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Sample records for acid gaba receptors

  1. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  2. Regulation of GABA-modulin phosphorylation and GABA receptor binding by excitatory amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1987-05-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells phosphorylate numerous proteins including GABA-modulin (GM), which is a putative allosteric modulator of GABA receptors. Cell depolarization and treatment with dicarboxylic excitatory amino acids, which activate PI turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and guanylate cyclase in granule cells increase the phosphorylation of specific proteins. To determine GM phosphorylation by endogenous protein kinases in living granule cell cultures, GM was isolated by immunoprecipitation and reverse-phase HPLC. High K/sup +/, veratridine, glutamate and NMDA treatment stimulated GM phosphorylation over 2-fold. This increase was abolished by the absence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was antagonized by Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and by AVP. The excitatory amino acid action was mimicked by phorbol esters but not by forskolin or by cGMP, and thus may be mediated by an activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, excitatory amino acids increase /sup 3/H-labelled phorbol ester binding sites in granule cell membrane. The same cultures, treated with glutamate or kainate, showed a 50-fold greater efficacy of muscimol for the stimulation of benzodiazepine (BZ) binding. These data-suggest that excitatory amino acid stimulation of neurons triggers PKC translocation and the activated enzyme phosphorylates GM. The extent of GM phosphorylation may regulate the coupling between GABA and BZ binding sites.

  3. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  4. An arylaminopyridazine derivative of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a selective and competitive antagonist at the GABAA receptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Chambon, J P; Feltz, P; Heaulme, M; Restle, S; Schlichter, R; Biziere, K; Wermuth, C G

    1985-01-01

    In view of finding a new gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor ligand we synthesized an arylaminopyridazine derivative of GABA, SR 95103 [2-(carboxy-3'-propyl)-3-amino-4-methyl-6-phenylpyridazinium chloride]. SR 95103 displaced [3H]GABA from rat brain membranes with an apparent Ki of 2.2 microM and a Hill number near 1.0. SR 95103 (1-100 microM) antagonized the GABA-mediated enhancement of [3H]diazepam binding in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting [3H]diazepam binding per se. SR 95103 competitively antagonized GABA-induced membrane depolarization in rat spinal ganglia. In all these experiments, the potency of SR 95103 was close to that of bicuculline. SR 95103 (100 microM) did not interact with a variety of central receptors--in particular the GABAB, the strychnine, and the glutamate receptors--did not inhibit Na+-dependent synaptosomal GABA uptake, and did not affect GABA-transaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities. Intraperitoneally administered SR 95103 elicited clonicotonic seizures in mice (ED50 = 180 mg/kg). On the basis of these results it is postulated that St 95103 is a competitive antagonist of GABA at the GABAA receptor site. In addition to being an interesting lead structure for the search of GABA ligands, SR 95103 could also be a useful tool to investigate GABA receptor subtypes because it is freely soluble in water and chemically stable. Images PMID:2984669

  5. Guanidino acids act as rho1 GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, Mary; Gavande, Navnath; Wong, Kit Yee; Park, Anna; Premoli, Isabella; Mewett, Kenneth N; Allan, Robin D; Duke, Rujee K; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2009-10-01

    GABA(C) receptors play a role in myopia, memory-related disorders and circadian rhythms signifying a need to develop potent and selective agents for this class of receptors. Guanidino analogs related to glycine, beta-alanine and taurine were evaluated at human rho(1)GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using 2-electrode voltage clamp methods. Of the 12 analogs tested, 8 analogs were active as antagonists and the remaining were inactive. (S)-2-guanidinopropionic acid (IC(50) = 2.2 microM) and guanidinoacetic acid (IC(50) = 5.4 microM; K (B) = 7.75 microM [pK (B) = 5.11 +/- 0.06]) were the most potent being competitive antagonists at this receptor. In contrast, the beta-alanine and GABA guanidino analogs showed reduced activity, indicating the distance between the carboxyl carbon and terminal nitrogen of the guanidino group is critical for activity. Substituting the C2-position of guanidinoacetic acid with various alkyl groups reduced activity indicating that steric effects may impact on activity. The results of this study contribute to the structure-activity-relationship profile required in developing novel therapeutic agents. PMID:19387831

  6. Selective antagonism of the GABA(A) receptor by ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Halliwell, R F

    1997-10-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) synergistically inhibit y-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of these two drugs on other neuronal ligand-gated ion channels. 2. Agonist-evoked depolarizations were recorded from rat vagus and optic nerves in vitro by use of an extracellular recording technique. 3. GABA (50 microM)-evoked responses, in the vagus nerve in vitro, were inhibited by bicuculline (0.3-10 microM) and picrotoxin (0.3-10 microM), with IC50 values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.2 microM (1.1-1.4) and 3.6 microM (3.0-4.3), respectively, and were potentiated by sodium pentobarbitone (30 microM) and diazepam (1 microM) to (mean+/-s.e.mean) 168+/-18% and 117+/-4% of control, respectively. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.5 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by MDL 72222 (1 microM) to 10+/-4% of control; DMPP (10 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by hexamethonium (100 microM) to 12+/-5% of control, and alphabetaMeATP (30 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by PPADS (10 microM) to 21+/-5% of control. Together, these data are consistent with activation of GABA(A), 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors, respectively. 4 Ciprofloxacin (10-3000 microM) inhibited GABA(A)-mediated responses in the vagus nerve with an IC50 (and 95% CI) of 202 microM (148-275). BPAA (1-1000 microM) had little or no effect on the GABA(A)-mediated response but concentration-dependently potentiated the effects of ciprofloxacin by up to 33,000 times. 5. Responses mediated by 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors in the vagus nerve and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the optic nerve were little or unaffected by ciprofloxacin (100 microM), BPAA (100 microM) or the combination of these drugs (both at 100 microM). 6. GABA (1 mM)-evoked responses in the optic nerve were inhibited by bicuculline with an IC50 of 3.6 microM (2.8-4.5), a value not significantly different

  7. γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor subtype inverse agonists as therapeutic agents in cognition.

    PubMed

    Gabriella, Guerrini; Giovanna, Ciciani

    2010-01-01

    The gabaergic system has been identified as a relevant regulator of cognitive and emotional processing. In fact, the discovery that negative allosteric regulators (or inverse agonists) at GABA(A) (γ-aminobutyric acid) α5 subtype receptors improve learning and memory tasks, has further validated this concept. The localization of these extrasynaptic subtype receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, has suggested that they play a key role in the three stages of memory: acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval. The "α5 inverse agonist" binds to an allosteric site at GABA(A) receptor, provoking a reduction of chlorine current, but to elicit this effect, the necessary condition is the binding of agonist neurotransmitter (γ-amino butyric acid) at its orthosteric site. In this case, the GABA(A) receptor is not a "constitutively active receptor" and, however, the presence of spontaneous opening channels for native GABA(A) receptors is rare. Here, we present various classes of nonselective and α5 selective GABA(A) receptor ligands, and the in vitro and in vivo tests to elucidate their affinity and activity. The study of the GABA(A) α5 inverse agonists is one of the important tools, although not the only one, for the development of clinical strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21050918

  8. Cloning of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rho 1 cDNA: a GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, G R; Lu, L; O'Hara, B F; Kasch, L M; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Donovan, D M; Shimada, S; Antonarakis, S E; Guggino, W B; Uhl, G R

    1991-01-01

    Type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. We have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence in 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABAA subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA rho 1, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family. Images PMID:1849271

  9. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  10. Brain regional distribution of GABA(A) receptors exhibiting atypical GABA agonism: roles of receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Lauri M; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Chandra, Dev; Homanics, Gregg E; Korpi, Esa R

    2009-11-01

    The major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), has only partial efficacy at certain subtypes of GABA(A) receptors. To characterize these minor receptor populations in rat and mouse brains, we used autoradiographic imaging of t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35)S]thionate ([(35)S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptors in brain sections and compared the displacing capacities of 10mM GABA and 1mM 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a competitive GABA-site agonist. Brains from GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha4, delta, and alpha4+delta subunit knockout (KO) mouse lines were used to understand the contribution of these particular receptor subunits to "GABA-insensitive" (GIS) [(35)S]TBPS binding. THIP displaced more [(35)S]TBPS binding than GABA in several brain regions, indicating that THIP also inhibited GIS-binding. In these regions, GABA prevented the effect of THIP on GIS-binding. GIS-binding was increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer of delta KO and alpha4+delta KO mice, being only slightly diminished in that of alpha1 KO mice. In the thalamus and some other forebrain regions of wild-type mice, a significant amount of GIS-binding was detected. This GIS-binding was higher in alpha4 KO mice. However, it was fully abolished in alpha1 KO mice, indicating that the alpha1 subunit was obligatory for the GIS-binding in the forebrain. Our results suggest that native GABA(A) receptors in brain sections showing reduced displacing capacity of [(35)S]TBPS binding by GABA (partial agonism) minimally require the assembly of alpha1 and beta subunits in the forebrain and of alpha6 and beta subunits in the cerebellar granule cell layer. These receptors may function as extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. PMID:19397945

  11. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  12. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing affects trafficking of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Chammiran; Wahlstedt, Helene; Ohlson, Johan; Björk, Petra; Ohman, Marie

    2011-01-21

    Recoding by adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing plays an important role in diversifying proteins involved in neurotransmission. We have previously shown that the Gabra-3 transcript, coding for the α3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor is edited in mouse, causing an isoleucine to methionine (I/M) change. Here we show that this editing event is evolutionarily conserved from human to chicken. Analyzing recombinant GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed in HEK293 cells, our results suggest that editing at the I/M site in α3 has functional consequences on receptor expression. We demonstrate that I/M editing reduces the cell surface and the total number of α3 subunits. The reduction in cell surface levels is independent of the subunit combination as it is observed for α3 in combination with either the β2 or the β3 subunit. Further, an amino acid substitution at the corresponding I/M site in the α1 subunit has a similar effect on cell surface presentation, indicating the importance of this site for receptor trafficking. We show that the I/M editing during brain development is inversely related to the α3 protein abundance. Our results suggest that editing controls trafficking of α3-containing receptors and may therefore facilitate the switch of subunit compositions during development as well as the subcellular distribution of α subunits in the adult brain. PMID:21030585

  13. γ-Amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit and transporter expression in the gonad and liver of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Biggs, Katie; Seidel, Jason S; Wilson, Alex; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    γ-Amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system. GABA receptors and synthesizing enzymes have also been localized to peripheral tissues including the liver, oviduct, uterus and ovary of mammals but the distribution and role of GABA in peripheral tissues of fish has not been fully investigated. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine if mRNA encoding GABA synthesizing enzymes (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67; gad65 and gad67), GABA transporters, and GABAA receptor subunits are localized to liver and gonad of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) (FHM) (2) investigate the effects of GABA on ovarian 17β-estradiol (E2) production, and (3) measure transcript responses in the ovary after in vitro incubation to GABA. Real-time PCR assays were developed for gad65, gad67, vesicular GABA transporter (vgat) and GABA transporter 1 (gat1), and select GABAA receptor subunits (gabra1, gabra5, gabrb1, gabrb2, gabrg1, gabrg2). All transcripts were localized to the brain as expected; however transcripts were also detected in the liver, ovary, and testis of FHMs. In the female liver, gad65 mRNA was significantly higher in expression compared to the male liver. Transcripts for gad67 were the highest in the brain>gonad>liver and in the gonads, gad67 was significantly higher in expression than gad65 mRNA. In the liver and gonad, the relative abundance of the subunits followed a general trend of gabrb1>gabrb2=gabrg1=gabrg2>gabra1=gabra5. To explore the effects of GABA in the ovary, tissue explants from reproductive female FHMs were treated with GABA (10(-10), 10(-8) and 10(-6)M) for 12h. GABA had no significant effect on 17β-estradiol production or on mRNA abundance for genes involved in ovarian steroidogenesis (e.g., 11βhsd, cyp17, cyp19a). There was a significant decrease in estrogen receptor 2a (esr2a) mRNA with 10(-10)M GABA. This study begins to investigate the GABA system in non-neural tissues of

  14. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  15. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  16. Role of a gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. The corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was partially controlled by ...

  17. GABA(B) receptors and synaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2006-11-01

    GABA(B) receptors modulate transmitter release and postsynaptic membrane potential at various types of central synapses. They function as heterodimers of two related seven-transmembrane domain receptor subunits. Trafficking, activation and signalling of GABA(B) receptors are regulated both by allosteric interactions between the subunits and by the binding of additional proteins. Recent studies have shed light on the roles of GABA(B) receptors in plasticity processes at excitatory synapses. This review summarizes our knowledge of the localization, structure and function of GABA(B) receptors in the central nervous system and their use as drug targets for neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:16932937

  18. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BA sub B receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with {sup 3}H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA{sub B} receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA{sub A} receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA{sub B} receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA{sub B} and GABA{sub A} receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA{sub B} receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons.

  19. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced currents of skate Muller (glial) cells are mediated by neuronal-like GABAA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Qian, H H; Ripps, H

    1989-01-01

    Radial glia (Muller cells) of the vertebrate retina appear to be intimately involved in regulating the actions of amino acid neurotransmitters. One of the amino acids thought to be important in mediating retinal information flow is gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The findings of this study indicate that enzymatically isolated skate Muller cells are depolarized by GABA and the GABAA agonist muscimol and that the actions of these agents are reduced by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Membrane currents induced by GABA under voltage clamp were dose dependent, were associated with an increase in membrane conductance, and showed marked desensitization when the concentration of GABA exceeded 2.5 microM. The responses had a reversal potential close to that calculated for chloride, indicating that the currents were generated by ions passing through channels. These data support the view that skate Muller cells possess functional GABAA receptors. The presence of such receptors on retinal glia may have important implications for the role of Muller cells in maintaining the constancy of the extracellular milieu, for neuron-glia interactions within the retina, and for theories concerning the generation of the electroretinogram. Images PMID:2567001

  20. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-01

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12405783

  1. The effects of agonists of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors on learning.

    PubMed

    Zyablitseva, Evgeniya A; Kositsyn, Nikolay S; Shul'gina, Galina I

    2009-05-01

    The research described here investigates the role played by inhibitory processes in the discriminations made by the nervous system of humans and animals between familiar and unfamiliar and significant and nonsignificant events. This research compared the effects of two inhibitory mediators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): 1) phenibut, a nonselective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors and 2) gaboxadol a selective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) receptors on the process of developing active defensive and inhibitory conditioned reflexes in alert non-immobilized rabbits. It was found that phenibut, but not gaboxadol, accelerates the development of defensive reflexes at an early stage of conditioning. Both phenibut and gaboxadol facilitate the development of conditioned inhibition, but the effect of gaboxadol occurs at later stages of conditioning and is less stable than that of phenibut. The earlier and more stable effects of phenibut, as compared to gaboxadol, on storage in memory of the inhibitory significance of a stimulus may occur because GABA(B) receptors play the dominant role in the development of internal inhibition during an early stage of conditioning. On the other hand this may occur because the participation of both GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors are essential to the process. We discuss the polyfunctionality of GABA receptors as a function of their structure and the positions of the relevant neurons in the brain as this factor can affect regulation of various types of psychological processes. PMID:19476215

  2. Colocalization of synaptic GABA(C)-receptors with GABA (A)-receptors and glycine-receptors in the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Frazao, Renata; Nogueira, Maria Ines; Wässle, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is preferentially mediated by GABA- and glycine-receptors. Two types of ionotropic GABA-receptor, the GABA(A)-receptor and GABA(C)-receptor, have been identified; they have specific molecular compositions, different sensitivities to GABA, different kinetics, and distinct pharmacological profiles. We have studied, by immunocytochemistry, the synaptic localization of glycine-, GABA(A)-, and GABA(C)-receptors in rodent retina, spinal cord, midbrain, and brain-stem. Antibodies specific for the alpha1 subunit of the glycine-receptor, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A)-receptor, and the rho subunits of the GABA(C)-receptor have been applied. Using double-immunolabeling, we have determined whether these receptors are expressed at the same postsynaptic sites. In the retina, no such colocalization was observed. However, in the spinal cord, we found the colocalization of glycine-receptors with GABA(A)- or GABA(C)-receptors and the colocalization of GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors in approximately 25% of the synapses. In the midbrain and brain-stem, GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors were colocalized in 10%-15% of the postsynaptic sites. We discuss the possible expression of heteromeric (hybrid) receptors assembled from GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptor subunits. Our results suggest that GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors are colocalized in a minority of synapses of the central nervous system. PMID:17610086

  3. Ionic Mechanisms of Neuronal Excitation by Inhibitory GABA_A Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Kevin J.; Soldo, Brandi L.; Proctor, William R.

    1995-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA_A) receptors are the principal mediators of synaptic inhibition, and yet when intensely activated, dendritic GABA_A receptors excite rather than inhibit neurons. The membrane depolarization mediated by GABA_A receptors is a result of the differential, activity-dependent collapse of the opposing concentration gradients of chloride and bicarbonate, the anions that permeate the GABA_A ionophore. Because this depolarization diminishes the voltage-dependent block of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by magnesium, the activity-dependent depolarization mediated by GABA is sufficient to account for frequency modulation of synaptic NMDA receptor activation. Anionic gradient shifts may represent a mechanism whereby the rate and coherence of synaptic activity determine whether dendritic GABA_A receptor activation is excitatory or inhibitory.

  4. GABA and GABA receptors in the gastrointestinal tract: from motility to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Auteri, Michelangelo; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Serio, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    Although an extensive body of literature confirmed γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as mediator within the enteric nervous system (ENS) controlling gastrointestinal (GI) function, the true significance of GABAergic signalling in the gut is still a matter of debate. GABAergic cells in the bowel include neuronal and endocrine-like cells, suggesting GABA as modulator of both motor and secretory GI activity. GABA effects in the GI tract depend on the activation of ionotropic GABAA and GABAC receptors and metabotropic GABAB receptors, resulting in a potential noteworthy regulation of both the excitatory and inhibitory signalling in the ENS. However, the preservation of GABAergic signalling in the gut could not be limited to the maintenance of physiologic intestinal activity. Indeed, a series of interesting studies have suggested a potential key role of GABA in the promising field of neuroimmune interaction, being involved in the modulation of immune cell activity associated with different systemic and enteric inflammatory conditions. Given the urgency of novel therapeutic strategies against chronic immunity-related pathologies, i.e. multiple sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease, an in-depth comprehension of the enteric GABAergic system in health and disease could provide the basis for new clinical application of nerve-driven immunity. Hence, in the attempt to drive novel researches addressing both the physiological and pathological importance of the GABAergic signalling in the gut, we summarized current evidence on GABA and GABA receptor function in the different parts of the GI tract, with particular focus on the potential involvement in the modulation of GI motility and inflammation. PMID:25526825

  5. Action of tremorgenic mycotoxins on GABA/sub A/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gant, D.B.; Cole, R.J.; Valdes, J.J.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1987-11-09

    The effects of four tremorgenic and one nontremorgenic mycotoxins were studied on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA/sub A/) receptor binding and function in rat brain and on binding of a voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel in Torpedo electric organ. None of the mycotoxins had significant effect on (/sup 3/H)muscimol or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding to the GAMA/sup A/ receptor. However, only the four tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibited GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx and (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)TBPS) binding in rate brain membranes, while the nontremorgenic verruculotoxin had no effect. Inhibition of (/sup 35/S)TBPS binding by paspalinine was non-competitive. This suggests that tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibit GABA/sub A/ receptor function by binding close to the receptor's Cl/sup -/ channel. On the voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel, only high concentrations of verruculogen and verruculotoxin caused significant inhibition of the channel's binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS. The data suggest that the tremorgenic action of these mycotoxins may be due in part to their inhibition of GABA/sub A/ receptor function. 21 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Role of a γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor mutation in the evolution and spread of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera resistance to cyclodiene insecticides.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Coates, B S; Chen, H; Sappington, T W; Guillemaud, T; Siegfried, B D

    2013-10-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, is a damaging pest of cultivated corn that was controlled by applications of cyclodiene insecticides from the late 1940s until resistance evolved ∼10 years later. Range expansion from the western plains into eastern USA coincides with resistance development. An alanine to serine amino acid substitution within the Rdl subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor confers resistance to cyclodiene insecticides in many species. We found that the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G/T at the GABA receptor cDNA position 838 (G/T(838)) of D. v. virgifera resulted in the alanine to serine change, and the codominant SNP allele T(838) was genetically linked to survival of beetles in aldrin bioassays. A phenotypic gradient of decreasing susceptibility from west to east was correlated with higher frequencies of the resistance-conferring T(838) allele in the eastern-most populations. This pattern exists in opposition to perceived selective pressures since the more eastern and most resistant populations probably experienced reduced exposure. The reasons for the observed distribution are uncertain, but historical records of the range expansion combined with the distribution of susceptible and resistant phenotypes and genotypes provide an opportunity to better understand factors affecting the species' range expansion. PMID:23841833

  7. GABA(B) receptor subunit 1 binds to proteins affected in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zunner, Dagmar; Deschermeier, Christina; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-03-01

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They function as heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors composed of the seven-transmembrane domain proteins GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), which are linked through a coiled-coil interaction. The ligand-binding subunit GABA(B1) is at first retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and is transported to the cell surface only upon assembly with GABA(B2). Here, we report that GABA(B1), via the coiled-coil domain, can also bind to soluble proteins of unknown function, that are affected in 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome and are therefore referred to as DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6). In transfected neurons the GABA(B1)-DGCR6 association resulted in a redistribution of both proteins into intracellular clusters. Furthermore, the C-terminus of GABA(B2) interfered with the novel interaction, consistent with heterodimer formation overriding transient DGCR6-binding to GABA(B1). Thus, sequential coiled-coil interactions may direct GABA(B1) into functional receptors. PMID:20036641

  8. Stimulation of TM3 Leydig cell proliferation via GABAA receptors: A new role for testicular GABA

    PubMed Central

    Geigerseder, Christof; Doepner, Richard FG; Thalhammer, Andrea; Krieger, Annette; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and subtypes of GABA receptors were recently identified in adult testes. Since adult Leydig cells possess both the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors, it is possible that GABA may act as auto-/paracrine molecule to regulate Leydig cell function. The present study was aimed to examine effects of GABA, which may include trophic action. This assumption is based on reports pinpointing GABA as regulator of proliferation and differentiation of developing neurons via GABAA receptors. Assuming such a role for the developing testis, we studied whether GABA synthesis and GABA receptors are already present in the postnatal testis, where fetal Leydig cells and, to a much greater extend, cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage proliferate. Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western blotting and a radioactive enzymatic GAD assay evidenced that fetal Leydig cells of five-six days old rats possess active GAD protein, and that both fetal Leydig cells and cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage possess GABAA receptor subunits. TM3 cells, a proliferating mouse Leydig cell line, which we showed to possess GABAA receptor subunits by RT-PCR, served to study effects of GABA on proliferation. Using a colorimetric proliferation assay and Western Blotting for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we demonstrated that GABA or the GABAA agonist isoguvacine significantly increased TM3 cell number and PCNA content in TM3 cells. These effects were blocked by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, implying a role for GABAA receptors. In conclusion, GABA increases proliferation of TM3 Leydig cells via GABAA receptor activation and proliferating Leydig cells in the postnatal rodent testis bear a GABAergic system. Thus testicular GABA may play an as yet unrecognized role in the development of Leydig cells during the differentiation of the testicular interstitial compartment. PMID:15040802

  9. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  10. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  11. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  12. Brain regional distribution of GABAA receptors exhibiting atypical GABA agonism: roles of receptor subunits

    PubMed Central

    Halonen, Lauri M.; Sinkkonen, Saku T.; Chandra, Dev; Homanics, Gregg E.; Korpi, Esa R.

