In addition, N-succinoylglutamic acid was identified for the first time in food as a minor compound in soy sauce (5 mg/kg). PMID:24130027

  13. The urinary excretion of orally administered pteroyl-l-glutamic acid by the rat

    PubMed Central

    Blair, J. A.; Dransfield, E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The urinary excretion of folates after oral administration of [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was studied by assaying the radioactivity in the urine and in materials purified and characterized by t.l.c. 2. Radioactivity excreted was 6.8, 5.9 and 30.7% of the oral dose in the first 24h after doses of 3.1, 32 and 320μg/kg respectively. 3. Extensive decomposition of urinary folates to pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was prevented by antioxidants or collection of urine frozen. 4. At the three dosages, two major and one minor radioactive compounds were isolated. One of the major metabolites was 5-methyltetrahydropteroylglutamic acid. The others were unidentified but were not pteroylglutamic acid, 7,8-dihydro-, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-, 5- or 10-formyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylidyne-tetrahydro-, 5-formimidoyl-tetrahydro-, 5,10-methylene-tetrahydro-, 5-methyltetrahydro-pteroylglutamic acid, nor any decomposition products of these compounds formed during isolation. Labelled unconjugated pteridines were absent. 5. Labelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid was displaced by oral administration of unlabelled pteroyl-l-glutamic acid (1.6mg/kg) when given 3.5h after, but not when given 24h after the labelled dose. 6. The results show that orally administered [2-14C]pteroyl-l-glutamic acid is absorbed without metabolism and is then metabolized into naturally occurring tetrahydro-folates. 7. These findings are discussed with reference to previous work. PMID:5124394

  14. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  15. Deficiency of the 65 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase impairs extinction of cued but not contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Susan; Narayanan, Rajeevan T; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge R; Stork, Oliver; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2009-12-16

    Extinction procedures are clinically relevant for reducing pathological fear, and the mechanisms of fear regulation are a subject of intense research. The amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) have all been suggested to be key brain areas in extinction of conditioned fear. GABA has particularly been implicated in extinction learning, and the 65 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) may be important in elevating GABA levels in response to environmental signals. Extinction of conditioned fear was examined in Gad65(-/-) mice while recording local field potentials from the amygdala, hippocampus, and PFC simultaneously while monitoring behavior. Gad65(-/-) mice showed generalization of cued fear, as reported previously, and impaired extinction of cued fear, such that fear remained high across extinction training. This endurance in cued fear was associated with theta frequency synchronization between the amygdala and hippocampus. Extinction of contextual fear, however, was unaltered in Gad65(-/-) mice when compared with wild-type littermates. The data imply that GAD65 plays a critical role in regulating cued fear responses during extinction learning and that, during this process, GABAergic signaling is involved in modulating synchronized activity between the amygdala and hippocampus. In view of the more pronounced effect on cued versus contextual fear extinction, these influences may rely more on GABAergic mechanisms in the amygdala. PMID:20016086

  16. Characterization of a Glutamate Transporter Operon, glnQHMP, in Streptococcus mutans and Its Role in Acid Tolerance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Krastel, Kirsten; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Mair, Richard; Downey, Jennifer S.; Goodman, Steven D.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate contributes to the acid tolerance response (ATR) of many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but its role in the ATR of the oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans is unknown. This study describes the discovery and characterization of a glutamate transporter operon designated glnQHMP (Smu.1519 to Smu.1522) and investigates its potential role in acid tolerance. Deletion of glnQHMP resulted in a 95% reduction in transport of radiolabeled glutamate compared to the wild-type UA159 strain. The addition of glutamate to metabolizing UA159 cells resulted in an increased production of acidic end products, whereas the glnQHMP mutant produced less lactic acid than UA159, suggesting a link between glutamate metabolism and acid production and possible acid tolerance. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a microarray analysis with glutamate and under pH 5.5 and pH 7.5 conditions which showed that expression of the glnQHMP operon was downregulated by both glutamate and mild acid. We also measured the growth kinetics of UA159 and its glnQHMP-negative derivative at pH 5.5 and found that the mutant doubled at a much slower rate than the parent strain but survived at pH 3.5 significantly better than the wild type. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of the glutamate transporter operon glnQHMP in the acid tolerance response in S. mutans. PMID:20023025

  17. Preparation of molecularly imprinted cross-linked chitosan/glutaraldehyde resin for enantioselective separation of L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; El-Sokkary, A M A

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, separation of L-glutamic acid from dilute aqueous solution by solid-phase extraction based on molecular imprinting technique using cross-linked chitosan/glutaraldehyde resin was investigated. L-Glutamic acid imprinted cross-linked chitosan (LGIC) was prepared by cross-linking of chitosan by glutaraldehyde cross-linker, in the presence of L-glutamic acid. Non-imprinted cross-linked chitosan (NIC) as control was also prepared by the same procedure in the absence of template molecules. The morphological structures of both LGIC and NIC were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). LGIC particles were applied to determine the optimum operational condition for l-glutamic acid separation from dilute aqueous solution. In adsorption step, optimum pH and retention time were 5.5 and 100 min, while corresponding values in extraction step were 2.5 and 60 min, respectively. The adsorption isotherms indicated that the maximum adsorption capacities of L- and D-glutamic acid on LGIC were 42+/-0.8 and 26+/-1.2mg/g, respectively, while in case of NIC, both L- and D-glutamic acid present the same maximum adsorption capacity 7+/-0.6 mg/g, which confirm that the molecular imprinting technique creates an enantioselectivity of LGIC toward L-glutamic acid. In addition, chiral resolution of l-, d-glutamic acid racemic mixture was carried out using column of LGIC. PMID:20441776

  18. Nonfunctional tricarboxylic acid cycle and the mechanism of glutamate biosynthesis in Acetobacter suboxydans.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, S; Claus, G W

    1972-12-01

    Acetobacter suboxydans does not contain an active tricarboxylic acid cycle, yet two pathways have been suggested for glutamate synthesis from acetate catalyzed by cell extracts: a partial tricarboxylic acid cycle following an initial condensation of oxalacetate and acetyl coenzyme A. and the citramalate-mesaconate pathway following an initial condensation of pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A. To determine which pathway functions in growing cells, acetate-1-(14)C was added to a culture growing in minimal medium. After growth had ceased, cells were recovered and fractionated. Radioactive glutamate was isolated from the cellular protein fraction, and the position of the radioactive label was determined. Decarboxylation of the C5 carbon removed 100% of the radioactivity found in the purified glutamate fraction. These experiments establish that growing cells synthesize glutamate via a partial tricarboxylic acid cycle. Aspartate isolated from these hydrolysates was not radioactive, thus providing further evidence for the lack of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle. When cell extracts were analyzed, activity of all tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, except succinate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. PMID:4640504

  19. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  20. Design, synthesis and SAR studies of GABA uptake inhibitors derived from 2-substituted pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Tobias; Renukappa-Gutke, Thejavathi; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we disclose the design and synthesis of a series of 2-substituted pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid as core structures and the N-arylalkyl derivatives thereof as potential GABA transport inhibitors. The 2-position in the side chain of pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid derivatives was substituted with alkyl, hydroxy and amino groups to modulate the activity and selectivity to mGAT1 and mGAT4 proteins. SAR studies of the compounds performed for the four mouse GABA transporter proteins (mGAT1-mGAT4) implied significant potencies and subtype selectivities for 2-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid derivatives. The racemate rac-(u)-13c exhibited the highest potency (pIC50 5.67) at and selectivity for mGAT1 in GABA uptake assays. In fact, the potency of rac-(u)-13c at hGAT-1 (pIC50 6.14) was even higher than its potency at mGAT1. These uptake results for rac-(u)-13c are in line with the binding affinities to the aforesaid proteins mGAT1 (pKi 6.99) and hGAT-1 (pKi 7.18) determined by MS Binding Assay based on NO711 as marker quantified by LC-ESI-MS-MS analysis. Interestingly, the 2-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid rac-(u)-13d containing 2-{[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)]methoxy} ethyl group at the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring showed high potency at mGAT4 and a comparatively better selectivity for this protein (>15 against mGAT3) than the well known mGAT4 uptake inhibitor (S)-SNAP-5114. PMID:25698617

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  2. [Effect of cholinomimetics on L-glutamic acid release and uptake in the neostriatum of rats].

    PubMed

    Godukhin, O V; Budantsev, A Iu; Selifonova, O V; Agapova, V N

    1983-12-01

    The effects of cholinomimetics on release and uptake of exogenic glutamic acid in the rat brain neostriatum in vivo and in vitro were studied. Carbocholine and nicotin were shown to inhibit the release, carbocholine acting directly on the presynaptic receptors whereas nicotin acting indirectly through the interneurons of neostriatum. PMID:6141074

  3. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product. 573.500 Section 573.500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  4. Phospholipids and poly(glutamic acid)/hydrolyzed gluten: interaction and kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of poly (glutamic acid) (PGA) and Hydrolyzed wheat gluten (HG) on the thermal and kinetics properties of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). A model system containing 3, 6 and 10% PGA or HG was added to 40% LPC aqueous suspension. ...

  5. Presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid responses in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, H G

    1979-01-01

    1. Potential changes were recorded from the lateral olfactory tract in slices of rat olfactory cortex in vitro at room temperature. 2. Superfused gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) usually produced dose-related depolarization of the lateral olfactory tract. Muscimol and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid appeared more potent depolarizing agents than GABA, and glycine and taurine appeared less potent. Carbachol and glutamate were virtually ineffective. 3. The GABA responses were at least partially Cl- dependent. 4. (+)-Bicuculline and higher concentrations of strychnine antagonized the GABA but not the glycine-induced depolarizations. Paradoxically, responses to high doses of GABA were sometimes potentiated by both bicuculline and strychnine. 5. It is suggested that GABA receptors could occur as widely on nerve terminals as they do postsynaptically in the CNS, where GABA could be involved in the modulation of transmitter output. PMID:760898

  6. Determination of theanine, GABA, and other amino acids in green, oolong, black, and Pu-erh teas with dabsylation and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Syu, Kai-Yang; Lin, Chih-Li; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2008-09-10

    Dabsyl chloride (dimethylaminoazobenzene sulfonyl chloride), a useful chromophoric labeling reagent for amino acids and amines, was developed in this laboratory in 1975. Although several methods have been developed to determine various types of amino acids, a quick and easy method of determining theanine, GABA, and other amino acids has not been developed in one HPLC system. In this paper are analyzed the free amino acid contents of theanine and GABA in different teas (green tea, black tea, oolong tea, Pu-erh tea, and GABA tea) with a dabsylation and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system coupled with a detector at 425 nm absorbance. Two reverse phase columns, Hypersil GOLD and Zorbax ODS, were used and gave different resolutions of dabsyl amino acids in the gradient elution program. The data suggest that the tea source or the steps of tea-making may contribute to the theanine contents variations. High theanine contents of high-mountain tea were observed in both green tea and oolong tea. Furthermore, the raw (natural fermented) Pu-erh tea contained more theanine than ripe (wet fermented) Pu-erh tea, and the GABA contents in normal teas were generally lower than that in GABA tea. PMID:18652476

  7. GABA(A) receptor downregulation in brains of subjects with autism.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J; Folsom, Timothy D; Thuras, Paul D

    2009-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the expression of four GABA(A) receptor subunits and observed significant reductions in GABRA1, GABRA2, GABRA3, and GABRB3 in parietal cortex (Brodmann's Area 40 (BA40)), while GABRA1 and GABRB3 were significantly altered in cerebellum, and GABRA1 was significantly altered in superior frontal cortex (BA9). The presence of seizure disorder did not have a significant impact on GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in the three brain areas. Our results demonstrate that GABA(A) receptors are reduced in three brain regions that have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism, suggesting widespread GABAergic dysfunction in the brains of subjects with autism. PMID:18821008

  8. Comparison of taurine, GABA, Glu, and Asp as scavengers of malondialdehyde in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan; Wang, Wei; Yu, Pingfeng; Xi, Zhijiang; Xu, Lijian; Li, Xiaolong; He, Nongyue

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if amino acid neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, glutamate (Glu), and aspartate (Asp) can scavenge activated carbonyl toxicants. In vitro, direct reaction between malondialdehyde (MDA) and amino acids was researched using different analytical methods. The results indicated that scavenging activated carbonyl function of taurine and GABA is very strong and that of Glu and Asp is very weak in pathophysiological situations. The results provided perspective into the reaction mechanism of taurine and GABA as targets of activated carbonyl such as MDA in protecting nerve terminals. In vivo, we studied the effect of taurine and GABA as antioxidants by detecting MDA concentration and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. It was shown that MDA concentration was decreased significantly, and the activities of SOD and GSH-Px were increased significantly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of acute epileptic state rats, after the administration of taurine and GABA. The results indicated that the peripherally administered taurine and GABA can scavenge free radicals and protect the tissue against activated carbonyl in vivo and in vitro.

  9. The role of ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate in thymocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, V; Sarac, M

    2010-01-01

    The studies on experimental animals have confirmed toxic effect of monosodium glutamate in different organs, mainly manifested by increased oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, strongly correlated with numerous diseases. Continuous intake of this flavor enhancer in modern nutrition also resulted with toxic effects on human health, known as Chinese restaurant syndrome. The reference data about influence of monosodium glutamate on the cells of the immune system or primary immune organs and possible protective effects of specific antioxidants are still largely unknown. This review summarizes recently known facts about the role of monosodium glutamate in the cells of the immune system, especially in thymocytes. Also, in this review many new data on positive effects of ascorbic acid on immune system and the mechanisms of its protective influence on thymocytes are discussed (Tab. 1, Ref. 52). PMID:20635684

  10. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Endogenous Respiration of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.; Cherry, John

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), and John Cherry. Influence of glutamic acid on the endogenous respiration of Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 91:546–550. 1966.—Amino acids serve as the major initial endogenous substrate for Bacillus subtilis. The endogenous activity of freshly harvested washed cells is high and falls off rapidly with time of shaking at 30 C to lower but still significant levels. The rate of O2 consumption after the addition of glutamic acid also decreases as the cells age, but more slowly than noted for endogenous respiration. When cells were fed glutamate as soon as possible after harvesting, an apparent stimulation of endogenous respiration was noted. However, endogenous activity was inhibited if the cell suspensions were shaken for at least 1 hr before addition of the glutamate. Similar results were obtained with glycerol or glucose as exogenous substrates. Variation in rates of respiration with age of the cells, inherent instability of B. subtilis, and possible utilization of substances initially excreted by the cells appear to account for the variations noted regarding the influence of an exogenous substrate on endogenous respiration. PMID:4956754

  11. Designing Novel Nanoformulations Targeting Glutamate Transporter Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2: Implications in Treating Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Yallapu, Murali M.; Sari, Youssef; Fisher, Paul B.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse is associated with elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain reward regions. Deficit of glutamate clearance has been identified as a contributing factor that leads to enhanced glutamate concentration following extended drug abuse. Importantly, normalization of glutamate level through induction of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1)/ excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) expression has been described in several in vivo studies. GLT1 upregulators including ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, have been effective in attenuating drug-seeking and drug-consumption behavior in rodent models. However, potential obstacles toward clinical translation of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators as treatment for drug addiction might include poor gastrointestinal absorption, serious peripheral adverse effects, and/or suboptimal CNS concentrations. Given the growing success of nanotechnology in targeting CNS ailments, nanoformulating known GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators for selective uptake across the blood brain barrier presents an ideal therapeutic approach for treating drug addiction. In this review, we summarize the results obtained with promising GLT1 (EAAT2) inducing compounds in animal models recapitulating drug addiction. Additionally, the various nanoformulations that can be employed for selectively increasing the CNS bioavailability of GLT1 (EAAT2) upregulators are discussed. Finally, the applicability of GLT1 (EAAT2) induction via central delivery of drug-loaded nanoformulations is described. PMID:26635971

  12. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii. A substance rich in glutamic acid residues

    PubMed Central

    Tibbs, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. The cyst wall of Colpoda steinii has been isolated and its chemical nature examined. It had a nitrogen content 13·9±0·2% (s.d.) and an ash 8·6±1·6% (s.d.). After lipid and hot-acid extraction there was a variable residual phosphorus of 0·19–0·64%. The protein nature, indicated by infrared and ultraviolet absorption, was confirmed when 100μg. of hydrolysed wall gave a ninhydrin colour equivalent to that given by 0·88–1·01μmoles of glycine. Hexosamine, hexose, pentose, lipid and dipicolinic acid were absent. 2. Paper chromatography of hydrolysates, besides showing the presence of the usual protein amino acids and three unidentified ninhydrin-reacting spots, indicated the presence of large amounts of glutamic acid. Estimated by chromatography, the amount present was 52·9±0·6 (s.d.) g./100g. of ash-free wall; manometric estimation of l-glutamic acid with l-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase gave 46·5±0·9 (s.d.) g./100g. 3. Free carboxyl groups were estimated by titration as 0·159±0·011 (s.d.) mole/100g. and those present as amide as 0·154±0·004 (s.d.) mole/100g., and the total was compared with the dicarboxylic acid content 0·360±0·010 (s.d.) mole/100g. 4. After treatment with 98% formic acid 25–30% of the wall material could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate solution (extract 1); after treatment of the residue with performic acid a further 62–63% based on the original weight could be extracted by 0·05m-sodium carbonate (extract 2). 5. The average values found for the glutamic acid contents were 21·7g./100g. for extract 1 and 58·0g./100g. for extract 2. The cysteic acid content of whole oxidized wall was about 5·8g./100g. and of extract 2 also about 5·8g./100g. The glutamic acid and cysteic acid contents of the final residue were also investigated. 6. The significance of these extraction experiments in relation to the wall structure is discussed. ImagesPlate 1. PMID:4957913

  13. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  14. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation. PMID:26765954

  15. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  16. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  17. The impact of GABA in harpin-elicited biotic stress responses in Nicotiana tabaccum.

    PubMed

    Dimlioğlu, Gizem; Daş, Zeycan Akcan; Bor, Melike; Özdemir, Filiz; Türkan, İsmail

    2015-09-01

    Harpin is a bacterial elicitor protein that was first isolated from Erwinia amylovora. Infiltration of this elicitor into the leaves of plants activates systemic acquired resistance against a variety of plant pathogens via the salicyclic acid defense pathway. The non-protein amino acid, neurotransmission inhibitor molecule of mammals-GABA- is found in all organisms and is known to be an important component of stress responses in plants. We hypothesized a possible interaction between harpin-induced defense responses and GABA shunt. Therefore, we conducted experiments on harpin-infiltrated tobacco and analyzed the components of GABA shunt in relation to growth, photosynthesis and H2O2 levels. RGR, RWC and photosynthetic efficiency were all affected in harpin-infiltrated tobacco leaves, but the rate of decline was more remarkable on RGR. H2O2 levels showed significant difference on 7 days after harpin infiltration when the necrotic lesions were also visible. GABA accumulation was increased and glutamate levels were decreased parallel to the differences in GDH and GAD enzyme activities, especially on days 5 and 7 of harpin infiltration. Transcript abundance of GDH and GAD encoding genes were differentially regulated in harpin-infiltrated leaves as compared to that of control and mock groups. In the present study, for the first time we showed a relationship between harpin-elicited responses and GABA in tobacco that was not mediated by H2O2 accumulation. Harpin infiltration significantly induced the first components of the GABA shunt such as GDH, GAD, glutamate and GABA in tobacco. PMID:26432406

  18. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wei, Li; Yu, Wenjing; Cui, Xia; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    Background Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD) is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS). The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and their receptors in a TS rat model. Materials and methods Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each). TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia) or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the mRNA expression, only Tia reduced the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, compared with the model group. Conclusion JPZDD could alleviate impairments in behavior and dysfunctional signaling by downregulating GABAAR in the striatum. We suggest that this acts to maintain the balance of Glu and GABA. PMID:27279743

  19. Evaluation of improved γ-aminobutyric acid production in yogurt using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017.

    PubMed

    Shan, Y; Man, C X; Han, X; Li, L; Guo, Y; Deng, Y; Li, T; Zhang, L W; Jiang, Y J

    2015-04-01

    Most γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), but the yield of GABA is limited in most of these GABA-producing strains. In this study, the production of GABA was carried out by using Lactobacillus plantarum NDC75017, a strain screened from traditional fermented dairy products in China. Concentrations of substrate (l-monosodium glutamate, L-MSG) and coenzyme (pyridoxal-5-phosphate, PLP) of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and culture temperature were investigated to evaluate their effects on GABA yield of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. The results indicated that GABA production was related to GAD activity and biomass of Lb. plantarum NDC75017. Response surface methodology was used to optimize conditions of GABA production. The optimal factors for GABA production were L-MSG at 80 mM, PLP at 18 μM, and a culture temperature of 36 °C. Under these conditions, production of GABA was maximized at 314.56 mg/100 g. Addition of Lb. plantarum NDC75017 to a commercial starter culture led to higher GABA production in fermented yogurt. Flavor and texture of the prepared yogurt and the control yogurt did not differ significantly. Thus, Lb. plantarum NDC75017 has good potential for manufacture of GABA-enriched fermented milk products. PMID:25622870

  20. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (l-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane. PMID:27120610

  1. Contribution of polyamines metabolism and GABA shunt to chilling tolerance induced by nitric oxide in cold-stored banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yansheng; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2016-04-15

    Effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on polyamines (PAs) catabolism, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, proline accumulation and chilling injury of banana fruit under cold storage was investigated. Banana fruit treated with NO sustained lower chilling injury index than the control. Notably elevated nitric oxide synthetase activity and endogenous NO level were observed in NO-treated banana fruit. PAs contents in treated fruit were significantly higher than control fruit, due to the elevated activities of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase. NO treatment increased the activities of diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase and glutamate decarboxylase, while reduced GABA transaminase activity to lower levels compared with control fruit, which resulted the accumulation of GABA. Besides, NO treatment upregulated proline content and significantly enhanced the ornithine aminotransferase activity. These results indicated that the chilling tolerance induced by NO treatment might be ascribed to the enhanced catabolism of PAs, GABA and proline. PMID:26616957

  2. GABA and GAD expression in the X-organ sinus gland system of the Procambarus clarkii crayfish: inhibition mediated by GABA between X-organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Polanco, Paola; Garduño, Julieta; Cebada, Jorge; Zarco, Natanael; Segovia, José; Lamas, Mónica; García, Ubaldo

    2011-09-01

    In crustaceans, the X-organ-sinus gland (XO-SG) neurosecretory system is formed of distinct populations of neurons that produce two families of neuropeptides: crustacean hyperglycemic hormone and adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone. On the basis of electrophysiological evidence, it has been proposed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) regulates both electrical and secretory activity of the XO-SG system. In this work we observed that depolarizing current pulses to neurons located in the external rim of the X-organ induced repetitive firing that suppressed the spontaneous firing of previously active X-organ neurons. Picrotoxin reversibly blocked this inhibitory effect suggesting that the GABA released from the stimulated neuron inhibited neighboring cells. Immunoperoxidase in X-organ serial sections showed co-localization of GABA and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) including the aforementioned neurons. Immunofluorescence in whole mount preparations showed that two subpopulations of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-containing neurons colocalized with GABA. The expression of GAD mRNA was determined in crayfish tissue and X-organ single cells by RT-PCR. Bioinformatics analysis shows, within the amplified region, 90.4% consensus and 41.9% identity at the amino acid level compared with Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We suggest that crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-GABA-containing neurons can regulate the excitability of other X-organ neurons that produce different neurohormones. PMID:21626307

  3. Microtransplantation of cellular membranes from squid stellate ganglion reveals ionotropic GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Limon, Agenor; Palma, Eleonora; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    The squid has been the most studied cephalopod, and it has served as a very useful model for investigating the events associated with nerve impulse generation and synaptic transmission. While the physiology of squid giant axons has been extensively studied, very little is known about the distribution and function of the neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate inhibitory transmission at the synapses. In this study we investigated whether γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activates neurotransmitter receptors in stellate ganglia membranes. To overcome the low abundance of GABA-like mRNAs in invertebrates and the low expression of GABA in cephalopods, we used a two-electrode voltage clamp technique to determine if Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with cell membranes from squid stellate ganglia responded to GABA. Using this method, membrane patches containing proteins and ion channels from the squid's stellate ganglion were incorporated into the surface of oocytes. We demonstrated that GABA activates membrane receptors in cellular membranes isolated from squid stellate ganglia. Using the same approach, we were able to record native glutamate-evoked currents. The squid's GABA receptors showed an EC(50) of 98 μmol l(-1) to GABA and were inhibited by zinc (IC(50) = 356 μmol l(-1)). Interestingly, GABA receptors from the squid were only partially blocked by bicuculline. These results indicate that the microtransplantation of native cell membranes is useful to identify and characterize scarce membrane proteins. Moreover, our data also support the role of GABA as an ionotropic neurotransmitter in cephalopods, acting through chloride-permeable membrane receptors. PMID:23493508

  4. Atorvastatin Prevents Glutamate Uptake Reduction Induced by Quinolinic Acid Via MAPKs Signaling.

    PubMed

    Vandresen-Filho, S; Martins, W C; Bertoldo, D B; Rieger, D K; Maestri, M; Leal, R B; Tasca, C I

    2016-08-01

    Statins have been shown to promote neuroprotection in a wide range of neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms involved in such effects of statins are not fully understood. Quinolinic acid (QA) is a neurotoxin that induces seizures when infused in vivo and promotes glutamatergic excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the putative glutamatergic mechanisms and the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the atorvastatin neuroprotective effects against QA toxicity. Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment for 7 days prevented the QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake, but had no effect on increased glutamate release induced by QA. Moreover, atorvastatin treatment increased the phosphorylation of ERK1 and prevented the decrease in Akt phosphorylation induced by QA. Neither atorvastatin treatment nor QA infusion altered glutamine synthetase activity or the levels of phosphorylation of p38(MAPK) or JNK1/2 during the evaluation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, but not PI3K/Akt signaling, abolished the neuroprotective effect of atorvastatin against QA-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. Our data suggest that atorvastatin protective effects against QA toxicity are related to modulation of glutamate transporters via MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27084771

  5. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of O-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  6. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  7. Glutamic Acid Not Beneficial for the Prevention of Vincristine Neurotoxicity in Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Scott M.; Sandler, Eric; Geller, Thomas; Tamura, Roy N.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vincristine causes known side effects of peripheral sensory, motor, autonomic and cranial neuropathies. No preventive interventions are known. Procedure We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of oral glutamic acid as a preventive agent in pediatric patients with cancer who would be receiving vincristine therapy for at least 9 consecutive weeks (Stratum 1= Wilms tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma) or 4 consecutive weeks in conjunction with steroids (Stratum 2=Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma). At designated time points, a scored neurologic exam using the Modified Balis Pediatric Scale of Peripheral Neuropathies was performed to document neurologic toxicity. Results Between 2007–12, 250 patients were enrolled (Stratum 1=50, Stratum 2=200). The glutamic acid treated group did not have a significantly lower percentage of neurotoxicity compared to placebo treated group either overall or within stratum or age subgroups. The only subgroup which was suggestive of treatment effect was for age. Patients 13 years or older showed a larger benefit in favor of glutamic acid (p=0.055) compared to patients less than 13 years (p=1.00). Constipation was the most frequently reported (14%) Grade II or higher neurotoxicity. Conclusion Vincristine-associated neurotoxicity in pediatric oncology remains a frequent complication of chemotherapy for multiple diagnoses with an approximate 30% of patients affected. Glutamic acid is not effective for prevention in pre-adolescents. There is a suggestion of benefit in patients 13 years or older, but the study was not designed to provide adequate power to test the treatment effect within this age group alone. PMID:25545757

  8. Synthesis and proteinase inhibitory properties of diphenyl phosphonate analogues of aspartic and glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R; Walker, B; Walker, B J

    1998-07-01

    The synthesis of diphenyl phosphonate analogues of aspartic and glutamic acid, and their inhibitory activity against S. aureus V8 protease and granzyme B, is described. The study has revealed difficulties with protecting group compatibility in the synthesis of these analogues. Two analogues, Acetyl. AspP (OPh)2 and Acetyl.GluP (OPh)2 were found to function as irreversible inactivators of V8 proteinase, yet exhibit no activity against granzyme B. PMID:9873408

  9. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing affects trafficking of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Wahlstedt, Helene; Ohlson, Johan; Björk, Petra; Ohman, Marie

    2011-01-21

    Recoding by adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing plays an important role in diversifying proteins involved in neurotransmission. We have previously shown that the Gabra-3 transcript, coding for the α3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor is edited in mouse, causing an isoleucine to methionine (I/M) change. Here we show that this editing event is evolutionarily conserved from human to chicken. Analyzing recombinant GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed in HEK293 cells, our results suggest that editing at the I/M site in α3 has functional consequences on receptor expression. We demonstrate that I/M editing reduces the cell surface and the total number of α3 subunits. The reduction in cell surface levels is independent of the subunit combination as it is observed for α3 in combination with either the β2 or the β3 subunit. Further, an amino acid substitution at the corresponding I/M site in the α1 subunit has a similar effect on cell surface presentation, indicating the importance of this site for receptor trafficking. We show that the I/M editing during brain development is inversely related to the α3 protein abundance. Our results suggest that editing controls trafficking of α3-containing receptors and may therefore facilitate the switch of subunit compositions during development as well as the subcellular distribution of α subunits in the adult brain. PMID:21030585

  10. Self-Healing Supramolecular Self-Assembled Hydrogels Based on Poly(L-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Li, Guifei; Wu, Jie; Wang, Bo; Yan, Shifeng; Zhang, Kunxi; Ding, Jianxun; Yin, Jingbo

    2015-11-01

    Self-healing polymeric hydrogels have the capability to recover their structures and functionalities upon injury, which are extremely attractive in emerging biomedical applications. This research reports a new kind of self-healing polypeptide hydrogels based on self-assembly between cholesterol (Chol)-modified triblock poly(L-glutamic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-glutamic acid) ((PLGA-b-PEG-b-PLGA)-g-Chol) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-modified poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA-g-β-CD). The hydrogel formation relied on the host and guest linkage between β-CD and Chol. This study demonstrates the influences of polymer concentration and β-CD/Chol molar ratio on viscoelastic behavior of the hydrogels. The results showed that storage modulus was highest at polymer concentration of 15% w/v and β-CD/Chol molar ratio of 1:1. The effect of the PLGA molecular weight in (PLGA-b-PEG-b-PLGA)-g-Chol on viscoelastic behavior, mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of the supramolecular hydrogels was also studied. The hydrogels showed outstanding self-healing capability and good cytocompatibility. The multilayer structure was constructed using hydrogels with self-healing ability. The developed hydrogels provide a fascinating glimpse for the applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26414083

  11. Bifurcated hydrogen bonds stabilize fibrils of poly(L-glutamic) acid.

    PubMed

    Fulara, Aleksandra; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2010-06-24

    Model fibrillating homopolypeptides have been providing many insightful analogies to the clinically important phenomena of protein misfolding and amyloidogenesis. Here we show that the beta(2) structural variant of poly(l-glutamic) acid forms fibrils with an amyloid-like morphology, ability to enhance fluorescence of thioflavin T, and seeding properties. The beta(2) fibrils are formed upon heating of aqueous solutions of alpha-helical poly(l-glutamic) acid, which leads to a significant increase of pD (pH) of unbuffered samples and a concomitant precipitation of fibrils with unusual infrared traits: amide I' band being dramatically red-shifted to 1596 cm(-1), and the -COOD stretching band split into two peaks around 1730 and 1719 cm(-1). We are proposing that formation of three-center hydrogen bonds involving bifurcated peptide carbonyl acceptors (>C=O) and main chains' NH, as well as side chains' -COOH proton donors is likely to underlie the observed infrared characteristics of beta(2) fibrils. Such bonds provide additional conformational constraints in a tightly packed environment around glutamate side chains resulting in the decreased overall acidity of the polypeptide. The presence of bifurcated hydrogen bonds in amyloid fibrils may be an overlooked factor in fibrils' robustness, thermodynamic stability and the ability to propagate their own growth. PMID:20509699

  12. Monitoring of free glutamic acid in Malaysian processed foods, dishes and condiments.

    PubMed

    Khairunnisak, M; Azizah, A H; Jinap, S; Nurul Izzah, A

    2009-04-01

    A study to quantify the free glutamic acid content of six processed foods, 44 dishes and 26 condiments available in Malaysia was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FRD). Recovery tests were carried out with spiked samples at levels from 6 to 31 mg g(-1). High recovery in different matrices was achieved ranging from 88% +/- 13% to 102% +/- 5.12%, with an average of 97% +/- 8.92%. Results from the study revealed that the average free glutamic acid content ranged from 0.34 +/- 0.20 to 4.63 +/- 0.41 mg g(-1) in processed foods, while in prepared dishes it was as low as 0.24 +/- 0.15 mg g(-1) in roti canai (puffed bread served with curry or dhal) to 8.16 +/- 1.99 mg g(-1) in dim sum (a small casing of dough, usually filled with minced meat, seafood, and vegetables, either steamed or fried). Relatively, the content of free glutamic acid was found to be higher in condiments at 0.28 +/- 0 mg g(-1) in mayonnaise to 170.90 +/- 6.40 mg g(-1) in chicken stock powder. PMID:19680916

  13. Microbial synthesis of poly-γ-glutamic acid: current progress, challenges, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiting; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Jidong; Qiu, Hua; Zhao, Mouming; Zou, Wei; Li, Shubo

    2016-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a naturally occurring biopolymer made from repeating units of l-glutamic acid, d-glutamic acid, or both. Since some bacteria are capable of vigorous γ-PGA biosynthesis from renewable biomass, γ-PGA is considered a promising bio-based chemical and is already widely used in the food, medical, and wastewater industries due to its biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic properties. In this review, we consider the properties, biosynthetic pathway, production strategies, and applications of γ-PGA. Microbial biosynthesis of γ-PGA and the molecular mechanisms regulating production are covered in particular detail. Genetic engineering and optimization of the growth medium, process control, and downstream processing have proved to be effective strategies for lowering the cost of production, as well as manipulating the molecular mass and conformational/enantiomeric properties that facilitate screening of competitive γ-PGA producers. Finally, future prospects of microbial γ-PGA production are discussed in light of recent progress, challenges, and trends in this field. PMID:27366207

  14. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter. PMID:25900811

  15. Promoters inducible by aromatic amino acids and γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) for metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Lee, Kyusung; Bae, Sang-Jeong; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2015-03-01

    A wide range of promoters with different strengths and regulatory mechanisms are valuable tools in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. While there are many constitutive promoters available, the number of inducible promoters is still limited for pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed aromatic amino-acid-inducible promoters based on the binding sites of Aro80 transcription factor, which is involved in the catabolism of aromatic amino acids through transcriptional activation of ARO9 and ARO10 genes in response to aromatic amino acids. A dynamic range of tryptophan-inducible promoter strengths can be obtained by modulating the number of Aro80 binding sites, plasmid copy numbers, and tryptophan concentrations. Using low and high copy number plasmid vectors and different tryptophan concentrations, a 29-fold range of fluorescence intensities of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter could be achieved from a synthetic U4C ARO9 promoter, which is composed of four repeats of Aro80 binding half site (CCG) and ARO9 core promoter element. The U4C ARO9 promoter was applied to express alsS and alsD genes from Bacillus subtilis for acetoin production in S. cerevisiae, resulting in a gradual increase in acetoin titers depending on tryptophan concentrations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-inducible UGA4 promoter, regulated by Uga3, can also be used in metabolic engineering as a dose-dependent inducible promoter. The wide range of controllable expression levels provided by these tryptophan- and GABA-inducible promoters might contribute to fine-tuning gene expression levels and timing for the optimization of pathways in metabolic engineering. PMID:25573467

  16. Preparation and evaluation of lysozyme-loaded nanoparticles coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Sun, Yan; Xu, Yaoxing; Feng, Hai; Fu, Sida; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Wei; Sun, Dongchang; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Shaochun

    2013-08-01

    To improve the application of lysozymes, methods for coating lysozymes with poly-γ-glutamic acid and chitosan were studied. Several lysozyme-loaded chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid composite nanosystems for loading and controlling the release of lysozymes were established. The lysozyme loading content and efficiency of the different systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of the composite nanoparticles was also investigated. Results showed that when the lysozymes were coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid and further rewrapped with chitosan, smooth spherical composite nanoparticles were obtained; the loading efficiency and loading content reached 76% and 40%, respectively. The lysozyme release in vitro was slow and presented a two-stage programmed release. Antibacterial testing in vitro indicated that lysozyme-loaded nanoparticles coated with poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan had outstanding antibacterial activity. An obvious assembly of bacterial cells and composite nanoparticles was observed during co-incubation. Therefore, the poly-γ-glutamic acid/chitosan composite coating broadened the antibacterial spectrum of the composite lysozyme nanoreagent, and presented satisfactory antibacterial effect. The lysozyme-loaded chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid nanocoating system established in this research could provide reference for coating and controlled releasing of alkaline proteins. PMID:23628585

  17. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  18. An NMR-Based Metabolomic Approach to Investigate the Effects of Supplementation with Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (P<0.05). Compared with DON treatment, dietary supplementation with glutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Addition glutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (P<0.05). These novel findings indicate that glutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino

  19. An NMR-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of supplementation with glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (P<0.05). Compared with DON treatment, dietary supplementation with glutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (P<0.05). Addition glutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (P<0.05). These novel findings indicate that glutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino

  20. Co-release of acetylcholine and gamma-aminobutyric acid by a retinal neuron

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, D.M.; Masland, R.H.

    1989-05-01

    Rabbit retinas were vitally stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), a fluorescent compound that selectively accumulates within the cholinergic amacrine cells. The retinas were then incubated in vitro in the presence of radioactive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and autoradiographed. The cells that accumulated DAPI were found to accumulate GABA, confirming immunohistochemical evidence that the cholinergic amacrine cells contain GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K+ caused them to release acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. This indicates that the cholinergic amacrine cells can secrete acetylcholine and GABA. Retinas were double-labeled with (14C)GABA and (3H)acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of (14C)GABA was found to be independent of extracellular Ca2+. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from (14C)glutamate behaved the same way as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments the simultaneously measured release of (3H)acetylcholine was strongly Ca2+-dependent, indicating that the releases of acetylcholine and GABA are controlled by different mechanisms. Synaptic vesicles immunologically isolated from double-labeled retinas contained much (3H)acetylcholine and little or no (14C)GABA. These results suggest that the cholinergic amacrine cells release acetylcholine primarily by vesicle exocytosis and release GABA primarily by means of a carrier.

  1. Comparison between the modes of action of novel meta-diamide and macrocyclic lactone insecticides on the RDL GABA receptor.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinichi; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2015-05-01

    Macrocyclic lactones, avermectins, and milbemycins are widely used to control arthropods, nematodes, and endo- and ectoparasites in livestock and pets. Their main targets are glutamate-gated chloride channels. Furthermore, macrocyclic lactones reportedly interact with insect RDL γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, but their modes of action on insect RDL GABA receptors remain unknown. In this study, we attempted to better understand the modes of action of macrocyclic lactones on RDL GABA receptors. We observed that ivermectin and milbemectin behaved as allosteric agonists of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. G336A, G336S, and G336T mutations had profound effects on the activities of ivermectin and milbemectin, and a G336M mutation abolished the allosteric agonist and antagonist activities of these macrocyclic lactones. These results suggest that G336 in TM3 of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor is important for the binding of macrocyclic lactones. Recently, it has been suggested that a novel RDL GABA receptor antagonist, 3-benzamido-N-(2-bromo-4-perfluoroisopropyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (meta-diamide 7), binds to the transmembrane intersubunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. Thus, we compared the effects of mutations around G336 and A302 mutations in TM2 on the activities of macrocyclic lactone and meta-diamide 7. The effects of L281C, V340Q, V340N, A302S, and A302N mutations on the activity of meta-diamide 7 differed from those on ivermectin and milbemectin. Molecular modeling studies showed that macrocyclic lactones docked in the intersubunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor in the open state. In contrast, meta-diamide 7 docked into the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor in the closed state. This suggests that the modes of action of macrocyclic lactone binding to the wild-type Drosophila RDL GABA receptor differ from those of meta-diamide binding. PMID:25987227

  2. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: selective inhibition of arthropod γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Gassel, Michael; Wolf, Christian; Noack, Sandra; Williams, Heike; Ilg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). In this study, the effects of the isoxazoline drug fluralaner on insect and acarid GABACl (RDL) and GluCl and its parasiticidal potency were investigated. We report the identification and cDNA cloning of Rhipicephalus (R.) microplus RDL and GluCl genes, and their functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The generation of six clonal HEK293 cell lines expressing Rhipicephalus microplus RDL and GluCl, Ctenocephalides felis RDL-A285 and RDL-S285, as well as Drosophila melanogaster RDLCl-A302 and RDL-S302, combined with the development of a membrane potential fluorescence dye assay allowed the comparison of ion channel inhibition by fluralaner with that of established insecticides addressing RDL and GluCl as targets. In these assays fluralaner was several orders of magnitude more potent than picrotoxinin and dieldrin, and performed 5-236 fold better than fipronil on the arthropod RDLs, while a rat GABACl remained unaffected. Comparative studies showed that R. microplus RDL is 52-fold more sensitive than R. microplus GluCl to fluralaner inhibition, confirming that the GABA-gated chloride channel is the primary target of this new parasiticide. In agreement with the superior RDL on-target activity, fluralaner outperformed dieldrin and fipronil in insecticidal screens on cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) and sheep blowfly larvae (Lucilia cuprina), as well as in acaricidal screens on cattle tick (R. microplus) adult females, brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) adult females and Ornithodoros moubata nymphs. These findings highlight the potential of fluralaner as a novel ectoparasiticide. PMID:24365472

  3. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  4. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced currents of skate Muller (glial) cells are mediated by neuronal-like GABAA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Qian, H H; Ripps, H

    1989-01-01

    Radial glia (Muller cells) of the vertebrate retina appear to be intimately involved in regulating the actions of amino acid neurotransmitters. One of the amino acids thought to be important in mediating retinal information flow is gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The findings of this study indicate that enzymatically isolated skate Muller cells are depolarized by GABA and the GABAA agonist muscimol and that the actions of these agents are reduced by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Membrane currents induced by GABA under voltage clamp were dose dependent, were associated with an increase in membrane conductance, and showed marked desensitization when the concentration of GABA exceeded 2.5 microM. The responses had a reversal potential close to that calculated for chloride, indicating that the currents were generated by ions passing through channels. These data support the view that skate Muller cells possess functional GABAA receptors. The presence of such receptors on retinal glia may have important implications for the role of Muller cells in maintaining the constancy of the extracellular milieu, for neuron-glia interactions within the retina, and for theories concerning the generation of the electroretinogram. Images PMID:2567001

  5. Electrophysiological evidence for 4-isobutyl-3-isopropylbicyclophosphorothionate as a selective blocker of insect GABA-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Yuki; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Furutani, Shogo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    Invertebrate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls), which function as inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors, are important targets of insecticides and antiparasitic agents. The antagonism of GABACls and GluCls by 4-isobutyl-3-isopropylbicyclophosphorothionate (PS-14) was examined in cultured cockroach and rat neurons using a whole-cell patch-clamp method. The results indicated that PS-14 selectively blocks cockroach GABACls relative to cockroach GluCls and rat GABACls. PS-14 represents a useful probe for the study of insect GABA receptors. PMID:23591113

  6. Cysteine pK[subscript a] Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A.

    2008-07-09

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pK{sub a} value for this residue. We have used atomic-resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pK{sub a} of 5.4 {+-} 0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid side chain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pK{sub a} analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid side chain of E18 is required for the maximal stabilization of the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pK{sub a} of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48, and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pK{sub a} in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen-bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily.

  7. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K. Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25485164

  8. Synaptic inhibition and γ-aminobutyric acid in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    OBATA, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Signal transmission through synapses connecting two neurons is mediated by release of neurotransmitter from the presynaptic axon terminals and activation of its receptor at the postsynaptic neurons. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), non-protein amino acid formed by decarboxylation of glutamic acid, is a principal neurotransmitter at inhibitory synapses of vertebrate and invertebrate nervous system. On one hand glutamic acid serves as a principal excitatory neurotransmitter. This article reviews GABA researches on; (1) synaptic inhibition by membrane hyperpolarization, (2) exclusive localization in inhibitory neurons, (3) release from inhibitory neurons, (4) excitatory action at developmental stage, (5) phenotype of GABA-deficient mouse produced by gene-targeting, (6) developmental adjustment of neural network and (7) neurological/psychiatric disorder. In the end, GABA functions in simple nervous system and plants, and non-amino acid neurotransmitters were supplemented. PMID:23574805

  9. Imidase catalyzing desymmetric imide hydrolysis forming optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Masutoshi; Hibi, Makoto; Shizawa, Hiroaki; Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Yasohara, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Ogawa, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The recent use of optically active 3-substituted gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs in human therapeutics has identified a need for an efficient, stereoselective method of their synthesis. Here, bacterial strains were screened for enzymes capable of stereospecific hydrolysis of 3-substituted glutarimides to generate (R)-3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides. The bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis NBRC13111 and Burkholderia phytofirmans DSM17436 were discovered to hydrolyze 3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutarimide (CGI) to (R)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutaric acid monoamide (CGM) with 98.1% enantiomeric excess (e.e.) and 97.5% e.e., respectively. B. phytofirmans DSM17436 could also hydrolyze 3-isobutyl glutarimide (IBI) to produce (R)-3-isobutyl glutaric acid monoamide (IBM) with 94.9% e.e. BpIH, an imidase, was purified from B. phytofirmans DSM17436 and found to generate (R)-CGM from CGI with specific activity of 0.95 U/mg. The amino acid sequence of BpIH had a 75% sequence identity to that of allantoinase from A. faecalis NBRC13111 (AfIH). The purified recombinant BpIH and AfIH catalyzed (R)-selective hydrolysis of CGI and IBI. In addition, a preliminary investigation of the enzymatic properties of BpIH and AfIH revealed that both enzymes were stable in the range of pH 6-10, with an optimal pH of 9.0, stable at temperatures below 40 °C, and were not metalloproteins. These results indicate that the use of this class of hydrolase to generate optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamide could simplify the production of specific chiral GABA analogs for drug therapeutics. PMID:26205522

  10. Apraxia in anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase-associated stiff person syndrome: link to corticobasal degeneration?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Subramony, S H; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is associated with asymmetrical rigidity as well as asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is characterized by muscle stiffness and gait difficulties. Whereas patients with CBS have several forms of pathology, many patients with SPS have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-ab), but these 2 disorders have not been reported to coexist. We report 2 patients with GAD-ab-positive SPS who also had signs suggestive of CBS, including asymmetrical limb rigidity associated with both asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Future studies should evaluate patients with CBS for GAD-ab and people with SPS for signs of CBS. PMID:25100431

  11. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  12. Optimization of γ-aminobutyric acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from honeybees.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Naser; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Baradaran, Ali; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abdul; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM) in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM. PMID:25884548

  13. Effect of supersaturation on L-glutamic acid polymorphs under droplet-based microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zhanzhong; Dang, Leping; Wei, Hongyuan

    2016-07-01

    Supersaturation is an important controlling factor for crystallization process and polymorphism. Droplet-based microchannels and conventional crystallization were used to investigate polymorphs of L-gluatamic acid in this work. The results illustrate that it is easy to realize the accurate and rapid control of the crystallization temperature in the droplets, which is especially beneficial to heat and mass transfer during crystallization. It is also noted that higher degree of supersaturation favors the nucleation of α crystal form, while lower degree of supersaturation favors the nucleation of β crystal form under droplet-based microchannels for L-gluatamic acid. In addition, there is a different nucleation behavior to be found under droplet-based microchannels both for the β form and α form of L-glutamic acid. This new finding can provide important insight into the development and design of investigation meanings for drug polymorph.