    2009-01-01

    The major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), has only partial efficacy at certain subtypes of GABAA receptors. To characterize these minor receptor populations in rat and mouse brains, we used autoradiographic imaging of t-butylbicyclophosphoro[35S]thionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to GABAA receptors in brain sections and compared the displacing capacities of 10 mM GABA and 1 mM 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a competitive GABA-site agonist. Brains from GABAA receptor α1, α4, δ, and α4 + δ subunit knockout (KO) mouse lines were used to understand the contribution of these particular receptor subunits to “GABA-insensitive” (GIS) [35S]TBPS binding. THIP displaced more [35S]TBPS binding than GABA in several brain regions, indicating that THIP also inhibited GIS-binding. In these regions, GABA prevented the effect of THIP on GIS-binding. GIS-binding was increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer of δ KO and α4 + δ KO mice, being only slightly diminished in that of α1 KO mice. In the thalamus and some other forebrain regions of wild-type mice, a significant amount of GIS-binding was detected. This GIS-binding was higher in α4 KO mice. However, it was fully abolished in α1 KO mice, indicating that the α1 subunit was obligatory for the GIS-binding in the forebrain. Our results suggest that native GABAA receptors in brain sections showing reduced displacing capacity of [35S]TBPS binding by GABA (partial agonism) minimally require the assembly of α1 and β subunits in the forebrain and of α6 and β subunits in the cerebellar granule cell layer. These receptors may function as extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. PMID:19397945

  13. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  14. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride’s positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound’s potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ. PMID:25829529

  15. Bioactivity-guided isolation of GABA(A) receptor modulating constituents from the rhizomes of Actaea racemosa.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Serhat S; Khom, Sophia; Taferner, Barbara; Hering, Steffen; Stuppner, Hermann

    2010-12-27

    Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) is a frequently used herbal remedy for the treatment of mild climacteric symptoms. In the present study, the modulation of γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA)-induced chloride currents (I(GABA)) through GABA type A (GABA(A)) receptors by black cohosh extracts and isolated compounds was investigated. GABA(A) receptors, consisting of α(1), β(2), and γ(2S) subunits, were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and potentiation of I(GABA) was measured using the two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique. In a bioactivity-guided isolation procedure the positive modulation of I(GABA) could be restricted to the plant terpenoid fractions, resulting in the isolation of 11 cycloartane glycosides, of which four significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced I(GABA). The most efficient effect was observed for 23-O-acetylshengmanol 3-O-β-d-xylopyranoside (4, 100 μM), enhancing I(GABA) by 1692 ± 201%, while actein (1), cimigenol 3-O-β-d-xylopyranoside (6), and 25-O-acetylcimigenol 3-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside (8) were significantly less active. In the absence of GABA, only 4 induced small (not exceeding 1% of I(GABA-max)) chloride inward currents through GABA(A) receptors. It is hypothesized that the established positive allosteric modulation of GABA(A) receptors may contribute to beneficial effects of black cohosh extracts in the treatment of climacteric symptoms. PMID:21082802

  16. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12926865

  17. Neurotoxins from snake venoms and α-conotoxin ImI inhibit functionally active ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Shelukhina, Irina V; Son, Lina V; Ojomoko, Lucy O; Kryukova, Elena V; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Zhmak, Maxim N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Ivanov, Igor A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Starkov, Vladislav G; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2015-09-11

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. PMID:26221036

  18. Acid Stimulation (Sour Taste) Elicits GABA and Serotonin Release from Mouse Taste Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijen A.; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    Several transmitter candidates including serotonin (5-HT), ATP, and norepinephrine (NE) have been identified in taste buds. Recently, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as well as the associated synthetic enzymes and receptors have also been identified in taste cells. GABA reduces taste-evoked ATP secretion from Receptor cells and is considered to be an inhibitory transmitter in taste buds. However, to date, the identity of GABAergic taste cells and the specific stimulus for GABA release are not well understood. In the present study, we used genetically-engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably co-expressing GABAB receptors and Gαqo5 proteins to measure GABA release from isolated taste buds. We recorded robust responses from GABA biosensors when they were positioned against taste buds isolated from mouse circumvallate papillae and the buds were depolarized with KCl or a stimulated with an acid (sour) taste. In contrast, a mixture of sweet and bitter taste stimuli did not trigger GABA release. KCl- or acid-evoked GABA secretion from taste buds was Ca2+-dependent; removing Ca2+ from the bathing medium eliminated GABA secretion. Finally, we isolated individual taste cells to identify the origin of GABA secretion. GABA was released only from Presynaptic (Type III) cells and not from Receptor (Type II) cells. Previously, we reported that 5-HT released from Presynaptic cells inhibits taste-evoked ATP secretion. Combined with the recent findings that GABA depresses taste-evoked ATP secretion [1], the present results indicate that GABA and 5-HT are inhibitory transmitters in mouse taste buds and both likely play an important role in modulating taste responses. PMID:22028776

  19. GABA(A) receptor downregulation in brains of subjects with autism.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J; Folsom, Timothy D; Thuras, Paul D

    2009-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the expression of four GABA(A) receptor subunits and observed significant reductions in GABRA1, GABRA2, GABRA3, and GABRB3 in parietal cortex (Brodmann's Area 40 (BA40)), while GABRA1 and GABRB3 were significantly altered in cerebellum, and GABRA1 was significantly altered in superior frontal cortex (BA9). The presence of seizure disorder did not have a significant impact on GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in the three brain areas. Our results demonstrate that GABA(A) receptors are reduced in three brain regions that have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism, suggesting widespread GABAergic dysfunction in the brains of subjects with autism. PMID:18821008

  20. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  1. GABA binding to an insect GABA receptor: a molecular dynamics and mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jamie A; McGonigle, Ian V; Price, Kerry L; Cohen, Netta; Comitani, Federico; Dougherty, Dennis A; Molteni, Carla; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2012-11-21

    RDL receptors are GABA-activated inhibitory Cys-loop receptors found throughout the insect CNS. They are a key target for insecticides. Here, we characterize the GABA binding site in RDL receptors using computational and electrophysiological techniques. A homology model of the extracellular domain of RDL was generated and GABA docked into the binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted critical GABA binding interactions with aromatic residues F206, Y254, and Y109 and hydrophilic residues E204, S176, R111, R166, S176, and T251. These residues were mutated, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and their functions assessed using electrophysiology. The data support the binding mechanism provided by the simulations, which predict that GABA forms many interactions with binding site residues, the most significant of which are cation-π interactions with F206 and Y254, H-bonds with E204, S205, R111, S176, T251, and ionic interactions with R111 and E204. These findings clarify the roles of a range of residues in binding GABA in the RDL receptor, and also show that molecular dynamics simulations are a useful tool to identify specific interactions in Cys-loop receptors. PMID:23200041

  2. First molecular genotyping of A302S mutation in the gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in Aedes albopictus from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Low, V L; Vinnie-Siow, W Y; Lim Y, A L; Tan, T K; Leong, C S; Chen, C D; Azidah, A A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2015-09-01

    Given the lack of molecular evidence in altered target-site insecticide resistance mechanism in Aedes albopictus (Skuse) worldwide, the present study aims to detect the presence of A302S mutation in the gene encoding the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor resistant to dieldrin (Rdl) in Ae. albopictus for the first time from its native range of South East Asia, namely Malaysia. World Health Organization (WHO) adult susceptibility bioassay indicated a relatively low level of dieldrin resistance (two-fold) in Ae. albopictus from Petaling Jaya, Selangor. However, PCR-RFLP and direct sequencing methods revealed the presence of the A302S mutation with the predomination of heterozygous genotype (40 out of 82 individuals), followed by the resistant genotype with 11 individuals. This study represents the first field evolved instance of A302S mutation in Malaysian insect species. PMID:26695218

  3. Microtransplantation of cellular membranes from squid stellate ganglion reveals ionotropic GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Limon, Agenor; Palma, Eleonora; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    The squid has been the most studied cephalopod, and it has served as a very useful model for investigating the events associated with nerve impulse generation and synaptic transmission. While the physiology of squid giant axons has been extensively studied, very little is known about the distribution and function of the neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate inhibitory transmission at the synapses. In this study we investigated whether γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activates neurotransmitter receptors in stellate ganglia membranes. To overcome the low abundance of GABA-like mRNAs in invertebrates and the low expression of GABA in cephalopods, we used a two-electrode voltage clamp technique to determine if Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with cell membranes from squid stellate ganglia responded to GABA. Using this method, membrane patches containing proteins and ion channels from the squid's stellate ganglion were incorporated into the surface of oocytes. We demonstrated that GABA activates membrane receptors in cellular membranes isolated from squid stellate ganglia. Using the same approach, we were able to record native glutamate-evoked currents. The squid's GABA receptors showed an EC(50) of 98 μmol l(-1) to GABA and were inhibited by zinc (IC(50) = 356 μmol l(-1)). Interestingly, GABA receptors from the squid were only partially blocked by bicuculline. These results indicate that the microtransplantation of native cell membranes is useful to identify and characterize scarce membrane proteins. Moreover, our data also support the role of GABA as an ionotropic neurotransmitter in cephalopods, acting through chloride-permeable membrane receptors. PMID:23493508

  4. An analysis of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K G; Dreksler, S

    1979-03-01

    The binding of [3H]GABA to membranes prepared from human brains obtained post morten was examined. This binding was independent of patient sex, age (16--80 years), postmortem interval (4--33 h) or storage time when frozen (0-64 months). In preparations from cerebellar cortex various compounds displaced [3H]GABA binding with the following order of potency: muscimol greater than 3-aminopropanesulfonic acid greater than GABA greater than imidazoleacet acid greater than delta-amino-n-valeric acid greater than 3-hydroxyGABA greater than bicuculline. Other compounds active 'in vitro' included strychnine, homocarnosine and some (e.g. clozapine, thioridazine, pimozide) but not all (chlorpromazine, haloperiodol) neuroleptics. Compounds inactive 'in vitro' included aminooxyacetic acid, baclofen, picrotoxin, anticholinergics, metrazole, anticonvulsants and naloxone. Triton X-100 augmented the [3H]GABA binding (25 nM) by about 10--20-fold in most brain regions. [3H]GABA binding (IC50) was altered in Huntington's chorea and Reye's syndrome, but not in schizophrenics (4-neuroleptic-treated patients) or sudden infant death syndrome. The data presented strongly support the proposal that the measurement of [3H]GABA binding in postmortem human brain offers a reflection of the state of the physiologically relevant GABA receptor. PMID:218679

  5. Downregulation of GABA[Subscript A] Receptor Protein Subunits a6, ß2, d, e, ?2, ?, and ?2 in Superior Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rustan, Oyvind G.; Rooney, Robert J.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured protein and mRNA levels for nine gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptor subunits in three brain regions (cerebellum, superior frontal cortex, and parietal cortex) in subjects with autism versus matched controls. We observed changes in mRNA for a number of GABA[subscript A] and GABA[subscript B] subunits and overall…

  6. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  7. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  8. GABA receptors, alcohol dependence and criminal behavior.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Tucci, Marianna; Sartore, Daniela; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Di Pietra, Laura; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Ferrara, Santo D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the connection between alcohol dependence and criminal behavior by an integrated genetic-environmental approach. The research, structured as a case-control study, examined 186 alcohol-dependent males; group 1 (N = 47 convicted subjects) was compared with group 2 (N = 139 no previous criminal records). Genetic results were innovative, highlighting differences in genotype distribution (p = 0.0067) in group 1 for single-nucleotide polymorphism rs 3780428, located in the intronic region of subunit 2 of the GABA B receptor gene (GABBR2). Some environmental factors (e.g., grade repetition) were associated with criminal behavior; others (e.g., attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous) were inversely related to convictions. The concomitant presence of the genetic and environmental factors found to be associated with the condition of alcohol-dependent inmate showed a 4-fold increase in the risk of antisocial behavior. The results need to be replicated on a larger population to develop new preventive and therapeutic proposals. PMID:23822588

  9. Comparison between the modes of action of novel meta-diamide and macrocyclic lactone insecticides on the RDL GABA receptor.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinichi; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2015-05-01

    Macrocyclic lactones, avermectins, and milbemycins are widely used to control arthropods, nematodes, and endo- and ectoparasites in livestock and pets. Their main targets are glutamate-gated chloride channels. Furthermore, macrocyclic lactones reportedly interact with insect RDL γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, but their modes of action on insect RDL GABA receptors remain unknown. In this study, we attempted to better understand the modes of action of macrocyclic lactones on RDL GABA receptors. We observed that ivermectin and milbemectin behaved as allosteric agonists of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. G336A, G336S, and G336T mutations had profound effects on the activities of ivermectin and milbemectin, and a G336M mutation abolished the allosteric agonist and antagonist activities of these macrocyclic lactones. These results suggest that G336 in TM3 of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor is important for the binding of macrocyclic lactones. Recently, it has been suggested that a novel RDL GABA receptor antagonist, 3-benzamido-N-(2-bromo-4-perfluoroisopropyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (meta-diamide 7), binds to the transmembrane intersubunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. Thus, we compared the effects of mutations around G336 and A302 mutations in TM2 on the activities of macrocyclic lactone and meta-diamide 7. The effects of L281C, V340Q, V340N, A302S, and A302N mutations on the activity of meta-diamide 7 differed from those on ivermectin and milbemectin. Molecular modeling studies showed that macrocyclic lactones docked in the intersubunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor in the open state. In contrast, meta-diamide 7 docked into the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor in the closed state. This suggests that the modes of action of macrocyclic lactone binding to the wild-type Drosophila RDL GABA receptor differ from those of meta-diamide binding. PMID:25987227

  10. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors. PMID:27538279

  11. GABA-independent GABAA Receptor Openings Maintain Tonic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I.; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Herd, Murray B.; Kersanté, Flavie; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Linthorst, Astrid C.E.; Semyanov, Alexey; Belelli, Delia; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) produces two forms of inhibition: ‘phasic’ inhibition generated by the rapid, transient activation of synaptic GABAARs by presynaptic GABA release, and tonic inhibition generated by the persistent activation of peri- or extrasynaptic GABAARs which can detect extracellular GABA. Such tonic GABAAR-mediated currents are particularly evident in dentate granule cells in which they play a major role in regulating cell excitability. Here we show that in rat dentate granule cells in ex-vivo hippocampal slices, tonic currents are predominantly generated by GABA-independent GABAA receptor openings. This tonic GABAAR conductance is resistant to the competitive GABAAR antagonist SR95531, which at high concentrations acts as a partial agonist, but can be blocked by an open channel blocker picrotoxin. When slices are perfused with 200 nM GABA, a concentration that is comparable to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations but is twice that measured by us in the hippocampus in vivo using zero-net-flux microdialysis, negligible GABA is detected by dentate granule cells. Spontaneously opening GABAARs, therefore, maintain dentate granule cell tonic currents in the face of low extracellular GABA concentrations. PMID:23447601

  12. Involvement of GABA(A) receptors in myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R R; Truong, D D; Nguyen, K D; Dang, A T; Hoang, T T; Vo, P Q; Sandroni, P

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in multiple neurochemical systems have been reported in animal and human studies of posthypoxic myoclonus. It is impossible, however, to establish causative relationships between the observed changes and the myoclonic movements from these studies. Therefore, to establish causative links between neurochemical changes and myoclonus, ligands that target neurotransmitter systems that are altered in posthypoxic myoclonus were microinjected into the lateral ventricles of normal rats to identify the changes that can produce myoclonus. Of the ligands that were tested, only the GABA(A) antagonists produced myoclonus after intracerebroventricular administration, suggesting the importance of disinhibition of GABAergic systems in myoclonus. To further examine the role of GABA in myoclonus, GABAergic antagonists were microinjected into the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus (NRT), an area of the brain in which extensive pathologic changes are seen in posthypoxic animals. GABA(A), but not GABA(B), antagonists produced myoclonus after microinjection into the NRT. Earlier investigators have further reported the ability of GABA(A) antagonists to produce myoclonus after microinjection into the caudate. The data therefore suggest that disruption of activity at GABA(A) receptors at any one of a number of levels in the neural axis can produce myoclonus. PMID:10755272

  13. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission. PMID:14718537

  14. Distribution of immunoreactive GABA and glutamate receptors in the gustatory portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract in rat.

    PubMed

    King, Michael S

    2003-05-15

    The distribution of glutamate (GLU) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors within the gustatory portion of the rat nucleus of the solitary tract (gNST) was investigated using immunohistochemical, histological and neural tract tracing techniques. Numerous somata throughout the gNST were immunoreactive for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, while few were labeled for kainate receptors. AMPA and NMDA receptors were particularly abundant in the rostral central (RC) subdivision of the gNST, which receives most of the primary afferent input from the oral cavity and contains most of the gNST neurons that project to the parabrachial nuclei (PBN). This finding supports electrophysiological evidence that AMPA and NMDA receptors are involved in responses to orosensory input and indicates that their action may influence ascending taste signals as well. Compared to the ionotropic GLU receptors, few cell bodies were immunoreactive for metabotropic GLU receptors. Somata immunoreactive for GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors were located throughout the nucleus. The densest neuropil labeling was for GABA(A) receptors in the ventral (V) subnucleus, the gNST subdivision that sends output to brainstem oromotor centers. The distributions of immunolabeling for GLU and GABA receptors imply that different functional roles may exist for specific receptors within this nucleus. PMID:12754086

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of a GABA receptor subunit from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Vázquez, Eric N; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara E; Uribe, R M; Arias, Juan M; García, Ubaldo

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning has introduced an unexpected, large diversity of neurotransmitter hetero- oligomeric receptors. Extensive research on the molecular structure of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) has been of great significance for understanding how the nervous system works in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, only two examples of functional homo-oligomeric GABA-activated Cl(-) channels have been reported. In the vertebrate retina, the GABAρ1 subunit of various species forms homo-oligomeric receptors; in invertebrates, a cDNA encoding a functional GABA-activated Cl(-) channel has been isolated from a Drosophila melanogaster head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, these subunits function efficiently as a homo-oligomeric complex. To investigate the structure-function of GABA channels from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, we cloned a subunit and expressed it in human embryonic kidney cells. Electrophysiological recordings show that this subunit forms a homo-oligomeric ionotropic GABAR that gates a bicuculline-insensitive Cl(-) current. The order of potency of the agonists was GABA > trans-4-amino-crotonic acid = cis-4-aminocrotonic acid > muscimol. These data support the notion that X-organ sinus gland neurons express at least two GABA subunits responsible for the formation of hetero-oligomeric and homo-oligomeric receptors. In addition, by in situ hybridization studies we demonstrate that most X-organ neurons from crayfish eyestalk express the isolated pcGABAA β subunit. This study increases the knowledge of the genetics of the crayfish, furthers the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family, and provides insight into the evolution of these genes among vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:26577600

  16. Are presynaptic GABA-Cρ2 receptors involved in anti-nociception?

    PubMed

    Tadavarty, R; Hwang, J; Rajput, P S; Soja, P J; Kumar, U; Sastry, B R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the anti-nociceptive effects of GABA-C receptors in the central nervous system. Intracisternal injection of CACA, a GABA-C receptor agonist or isoguvacine, a GABA-A receptor agonist, significantly increased the tail-withdrawal latency. TPMPA, a GABA-C receptor antagonist blocked the effects of CACA but not isoguvacine indicating that GABA-C receptors are involved in regulating pain. Further, double-labelled immunofluorescence studies revealed that GABA-Cρ2 receptors are expressed presynaptically in the spinal dorsal horn, especially, substantia gelatinosa, a region that has been previously implicated in analgesia by regulating nociceptive inflow. These data provide a provenance for future work looking at presynaptic spinal GABA-C receptors in the control of nociception. PMID:26327143

  17. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhances /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.

  18. Genetic differences in the ethanol sensitivity of GABA sub A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wafford, K.A.; Burnett, D.M.; Dunwiddie, T.V.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-07-20

    Animal lines selected for differences in drug sensitivity can be used to help determine the molecular basis of drug action. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice differ markedly in their genetic sensitivity to ethanol. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference, mRNA from brains of LS and SS mice was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the ethanol sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A})- and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) - activated ion channels was tested. Ethanol facilitated GABA responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from LS mice but antagonized responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from SS animals. Ethanol inhibited NMDA responses equally in the two lines. Thus, genes coding for the GABA{sub A} receptor or associated proteins may be critical determinants of individual differences in ethanol sensitivity.

  19. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and other glutamate and GABA receptor antibody encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    De Bruijn, Marienke A A M; Titulaer, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few year, antibodies to various central nervous system receptors, particularly the glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, have been found to be associated with autoimmune neurologic disorders. The receptors include the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR), the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and GABA type A and B receptors (respectively GABAAR and GABABR). Compared to the previously described paraneoplastic antibodies directed at intracellular targets, the patients with receptor antibodies are often younger, they less frequently have malignancies, and they respond better to immunotherapy. Many of the patients have limbic encephalitis with amnesia, disorientation, seizures, and psychological or psychiatric symptoms, but those with NMDAR antibodies usually develop a more widespread form of encephalitis, often leading to a decrease in consciousness and requirement for long-term intensive care treatment. The autoantibodies bind directly to the synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors on the membrane surface, and have direct effects on signal transduction in central synapses. These conditions are very important to recognize as the symptoms and complications can be fatal when not treated in time, whereas with immunotherapy many patients recover considerably. PMID:27112679

  20. GABA(A) receptors in visual and auditory cortex and neural activity changes during basic visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pengmin; Duncan, Niall W; Wiebking, Christine; Gravel, Paul; Lyttelton, Oliver; Hayes, Dave J; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Kostikov, Alexey; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Reader, Andrew J; Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that levels of resting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the visual cortex predict the degree of stimulus-induced activity in the same region. These studies have used the presentation of discrete visual stimulus; the change from closed eyes to open also represents a simple visual stimulus, however, and has been shown to induce changes in local brain activity and in functional connectivity between regions. We thus aimed to investigate the role of the GABA system, specifically GABA(A) receptors, in the changes in brain activity between the eyes closed (EC) and eyes open (EO) state in order to provide detail at the receptor level to complement previous studies of GABA concentrations. We conducted an fMRI study involving two different modes of the change from EC to EO: an EO and EC block design, allowing the modeling of the haemodynamic response, followed by longer periods of EC and EO to allow the measuring of functional connectivity. The same subjects also underwent [(18)F]Flumazenil PET to measure GABA(A) receptor binding potentials. It was demonstrated that the local-to-global ratio of GABA(A) receptor binding potential in the visual cortex predicted the degree of changes in neural activity from EC to EO. This same relationship was also shown in the auditory cortex. Furthermore, the local-to-global ratio of GABA(A) receptor binding potential in the visual cortex also predicted the change in functional connectivity between the visual and auditory cortex from EC to EO. These findings contribute to our understanding of the role of GABA(A) receptors in stimulus-induced neural activity in local regions and in inter-regional functional connectivity. PMID:23293594

  1. Hypothalamic oxytocin attenuates CRF expression via GABA(A) receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; Babygirija, Reji; Cerjak, Diana; Yoshimoto, Sazu; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2011-04-28

    Centrally released oxytocin (OXT) has anxiolytic and anti-stress effects. Delayed gastric emptying (GE) induced by acute restraint stress (ARS) for 90 min is completely restored following 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic restraint stress (CHS), via up-regulating hypothalamic OXT expression in rats. However, the mechanism behind the restoration of delayed GE following CHS remains unclear. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-projecting neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) have been shown to inhibit corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) synthesis via GABA(A) receptors. We hypothesized that GABA(A) receptors are involved in mediating the inhibitory effect of OXT on CRF expression in the PVN, which in turn restores delayed GE following CHS. OXT (0.5 μg) and selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (BMI) (100 ng), were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Solid GE was measured under non-stressed (NS), ARS and CHS conditions. Expression of CRF mRNA in the PVN was evaluated by real time RT-PCR. Neither OXT nor BMI changed GE and CRF mRNA expression under NS conditions. Delayed GE and increased CRF mRNA expression induced by ARS were restored by icv-injection of OXT. The effects of OXT on delayed GE and increased CRF mRNA expression in ARS were abolished by icv-injection of BMI. Following CHS, delayed GE was completely restored in saline (icv)-injected rats, whereas daily injection of BMI (icv) attenuated the restoration of delayed GE. Daily injection of BMI (icv) significantly increased CRF mRNA expression following CHS. It is suggested that central OXT inhibits ARS-induced CRF mRNA expression via GABA(A) receptors in the PVN. GABAergic system is also involved in OXT-mediated adaptation response of delayed GE under CHS conditions. PMID:21382355

  2. GABA{sub A} receptor open-state conformation determines non-competitive antagonist binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ligong; Xue Ling; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Casida, John E.