  14. Fine Tuning of Synaptic Plasticity and Filtering by GABA Released from Hippocampal Autaptic Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Orlando, Marta; Raimondi, Andrea; Benfenati, Fabio; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    The functional consequence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release at mossy fiber terminals is still a debated topic. Here, we provide multiple evidence of GABA release in cultured autaptic hippocampal granule cells. In ∼50% of the excitatory autaptic neurons, GABA, VGAT, or GAD67 colocalized with vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive puncta, where both GABAB and GABAA receptors (Rs) were present. Patch-clamp recordings showed a clear enhancement of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents in response to the application of the GABABR antagonist CGP58845 only in neurons positive to the selective granule cell marker Prox1, and expressing low levels of GAD67. Indeed, GCP non-responsive excitatory autaptic neurons were both Prox1- and GAD67-negative. Although the amount of released GABA was not sufficient to activate functional postsynaptic GABAARs, it effectively activated presynaptic GABABRs that maintain a tonic "brake" on the probability of release and on the size of the readily releasable pool and contributed to resting potential hyperpolarization possibly through extrasynaptic GABAAR activation. The autocrine inhibition exerted by GABABRs on glutamate release enhanced both paired-pulse facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation. Such GABABR-mediated changes in short-term plasticity confer to immature granule cells the capability to modulate their filtering properties in an activity-dependent fashion, with remarkable consequences on the dynamic behavior of neural circuits. PMID:25576534

  15. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid treatment affects citrate and amino acid accumulation to improve fruit quality and storage performance of postharvest citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Shen, Dandan; Luo, Yi; Sun, Xiaohua; Wang, Jinqiu; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Juan; Deng, Xiuxin; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2017-02-01

    The loss of organic acids during postharvest storage is one of the major factors that reduces the fruit quality and economic value of citrus. Citrate is the most important organic acid in citrus fruits. Molecular evidence has proved that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt plays a key role in citrate metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous GABA treatment on citrate metabolism and storage quality of postharvest citrus fruit. The content of citrate was significantly increased, which was primarily attributed to the inhibition of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). Amino acids, including glutamate, alanine, serine, aspartate and proline, were also increased. Moreover, GABA treatment decreased the fruit rot rate. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the content of energy source ATP were affected by the treatment. Our results indicate that GABA treatment is a very effective approach for postharvest quality maintenance and improvement of storage performance in citrus production. PMID:27596402

  16. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin may alter LH release patterns by abolishing sex differences in GABA/glutamate cell number and modifying the transcriptome of the male anteroventral periventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Del Pino Sans, Javier; Clements, Kelsey J; Suvorov, Alexander; Krishnan, Sudha; Adams, Hillary L; Petersen, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    Developmental exposure to arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands abolishes sex differences in a wide range of neural structures and functions. A well-studied example is the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a structure that controls sex-specific luteinizing hormone (LH) release. In the male, testosterone (T) secreted by the developing testes defeminizes LH release mechanisms; conversely, perinatal AhR activation by 2,3,7,8,-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) blocks defeminization. To better understand developmental mechanisms altered by TCDD exposure, we first verified that neonatal TCDD exposure in male rats prevented the loss of AVPV GABA/glutamate neurons that are critical for female-typical LH surge release. We then used whole genome arrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) to compare AVPV transcriptomes of males treated neonatally with TCDD or vehicle. Our bioinformatics analyses showed that TCDD enriched gene sets important for neuron development, synaptic transmission, ion homeostasis, and cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, upstream regulatory analysis suggests that both estrogen receptors (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) regulate genes targeted by TCDD. Of the 23 mRNAs found to be changed by TCDD at least 2-fold (p<0.05), most participate in the functions identified in our bioinformatics analyses. Several, including matrix metallopeptidase 9 and SRY-box 11 (Sox11), are known targets of E2. CUG triplet repeat, RNA binding protein 2 (cugbp2) is particularly interesting because it is sex-specific, oppositely regulated by estradiol (E2) and TCDD. Moreover, it regulates the post-transcriptional processing of molecules previously linked to sexual differentiation of the brain. These findings provide new insights into how TCDD may interfere with defeminization of LH release patterns. PMID:27185484

  17. Hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazolyl moiety as bioisoster of the carboxy function. A computational study on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) related compounds.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Lolli, Marco L

    2008-04-01

    Recently, our research group has proposed the hydroxyfurazanyl (4-hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-yl) moiety as a new non-classical isoster of the carboxy function in the design of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues. Some compounds showed significant activity at the GABA(A) receptor, representing the only examples of pentatomic heterocycles bearing an omega-aminoalkyl flexible side chain in the position vicinal to the hydroxy group displaying agonist activity at this receptor subtype. In this work, an ab initio analysis of the structural and electronic features of furazan-3-ol is presented, in order to provide a theoretical basis to the claimed bioisosterism with the carboxy function. An ab initio conformational study with the C-PCM implicit solvent model was carried out to elucidate the reasons of the peculiar behaviour of the furazan models. Alongside, another conformational search through molecular dynamics in explicit solvent was accomplished, in order to validate the first method. The electronic features of the 4-hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-yl substructure seem to account for a marked stabilising effect of the putative bioactive conformation at the GABA(A) receptor subtype. The 1,2,5-thiadiazole analogue, which shares the same conformational preference of its oxygenated counterpart, was identified as a potential candidate for synthesis and pharmacological testing. Figure 4-(omega-aminoalkyl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-ol analogues of GABA. PMID:18247067

  18. A poly-γ-(D)-glutamic acid depolymerase that degrades the protective capsule of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Negus, David; Taylor, Peter W

    2014-03-01

    A mixed culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pusillimonas noertemanii, obtained by soil enrichment, elaborated an enzyme (EnvD) which rapidly hydrolysed poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PDGA), the constituent of the anti-phagocytic capsule conferring virulence on Bacillus anthracis. The EnvD gene is carried on the P. noertemanii genome but co-culture is required for the elaboration of PDGA depolymerase activity. EnvD showed strong sequence homology to dienelactone hydrolases from other Gram-negative bacteria, possessed no general protease activity but cleaved γ-links in both d- and l-glutamic acid-containing polymers. The stability at 37°C was markedly superior to that of CapD, a γ-glutamyltranspeptidase with PDGA depolymerase activity. Recombinant EnvD was recovered from inclusion bodies in soluble form from an Escherichia coli expression vector and the enzyme stripped the PDGA capsule from the surface of B. anthracis Pasteur within 5 min. We conclude from this in vitro study that rEnvD shows promise as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of anthrax. PMID:24428662

  19. Rapid glutamic acid decarboxylase test for identification of Bacteroides and Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jilly, B J; Schreckenberger, P C; LeBeau, L J

    1984-01-01

    A rapid 4-h test for glutamic acid decarboxylase is described for the identification of certain anaerobic bacteria. The test substrate consisted of 1.0 g of L-glutamic acid, 0.3 ml of Triton X-155, and 0.05 g of bromcresol green sodium salt in 1 liter of water. The substrate was dispensed in 0.5-ml amounts into test tubes, and a turbid suspension was made with the test organism. The test was then incubated aerobically at 35 degrees C for 4 h. The development of a blue color was considered positive. A total of 345 strains of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria were tested. All isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis. Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium sordellii gave a positive reaction. Some isolates of Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides vulgatus were also positive. The use of this rapid test in conjunction with other rapid methods, such as the spot indol test, will enable laboratory workers to report these pathogens on the same day on which an inoculum of pure culture growth on agar is available. PMID:6376535

  20. Inhibitory effect of glutamic acid on the scale formation process using electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Karar, A; Naamoune, F; Kahoul, A; Belattar, N

    2016-08-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate CaCO3 in water has some important implications in geoscience researches, ocean chemistry studies, CO2 emission issues and biology. In industry, the scaling phenomenon may cause technical problems, such as reduction in heat transfer efficiency in cooling systems and obstruction of pipes. This paper focuses on the study of the glutamic acid (GA) for reducing CaCO3 scale formation on metallic surfaces in the water of Bir Aissa region. The anti-scaling properties of glutamic acid (GA), used as a complexing agent of Ca(2+) ions, have been evaluated by the chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods in conjunction with a microscopic examination. Chemical and electrochemical study of this water shows a high calcium concentration. The characterization using X-ray diffraction reveals that while the CaCO3 scale formed chemically is a mixture of calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the one deposited electrochemically is a pure calcite. The effect of temperature on the efficiency of the inhibitor was investigated. At 30 and 40°C, a complete scaling inhibition was obtained at a GA concentration of 18 mg/L with 90.2% efficiency rate. However, the efficiency of GA decreased at 50 and 60°C. PMID:26824779

  1. Post-polymerization modification of poly(L-glutamic acid) with D-(+)-glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Peter; Cebašek, Sašo; Možir, Alenka; Zagar, Ema

    2014-01-01

    Carboxyl functional groups of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGlu) were modified with a D-(+)-glucosamine (GlcN) by amidation using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMTMM) as a coupling reagent. The coupling reaction was performed in aqueous medium without protection of hydroxyl functional groups of D-(+)-glucosamine. Poly(L-glutamic acid) and GlcN functionalized polyglutamates (P(Glu-GlcN)) were thoroughly characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and SEC-MALS to gain detailed information on their structure, composition and molar mass characteristics. The results reveal successful functionalization with GlcN through the amide bond and also to a minor extent through ester bond formation in position 1 of GlcN. In addition, a ratio between the α- and β-form of glucosamine substituent coupled to polyglutamate repeating units as well as the content of residual dimethoxy triazinyl active ester moiety in the samples were evaluated. PMID:25438084

  2. Stacking interaction and its role in kynurenic acid binding to glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Alexander V; Zakharov, Gennady A; Shchegolev, Boris F; Savvateeva-Popova, Elena V

    2012-05-01

    Stacking interaction is known to play an important role in protein folding, enzyme-substrate and ligand-receptor complex formation. It has been shown to make a contribution into the aromatic antagonists binding with glutamate ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), in particular, the complex of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit with the kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivatives. The specificity of KYNA binding to the glutamate receptors subtypes might partially result from the differences in stacking interaction. We have calculated the optimal geometry and binding energy of KYNA dimers with the four types of aromatic amino acid residues in Rattus and Drosophila ionotropic iGluR subunits. All ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed taking into account electron correlations at MP2 and MP4 perturbation theory levels. We have also investigated the potential energy surfaces (PES) of stacking and hydrogen bonds (HBs) within the receptor binding site and calculated the free energy of the ligand-receptor complex formation. The energy of stacking interaction depends both on the size of aromatic moieties and the electrostatic effects. The distribution of charges was shown to determine the geometry of polar aromatic ring dimers. Presumably, stacking interaction is important at the first stage of ligand binding when HBs are weak. The freedom of ligand movements and rotation within receptor site provides the precise tuning of the HBs pattern, while the incorrect stacking binding prohibits the ligand-receptor complex formation. PMID:21833825

  3. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting-Chou; Korczyńska, Justyna; Smith, David K.; Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  4. Glutamate Utilization Couples Oxidative Stress Defense and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Francisella Phagosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Rigard, Mélanie; Dairou, Julien; Dupuis, Marion; Dubail, Iharilalao; Meibom, Karin; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to avoid degradation by the host innate immune defense mechanisms triggered upon phagocytocis. Upon infection of mammalian host cells, the intracellular pathogen Francisella replicates exclusively in the cytosolic compartment. Hence, its ability to escape rapidly from the phagosomal compartment is critical for its pathogenicity. Here, we show for the first time that a glutamate transporter of Francisella (here designated GadC) is critical for oxidative stress defense in the phagosome, thus impairing intra-macrophage multiplication and virulence in the mouse model. The gadC mutant failed to efficiently neutralize the production of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, virulence of the gadC mutant was partially restored in mice defective in NADPH oxidase activity. The data presented highlight links between glutamate uptake, oxidative stress defense, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and phagosomal escape. This is the first report establishing the role of an amino acid transporter in the early stage of the Francisella intracellular lifecycle. PMID:24453979

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals control of reactive oxygen species accumulation and salt tolerance in tomato by γ-aminobutyric acid metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hexigeduleng; Chen, Xianyang; Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Nie, Lingling; Li, Yinxin

    2015-03-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in many plant species in response to environmental stress. However, the physiological function of GABA or its metabolic pathway (GABA shunt) in plants remains largely unclear. Here, the genes, including glutamate decarboxylases (SlGADs), GABA transaminases (SlGABA-Ts) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SlSSADH), controlling three steps of the metabolic pathway of GABA, were studied through virus-induced gene silencing approach in tomato. Silencing of SlGADs (GABA biosynthetic genes) and SlGABA-Ts (GABA catabolic genes) led to increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as salt sensitivity under 200 mm NaCl treatment. Targeted quantitative analysis of metabolites revealed that GABA decreased and increased in the SlGADs- and SlGABA-Ts-silenced plants, respectively, whereas succinate (the final product of GABA metabolism) decreased in both silenced plants. Contrarily, SlSSADH-silenced plants, also defective in GABA degradation process, showed dwarf phenotype, curled leaves and enhanced accumulation of ROS in normal conditions, suggesting the involvement of a bypath for succinic semialdehyde catabolism to γ-hydroxybutyrate as reported previously in Arabidopsis, were less sensitive to salt stress. These results suggest that GABA shunt is involved in salt tolerance of tomato, probably by affecting the homeostasis of metabolites such as succinate and γ-hydroxybutyrate and subsequent ROS accumulation under salt stress. PMID:25074245

  6. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  7. Retinoic Acid, GABA-ergic, and TGF-β Signaling Systems Are Involved in Human Cleft Palate Fibroblast Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Tiziano; Bellucci, Catia; Lilli, Cinzia; Pezzetti, Furio; Carinci, Francesco; Becchetti, Ennio; Carinci, Paolo; Stabellini, Giordano; Calvitti, Mario; Lumare, Eleonora; Bodo, Maria

    2006-01-01

    During embryogenesis, a complex interplay between extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, regulatory molecules, and growth factors mediates morphogenetic processes involved in palatogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), retinoic acid (RA), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic signaling systems are also potentially involved. Using [3H]glucosamine and [35S]methionine incorporation, anion exchange chromatography, semiquantitative radioactive RT-PCR, and a TGF-β binding assay, we aimed to verify the presence of phenotypic differences between primary cultures of secondary palate (SP) fibroblasts from 2-year-old subjects with familial nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (CLP-SP fibroblasts) and age-matched normal SP (N-SP) fibroblasts. The effects of RA—which, at pharmacologic doses, induces cleft palate in newborns of many species—were also studied. We found an altered ECM production in CLP-SP fibroblasts that synthesized and secreted more glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fibronectin (FN) compared with N-SP cells. In CLP-SP cells, TGF-β3 mRNA expression and TGF-β receptor number were higher and RA receptor-α (RARA) gene expression was increased. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that GABA receptor (GABRB3) mRNA expression was upregulated in human CLP-SP fibroblasts. In N-SP and CLP-SP fibroblasts, RA decreased GAG and FN secretion and increased TGF-β3 mRNA expression but reduced the number of TGF-β receptors. TGF-β receptor type I mRNA expression was decreased, TGF-β receptor type II was increased, and TGF-β receptor type III was not affected. RA treatment increased RARA gene expression in both cell populations but upregulated GABRB3 mRNA expression only in N-SP cells. These results show that CLP-SP fibroblasts compared with N-SP fibroblasts exhibit an abnormal phenotype in vitro and respond differently to RA treatment, and suggest that altered crosstalk between RA, GABAergic, and TGF-β signaling systems could be involved in human cleft

  8. Interaction of Peptide Transporter 1 With D-Glucose and L-Glutamic Acid; Possible Involvement of Taste Receptors.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohmachi, Taichi; Ichiba, Kiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Tomono, Takumi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Idota, Yoko; Hatano, Yasuko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of sweet and umami (savory) tastants on the intestinal absorption of cephalexin (CEX), a substrate of peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1, SLC15A1) in rats. After oral administration of glucose or mannitol to rats, CEX was administered together with a second dose of glucose or mannitol. Western blot analysis indicated that expression of PEPT1 in rat jejunum membrane was decreased by glucose, compared to mannitol. Furthermore, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of orally administered CEX was reduced by glucose compared to mannitol. The effect of glucose was diminished by nifedipine, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker. We also found that Cmax of orally administered CEX was reduced by treatment with L-glutamic acid, compared to D-glutamic acid. Thus, excessive intake of glucose and L-glutamic acid may impair oral absorption of PEPT1 substrates. PMID:26852864

  9. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  10. Epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by glutamate decarboxylase inhibitors in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Patricia; Tapia, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis, requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and γ-glutamyl-hydrazone (PLPGH) inhibit the free PLP-dependent isoform (GAD65) activity after systemic administration, leading to epilepsy in mice and in young, but not in adult rats. However, the competitive GAD inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) induces convulsions in both immature and adult rats. In the present study we tested comparatively the epileptogenic and neurotoxic effects of PLPGH, TSC and MPA, administered by microdialysis in the hippocampus of adult awake rats. Cortical EEG and motor behavior were analyzed during the next 2h, and aspartate, glutamate and GABA were measured by HPLC in the microdialysis-collected fractions. Twenty-four hours after drug administration rats were fixed for histological analysis of the hippocampus. PLPGH or TSC did not affect the motor behavior, EEG or cellular morphology, although the extracellular concentration of GABA was decreased. In contrast, MPA produced intense wet-dog shakes, EEG epileptiform discharges, a >75% reduction of extracellular GABA levels and remarkable neurodegeneration of the CA1 region, with >80% neuronal loss. The systemic administration of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 30 min before MPA did not prevent the MPA-induced epilepsy but significantly protected against its neurotoxic effect, reducing neuronal loss to <30%. We conclude that in adult awake rats, drugs acting on PLP availability have only a weak effect on GABA neurotransmission, whereas direct GAD inhibition produced by MPA induces hyperexcitation leading to epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Because this degeneration was prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, we conclude that it is due to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity consequent to disinhibition of the hippocampal excitatory circuits. PMID:26354164

  11. Synergistic effects of sodium lauroyl sarcosinate and glutamic acid in inhibition assembly against copper corrosion in acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yinzhe; Zhang, Daquan; Zeng, Huijing; Xie, Bin; Gao, Lixin; Lin, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A self-assembled multilayer (SAM) from sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS) and glutamic acid (GLU) is formed on copper surface. Its inhibition ability against copper corrosion is examined by electrochemical analysis and weight loss test. In comparison to SAM formed by just SLS or GLU, a synergistic effect is observed when the coexistence of SLS and GLU in SAM. The SLS/GLU SAM has an acicular multilayer structure, and SAM prepared under the condition of 5 mM SLS and 1 mM GLU shows the best protection efficiency. PM6 calculation reveals that the synergistic effect stems from interactions between SLS, GLU and cupric ions.

  12. Closing the loop on the GABA shunt in plants: are GABA metabolism and signaling entwined?

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Simon; Fromm, Hillel

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is found in uni- and multi-cellular organisms and is involved in many aspects of plant life cycle. GABA metabolism occurs by the action of evolutionary conserved enzymes that constitute the GABA shunt, bypassing two steps of the TCA cycle. The central position of GABA in the interface between plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism is well established. In parallel, there is evidence to support a role for GABA as a signaling molecule in plants. Here we cover some of the recent findings on GABA metabolism and signaling in plants and further suggest that the metabolic and signaling aspects of GABA may actually be inseparable. PMID:26106401

  13. Expression, immobilization and enzymatic properties of glutamate decarboxylase fused to a cellulose-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyemin; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Juwhan; Lee, Hyeokwon; Kim, Chunsuk; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamic acid to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), was fused to the cellulose-binding domain (CBD) and a linker of Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase II. To prevent proteolysis of the fusion protein, the native linker was replaced with a S(3)N(10) peptide known to be completely resistant to E. coli endopeptidase. The CBD-GAD expressed in E. coli was successfully immobilized on Avicel, a crystalline cellulose, with binding capacity of 33 ± 2 nmol(CBD-GAD)/g(Avicel) and the immobilized enzymes retained 60% of their initial activities after 10 uses. The results of this report provide a feasible alternative to produce GABA using immobilized GAD through fusion to CBD. PMID:22312257

  14. Neuregulin 1 Controls Glutamate Uptake by Up-regulating Excitatory Amino Acid Carrier 1 (EAAC1).

    PubMed

    Yu, Ha-Nul; Park, Woo-Kyu; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Song, Dae-Yong; Kim, Hye-Sun; Baik, Tai-Kyoung; Woo, Ran-Sook

    2015-08-14

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a trophic factor that is thought to have important roles in the regulating brain circuitry. Recent studies suggest that NRG1 regulates synaptic transmission, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that NRG1 influences glutamate uptake by increasing the protein level of excitatory amino acid carrier (EAAC1). Our data indicate that NRG1 induced the up-regulation of EAAC1 in primary cortical neurons with an increase in glutamate uptake. These in vitro results were corroborated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of mice given NRG1. The stimulatory effect of NRG1 was blocked by inhibition of the NRG1 receptor ErbB4. The suppressed expression of ErbB4 by siRNA led to a decrease in the expression of EAAC1. In addition, the ablation of ErbB4 in parvalbumin (PV)-positive neurons in PV-ErbB4(-/-) mice suppressed EAAC1 expression. Taken together, our results show that NRG1 signaling through ErbB4 modulates EAAC1. These findings link proposed effectors in schizophrenia: NRG1/ErbB4 signaling perturbation, EAAC1 deficit, and neurotransmission dysfunction. PMID:26092725

  15. Effects of ABA and CaCl₂ on GABA accumulation in fava bean germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Hui, Qianru; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and CaCl2 on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation of germinated fava bean under hypoxia-NaCl stress were investigated. Exogenous ABA resulted in the enhancement of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and diamine oxidase (DAO) activity as well as GABA content in cotyledon and shoot. CaCl2 increased both enzyme activities in shoot and GABA content in cotyledon and shoot. ABA downregulated GAD expression in cotyledon and radicle, while upregulated that in shoot; it also upregulated DAO expression in each organ. CaCl2 upregulated GAD expression in cotyledon, while downregulated that in radicle. However, it upregulated DAO expression in shoot, downregulated that in radicle. ABA inhibitor fluridon and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited GAD and DAO activities significantly so that inhibited GABA accumulation through reducing ABA biosynthesis and chelating Ca(2+), respectively. However, they upregulated GAD and DAO expression in varying degrees. These results indicate that ABA and Ca(2+) participate in GABA biosynthesis in fava bean during germination under hypoxia-NaCl stress. PMID:26644273

  16. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs. PMID:25902139

  17. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Furutani, Shogo; Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to 10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs. PMID:25902139

  18. Effect of l-glutamic acid supplementation on performance and nitrogen balance of broilers fed low protein diets.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, R M; Costa, F G P; Givisiez, P E N; Freitas, E R; Goulart, C C; Santos, R A; Souza, J G; Brandão, P A; Lima, M R; Melo, M L; Rodrigues, V P; Nogueira, E T; Vieira, D V G

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of protein reduction and supplementation of l-glutamic acid in male broiler diets. A total of 648 chicks of the Cobb 500 strain were distributed in a completely randomized design with six treatments and six replications with eighteen birds per experimental unit. The study comprised pre-starter (1-7 days), starter (8-21 days), growth (22-35 days) and final (36-45 days) phases. The first treatment consisted of a control diet formulated according to the requirements of essential amino acids for each rearing phase. The second and third treatments had crude protein (CP) reduced by 1.8 and 3.6 percentage points (pp) in relation to the control diet respectively. In the fourth treatment, l-glutamic acid was added to provide the same glutamate level as the control diet, and in the last two treatments, the broilers were supplemented with 1 and 2 pp of glutamate above that of the control diet respectively. The reduction in CP decreased the performance of broilers and the supplementation of l-glutamic acid did not influence performance when supplied in the diets with excess of glutamate. The lowest excreted nitrogen values were observed in the control diet, and treatments 2 and 3, respectively, in comparison with treatments with the use of l-glutamic acid (5 and 6). Retention efficiency of nitrogen was better in the control diet and in the treatment with a reduction of 1.8 pp of CP. It was verified that the serum uric acid level decreased with the CP reduction. A reduction in CP levels of up to 21.3%, 18.8%, 18.32% and 17.57% is recommended in phases from 1 to 7, 8 to 21, 22 to 35 and at 36 to 42 days, respectively, with a level of glutamate at 5.32%, 4.73%, 4.57%, 4.38%, also in these phases. PMID:26614118

  19. Amino acid composition of cerebrospinal fluid in actue neuroinfections in children.

    PubMed

    Buryakova, A V; Sytinsky, I A

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids was made in 168 children, aged 1 to 14 years, with various neurological infections. The glutamic acid and glutamine concentrations in the CSF of children with severe forms of acute serous and bacterial meningitis were about three to four times as great as in controls. The indices returned almost to normal during recovery. GABA is absent in normal CSF, but appeared in the CSF of patients with bacterial meningitis. Its determination may be used as an additional test to differentiate between serous and bacterial meningitis. PMID:234733

  20. EFFECT OF LEAD ON GAMMA AMINO BUTYRIC ACID SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project studies the inhibitory effect of lead on the enzymatic activity of brain glutamic amino acid decarboxylase (GADC). The enzyme is responsible for the catalytic formation of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) inhibitory neurons which is believed to be involved with the tra...