    2011-02-01

    The {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA{sub A}R) is one of the most important targets for insecticide action. The human recombinant {beta}3 homomer is the best available model for this binding site and 4-n-[{sup 3}H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([{sup 3}H]EBOB) is the preferred non-competitive antagonist (NCA) radioligand. The uniquely high sensitivity of the {beta}3 homomer relative to the much-less-active but structurally very-similar {beta}1 homomer provides an ideal comparison to elucidate structural and functional features important for NCA binding. The {beta}1 and {beta}3 subunits were compared using chimeragenesis and mutagenesis and various combinations with the {alpha}1 subunit and modulators. Chimera {beta}3/{beta}1 with the {beta}3 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}1 subunit transmembrane helices retained the high [{sup 3}H]EBOB binding level of the {beta}3 homomer while chimera {beta}1/{beta}3 with the {beta}1 subunit extracellular domain and the {beta}3 subunit transmembrane helices had low binding activity similar to the {beta}1 homomer. GABA at 3 {mu}M stimulated heteromers {alpha}1{beta}1 and {alpha}1{beta}3 binding levels more than 2-fold by increasing the open probability of the channel. Addition of the {alpha}1 subunit rescued the inactive {beta}1/{beta}3 chimera close to wildtype {alpha}1{beta}1 activity. EBOB binding was significantly altered by mutations {beta}1S15'N and {beta}3N15'S compared with wildtype {beta}1 and {beta}3, respectively. However, the binding activity of {alpha}1{beta}1S15'N was insensitive to GABA and {alpha}1{beta}3N15'S was stimulated much less than wildtype {alpha}1{beta}3 by GABA. The inhibitory effect of etomidate on NCA binding was reduced more than 5-fold by the mutation {beta}3N15'S. Therefore, the NCA binding site is tightly regulated by the open-state conformation that largely determines GABA{sub A} receptor sensitivity. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights

  3. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  4. Homomeric RDL and heteromeric RDL/LCCH3 GABA receptors in the honeybee antennal lobes: two candidates for inhibitory transmission in olfactory processing.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Julien Pierre; Bazelot, Michaël; Barbara, Guillaume Stéphane; Paute, Sandrine; Gauthier, Monique; Raymond-Delpech, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel receptors are abundant in the CNS, where their physiological role is to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission. In insects, this inhibitory transmission plays a crucial role in olfactory information processing. In an effort to understand the nature and properties of the ionotropic receptors involved in these processes in the honeybee Apis mellifera, we performed a pharmacological and molecular characterization of GABA-gated channels in the primary olfactory neuropile of the honeybee brain-the antennal lobe (AL)-using whole cell patch-clamp recordings coupled with single-cell RT-PCR. Application of GABA onto AL cells at -110 mV elicited fast inward currents, demonstrating the existence of ionotropic GABA-gated chloride channels. Molecular analysis of the GABA-responding cells revealed that both subunits RDL and LCCH3 were expressed out of the three orthologs of Drosophila melanogaster GABA-receptor subunits encoded within the honeybee genome (RDL, resistant to dieldrin; GRD, GABA/glycine-like receptor of Drosophila; LCCH3, ligand-gated chloride channel homologue 3), opening the door to possible homo- and/or heteromeric associations. The resulting receptors were activated by insect GABA-receptor agonists muscimol and CACA and blocked by antagonists fipronil, dieldrin, and picrotoxin, but not bicuculline, displaying a typical RDL-like pharmacology. Interestingly, increasing the intracellular calcium concentration potentiated GABA-elicited currents, suggesting a modulating effect of calcium on GABA receptors possibly through phosphorylation processes that remain to be determined. These results indicate that adult honeybee AL cells express typical RDL-like GABA receptors whose properties support a major role in synaptic inhibitory transmission during olfactory information processing. PMID:19906878

  5. Lamina-specific alterations in cortical GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Beneyto, Monica; Abbott, Andrew; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A

    2011-05-01

    Dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia is associated with lamina-specific alterations in particular subpopulations of interneurons. In pyramidal cells, postsynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors containing different α subunits are inserted preferentially in distinct subcellular locations targeted by inputs from specific interneuron subpopulations. We used in situ hybridization to quantify the laminar expression of α1, α2, α3, and α5 subunit, and of β1-3 subunit, mRNAs in the DLFPC of schizophrenia, and matched normal comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABA(A) α1 mRNA expression was 17% lower in layers 3 and 4, α2 expression was 14% higher in layer 2, α5 expression was 15% lower in layer 4, and α3 expression did not differ relative to comparison subjects. The mRNA expression of β2, which preferentially assembles with α1 subunits, was also 20% lower in layers 3 and 4, whereas β1 and β3 mRNA levels were not altered in schizophrenia. These expression differences were not attributable to medication effects or other potential confounds. These findings suggest that GABA neurotransmission in the DLPFC is altered at the postsynaptic level in a receptor subunit- and layer-specific manner in subjects with schizophrenia and support the hypothesis that GABA neurotransmission in this illness is predominantly impaired in certain cortical microcircuits. PMID:20843900

  6. Distinct structural changes in the GABAA receptor elicited by pentobarbital and GABA.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Theusch, Cassandra M; Czajkowski, Cynthia; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-01-01

    The barbiturate pentobarbital binds to gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors, and this interaction plays an important role in the anesthetic action of this drug. Depending on its concentration, pentobarbital can potentiate (approximately 10-100 microM), activate (approximately 100-800 microM), or block (approximately 1-10 mM) the channel, but the mechanisms underlying these three distinct actions are poorly understood. To investigate the drug-induced structural rearrangements in the GABA(A) receptor, we labeled cysteine mutant receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes with the sulfhydryl-reactive, environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe tetramethylrhodamine-6-maleimide (TMRM). We then used combined voltage clamp and fluorometry to monitor pentobarbital-induced channel activity and local protein movements simultaneously in real time. High concentrations of pentobarbital induced a decrease in TMRM fluorescence (F(TMRM)) of labels tethered to two residues in the extracellular domain (alpha(1)L127C and beta(2)L125C) that have been shown previously to produce an increase in F(TMRM) in response to GABA. Label at beta(2)K274C in the extracellular end of the M2 transmembrane helix reported a small but significant F(TMRM) increase during application of low modulating pentobarbital concentrations, and it showed a much greater F(TMRM) increase at higher concentrations. In contrast, GABA decreased F(TMRM) at this site. These results indicate that GABA and pentobarbital induce different structural rearrangements in the receptor, and thus activate the receptor by different mechanisms. Labels at alpha(1)L127C and beta(2)K274C change their fluorescence by substantial amounts during channel blockade by pentobarbital. In contrast, picrotoxin blockade produces no change in F(TMRM) at these sites, and the pattern of F(TMRM) signals elicited by the antagonist SR95531 differs from that produced by other antagonists. Thus, with either channel block by antagonists or

  7. Valerian inhibits rat hepatocarcinogenesis by activating GABA(A) receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Ishii, Naomi; Wei, Min; Morimura, Keiichirou; Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Valerian is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep due to interaction of several active components with the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor (GABA(A)R) system. Recently, activation of GABA signaling in stem cells has been reported to suppress cell cycle progression in vivo. Furthermore, possible inhibitory effects of GABA(A)R agonists on hepatocarcinogenesis have been reported. The present study was performed to investigate modulating effects of Valerian on hepatocarcinogenesis using a medium-term rat liver bioassay. Male F344 rats were treated with one of the most powerful Valerian species (Valeriana sitchensis) at doses of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm in their drinking water after initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Formation of glutathione S-transferase placental form positive (GST-P(+)) foci was significantly inhibited by Valerian at all applied doses compared with DEN initiation control rats. Generation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in the rat liver was significantly suppressed by all doses of Valerian, likely due to suppression of Nrf2, CYP7A1 and induction of catalase expression. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was induced in areas of GST-P(+) foci of Valerian groups associated with suppression of c-myc, Mafb, cyclin D1 and induction of p21(Waf1/Cip1), p53 and Bax mRNA expression. Interestingly, expression of the GABA(A)R alpha 1 subunit was observed in GST-P(+) foci of DEN control rats, with significant elevation associated with Valerian treatment. These results indicate that Valerian exhibits inhibitory effects on rat hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in GST-P(+) foci by activating GABA(A)R-mediated signaling. PMID:25419570

  8. Valerian Inhibits Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis by Activating GABA(A) Receptor-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Ishii, Naomi; Wei, Min; Morimura, Keiichirou; Fukushima, Shoji; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Valerian is widely used as a traditional medicine to improve the quality of sleep due to interaction of several active components with the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor (GABA(A)R) system. Recently, activation of GABA signaling in stem cells has been reported to suppress cell cycle progression in vivo. Furthermore, possible inhibitory effects of GABA(A)R agonists on hepatocarcinogenesis have been reported. The present study was performed to investigate modulating effects of Valerian on hepatocarcinogenesis using a medium-term rat liver bioassay. Male F344 rats were treated with one of the most powerful Valerian species (Valeriana sitchensis) at doses of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm in their drinking water after initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Formation of glutathione S-transferase placental form positive (GST-P+) foci was significantly inhibited by Valerian at all applied doses compared with DEN initiation control rats. Generation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in the rat liver was significantly suppressed by all doses of Valerian, likely due to suppression of Nrf2, CYP7A1 and induction of catalase expression. Cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was induced in areas of GST-P+ foci of Valerian groups associated with suppression of c-myc, Mafb, cyclin D1 and induction of p21Waf1/Cip1, p53 and Bax mRNA expression. Interestingly, expression of the GABA(A)R alpha 1 subunit was observed in GST-P+ foci of DEN control rats, with significant elevation associated with Valerian treatment. These results indicate that Valerian exhibits inhibitory effects on rat hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting oxidative DNA damage, suppressing cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in GST-P+ foci by activating GABA(A)R-mediated signaling. PMID:25419570

  9. GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in the gerbil brain after transient ischemia: demonstration by quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, H.; Sato, G.; Kogure, K.

    1987-02-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to measure the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors after ischemia by means of transient occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in the gerbil. (/sup 3/H)Muscimol was used to label the GABAA receptors and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam to label central type benzodiazepine receptors. In the superolateral convexities of the frontal cortices, (/sup 3/H)muscimol binding was increased in 60% of the animals killed 3 days after ischemia, and decreased in 67% of the animals killed 27 days after ischemia. Twenty-seven days after ischemia, (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding in the substantia nigra pars reticulata increased to 252% of the control, though the increase in (/sup 3/H)muscimol binding was not significant. In the dorsolateral region of the caudate putamen, marked neuronal necrosis and depletion of both (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding sites were observed 27 days after ischemia, the ventromedial region being left intact. In spite of the depletion of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, both (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding sites were preserved 27 days after ischemia. Since our previous study revealed that adenosine A1 binding sites were depleted in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after ischemia correlating with neuronal damage, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors may not be distributed predominantly on the pyramidal cells in the CA1 region.

  10. GABA as a rising gliotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Lee, C. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter that is known to be synthesized and released from GABAergic neurons in the brain. However, recent studies have shown that not only neurons but also astrocytes contain a considerable amount of GABA that can be released and activate GABA receptors in neighboring neurons. These exciting new findings for glial GABA raise further interesting questions about the source of GABA, its mechanism of release and regulation and the functional role of glial GABA. In this review, we highlight recent studies that identify the presence and release of GABA in glial cells, we show several proposed potential pathways for accumulation and modulation of glial intracellular and extracellular GABA content, and finally we discuss functional roles for glial GABA in the brain. PMID:25565970

  11. Developing oligodendrocytes express functional GABA(B) receptors that stimulate cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Luyt, Karen; Slade, Timothy P; Dorward, Jienchi J; Durant, Claire F; Wu, Yue; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Mundell, Stuart J; Váradi, Anikó; Molnár, Elek

    2007-02-01

    GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) are involved in early events during neuronal development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes has not been established. Using immunofluorescent co-localization, we have identified GABA(B)R proteins in O4 marker-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in 4-day-old mouse brain periventricular white matter. In culture, OPCs, differentiated oligodendrocytes (DOs) and type 2 astrocytes (ASTs) express both the GABA(B1abcdf) and GABA(B2) subunits of the GABA(B)R. Using semiquantitative PCR analysis with GABA(B)R isoform-selective primers we found that the expression level of GABA(B1abd) was substantially higher in OPCs or ASTs than in DOs. In contrast, the GABA(B2) isoform showed a similar level of expression in OPCs and DOs, and a significantly higher level in ASTs. This indicates that the expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits are under independent control during oligodendroglial development. Activation of GABA(B)Rs using the selective agonist baclofen demonstrated that these receptors are functionally active and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Manipulation of GABA(B)R activity had no effect on OPC migration in a conventional agarose drop assay, whereas baclofen significantly increased OPC migration in a more sensitive transwell microchamber-based assay. Exposure of cultured OPCs to baclofen increased their proliferation, providing evidence for a functional role of GABA(B)Rs in oligodendrocyte development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes provides a new mechanism for neuronal-glial interactions during development and may offer a novel target for promoting remyelination following white matter injury. PMID:17144904

  12. Roles of forebrain GABA receptors in controlling vasopressin secretion and related phenomena under basal and hyperosmotic circumstances in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ken'ichi; Yamada, Takaho

    2008-09-01

    Although the anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V), a forebrain area essential for homeostatic responses, includes receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the roles of these receptors in controlling vasopressin (AVP) secretion and related phenomena have not been clarified as yet. This study aimed to pursue this problem in conscious rats implanted with indwelling catheters. Cerebral injection sites were determined histologically. Applications of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, to the AV3V induced prompt and marked augmentations in plasma AVP, osmolality, glucose, arterial pressure and heart rate, without affecting plasma electrolytes. Such phenomena did not occur when phaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist, was applied to the AV3V. All of the effects of AV3V-administered bicuculline were abolished by preadministration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol. Preadministration of either MK-801 or NBQX, ionotropic glutamatergic receptor antagonists, was also potent to abolish the AVP response to AV3V bicuculline. When hypertonic saline was infused intravenously, plasma AVP increased progressively, in parallel with rises in plasma osmolality, sodium and arterial pressure. AV3V application of muscimol or baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, was found to abolish the response of plasma AVP, without inhibiting that of the osmolality or sodium. The response of arterial pressure was also blocked by muscimol treatment, but not by baclofen treatment. Based on these results, we concluded that, under basal conditions, GABA receptors in the AV3V or vicinity may tonically operate to attenuate AVP secretion and cardiovascular functions through mechanisms associated with glutamatergic activity, and that plasma hyperosmolality may cause facilitation of AVP release by decreasing forebrain GABAergic activity. PMID:18639747

  13. Modulation of diazepam-insensitive GABA(A) receptors by micromolar concentrations of thyroxine and related compounds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Witt, Michael-Robin; Nabekura, Junichi; Nielsen, Mogens

    2013-01-15

    The effects of thyroxine and its related compounds on the benzodiazepine-insensitive γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors were studied. Thyroxine at micromolar concentrations potentiated the (3)H-Ro15-4513 binding to rat brain membranes in-vitro in the thalamus, striatum, cortex and hippocampus, but not in cerebellum. In the thalamus, the rank order of potency was the following: 3,3',5,5'-tetraiodothyroacetic acid (TETRAC)>L-thyroxine>3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine (3,5-T2). TETRAC induced a slight potentiation of flumazenil binding to diazepam-sensitive GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus and striatum while no effect was found in cortex and hippocampus. Consequently, we examined whether these compounds could exert their modulatory effect on the currents mediated by benzodiazepine-insensitive GABA(A) receptors. The diazepam-insensitive GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents were recorded from acutely isolated rat ventrobasal thalamic neurons by applying low concentrations of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). TETRAC and thyroxine at low μM concentrations potentiated the THIP-evoked currents, although 3,5-T2 had no effect on the THIP-induced currents. Ethanol had no effect on the enhancing effects of TETRAC. TETRAC itself evoked GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents at high concentrations beyond 30 μM. Although the effects of TETRAC and thyroxine were observed at non-physiological concentrations of hormones, the present results might lead to new lead structures with specificity to diazepam-insensitive GABA(A) receptor subtypes. PMID:23103412

  14. Assessment of direct gating and allosteric modulatory effects of meprobamate in recombinant GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Dillon, Glenn H

    2016-03-15

    Meprobamate is a schedule IV anxiolytic and the primary metabolite of the muscle relaxant carisoprodol. Meprobamate modulates GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid Type A) receptors, and has barbiturate-like activity. To gain insight into its actions, we have conducted a series of studies using recombinant GABAA receptors. In αxβzγ2 GABAA receptors (where x=1-6 and z=1-3), the ability to enhance GABA-mediated current was evident for all α subunit isoforms, with the largest effect observed in α5-expressing receptors. Direct gating was present with all α subunits, although attenuated in α3-expressing receptors. Allosteric and direct effects were comparable in α1β1γ2 and α1β2γ2 receptors, whereas allosteric effects were enhanced in α1β2 compared to α1β2γ2 receptors. In "extrasynaptic" (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, meprobamate enhanced EC20 and saturating GABA currents, and directly activated these receptors. The barbiturate antagonist bemegride attenuated direct effects of meprobamate. Whereas pentobarbital directly gated homomeric β3 receptors, meprobamate did not, and instead blocked the spontaneously open current present in these receptors. In wild type homomeric ρ1 receptors, pentobarbital and meprobamate were ineffective in direct gating; a mutation known to confer sensitivity to pentobarbital did not confer sensitivity to meprobamate. Our results provide insight into the actions of meprobamate and parent therapeutic agents such as carisoprodol. Whereas in general actions of meprobamate were comparable to those of carisoprodol, differential effects of meprobamate at some receptor subtypes suggest potential advantages of meprobamate may be exploited. A re-assessment of previously synthesized meprobamate-related carbamate molecules for myorelaxant and other therapeutic indications is warranted. PMID:26872987

  15. Actions of picrodendrin antagonists on dieldrin-sensitive and -resistant Drosophila GABA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Ozoe, Y.; Koike, K.; Ohmoto, T.; Nikaido, T.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of terpenoid compounds, recently isolated from Picrodendron baccatum, share a picrotoxane skeleton with picrotoxinin, an antagonist of ionotropic GABA receptors. Referred to as picrodendrins, they inhibit the binding of [35S]-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) to rat GABAA receptors. Hitherto, their effects on GABA receptors have not been investigated electrophysiologically. Under two-electrode voltage-clamp, the actions of picrodendrins and related terpenoids have been assayed on homooligomeric GABA receptors formed by the expression of a Drosophila GABA receptor subunit (RDLac) in Xenopus oocytes. 2. All the terpenoids tested, dose-dependently antagonized currents induced by 30 microM (EC50) GABA. 3. Tutin and its analogues (dihydrotutin and isohyenanchin) differ in the structure of their axial C4 substituents. Of these compounds, tutin, which bears an isopropenyl group at this carbon atom, was the most potent antagonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, whereas isohyenanchin, which bears a hydroxyisopropyl group, was the least potent antagonist tested. 4. Picrodendrins differ mainly in the structure of their C9 substituents. The IC50s of picrodendrins ranged from 17 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-Q) to 1006 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-O). As such, the most potent picrodendrins (Q, A and B) were approximately equipotent with picrotoxinin as antagonists of RDLac homo-oligomers. 5. Certain picrodendrin compounds effected a use-dependent blockade of RDLac homo-oligomers. Such a biphasic block was not observed with tutin analogues. 6. Picrotoxin-resistant RDLacA3025 homo-oligomers, which have a single amino acid substitution (A302S) in the 2nd transmembrane region, were markedly less sensitive to picrodendrin-O than the wild-type, dieldrin-sensitive, homo-oligomers. 7. The relative potency of tutin analogues demonstrates that the structure-activity relationship of the C4 substituent of picrotoxane-based compounds is conserved in vertebrates and insects. However, the

  16. Endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor active neurosteroids and the sedative/hypnotic action of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB): a study in GHB-S (sensitive) and GHB-R (resistant) rat lines.