  1. Use of sourdough fermentation and pseudo-cereals and leguminous flours for the making of a functional bread enriched of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-02-28

    Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis PU1, previously selected for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), were used for sourdough fermentation of cereal, pseudo-cereal and leguminous flours. Chickpea, amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat were the flours most suitable to be enriched of GABA. The parameters of sourdough fermentation were optimized. Addition of 0.1mM pyridoxal phosphate, dough yield of 160, inoculum of 5 x 10(7)CFU/g of starter bacteria and fermentation for 24h at 30 degrees C were found to be the optimal conditions. A blend of buckwheat, amaranth, chickpea and quinoa flours (ratio 1:1:5.3:1) was selected and fermented with baker's yeast (non-conventional flour bread, NCB) or with Lb. plantarum C48 sourdough (non-conventional flour sourdough bread, NCSB) and compared to baker's yeast started wheat flour bread (WFB). NCSB had the highest concentration of free amino acids and GABA (ca. 4467 and 504 mg/kg, respectively). The concentration of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of NCSB bread was the highest, as well as the rate of in vitro starch hydrolysis was the lowest. Texture analysis showed that sourdough fermentation enhances several characteristics of NCSB with respect to NCB, thus approaching the features of WFB. Sensory analysis showed that sourdough fermentation allowed to get good palatability and overall taste appreciation. PMID:20071045

  2. Synthesis of potent inhibitors of anthrax toxin based on poly-L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amit; Saraph, Arundhati; Poon, Vincent; Mogridge, Jeremy; Kane, Ravi S

    2006-01-01

    We report the synthesis of biodegradable polyvalent inhibitors of anthrax toxin based on poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA). These biocompatible polyvalent inhibitors are at least 4 orders of magnitude more potent than the corresponding monovalent peptides in vitro and are comparable in potency to polyacrylamide-based inhibitors of anthrax toxin assembly. We have elucidated the influence of peptide density on inhibitory potency and demonstrated that these inhibitory potencies are limited by kinetics, with even higher activities seen when the inhibitors are preincubated with the heptameric receptor-binding subunit of anthrax toxin prior to exposure to cells. These polyvalent inhibitors are also effective at neutralizing anthrax toxin in vivo and represent attractive leads for designing biocompatible anthrax therapeutics. PMID:16984137

  3. [Experience in using glutamic acid electrophoresis in the early treatment of craniocerebral injuries].

    PubMed

    Naĭdin, V L; Karaseva, T A; Salazkina, S I; Zhukov, P V; Krotkova, O A

    1982-01-01

    Endonasal electrophoresis with alpha-glutamic acid was used in 76 patients with severe craniocerebral injury. The result was good in 24 (38%) and satisfactory in 40 (55%) patients. Thus, a positive result of treatment was obtained in 88% of cases, which was confirmed by electrophysiological and neuropsychological studies. The method produced the greatest effect on the patients' psychic status: 74% of all disorders of higher psychic functions, mainly memory, were restored on the average by the end of treatment. Good tolerance of electrophoresis and its efficacy in the early period after severe injury, i. e. in the first month, were established. Contraindications for treatment were defined more precisely. Since the method is simple and does not call for special conditions, it may be widely used in any medical establishment equipped with galvanization apparatuses. PMID:6121438

  4. Intrathecal-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies at low titers in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Chu, Kon; Byun, Jung-Ick; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Il; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-15

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad-Abs) are implicated in various neurological syndromes. The present study aims to identify intrathecal-specific GAD-Abs and to determine clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes. Nineteen patients had GAD-Abs in cerebrospinal fluid but not in paired serum samples. Neurological syndromes included limbic encephalitis, temporal lobe epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stiff-person syndrome. Immunotherapy had beneficial effects in 57.1% of patients, and the patients with limbic encephalitis responded especially well to immunotherapy. Intrathecal-specific antibodies to GAD at low titers may appear as nonspecific markers of immune activation within the central nervous system rather than pathogenic antibodies causing neuronal dysfunction. PMID:26711563

  5. The preparation and characterization of an immobilized l-glutamic decarboxylase and its application for determination of l-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ling; Wu; Wang; Wang; Song

    2000-10-01

    This paper is to study the preparation and characterization of an immobilized L-glutamic decarboxylase (GDC) and develop a sensitive method for the determination of L-glutamate using a new biosensor, which consists of an enzyme column reactor of GDC immobilized on a novel ion exchange resin (carboxymethyl-copolymer of allyl dextran and N.N'-methylene-bisacrylamide CM-CADB) and ion analyzer coupled with a CO(2) electrode. The conditions for the enzyme immobilization were optimized by the parameters: buffer composition and concentration, adsorption equilibration time, amount of enzyme, temperature, ionic strength and pH. The dynamic response of Na(2)HPO(4)-citric acid buffer system selected is much better than that of the others, 0.10 M HAc-0.10 M NaAc and 0.10 M sodium citrate-0.10 M citric acid. The initial rate of the enzyme reaction v(0) in this buffer system is 1.76 mol. l(-1) min(-1), moreover, the rate of the enzyme reaction appears linear in the first 4 min. The optimum adsorption equilibrium time is around 6 h. The amount of enzyme adsorbed on CM-CADB resin affects the response to substrate L-glutamic acid, the widest range of linearity is obtained with over 30 mg (GDC)/g(resin). The GDC activity immobilized on CM-CADB reaches a maximum when the immobilization temperature was kept around 40 degrees C. pH was kept at 4.4 when measuring the activity of the immobilized GDC. No variation of the activity of immobilized GDC is observed when the capacity is over 2.5 meq/g.(CM-CADB resin). The properties of the immobilized enzyme on CM-CADB were characterized. No significant improvement can be achieved when the substrate concentration exceeds 12.00 mmol/l, where the activity of immobilized GDC is equal to 1.58 mmol/l.min.g. The optimum pH is found to be 5.2, which changes 0.2 unit, comparing with that of the free GDC (5.0). The optimum temperature is found to be around 48 degrees C, which is lower than that of free GDC (55 degrees C). The critical temperature of the

  6. Genetic Examination of Initial Amino Acid Oxidation and Glutamate Catabolism in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid catabolism in Thermococcales is presumed to proceed via three steps: oxidative deamination of amino acids by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or aminotransferases, oxidative decarboxylation by 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (KOR), and hydrolysis of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by ADP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Here, we performed a genetic examination of enzymes involved in Glu catabolism in Thermococcus kodakarensis. Examination of amino acid dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of T. kodakarensis KUW1 (ΔpyrF ΔtrpE) revealed high NADP-dependent GDH activity, along with lower levels of NAD-dependent activity. NADP-dependent activities toward Gln/Ala/Val/Cys and an NAD-dependent threonine dehydrogenase activity were also detected. In KGDH1, a gene disruption strain of T. kodakarensis GDH (Tk-GDH), only threonine dehydrogenase activity was detected, indicating that all other activities were dependent on Tk-GDH. KGDH1 could not grow in a medium in which growth was dependent on amino acid catabolism, implying that Tk-GDH is the only enzyme that can discharge the electrons (to NADP+/NAD+) released from amino acids in their oxidation to 2-oxoacids. In a medium containing excess pyruvate, KGDH1 displayed normal growth, but higher degrees of amino acid catabolism were observed compared to those for KUW1, suggesting that Tk-GDH functions to suppress amino acid oxidation and plays an anabolic role under this condition. We further constructed disruption strains of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two strains displayed growth defects in both media compared to KUW1. Succinate generation was not observed in these strains, indicating that the two enzymes are solely responsible for Glu catabolism among the multiple KOR and ACS enzymes in T. kodakarensis. PMID:23435976

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  8. Growth and characterization of a new NLO material: L-Glutamic acid hydro bromide [L-GluHBr

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyalakshmi, R.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-05-06

    L-(+)-Glutamic acid hydro bromide, an isomorphic salt of L-glutamic acid hydrochloride, was synthesized and the synthesis was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared analysis. Solubility of the material in water was determined. L-Glutamic acid hydro bromide crystals were grown by low temperature solution growth using the solvent evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies were carried out and the cell parameters, atomic co-ordinates, bond lengths and bond angles were reported. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies were carried out and good crystallinity for the grown crystal was observed from the diffraction curve. The grown crystals were subjected to dielectric studies. Ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectral analysis shows good optical transmission in the visible and infrared region of the grown crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency of L-glutamic acid hydro bromide crystal was determined using the Kurtz powder test and it was found that it had efficiency comparable with that of the potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystal.

  9. Preparation of starch-poly-glutamic acid graft copolymers by microwave irradiation and the characterization of their properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graft copolymers of waxy maize starch and poly-y-glutamic acid (PGA) were produced in an aqueous solution using microwave irradiation. The microwave reaction conditions were optimized with regard to temperature and pH. The temperature of 180 deg C and pH 7.0 were the best reaction conditions resulti...

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siyuan; Meng, Yonghong; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  11. Independent Effects of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase (GABAT) on Metabolic and Sleep Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah E.; Rhoades, Seth; Chen, Wen-Feng; Sengupta, Arjun; Yue, Zhifeng; Lim, Jason C.; Mitchell, Claire H.; Weljie, Aalim M.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of the major sleep-promoting neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), in the GABA shunt generates catabolites that may enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but it is unknown whether catabolic by-products of the GABA shunt actually support metabolic homeostasis. In Drosophila, the loss of the specific enzyme that degrades GABA, GABA transaminase (GABAT), increases sleep, and we show here that it also affects metabolism such that flies lacking GABAT fail to survive on carbohydrate media. Expression of GABAT in neurons or glia rescues this phenotype, indicating a general metabolic function for this enzyme in the brain. As GABA degradation produces two catabolic products, glutamate and succinic semialdehyde, we sought to determine which was responsible for the metabolic phenotype. Through genetic and pharmacological experiments, we determined that glutamate, rather than succinic semialdehyde, accounts for the metabolic phenotype of gabat mutants. This is supported by biochemical measurements of catabolites in wild-type and mutant animals. Using in vitro labeling assays, we found that inhibition of GABAT affects energetic pathways. Interestingly, we also observed that gaba mutants display a general disruption in bioenergetics as measured by altered levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, NAD+/NADH, and ATP levels. Finally, we report that the effects of GABAT on sleep do not depend upon glutamate, indicating that GABAT regulates metabolic and sleep homeostasis through independent mechanisms. These data indicate a role of the GABA shunt in the development of metabolic risk and suggest that neurological disorders caused by altered glutamate or GABA may be associated with metabolic disruption. PMID:26124278

  12. A selective review of glutamate pharmacological therapy in obsessive–compulsive and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Grados, Marco A; Atkins, Elizabeth B; Kovacikova, Gabriela I; McVicar, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate, an excitatory central nervous system neurotransmitter, is emerging as a potential alternative pharmacological treatment when compared to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-, dopamine-, and serotonin-modulating treatments for neuropsychiatric conditions. The pathophysiology, animal models, and clinical trials of glutamate modulation are explored in disorders with underlying inhibitory deficits (cognitive, motor, behavioral) including obsessive–compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Tourette syndrome, trichotillomania, excoriation disorder, and nail biting. Obsessive–compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and grooming disorders (trichotillomania and excoriation disorder) have emerging positive data, although only scarce controlled trials are available. The evidence is less supportive for the use of glutamate modulators in Tourette syndrome. Glutamate-modulating agents show promise in the treatment of disorders of inhibition. PMID:25995654

  13. Glutamate Decarboxylase-Dependent Acid Resistance in Brucella spp.: Distribution and Contribution to Fitness under Extremely Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. PMID:25381237

  14. Binding of Ca2+ to Glutamic Acid-Rich Polypeptides from the Rod Outer Segment

    PubMed Central

    Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Abarca-Heidemann, K.; Körschen, H. G.; Dhiman, H. Kaur; Heberle, J.; Schwalbe, H.; Klein-Seetharaman, J.; Kaupp, U. B.; Pohlmeier, A.

    2007-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors contain three different glutamic acid-rich proteins (GARPs) that have been proposed to control the propagation of Ca2+ from the site of its entry at the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel to the cytosol of the outer segment. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the binding of Ca2+ to the following five constructs related to GARPs of rod photoreceptors: a 32-mer peptide containing 22 carboxylate groups, polyglutamic acid, a recombinant segment comprising 73 carboxylate groups (GLU), GARP1, and GARP2. Ca2+ binding was investigated by means of a Ca2+-sensitive electrode. In all cases, Ca2+ binds with low affinity; the half-maximum binding constant K1/2 ranges from 6 to 16 mM. The binding stoichiometry between Ca2+ ions and carboxylic groups is ∼1:1; an exception is GARP2, where a binding stoichiometry of ∼1:2 was found. Hydrodynamic radii of 1.6, 2.8, 3.3, 5.7, and 6.7 nm were determined by dynamic light scattering for the 32-mer, polyglutamic acid, GLU, GARP2, and GARP1 constructs, respectively. These results suggest that the peptides as well as GARP1 and GARP2 do not adopt compact globular structures. We conclude that the structures should be regarded as loose coils with low-affinity, high-capacity Ca2+ binding. PMID:17218469

  15. Accumulation of GABAergic Neurons, Causing a Focal Ambient GABA Gradient, and Downregulation of KCC2 Are Induced During Microgyrus Formation in a Mouse Model of Polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianying; Kumada, Tatsuro; Morishima, Toshitaka; Iwata, Satomi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Yoshida, Sachiko; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Although focal cortical malformations are considered neuronal migration disorders, their formation mechanisms remain unknown. We addressed how the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system affects the GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal migration underlying such malformations. A focal freeze-lesion (FFL) of the postnatal day zero (P0) glutamic acid decarboxylase–green fluorescent protein knock-in mouse neocortex produced a 3- or 4-layered microgyrus at P7. GABAergic interneurons accumulated around the necrosis including the superficial region during microgyrus formation at P4, whereas E17.5-born, Cux1-positive pyramidal neurons outlined the GABAergic neurons and were absent from the superficial layer, forming cell-dense areas in layer 2 of the P7 microgyrus. GABA imaging showed that an extracellular GABA level temporally increased in the GABAergic neuron-positive area, including the necrotic center, at P4. The expression of the Cl– transporter KCC2 was downregulated in the microgyrus-forming GABAergic and E17.5-born glutamatergic neurons at P4; these cells may need a high intracellular Cl– concentration to induce depolarizing GABA effects. Bicuculline decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in these microgyrus-forming cells. Thus, neonatal FFL causes specific neuronal accumulation, preceded by an increase in ambient GABA during microgyrus formation. This GABA increase induces GABAA receptor-mediated Ca2+ oscillation in KCC2-downregulated microgyrus-forming cells, as seen in migrating cells during early neocortical development. PMID:23246779

  16. Role for pro-inflammatory cytokines in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 in specific brain regions of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Yin, Jian; Qin, Wei; Sha, Suxu; Xu, Jun; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-03-01

    In general, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) contribute to regulation of epilepsy-associated pathophysiological processes in the central nerve system. In this report, we examined the specific activation of PICs, namely IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in rat brain after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, we examined the role played by PICs in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 (GAT-1 and GAT-3, respectively), which are the two important subtypes of GATs responsible for the regulation of extracellular GABA levels in the brain. Our results show that IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increased in the parietal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of KA-rats as compared with sham control animals (P < 0.05, KA rats vs. control rats). KA-induced SE also significantly increased (P < 0.05 vs. controls) the protein expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 in those brain regions. In addition, central administration of antagonists to IL-1β and TNF-α receptors significantly attenuated amplified GAT-1 and GAT-3 (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle control for each antagonist group). However, antagonist to IL-6 receptor failed to attenuate enhancement in expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 induced by KA-induced SE. Overall, our data demonstrate that PIC pathways are activated in the specific brain regions during SE which thereby selectively leads to upregulation of GABA transporters. As a result, it is likely that de-inhibition of GABA system is increased in the brain. This support a role for PICs in engagement of the adaptive mechanisms associated with epileptic activity, and has pharmacological implications to target specific PICs for neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability related to epilepsy. PMID:25708016

  17. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  18. [GABA-ergic system in defense against excitatory kynurenines].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1997-01-01

    Protection against the excitatory action of L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice is related to the activation of GABA-B and dopamine receptors of the brain and to much lesser degree to the activation of GABA-A receptors. It is hardly believable that the anticonvulsant effect of phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA), baclofen (CL-phenibut), sodium hydroxybutyrate and taurine against seizures induced by these two kynurenines is determined by alterations in metabolism of GABA. PMID:9503572

  19. Nanoporous multilayer poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan microcapsules for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shifeng; Rao, Shuiqin; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhichun; Zhang, Ying; Duan, Yourong; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Jingbo

    2012-05-10

    Nanoporous poly(L-glutamic acid)/chitosan (PLGA/CS) multilayer microcapsules were fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly using the porous silica particles as sacrificial templates. The LbL assembled nanoporous PLGA/CS microcapsules were characterized by Zeta-potential analyzer, FTIR, TGA, SEM, TEM and CLSM. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was chosen as model drug. The drug loading content of PLGA/CS microcapsules depends on loading time, loading temperature, pH value and NaCl concentration. High loading capacity of microcapsules can be achieved by simply adjusting pH value and salt concentration. Moreover, 5-Fu loaded microcapsules take on a sustained release behavior, especially in an acid solution, in contrast to burst release of bare 5-Fu. The kinetics of 5-Fu release from PLGA/CS microcapsules conforms to Korsmeyer-Peppas and Baker-Lonsdale models, the mechanism of which can be ascribed to priority of drug diffusion and subordination of polymer degradation. The MTT cytotoxicity assay in vitro reveals the satisfactory anticancer activity of the drug-loaded PLGA/CS microcapsules. Therefore, the novel nanoporous PLGA/CS microcapsules is expected to find application in drug delivery systems. PMID:22301425

  20. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  1. Neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in expression of two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in the hippocampus following electroconvulsive shock: A stereology-based study.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Shozo; Kosaka, Toshio

    2009-11-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that GABAergic dysfunction is involved in various psychiatric disorders. The goal of our study was to investigate the influences of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), one of the most effective treatments for depression, on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. In this stereology-based study, we identified GABAergic neurons by immunostaining for two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65, and GAD67 and estimated the expression changes induced by single or repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS; an animal model of ECT). The numerical density (ND) of entire population of GABAergic neurons (expressing GAD65 and/or GAD67) was seldom altered by the administration of ECS. GAD67-positive (GAD67(+)) neurons were also rarely affected by ECS. On the other hand, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was changed in a layer-specific manner. In the CA1 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was increased in the strata radiatum/lacunosum-moleculare (SR/SLM) by repeated ECS. In the CA3 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was decreased in the stratum oriens and SR/SLM after single ECS. The expression ratio of GAD65 in GABAergic neurons was increased specifically in layers receiving afferents from the entorhinal cortex (EC), i.e., SR/SLM of the CA1 region and molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), after repeated ECS administration, whereas the expression ratio of GAD67 in GABAergic neurons was decreased in several layers by the same treatment. These results indicate that the ECS-induced changes in ND of GAD65(+) or GAD67(+) neurons were most likely due to alterations in GAD expression rather than actual increases or decreases in cell numbers. Altogether, the neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in GABA-mediated signaling may play a contributory role in the depression treatment process introduced by ECT. PMID:19283776

  2. Adsorption of L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid to γ-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Edward; Kumar, Kartik; Sumit, Madhuresh; Giuffre, Anthony; Zhao, Weilong; Pedersen, Joel; Sahai, Nita

    2014-05-01

    The interactions of amino acids with mineral surfaces have potential relevance for processes ranging from pre-biotic chemistry to biomineralization to protein adsorption on biomedical implants in vivo. Here, we report the results of experiments investigating the adsorption of L-glutamic (Glu) and L-aspartic (Asp) acids to γ-Al2O3. We examined the extent of Glu and Asp coverage as a function of pH and solution concentration (pH edges and isotherms) in solution-depletion experiments and used in situ Attenuated Total Refkectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to estimate the molecular conformations of the adsorbed molecules. Glu and Asp exhibited similar adsorption behavior on γ-Al2O3 with respect to pH and solution concentration. In general, adsorption decreased as pH increased. At low and high amino acid concentrations, the isotherms exhibited two apparent saturation coverages, which could be interpreted as 1:4 or 1:2 ratios of adsorbed molecule/surface Al sites. Tetradentate tetranuclear and bidentate binuclear species were the dominant conformations inferred independently from FTIR spectra. In these conformations, both carboxylate groups are involved in bonding to either four or to two Al surface atoms, through direct covalent bonds or via H-bonds. An outer sphere species, in which one carboxylate group interacts with a surface Al atom, could not be ruled out based on the FTIR spectra.

  3. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. PMID:26144993

  4. GABA content within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex is related to trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Padulo, Caterina; Brancucci, Alfredo; Bubbico, Giovanna; Edden, Richard A; Ferretti, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella; Manippa, Valerio; Marzoli, Daniele; Onofrj, Marco; Sepede, Gianna; Tartaro, Armando; Tommasi, Luca; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-05-01

    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) plays a key role in emotion processing and regulation. vmPFC dysfunction may lead to disinhibition of amygdala causing high anxiety levels. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) inter-neurons within vmPFC shape the information flow to amygdala. Thus, we hypothesize that GABA content within vmPFC could be relevant to trait anxiety. Forty-three healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 88 years were assessed for trait anxiety with the Subscale-2 of the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y2) and were studied with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate GABA and Glx (glutamate+glutamine) contents within vmPFC. Total creatine (tCr) was used as internal reference. Partial correlations assessed the association between metabolite levels and STAI-Y2 scores, removing the effect of possible nuisance factors including age, educational level, volumes of gray matter and white matter within magnetic resonance spectroscopy voxel. We observed a positive relationship between GABA/tCr and STAI-Y2 scores. No significant relationships were found between Glx/tCr and STAI-Y2 and between tCr/water and STAI-Y2. No differences were found between males and females as regards to age, STAI-Y2, GABA/tCr, Glx/tCr, tCr/water, gray matter and white matter volumes. We suggest a close relationship between GABA content within vmPFC and trait anxiety providing new insights in the physiology of emotional brain. PMID:26722018

  5. Selective pyramidal cell reduction of GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit messenger RNA expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A

    2011-09-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABA(A) receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα)-containing pyramidal cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65)-containing interneurons in layer 3 of the PFC from matched schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression was significantly 40% lower in pyramidal cells, but was not altered in interneurons. Lower α1 subunit mRNA expression in pyramidal cells was not attributable to potential confounding factors, and thus appeared to reflect the disease process of schizophrenia. These results suggest that pyramidal cell inhibition is reduced in schizophrenia, whereas inhibition of GABA neurons is maintained. The cell type specificity of these findings may reflect a compensatory response to enhance layer 3 pyramidal cell activity in the face of the diminished excitatory drive associated with the lower dendritic spine density on these neurons. PMID:21677653

  6. Increased GABA concentrations in type 2 diabetes mellitus are related to lower cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    van Bussel, Frank C G; Backes, Walter H; Hofman, Paul A M; Puts, Nicolaas A J; Edden, Richard A E; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Schram, Miranda T; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Wildberger, Joachim E; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with accelerated cognitive decline. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms still remain to be elucidated although it is known that insulin signaling modulates neurotransmitter activity, including inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and excitatory glutamate (Glu) receptors. Therefore, we examined whether levels of GABA and Glu are related to diabetes status and cognitive performance.Forty-one participants with type 2 diabetes and 39 participants without type 2 diabetes underwent detailed cognitive assessments and 3-Tesla proton MR spectroscopy. The associations of neurotransmitters with type 2 diabetes and cognitive performance were examined using multivariate regression analyses controlling for age, sex, education, BMI, and percentage gray/white matter ratio in spectroscopic voxel.Analysis revealed higher GABA+ levels in participants with type 2 diabetes, in participants with higher fasting blood glucose levels and in participants with higher HbA1c levels, and higher GABA+ levels in participants with both high HbA1c levels and less cognitive performance.To conclude, participants with type 2 diabetes have alterations in the GABAergic neurotransmitter system, which are related to lower cognitive functioning, and hint at the involvement of an underlying metabolic mechanism. PMID:27603392

  7. Excitatory actions of GABA in developing chick vestibular afferents: effects on resting electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Celso; Galindo, Fabian; Galicia, Salvador; Cebada, Jorge; Flores, Amira

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the resting multiunit activity of the vestibular afferents during development using the isolated inner ear of embryonic and postnatal chickens (E15-E21 and P5). GABA (10(-3) to 10(-5) M; n = 133) and muscimol (10(-3) M) elicited an increase in the frequency of the basal discharge of the vestibular afferents. We found that GABA action was dose-dependent and inversely related to animal age. Thus, the largest effect was observed in embryonic ages such as E15 and E17 and decreases in E21 and P5. The GABAA receptor antagonists, bicuculline (10(-5) M; n = 10) and picrotoxin (10(-4) M; n = 10), significantly decreased the excitatory action of GABA and muscimol (10(-3) M). Additionally, CNQX 10(-6) M, MCPG 10(-5) M and 7ClKyn 10(-5) M (n = 5) were co-applied by bath substitution (n = 5). Both the basal discharge and the GABA action significantly decreased in these experimental conditions. The chloride channel blocker 9-AC 0.5 mM produced an important reduction in the effect of GABA 10(-3) (n = 5) and 10(-4) M (n = 5). Thus, our results suggest an excitatory role of GABA in the resting activity of the vestibular afferents that can be explained by changes in the gradient of concentration of Cl(-) during development. We show for the first time that the magnitude of this GABA effect decreases at later stages of embryonic and early postnatal development. Taking into account the results with glutamatergic antagonists, we conclude that GABA has a presynaptic action but is not the neurotransmitter in the vestibular afferent synapses, although it could act as a facilitator of the spontaneous activity and may regulate glutamate release. PMID:23401185

  8. Reduction of Endogenous Kynurenic Acid Formation Enhances Extracellular Glutamate, Hippocampal Plasticity, and Cognitive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michelle C; Elmer, Greg I; Bergeron, Richard; Albuquerque, Edson X; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Schwarcz, Robert

    2010-01-01

    At endogenous brain concentrations, the astrocyte-derived metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) antagonizes the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and, possibly, the glycine co-agonist site of the NMDA receptor. The functions of these two receptors, which are intimately involved in synaptic plasticity and cognitive processes, may, therefore, be enhanced by reductions in brain KYNA levels. This concept was tested in mice with a targeted deletion of kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), a major biosynthetic enzyme of brain KYNA. At 21 days of age, KAT II knock-out mice had reduced hippocampal KYNA levels (−71%) and showed significantly increased performance in three cognitive paradigms that rely in part on the integrity of hippocampal function, namely object exploration and recognition, passive avoidance, and spatial discrimination. Moreover, compared with wild-type controls, hippocampal slices from KAT II-deficient mice showed a significant increase in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in vitro. These functional changes were accompanied by reduced extracellular KYNA (−66%) and increased extracellular glutamate (+51%) concentrations, measured by hippocampal microdialysis in vivo. Taken together, a picture emerges in which a reduction in the astrocytic formation of KYNA increases glutamatergic tone in the hippocampus and enhances cognitive abilities and synaptic plasticity. Our studies raise the prospect that interventions aimed specifically at reducing KYNA formation in the brain may constitute a promising molecular strategy for cognitive improvement in health and disease. PMID:20336058

  9. Non-convulsive status epilepticus associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody.

    PubMed

    Cikrikçili, Ugur; Ulusoy, Canan; Turan, Selin; Yildiz, Senay; Bilgiç, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Baykan, Betül; Tüzün, Erdem; Gürvit, Hakan

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Ab) often presents with treatment-resistant partial seizures, as well as other central nervous system symptoms. In contrast to several other well-characterized autoantibodies, GAD-Ab has very rarely been associated with status epilepticus. We report a 63-year-old woman initially admitted with somnolence and psychiatric findings. The EEG findings, of generalized and rhythmical slow spike-wave activity over the posterior regions of both hemispheres, together with the clinical deterioration in responsiveness, led to the diagnosis of non-convulsive status epilepticus. Investigation of a broad panel of autoantibodies, revealed only increased serum GAD-Ab levels. Following methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments, the patient's neurological symptoms improved, EEG findings disappeared and GAD-Ab levels significantly decreased. GAD-Ab should be added to the list of anti-neuronal antibodies associated with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Disappearance of clinical findings and seroreversion after immunotherapy suggest that GAD-Ab might be involved in seizure pathogenesis.  PMID:23820312

  10. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wing P.; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca2+ from Ca–γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  11. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-06

    Poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Some recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. Our paper characterizes the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through variousmore » techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. Finally, when probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure.« less

  12. Transcriptional regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase in the male mouse amygdala by dietary phyto-oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, K V; Yanagawa, Y; Stork, O

    2015-04-01

    Phyto-oestrogens are biologically active components of many human and laboratory animal diets. In the present study, we investigated, in adult male mice with C57BL/6 genetic background, the effects of a reduced phyto-oestrogens intake on anxiety-related behaviour and associated gene expression in the amygdala. After 6 weeks on a low-phyto-oestrogen diet (< 20 μg/g cumulative phyto-oestrogen content), animals showed reduced centre exploration in an open-field task compared to their littermates on a soybean-based standard diet (300 μg/g). Freezing behaviour in an auditory fear memory task, in contrast, was not affected. We hypothesised that this mildly increased anxiety may involve changes in the function of GABAergic local circuit neurones in the amygdala. Using GAD67(+/GFP) mice, we could demonstrate reduced transcription of the GAD67 gene in the lateral and basolateral amygdala under the low-phyto-oestrogen diet. Analysis of mRNA levels in microdissected samples confirmed this regulation and demonstrated concomitant changes in expression of the second glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) isoform, GAD65, as well as the anxiolytic neuropeptide Y. These molecular and behavioural alterations occurred without apparent changes in circulating oestrogens or testosterone levels. Our data suggest that expression regulation of interneurone-specific gene products in the amygdala may provide a mechanism for the control of anxiety-related behaviour through dietary phyto-oestrogens. PMID:25650988

  13. An amphipathic polypeptide derived from poly-γ-glutamic acid for the stabilization of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Gu; Na, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Park, Dongkook; Oh, Jihye; Yoon, Sung-Ho; Lee, Cheng-Kang; Sung, Moon-Hee; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yu, Yeon Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in the extraction of membrane proteins from cell membrane and their solubilization in native conformations have hindered their structural and biochemical analysis. To overcome these difficulties, an amphipathic polypeptide was synthesized by the conjugation of octyl and glucosyl groups to the carboxyl groups of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA). This polymer, called amphipathic PGA (APG), self-assembles as mono-disperse oligomers consisted of 4–5 monomers. APG shows significantly low value of critical micelle concentration and stabilization activity toward membrane proteins. Most of the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-solubilized membrane proteins from Escherichia coli remain soluble state in the presence of APG even after the removal of SDS. In addition, APG stabilizes purified 7 transmembrane proteins such as bacteriorhodopsin and human endothelin receptor Type A (ETA) in their active conformations. Furthermore, ETA in complex with APG is readily inserted into liposomes without disrupting the integrity of liposomes. These properties of APG can be applied to overcome the difficulties in the stabilization and reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:25283538

  14. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-09-01

    Poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. We have characterized the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. When probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure. PMID:25690698

  15. In vitro properties and performance of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked bovine pericardial bioprostheses treated with glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Braile, Maria Christiane Valéria Braga; Carnevalli, Nelly Cristina; Goissis, Gilberto; Ramirez, Vladimir Aparecido; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2011-05-01

    Calcification is one of the major causes of failure of heart valve bioprostheses (HVBs) derived from glutaraldehyde (GA)-processed bovine pericardium (BP) or porcine aortic valves. New crosslinking reagent procedures are still far from giving satisfactory results, and this is the main reason why GA is still the reagent of choice for the fixation of native tissue intended for HVB manufacture. Nevertheless, two new findings with respect to GA processing may significantly improve HVB performance postimplantation: the finding that increasing concentrations of GA result in a decrease in calcification; the blocking of free aldehyde usually by nucleophyles or the treatment of processed material at low pH. This work investigates the in vitro properties of BP fixed with GA followed by the treatment with glutamic acid under alkaline conditions in order to prepare BP materials with lower calcification potential postimplantation. In comparison to conventional processing, except for the tensile strength that was slightly lower, elongation and toughness were higher than the accepted values. No significant differences were observed in the performance indexes (mean pressure gradient, mean effective area, regurgitant fraction, performance and efficiency indexes) with wear resistance over 150 × 10⁶ cycles. These results indicate that the processing of BP described in this work may be of potential use in the manufacture of HVBs. PMID:21595718

  16. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SYNTHETIC POLY(L-GLUTAMIC ACID)-BASED CANCER THERAPEUTIC AND IMAGING AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern polymer chemistry has led to the generation of a number of biocompatible synthetic polymers have been increasingly studied as efficient carriers for drugs and imaging agents. Synthetic biocompatible polymers have been used to improve the efficacy of both small-molecular-weight therapeutics and imaging agents. Furthermore, multiple targeted anticancer agents and/or imaging reporters can be attached to a single polymer chain, allowing multifunctional and/or multimodality therapy and molecular imaging. Having both an anticancer drug and an imaging reporter in a single polymer chain allows noninvasive real-time visualization of the pharmacokinetics of polymeric drug delivery systems, which can uncover and explain the complicated mechanisms of in vivo drug delivery and their correlation to pharmacodynamics. This review examines use of the synthetic biocompatible polymer poly(L-glutamic acid) (PG) as an efficient carrier of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. This review will summarize and update our recent research on use of PG as a platform for drug delivery and molecular imaging, including recent clinical findings with respect to PG-paclitaxel (PG-TXL); the combination of PG-TXL with radiotherapy; mechanisms of action of PG-TXL; and noninvasive visualization of in vivo delivery of polymeric conjugates with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, and multimodality imaging. PMID:21303613

  17. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-06

    Poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Some recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. Our paper characterizes the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. Finally, when probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure.

  18. Alginate/Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) Base Biocompatible Gel for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing P; Kung, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Yu-Lin; Yang, Ming-Chen; Lai, Wen-Fu Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A technique for synthesizing biocompatible hydrogels by cross-linking calcium-form poly(γ-glutamic acid), alginate sodium, and Pluronic F-127 was created, in which alginate can be cross-linked by Ca(2+) from Ca-γ-PGA directly and γ-PGA molecules introduced into the alginate matrix to provide pH sensitivity and hemostasis. Mechanical properties, swelling behavior, and blood compatibility were investigated for each hydrogel compared with alginate and for γ-PGA hydrogel with the sodium form only. Adding F-127 improves mechanical properties efficiently and influences the temperature-sensitive swelling of the hydrogels but also has a minor effect on pH-sensitive swelling and promotes anticoagulation. MG-63 cells were used to test biocompatibility. Gelation occurred gradually through change in the elastic modulus as the release of calcium ions increased over time and caused ionic cross-linking, which promotes the elasticity of gel. In addition, the growth of MG-63 cells in the gel reflected nontoxicity. These results showed that this biocompatible scaffold has potential for application in bone materials. PMID:26504784

  19. Oxytocin induces penile erection when injected into the ventral subiculum: role of nitric oxide and glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Melis, Maria Rosaria; Succu, Salvatora; Cocco, Cristina; Caboni, Emanuela; Sanna, Fabrizio; Boi, Antonio; Ferri, Gian Luca; Argiolas, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Oxytocin (100 ng) induces penile erection when injected unilaterally into the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus of male rats. The pro-erectile effect started mostly 30 min after treatment and occurred 15 min after an increase in both nitric oxide (NO) production, measured by the concentration of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-), the main metabolites of newly formed NO, and extra-cellular glutamic acid concentration in the dialysate obtained from the ventral subiculum by intracerebral microdialysis. These responses were abolished by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin (2 microg), an oxytocin receptor antagonist, S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NO-synthase (25 microg), and haemoglobin, a NO scavenger (25 microg), given into the ventral subiculum before oxytocin. Unlike d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, SMTC and haemoglobin, (+)MK-801 (5 microg), a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors abolished oxytocin-induced penile erection, but reduced only partially the increase in NO production and extra-cellular glutamic acid. As NMDA (0.25-1 microg) injected into the ventral subiculum induces penile erection episodes, which also occurred with an increase of NO production and extra-cellular glutamic acid, and NMDA responses were abolished by (+)MK-801 (5 microg), but not by SMTC (25 microg) or haemoglobin (25 microg), injected into the ventral subiculum, these results show that oxytocin injected into the ventral subiculum increases NO production by activating its own receptors. NO in turn increases glutamic acid neurotransmission, leading to penile erection, possibly through neural (glutamatergic) efferent projections from the ventral subiculum to extra-hippocampal brain areas (e.g., prefrontal cortex) modulating the activity of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. PMID:20156463

  20. Vasorelaxation induced by L-glutamate in porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Duong, H

    2001-04-20

    Isolated porcine coronary arteries (PCA) contracted by depolarization with high K0 or by histamine (10 microM) were relaxed concentration-dependently by glutamic acid, aspartic acid, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the PCA preparations contracted by high K0 or histamine the effects were monophasic, but the histamine-induced effects were more sustained and of larger amplitude. The ED50 values of cumulative concentration-response (CCR) curves obtained for the relaxation induced by L-glutamate in histamine-stimulated PCA preparations were shifted from 0.8 mM to 0.25 microM in presence of 1 mM glycine, a co-agonist required for the activation of NMDA receptors. The relaxations resulting from low-affinity binding of L-glutamic were dependent on Ca0 as evidenced by the shift of CCR curves to the right in the presence of 5-100 mM K0. In contrast, CCR curves obtained for contractions induced by NaF (1.5-12 mM), were significantly shifted to the left (from 6.3 to 3.1 mM). A depression of the maximum effect observed at higher F- concentrations was reversed by addition of 5 mM Mg0. Data show that glutamate induces a vasorelaxation that may be associated with symptoms seen in Chinese restaurant syndrome. PMID:11339334

  1. Fatty acid biosynthesis from glutamate and glutamine is specifically induced in neuronal cells under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Stephen A.; Marquardt, Amanda L.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is involved in many neuronal and non-neuronal diseases, and defining the mechanisms for tissue adaptation to hypoxia is critical for the understanding and treatment of these diseases. One mechanism for tissue adaptation to hypoxia is increased glutamine and/or glutamate (Gln/Glu) utilization. To address this mechanism, we determined total Gln/Glu incorporation into lipids and fatty acids in both primary neurons and a neuronal cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and compared this to non-neuronal primary cells and non-neuronal cell lines. Incorporation of Gln/Glu into total lipids was dramatically and specifically increased under hypoxia in neuronal cells including both primary (2.0- and 3.0- fold for Gln and Glu, respectively) and immortalized cultures (3.5- and 8.0- fold for Gln and Glu, respectively), and 90% to 97% of this increase was accounted for by incorporation into fatty acids (FA) depending upon substrate and cell type. All other non-neuronal cells tested demonstrated decreased or unchanged FA synthesis from Gln/Glu under hypoxia. Consistent with these data, total FA mass was also increased in neuronal cells under hypoxia that was mainly accounted for by the increase in saturated and monounsaturated FA with carbon length from 14 to 24. Incorporation of FA synthesized from Gln/Glu was increased in all major lipid classes including cholesteryl esters, TAGs, DAGs, free FA, and phospholipids, with the highest rate of incorporation into TAGs. These results indicate that increased FA biosynthesis from Gln/Glu followed by esterification may be a neuronal specific pathway for adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:24266789

  2. Expression of the neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase in male germ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Pelto-Huikko, M; Metsis, M; Söder, O; Brene, S; Skog, S; Hökfelt, T; Ritzén, E M

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the key enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid, is shown to be expressed in the testis of several different species. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a cDNA clone isolated from the human testis confirmed the presence of GAD mRNA in the testis. The major GAD mRNA in the testis was 2.5 kilobases. Smaller amounts of a 3.7-kilobase mRNA with the same size as GAD mRNA in the brain was also detected in the testis. In situ hybridization using a GAD-specific probe revealed GAD mRNA expressing spermatocytes and spermatids located in the middle part of rat seminiferous tubules. Studies on the ontogeny of GAD mRNA expression showed low levels of GAD mRNA in testes of prepubertal rats, with increasing levels as sexual maturation is reached, compatible with GAD mRNA expression in germ cells. In agreement with this, fractionation of cells from the rat seminiferous epithelium followed by Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed the highest levels of GAD mRNA associated with spermatocytes and spermatids. Evidence for the presence of GAD protein in the rat testis was obtained from the demonstration of GAD-like immunoreactivity in seminiferous tubules, predominantly at a position where spermatids and spermatozoa are found. Furthermore, GAD-like immunoreactivity was seen in the midpiece of ejaculated human spermatozoa, the part that is responsible for generating energy for spermatozoan motility. Images PMID:1697032

  3. Production of L-glutamic Acid with Corynebacterium glutamicum (NCIM 2168) and Pseudomonas reptilivora (NCIM 2598): A Study on Immobilization and Reusability

    PubMed Central

    Shyamkumar, Rajaram; Moorthy, Innasi Muthu Ganesh; Ponmurugan, Karuppiah; Baskar, Rajoo

    2014-01-01

    Background L-glutamic acid is one of the major amino acids that is present in a wide variety of foods. It is mainly used as a food additive and flavor enhancer in the form of sodium salt. Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) is one of the major organisms widely used for glutamic acid production. Methods The study was dealing with immobilization of C. glutamicum and mixed culture of C. glutamicum and Pseudomonas reptilivora (P. reptilivora) for L-glutamic acid production using submerged fermentation. 2, 3 and 5% sodium alginate concentrations were used for production and reusability of immobilized cells for 5 more trials. Results The results revealed that 2% sodium alginate concentration produced the highest yield (13.026±0.247 g/l by C. glutamicum and 16.026±0.475 g/l by mixed immobilized culture). Moreover, reusability of immobilized cells was evaluated in 2% concentration with 5 more trials. However, when the number of cycles increased, the production of L-glutamic acid decreased. Conclusion Production of glutamic acid using optimized medium minimizes the time needed for designing the medium composition. It also minimizes external contamination. Glutamic acid production gradually decreased due to multiple uses of beads and consequently it reduces the shelf life. PMID:25215180

  4. Cooperative Effects Between Arginine and Glutamic Acid in the Amino Acid-Catalyzed Aldol Reaction.

    PubMed

    Valero, Guillem; Moyano, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Catalysis of the aldol reaction between cyclohexanone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde by mixtures of L-Arg and of L-Glu in wet dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) takes place with higher enantioselectivity (up to a 7-fold enhancement in the anti-aldol for the 1:1 mixture) than that observed when either L-Glu or L-Arg alone are used as the catalysts. These results can be explained by the formation of a catalytically active hydrogen-bonded complex between both amino acids, and demonstrate the possibility of positive cooperative effects in catalysis by two different α-amino acids. Chirality 28:599-605, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27362554

  5. Targeting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) carriers to the brain: potential relevance as antiepileptic pro-drugs.

    PubMed

    Semreen, Mohammad H; El-Shorbagi, Abdel-Nasser; Al-Tel, Taleb H; Alsalahat, Izzeddin M M

    2010-05-01

    The search for antiepileptic compounds with more selective activity continues to be an area of intensive investigation in medicinal chemistry. 3,5-Disubstituted tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-thiadiazine-2-thione (THTT) derivatives, 3a-g, potential prodrugs incorporating the neurotransmitter GABA were synthesized and studied for crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Compounds were prepared from primary amines and carbon disulfide to give dithiocarbamates 2a-g which upon reaction in situ with formaldehyde provided the intermediates Ia-g. Addition of Ia-g onto GABA furnished the title compounds 3a-g. The structures were verified by spectral data and the amounts of the compounds in the brain were investigated by using HPLC. The concentration profiles of the tested compounds in mice brain were determined and the in vivo anticonvulsant activity was measured. PMID:20632978

  6. Influence of light on the free amino acid content and γ-aminobutyric acid synthesis in Brassica juncea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Uddin, Md Romij; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Sun-Ju; Park, Sang Un

    2013-09-11

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) is an important enzyme in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) biosynthesis. Here we report the influence of light on amino acid accumulation and investigate the molecular mechanism by which light influences GABA biosynthesis at the seedling stage of two mustard (Brassica juncea) cultivars (green-leaf and purple-leaf). Gene expression profiles of four GAD-encoding genes (GAD1, GAD2, GAD4a, and GAD4b) and their impact on GABA biosynthesis were analyzed. Light exerted an obvious influence on amino acid accumulation in mustard seedlings. GAD gene expression was also significantly regulated by light/dark or dark treatment, which differentially regulated GABA biosynthesis in B. juncea seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed that the seeds of purple cultivars contain a higher amount of free amino acids and GABA than do the seeds of green cultivars. After seed germination, however, the accumulation of free amino acids peaked in dark-treated seedlings on day 9 in both cultivars, whereas GABA synthesis peaked at 9 days under light conditions. This study may provide a foundation for understanding the effect of light on amino acids, particularly GABA biosynthesis in Brassica plants. PMID:23909820

  7. Role of a γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Coates, B S; Chen, H; Sappington, T W; Guillemaud, T; Siegfried, B D

    2013-10-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was controlled by applications of cyclodiene insecticides from the late 1940s until resistance evolved ∼10 years later. Range expansion from the western plains into eastern USA coincides with resistance development. An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. We found that the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G/T at the GABA receptor cDNA position 838 (G/T(838)) of D. v. virgifera resulted in the alanine to serine change, and the codominant SNP allele T(838) was genetically linked to survival of beetles in aldrin bioassays. A phenotypic gradient of decreasing susceptibility from west to east was correlated with higher frequencies of the resistance-conferring T(838) allele in the eastern-most populations. This pattern exists in opposition to perceived selective pressures since the more eastern and most resistant populations probably experienced reduced exposure. The reasons for the observed distribution are uncertain, but historical records of the range expansion combined with the distribution of susceptible and resistant phenotypes and genotypes provide an opportunity to better understand factors affecting the species' range expansion. PMID:23841833

  8. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water. PMID:26940489

  9. Lack of effect of entorhinal kindling on L-(/sup 3/H)glutamic acid presynaptic uptake and postsynaptic binding in hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Slevin, J.T.; Ferrara, L.P.