    PubMed

    Barbaccia, Maria Luisa; Carai, Mauro A M; Colombo, Giancarlo; Lobina, Carla; Purdy, Robert H; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2005-07-01

    In the rat brain, gamma-hydroxybutyric-acid (GHB) increases the concentrations of 3alpha-hydroxy,5alpha-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone, 3alpha,5alpha-THP) and 3alpha,21-dihydroxy,5alpha-pregnan-20-one (allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone/3alpha,5alphaTHDOC), two neurosteroids acting as positive allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. This study was aimed at assessing whether neurosteroids play a role in GHB-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR). Basal and GHB-stimulated brain concentrations of endogenous 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC were analyzed in two rat lines, GHB-sensitive (GHB-S) and GHB-resistant (GHB-R), selectively bred for opposite sensitivity to GHB-induced sedation/hypnosis. Basal neurosteroid concentrations were similar in brain cortex of the two rat lines. However, in male GHB-S rats, administration of GHB (1000 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min) increased brain cortical concentrations of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC 7- and 2.5-fold, respectively, whilst male GHB-R animals displayed only a 4- and 2-fold increase, respectively. In GHB-S rats this increase lasted up to 90 min and declined 180 min following GHB administration, a time course that matches LORR onset and duration. In contrast, in GHB-R rats, which failed to show GHB-induced LORR, brain cortical 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC had returned to control values within 90 min. At onset of LORR, a similar increase in brain cortical levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC (2-3-fold) was observed in GHB-S female rats and in the few female GHB-R rats that lost the righting reflex after GHB administration, but not in female GHB-R rats failing to show LORR. Sub-hypnotic doses (7.5 and 12.5 mg/kg, i.p.) of pregnanolone, administered 10 min before GHB, dose-dependently facilitated the expression of GHB-induced LORR in GHB-R male rats. These results suggest that the GHB-induced increases of brain 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha

  17. A pharmacological characterization of GABA, THIP and DS2 at binary α4β3 and β3δ receptors: GABA activates β3δ receptors via the β3(+)δ(-) interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Absalom, N L; Hanrahan, J R; van Nieuwenhuijzen, P; Ahring, P K; Chebib, M

    2016-08-01

    There is growing evidence that GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) can activate GABAA receptors (GABAARs) in the absence of an α subunit. In this study, we compared the pharmacology of homomeric and binary α4, β3 or δ subunits with ternary α4β3δ to identify subunit interfaces that contribute to the pharmacology of GABA, THIP, and DS2, and the antagonists, Zn(2+), gabazine and bicuculline. β3δ receptors form functional GABA-gated channels when expressed in Xenopus oocytes with a pharmacology that differs to homomeric β3, binary α4β3 and ternary α4β3δ receptors. GABA had similar potency at α4β3 and β3δ receptors (25µM and 26µM, respectively) but differed at α4β3δ receptors where GABA exhibited a biphasic concentration-response (EC50 (1)=12.6nM; EC50 (2)=6.3μM). THIP activated β3δ receptors (EC50=456μM) but was a more potent activator of α4β3 (EC50=27μM) and α4β3δ receptors (EC50 (1)=27.5nM; EC50 (2)=29.5μΜ), indicating that the α4 subunit significantly contribute to its potency. The δ-preferring modulator, DS2 had marginal or no effect at β3δ and α4β3 receptors, indicating a role for both the α4 and δ subunits for its potency. Gabazine inhibited GABA-elicited currents at β3δ receptors whereas bicuculline activated these receptors. Mutational analysis verified that GABA binds to the β3(+)δ(-) interface formed by the β3 and δ subunits. In conclusion, evaluating agents against binary GABAARs such as β3δ and α4β3 receptors enables identification of interfaces that may contribute to the pharmacology of the more complex ternary α4β3δ receptors. PMID:27181518

  18. Production of gaba (γ – Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K.; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  19. Up-regulation of GABA transporters and GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit in tremor rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyuan; Guo, Feng; Yu, Junling; Min, Dongyu; Wang, Zhanyou; Xie, Ni; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Cai, Jiqun

    2010-12-17

    The loss of GABAergic neurotransmission has been closely linked with epileptogenesis. The modulation of the synaptic activity occurs both via the removal of GABA from the synaptic cleft and by GABA transporters (GATs) and by modulation of GABA receptors. The tremor rat (TRM; tm/tm) is the parent strain of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER; zi/zi, tm/tm), which exhibits absence-like seizure after 8 weeks of age. However, there are no reports that can elucidate the effects of GATs and GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) on TRMs. The present study was conducted to detect GATs and GABAR α1 subunit in TRMs hippocampus at mRNA and protein levels. In this study, total synaptosomal GABA content was significantly decreased in TRMs hippocampus compared with control Wistar rats by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); mRNA and protein expressions of GAT-1, GAT-3 and GABAR α1 subunit were all significantly increased in TRMs hippocampus by real time PCR and Western blot, respectively; GAT-1 and GABAR α1 subunit proteins were localized widely in TRMs and control rats hippocampus including CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions whereas only a wide distribution of GAT-3 was observed in CA1 region by immunohistochemistry. These data demonstrate that excessive expressions of GAT-1 as well as GAT-3 and GABAR α1 subunit in TRMs hippocampus may provide the potential therapeutic targets for genetic epilepsy. PMID:20851161

  20. Decreased Phosphorylated Protein Kinase B (Akt) in Individuals with Autism Associated with High Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Low Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway could contribute to the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders. In this study, phosphorylated Akt concentration was measured in 37 autistic children and 12, gender and age similar neurotypical, controls using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Akt levels were compared to biomarkers known to be associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor) pathways and severity levels of 19 autism-related symptoms. We found phosphorylated Akt levels significantly lower in autistic children and low Akt levels correlated with high EGFR and HGF and low gamma-aminobutyric acid, but not other biomarkers. Low Akt levels also correlated significantly with increased severity of receptive language, conversational language, hypotonia, rocking and pacing, and stimming, These results suggest a relationship between decreased phosphorylated Akt and selected symptom severity in autistic children and support the suggestion that the AKT pathways may be associated with the etiology of autism. PMID:26508828

  1. Hco-LGC-38 is novel nematode cys-loop GABA receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Salma Z; Brown, David D R; Accardi, Michael V; Forrester, Sean G

    2012-10-01

    We have identified and characterized a novel cys-loop GABA receptor subunit (Hco-LGC-38) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. This subunit is present in parasitic and free-living nematodes and shares similarity to both the UNC-49 group of GABA receptor subunits from nematodes and the resistant to dieldrin (RDL) receptors of insects. Expression of the Hco-lgc-38 gene in Xenopus oocytes and subsequent electrophysiological analysis has revealed that the gene encodes a homomeric channel sensitive to GABA (EC(50) 19 μM) and the GABA analogue muscimol. The sensitivity of the Hco-LGC-38 channel to GABA is similar to reported values for the Drosophila RDL receptor whereas its lower sensitivity to muscimol is similar to nematode GABA receptors. Hco-LGC-38 is also highly sensitive to the channel blocker picrotoxin and moderately sensitive to fipronil and dieldrin. Homology modeling of Hco-LGC-38 and subsequent docking of GABA and muscimol into the binding site has uncovered several types of potential interactions with binding-site residues and overall appears to share similarity with models of other invertebrate GABA receptors. PMID:22940478

  2. Concentration-dependent effects of GABA on insensitivity to fipronil in the A2'S mutant RDL GABA receptor from fipronil-resistant Oulema oryzae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Naoi, Atsuko; Hama, Masako; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2012-10-01

    The beetle Oulema oryzae Kuwayama (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), an important pest of rice, has developed fipronil resistance in Japan. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of O. oryzae RDL gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit (OO-RDL) genes from fipronil-susceptible and -resistant O. oryzae identified the A2'S mutation (index number for the M2 membrane-spanning region). To investigate the effect of the A2'S mutation on fipronil resistance, we stably expressed the wild-type and mutant OO-RDL homomers in Drosophila Mel-2 cells. A membrane potential assay exhibited that the IC50 values of fipronil for inhibition of the response to EC80 GABA of the wild-type and A2'S mutant OO-RDL homomers were 0.09 microM and 0.11 microM, respectively. However, the IC50 values of fipronil for inhibition of the response to EC95 GABA of the wild-type and A2'S mutant OO-RDL homomers were 0.11 microM and approximately equal to 5 microM, respectively. These results suggest that the GABA concentration is an important factor affecting fipronil resistance in O. oryzae carrying the A2'S mutation in OO-RDL. PMID:23156177

  3. Dopamine receptor activation modulates GABA neuron migration from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Crandall, James E; McCarthy, Deirdre M; Araki, Kiyomi Y; Sims, John R; Ren, Jia-Qian; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2007-04-01

    GABA neurons of the cerebral cortex and other telencephalic structures are produced in the basal forebrain and migrate to their final destinations during the embryonic period. The embryonic basal forebrain is enriched in dopamine and its receptors, creating a favorable environment for dopamine to influence GABA neuron migration. However, whether dopamine receptor activation can influence GABA neuron migration is not known. We show that dopamine D1 receptor activation promotes and D2 receptor activation decreases GABA neuron migration from the medial and caudal ganglionic eminences to the cerebral cortex in slice preparations of embryonic mouse forebrain. Slice preparations from D1 or D2 receptor knock-out mouse embryos confirm the findings. In addition, D1 receptor electroporation into cells of the basal forebrain and pharmacological activation of the receptor promote migration of the electroporated cells to the cerebral cortex. Analysis of GABA neuron numbers in the cerebral wall of the dopamine receptor knock-out mouse embryos further confirmed the effects of dopamine receptor activation on GABA neuron migration. Finally, dopamine receptor activation mobilizes striatal neuronal cytoskeleton in a manner consistent with the effects on neuronal migration. These data show that impairing the physiological balance between D1 and D2 receptors can alter GABA neuron migration from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex. The intimate relationship between dopamine and GABA neuron development revealed here may offer novel insights into developmental disorders such as schizophrenia, attention deficit or autism, and fetal cocaine exposure, all of which are associated with dopamine and GABA imbalance. PMID:17409246

  4. Identification of the sites for CaMK-II-dependent phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Houston, Catriona M; Lee, Henry H C; Hosie, Alastair M; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation can affect both the function and trafficking of GABA(A) receptors with significant consequences for neuronal excitability. Serine/threonine kinases can phosphorylate the intracellular loops between M3-4 of GABA(A) receptor beta and gamma subunits thereby modulating receptor function in heterologous expression systems and in neurons (1, 2). Specifically, CaMK-II has been demonstrated to phosphorylate the M3-4 loop of GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed as GST fusion proteins (3, 4). It also increases the amplitude of GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in a number of neuronal cell types (5-7). To identify which substrate sites CaMK-II might phosphorylate and the consequent functional effects, we expressed recombinant GABA(A) receptors in NG108-15 cells, which have previously been shown to support CaMK-II modulation of GABA(A) receptors containing the beta3 subunit (8). We now demonstrate that CaMK-II mediates its effects on alpha1beta3 receptors via phosphorylation of Ser(383) within the M3-4 domain of the beta subunit. Ablation of beta3 subunit phosphorylation sites for CaMK-II revealed that for alphabetagamma receptors, CaMK-II has a residual effect on GABA currents that is not mediated by previously identified sites of CaMK-II phosphorylation. This residual effect is abolished by mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Tyr(365) and Tyr(367), on the gamma2S subunit, and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These results suggested that CaMK-II is capable of directly phosphorylating GABA(A) receptors and activating endogenous tyrosine kinases to phosphorylate the gamma2 subunit in NG108-15 cells. These findings were confirmed in a neuronal environment by expressing recombinant GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:17442679

  5. Effects of Antecedent GABA A Receptor Activation on Counterregulatory Responses to Exercise in Healthy Man.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Tate, Donna B; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Stephen N

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether antecedent stimulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors with the benzodiazepine alprazolam can blunt physiologic responses during next-day moderate (90 min) exercise in healthy man. Thirty-one healthy individuals (16 male/15 female aged 28 ± 1 year, BMI 23 ± 3 kg/m(2)) were studied during separate, 2-day protocols. Day 1 consisted of morning and afternoon 2-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic or hypoglycemic clamps with or without 1 mg alprazolam given 30 min before a clamp. Day 2 consisted of 90-min euglycemic cycling exercise at 50% VO2max. Despite similar euglycemia (5.3 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and insulinemia (46 ± 6 pmol/L) during day 2 exercise studies, GABA A activation with alprazolam during day 1 euglycemia resulted in significant blunting of plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone responses. Lipolysis (glycerol, nonesterified fatty acids) and endogenous glucose production during exercise were also reduced, and glucose infusion rates were increased following prior euglycemia with alprazolam. Prior hypoglycemia with alprazolam resulted in further reduction of glucagon and cortisol responses during exercise. We conclude that prior activation of GABA A pathways can play a significant role in blunting key autonomous nervous system, neuroendocrine, and metabolic physiologic responses during next-day exercise in healthy man. PMID:25901095

  6. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies.

  7. GABA-A Receptor Modulation and Anticonvulsant, Anxiolytic, and Antidepressant Activities of Constituents from Artemisia indica Linn

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Karim, Nasiara; Ahmad, Waqar; Abdelhalim, Abeer; Chebib, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Artemisia indica, also known as “Mugwort,” has been widely used in traditional medicines. However, few studies have investigated the effects of nonvolatile components of Artemisia indica on central nervous system's function. Fractionation of Artemisia indica led to the isolation of carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid which were evaluated for their effects on GABA-A receptors in electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes and were subsequently investigated in mouse models of acute toxicity, convulsions (pentylenetetrazole induced seizures), depression (tail suspension and forced swim tests), and anxiety (elevated plus maze and light/dark box paradigms). Carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid were found to be positive modulators of α1β2γ2L GABA-A receptors and the modulation was antagonized by flumazenil. Carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid were found to be devoid of any signs of acute toxicity (50–200 mg/kg) but elicited anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anxiolytic activities. Thus carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid demonstrated CNS activity in mouse models of anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anxiolysis. The anxiolytic activity of all three compounds was ameliorated by flumazenil suggesting a mode of action via the benzodiazepine binding site of GABA-A receptors. PMID:27143980

  8. Identification and characterization of GABA(A) receptor autoantibodies in autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Toshika; Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Yokoi, Norihiko; Miyazaki, Yu; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Sobue, Gen; Takashima, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki

    2014-06-11

    Autoimmune forms of encephalitis have been associated with autoantibodies against synaptic cell surface antigens such as NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors, GABA(B) receptor, and LGI1. However, it remains unclear how many synaptic autoantigens are yet to be defined. Using immunoproteomics, we identified autoantibodies against the GABA(A) receptor in human sera from two patients diagnosed with encephalitis who presented with cognitive impairment and multifocal brain MRI abnormalities. Both patients had antibodies directed against the extracellular epitope of the β3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor. The β3-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor was a major target of the patients' serum antibodies in rat hippocampal neurons because the serum reactivity to the neuronal surface was greatly decreased by 80% when the β3 subunit was knocked down. Our developed multiplex ELISA testing showed that both patients had similar levels of GABA(A) receptor antibodies, one patient also had a low level of LGI1 antibodies, and the other also had CASPR2 antibodies. Application of the patients' serum at the time of symptom presentation of encephalitis to rat hippocampal neuron cultures specifically decreased both synaptic and surface GABA(A) receptors. Furthermore, treatment of neurons with the patients' serum selectively reduced miniature IPSC amplitude and frequency without affecting miniature EPSCs. These results strongly suggest that the patients' GABA(A) receptor antibodies play a central role in the patients' symptoms. Therefore, this study establishes anti-GABA(A) receptor encephalitis and expands the pathogenic roles of GABA(A) receptor autoantibodies. PMID:24920620

  9. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing Chen Jingyuan

    2009-04-15

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  10. Selective pyramidal cell reduction of GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit messenger RNA expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A

    2011-09-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABA(A) receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα)-containing pyramidal cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65)-containing interneurons in layer 3 of the PFC from matched schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression was significantly 40% lower in pyramidal cells, but was not altered in interneurons. Lower α1 subunit mRNA expression in pyramidal cells was not attributable to potential confounding factors, and thus appeared to reflect the disease process of schizophrenia. These results suggest that pyramidal cell inhibition is reduced in schizophrenia, whereas inhibition of GABA neurons is maintained. The cell type specificity of these findings may reflect a compensatory response to enhance layer 3 pyramidal cell activity in the face of the diminished excitatory drive associated with the lower dendritic spine density on these neurons. PMID:21677653

  11. Modulation of radioligand binding to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex by a new component from Cyperus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Kwang-Youn; Choi, Hyoung-Chul; Cho, Jungsook; Kang, Byung-Soo; Lim, Jae-Chul; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2002-01-01

    Four sesquiterpenes, beta-selinene, isocurcumenol, nootkatone and aristolone and one triterpene, oleanolic acid were isolated from the ethylacetate fraction of the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus and tested for their ability to modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor function by radioligand binding assays using rat cerebrocortical membranes. Among these compounds, only isocurcumenol, one of the newly identified constituents of this plant, was found to inhibit [3H]Ro15-1788 binding and enhance [3H]flunitrazepam binding in the presence of GABA. These results suggest that isocurcumenol may serve as a benzodiazepine receptor agonist and allosterically modulate GABAergic neurotransmission via enhancement of endogenous receptor ligand binding. PMID:11824542

  12. [Influence of GABA(C)-Receptor Antagonist on Formation of Evoked Potentials in Columns of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex].

    PubMed

    Matukhno, A E; Lysenko, L V; Andreeva, Y V; Sukhov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode studies of evoked potentials (EP) in neuronal column of rats barrel cortex show activating action of selective GABA(C)-receptor antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) mainly on secondary components of EP of supragranular afferent layers of column compared to the efferent infragranular layers. These data suggest localization of GABA(C)-receptors on pre- synaptic terminals of thalamo-cortical glutamatergic afferents and ascending apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. A blockade of GABA(C)-receptors with the selective antagonist TPM PA leads to dose-dependent afferent depolarization with development of presynaptic inhibition and suppression of primary components of EP GABA(C)-receptors blocker produces different effects on secondary components of EP in supragranular layers of the cortex caused by the development of neuronal after hyperpolarization followed by high-amplitude primary response and afterdepolarization followed by low-amplitude primary responses with subsequent activation of different voltage-gated channels and formation of different level of cortical direct current potential gradients. PMID:26841661

  13. Cyclohexanol analogues are positive modulators of GABA(A) receptor currents and act as general anaesthetics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam C; Griffith, Theanne N; Tsikolia, Maia; Kotey, Francesca O; Gill, Nikhila; Humbert, Danielle J; Watt, Erin E; Yermolina, Yuliya A; Goel, Shikha; El-Ghendy, Bahaa; Hall, C Dennis

    2011-09-30

    GABA(A) receptors meet all the pharmacological criteria required to be considered important general anaesthetic targets. In the following study, the modulatory effects of various commercially available and novel cyclohexanols were investigated on recombinant human γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A), α(1)β(2)γ(2s)) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and compared to the modulatory effects on GABA currents observed with exposures to the intravenous anaesthetic agent, propofol. Submaximal EC(20) GABA currents were typically enhanced by co-applications of 3-300 μM cyclohexanols. For instance, at 30 μM 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol (a novel compound) GABA responses were increased ~3-fold (although similar enhancements were achieved at 3 μM propofol). As regards rank order for modulation by the cyclohexanol analogues at 30 μM, the % enhancements for 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diethylcyclohexanol~2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol~2,6-di-sec-butylcyclohexanol ≫2,6-di-tert-butylcyclohexanol~4-tert-butylcyclohexanol>cyclohexanol~cyclopentanol~2-methylcyclohexanol. We further tested the potencies of the cyclohexanol analogues as general anaesthetics using a tadpole in vivo assay. Both 2,6-diisopropylcyclohexanol and 2,6-dimethylcyclohexanol were effective as anaesthetics with EC(50)s of 14.0 μM and 13.1 μM respectively, while other cyclohexanols with bulkier side chains were less potent. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyclohexanols are both positive modulators of GABA(A) receptors currents and anaesthetics. The positioning and size of the alkyl groups at the 2 and 6 positions on the cyclohexanol ring were critical determinants of activity. PMID:21658385

  14. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway. PMID:26838342

  15. Variance analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents from melanotropes of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Borst, J G; Kits, K S; Bier, M

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the variance in the decay of large spontaneous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in melanotropes of Xenopus laevis to obtain information about the number of GABAA receptor channels that bind GABA during the IPSCs. The average decay of the IPSCs is well described by the sum of two exponential functions. This suggests that a three-state Markov model is sufficient to describe the decay phase, with one of the three states being an absorbing state, entered when GABA dissociates from the GABAA receptor. We have compared the variance in the decay of large spontaneous IPSCs with the variance calculated for two different three-state models: a model with one open state, one closed state, and one absorbing state (I), and a model with two open states and one absorbing state (II). The data were better described by the more efficient model II. This suggests that the efficacy of GABA at synaptic GABAA receptor channels is high and that only a small number of channels are involved in generating the GABA-ergic IPSCs. PMID:7918986

  16. Chronic anabolic-androgenic steroid treatment affects brain GABA(A) receptor-gated chloride ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bitran, D; Hilvers, R J; Frye, C A; Erskine, M S

    1996-01-01

    Previous research in this laboratory has shown that chronic treatment of adult male rats with an anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) produced anxiolytic behavior and increased the functional response of cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptors. The experiments reported here were aimed at further characterizing the effect of chronic AAS exposure on cerebral cortical GABA(A) receptors. Adult male rats were injected with dianabol (1,4-androstadien-17alpha-methyl-17beta-ol-3-one; 10 mg/kg/day, SC) for 4 weeks. A significant decrease in ventral prostate gland weight was found after 2 weeks of dianabol, and returned to control levels 3 and 10 days after steroid discontinuation. Testicular weights decreased throughout the treatment period but reached statistical significance only during the withdrawal period. Serum 3alpha-androstanediol level was marginally increased afer 2 weeks of dianabol injection, and was significantly decreased at 3 and 10 days after withdrawal. GABA-stimulated 36chloride (Cl-) influx in cortical synaptoneurosomes was increased in animals treated with dianabol for 2 and 4 weeks, and remained elevated 3 days after dianabol withdrawal, returning to control levels at withdrawal day 10. The increase in receptor efficacy was associated with a transient increase in receptor sensitivity (inverse of EC50), apparent after 2 weeks of AAS treatment and at withdrawal day 3. In a follow-up experiment, metabolites of dianabol were tested for the in vitro efficacy in potentiating GABA-stimulated Cl- transport. Only 3alpha-androstanedial and androsterone were found to have potent stimulatory effects. The 3beta-reduced metabolites were inactive, as were metabolites that contained a methyl group at the 17alpha position. These results point to significant facilitative effects of dianabol treatment on brain GABA(A) receptors via the metabolic formation of neuroactive steroids. PMID:8632710

  17. Human locus coeruleus neurons express the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit gene and produce benzodiazepine binding.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Kati S; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Särkioja, Terttu; Maksimow, Anu; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2010-06-21

    Noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus project throughout the cerebral cortex and multiple subcortical structures. Alterations in the locus coeruleus firing are associated with vigilance states and with fear and anxiety disorders. Brain ionotropic type A receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serve as targets for anxiolytic and sedative drugs, and play an essential regulatory role in the locus coeruleus. GABA(A) receptors are composed of a variable array of subunits forming heteropentameric chloride channels with different pharmacological properties. The gamma2 subunit is essential for the formation of the binding site for benzodiazepines, allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors that are clinically often used as sedatives/hypnotics and anxiolytics. There are contradictory reports in regard to the gamma2 subunit's expression and participation in the functional GABA(A) receptors in the mammalian locus coeruleus. We report here that the gamma2 subunit is transcribed and participates in the assembly of functional GABA(A) receptors in the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuromelanin-containing neurons within postmortem human locus coeruleus as demonstrated by in situ hybridization with specific gamma2 subunit oligonucleotides and autoradiographic assay for flumazenil-sensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 binding to benzodiazepine sites. These sites were also sensitive to the alpha1 subunit-preferring agonist zolpidem. Our data suggest a species difference in the expression profiles of the alpha1 and gamma2 subunits in the locus coeruleus, with the sedation-related benzodiazepine sites being more important in man than rodents. This may explain the repeated failures in the transition of novel drugs with a promising neuropharmacological profile in rodents to human clinical usage, due to intolerable sedative effects. PMID:20417252

  18. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  19. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  20. Dopamine-related drugs act presynaptically to potentiate GABA(A) receptor currents in VTA dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Avner; Yaka, Rami

    2011-01-01

    Electrical activity of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons is immediately inhibited following in vivo administration of cocaine and other DA-related drugs. While various forms of synaptic modulation were demonstrated in the VTA following exposure to DA-related drugs, comprehensive understanding of their ability to inhibit the activity of DA neurons, however, is still lacking. In this study, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices, a novel form of synaptic modulation induced by DA-related drugs was isolated. DA exposure was shown to cause potentiation of γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor type A (GABA(A)R)-mediated evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs), recorded from VTA DA neurons, under conditions of potassium channels blockade. The potentiation of these eIPSCs lasted for more than twenty minutes, could be mimicked by activation of D2-like but not D1-like DA receptors, and was accompanied by an increase in the frequency of GABA(A)R-mediated spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). Furthermore, exposure to inhibitors of DA transporter (DAT) led to potentiation of GABA(A) currents in a manner similar to the DA-mediated potentiation. Finally, a prolonged presence of l-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric-oxide (NO) signaling was found to conceal the potentiation of GABA(A) currents induced by the DA-related drugs. Taken together, this study demonstrates a new modulatory form of VTA GABA(A) neurotransmission mediated by DA-related drugs. These results also suggest better understanding of the initial inhibitory action of DA-related drugs on the activity of DA neurons in the VTA. PMID:21527263

  1. GABA Receptors Genes Polymorphisms and Alcohol Dependence: No Evidence of an Association in an Italian Male Population

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Marianna; Di Pietra, Laura; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2014-01-01

    Objective The genes encoding for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A and B receptors may be considered as candidates for alcoholism; genetic alterations at this level may produce structural and functional diversity and thus play a role in the response to alcohol addiction treatment. To investigate these aspects further, we conducted a preliminary genetic association study on a population of Italian male alcohol addicts, focusing on GABA A and B receptors. Methods A total of 186 alcohol-dependent subjects (in the first phase 139, then 47 more samples) and 182 controls were genotyped for 25 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes encoding the alpha-1 subunit of GABA A receptor (GABRA1) and subunits 1 and 2 of GABA B receptor (GABBR1 and GABBR2). The chi-squared test for allele and genotype distributions and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis of both subjects and controls were performed. Bonferroni's correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Results Preliminary results comparing 139 alcohol-dependent subjects and 182 controls showed differences in genotype distribution in the former for SNP rs29253, located in the intron region of the GABBR1 gene. In order to clarify the meaning of this association, 47 more samples from alcohol-dependent subjects were tested for this SNP only: the previously found association was not confirmed. Conclusion The lack of significant differences between the two groups does not provide evidence that GABRA 1 and GABBR1 and 2 genes are candidates for alcoholism in this population. Further studies with larger samples are needed, together with investigation of other components of the GABA pathway. PMID:25191505

  2. Insights into the binding of GABA to the insect RDL receptor from atomistic simulations: a comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Comitani, Federico; Cohen, Netta; Ashby, Jamie; Botten, Dominic; Lummis, Sarah C R; Molteni, Carla

    2014-01-01

    The resistance to dieldrin (RDL) receptor is an insect pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC). It is activated by the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to its extracellular domain; hence elucidating the atomistic details of this interaction is important for understanding how the RDL receptor functions. As no high resolution structures are currently available, we built homology models of the extracellular domain of the RDL receptor using different templates, including the widely used acetylcholine binding protein and two pLGICs, the Erwinia Chrysanthemi ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC) and the more recently resolved GluCl. We then docked GABA into the selected three dimensional structures, which we used as starting points for classical molecular dynamics simulations. This allowed us to analyze in detail the behavior of GABA in the binding sites, including the hydrogen bond and cation-π interaction networks it formed, the conformers it visited and the possible role of water molecules in mediating the interactions; we also estimated the binding free energies. The models were all stable and showed common features, including interactions consistent with experimental data and similar to other pLGICs; differences could be attributed to the quality of the models, which increases with increasing sequence identity, and the use of a pLGIC template. We supplemented the molecular dynamics information with metadynamics, a rare event method, by exploring the free energy landscape of GABA binding to the RDL receptor. Overall, we show that the GluCl template provided the best models. GABA forming direct salt-bridges with Arg211 and Glu204, and cation-π interactions with an aromatic cage including Tyr109, Phe206 and Tyr254, represents a favorable binding arrangement, and the interaction with Glu204 can also be mediated by a water molecule. PMID:24442887

  3. A network of autism linked genes stabilizes two pools of synaptic GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xia-Jing; Hu, Zhitao; Liu, Yu; Anderson, Dorian; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Changing receptor abundance at synapses is an important mechanism for regulating synaptic strength. Synapses contain two pools of receptors, immobilized and diffusing receptors, both of which are confined to post-synaptic elements. Here we show that immobile and diffusing GABA(A) receptors are stabilized by distinct synaptic scaffolds at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions. Immobilized GABA(A) receptors are stabilized by binding to FRM-3/EPB4.1 and LIN-2A/CASK. Diffusing GABA(A) receptors are stabilized by the synaptic adhesion molecules Neurexin and Neuroligin. Inhibitory post-synaptic currents are eliminated in double mutants lacking both scaffolds. Neurexin, Neuroligin, and CASK mutations are all linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Our results suggest that these mutations may directly alter inhibitory transmission, which could contribute to the developmental and cognitive deficits observed in ASD. PMID:26575289

  4. GABA A receptor π subunit promotes apoptosis of HTR-8/SVneo trophoblastic cells: Implications in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junjie; Zhang, Qian; Tan, Dongmei; Luo, Wenping; Zhao, Hai; Ma, Jing; Liang, Hao; Tan, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions primarily as an inhibitory neurotransmitter through its receptors in the mature central nervous system. The GABA type A receptor π subunit (GABRP) has been identified in the tissues of the reproductive system, particularly in the uterus. In addition, we have previously detected GABRP expression in both human and mouse placentas. To examine the role of GABRP in trophoblastic cell invasion, we constructed a pIRES2-GABRP-EGFP plasmid which was used for the transfection of a human placental cell line derived from first trimester extravillous trophoblasts (HTR-8/SVneo). The number of invaded cells was decreased by GABRP overexpression. Notably, the decrease in the invasive cell number may be due to the increased apoptosis of the HTR-8/SVneo cells following GABRP transfection, which was further confirmed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Based on the increased apoptosis of trophoblastic cells in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (PE) and the fact that GABRP promotes the apoptosis of trophoblastic cells, we hypothesized that GABRP expression is increased in the placental tissues from patients with PE compared with that in the normal groups and this hypothesis was confirmed by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these findings imply that GABRP plays an important role in placentation and this pathway may be a promising molecular target for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for PE. PMID:27221053

  5. GABA A receptor π subunit promotes apoptosis of HTR-8/SVneo trophoblastic cells: Implications in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    LU, JUNJIE; ZHANG, QIAN; TAN, DONGMEI; LUO, WENPING; ZHAO, HAI; MA, JING; LIANG, HAO; TAN, YI

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions primarily as an inhibitory neurotransmitter through its receptors in the mature central nervous system. The GABA type A receptor π subunit (GABRP) has been identified in the tissues of the reproductive system, particularly in the uterus. In addition, we have previously detected GABRP expression in both human and mouse placentas. To examine the role of GABRP in trophoblastic cell invasion, we constructed a pIRES2-GABRP-EGFP plasmid which was used for the transfection of a human placental cell line derived from first trimester extravillous trophoblasts (HTR-8/SVneo). The number of invaded cells was decreased by GABRP overexpression. Notably, the decrease in the invasive cell number may be due to the increased apoptosis of the HTR-8/SVneo cells following GABRP transfection, which was further confirmed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Based on the increased apoptosis of trophoblastic cells in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (PE) and the fact that GABRP promotes the apoptosis of trophoblastic cells, we hypothesized that GABRP expression is increased in the placental tissues from patients with PE compared with that in the normal groups and this hypothesis was confirmed by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these findings imply that GABRP plays an important role in placentation and this pathway may be a promising molecular target for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for PE. PMID:27221053

  6. Role of GABAB Receptor and L-Arg in GABA-Induced Vasorelaxation in Non-diabetic and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kharazmi, Fatemah; Soltani, Nepton; Rezaei, Sana; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Farsi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality in diabetic patients. The present study was designed to determine the role of gamma amino butyric acid B (GABAB) receptor and L-arginine (L-Arg) in GABA-induced vasorelaxation in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat vessels. Methods: Diabetes was induced by a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 60 mg/kg). Eight weeks later, superior mesenteric arteries of all groups were isolated and perfused according to the McGregor method. Results: Baseline perfusion pressure of STZ diabetic rats was significantly higher than non-diabetic rats in both intact and denuded endothelium. In the presence of faclofen, a selective GABAB receptor blocker, GABA-induced relaxation in intact and denuded endothelium mesenteric beds of STZ diabetic rats was suppressed, but this response in non-diabetic rats was not suppressed. Our results showed that in the presence of L-Arg, a nitric oxide precursor, GABA induced vasorelaxation in both diabetic and non-diabetic vessels. Conclusion: From the results of this study, it may be concluded that the vasorelaxatory effect of GABA in diabetic vessel is mediated by the GABAB receptor and nitric oxide, but it seems that in non-diabetic vessel GABAB receptor does not play any role in GABA-induced vasorelaxation, but nitric oxide induced GABA relaxation in non-diabetic vessel. PMID:25864813

  7. Specific targeting of the GABA-A receptor α5 subtype by a selective inverse agonist restores cognitive deficits in Down syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Braudeau, J; Delatour, B; Duchon, A; Pereira, P Lopes; Dauphinot, L; de Chaumont, F; Olivo-Marin, J-C; Dodd, RH; Hérault, Y; Potier, M-C

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission has been proposed to contribute to altered brain function in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and accordingly treatment with GABA-A antagonists can efficiently restore cognitive functions of Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model for DS. However, GABA-A antagonists are also convulsant which preclude their use for therapeutic intervention in DS individuals. Here, we have evaluated safer strategies to release GABAergic inhibition using a GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist selective for the α5-subtype (α5IA). We demonstrate that α5IA restores learning and memory functions of Ts65Dn mice in the novel-object recognition and in the Morris water maze tasks. Furthermore, we show that following behavioural stimulation, α5IA enhances learning-evoked immediate early gene products in specific brain regions involved in cognition. Importantly, acute and chronic treatments with α5IA do not induce any convulsant or anxiogenic effects that are associated with GABA-A antagonists or non-selective inverse agonists of the GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptors. Finally, chronic treatment with α5IA did not induce histological alterations in the brain, liver and kidney of mice. Our results suggest that non-convulsant α5-selective GABA-A inverse agonists could improve learning and memory deficits in DS individuals. PMID:21693554

  8. Lesions of nucleus accumbens affect morphine-induced release of ascorbic acid and GABA but not of glutamate in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ji Y; Yang, Jing Y; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian Y; Song, Wu; Su, Guang Y; Dong, Ying X; Wu, Chun F

    2011-10-01

    Our previous studies have shown that local perfusion of morphine causes an increase of extracellular ascorbic acid (AA) levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of freely moving rats. Lines of evidence showed that glutamatergic and GABAergic were associated with morphine-induced effects on the neurotransmission of the brain, especially on the release of AA. In the present study, the effects of morphine on the release of extracellular AA, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) in the NAc following bilateral NAc lesions induced by kainic acid (KA) were studied by using the microdialysis technique, coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) and fluorescent detection (HPLC-FD). The results showed that local perfusion of morphine (100 µM, 1 mM) in NAc dose-dependently increased AA and GABA release, while attenuated Glu release in the NAc. Naloxone (0.4 mM) pretreated by local perfusion to the NAc, significantly blocked the effects of morphine. After NAc lesion by KA (1 µg), morphine-induced increase in AA and GABA were markedly eliminated, while decrease in Glu was not affected. The loss effect of morphine on AA and GABA release after KA lesion could be recovered by GABA agonist, musimol. These results indicate that morphine-induced AA release may be mediated at least by µ-opioid receptor. Moreover, this effect of morphine possibly depend less on the glutamatergic afferents, but more on the GABAergic circuits within this nucleus. Finally, AA release induced by local perfusion of morphine may be GABA-receptor mediated and synaptically localized in the NAc. PMID:20731632

  9. Phasic, Nonsynaptic GABA-A Receptor-Mediated Inhibition Entrains Thalamocortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Rovó, Zita; Mátyás, Ferenc; Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Lecci, Sandro; Pellegrini, Chiara; Astori, Simone; Dávid, Csaba; Hangya, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    GABA-A receptors (GABA-ARs) are typically expressed at synaptic or nonsynaptic sites mediating phasic and tonic inhibition, respectively. These two forms of inhibition conjointly control various network oscillations. To disentangle their roles in thalamocortical rhythms, we focally deleted synaptic, γ2 subunit-containing GABA-ARs in the thalamus using viral intervention in mice. After successful removal of γ2 subunit clusters, spontaneous and evoked GABAergic synaptic currents disappeared in thalamocortical cells when the presynaptic, reticular thalamic (nRT) neurons fired in tonic mode. However, when nRT cells fired in burst mode, slow phasic GABA-AR-mediated events persisted, indicating a dynamic, burst-specific recruitment of nonsynaptic GABA-ARs. In vivo, removal of synaptic GABA-ARs reduced the firing of individual thalamocortical cells but did not abolish slow oscillations or sleep spindles. We conclude that nonsynaptic GABA-ARs are recruited in a phasic manner specifically during burst firing of nRT cells and provide sufficient GABA-AR activation to control major thalamocortical oscillations. PMID:24849349

  10. Mutant GABA(A) receptor subunits in genetic (idiopathic) epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAA receptor) is a ligand-gated chloride channel that mediates major inhibitory functions in the central nervous system. GABAA receptors function mainly as pentamers containing α, β, and either γ or δ subunits. A number of antiepileptic drugs have agonistic effects on GABAA receptors. Hence, dysfunctions of GABAA receptors have been postulated to play important roles in the etiology of epilepsy. In fact, mutations or genetic variations of the genes encoding the α1, α6, β2, β3, γ2, or δ subunits (GABRA1, GABRA6, GABRB2, GABRB3, GABRG2, and GABRD, respectively) have been associated with human epilepsy, both with and without febrile seizures. Epilepsy resulting from mutations is commonly one of following, genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy (e.g., juvenile myoclonic epilepsy), childhood absence epilepsy, genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures, or Dravet syndrome. Recently, mutations of GABRA1, GABRB2, and GABRB3 were associated with infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These mutations compromise hyperpolarization through GABAA receptors, which is believed to cause seizures. Interestingly, most of the insufficiencies are not caused by receptor gating abnormalities, but by complex mechanisms, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, intracellular trafficking defects, and ER stress. Thus, GABAA receptor subunit mutations are now thought to participate in the pathomechanisms of epilepsy, and an improved understanding of these mutations should facilitate our understanding of epilepsy and the development of new therapies. PMID:25194483

  11. Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhe; Bhandage, Amol K.; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R.; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    The central amygdala (CeA) has a role for mediating fear and anxiety responses. It is also involved in emotional imbalance caused by alcohol abuse and dependence and in regulating relapse to alcohol abuse. Growing evidences suggest that excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) transmissions in the CeA are affected by chronic alcohol exposure. Human post-mortem CeA samples from male alcoholics (n = 9) and matched controls (n = 9) were assayed for the expression level of ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptors subunit mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data revealed that out of the 16 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA [2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA4; one kainate receptor subunit GluK2; one NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor subunit GluN2D and one delta receptor subunit GluD2 were significantly decreased in the CeA of alcoholics. In contrast, of the 19 GABA-A receptor subunits, only the mRNA encoding the α2 subunit was significantly down-regulated in the CeA of the alcoholics as compared with control subjects. Our findings imply that the down-regulation of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits in the CeA of alcoholics may represent one of the molecular substrates underlying the new balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in alcohol dependence. PMID:25278838

  12. Striatal GABA receptor alterations in hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Binoy, J; Anitha, M; Paulose, C S

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia in neonates disrupts the oxygen flow to the brain, essentially starving the brain and preventing it from performing vital biochemical processes important for central nervous system development. Hypoxia results in a permanent brain damage by gene and receptor level alterations mediated through neurotransmitters. The present study evaluated GABA, GABAA, GABAB receptor functions and gene expression changes in glutamate decarboxylase in the corpus striatum of hypoxic neonatal rats and the treatment groups with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Since GABA is the principal neurotransmitter involved in hypoxic ventilatory decline, the alterations in its level under hypoxic stress points to an important aspect of respiratory control. Following hypoxic stress, a significant decrease in total GABA, GABAA and GABAB receptors function and GAD expression was observed in the striatum, which accounts for the ventilator decline. Hypoxic rats treated with glucose alone and with oxygen showed a reversal of the receptor alterations and changes in GAD to near control. Being a source of immediate energy, glucose can reduce the ATP-depletion-induced changes in GABA and oxygenation helps in overcoming reduction in oxygen supply. Treatment with oxygen alone and epinephrine was not effective in reversing the altered receptor functions. Thus, our study point to the functional role of GABA receptors in mediating ventilatory response to hypoxia and the neuroprotective role of glucose treatment. This has immense significance in the proper management of neonatal hypoxia for a better intellect in the later stages of life. PMID:22089934

  13. [GABA-ergic system in defense against excitatory kynurenines].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1997-01-01

    Protection against the excitatory action of L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice is related to the activation of GABA-B and dopamine receptors of the brain and to much lesser degree to the activation of GABA-A receptors. It is hardly believable that the anticonvulsant effect of phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA), baclofen (CL-phenibut), sodium hydroxybutyrate and taurine against seizures induced by these two kynurenines is determined by alterations in metabolism of GABA. PMID:9503572

  14. α(5)GABA(A) receptors mediate primary afferent fiber tonic excitability in the turtle spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; Canto-Bustos, Martha; Aguilar, Justo; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2013-11-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) plays a key role in the regulation of central nervous system by activating synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. It is acknowledged that extrasynaptic GABAA receptors located in the soma, dendrites, and axons may be activated tonically by low extracellular GABA concentrations. The activation of these receptors produces a persistent conductance that can hyperpolarize or depolarize nerve cells depending on the Cl(-) equilibrium potential. In an in vitro preparation of the turtle spinal cord we show that extrasynaptic α5GABAA receptors mediate the tonic state of excitability of primary afferents independently of the phasic primary afferent depolarization mediated by synaptic GABAA receptors. Blockade of α5GABAA receptors with the inverse agonist L-655,708 depressed the dorsal root reflex (DRR) without affecting the phasic increase in excitability of primary afferents. Using RT-PCR and Western blotting, we corroborated the presence of the mRNA and the α5GABAA protein in the dorsal root ganglia of the turtle spinal cord. The receptors were localized in primary afferents in dorsal root, dorsal root ganglia, and peripheral nerve terminals using immunoconfocal microscopy. Considering the implications of the DRR in neurogenic inflammation, α5GABAA receptors may serve as potential pharmacological targets for the treatment of pain. PMID:23966669

  15. C. elegans Punctin Clusters GABA(A) Receptors via Neuroligin Binding and UNC-40/DCC Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haijun; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Ji, Tingting; Jospin, Maelle; Bessereau, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-17

    Positioning type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) in front of GABA release sites sets the strength of inhibitory synapses. The evolutionarily conserved Ce-Punctin/MADD-4 is an anterograde synaptic organizer that specifies GABAergic versus cholinergic identity of postsynaptic domains at the C. elegans neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here we show that the Ce-Punctin secreted by GABAergic motor neurons controls the clustering of GABA(A)Rs through the synaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin (NLG-1) and the netrin receptor UNC-40/DCC. The short isoform of Ce-Punctin binds and clusters NLG-1 postsynaptically at GABAergic NMJs. NLG-1 disruption causes a strong reduction of GABA(A)R content at GABAergic synapses. Ce-Punctin also binds and localizes UNC-40 receptors in the postsynaptic membrane of NMJs, which promotes the recruitment of GABA(A)Rs by NLG-1. Since the mammalian orthologs of these genes are expressed in the central nervous system and their mutations are implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases, this molecular pathway might have been evolutionarily conserved. PMID:26028575

  16. Biphenylacetic acid enhances the antagonistic action of fluoroquinolones on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Koutsoviti-Papadopoulou, M; Nikolaidis, E; Kounenis, G

    2001-09-01

    This paper examines the effect of biphenylacetic acid on the antagonistic action of norfloxacin and enoxacin on the GABA(A)-mediated responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum. GABA produced transient contractions followed by relaxation. The contractile effect of exogenously applied GABA was concentration-dependent with EC(50)= 9.8 x 10(-6) M. This contractile effect was not significantly modified by biphenylacetic acid, and the EC(50) value for GABA in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid was 1.15 x 10(-5) M. The GABA contractile effect was inhibited, dose-dependently, by either norfloxacin or enoxacin, but only at concentrations higher than 10(-5) M. The response of the ileum to GABA (at EC(50)) was reduced to 35 and 36% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin or enoxacin, respectively. However, in the presence of 10(-5) M biphenylacetic acid, the response of the ileum to GABA was reduced to 2.2% by pretreatment with 10(-5) M enoxacin, while it was completely abolished by pretreatment with 10(-5) M norfloxacin and the IC(50) values were 5.5 x 10(-7) and 1.5 x 10(-6) M for norfloxacin and enoxacin, respectively. These data show that biphenylacetic acid whilst having no effect at the GABA(A)-mediated contractile response of the guinea-pig ileum, enhances the antagonistic effect of both enoxacin and norfloxacin. This suggests that combined administration of fluoroquinolones and biphenylacetic acid synergistically inhibits GABA(A)-receptors at the intestinal level. PMID:11529690

  17. Molecular mechanisms of interaction between the neuroprotective substance riluzole and GABA(A)-receptors.

    PubMed

    Jahn, K; Schlesinger, F; Jin, L J; Dengler, R; Bufler, J; Krampfl, K

    2008-07-01

    The antiepileptic drug riluzole is used as a therapeutic agent in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis due to its neuroprotective effects. Besides presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic and preferentially glutamatergic transmission, it also potentiates postsynaptic GABA(A)-receptor function. We investigated the postsynaptic effects of riluzole on GABA(A)-receptor channels by use of the patch-clamp technique. Recombinant alpha1beta2gamma(2s) and alpha1beta2 GABA(A) receptors were expressed in HEK 293 cells by transient transfection. Pulses of GABA were applied in combination with different concentrations of riluzole to whole cell or outside-out patches with either alpha1beta2gamma(2s) or alpha1beta2 GABA(A)-receptor channels. Co-application of riluzole led to a slight decrease of absolute peak current amplitudes and steady-state currents in prolonged presence of GABA at saturating concentrations. In the presence of riluzole, enhancement of current amplitudes was observed with lower concentrations of GABA at alpha1beta2gamma(2s) receptors and to a lower extent also at alpha1beta2 receptors. Thus, the potentiating effect of riluzole was shown to be not abolished in the absence of the gamma(2s)-subunit. A further prominent effect of riluzole was a highly significant acceleration of the time course of current decay, most probably pointing to an open-channel block-like mechanism of action. As both receptor subtypes were affected similarly by the block, it could be concluded that the respective binding sites should be assumed within a region of high sequence homology like it is given for the channel-lining M2 domain of GABA(A)-receptor subunits. In conclusion, three different molecular mechanisms of interaction of the neuroprotective compound riluzole were observed at two different subtypes of GABA(A) receptor channels. The results further point to the impact of the inhibitory as well as the excitatory synaptic activity as a pharmacological target to counteract chronic

  18. Effect of GABA(B) receptor agonist SKF97541 on cortical and hippocampal epileptic afterdischarges.

    PubMed

    Fábera, P; Mareš, P

    2014-01-01

    Activation of GABA(B) receptors leads to longer inhibitory postsynaptic potentials than activation of GABA(A) receptors. Therefore GABA(B) receptors may be a target for anticonvulsant therapy. The present study examined possible effects of GABA(B) receptor agonist SKF97541 on cortical and hippocampal epileptic afterdischarges (ADs). Epileptic ADs elicited by electrical stimulation of sensorimotor cortex or dorsal hippocampus were studied in adult male Wistar rats. Stimulation series were applied 6 times with 10- or 20-min interval. Either interval was efficient for reliable elicitation of cortical ADs but stimulation at 10-min intervals did not reliably elicit hippocampal ADs, many stimulations were without effect. SKF97541 in dose 1 mg/kg significantly prolonged cortical ADs. Duration of hippocampal ADs was not significantly changed by either dose of SKF97541 in spite of a marked myorelaxant effect of the higher dose. Our present data demonstrated that neither cortical nor hippocampal ADs in adult rats were suppressed by GABA(B) receptor agonist SKF97541. Proconvulsant effect on cortical ADs indicates a different role in these two brain structures. In addition, duration of refractory period for electrically-induced ADs in these two structures in adult rats is different. PMID:24702499

  19. Functional asymmetry of the conserved cystine loops in alphabetagamma GABA A receptors revealed by the response to GABA activation and drug potentiation.