    1985-07-01

    Sodium-independent L-(/sup 3/H)glutamic acid binding and sodium-dependent L-(/sup 3/H)glutamic acid high affinity uptake were measured in hippocampal membranes of rats administered electroshock seizures or kindled to class 5 seizures by entorhinal cortical stimulation. There were no differences in these glutamatergic synaptic markers among electroshocked, kindled, or surgical control animals. Entorhinal kindling is not a reflection of activity-regulated facilitation of perforant path glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  10. Pharmacology of GABA.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B

    1982-01-01

    GABA-ergic systems are involved in all the main functions of the brain. In most brain regions impairment of this system produces epileptic activity. GABA-mediated inhibitory function can be enhanced by drugs of at least seven different types. They act on the metabolism or synaptic release of GABA, or its reuptake into neurones of glia, or on various components of the GABA receptor complex (GABA recognition site, "benzodiazepine" receptor or chloride ionophore). Among such compounds, those which act most specifically and potently on GABA receptors remain primarily research tools. Among compounds in clinical use, valproate, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsant barbiturates al enhance GABA-mediated inhibition. In the future, new inhibitors of GABA uptake, new GABA agonists and potent inhibitors of GABA-transaminase are likely to become available. Trials of drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function have been made in a wide variety of neurological disorders. In most forms of epilepsy a therapeutic effect is evident. Real benefit from GABA therapies has not been demonstrated in the principal disorders of movement (Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease, dystonias), except in so far as they have a myoclonic or paroxysmal component. Among psychiatric disorders the acute symptoms of schizophrenia are exacerbated by enhanced GABA-ergic function. Abstinence syndromes (alcohol, barbiturate or narcotic withdrawal) are ameliorated by drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function, and there is some evidence for a beneficial action in anxiety states and mania. Attempts to relate the molecular neurobiology of GABA with clinical pharmacology are of very recent origin. Improved understanding of the variety of GABA receptor mechanisms will provide the key to the more selective pharmacological manipulations that are required for therapeutic success. PMID:6214305

  11. L-glutamic acid: a neurotransmitter candidate for cone photoreceptors in human and rat retinas.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, C; Lam, D M

    1983-01-01

    We have combined immunocytochemical localization of L-aspartate aminotransferase (L-aspartate:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.1; glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase) with autoradiographic localization of high-affinity uptake sites for L-glutamate or L-aspartate to identify the neurotransmitters of mammalian photoreceptors. In both human and rat retinas, high aspartate aminotransferase immunoreactivity is found in cones but not in rods; certain putative bipolar and amacrine cells are also heavily stained. In the human retina, and perhaps also in the rat retina, cones possess a high-affinity uptake mechanism for L-glutamate but not L-aspartate, whereas rods and Müller (glial) cells take up both L-glutamate and L-aspartate. Taken together, our results indicate that (i) L-glutamate is much more likely than L-aspartate to be the transmitter for human cones, and possibly for cones of other mammalian species as well, and (ii) major differences exist between mammalian cones and rods in the transport and metabolism or utilization of L-aspartate and L-glutamate. Images PMID:6136039

  12. Linking Metabolism to Membrane Signaling: The GABA-Malate Connection.

    PubMed

    Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2016-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration increases rapidly in tissues when plants encounter abiotic or biotic stress, and GABA manipulation affects growth. This, coupled to GABA's well-described role as a neurotransmitter in mammals, led to over a decade of speculation that GABA is a signal in plants. The discovery of GABA-regulated anion channels in plants provides compelling mechanistic proof that GABA is a legitimate plant-signaling molecule. Here we examine research avenues unlocked by this finding and propose that these plant 'GABA receptors' possess novel properties ideally suited to translating changes in metabolic status into physiological responses. Specifically, we suggest they have a role in signaling altered cycling of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates during stress via eliciting changes in electrical potential differences across membranes. PMID:26723562

  13. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  14. Dietary Glutamate Supplementation Ameliorates Mycotoxin-Induced Abnormalities in the Intestinal Structure and Expression of Amino Acid Transporters in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M.; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins. PMID:25405987

  15. Altered γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in major depressive disorder: a critical review of the supporting evidence and the influence of serotonergic antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Pehrson, Alan L; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that central nervous system γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations are reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been present since at least 1980, and this idea has recently gained support from more recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy data. These observations have led to the assumption that MDD’s underlying etiology is tied to an overall reduction in GABA-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. In this paper, we review the mechanisms that govern GABA and glutamate concentrations in the brain, and provide a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the clinical data supporting reduced GABA neurotransmission in MDD. This review includes an evaluation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy data, as well as data on the expression and function of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, GABA neuron-specific cell markers, such as parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin, and the GABAA and GABAB receptors in clinical MDD populations. We explore a potential role for glial pathology in MDD-related reductions in GABA concentrations, and evidence of a connection between neurosteroids, GABA neurotransmission, and hormone-related mood disorders. Additionally, we investigate the effects of GABAergic pharmacological agents on mood, and demonstrate that these compounds have complex effects that do not universally support the idea that reduced GABA neurotransmission is at the root of MDD. Finally, we discuss the connections between serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and show that two serotonin-focused antidepressants – the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine – modulate GABA neurotransmission in opposing ways, despite both being effective MDD treatments. Altogether, this review demonstrates that there are large gaps in our understanding of the relationship between GABA physiology and MDD, which must be remedied with more data from well

  16. Altered γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in major depressive disorder: a critical review of the supporting evidence and the influence of serotonergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that central nervous system γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations are reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been present since at least 1980, and this idea has recently gained support from more recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy data. These observations have led to the assumption that MDD's underlying etiology is tied to an overall reduction in GABA-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. In this paper, we review the mechanisms that govern GABA and glutamate concentrations in the brain, and provide a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the clinical data supporting reduced GABA neurotransmission in MDD. This review includes an evaluation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy data, as well as data on the expression and function of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, GABA neuron-specific cell markers, such as parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin, and the GABAA and GABAB receptors in clinical MDD populations. We explore a potential role for glial pathology in MDD-related reductions in GABA concentrations, and evidence of a connection between neurosteroids, GABA neurotransmission, and hormone-related mood disorders. Additionally, we investigate the effects of GABAergic pharmacological agents on mood, and demonstrate that these compounds have complex effects that do not universally support the idea that reduced GABA neurotransmission is at the root of MDD. Finally, we discuss the connections between serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and show that two serotonin-focused antidepressants - the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine - modulate GABA neurotransmission in opposing ways, despite both being effective MDD treatments. Altogether, this review demonstrates that there are large gaps in our understanding of the relationship between GABA physiology and MDD, which must be remedied with more data from well-controlled empirical

  17. Regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion by hypothalamic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Donoso, A O; Seltzer, A M; Navarro, C E; Cabrera, R J; López, F J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1994-04-01

    1. The present review discusses the proposed roles of the amino acids glutamate and GABA in the central regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. 2. Descriptions of the mechanisms of action of these neurotransmitters have focused on two diencephalic areas, namely, the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area where the cell bodies of LHRH neurons are located, and the medial basal hypothalamus which contains the nerve endings of the LHRH system. Increasing endogenous GABA concentration by drugs, GABA agonists, or blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission by selective antagonists in rats and non-human primates prevents ovulation and pulsatile LH release, and blunts the LH surges induced by estrogen or an estrogen-progesterone combination. In contrast, glutamate and different glutamate agonists such as NMDA, AMPA and kainate, can increase LHRH/LH secretion. 3. The simultaneous enhancement of glutamatergic activity and a decrease of GABAergic tone may positively influence the maturation of the pituitary-gonadal system in rats and non-human primates. Administration of glutamate receptor agonists has been shown to significantly advance the onset of puberty. Conversely, glutamate antagonists or increased endogenous GABA levels may delay the onset of puberty. The physiological regulation of LHRH/LH secretion may thus involve a GABA-glutamate interaction and a cooperative action of the various types of ionotropic glutamate receptors. 4. The inhibitory actions of GABA on LH release and ovulation may be exerted at the level of afferent nerve terminals that regulate LHRH secretion. A likely candidate is noradrenaline, as suggested by the synaptic connections between noradrenergic nerve terminals and GABAergic interneurons in the preoptic area. Recent experiments have provided complementary evidence for the physiological balance between inhibitory and excitatory transmission resulting in modulation of the action of

  18. Peroxide-dependent amino acid oxidation and chemiluminescence catalysed by magnesium-pyridoxal phosphate-glutamate complex.

    PubMed

    Meyer, B U; Schneider, W; Elstner, E F

    1992-08-01

    Magnesium-pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-glutamate (MPPG) has been shown to ameliorate atherosclerotic symptoms in rabbits. In vitro, MPPG in the presence of peroxides such as cholesterolhydroperoxide or cumene hydroperoxide and Mn2+ ions produces "excited states" measurable as chemiluminescence or ethylene release from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). The reactions are stimulated synergistically by unsaturated fatty acids. Pyridoxal phosphate exhibits similar properties, but can be differentiated from the activities of MPPG or the sum of the components present in MPPG. PMID:1510700

  19. Combining disulfiram and poly(l-glutamic acid)-cisplatin conjugates for combating cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Shen, Na; Yu, Haiyang; Jia, Yanjie; Zhang, Dawei; Jiang, Jian; He, Chaoliang; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-10

    A poly(l-glutamic acid) graft polyethylene glycol-cisplatin complex (PGA-CisPt) performs well in reducing the toxicity of free cisplatin and greatly enhances the accumulation and retention of cisplatin in solid tumors. However, there is a lack of effective treatment options for cisplatin-resistant tumors. A major reason for this is the dense PEG shell, which ensures that the PGA-CisPt maintains a long retention time in the blood that may result in it bypassing the tumor cells or failing to be endocytosed within the tumor microenvironment. Consequently, the cisplatin from PGA-CisPt is released to the extracellular space in the presence of cisplatin-resistant tumor cells and the resistant problem to free cisplatin still valid. Therefore, we devised a strategy to combat the resistance of cisplatin in the tumor microenvironment using nanoparticles-loaded disulfiram (NPs-DSF) as a modulator. In vitro, cisplatin, in combination with DSF, had a synergistic effect and decreased cell survival rate of cisplatin-resistant A549DDP cells. This effect was also observed when combining PGA-CisPt with NPs-DSF. Similarly, in Balb/C nude mice with A549DDP xenografts, NPs-DSF improved PGA-CisPt effectiveness in inhibiting tumor growth while maintaining low toxicity. Our data demonstrate that DSF reduces intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, inhibits NFκB activity, and modulates the expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax, thereby improves the effectiveness of cisplatin in resistant cell lines. Here, we provide a promising method for overcoming cisplatin resistance in tumors, while maintaining the in vivo benefits of the PGA-CisPt complex. PMID:26928530

  20. Bioactivity in silica/poly(γ-glutamic acid) sol-gel hybrids through calcium chelation.

    PubMed

    Valliant, Esther M; Romer, Frederik; Wang, Daming; McPhail, David S; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Jones, Julian R

    2013-08-01

    Bioactive glasses and inorganic/organic hybrids have great potential as biomedical implant materials. Sol-gel hybrids with interpenetrating networks of silica and biodegradable polymers can combine the bioactive properties of a glass with the toughness of a polymer. However, traditional calcium sources such as calcium nitrate and calcium chloride are unsuitable for hybrids. In this study calcium was incorporated by chelation to the polymer component. The calcium salt form of poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γCaPGA) was synthesized for use as both a calcium source and as the biodegradable toughening component of the hybrids. Hybrids of 40wt.% γCaPGA were successfully formed and had fine scale integration of Ca and Si ions, according to secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging, indicating a homogeneous distribution of organic and inorganic components. (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data demonstrated that the network connectivity was unaltered with changing polymer molecular weight, as there was no perturbation to the overall Si speciation and silica network formation. Upon immersion in simulated body fluid a hydroxycarbonate apatite surface layer formed on the hybrids within 1week. The polymer molecular weight (Mw 30-120kDa) affected the mechanical properties of the resulting hybrids, but all hybrids had large strains to failure, >26%, and compressive strengths, in excess of 300MPa. The large strain to failure values showed that γCaPGA hybrids exhibited non-brittle behaviour whilst also incorporating calcium. Thus calcium incorporation by chelation to the polymer component is justified as a novel approach in hybrids for biomedical materials. PMID:23632373

  1. Structural Characterization and Epitope Mapping of the Glutamic Acid/Alanine-rich Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Loveless, Bianca C.; Mason, Jeremy W.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Razavi, Morteza; Pearson, Terry W.; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an African trypanosome that causes serious disease in cattle in Sub-Saharan Africa. The four major life cycle stages of T. congolense can be grown in vitro, which has led to the identification of several cell-surface molecules expressed on the parasite during its transit through the tsetse vector. One of these, glutamic acid/alanine-rich protein (GARP), is the first expressed on procyclic forms in the tsetse midgut and is of particular interest because it replaces the major surface coat molecule of bloodstream forms, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that protects the parasite membrane, and is involved in antigenic variation. Unlike VSG, however, the function of GARP is not known, which necessarily limits our understanding of parasite survival in the tsetse. Toward establishing the function of GARP, we report its three-dimensional structure solved by iodide phasing to a resolution of 1.65 Å. An extended helical bundle structure displays an unexpected and significant degree of homology to the core structure of VSG, the only other major surface molecule of trypanosomes to be structurally characterized. Immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoaffinity-tandem mass spectrometry were used in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to map both non-surface-disposed and surface epitopes. Collectively, these studies enabled us to derive a model describing the orientation and assembly of GARP on the surface of trypanosomes. The data presented here suggest the possible structure-function relationships involved in replacement of the bloodstream form VSG by GARP as trypanosomes differentiate in the tsetse vector after a blood meal. PMID:21471223

  2. In vitro adsorption of aluminum by an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Yesudoss Christu; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing Huei

    2014-05-21

    Accumulation of aluminum in human has been reported to be associated with dementia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this study were to evaluate an edible biopolymer poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) for aluminum removal efficiency under in vitro conditions as affected by pH, contact time, aluminum concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and essential metals in both aqueous aluminum solution and simulated gastrointestinal fluid (GIF). A low aluminum adsorption occurred at pH 1.5-2.5, followed by a maximum adsorption at pH 3.0-4.0 and precipitating thereafter as aluminum hydroxide at pH > 4. Adsorption was extremely fast with 81-96% of total adsorption being attained within 1 min, reaching equilibrium in 5-10 min. Kinetic data at low (10 mg/L) and high (50 mg/L) concentrations were well described by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models, respectively. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were precisely fitted by both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models with the maximum adsorption capacities at 25, 37, and 50 °C being 35.85, 38.68, and 44.23 mg/g, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations suggested endothermic and spontaneous nature of aluminum adsorption by γ-PGA with increased randomness at the solid/solution interface. Variation in ionic strengths did not alter the adsorption capacity, however, the incorporation of essential metals significantly reduced the aluminum adsorption by following the order copper > iron > zinc > calcium > potassium. Compared to aqueous solution, the aluminum adsorption from simulated GIF was high at all studied pH (1-4) with Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity being 49.43 mg/g at 37 °C and pH 4. The outcome of this study suggests that γ-PGA could be used as a safe detoxifying agent for aluminum. PMID:24799126

  3. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: <0.02) and was treated with multiple immuno- and chemotherapies, with eventual partial seizure control. Patient 2 was a 61-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l. EEG showed persistent generalized periodic discharges despite maximized therapy with anticonvulsants but no immunotherapy, resulting in withdrawal of care and discharge to nursing home. Patient 3 was a 50-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l, and was discovered to have pulmonary sarcoidosis. Treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in seizure resolution. Due to the responsiveness to immunotherapy, there may be an association between GAD-Abs and refractory seizures, including refractory status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. PMID:26878120

  4. Bio-derived poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanogels as controlled anticancer drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee Ho; Cho, Mi Young; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Poo, Haryoung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lim, Yong Taik

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel type of polymer nanogel loaded with anticancer drug based on bio-derived poly(gamma- glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA). gamma-PGA is a highly anionic polymer that is synthesized naturally by microbial species, most prominently in various bacilli, and has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility. Thiolated gamma-PGA was synthesized by covalent coupling between the carboxyl groups of gamma-PGA and the primary amine group of cysteamine. Doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated using the following steps: (1) an ionic nanocomplex was formed between thiolated gamma-PGA as the negative charge component, and Dox as the positive charge component; (2) addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) induced hydrogen-bond interactions between thiol groups of thiolated gamma-PGA and hydroxyl groups of PEG, resulting in the nanocomplex; and (3) disulfide crosslinked gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated by ultrasonication. The average size and surface charge of Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels in aqueous solution were 136.3 +/- 37.6 nm and -32.5 +/- 5.3 mV, respectively. The loading amount of Dox was approximately 38.7 microgram per mg of gamma-PGA nanogel. The Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels showed controlled drug release behavior in the presence of reducing agents, glutathione (GSH) (1- 10 mM). Through fluorescence microscopy and FACS, the cellular uptake of gamma-PGA nanogels into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated using the MTT assay and was determined to be dependent on both the concentration and treatment time of gamma-PGA nanogels. The bio-derived gamma-PGA nanogels are expected to be a well-designed delivery carrier for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:23221543

  5. Pivotal Enzyme in Glutamate Metabolism of Poly-γ-Glutamate-Producing Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kamei, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    The extremely halophilic archaeon Natrialba aegyptiaca secretes the L-homo type of poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) as an extremolyte. We examined the enzymes involved in glutamate metabolism and verified the presence of L-glutamate dehydrogenases, L-aspartate aminotransferase, and L-glutamate synthase. However, neither glutamate racemase nor D-amino acid aminotransferase activity was detected, suggesting the absence of sources of D-glutamate. In contrast, D-glutamate-rich PGA producers mostly possess such intracellular sources of D-glutamate. The results of our present study indicate that the D-glutamate-anabolic enzyme “glutamate racemase” is pivotal in the biosynthesis of PGA. PMID:25371338

  6. Brain regional distribution of GABA(A) receptors exhibiting atypical GABA agonism: roles of receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Lauri M; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Chandra, Dev; Homanics, Gregg E; Korpi, Esa R

    2009-11-01

    The major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), has only partial efficacy at certain subtypes of GABA(A) receptors. To characterize these minor receptor populations in rat and mouse brains, we used autoradiographic imaging of t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35)S]thionate ([(35)S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptors in brain sections and compared the displacing capacities of 10mM GABA and 1mM 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a competitive GABA-site agonist. Brains from GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha4, delta, and alpha4+delta subunit knockout (KO) mouse lines were used to understand the contribution of these particular receptor subunits to "GABA-insensitive" (GIS) [(35)S]TBPS binding. THIP displaced more [(35)S]TBPS binding than GABA in several brain regions, indicating that THIP also inhibited GIS-binding. In these regions, GABA prevented the effect of THIP on GIS-binding. GIS-binding was increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer of delta KO and alpha4+delta KO mice, being only slightly diminished in that of alpha1 KO mice. In the thalamus and some other forebrain regions of wild-type mice, a significant amount of GIS-binding was detected. This GIS-binding was higher in alpha4 KO mice. However, it was fully abolished in alpha1 KO mice, indicating that the alpha1 subunit was obligatory for the GIS-binding in the forebrain. Our results suggest that native GABA(A) receptors in brain sections showing reduced displacing capacity of [(35)S]TBPS binding by GABA (partial agonism) minimally require the assembly of alpha1 and beta subunits in the forebrain and of alpha6 and beta subunits in the cerebellar granule cell layer. These receptors may function as extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. PMID:19397945

  7. A 13C{31P} REDOR NMR Investigation of the Role of Glutamic Acid Residues in Statherin-Hydroxyapatite Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ndao, Moise; Ash, Jason T.; Breen, Nicholas F.; Goobes, Gil; Stayton, Patrick S.; Drobny, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    The side chain carboxyl groups of acidic proteins found in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) of mineralized tissues play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals such as hydroxyapatite (HAP), the principal mineral component of bone and teeth. Among the acidic proteins found in the saliva is statherin, a 43-residue tyrosine-rich peptide that is a potent lubricant in the salivary pellicle and an inhibitor of both HAP crystal nucleation and growth. Three acidic amino acids – D1, E4, and E5 – are located in the N-terminal 15 amino acid segment, with a fourth amino acid, E26, located outside the N-terminus. We have utilized 13C{31P} REDOR NMR to analyze the role played by acidic amino acids in the binding mechanism of statherin to the HAP surface by measuring the distance between the δ-carboxyl 13C spins of the three glutamic acid side chains of statherin (residues E4, E5, E26) and 31P spins of the phosphate groups at the HAP surface. 13C{31P} REDOR studies of glutamic-5-13C acid incorporated at positions E4 and E26 indicate a 13C–31P distance of more than 6.5 Å between the side chain carboxyl 13C spin of E4 and the closest 31P in the HAP surface. In contrast, the carboxyl 13C spin at E5 has a much shorter 13C–31P internuclear distance of 4.25±0.09 Å, indicating that the carboxyl group of this side chain interacts directly with the surface. 13C T1ρ and slow-spinning MAS studies indicate that the motions of the side chains of E4 and E5 are more restricted than that of E26. Together, these results provide further insight into the molecular interactions of statherin with HAP surfaces. PMID:19678690

  8. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Producing Bacteria on In vitro Rumen Fermentation, Biogenic Amine Production and Anti-oxidation Using Corn Meal as Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bum Seung; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Jeong, Chang Dae; Soriano, Alvin P.; Lee, Ho-Il; Nam, Ki-Chang; Ha, Jong K.; Lee, Sang Suk

    2013-01-01

    The effects and significance of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) producing bacteria (GPB) on in vitro rumen fermentation and reduction of biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, and tyramine) using corn meal as a substrate were determined. Ruminal samples collected from ruminally fistulated Holstein cows served as inoculum and corn was used as substrate at 2% dry matter (DM). Different inclusion rates of GPB and GABA were evaluated. After incubation, addition of GPB had no significant effect on in vitro fermentation pH and total gas production, but significantly increased the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration and reduced the total biogenic amines production (p<0.05). Furthermore, antioxidation activity was improved as indicated by the significantly higher concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) among treated samples when compared to the control (p<0.05). Additionally, 0.2% GPB was established as the optimum inclusion level. Taken together, these results suggest the potential of utilizing GPB as feed additives to improve growth performance in ruminants by reducing biogenic amines and increasing anti-oxidation. PMID:25049853

  9. The effects of temperature, pH and redox state on the stability of glutamic acid in hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namhey; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Cody, George D.; Hazen, Robert M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural hydrothermal vent environments cover a wide range of physicochemical conditions involving temperature, pH and redox state. The stability of simple biomolecules such as amino acids in such environments is of interest in various fields of study from the origin of life to the metabolism of microbes at the present day. Numerous previous experimental studies have suggested that amino acids are unstable under hydrothermal conditions and decompose rapidly. However, previous studies have not effectively controlled the redox state of the hydrothermal fluids. Here we studied the stability of glutamate with and without reducing hydrothermal conditions imposed by 13 mM aqueous H2 at temperatures of 150, 200 and 250 °C and initial (25 °C) pH values of 6 and 10 in a flow-through hydrothermal reactor with reaction times from 3 to 36 min. We combined the experimental measurements with theoretical calculations to model the in situ aqueous speciation and pH values. As previously observed under hydrothermal conditions, the main reaction involves glutamate cyclizing to pyroglutamate through a simple dehydration reaction. However, the amounts of decomposition products of the glutamate detected, including succinate, formate, carbon dioxide and ammonia depend on the temperature, the pH and particularly the redox state of the fluid. In the absence of dissolved H2, glutamate decomposes in the sequence glutamate, glutaconate, α-hydroxyglutarate, ketoglutarate, formate and succinate, and ultimately to CO2 and micromolar quantities of H2(aq). Model speciation calculations indicate the CO2, formate and H2(aq) are not in metastable thermodynamic equilibrium. However, with 13 mM H2(aq) concentrations, the amounts of decomposition products are suppressed at all temperatures and pH values investigated. The small amounts of CO2 and formate present are calculated to be in metastable equilibrium with the H2. It is further proposed that there is a metastable equilibrium between glutamate

  10. Glutamate, Ornithine, Arginine, Proline, and Polyamine Metabolic Interactions: The Pathway Is Regulated at the Post-Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Barchi, Boubker; Turlapati, Swathi A.; Gagne, Maegan; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of glutamate into ornithine, arginine, proline, and polyamines is a major network of nitrogen-metabolizing pathways in plants, which also produces intermediates like nitric oxide, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that play critical roles in plant development and stress. While the accumulations of intermediates and the products of this network depend primarily on nitrogen assimilation, the overall regulation of the interacting sub-pathways is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that diversion of ornithine into polyamine biosynthesis (by transgenic approach) not only plays a role in regulating its own biosynthesis from glutamate but also affects arginine and proline biosynthesis. Using two high putrescine producing lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (containing a transgenic mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene), we studied the: (1) effects of exogenous supply of carbon and nitrogen on polyamines and pools of soluble amino acids; and, (2) expression of genes encoding key enzymes in the interactive pathways of arginine, proline and GABA biosynthesis as well as the catabolism of polyamines. Our findings suggest that: (1) the overall conversion of glutamate to arginine and polyamines is enhanced by increased utilization of ornithine for polyamine biosynthesis by the transgene product; (2) proline and arginine biosynthesis are regulated independently of polyamines and GABA biosynthesis; (3) the expression of most genes (28 that were studied) that encode enzymes of the interacting sub-pathways of arginine and GABA biosynthesis does not change even though overall biosynthesis of Orn from glutamate is increased several fold; and (4) increased polyamine biosynthesis results in increased assimilation of both nitrogen and carbon by the cells. PMID:26909083

  11. Metabolic engineering of the mixed-acid fermentation pathway of Escherichia coli for anaerobic production of glutamate and itaconate.

    PubMed

    Vuoristo, Kiira S; Mars, Astrid E; Sangra, Jose Vidal; Springer, Jan; Eggink, Gerrit; Sanders, Johan P M; Weusthuis, Ruud A

    2015-12-01

    Itaconic acid, an unsaturated C5-dicarboxylic acid, is a biobased building block for the polymer industry. The purpose of this study was to establish proof of principle for an anaerobic fermentation process for the production of itaconic acid by modification of the mixed acid fermentation pathway of E. coli. E. coli BW25113 (DE3) and the phosphate acetyltransferase (pta) and lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA) deficient strain E. coli BW25113 (DE3) Δpta-ΔldhA were used to study anaerobic itaconate production in E. coli. Heterologous expression of the gene encoding cis-aconitate decarboxylase (cadA) from A. terreus in E. coli BW25113 (DE3) did not result in itaconate production under anaerobic conditions, but 0.08 mM of itaconate was formed when the genes encoding citrate synthase (gltA) and aconitase (acnA) from Corynebacterium glutamicum were also expressed. The same amount was produced when cadA was expressed in E. coli BW25113 (DE3) Δpta-ΔldhA. The titre increased 8 times to 0.66 mM (1.2 % Cmol) when E. coli BW25113 (DE3) Δpta-ΔldhA also expressed gltA and acnA. In addition, this strain produced 8.5 mM (13 % Cmol) of glutamate. The use of a nitrogen-limited growth medium reduced the accumulation of glutamate by nearly 50 % compared to the normal medium, and also resulted in a more than 3-fold increase of the itaconate titre to 2.9 mM. These results demonstrated that E. coli has potential to produce itaconate and glutamate under anaerobic conditions, closing the redox balance by co-production of succinate or ethanol with H2 and CO2. PMID:26384341

  12. Stereospecific enzymatic transformation of alpha-ketoglutarate to (2S,3R)-3-methyl glutamate during acidic lipopeptide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mahlert, Christoph; Kopp, Florian; Thirlway, Jenny; Micklefield, Jason; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2007-10-01

    The acidic lipopeptides, including the calcium-dependent antibiotics (CDA), daptomycin, and A54145, are important macrocyclic peptide natural products produced by Streptomyces species. All three compounds contain a 3-methyl glutamate (3-MeGlu) as the penultimate C-terminal residue, which is important for bioactivity. Here, biochemical in vitro reconstitution of the 3-MeGlu biosynthetic pathway is presented, using exclusively enzymes from the CDA producer Streptomyces coelicolor. It is shown that the predicted 3-MeGlu methyltransferase GlmT and its homologues DptI from the daptomycin producer Streptomyces roseosporus and LptI from the A54145 producer Streptomyces fradiae do not methylate free glutamic acid, PCP-bound glutamate, or Glu-containing CDA in vitro. Instead, GlmT, DptI, and LptI are S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-dependent alpha-ketoglutarate methyltransferases that catalyze the stereospecific methylation of alpha-ketoglutarate (alphaKG) leading to (3R)-3-methyl-2-oxoglutarate. Subsequent enzyme screening identified the branched chain amino acid transaminase IlvE (SCO5523) as an efficient catalyst for the transformation of (3R)-3-methyl-2-oxoglutarate into (2S,3R)-3-MeGlu. Comparison of reversed-phase HPLC retention time of dabsylated 3-MeGlu generated by the coupled enzymatic reaction with dabsylated synthetic standards confirmed complete stereocontrol during enzymatic catalysis. This stereospecific two-step conversion of alphaKG to (2S,3R)-3-MeGlu completes our understanding of the biosynthesis and incorporation of beta-methylated amino acids into the nonribosomal lipopeptides. Finally, understanding this pathway may provide new possibilities for the production of modified peptides in engineered microbes. PMID:17784761

  13. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid (PGA)-Producing Bacillus Species Isolated from Kinema, Indian Fermented Soybean Food

    PubMed Central

    Chettri, Rajen; Bhutia, Meera O.; Tamang, Jyoti P.

    2016-01-01

    Kinema, an ethnic fermented, non-salted and sticky soybean food is consumed in the eastern part of India. The stickiness is one of the best qualities of good kinema preferred by consumers, which is due to the production of poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA). Average load of Bacillus in kinema was 107 cfu/g and of lactic acid bacteria was 103 cfu/g. Bacillus spp. were screened for PGA-production and isolates of lactic acid bacteria were also tested for degradation of PGA. Only Bacillus produced PGA, none of lactic acid bacteria produced PGA. PGA-producing Bacillus spp. were identified by phenotypic characterization and also by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. sonorensis. PMID:27446012

  14. Detection of Glutamic Acid in Oilseed Rape Leaves Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy and the Least Squares-Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yidan; Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; Qiu, Zhengjun; He, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are quite important indices to indicate the growth status of oilseed rape under herbicide stress. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics was applied for fast determination of glutamic acid in oilseed rape leaves. The optimal spectral preprocessing method was obtained after comparing Savitzky-Golay smoothing, standard normal variate, multiplicative scatter correction, first and second derivatives, detrending and direct orthogonal signal correction. Linear and nonlinear calibration methods were developed, including partial least squares (PLS) and least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM). The most effective wavelengths (EWs) were determined by the successive projections algorithm (SPA), and these wavelengths were used as the inputs of PLS and LS-SVM model. The best prediction results were achieved by SPA-LS-SVM (Raw) model with correlation coefficient r = 0.9943 and root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) = 0.0569 for prediction set. These results indicated that NIR spectroscopy combined with SPA-LS-SVM was feasible for the fast and effective detection of glutamic acid in oilseed rape leaves. The selected EWs could be used to develop spectral sensors, and the important and basic amino acid data were helpful to study the function mechanism of herbicide. PMID:23203052

  15. The effect of glutamic acid side chain on acidity constant of lysine in beta-sheet: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargolzaei, M.; Afshar, M.; Sadeghi, M. S.; Kavee, M.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, the possibility of proton transfer between side chain of lysine and glutamic acid in peptide of Glu--Ala-Lys+ was demonstrated using density functional theory (DFT). We have shown that the proton transfer takes place between side chain of glutamic and lysine residues through the hydrogen bond formation. The structures of transition state for proton transfer reaction were detected in gas and solution phases. Our kinetic studies show that the proton transfer reaction rate in gas phase is higher than solution phase. The ionization constant (p K a) value of lysine residue in peptide was estimated 1.039 which is lower than intrinsic p K a of lysine amino acid.

  16. Detection of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in macrophages by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, D J; Anthony, D C; Lowe, J P; Miller, J; Palm, W M; Styles, P; Perry, V H; Blamire, A M; Sibson, N R

    2005-08-01

    Macrophages are key components of the inflammatory response to tissue injury, but their activities can exacerbate neuropathology. High-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to identify metabolite levels in perchloric acid extracts of cultured cells of the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line under resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated conditions. Over 25 metabolites were identified including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter not previously reported to be present in macrophages. The presence of GABA was also demonstrated in extracts of human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. This finding suggests that there may be communication between damaged central nervous system (CNS) tissue and recruited macrophages and resident microglia, which could help orchestrate the immune response. On activation, lactate, glutamine, glutamate, and taurine levels were elevated significantly, and GABA and alanine were reduced significantly. Strong resonances from glutathione, evident in the macrophage two-dimensional 1H spectrum, suggest that this may have potential as a noninvasive marker of macrophages recruited to the CNS, as it is only present at low levels in normal brain. Alternatively, a specific combination of spectroscopic changes, such as lactate, alanine, glutathione, and polyamines, may prove to be the most accurate means of detecting macrophage recruitment to the CNS. PMID:15908457

  17. Mechanisms of carbacholine and GABA action on resting membrane potential and Na+/K+-ATPase of Lumbricus terrestris body wall muscles.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Eugeny M; Nurullin, Leniz F; Volkov, Michael E; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, Frantisek

    2011-04-01

    This work was aimed to identify the action of several ion channel and pump inhibitors as well as nicotinic, GABAergic, purinergic and serotoninergic drugs on the resting membrane potential (RMP) and assess the role of cholinergic and GABAergic sensitivity in earthworm muscle electrogenesis. The nicotinic agonists acetylcholine (ACh), carbacholine (CCh) and nicotine depolarize the RMP at concentrations of 5 μM and higher. The nicotinic antagonists (+)tubocurarine, α-bungarotoxin, muscarinic antagonists atropine and hexamethonium do not remove or prevent the CCh-induced depolarization. Verapamil, tetrodotoxin, removal of Cl(-) and Ca(2+) from the solution also cannot prevent the depolarization by CCh. In a Na(+)-free medium, however, CCh lost this depolarization ability and this indicates that the drug opens the sodium permeable pathway. Serotonin, glutamate, glycine, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (GABA(C) receptor antagonist) had no effect on the RMP. On the other hand, isoguvacin, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and baclofen (GABA(B) receptor agonist) hyperpolarized the RMP. Ouabain, bicucullin (GABA(A) antagonist) and phaclofen (GABA(B) antagonist), as well as the removal of Cl(-), suppressed the effect of GABA and baclofen. CCh did not enhance the depolarization generated by ouabain but, on the other hand, hindered the hyperpolarizing activity of baclofen both in the absence and presence of atropine and (+)tubocurarine. The long-term application of CCh depolarizes the RMP primarily by inhibiting the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. The muscle membrane also contains A and B type GABA binding sites, the activation of which increases the RMP at the expense of increasing the action of ouabain- and Cl(-) -sensitive electrogenic pumps. PMID:21184841

  18. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep. PMID:25431268

  19. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2004-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is both the basis of a trillion dollar worldwide industry and a presence in the diet of a majority of the inhabitants of the world. Some parts of the "story" of MSG that might be of most interest to chemists, chemistry teachers and their students are presented.

  20. GLUTAMATE NEUROTOXICITY IN THE DEVELOPING RAT COCHLEA IS ANTAGONIZED BY KUNURENIC ACID AND MK-801

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glutamate (GLU) is neurotoxic in the neonatal rat cochlea, producing hearing impairment which is largely due to the death of spiral ganglion cells, whereas the receptor hair cells are spared. endritic fibers of the spiral ganglion are post-synaptic to the primary afferent synapse...

  1. Thermostability Improvement of a Streptomyces Xylanase by Introducing Proline and Glutamic Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Tian, Jian; Turunen, Ossi; Huang, Huoqing; Shi, Pengjun; Hua, Huifang; Wang, Caihong; Wang, Shuanghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein engineering is commonly used to improve the robustness of enzymes for activity and stability at high temperatures. In this study, we identified four residues expected to affect the thermostability of Streptomyces sp. strain S9 xylanase XynAS9 through multiple-sequence analysis (MSA) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct five mutants by replacing these residues with proline or glutamic acid (V81P, G82E, V81P/G82E, D185P/S186E, and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E), and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris. Compared to the wild-type XynAS9, all five mutant enzymes showed improved thermal properties. The activity and stability assays, including circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry, showed that the mutations at positions 81 and 82 increased the thermal performance more than the mutations at positions 185 and 186. The mutants with combined substitutions (V81P/G82E and V81P/G82E/D185P/S186E) showed the most pronounced shifts in temperature optima, about 17°C upward, and their half-lives for thermal inactivation at 70°C and melting temperatures were increased by >9 times and approximately 7.0°C, respectively. The mutation combination of V81P and G82E in adjacent positions more than doubled the effect of single mutations. Both mutation regions were at the end of long secondary-structure elements and probably rigidified the local structure. MDS indicated that a long loop region after positions 81 and 82 located at the end of the inner β-barrel was prone to unfold. The rigidified main chain and filling of a groove by the mutations on the bottom of the active site canyon may stabilize the mutants and thus improve their thermostability. PMID:24463976

  2. Cell proliferation on PVA/sodium alginate and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) electrospun fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen Ming; Yang, Jhe Hao; Tsou, Shu Chun; Ding, Chian Hua; Hsu, Chih Chin; Yang, Kai Chiang; Yang, Chun Chen; Chen, Ko Shao; Chen, Szi Wen; Wang, Jong Shyan

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the obstacles of easy dissolution of PVA nanofibers without crosslinking treatment and the poor electrospinnability of the PVA cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning process, the PVA based electrospun hydrogel nanofibers are prepared with post-crosslinking method. To expect the electrospun hydrogel fibers might be a promising scaffold for cell culture and tissue engineering applications, the evaluation of cell proliferation on the post-crosslinking electrospun fibers is conducted in this study. At beginning, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), PVA/sodium alginate (PVASA) and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PVAPGA) electrospun fibers were prepared by electrospinning method. The electrospun PVA, PVASA and PVAPGA nanofibers were treated with post-cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde (Glu) as crosslinking agent. These electrospun fibers were characterized with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and their morphologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). To support the evaluation and explanation of cell growth on the fiber, the study of 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell growth on the surface of pure PVA, SA, and PGA thin films is conducted. The proliferation of 3T3 on the electrospun fiber surface of PVA, PVASA, and PVAPGA was evaluated by seeding 3T3 fibroblast cells on these crosslinked electrospun fibers. The cell viability on electrospun fibers was conducted with water-soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay (Cell Proliferation Reagent WST-1). The morphology of the cells on the fibers was also observed with SEM. The results of WST-1 assay revealed that 3T3 cells cultured on different electrospun fibers had similar viability, and the cell viability increased with time for all electrospun fibers. From the morphology of the cells on electrospun fibers, it is found that 3T3 cells attached on all electrospun fiber after 1day seeded. Cell-cell communication was noticed on day 3 for all electrospun fibers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) productions were found and

  3. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  4. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  5. Crystal growth and preliminary X-ray study of glutamic acid specific serine protease from Bacillus intermedius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, I. P.; Blagova, E. V.; Levdikov, V. M.; Rudenskaya, G. N.; Balaban, N. P.; Shakirov, E. V.

    1999-01-01

    The glutamic acid specific protease (glutamyl-endopeptidase) from Bacillus intermedius, strain 3-19, was isolated and purified using ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and Mono-S FPLC column. The conditions for crystallization of the enzyme have been discussed. The crystals of enzyme were grown using hanging-drop vapor-diffusion technique. Crystals belong to the space group C2 with unit cell parameters of a=61.62 Å, b=55.84 Å, c=60.40 Å, β=117.6° X-ray diffraction data to 1.68 Å resolution were collected using synchrotron radiation (EMBL, Hamburg) and an imaging plate scanner.

  6. Effects of a New Glutamic Acid Derivative on Myocardial Contractility of Stressed Animals under Conditions of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2015-07-01

    Glufimet (glutamic acid derivative) in a dose of 28.7 mg/kg limited the reduction of the cardiac functional reserve in animals subjected to 24-h stress under conditions of nonselective NO synthase blockade with L-NAME (10 mg/kg). Adrenoreactivity and increased afterload tests showed that the increment of myocardial contraction/relaxation rates, left-ventricular pressure, and HR were significantly higher in glufimet-treated stressed animals with NO synthesis blockade than in animals which received no glufimet. The efficiency of glufimet was higher than that of phenibut (the reference drug). PMID:26205724

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibit microglial glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Stephen M; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Guo Li, Gary; Barger, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory stimuli evoke an export of glutamate from microglia that is sufficient to contribute to excitotoxicity in neighbouring neurons. Since microglia also express various glutamate receptors themselves, we were interested in the potential feedback of glutamate on this system. Several agonists of mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors) were applied to primary rat microglia, and the export of glutamate into their culture medium was evoked by LPS (lipopolysaccharide). Agonists of group-II and -III mGluR ACPD [(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] and L-AP4 [L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid] were both capable of completely blocking the glutamate export without interfering with the production of NO (nitric oxide); the group-I agonist tADA (trans-azetidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid) was ineffective. Consistent with the possibility of feedback, inhibition of mGluR by MSPG [(R,S)-α-2-methyl-4sulfonophenylglycine] potentiated glutamate export. As the group-II and -III mGluR are coupled to Gαi-containing G-proteins and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, we explored the role of cAMP in this effect. Inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase [also known as protein kinase A (PKA)] by H89 mimicked the effect of ACPD, and the mGluR agonist had its actions reversed by artificially sustaining cAMP through the PDE (phosphodiesterase) inhibitor IBMX (isobutylmethylxanthine) or the cAMP mimetic dbcAMP (dibutyryl cAMP). These data indicate that mGluR activation attenuates a potentially neurotoxic export of glutamate from activated microglia and implicate cAMP as a contributor to this aspect of microglial action. PMID:22770428

  8. Mechanism of specific influence of L-Glutamic acid on the shape of L-Valine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiura, Hiromu; Nagano, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2013-01-01

    The specific interaction between L-valine (L-Val) and L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) in the process of evaporative crystallization from an aqueous solution has been investigated. It was found that only 2.0% (wt/wt) of L-Glu against the total amount of L-Val was required to induce significant agglomeration of L-Val. Interestingly, the agglomeration was only induced under acidic conditions, suggesting that the electrostatic interaction was an effective factor for the agglomeration process. As well as the electrostatic interaction, the length of the amino acid side chain was identified as another important factor. In addition, we confirmed that the incorporation rate of L-Glu into L-Val crystals was different during the nucleation and crystal growth stages. Based on these results, a mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of L-Glu and L-Val during the agglomeration process.

  9. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D.; Guo, T.Q.; Wang, Z.Y.; Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J.; Zhang, X.L.; Liu, Y.; Teng, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25075574

  10. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon (δ13C) in Organs of Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Alessandro Borges; Berto, Dirlei Antonio; Saleh, Mayra Anton Dib; Telles, Filipe Garcia; Denadai, Juliana Célia; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Luiggi, Fabiana Golin; Santos, Luan Sousa; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides (ND). One hundred and twenty-three piglets were utilized with three pigs slaughtered at day zero (weaning day) and three at each one of the experimental days (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27, and 49 post-weaning), in order to collect organ samples, which were analyzed for the δ13C isotopic composition and compared by means of time. No differences were found (p>0.05) among treatments for the turnover of the 13C in the pancreas (T50% = 13.91, 14.37, 11.07, and 9.34 days; T95% = 46.22, 47.73, 36.79, and 31.04 days for CD, GD, GAD, and ND, respectively). In the liver, the ND presented accelerated values of carbon turnover (T50% = 7.36 and T95% = 24.47 days) in relation to the values obtained for the GD (T50% = 10.15 and T95% = 33.74 days). However, the values obtained for the CD (T50% = 9.12 and T95% = 30.31 days) and GAD (T50% = 7.83 and T95% = 26.03 days) had no differences (p>0.05) among other diets. The technique of 13C isotopic dilution demonstrated trophic action of nucleotides in the liver. PMID:26954179

  11. Effect of Glutamine, Glutamic Acid and Nucleotides on the Turnover of Carbon (δ(13)C) in Organs of Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Alessandro Borges; Berto, Dirlei Antonio; Saleh, Mayra Anton Dib; Telles, Filipe Garcia; Denadai, Juliana Célia; Sartori, Maria Márcia Pereira; Luiggi, Fabiana Golin; Santos, Luan Sousa; Ducatti, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Morphological and physiological alterations occur in the digestive system of weanling piglets, compromising the performance in subsequent phases. This experiment aimed at verifying the influence of glutamine, glutamate and nucleotides on the carbon turnover in the pancreas and liver of piglets weaned at 21 days of age. Four diets were evaluated: glutamine, glutamic acid or nucleotides-free diet (CD); containing 1% glutamine (GD); containing 1% glutamic acid (GAD) and containing 1% nucleotides (ND). One hundred and twenty-three piglets were utilized with three pigs slaughtered at day zero (weaning day) and three at each one of the experimental days (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 13, 20, 27, and 49 post-weaning), in order to collect organ samples, which were analyzed for the δ(13)C isotopic composition and compared by means of time. No differences were found (p>0.05) among treatments for the turnover of the (13)C in the pancreas (T50% = 13.91, 14.37, 11.07, and 9.34 days; T95% = 46.22, 47.73, 36.79, and 31.04 days for CD, GD, GAD, and ND, respectively). In the liver, the ND presented accelerated values of carbon turnover (T50% = 7.36 and T95% = 24.47 days) in relation to the values obtained for the GD (T50% = 10.15 and T95% = 33.74 days). However, the values obtained for the CD (T50% = 9.12 and T95% = 30.31 days) and GAD (T50% = 7.83 and T95% = 26.03 days) had no differences (p>0.05) among other diets. The technique of (13)C isotopic dilution demonstrated trophic action of nucleotides in the liver. PMID:26954179

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the detection of IMP and L-amino acids by mouse taste sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Pal Choudhuri, S; Delay, R J; Delay, E R

    2016-03-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are thought to be involved in the detection of umami and L-amino acid taste. These include the heterodimer taste receptor type 1 member 1 (T1r1)+taste receptor type 1 member 3 (T1r3), taste and brain variants of mGluR4 and mGluR1, and calcium sensors. While several studies suggest T1r1+T1r3 is a broadly tuned lLamino acid receptor, little is known about the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in L-amino acid taste transduction. Calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells (TSCs) of T1r3-GFP and T1r3 knock-out (T1r3 KO) mice was performed using the ratiometric dye Fura 2 AM to investigate the role of different mGluRs in detecting various L-amino acids and inosine 5' monophosphate (IMP). Using agonists selective for various mGluRs such as (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (an mGluR1 agonist) and L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) (an mGluR4 agonist), we evaluated TSCs to determine if they might respond to these agonists, IMP, and three L-amino acids (monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine and L-arginine). Additionally, we used selective antagonists against different mGluRs such as (RS)-L-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) (an mGluR1 antagonist), and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (an mGluR4 antagonist) to determine if they can block responses elicited by these L-amino acids and IMP. We found that L-amino acid- and IMP-responsive cells also responded to each agonist. Antagonists for mGluR4 and mGluR1 significantly blocked the responses elicited by IMP and each of the L-amino acids. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the involvement of taste and brain variants of mGluR1 and mGluR4 in L-amino acid and IMP taste responses in mice, and support the concept that multiple receptors contribute to IMP and L-amino acid taste. PMID:26701297

  13. Increased extracellular levels of glutamate in the hippocampus of chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Soukupova, M; Binaschi, A; Falcicchia, C; Palma, E; Roncon, P; Zucchini, S; Simonato, M

    2015-08-20

    An increase in the release of excitatory amino acids has consistently been observed in the hippocampus during seizures, both in humans and animals. However, very little or nothing is known about the extracellular levels of glutamate and aspartate during epileptogenesis and in the interictal chronic period of established epilepsy. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the relationship between seizure activity and changes in hippocampal glutamate and aspartate extracellular levels under basal and high K(+)-evoked conditions, at various time-points in the natural history of experimental temporal lobe epilepsy, using in vivo microdialysis. Hippocampal extracellular glutamate and aspartate levels were evaluated: 24h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE); during the latency period preceding spontaneous seizures; immediately after the first spontaneous seizure; in the chronic (epileptic) period. We found that (i) basal (spontaneous) glutamate outflow is increased in the interictal phases of the chronic period, whereas basal aspartate outflow remains stable for the entire course of the disease; (ii) high K(+) perfusion increased glutamate and aspartate outflow in both control and pilocarpine-treated animals, and the overflow of glutamate was clearly increased in the chronic group. Our data suggest that the glutamatergic signaling is preserved and even potentiated in the hippocampus of epileptic rats, and thus may favor the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Together with an impairment of GABA signaling (Soukupova et al., 2014), these data suggest that a shift toward excitation occurs in the excitation/inhibition balance in the chronic epileptic state. PMID:26073699

  14. Variable clinical manifestations of a glycine to glutamic acid substitution of the COL3A1 gene at residue 736

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, F.M.; Narcisi, P.; Richards, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Glycine substitutions at the 3{prime} end of the COL3A1 gene generally produce a characteristic clinical phenotype including acrogeria and severe vascular fragility. Here we report a three generation British family in which the propositus presented with aneurysms of the groins. He, his mother, sister and elder daughter all had the external clinical phenotype of vascular EDS IV whilst another daughter and nephew were clinically normal. Cultured skin fibroblasts from the propositus and his clinically affected relatives poorly secreted normal and overmodified collagen III species. Normal components of secreted proteins predominated whilst overmodified molecules were prominent in intracellular material. Surprisingly the normal children also secreted less collagen type III than expected (though more than their clinically abnormal relatives). cDNA from bases 2671 to 3714 were amplified as four overlapping PCR fragments and analysed by DGGE. The region between 2671 and 3015 was heterozygous. Sequencing showed a mutation of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 736. This mutation created an extra Apa 1 restriction site which was suitable for family studies. These showed inheritance of the mutant gene by both vascular and non-vascular clinical phenotypes. This family therefore illustrates that replacement of glycine to glutamic acid at position 736 produces variable clinical and biochemical phenotypes ranging from easily recognizable vascular EDS IV with very poor collagen secretion to an EDS III-like picture and with less severe protein disturbance. The reasons for these differences are at present unexplained.