    PubMed

    Tierney, M Louise; Luu, Tien; Gage, Peter W

    2008-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels respond to specific neurotransmitters by transiently opening an integral membrane ion-selective pore, allowing ions to move down their electrochemical gradient. A distinguishing feature of all members of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily is the presence of a 13-amino acid disulfide loop (Cys-loop) in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. Structural data derived from the acetylcholine receptor place this loop at the interface between the ligand-binding domain and the transmembrane pore-forming domain where it is ideally located to participate in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. We have introduced specific mutations into a conserved motif at the mid-point of the Cys-loop of the GABA A receptor subunits alpha1, beta2 and gamma2S where the sequence reads aromatic, proline, aliphatic (ArProAl motif). Receptors carrying a mutation in the Cys-loop of one of their subunits were expressed in L929 cells and responses to both GABA and drugs were assessed using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Drug potentiation and direct activation were significantly enhanced by mutations in this Cys-loop but these effects were subunit-dependent. Currents in response to agonists were larger when mutations were carried in the alpha and beta subunits but not in the gamma subunit. In contrast, potentiation of current responses by diazepam, etomidate and pentobarbital were all enhanced when mutations were carried in the alpha and gamma subunits, but not the beta subunit. Since the disruption of interactions mediated through the ArProAl motif enhances the mutant receptor's response to both agonist and drugs we suggest that this motif in the Cys-loop of the wild-type receptor participates in interactions that create activation barriers to conformational changes during channel gating. PMID:18083058

  20. Biphasic GABA-A receptor-mediated effect on the spontaneous activity of the circular layer in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N; Radomirov, R

    1993-07-01

    1. The GABA and GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol changed the spontaneous mechanical activity of a circular layer isolated from cat terminal ileum, while the selective GABA-B receptor agonist (+/-)baclofen had no effect. 2. GABA at doses ranging from 1 microM to 2 mM elicited concentration-dependent biphasic responses which consisted of a relaxation followed by contraction, with a tonic and a phasic component. The EC50 values, calculated at 95% confidence limits (CL), were 94.9 microM (83.5-109.8 microM) and 66.0 microM (51.2-75.5 microM) for the relaxation and contractile phases, respectively. 3. The GABA-induced biphasic responses were sensitive to bicuculline and picrotoxinin and were entirely mimicked by muscimol. Bicuculline competitively antagonized the effects of GABA and gave closely similar pA2 values for both phases of these responses--inhibitory and stimulatory. Cross-desensitization occurred only between GABA and muscimol and not between (+/-)baclofen and GABA, or (+/-)baclofen and muscimol. 4. Both bicuculline-sensitive phases evoked by GABA and muscimol were abolished by tetrodotoxin or atropine, but were unaffected by guanethidine or naloxone. 5. The present results suggested that the biphasic GABA effect on the mechanical activity of the circular layer in cat terminal ileum was mediated by prejunctional GABA-A receptors, most probably through an action on the cholinergic pathway. PMID:8224749

  1. Ingestion of Lactobacillus strain regulates emotional behavior and central GABA receptor expression in a mouse via the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Javier A; Forsythe, Paul; Chew, Marianne V; Escaravage, Emily; Savignac, Hélène M; Dinan, Timothy G; Bienenstock, John; Cryan, John F

    2011-09-20

    There is increasing, but largely indirect, evidence pointing to an effect of commensal gut microbiota on the central nervous system (CNS). However, it is unknown whether lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus could have a direct effect on neurotransmitter receptors in the CNS in normal, healthy animals. GABA is the main CNS inhibitory neurotransmitter and is significantly involved in regulating many physiological and psychological processes. Alterations in central GABA receptor expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression, which are highly comorbid with functional bowel disorders. In this work, we show that chronic treatment with L. rhamnosus (JB-1) induced region-dependent alterations in GABA(B1b) mRNA in the brain with increases in cortical regions (cingulate and prelimbic) and concomitant reductions in expression in the hippocampus, amygdala, and locus coeruleus, in comparison with control-fed mice. In addition, L. rhamnosus (JB-1) reduced GABA(Aα2) mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, but increased GABA(Aα2) in the hippocampus. Importantly, L. rhamnosus (JB-1) reduced stress-induced corticosterone and anxiety- and depression-related behavior. Moreover, the neurochemical and behavioral effects were not found in vagotomized mice, identifying the vagus as a major modulatory constitutive communication pathway between the bacteria exposed to the gut and the brain. Together, these findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the bidirectional communication of the gut-brain axis and suggest that certain organisms may prove to be useful therapeutic adjuncts in stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. PMID:21876150

  2. Etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC increase the GABA efficacy of recombinant alpha4beta3delta and alpha4beta3 GABA A receptors expressed in HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    General anesthetics, once thought to exert their effects through non-specific membrane effects, have highly specific ion channel targets that can silence neuronal populations in the nervous system, thereby causing unconsciousness and immobility, characteristic of general anesthesia. Inhibitory GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs), particularly highly GABA-sensitive extrasynaptic receptor subtypes that give rise to sustained inhibitory currents, are uniquely sensitive to GABA(A)R-active anesthetics. A prominent population of extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs is made up of alpha4, beta2 or beta3, and delta subunits. Considering the demonstrated importance of GABA receptor beta3 subunits for in vivo anesthetic effects of etomidate and propofol, we decided to investigate the effects of GABA anesthetics on "extrasynaptic" alpha4beta3delta and also binary alpha4beta3 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Consistent with previous work on similar receptor subtypes we show that maximal GABA currents through "extrasynaptic" alpha4beta3delta receptors, receptors defined by sensitivity to EtOH (30mM) and the beta-carboline beta-CCE (1microM), are enhanced by the GABA(A)R-active anesthetics etomidate, propofol, and the neurosteroid anesthetic THDOC. Furthermore, we show that receptors formed by alpha4beta3 subunits alone also show high GABA sensitivity and that saturating GABA responses of alpha4beta3 receptors are increased to the same extent by etomidate, propofol, and THDOC as are alpha4beta3delta receptors. Therefore, both alpha4beta3 and alpha4beta3delta receptors show low GABA efficacy, and GABA is also a partial agonist on certain binary alphabeta receptor subtypes. Increasing GABA efficacy on alpha4/6beta3delta and alpha4beta3 receptors is likely to make an important contribution to the anesthetic effects of etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC. PMID:18778723

  3. Spinal GABA-B receptor modulates neutrophil recruitment to the knee joint in zymosan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel S; do C Malvar, David; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Kanashiro, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the central nervous system controls inflammatory responses by activating complex efferent neuroimmune pathways. The present study was designed to evaluate the role that central gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA-B) receptor plays in neutrophil migration in a murine model of zymosan-induced arthritis by using different pharmacological tools. We observed that intrathecal administration of baclofen, a selective GABA-B agonist, exacerbated the inflammatory response in the knee after zymosan administration characterized by an increase in the neutrophil recruitment and knee joint edema, whereas saclofen, a GABA-B antagonist, exerted the opposite effect. Intrathecal pretreatment of the animals with SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) blocked the pro-inflammatory effect of baclofen. On the other hand, systemic administration of guanethidine, a sympatholytic drug that inhibits catecholamine release, and nadolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of saclofen. Moreover, saclofen suppressed the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines into the knee joint (ELISA) and pain-related behaviors (open field test). Since the anti-inflammatory effect of saclofen depends on the sympathetic nervous system integrity, we observed that isoproterenol, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, mimics the central GABA-B blockade decreasing knee joint neutrophil recruitment. Together, these results demonstrate that the pharmacological manipulation of spinal GABAergic transmission aids control of neutrophil migration to the inflamed joint by modulating the activation of the knee joint-innervating sympathetic terminal fibers through a mechanism dependent on peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors and central components, such as p38 MAPK. PMID:27106212

  4. A Review of the Updated Pharmacophore for the Alpha 5 GABA(A) Benzodiazepine Receptor Model

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Terry; Poe, Michael M.; Rallapalli, Sundari; Biawat, Poonam; Savić, Miroslav M.; Rowlett, James K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; Stafford, Douglas C.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Cook, James M.

    2015-01-01

    An updated model of the GABA(A) benzodiazepine receptor pharmacophore of the α5-BzR/GABA(A) subtype has been constructed prompted by the synthesis of subtype selective ligands in light of the recent developments in both ligand synthesis, behavioral studies, and molecular modeling studies of the binding site itself. A number of BzR/GABA(A) α5 subtype selective compounds were synthesized, notably α5-subtype selective inverse agonist PWZ-029 (1) which is active in enhancing cognition in both rodents and primates. In addition, a chiral positive allosteric modulator (PAM), SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 (2), has been shown to reverse the deleterious effects in the MAM-model of schizophrenia as well as alleviate constriction in airway smooth muscle. Presented here is an updated model of the pharmacophore for α5β2γ2 Bz/GABA(A) receptors, including a rendering of PWZ-029 docked within the α5-binding pocket showing specific interactions of the molecule with the receptor. Differences in the included volume as compared to α1β2γ2, α2β2γ2, and α3β2γ2 will be illustrated for clarity. These new models enhance the ability to understand structural characteristics of ligands which act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists at the Bz BS of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:26682068

  5. Serotonin-2C Receptor Agonists Decrease Potassium-Stimulated GABA Release In the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, James M; Booth, Raymond G; Peris, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor has shown promise in vivo as a pharmacotherapeutic target for alcoholism. For example, recently, a novel 4-phenyl-2-N,N-dimethylaminotetralin (PAT) drug candidate, that demonstrates 5-HT2C receptor agonist activity together with 5-HT2A/2B receptor inverse agonist activity, was shown to reduce operant responding for ethanol after peripheral administration to rats. Previous studies have shown that the 5-HT2C receptor is found throughout the mesoaccumbens pathway and that 5-HT2C receptor agonism causes activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) GABA neurons. It is unknown what effect 5-HT2C receptor modulation has on GABA release in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcc). To this end, microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence was used to quantify extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations in the NAcc under basal and after potassium stimulation conditions, in response to PAT analogs and other 5-HT2C receptor modulators administered by reverse dialysis to rats. 5-HT2C receptor agonists specifically attenuated stimulated GABA release in the NAcc while 5-HT2C antagonists or inverse agonists had no effect. Agents with activity at 5-HT2A receptors had no effect on GABA release. Thus, in contrast to results reported for the VTA, current results suggest 5-HT2C receptor agonists decrease stimulated GABA release in the NAcc, and provide a possible mechanism of action for 5HT2C-mediated negative modulation of ethanol self-administration. PMID:25382408

  6. GABA-receptor complex in monkeys treated with MPTP

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, R.D.; Ticku, M.K.

    1986-03-01

    Tissue samples from the brains of monkeys made parkinsonian by the depletion of dopamine (DA) with dopaminergic neurotoxin (N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (1.4-3.4 mg/kg, i.v.) were assayed for changed in GABA ((/sup 3/H)-GABA), benzodiazepine ((/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam) and picrotoxin ((/sup 35/S)-TBPS) binding sites. One point binding assays were performed on globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra reticulata (SN/sub R/) and VA-VL thalamic samples. GABA binding was markedly increased in the SN/sub R/ (129 +/- 12%, n = 2) and GP (108 +/- 33%, n = 4) and not altered in the striatum or thalamus. However, benzodiazepine binding was increased in the striatum (170%; 257 fm/mg, control; 692 fm/mg, treated) and GP (28%; 317 fm/mg, control, 405 fm/mg, treated) and (/sup 35/S)-TBPS binding was also increased in GP (100%; 32.5 fm/mg, control; 65.5 fm/mg, treated). atScatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-GABA binding was also performed on tissue samples of motor cortex, cerebellar vermis and striatum pooled from half brains of 4 parkinsonian and 2 control monkeys. Depletion of DA (92 +/- 5%) in the striatum of these monkeys was not associated with any change in the K/sub D/ or B/sub max/ for the high or low affinity GABA binding sites in the striatum, motor cortex or cerebellum. Thus, in the basal ganglia, DA depletion is associated with an increase in GABA binding sites in GP and SN/sub R/, an increase in picrotoxin binding sites in GP and an increase in benzodiazepine binding sites in the striatum.

  7. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies. PMID:24551133

  8. GAB(A) receptors present higher affinity and modified subunit composition in spinal motor neurons from a genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carunchio, Irene; Mollinari, Cristiana; Pieri, Massimo; Merlo, Daniela; Zona, Cristina

    2008-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and cerebral cortex. In this study we have analysed the electrophysiological properties of GABA(A) receptors and GABA(A) alpha1 and alpha2 subunits expression in spinal motor neurons in culture obtained from a genetic model of ALS (G93A) and compared with transgenic wild type SOD1 (SOD1) and their corresponding non transgenic litter mates (Control). Although excitotoxic motor neuron death has been extensively studied in relation to Ca(2+)-dependent processes, strong evidence indicates that excitotoxic cell death is also remarkably dependent on Cl(-) ions and on GABA(A) receptor activation. In this study we have analysed the electrophysiological properties of GABA(A) receptors and the expression of GABA(A)alpha(1) and alpha(2) subunits in cultured motor neurons obtained from a genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (G93A) and compared them with transgenic wild-type Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and their corresponding non-transgenic littermates (Control). In all tested motor neurons, the application of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (0.5-100 mum) evoked an inward current that was reversibly blocked by bicuculline (100 mum), thus indicating that it was mediated by the activation of GABA(A) receptors. Our results indicate that the current density at high GABA concentrations is similar in control, Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and G93A motor neurons. However, the dose-response curve significantly shifted toward lower concentration values in G93A motor neurons and the extent of desensitization also increased in these neurons. Finally, multiplex single-cell real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence revealed that the amount of GABA(A)alpha(1) subunit was significantly increased in G93A motor neurons, whereas the levels of alpha(2) subunit were unchanged. These data show that the functionality and

  9. Role of GABA(B) receptors in learning and memory and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Chelcie F; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2016-04-01

    Although it is evident from the literature that altered GABAB receptor function does affect behavior, these results often do not correspond well. These differences could be due to the task protocol, animal strain, ligand concentration, or timing of administration utilized. Because several clinical populations exhibit learning and memory deficits in addition to altered markers of GABA and the GABAB receptor, it is important to determine whether altered GABAB receptor function is capable of contributing to the deficits. The aim of this review is to examine the effect of altered GABAB receptor function on synaptic plasticity as demonstrated by in vitro data, as well as the effects on performance in learning and memory tasks. Finally, data regarding altered GABA and GABAB receptor markers within clinical populations will be reviewed. Together, the data agree that proper functioning of GABAB receptors is crucial for numerous learning and memory tasks and that targeting this system via pharmaceuticals may benefit several clinical populations. PMID:26814961

  10. Prefrontal GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit expression in normal postnatal human development and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Carlotta E; Webster, Maree J; Rothmond, Debora A; Bahn, Sabine; Elashoff, Michael; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2010-07-01

    Cortical GABA deficits that are consistently reported in schizophrenia may reflect an etiology of failed normal postnatal neurotransmitter maturation. Previous studies have found prefrontal cortical GABA(A) receptor alpha subunit alterations in schizophrenia, yet their relationship to normal developmental expression profiles in the human cortex has not been determined. The aim of this study was to quantify GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit mRNA expression patterns in human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during normal postnatal development and in schizophrenia cases compared to controls. Transcript levels of GABA(A) receptor alpha subunits were measured using microarray and qPCR analysis of 60 normal individuals aged 6weeks to 49years and in 37 patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and 37 matched controls. We detected robust opposing changes in cortical GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha5 subunits during the first few years of postnatal development, with a 60% decrease in alpha5 mRNA expression and a doubling of alpha1 mRNA expression with increasing age. In our Australian schizophrenia cohort we detected decreased GAD67 mRNA expression (p=0.0012) and decreased alpha5 mRNA expression (p=0.038) in the DLPFC with no significant change of other alpha subunits. Our findings confirm that GABA deficits (reduced GAD67) are a consistent feature of schizophrenia postmortem brain studies. Our study does not confirm alterations in cortical alpha1 or alpha2 mRNA levels in the schizophrenic DLPFC, as seen in previous studies, but instead we report a novel down-regulation of alpha5 subunit mRNA suggesting that post-synaptic alterations of inhibitory receptors are an important feature of schizophrenia but may vary between cohorts. PMID:20100621

  11. Non-neuronal, slow GABA signalling in the ventrobasal thalamus targets δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-González, Cristina; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Cope, David W; Parri, H R

    2011-01-01

    The rodent ventrobasal (VB) thalamus contains a relatively uniform population of thalamocortical (TC) neurons that receive glutamatergic input from the vibrissae and the somatosensory cortex, and inhibitory input from the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT). In this study we describe γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-dependent slow outward currents (SOCs) in TC neurons that are distinct from fast inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and tonic currents. SOCs occurred spontaneously or could be evoked by hypo-osmotic stimulus, and were not blocked by tetrodotoxin, removal of extracellular Ca2+ or bafilomycin A1, indicating a non-synaptic, non-vesicular GABA origin. SOCs were more common in TC neurons of the VB compared with the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, and were rarely observed in nRT neurons, whilst SOC frequency in the VB increased with age. Application of THIP, a selective agonist at δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors, occluded SOCs, whereas the benzodiazepine site inverse agonist β-CCB had no effect, but did inhibit spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In addition, the occurrence of SOCs was reduced in mice lacking the δ-subunit, and their kinetics were also altered. The anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin increased SOC frequency in a time-dependent manner, but this effect was not due to reversal of GABA transporters. Together, these data indicate that SOCs in TC neurons arise from astrocytic GABA release, and are mediated by δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the therapeutic action of vigabatrin may occur through the augmentation of this astrocyte–neuron interaction, and highlight the importance of glial cells in CNS (patho) physiology. PMID:21395866

  12. A tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that affects tomato fruit amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Christopher J; Thomas, Benjamin; Baxter, Charles J; Smith, J Andrew C; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2015-03-01

    Vacuolar accumulation of acidic metabolites is an important aspect of tomato fruit flavour and nutritional quality. The amino acids Asp and Glu accumulate to high concentrations during ripening, while γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) shows an approximately stoichiometric decline. Given that GABA can be catabolised to form Glu and subsequently Asp, and the requirement for the fruit to maintain osmotic homeostasis during ripening, we hypothesised the existence of a tonoplast transporter that exports GABA from the vacuole in exchange for import of either Asp or Glu. We show here that the tomato vacuolar membrane possesses such a transport property: transport of Glu across isolated tonoplast vesicle membranes was trans-stimulated in counterexchange mode by GABA, Glu and Asp. We identified SlCAT9 as a candidate protein for this exchanger using quantitative proteomics of a tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction. Transient expression of a SlCAT9-YFP fusion in tobacco confirmed a tonoplast localisation. The function of the protein was examined by overexpression of SlCAT9 in transgenic tomato plants. Tonoplast vesicles isolated from transgenic plants showed higher rates of Glu and GABA transport than wild-type (WT) only when assayed in counterexchange mode with Glu, Asp, or GABA. Moreover, there were substantial increases in the content of all three cognate amino acids in ripe fruit from the transgenic plants. We conclude that SlCAT9 is a tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that strongly influences the accumulation of these amino acids during fruit development. PMID:25602029

  13. Effects of GABA(B) receptor agents on cocaine priming, discrete contextual cue and food induced relapses.

    PubMed

    Filip, Małgorzata; Frankowska, Małgorzata

    2007-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH 50911), the agonists baclofen and 3-aminopropyl(methyl)phosphinic acid (SKF 97541), and the allosteric positive modulator 3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxy-beta,beta-dimethylbenzenepropanol (CGP 7930) on cocaine seeking behavior. The effects of the above drugs on the reinstatement of responding induced by natural reinforcer (food) were also studied. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer either cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion) or food (sweet milk) and responding on the reinforcer-paired lever was extinguished. Reinstatement of responding was induced by a noncontingent presentation of the self-administered reinforcer (10 mg/kg cocaine, i.p.), a discrete contextual cue, or a contingent presentation of food. SCH 50911 (3-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently attenuated responding on the previously cocaine-paired lever during both reinstatement conditions, with slightly greater efficacy at reducing conditioned cue reinstatement. At the same time, it failed to alter reinstatement of food-seeking behavior. Baclofen (1.25-5 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) attenuated cocaine- or food-seeking behavior; the effect of the drug appeared more effective for cocaine-seeking than food-seeking. CGP 7930 (10-30 mg/kg) reduced cocaine seeking without affecting food-induced reinstatement on reward seeking. Our results indicate that tonic activation of GABA(B) receptors is required for cocaine seeking behavior in rats. Moreover, the GABA(B) receptor antagonist SCH 50911 was effective in reducing relapse to cocaine at doses that failed to alter reinstatement of food-seeking behavior (present study), basal locomotor activity, cocaine and food self-administration (Filip et al., submitted for publication), suggesting its selective effects on motivated drug-seeking behavior. The potent inhibitory responses on cocaine seeking behavior were also seen

  14. Identification and distribution of a GABA receptor mutation conferring dieldrin resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wondji, Charles S; Dabire, Roch K; Tukur, Zainab; Irving, Helen; Djouaka, Rousseau; Morgan, John C

    2011-07-01

    Growing problems of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles funestus have intensified efforts to identify alternative insecticides. Many agrochemicals target the GABA receptors, but cross-resistance from dieldrin resistance may preclude their introduction. Dieldrin resistance was detected in An. funestus populations from West (Burkina Faso) and central (Cameroon) Africa, but populations from East (Uganda) and Southern Africa (Mozambique and Malawi) were fully susceptible to this insecticide. Partial sequencing of the dieldrin target site, the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, identified two amino acid substitutions, A296S and V327I. The A296S mutation has been associated with dieldrin resistance in other species. The V327I mutations was detected in the resistant sample from Burkina Faso and Cameroon and consistently associated with the A296S substitution. The full-length of the An. funestus GABA-receptor gene, amplified by RT-PCR, generated a sequence of 1674 bp encoding 557 amino acid of the protein in An. funestus with 98% similarity to that of Anopheles gambiae. Two diagnostic assays were developed to genotype the A296S mutation (pyrosequencing and PCR-RFLP), and use of these assays revealed high frequency of the resistant allele in Burkina Faso (60%) and Cameroon (82%), moderate level in Benin (16%) while low frequency or absence of the mutation was observed respectively in Uganda (7.5%) or 0% in Malawi and Mozambique. The distribution of the Rdl(R) mutation in An. funestus populations in Africa suggests extensive barriers to gene flow between populations from different regions. PMID:21501685

  15. Activation of alpha6-containing GABAA receptors by pentobarbital occurs through a different mechanism than activation by GABA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew T; Fisher, Janet L

    2010-03-01

    The GABA(A) receptors are ligand-gated chloride channels which are the targets for many clinically used sedatives, including the barbiturates. The barbiturate pentobarbital acts through multiple sites on the GABA(A) receptor. At low concentrations (muM), it acts as a positive allosteric modulator while at higher concentrations it can directly activate the receptor. This agonist action is influenced by the subunit composition of the receptor, and pentobarbital is a more effective agonist than GABA only at receptors containing an alpha6 subunit. The conformational change that translates GABA binding into channel opening is known to involve a lysine residue located in an extracellular domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane domains. Mutations of this residue disrupt activation of the channel by GABA and have been linked to inherited epilepsy. Pentobarbital binds to the receptor at a different agonist site than GABA, but could use a common signal transduction mechanism to gate the channel. To address this question, we compared the effect of a mutating the homologous lysine residue in the alpha1 or alpha6 subunits (K278 or K277, respectively) to methionine on direct activation of recombinant GABA(A) receptors by GABA or pentobarbital. We found that this mutation reduced GABA sensitivity for both alpha1 and alpha6 subunits, but affected pentobarbital sensitivity only for the alpha1 subunit. This suggests that pentobarbital acts through a distinct signal transduction pathway at the alpha6 subunit, which may account for its greater efficacy compared to GABA at receptors containing this subunit. PMID:20109529

  16. Nematode cys-loop GABA receptors: biological function, pharmacology and sites of action for anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Michael V; Beech, Robin N; Forrester, Sean G

    2012-06-01

    Parasitic nematode infection of humans and livestock is a major problem globally. Attempts to control nematode populations have led to the development of several classes of anthelmintic, which target cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. Unlike the vertebrate nervous system, the nematode nervous system possesses a large and diversified array of ligand-gated chloride channels that comprise key components of the inhibitory neurotransmission system. In particular, cys-loop GABA receptors have evolved to play many fundamental roles in nematode behaviour such as locomotion. Analysis of the genomes of several free-living and parasitic nematodes suggests that there are several groups of cys-loop GABA receptor subunits that, for the most part, are conserved among nematodes. Despite many similarities with vertebrate cys-loop GABA receptors, those in nematodes are quite distinct in sequence similarity, subunit composition and biological function. With rising anthelmintic resistance in many nematode populations worldwide, GABA receptors should become an area of increased scientific investigation in the development of the next generation of anthelmintics. PMID:22430311

  17. GABA-A Receptor Inhibition of Local Calcium Signaling in Spines and Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Marlin, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical interneurons activate GABA-A receptors to rapidly control electrical and biochemical signaling at pyramidal neurons. Different populations of interneurons are known to uniquely target the soma and dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, the ability of these interneurons to inhibit Ca2+ signaling at spines and dendrites is largely unexplored. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, GABA uncaging and optogenetics to study dendritic inhibition at layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in slices of mouse PFC. We first show that GABA-A receptors strongly inhibit action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ signals at both spines and dendrites. We find robust inhibition over tens of milliseconds that spreads along the dendritic branch. However, we observe no difference in the amount of inhibition at neighboring spines and dendrites. We then examine the influence of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), or 5HT3a receptors. We determine that these populations of interneurons make unique contacts onto the apical and basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons. We also show that SOM and 5HT3a but not PV interneurons potently inhibit AP Ca2+ signals via GABA-A receptors at both spines and dendrites. These findings reveal how multiple interneurons regulate local Ca2+ signaling in pyramidal neurons, with implications for cortical function and disease. PMID:25429132

  18. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  19. Association between GABA(A) receptor subunit polymorphisms and autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    PubMed

    Sesarini, Carla V; Costa, Lucas; Grañana, Nora; Coto, Miguel Garcia; Pallia, Roberto C; Argibay, Pablo F

    2015-09-30

    ASD might be associated with alterations in excitation/inhibition ratio and GABA(A) has been implicated since it mediates synaptic inhibition. Polymorphisms in GABA receptor (GABAR) were studied: significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies observed between cases and controls (rs1912960, GABRA4). Haplotype analysis: rs1912960 (GABRA4) and rs211037 (GABRG2) overrepresented in cases. Rs1912960 has been associated with ASD and rs211037 with epilepsy. GABRA4 is associated with autism in the Argentinean dataset independently or in combination with GABRG2. PMID:26239769

  20. Honeybee Kenyon cells are regulated by a tonic GABA receptor conductance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary J; Harvey, Jenni

    2014-10-15

    The higher cognitive functions of insects are dependent on their mushroom bodies (MBs), which are particularly large in social insects such as honeybees. MB Kenyon cells (KCs) receive multisensory input and are involved in associative learning and memory. In addition to receiving sensory input via excitatory nicotinic synapses, KCs receive inhibitory GABAergic input from MB feedback neurons. Cultured honeybee KCs exhibit ionotropic GABA receptor currents, but the properties of GABA-mediated inhibition in intact MBs are currently unknown. Here, using whole cell recordings from KCs in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that KCs exhibit a tonic current that is inhibited by picrotoxin but not by bicuculline. Bath application of GABA (5 μM) and taurine (1 mM) activate a tonic current in KCs, but l-glutamate (0.1-0.5 mM) has no effect. The tonic current is strongly potentiated by the allosteric GABAA receptor modulator pentobarbital and is reduced by inhibition of Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+) or nifedipine. Noise analysis of the GABA-evoked current gives a single-channel conductance value for the underlying receptors of 27 ± 3 pS, similar to that of resistant to dieldrin (RDL) receptors. The amount of injected current required to evoke action potential firing in KCs is significantly lower in the presence of picrotoxin. KCs recorded in an intact honeybee head preparation similarly exhibit a tonic GABA receptor conductance that reduces neuronal excitability, a property that is likely to contribute to the sparse coding of sensory information in insect MBs. PMID:25031259

  1. Neurosteroid Structure-Activity Relationships for Functional Activation of Extrasynaptic δGABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-04-01

    Synaptic GABAA receptors are primary mediators of rapid inhibition in the brain and play a key role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and other neurologic disorders. The δ-subunit GABAA receptors are expressed extrasynaptically in the dentate gyrus and contribute to tonic inhibition, promoting network shunting as well as reducing seizure susceptibility. However, the neurosteroid structure-function relationship at δGABA(A) receptors within the native hippocampus neurons remains unclear. Here we report a structure-activity relationship for neurosteroid modulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibition in the murine dentate gyrus granule cells. We recorded neurosteroid allosteric potentiation of GABA as well as direct activation of tonic currents using a wide array of natural and synthetic neurosteroids. Our results shows that, for all neurosteroids, the C3α-OH group remains obligatory for extrasynaptic receptor functional activity, as C3β-OH epimers were inactive in activating tonic currents. Allopregnanolone and related pregnane analogs exhibited the highest potency and maximal efficacy in promoting tonic currents. Alterations at the C17 or C20 region of the neurosteroid molecule drastically altered the transduction kinetics of tonic current activation. The androstane analogs had the weakest modulatory response among the analogs tested. Neurosteroid potentiation of tonic currents was completely (approximately 95%) diminished in granule cells from δ-knockout mice, suggesting that δ-subunit receptors are essential for neurosteroid activity. The neurosteroid sensitivity of δGABA(A) receptors was confirmed at the systems level using a 6-Hz seizure test. A consensus neurosteroid pharmacophore model at extrasynaptic δGABA(A) receptors is proposed based on a structure-activity relationship for activation of tonic current and seizure protection. PMID:26857959

  2. Contents of Neo-flavored Tea (GABA Kintaro) Containing γ-Aminobutyric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Yoshiya

    The contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), catechins, theaflavins, caffeine and pheophorbide-a in neo-flavored tea (GABA Kintaro tea) were analyzed. 1)The amounts of GABA were increased over 1.5mg/g by means of infrared ray irradiation with agitation treatment. 2)There was a tendency for the amount of catechins to be decreased by this treatment, whereas the amount of theaflavins tended to increase with the same treatment. The composition of these contents in this GABA Kintaro tea was almost the same as that of black tea. 3)There was a tendency for the amount of caffeine to be decreased by this treatment. 4)There was a tendency for the amount of pheophorbide-a to be increased by this treatment. 5)The result of this study showed that the amounts of GABA and theaflavins in this GABA Kintaro tea were higher than ordinary green tea but contained few catechins.It became clear that the amount of pheophorbide-a in this GABA Kintaro tea was less than the standard value established in processed chlorella.

  3. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis regulates pollen germination and polarized growth in Picea wilsonii.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Tong; Jing, Yanping; Fan, Lusheng; Wan, Yinglang; Lin, Jinxing

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid found in a wide range of organisms. Recently, GABA accumulation has been shown to play a role in the stress response and cell growth in angiosperms. However, the effect of GABA deficiency on pollen tube development remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that specific concentrations of exogenous GABA stimulated pollen tube growth in Picea wilsonii, while an overdose suppressed pollen tube elongation. The germination percentage of pollen grains and morphological variations in pollen tubes responded in a dose-dependent manner to treatment with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP), a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, while the inhibitory effects could be recovered in calcium-containing medium supplemented with GABA. Using immunofluorescence labeling, we found that the actin cables were disorganized in 3-MP treated cells, followed by the transition of endo/exocytosis activating sites from the apex to the whole tube shank. In addition, variations in the deposition of cell wall components were detected upon labeling with JIM5, JIM7, and aniline blue. Our results demonstrated that calcium-dependent GABA signaling regulates pollen germination and polarized tube growth in P. wilsonii by affecting actin filament patterns, vesicle trafficking, and the configuration and distribution of cell wall components. PMID:23900837

  4. Antiseizure Activity of Midazolam in Mice Lacking δ-Subunit Extrasynaptic GABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sandesh D; Younus, Iyan; Clossen, Bryan L; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2015-06-01

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine anticonvulsant with rapid onset and short duration of action. Midazolam is the current drug of choice for acute seizures and status epilepticus, including those caused by organophosphate nerve agents. The antiseizure activity of midazolam is thought to result from its allosteric potentiation of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in the brain. However, there are indications that benzodiazepines promote neurosteroid synthesis via the 18-kDa cholesterol transporter protein (TSPO). Therefore, we investigated the role of neurosteroids and their extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor targets in the antiseizure activity of midazolam. Here, we used δ-subunit knockout (DKO) mice bearing a targeted deletion of the extrasynaptic receptors to investigate the contribution of the extrasynaptic receptors to the antiseizure activity of midazolam using the 6-Hz and hippocampus kindling seizure models. In both models, midazolam produced rapid and dose-dependent protection against seizures (ED50, 0.4 mg/kg). Moreover, the antiseizure potency of midazolam was undiminished in DKO mice compared with control mice. Pretreatment with PK11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide], a TSPO blocker, or finasteride, a 5α-reductase neurosteroid inhibitor, did not affect the antiseizure effect of midazolam. The antiseizure activity of midazolam was significantly reversed by pretreatment with flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist. Plasma and brain levels of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone were not significantly greater in midazolam-treated animals. These studies therefore provide strong evidence that neurosteroids and extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are not involved in the antiseizure activity of midazolam, which mainly occurs through synaptic GABA(A) receptors via direct binding to benzodiazepine sites. This study reaffirms midazolam's use for controlling acute seizures and status epilepticus. PMID:25784648

  5. Levofloxacin, an optical isomer of ofloxacin, has attenuated epileptogenic activity in mice and inhibitory potency in GABA receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Tsutomi, Y; Kimura, Y; Kitano, Y

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterials with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) functionally inhibits the gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptors and thereby induces clonic convulsions. We examined the effects of ofloxacin and its optical isomers on this quinolone-induced neurotoxicity. Norfloxacin at 10(-5) M alone or at 10(-7) M in combination with BPAA (10(-4) M) inhibited [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain synaptic membranes. Ofloxacin and its optical isomers did not affect muscimol binding by themselves. While they slightly reduced muscimol binding at 10(-4) M in combination with BPAA, the inhibitory activity of the l-isomer levofloxacin (DR-3355) on muscimol binding was slightly, but significantly, weaker than that of the d-isomer DR-3354 and ofloxacin. Intracisternal injection of norfloxacin (5 micrograms), ofloxacin, levofloxacin or DR-3354 (50 micrograms each) induced clonic convulsions in mice. The incidence of these convulsions was enhanced by the combination with BPAA (50 micrograms). The epileptogenic activity of levofloxacin was also weaker than that of DR-3354 or ofloxacin when quinolones were given alone or in combination with BPAA. These results suggest that epileptogenic activity of quinolones is closely related to the inhibitory potency in GABA receptor binding and that levofloxacin may have lower neurotoxicity than ofloxacin and DR-3354. PMID:7842825

  6. Effects of GABA(A) receptor blockade on regional cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier disruption in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Hunter, Christine; Liu, Xia; Chi, Youngchan; Weiss, Harvey R

    2011-02-15

    In cerebral ischemia, transmission by the inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is altered. This study was performed to determine whether blockade of GABA(A) receptor would affect regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in a focal ischemic area of the brain. Rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and mechanically ventilated. Fifteen minutes after a permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, one half of the rats were infused with bicuculline 1mg/kg/min iv for 2 min followed by 0.1mg/kg/min iv to the end of the experiment. The other half were infused with normal saline. At one hour after MCA occlusion, rCBF was determined using ¹⁴C-iodoantipyrine and BBB permeability was determined by measuring the transfer coefficient (Ki) of ¹⁴C-α-aminoisobutyric acid. With MCA occlusion, rCBF was decreased in the ischemic cortex (IC) (-70%) in the control rats. In the bicuculline treated rats, the rCBF of the IC was lower (-48%) than the contralateral cortex but higher than the rCBF of the IC of the control rats (+55%). MCA occlusion increased Ki in the IC of the control rats (+72%) and bicuculline administration increased Ki further (+53%) in the IC. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors did not significantly affect rCBF or BBB permeability in the non-ischemic brain regions under isoflurane anesthesia. Our data demonstrated that blockade of GABA(A) receptors increased rCBF and enhanced the BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia. Our data suggest that GABA(A) receptors are involved, at least in part, in modulating rCBF and BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:21094956

  7. eQTL and receptor pharmacology implicate Arg1 and the GABA-A receptor as therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Christopher S.; Quigley, David A.; Wong, Robyn A.; Chen, Justin; Cheng, Christine; Song, Young K.; Wei, Jun S.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Bao, Yun; Goldenberg, David D.; Nguyen, Kim; Gustafson, W. Clay; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Cook, James M.; Kozlov, Serguei; Mao, Jian-Hua; Van Dyke, Terry; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Balmain, Allan; Fan, QiWen; Weiss, William A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The development of targeted therapeutics for neuroblastoma, the third most common tumor in children, has been limited by a poor understanding of growth signaling mechanisms unique to the peripheral nerve precursors from which tumors arise. In this study, we combined genetics with gene expression analysis in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system to implicate arginase 1 and GABA signaling in tumor formation in vivo. In human neuroblastoma cells, either blockade of ARG1 or benzodiazepine-mediated activation of GABA-A receptors induced apoptosis and inhibited mitogenic signaling through AKT and MAPK. These results suggest that ARG1 and GABA influence both neural development and neuroblastoma, and that benzodiazepines in clinical use may have potential for neuroblastoma therapy. PMID:25437558

  8. Isolation, characterization, and tissue-specific expression of GABA A receptor α1 subunit gene of Carassius auratus gibelio after avermectin treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yini; Sun, Qi; Hu, Kun; Ruan, Jiming; Yang, Xianle

    2016-02-01

    Carassius auratus gibelio has been widely cultivated in fish farms in China, with avermectin (AVM) being used to prevent parasite infection. Recently, AVM was found to pass through the Carassius auratus gibelio blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although AVM acts mainly through a GABA receptor and specifically the α1 subunit gene, the most common isoform of the GABA A receptor, which is widely expressed in brain neurons and has been studied in other fish, Carassius auratus gibelio GABA A receptor α1 subunit gene cloning, and whether AVM passes through the BBB to induce Carassius auratus gibelio GABA A receptor α1 subunit gene expression have not been studied. The aim of this study was to clone, sequence, and phylogenetically analyze the GABA A receptor α1 subunit gene and to investigate the correlation of its expression with neurotoxicity in brain, liver, and kidney after AVM treatment by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The α1 subunit gene was 1550 bp in length with an open reading frame of 1380 bp encoding a predicted protein with 459 amino acid residues. The gene contained 128 bp of 5' terminal untranslated region (URT) and 72 bp of 3' terminal UTR. The α1 subunit structural features conformed to the Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels family, which includes a signal peptide, an extracellular domain at the N-terminal, and four transmembrane domains. The established phylogenetic tree indicated that the α1 subunits of Carassius auratus gibelio and Danio rerio were the most closely related to each other. The α1 subunit was found to be highly expressed in brain and ovary, and the α1 mRNA transcription level increased significantly in brain. Moreover, the higher the concentration of AVM was, the higher the GABA A receptor expression was, indicating that AVM can induce significant neurotoxicity to Carassius auratus gibelio. Therefore, the α1 subunit mRNA expression was positively correlated with the neurotoxicity of AVM in

  9. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  10. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  11. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  12. GABA, 5-HT and amino acids in the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and Brachionus rotundiformis.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, W G; Hagiwara, A; Hara, K; Soyano, K; Snell, T W

    2000-11-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) have been shown to increase the reproduction of the Brachionus plicatilis (NH3L strain). In the present study, the endogenous presence of GABA and 5-HT in the rotifers B. plicatilis (NH3L and Kamiura strains) and Brachionus rotundiformis (Langkawi strain) were confirmed by dot blot immunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC showed that GABA and 5-HT concentrations in the three rotifer strains range from 71 to 188 pmol/mg and from 12 to 64 pmol/mg, respectively. A total of 33 amino acids were also detected in B. plicatilis and B. rotundiformis, with glutamic acid, serine, glycine, taurine, threonine, alanine, arginine, proline, valine and isoleucine in high concentrations relative to other amino acids. PMID:11118940

  13. Activation of GABA(A) receptors by taurine and muscimol blocks the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andréa C; De Felice, Fernanda G; Brito-Moreira, Jordano; Ferreira, Sérgio T

    2005-12-01

    The beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is centrally related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is potently neurotoxic to central nervous system neurons. The neurotoxicity of Abeta has been partially related to the over activation of glutamatergic transmission and excitotoxicity. Taurine is a naturally occurring beta-amino acid present in the mammalian brain. Due to its safety and tolerability, taurine has been clinically used in humans in the treatment of a number of non-neurological disorders. Here, we show that micromolar doses of taurine block the neurotoxicity of Abeta to rat hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture. Moreover, taurine also rescues central neurons from the excitotoxicity induced by high concentrations of extracellular glutamate. Neuroprotection by taurine is abrogated by picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. GABA and muscimol, an agonist of the GABA(A) receptor, also block neuronal death induced by Abeta in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. These results suggest that activation of GABA(A) receptors protects neurons against Abeta toxicity in AD-affected regions of the mammalian brain and that taurine should be investigated as a novel therapeutic tool in the treatment of AD and of other neurological disorders in which excitotoxicity plays a relevant role. PMID:16150468

  14. Multiple tyrosine residues at the GABA binding pocket influence surface expression and mediate kinetics of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Laha, Kurt T; Tran, Phu N

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of aromatic residues in the ligand binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, as with other cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels, is undoubtedly important for the ability of neurotransmitters to bind and trigger channel opening. Here, we have examined three conserved tyrosine residues at the GABA binding pocket (β(2) Tyr97, β(2) Tyr157, and β(2) Tyr205), making mutations to alanine and phenylalanine. We fully characterized the effects each mutation had on receptor function using heterologous expression in HEK-293 cells, which included examining surface expression, kinetics of macroscopic currents, microscopic binding and unbinding rates for an antagonist, and microscopic binding rates for an agonist. The assembly or trafficking of GABA(A) receptors was disrupted when tyrosine mutants were expressed as αβ receptors, but interestingly not when expressed as αβγ receptors. Mutation of each tyrosine accelerated deactivation and slowed GABA binding. This provides strong evidence that these residues influence the binding of GABA. Qualitatively, mutation of each tyrosine has a very similar effect on receptor function; however, mutations at β(2) Tyr157 and β(2) Tyr205 are more detrimental than β(2) Tyr97 mutations, particularly to the GABA binding rate. Overall, the results suggest that interactions involving multiple tyrosine residues are likely during the binding process. PMID:23121119

  15. A Comprehensive Optogenetic Pharmacology Toolkit for In Vivo Control of GABA(A) Receptors and Synaptic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Davenport, Christopher M; Smith, Caleb M; Veit, Julia; Wilson, Neil M; Adesnik, Hillel; Kramer, Richard H

    2015-12-01

    Exogenously expressed opsins are valuable tools for optogenetic control of neurons in circuits. A deeper understanding of neural function can be gained by bringing control to endogenous neurotransmitter receptors that mediate synaptic transmission. Here we introduce a comprehensive optogenetic toolkit for controlling GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition in the brain. We developed a series of photoswitch ligands and the complementary genetically modified GABA(A) receptor subunits. By conjugating the two components, we generated light-sensitive versions of the entire GABA(A) receptor family. We validated these light-sensitive receptors for applications across a broad range of spatial scales, from subcellular receptor mapping to in vivo photo-control of visual responses in the cerebral cortex. Finally, we generated a knockin mouse in which the "photoswitch-ready" version of a GABA(A) receptor subunit genomically replaces its wild-type counterpart, ensuring normal receptor expression. This optogenetic pharmacology toolkit allows scalable interrogation of endogenous GABA(A) receptor function with high spatial, temporal, and biochemical precision. PMID:26606997

  16. GABA-BZD Receptor Modulating Mechanism of Panax quinquefolius against 72-h Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety like Behavior: Possible Roles of Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Priyanka; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng) is known for its therapeutic potential against various neurological disorders, but its plausible mechanism of action still remains undeciphered. GABA (Gamma Amino Butyric Acid) plays an important role in sleep wake cycle homeostasis. Thus, there exists rationale in exploring the GABA-ergic potential of Panax quinquefolius as neuroprotective strategy in sleep deprivation induced secondary neurological problems. Objective: The present study was designed to explore the possible GABA-ergic mechanism in the neuro-protective effect of Panax quinquefolius against 72-h sleep deprivation induced anxiety like behavior, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, HPA-axis activation and neuroinflammation. Materials and Methods: Male laca mice were sleep deprived for 72-h by using Grid suspended over water method. Panax quinquefolius (American Ginseng 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was administered alone and in combination with GABA modulators (GABA Cl− channel inhibitor, GABA-benzodiazepine receptor inhibitor and GABAA agonist) for 8 days, starting 5 days prior to 72-h sleep deprivation period. Various behavioral (locomotor activity, mirror chamber test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite levels), mitochondrial complexes, neuroinflammation marker (Tumor Necrosis Factor, TNF-alpha), serum corticosterone, and histopathological sections of brains were assessed. Results: Seventy two hours sleep deprivation significantly impaired locomotor activity, caused anxiety-like behavior, conditions of oxidative stress, alterations in mitochondrial enzyme complex activities, raised serum corticosterone levels, brain TNFα levels and led to neuroinflammation like signs in discrete brain areas as compared to naive group. Panax quinquefolius (100 and 200 mg/kg) treatment restored the behavioral, biochemical, mitochondrial, molecular and histopathological alterations. Pre-treatment of GABA Cl− channel

  17. Identification of Significant Association and Gene-Gene Interaction of GABA Receptor Subunit Genes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D. Q.; Whitehead, P. L.; Menold, M. M.; Martin, E. R.; Ashley-Koch, A. E.; Mei, H.; Ritchie, M. D.; DeLong, G. R.; Abramson, R. K.; Wright, H. H.; Cuccaro, M. L.; Hussman, J. P.; Gilbert, J. R.; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a significant genetic component. Existing research suggests that multiple genes contribute to autism and that epigenetic effects or gene-gene interactions are likely contributors to autism risk. However, these effects have not yet been identified. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, has been implicated in autism etiology. Fourteen known autosomal GABA receptor subunit genes were studied to look for the genes associated with autism and their possible interactions. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened in the following genes: GABRG1, GABRA2, GABRA4, and GABRB1 on chromosome 4p12; GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, GABRG2, and GABRP on 5q34-q35.1; GABRR1 and GABRR2 on 6q15; and GABRA5, GABRB3, and GABRG3 on 15q12. Intronic and/or silent mutation SNPs within each gene were analyzed in 470 white families with autism. Initially, SNPs were used in a family-based study for allelic association analysis—with the pedigree disequilibrium test and the family-based association test—and for genotypic and haplotypic association analysis—with the genotype-pedigree disequilibrium test (geno-PDT), the association in the presence of linkage (APL) test, and the haplotype family-based association test. Next, with the use of five refined independent marker sets, extended multifactor-dimensionality reduction (EMDR) analysis was employed to identify the models with locus joint effects, and interaction was further verified by conditional logistic regression. Significant allelic association was found for markers RS1912960 (in GABRA4; P = .01) and HCV9866022 (in GABRR2; P = .04). The geno-PDT found significant genotypic association for HCV8262334 (in GABRA2), RS1912960 and RS2280073 (in GABRA4), and RS2617503 and RS12187676 (in GABRB2). Consistent with the allelic and genotypic association results, EMDR confirmed the main effect at RS1912960 (in GABRA4). EMDR also identified a

  18. Zolpidem withdrawal induced uncoupling of GABA(A) receptors in vitro associated with altered GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Jembrek, Maja Jazvinšćak; Vlainić, Josipa; Šuran, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotic zolpidem produces its effects via the benzodiazepine binding site in α1-containing GABAA receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of duration of zolpidem treatment and its withdrawal, as well as the role of alpha1-containing GABAA receptors in the development of physical dependence and tolerance. Namely, recombinant receptors can be used to characterize mechanisms involved in different processes in the brain and to delineate the contribution of specific receptor subtypes. To address the influence of chronic zolpidem treatment we exposed HEK293 cells stably expressing alpha1beta2gamma2S recombinant GABAA receptors for seven consecutive days, while withdrawal periods lasted for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Using radioligand binding studies we determined that chronic zolpidem treatment did not induce changes in either GABAA receptor number or in the expression of subunit mRNAs. We observed the enhancement of binding sites and upregulated expression of subunit mRNAs only following 96-hour withdrawal. Moreover, zolpidem treatment and its withdrawal (All time points) induced functional uncoupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites in the GABAA receptor complex. Accordingly, it might be assumed that zolpidem withdrawal-induced uncoupling of GABAA receptors is associated with altered GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression. The results presented here provide an insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms probably underlying adaptive changes of GABAA receptor function in response to chronic usage and withdrawal of zolpidem and perhaps the observed molecular changes could be linked to the tolerance and dependence produced upon prolonged treatment with other GABAergic drugs. PMID:26232993

  19. Plasticity-related binding of GABA and muscarinic receptor sites in piriform cortex of rat: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A.P.; Westrum, L.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This study has used the recently developed in vitro quantitative autoradiographic technique to examine the effects of olfactory bulb (OB) removal on receptor-binding sites in the deafferented piriform cortex (PC) of the rat. The gamma-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR)- and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MChR)-binding sites in layer I of PC were localized using (3H)flunitrazepam and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate as ligands, respectively. From the resultant autoradiograms the optical densities were measured using a Drexel-DUMAS image analysis system. The densities of BZR and MChR-binding sites were markedly increased in the PC ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the contralateral side in those subjects that were operated in adulthood (Postnatal Day 100, PN 100). Comparisons between the unoperated and PN 100 operated animals also showed significant increases in the deafferented PC. In the animals operated on the day of birth (PN 0) no significant differences were seen between the operated and the contralateral PC. The difference between the PN 0 deafferented PC and the unoperated controls shows a slight decrease in BZR density in the former group; however, in case of the MChR there is a slight increase on the side of the lesion. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of PC by OB removal appears to modulate both the BZR-binding sites that are coupled with the GABA-A receptor complex and the MChR-binding sites. The results also suggest that possibility of a role for these neurotransmitter receptor-binding sites in plasticity following deafferentation.