  15. Poly-glutamic acid modified carbon nanotube-doped carbon paste electrode for sensitive detection of L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Luo, Liqiang; Ding, Yaping; Ye, Daixin

    2011-08-01

    A novel poly-glutamic acid (PGA) film modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was first prepared for the determination of l-tryptophan (l-Trp). Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were applied for characterization of the surface morphology of the modified electrodes and cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical properties of the proposed electrode towards the oxidation of l-Trp. Optimization of the experimental parameters was performed with regard to pH, ratio of CNTs, concentration of glutamic acid, electro-polymerization cycles, accumulation time and concentration of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. The linearity between the oxidation peak current and the l-Trp concentration was obtained in the range of 5.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-4)M with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-8)M (S/N=3) and the sensitivity was calculated to be 1143.79μA∙mM(-1)∙cm(-2). In addition, the PGA modified CPE incorporating CNTs displayed high selectivity, good stability and reproducibility, making it suitable for the routine analysis of l-Trp in clinical use. PMID:21640670

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of a glutamic acid-modified hPAMAM complex as a promising versatile gene carrier.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Mohammad; Kazemi, Bahram; Najafi, Farhood; Zarebkohan, Amir; Shirkoohi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    Hyperbranched poly(amidoamine) (HPAMAM), structurally analogous to polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) dendrimers, has been suggested to be an effective carrier for gene delivery. In the present study, glutamic acid-modified hPAMAM was developed as a novel non-viral gene carrier for the first time. The hPAMAM was synthesized by using a modified one-pot method. DNA was found to be bound to hPAMAM at different weight ratios (WhPAMAM/WDNA). The resulting HPAMAM-Glu20 was able to efficiently protect the encapsulated-DNA against degradation for over 2 h. In addition to low cytotoxicity, the transfection efficiency of hPAMAM-Glu20 represented much higher (p < 0.05) than that of Lipofectamine 2000 in both MCF7 and MDA-MB231 cells. Cellular uptake of the hPAMAM-Glu20 in MDA-MB231 cells, 173.56 ± 1.37%, was significantly higher than that of MCF7 cells, 65.00 ± 1.73% (p < 0.05). The results indicated that hPAMAM-Glu20-mediated gene delivery to breast cancer cells is a feasible and effective strategy that may provide a new therapeutic avenue as a non-viral gene delivery carrier. In addition, it was found that hPAMAM-glutamic amino acid (Glu)-based gene delivery is an economical, effective and biocompatible method. PMID:26339844

  17. Depolarization-induced release of amino acids from the vestibular nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Sun, Yizhe; Frisch, Christopher; Godfrey, Matthew A; Rubin, Allan M

    2012-04-01

    There is evidence from immunohistochemistry, quantitative microchemistry, and pharmacology for several amino acids as neurotransmitters in the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), including glutamate, γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), and glycine. However, evidence from measurements of release has been limited. The purpose of this study was to measure depolarization-stimulated calcium-dependent release of amino acids from the VNC in brain slices. Coronal slices containing predominantly the VNC were prepared from rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in an interface chamber. Fluid was collected from the chamber just downstream from the VNC using a microsiphon. Depolarization was induced by 50 mM potassium in either control calcium and magnesium concentrations or reduced calcium and elevated magnesium. Amino acid concentrations in effluent fluid were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Glutamate release increased fivefold during depolarization in control calcium concentration and twofold in low calcium/high magnesium. These same ratios were 6 and 1.5 for GABA, 2 and 1.3 for glycine, and 2 and 1.5 for aspartate. Differences between release in control and low calcium/high magnesium ACSF were statistically significant for glutamate, GABA, and glycine. Glutamine release decreased during and after depolarization, and taurine release slowly increased. No evidence for calcium-dependent release was found for serine, glutamine, alanine, threonine, arginine, taurine, or tyrosine. Our results support glutamate and GABA as major neurotransmitters in the VNC. They also support glycine as a neurotransmitter and some function for taurine. PMID:22147284

  18. GABA mechanisms of the nucleus of the solitary tract regulates the cardiovascular and sympathetic effects of moxonidine.

    PubMed

    Alves, Thales B; Totola, Leonardo T; Takakura, Ana C; Colombari, Eduardo; Moreira, Thiago S

    2016-01-01

    The antihypertensive drugs moxonidine and clonidine are α2-adrenoceptor and imidazoline (I1) agonists. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that moxonidine can act in the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract (commNTS). In addition, some studies have shown that GABA or glutamate receptor blockade in the RVLM blunted the hypotension produced by these antihypertensive agents in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Therefore, in the present study we verify whether the cardiovascular and sympathetic effects produced by moxonidine in the commNTS are dependent on GABAergic or glutamatergic mechanisms. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (sSNA) were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, and artificially-ventilated male Wistar rats (250-350 g). Injection of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (25 pmol/50 nL) into the commNTS reduced the hypotension as well as the sympathoinhibition elicited by moxonidine. Prior injection of the glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (2.5 nmol/50 nL) into the commNTS was not effective in reducing the hypotension and sympathoinhibition elicited by moxonidine. Therefore, we conclude that the hypotensive and sympathoinhibitory effects elicited by microinjection of moxonidine into the commNTS are dependent on GABA receptors, but not ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:26633249

  19. Recognition of the folded conformation of plant hormone (auxin, IAA) conjugates with glutamic and aspartic acids and their amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolić, S.; Kveder, M.; Klaić, B.; Magnus, V.; Kojić-Prodić, B.

    2001-01-01

    The molecular structure of the endogenous plant hormone (auxin) conjugate, N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-glutamic acid, is deduced by comparison with N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)glutamine (IAA-Gln), N2-(indol-3-ylacetyl)asparagine (IAA-Asn) and N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)- L-aspartic acid using X-ray structure analysis, 1H-NMR spectroscopy (NOE measurements) and molecular modelling. The significance of the overall molecular shape, and of the resulting amphiphilic properties, of the compounds studied are discussed in terms of possible implications for trafficking between cell compartments. Both in the solid state and in solution, the molecules are in the hair-pin (folded) conformation in which the side chain is folded over the indole ring. While extended conformations can be detected by molecular dynamics simulations, they are so short-lived that any major influence on the biological properties of the compounds studied is unlikely.

  20. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BA sub B receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with {sup 3}H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA{sub B} receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA{sub A} receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA{sub B} receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA{sub B} and GABA{sub A} receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA{sub B} receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of L-(/sup 3/H)glutamate and L-(/sup 3/H)glutamine in adult rat cerebellar slices

    SciTech Connect

    de Barry, J.; Vincendon, G.; Gombos, G.

    1983-10-01

    Using very low concentrations (1 mumol range) of L-2-3-(/sup 3/H)glutamate, (/sup 3/H-Glu) or L-2-3-(/sup 3/H)glutamine (/sup 3/H-Gln), the authors have previously shown by autoradiography that these amino acids were preferentially taken up in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, the accumulation of /sup 3/H-Glu was essentially glial in these conditions. Uptake and metabolism of either (/sup 3/H-Glu) or (/sup 3/H-Gln) were studied in adult rat cerebellar slices. Both amino acids were rapidly converted into other metabolic compounds: after seven minutes of incubation in the presence of exogenous /sup 3/H-Glu, 70% of the tissue accumulated radioactivity was found to be in compounds other than glutamate. The main metabolites were Gln (42%), alpha-ketoglutarate (25%) and GABA (1,4%). In the presence of exogenous /sup 3/H-Gln the rate of metabolism was slightly slower (50% after seven minutes of incubation) and the metabolites were also Glu (29%), alpha-ketoglutarate (15%) and GABA (5%). Using depolarizing conditions (56 mM KCl) with either exogenous /sup 3/H-Glu or /sup 3/H-Gln, the radioactivity was preferentially accumulated in glutamate compared to control. From these results we conclude: i) there are two cellular compartments for the neurotransmission-glutamate-glutamine cycle; one is glial, the other neuronal; ii) these two cellular compartments contain both Gln and Glu; iii) transmitter glutamate is always in equilibrium with the so-called ''metabolic'' pool of glutamate; iv) the regulation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle occurs at least at two different levels: the uptake of glutamate and the enzymatic activity of the neuronal glutaminase.

  2. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA by an amacrine cell: Evidence for independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mally, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the cholinergic cells was measured by illuminating the retina with moving gratings composed of light and dark bars. Retinas that were labelled with {sup 3}H-choline released acetylcholine in response to moving gratings composed of bars as small as 50 {mu}m; 300 to 800 {mu}m wide bars yielded maximal responses. Responses were obtained to gratings moving at speeds from 50 to 6000 {mu}m/sec. Three groups recently reported that the cholinergic cells also contain GABA. To confirm these findings, retinas were double-labeled with {sup 3}H-GABA and DAPI, and processed for autoradiography. The cells that accumulate DAPI were heavily labelled with silver grains due to uptake of {sup 3}H-GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K{sup +} caused them to release both acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. Retinas were double-labeled with {sup 14}C-GABA and {sup 3}H-acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of {sup 14}C-GABA was independent of extracellular Ca{sup ++}. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-glutamate behave the same as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments, the simultaneously measured release of {sup 3}H-acetylcholine was strongly Ca{sup ++}-dependent, indicating that acetylcholine and GABA are released by different mechanisms.

  3. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid by Enterococcus avium 9184 in scallop solution in a two-stage fermentation strategy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haoyue; Xing, Ronge; Hu, Linfeng; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a new bacterial strain having a high ability to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was isolated from naturally fermented scallop solution and was identified as Enterococcus avium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to prove that E. avium possesses glutamate decarboxylase activity. The strain was then mutagenized with UV radiation and was designated as E. avium 9184. Scallop solution was used as the culture medium to produce GABA. A two-stage fermentation strategy was applied to accumulate GABA. In the first stage, cell growth was regulated. Optimum conditions for cell growth were pH, 6.5; temperature, 37°C; and glucose concentration, 10 g·L(-1) . This produced a maximum dry cell mass of 2.10 g·L(-1) . In the second stage, GABA formation was regulated. GABA concentration reached 3.71 g·L(-1) at 96 h pH 6.0, 37°C and initial l-monosodium glutamate concentration of 10 g·L(-1) . Thus, compared with traditional one-stage fermentation, the two-stage fermentation significantly increased GABA accumulation. These results provide preliminary data to produce GABA using E. avium and also provide a new approach to process and utilize shellfish. PMID:26200650

  4. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  5. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  6. Clavulanic acid enhances glutamate transporter subtype I (GLT-1) expression and decreases reinforcing efficacy of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae; John, Joel; Langford, Dianne; Walker, Ellen; Ward, Sara; Rawls, Scott M

    2016-03-01

    The β-lactam antibiotic ceftriaxone (CTX) reduces cocaine reinforcement and relapse in preclinical assays through a mechanism involving activation of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). However, its poor brain penetrability and intravenous administration route may limit its therapeutic utility for indications related to CNS diseases. An alternative is clavulanic acid (CA), a structural analog of CTX that retains the β-lactam core required for GLT-1 activity but displays enhanced brain penetrability and oral activity relative to CTX. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CA (1, 10 mg/kg ip) would enhance GLT-1 expression and decrease cocaine self-administration (SA) in mice, but at lower doses than CTX. Experiments revealed that GLT-1 transporter expression in the nucleus accumbens of mice treated with repeated CA (1, 10 mg/kg) was enhanced relative to saline-treated mice. Repeated CA treatment (1 mg/kg) reduced the reinforcing efficacy of cocaine (0.56 mg/kg/inf) in mice maintained on a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement but did not affect acquisition of cocaine SA under fixed-ratio responding or acquisition or retention of learning. These findings suggest that the β-lactamase inhibitor CA can activate the cellular glutamate reuptake system in the brain reward circuit and reduce cocaine's reinforcing efficacy at 100-fold lower doses than CTX. PMID:26543027

  7. Neuroprotective effect of estradiol-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles on glutamate-induced excitotoxic neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Gyu Hyun; Jeong, Ji Heun; Lee, In Ho; Lee, Ye Ji; Lee, Nam Seob; Jeong, Young Gil; Lee, Je Hun; Yu, Kwang Sik; Lee, Shin Hye; Hong, Seul Ki; Kang, Seong Hee; Kang, Bo Sun; Kim, Do Kyung; Han, Seung Yun

    2014-11-01

    Different concentrations of estradiol (E2)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (E2-PLGA-NPs) were synthesized using the emulsion-diffusion method. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that the average particle size of E2-PLGA-NPs was 98 ± 1.9 nm when stabilized with polyvinyl alcohol and 103 ± 4.9 nm when stabilized with Tween-80. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy with diamond attenuated total reflectance was used to identify the presence or absence of E2 molecules in PLGA nanocapsules. Cell proliferation was assessed after treating SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 1 nM-1 μM of E2 and E2-PLGA-NPs. The neuroprotective efficacy against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity was also investigated in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Neuroprotection was greater in E2-PLGA-NP-treated cells than in cells treated with the same concentration of E2. Furthermore, E2- and E2-PLGA-NP-treated cells expressed more p-ERK1/2 and p-CREB than cells treated with glutamate only. Moreover, the expression of p-ERK1/2 was higher than that of p-CREB. In this study, p-ERK1/2 had a greater influence on the neuroprotective effect of E2 and E2-PLGA-NPs than p-CREB. PMID:25958534

  8. L-Aspartic and l-glutamic acid ester-based ProTides of anticancer nucleosides: Synthesis and antitumoral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling-Jie; De Jonghe, Steven; Daelemans, Dirk; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-05-01

    A series of novel aryloxyphosphoramidate nucleoside prodrugs based on l-aspartic acid and l-glutamic acid as amino acid motif has been synthesized and evaluated for antitumoral activity. Depending on the cancer cell line studied and on the nature of the parent nucleoside compound (gemcitabine, 5-iodo-2'-deoxy-uridine, floxuridine or brivudin), the corresponding ProTides are endowed with an improved or decreased cytotoxic activity. PMID:27032331

  9. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing; Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua

    2016-05-01

    To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G-Fe-Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G-Fe-Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G-Fe-Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G-Fe-Mt under neutral pH. G-Fe-Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  10. Enzymatic synthesis of theanine from glutamic acid γ-methyl ester and ethylamine by immobilized Escherichia coli cells with γ-glutamyltranspeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Jiao, Qing-Cai; Liu, Jun-Zhong; Zhao, Gen-Hai

    2010-11-01

    Theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide) is the main amino acid component in green tea. The demand for theanine in the food and pharmaceutical industries continues to increase because of its special flavour and multiple physiological effects. In this research, an improved method for enzymatic theanine synthesis is reported. An economical substrate, glutamic acid γ-methyl ester, was used in the synthesis catalyzed by immobilized Escherichia coli cells with γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) activity. The results show that GGT activity with glutamic acid γ-methyl ester as substrate was about 1.2-folds higher than that with glutamine as substrate. Reaction conditions were optimized by using 300 mmol/l glutamic acid γ-methyl ester, 3,000 mmol/l ethylamine, and 0.1 g/ml of immobilized GGT cells at pH 10 and 50°C. Under these conditions, the immobilized cells were continuously used ten times, yielding an average glutamic acid γ-methyl ester to theanine conversion rate of 69.3%. Bead activity did not change significantly the first six times they were used, and the average conversion rate during the first six instances was 87.2%. The immobilized cells exhibited favourable operational stability. PMID:20238131

  11. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  12. Improved poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gu, Yanyan; Quan, Yufen; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shufang; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    A Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain with enhanced γ-PGA production was constructed by metabolically engineering its γ-PGA synthesis-related metabolic networks: by-products synthesis, γ-PGA degradation, glutamate precursor synthesis, γ-PGA synthesis and autoinducer synthesis. The genes involved in by-products synthesis were firstly deleted from the starting NK-1 strain. The obtained NK-E7 strain with deletions of the epsA-O (responsible for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis), sac (responsible for levan synthesis), lps (responsible for lipopolysaccharide synthesis) and pta (encoding phosphotransacetylase) genes, showed increased γ-PGA purity and slight increase of γ-PGA titer from 3.8 to 4.15 g/L. The γ-PGA degrading genes pgdS (encoding poly-gamma-glutamate depolymerase) and cwlO (encoding cell wall hydrolase) were further deleted. The obtained NK-E10 strain showed further increased γ-PGA production from 4.15 to 9.18 g/L. The autoinducer AI-2 synthetase gene luxS was deleted in NK-E10 strain and the resulting NK-E11 strain showed comparable γ-PGA titer to NK-E10 (from 9.18 to 9.54 g/L). In addition, we overexpressed the pgsBCA genes (encoding γ-PGA synthetase) in NK-E11 strain; however, the overexpression of these genes led to a decrease in γ-PGA production. Finally, the rocG gene (encoding glutamate dehydrogenase) and the glnA gene (glutamine synthetase) were repressed by the expression of synthetic small regulatory RNAs in NK-E11 strain. The rocG-repressed NK-anti-rocG strain exhibited the highest γ-PGA titer (11.04 g/L), which was 2.91-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain. Fed-batch cultivation of the NK-anti-rocG strain resulted in a final γ-PGA titer of 20.3g/L, which was 5.34-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain in shaking flasks. This work is the first report of a systematically metabolic engineering approach that significantly enhanced γ-PGA production in a B. amyloliquefaciens strain. The engineering strategies explored here are

  13. [Studying the neuroprotective effect of the novel glutamic acid derivative neiroglutam on focal cerebral ischemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Kurkin, D V; Bakulin, D A; Volotova, E V

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the neuroprotective effect of the novel glutamic acid derivative neiroglutam on reversible focal cerebral ischemia in rats. The neuroprotective drug action was assessed by the ability to reduce the severity of neurological deficit (1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 days), forelimb fine-motor disorders (in the ladder test), hind limb motor activity (beam-walking test), and volume of the infarct zone upon 7-day pathologic exposure. It was found that the therapeutic administration of neiroglutam (26 mg/kg, i.p., for 7 days) reduces the volume of necrosis of cerebral tissues in case of focal brain ischemia in animals (on the average by 38%, (p < 0.05) and decreases the severity of motor disorders, which indicates the presence of neuroprotective effect of this compound. PMID:25365863

  14. Control generating of bacterial magnetic nanoparticle-doxorubicin conjugates by poly-L-glutamic acid surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Huang, Ji; Zheng, Li-Min

    2011-04-01

    By using poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA) to modify the membrane surface of bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (BMPs), (BMP)-doxorubicin conjugates (DBMP-P) could be control generated. The doxorubicin loading ratio could be raised up to 81.7% (w/w) in comparison with that of dual functional linkers. DBMP-P was characterized by transmission electron micrographs, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, magnetic properties, and dynamic light scattering. It is found that increase of the doxorubicin/PLGA modified BMP (PBMP) ratio leads to an increase of the drug loading ratio and a decrease of saturation magnetization. Besides, DBMP-P is sensitive to pH to facilitate drug release, shows enhancement of uptake by cancer cells, and is strongly cytotoxic to HePG2 and MCF-7 cells.

  15. Preparation of pixantrone/poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanoparticles through complex self-assembly for oral chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lili; Ji, Bing; Huang, Wei; Wang, Dali; Tong, Gangsheng; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2012-11-01

    A facile and green approach is reported to construct pixantrone/poly(γ-glutamic acid) nanoparticles (PIX/γ-PGA NPs) as an oral drug delivery system through the complex self-assembly of polyelectrolyte γ-PGA and the anticancer drug pixantrone dimaleate (PDM). The complex self-assembly behavior is investigated in detail. The results demonstrate that PDM can interact with γ-PGA to conveniently form NPs and the size of NPs can be controlled by adjusting the solution volume ratio of PDM to γ-PGA. These NPs illustrate their pH-dependent release behavior, efficient cellular uptake and enhanced drug efficacy through an in vitro release study, flow cytometry, CLSM analysis and the MTT assay. In summary, PIX/γ-PGA NPs may serve as a promising oral drug delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:23008063

  16. Interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase on poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode and glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuechou; Tan, Bingcan; Zheng, Xinyu; Kong, Dexian; Li, Qinglu

    2015-11-15

    The interfacial electron transfer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on a poly(glutamic acid)-modified glassy carbon electrode (PGA/GCE) was investigated. The redox peaks measured for GOx and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are similar, and the anodic peak of GOx does not increase in the presence of glucose in a mediator-free solution. These indicate that the electroactivity of GOx is not the direct electron transfer (DET) between GOx and PGA/GCE and that the observed electroactivity of GOx is ascribed to free FAD that is released from GOx. However, efficient electron transfer occurred if an appropriate mediator was placed in solution, suggesting that GOx is active. The PGA/GCE-based biosensor showed wide linear response in the range of 0.5-5.5 mM with a low detection limit of 0.12 mM and high sensitivity and selectivity for measuring glucose. PMID:26278169

  17. A novel poly(γ-glutamic acid)/silk-sericin hydrogel for wound dressing: Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Li; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Liu, Hui; Luo, Ying

    2015-03-01

    A novel multifunctional poly(γ-glutamic acid)/silk sericin (γ-PGA/SS) hydrogel has been developed and used as wound dressing. The physical and chemical properties of the γ-PGA/SS gels were systemically investigated. Furthermore, these γ-PGA/SS gels have been found to promote the L929 fibroblast cells proliferate, and in the in vivo study, significant stimulatory effects were also observed on granulation and capillary formation on day 9 in H-2-treated wounds, indicating that this new complex hydrogel could maintain a moist healing environment, protect the wound from bacterial infection, absorb excess exudates, and promote cell proliferation to reconstruct damaged tissue. Considering the simple preparation process and excellent biological property, this γ-PGA/SS hydrogel might have a wide range of applications in biomedical and clinical areas. PMID:25579954

  18. Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide as a responsive fluorescent material and its interaction with glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yufeng; Li, Fei; Yu, Gensheng; Wei, Junchao

    2012-10-01

    The paper describes a study on the fluorescence of a Eu-doped Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (Eu-doped LDH) response to glutamic acid (Glu). Various characterizations (UV-Vis transmittance, TG-DTA and IR-spectrum) indicated that there is an interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu. Fluorescent study was found that the red emissions resulted from 5D0-7FJ transition (J = 1, 2) of Eu3+ markedly decreased, while the blue emission at 440 nm contributed to Glu shifted to low energy after the addition of Glu to the Eu-doped LDH. The fluorescent changes may be relevant to the hydrogen-bond interaction between the Eu-doped LDH and Glu, and the mechanism of the interaction between Eu-doped LDH and Glu was discussed.

  19. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium

    PubMed Central

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C.; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  20. 2-D DIGE proteomic profiles of three strains of Fusarium graminearum grown in agmatine or glutamic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Serchi, Tommaso; Pasquali, Matias; Leclercq, Céline C; Planchon, Sébastien; Hoffmann, Lucien; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-03-01

    2D DIGE proteomics data obtained from three strains belonging to Fusarium graminearum s.s. species growing in a glutamic acid or agmatine containing medium are provided. A total of 381 protein species have been identified which do differ for abundance among the two treatments and among the strains (ANOVA<0.05 and abundance ratio>±1.3). Data on the diversity of protein species profiles between the two media for each strain are made available. Shared profiles among strains are discussed in Pasquali et al. [1]. Here proteins that with diverse profile can be used to differentiate strains are highlighted. The full dataset allow to obtaining single strain proteomic profiles. PMID:26981549

  1. Effect of corona electric field on the production of gamma-poly glutamic acid based on bacillus natto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hong; Na, Ri; Xin, Jiletu; Jie Xie, Ya; Guo, Jiu Feng

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus Natto is an important strain for gamma-poly glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production. The mutagenesis of Bacillus Natto 20646 under corona electric field and the screening of high γ-PGA producing mutant were investigated. A new mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 was isolated from Bacillus Natto 20646 after mutation in corona electric field at 9kV for 2min. The Ndlz01 exhibited genetic stability of high γ-PGA producing ability even after five generation cultures. When the bacterium was mutated in streamer discharge state at 9kV for 2min, its death rate was more than 90%. Compared with the yield of γ-PGA based on the original Bacillus Natto 20646, the γ-PGA yield of mutant bacillus natto Ndlz01 increased from 2.6 to 5.94 g/L, with an increase rate of 129.78%.

  2. S-Isovaline Contained in Meteorites, Induces Enantiomeric Excess in D,L-glutamic Acid During Recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojo, Shosuke

    2015-06-01

    S-Isovaline (S-Iva: 6.7 mmol) and D,L-glutamic acid (Glu: 2 mmol) were dissolved in 10 ml of hot water, and the resulting solution was divided in 5 vessels. After recrystallization, the crystals were collected from each vessel, and the enantiomeric excess (ee) of Glu was determined with chemical derivatization using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl- 5-L-leucinamide followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ten crystallizations provided all D-rich Glu with ee values of 2.69 % ± 0.81 % (mean ± standard deviation), and those using R-Iva provided all L-rich Glu with ee values of 6.24 % ± 2.20 %. Five recrystallizations of D,L-Glu alone provided ee values of 0.474 % ± 0.33 %. The differences among these three ee values were statistically significant, showing that S-Iva, which was present in meteorites caused a significant induction of ee in this physiological amino acid. This is the first outcome that S-Iva induced ee changes in a physiological amino acid. S-Iva did not induce any ee changes in D,L-asparagine, leucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine, tyrosine, aspartic acid, or histidine under similar recrystallizations.

  3. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro. PMID:25053052

  4. S-Isovaline Contained in Meteorites, Induces Enantiomeric Excess in D,L-glutamic Acid During Recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Shosuke

    2015-06-01

    S-Isovaline (S-Iva: 6.7 mmol) and D,L-glutamic acid (Glu: 2 mmol) were di