  20. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission. PMID:24398941

  1. Molecular basis for the high THIP/gaboxadol sensitivity of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S

    2011-10-01

    Extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors (eGABARs) allow ambient GABA to tonically regulate neuronal excitability and are implicated as targets for ethanol and anesthetics. These receptors are thought to be heteropentameric proteins made up of two α subunits-either α4 or α6-two β2 or β3 subunits, and one δ subunit. The GABA analog 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo (5,4-c)pyridin-3(-ol) (THIP) has been proposed as a selective ligand for eGABARs. Behavioral and in vitro studies suggest that eGABARs have nanomolar affinity for THIP; however, all published studies on recombinant versions of eGABARs report micromolar affinities. Here, we examine THIP sensitivity of native eGABARs on cerebellar neurons and on reconstituted GABARs in heterologous systems. Concentration-response data for THIP, obtained from cerebellar granule cells and molecular layer interneurons in wild-type and δ subunit knockout slices, confirm that submicromolar THIP sensitivity requires δ subunits. In recombinant experiments, we find that δ subunit coexpression leads to receptors activated by nanomolar THIP concentrations (EC(50) of 30-50 nM for α4β3δ and α6β3δ), a sensitivity almost 1,000-fold higher than receptors formed by α4/6 and β3 subunits. In contrast, γ2 subunit expression significantly reduces THIP sensitivity. Even when δ subunit cDNA or cRNA was supplied in excess, high- and low-sensitivity THIP responses were often apparent, indicative of variable mixtures of low-affinity αβ and high-affinity αβδ receptors. We conclude that δ subunit incorporation into GABARs leads to a dramatic increase in THIP sensitivity, a defining feature that accounts for the unique behavioral and neurophysiological properties of THIP. PMID:21795619

  2. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-08-10

    The interaction of TH-GABA and UC-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system TH-GABA and UC-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between TH-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for TH-GABA-lipids or UC-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, US -alanine and glycine displaced TH-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 M were required and in the partition system TH-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  3. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes α1β2γ(2S), α2β2γ(2S), α3β2γ(2S), α5β2γ(2S) and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) GABA(A)Rs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold) as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(A)R than at the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation

  4. Oxymatrine-carbenoxolone sodium inclusion compound induces antinociception and increases the expression of GABA(A)alpha1 receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junjun; Yang, Guang; Jin, Shaoju; Tao, Lijun; Yu, Jianqiang; Jiang, Yuanxu

    2010-01-25

    Oxymatrine-carbenoxolone sodium inclusion compound (OCSIC) has been reported as a novel painkiller, but its effectiveness and mechanism remain unknown. This study investigated the analgesic effects of OCSIC and the possible alterations in the expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A alpha1 (GABA(A)alpha1) receptors in the central nervous system caused by the compound. The antinociceptive action of the OCSIC was assessed in thermal and chemical behavioral models of nociception. The hot-plate test, tail immersion test, acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-induced pain were used in ICR mice. OCSIC was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In all cases, OCSIC produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects. In addition, OCSIC (150 mg/kg) increased the expression of positive staining cells of GABA(A)alpha1 receptors. These results reveal that the antinociceptive effects of OCSIC may be involved in the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The involvement of GABA(A) receptors in the antinociceptive effect of OCSIC is now under investigation. PMID:19818751

  5. Tonic inhibition in spinal ventral horn interneurons mediated by α5 subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Aguilar, Justo; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; Canto-Bustos, Martha; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2011-08-19

    GABA(A) receptors mediate synaptic and tonic inhibition in many neurons of the central nervous system. These receptors can be constructed from a range of different subunits deriving from seven identified families. Among these subunits, α(5) has been shown to mediate GABAergic tonic inhibitory currents in neurons from supraspinal nuclei. Likewise, immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies have shown the presence of the α(5) subunit in spinal cord neurons, though almost nothing is known about its function. In the present report, using slices of the adult turtle spinal cord as a model system we have recorded a tonic inhibitory current in ventral horn interneurons (VHIs) and determined the functional contribution of the α(5) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors to this current. Patch clamp studies show that the GABAergic tonic inhibitory current in VHIs is not affected by the application of antagonists of the α(4/6) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors, but is sensitive to L-655708, an antagonist of the GABA(A) receptors containing α(5) subunits. Last, by using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we confirmed the expression of the α(5) subunit in the turtle spinal cord. Together, these results suggest that GABA(A) receptors containing the α(5) subunit mediate the tonic inhibitory currents observed in VHIs. PMID:21798246

  6. An atypical residue in the pore of Varroa destructor GABA-activated RDL receptors affects picrotoxin block and thymol modulation.

    PubMed

    Price, Kerry L; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2014-12-01

    GABA-activated RDL receptors are the insect equivalent of mammalian GABAA receptors, and play a vital role in neurotransmission and insecticide action. Here we clone the pore lining M2 region of the Varroa mite RDL receptor and show that it has 4 atypical residues when compared to M2 regions of most other insects, including bees, which are the major host of Varroa mites. We create mutant Drosophila RDL receptors containing these substitutions and characterise their effects on function. Using two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we show that one substitution (T6'M) ablates picrotoxin inhibition and increases the potency of GABA. This mutation also alters the effect of thymol, which enhances both insect and mammalian GABA responses, and is widely used as a miticide. Thymol decreases the GABA EC50 of WT receptors, enhancing responses, but in T6'M-containing receptors it is inhibitory. The other 3 atypical residues have no major effects on either the GABA EC50, the picrotoxin potency or the effect of thymol. In conclusion we show that the RDL 6' residue is important for channel block, activation and modulation, and understanding its function also has the potential to prove useful in the design of Varroa-specific insecticidal agents. PMID:25460510

  7. An atypical residue in the pore of Varroa destructor GABA-activated RDL receptors affects picrotoxin block and thymol modulation

    PubMed Central

    Price, Kerry L.; Lummis, Sarah C.R.

    2014-01-01

    GABA-activated RDL receptors are the insect equivalent of mammalian GABAA receptors, and play a vital role in neurotransmission and insecticide action. Here we clone the pore lining M2 region of the Varroa mite RDL receptor and show that it has 4 atypical residues when compared to M2 regions of most other insects, including bees, which are the major host of Varroa mites. We create mutant Drosophila RDL receptors containing these substitutions and characterise their effects on function. Using two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we show that one substitution (T6′M) ablates picrotoxin inhibition and increases the potency of GABA. This mutation also alters the effect of thymol, which enhances both insect and mammalian GABA responses, and is widely used as a miticide. Thymol decreases the GABA EC50 of WT receptors, enhancing responses, but in T6′M-containing receptors it is inhibitory. The other 3 atypical residues have no major effects on either the GABA EC50, the picrotoxin potency or the effect of thymol. In conclusion we show that the RDL 6′ residue is important for channel block, activation and modulation, and understanding its function also has the potential to prove useful in the design of Varroa-specific insecticidal agents. PMID:25460510

  8. Agonist-specific conformational changes in the α1-γ2 subunit interface of the GABA A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The GABA(A) receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  9. Hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazolyl moiety as bioisoster of the carboxy function. A computational study on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) related compounds.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Lolli, Marco L

    2008-04-01

    Recently, our research group has proposed the hydroxyfurazanyl (4-hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-yl) moiety as a new non-classical isoster of the carboxy function in the design of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues. Some compounds showed significant activity at the GABA(A) receptor, representing the only examples of pentatomic heterocycles bearing an omega-aminoalkyl flexible side chain in the position vicinal to the hydroxy group displaying agonist activity at this receptor subtype. In this work, an ab initio analysis of the structural and electronic features of furazan-3-ol is presented, in order to provide a theoretical basis to the claimed bioisosterism with the carboxy function. An ab initio conformational study with the C-PCM implicit solvent model was carried out to elucidate the reasons of the peculiar behaviour of the furazan models. Alongside, another conformational search through molecular dynamics in explicit solvent was accomplished, in order to validate the first method. The electronic features of the 4-hydroxy-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-yl substructure seem to account for a marked stabilising effect of the putative bioactive conformation at the GABA(A) receptor subtype. The 1,2,5-thiadiazole analogue, which shares the same conformational preference of its oxygenated counterpart, was identified as a potential candidate for synthesis and pharmacological testing. Figure 4-(omega-aminoalkyl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole-3-ol analogues of GABA. PMID:18247067

  10. Insecticidal 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides specifically bind with high affinity to a novel allosteric site in housefly GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Nakao, Toshifumi; Sato, Kazuyuki; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs) are an important target for existing insecticides such as fiproles. These insecticides act as noncompetitive antagonists (channel blockers) for insect GABARs by binding to a site within the intrinsic channel of the GABAR. Recently, a novel class of insecticides, 3-benzamido-N-phenylbenzamides (BPBs), was shown to inhibit GABARs by binding to a site distinct from the site for fiproles. We examined the binding site of BPBs in the adult housefly by means of radioligand-binding and electrophysiological experiments. 3-Benzamido-N-(2,6-dimethyl-4-perfluoroisopropylphenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (BPB 1) (the N-demethyl BPB) was a partial, but potent, inhibitor of [(3)H]4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (GABA channel blocker) binding to housefly head membranes, whereas the 3-(N-methyl)benzamido congener (the N-methyl BPB) had low or little activity. A total of 15 BPB analogs were tested for their abilities to inhibit [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to the head membranes. The N-demethyl analogs, known to be highly effective insecticides, potently inhibited the [(3)H]BPB 1 binding, but the N-methyl analogs did not even though they, too, are considered highly effective. [(3)H]BPB 1 equally bound to the head membranes from wild-type and dieldrin-resistant (rdl mutant) houseflies. GABA allosterically inhibited [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. By contrast, channel blocker-type antagonists enhanced [(3)H]BPB 1 binding to housefly head membranes by increasing the affinity of BPB 1. Antiparasitic macrolides, such as ivermectin B1a, were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]BPB 1 binding. BPB 1 inhibited GABA-induced currents in housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it failed to inhibit l-glutamate-induced currents in inhibitory l-glutamate receptors. Overall, these findings indicate that BPBs act at a novel allosteric site that is different from the site for channel blocker-type antagonists and that is probably overlapped with the site for macrolides

  11. Linking Metabolism to Membrane Signaling: The GABA-Malate Connection.

    PubMed

    Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2016-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration increases rapidly in tissues when plants encounter abiotic or biotic stress, and GABA manipulation affects growth. This, coupled to GABA's well-described role as a neurotransmitter in mammals, led to over a decade of speculation that GABA is a signal in plants. The discovery of GABA-regulated anion channels in plants provides compelling mechanistic proof that GABA is a legitimate plant-signaling molecule. Here we examine research avenues unlocked by this finding and propose that these plant 'GABA receptors' possess novel properties ideally suited to translating changes in metabolic status into physiological responses. Specifically, we suggest they have a role in signaling altered cycling of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates during stress via eliciting changes in electrical potential differences across membranes. PMID:26723562

  12. Felbamate is a subunit selective modulator of recombinant gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Timothy A; Otto, James F; Wilcox, Karen S; White, H Steve

    2006-12-15

    Felbamate (2-phenyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate) is clinically available for the treatment of refractory epileptic seizures, and is known to modulate several ion channels including gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors. To determine felbamate subunit selectivity for GABA(A) receptors we expressed 15 different GABA(A) receptor combinations in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Felbamate positively modulated GABA-currents of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2S), alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2S), alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2S) and alpha(2)beta(3)gamma(2S), whereas felbamate was either ineffective or negatively modulated the other 11 receptor combinations. Regional distributions of GABA(A) receptor subunits suggest that felbamate may differentially modulate distinct inhibitory circuits, a possibility that may have relevance to felbamate efficacy in refractory epilepsies. PMID:17056029

  13. P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity GABA and glutamate transport into rat brain cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, A R; Lobo, M G; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P; Cordeiro, J M

    2015-10-15

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity amino-acid transporters play crucial roles in terminating synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is lack of information about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of amino-acid transport by fast-acting neuromodulators, like ATP. Here, we investigated whether activation of the ATP-sensitive P2X7 receptor modulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake into nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of the rat cerebral cortex. Radiolabeled neurotransmitter accumulation was evaluated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The cell-permeant sodium-selective fluorescent indicator, SBFI-AM, was used to estimate Na(+) influx across plasma membrane. 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-300 μM), a prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist, concentration-dependently decreased [(3)H]GABA (14%) and [(14)C]glutamate (24%) uptake; BzATP decreased transport maximum velocity (Vmax) without affecting the Michaelis constant (Km) values. The selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079 (3 μM), prevented inhibition of [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μM). The inhibitory effect of BzATP coincided with its ability to increase intracellular Na(+) and was mimicked by Na(+) ionophores, like gramicidin and monensin. Increases in intracellular Na(+) (with veratridine or ouabain) or substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)(+) all decreased [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake and attenuated BzATP effects. Uptake inhibition by BzATP (100 μM) was also attenuated by calmidazolium, which selectively inhibits Na(+) currents through the P2X7 receptor pore. In conclusion, disruption of the Na(+) gradient by P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates high-affinity GABA and glutamate uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes. Interference with amino-acid transport efficacy may constitute a novel target for therapeutic management of cortical excitability. PMID

  14. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABA[subscript B] receptor GBR2

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L.; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R.

    2012-10-24

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. The metabotropic GABA{sub B} receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABA{sub B} receptor has been implicated in several neurological disorders. GABA{sub B} receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABA{sub B} receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system.

  15. Interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with GABA sub A and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Devaud, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are potent proconvulsants in the rat. All pyrethroids evincing proconvulsant activity elicited a similar 25-30% maximal reduction of seizure threshold. The Type II pyrethroids were the most potent proconvulsants with 1R{alpha}S, cis cypermethrin having an ED{sub 50} value of 6.3 nmol/kg. The proconvulsant activity of both Type I and Type II pyrenthroids was blocked by pretreatment with PK 11195, the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) antagonist. In contrast, phenytoin did not antagonize the proconvulsant activity of either deltamethrin or permethrin. Pyrethroids displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 to rat brain membranes with a significant correlation between the log EC{sub 50} values for their activities as proconvulsants and the log IC{sub 50} values for their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 binding. Both Ro5-4864 and pyrethroid insecticides were found to influence specific ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding in a GABA-dependent manner. PK 11195 and the Type II pyrethroid, deltamethrin antagonized the Ro5-4864-induced modulation of ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding. Pyrethroid insecticides, Ro5-4864 and veratridine influenced GABA-gated {sup 36}Chloride influx. Moreover, the Type II pyrethroids elicited an increase in {sup 36}chloride influx in the absence of GABA-stimulation. Both of these actions were antagonized by PK 11195 and tetrodotoxin.

  16. Abuse Potential of Soma: the GABA(A) Receptor as a Target.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Lorie A; Gatch, Michael B; Forster, Michael J; Dillon, Glenn H

    2009-01-01

    Soma(®) (carisoprodol) is an increasingly abused, centrally-acting muscle relaxant. Despite the prevalence of carisoprodol abuse, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Its sedative effects, which contribute to its therapeutic and recreational use, are generally attributed to the actions of its primary metabolite, meprobamate, at GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R). Meprobamate is a controlled substance at the federal level; ironically, carisoprodol is not currently classified as such. Using behavioral and molecular pharmacological approaches, we recently demonstrated carisoprodol, itself, is capable of modulating GABA(A)R function in a manner similar to central nervous system depressants. Its functional similarities with this highly addictive class of drugs may contribute to the abuse potential of carisoprodol. The site of action of carisoprodol has not been identified; based on our studies, interaction with benzodiazepine or barbiturate sites is unlikely. These recent findings, when coupled with numerous reports in the literature, support the contention that the non-controlled status of carisoprodol should be reevaluated. PMID:20419052

  17. Synthesis of novel cognition enhancers with pyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]benzotriazine core acting at γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Gabriella; Ciciani, Giovanna; Costanzo, Annarella; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ciattini, Samuele

    2013-04-15

    Memory dysfunction associated with aging, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders represents an increasing medical need. Advances in research exploring the biological mechanisms underlying learning and memory have opened new potential approaches for development of memory-enhancing therapies addressed to selective neuronal targets. In this work, we synthesized some derivatives with a pyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]benzotriazine core to identify ligands on GABAA receptors subtype (benzodiazepine site on GABAA-receptor) endowed with the potential of enhancing cognition activity without the side effects usually associated with non-selective GABAA modulators. In fact, there is much evidence that GABAA-R (γ-aminobutyric acid, type A receptor) subtype ligands have relevance in learning and memory. In vitro and in vivo tests have been performed. Pharmacological data indicate that compounds 7, 13, 14 and 22 act as dual functional modulators of GABAA-Rs (promnemonic and anxiolytic agents) while only compounds 3 and 10 stand out as selectively displaying good antiamnesic and procognitive activity (1 and 3 mg/kg, respectively). PMID:23490154

  18. Electrophysiological study of SR 42641, a novel aminopyridazine derivative of GABA: antagonist properties and receptor selectivity of GABAA versus GABAB responses.

    PubMed Central

    Desarmenien, M.; Desaulles, E.; Feltz, P.; Hamann, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new arylamino-pyridazine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivative, SR 42641, has been tested for its ability to antagonize the actions of GABA on mammalian sensory neurones. SR 42641 and bicuculline reversibly decreased GABAA-induced depolarizations and currents recorded intracellularly from dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Dose-response curves were shifted to the right in a parallel fashion. KB values (determined under voltage clamp conditions) were respectively 0.12 +/- 0.05 and 0.38 +/- 0.08 microM. Similar values were obtained with current clamp recording conditions. The study of the GABA-induced Cl- current under voltage-clamp conditions did not show any voltage-dependency of the antagonist effect of SR 42641. In nodose ganglion neurones, SR 42641 (0.4-4.5 microM) did not alter the (-)-baclofen-induced shortening of the calcium component of action potentials. At concentrations higher than 10 microM, SR 42641 itself prolonged calcium-dependent action potentials. Patch-clamp recordings from DRG cultured neurones indicated that SR 42641 did not affect the calcium current responsible for sustained calcium entry into cells. We conclude that SR 42641 is a potent competitive GABA antagonist, specific for the GABAA receptor. It does not act at the level of the chloride ionophore. PMID:2435350

  19. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils. PMID:24141311

  20. Meta-diamide insecticides acting on distinct sites of RDL GABA receptor from those for conventional noncompetitive antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinich; Nomura, Michikazu; Hirase, Kangetsu

    2013-04-01

    The RDL GABA receptor is an attractive target of insecticides. Here we demonstrate that meta-diamides [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamides] are a distinct class of RDL GABA receptor antagonists showing high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. We also suggest that the mode of action of the meta-diamides is distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs), such as fipronil, picrotoxin, lindane, dieldrin, and α-endosulfan. Using a membrane potential assay, we examined the effects of the meta-diamide 3-benzamido-N-(2-bromo-4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-fluorobenzamide (meta-diamide 7) and NCAs on mutant Drosophila RDL GABA receptors expressed in Drosophila Mel-2 cells. NCAs had little or no inhibitory activity against at least one of the three mutant receptors (A2'S, A2'G, and A2'N), which were reported to confer resistance to NCAs. In contrast, meta-diamide 7 inhibited all three A2' mutant receptors, at levels comparable to its activity with the wild-type receptor. Furthermore, the A2'S·T6'V mutation almost abolished the inhibitory effects of all NCAs. However, meta-diamide 7 inhibited the A2'S・T6'S mutant receptor at the same level as its activity with the wild-type receptor. In contrast, a G336M mutation in the third transmembrane domain of the RDL GABA receptor abolished the inhibitory activities of meta-diamide 7, although the G336M mutation had little effect on the inhibitory activities of conventional NCAs. Molecular modeling studies also suggested that the binding site of meta-diamides was different from those of NCAs. Meta-diamide insecticides are expected to be prominent insecticides effective against A2' mutant RDL GABA receptors with a different mode of action. PMID:23416568

  1. Two types of functionally different GABAA receptors mediate GABA modulation of cholinergic transmission in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, R; Pencheva, N

    1995-08-01

    1. The effects of GABA (1 microM-2 mM) on longitudinally or circularly oriented organ bath preparations of cat terminal ileum consisted of a relaxation phase with an inhibition of the rhythmic spontaneous phasic contractions, followed by a phase of contractions characterized by an elevation in basal tone and an increase in amplitude of the spontaneous phasic contractions. 2. Muscimol (100 microM), but not baclofen (100 microM), mimicked the relaxation phase of the response to applied GABA (100 microM) in all tissue preparations. In addition, muscimol induced a phase of contractile activity in the circular muscle layer whilst baclofen exerted a 'GABA-like' contractile effect on the longitudinal muscle layer. Bicuculline (30 microM) or picrotoxinin (30 microM) antagonized the GABA- or muscimol-induced relaxations in all preparations and decreased the GABA- but not the baclofen-induced contractions of the longitudinal muscle layer. 3. Tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM) or atropine (0.1 microM) prevented the bicuculline-sensitive phases of the GABA or muscimol effects on both muscle layers but not the contractile effect of baclofen on the longitudinal muscle layer. 4. The bicuculline-sensitive phases of the GABA effect on both muscle layers were almost completely eliminated by 1 nM pirenzepine. At this concentration pirenzepine did not affect the electrically-evoked cholinergic twitch contractions or contractile responses to applied acetylcholine of both muscle layers. 5. During electrically-evoked cholinergic twitch contractions of both muscle layers, GABA (100 microM) had an inhibitory effect. The inhibition occurred in the presence of pirenzepine (1 nM) but not of bicuculline (30 microM). 6. It is suggested that two types of functionally different bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptors mediate an exitatory presynaptic and an inhibitory prejunctional action of GABA on the cholinergic transmission in cat terminal ileum. PMID:8576270

  2. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  3. Expression of GABA A receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA and protein in rat neocortex following photothrombotic infarction.

    PubMed

    Kharlamov, Elena A; Downey, Kathy L; Jukkola, Peter I; Grayson, Dennis R; Kelly, Kevin M

    2008-05-19

    Photothrombotic infarcts of the neocortex result in structural and functional alterations of cortical networks, including decreased GABAergic inhibition, and can generate epileptic seizures within 1 month of lesioning. In our study, we assessed the involvement and potential changes of cortical GABA A receptor (GABA AR) alpha1 subunits at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days after photothrombosis. Quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis were used to investigate GABA AR alpha1 subunit mRNA and protein levels in proximal and distal regions of perilesional cortex and in homotopic areas of young adult Sprague-Dawley rats. GABA AR alpha1 subunit mRNA levels were decreased ipsilateral and contralateral to the infarct at 7 days, but were increased bilaterally at 30 days. GABA AR alpha1 subunit protein levels revealed no significant change in neocortical areas of both hemispheres of lesioned animals compared with protein levels of sham-operated controls at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days. At 30 days, GABA AR alpha1 subunit protein expression was significantly increased in lesioned animals within proximal and distal regions of perilesional cortex compared with distal neocortical areas contralaterally (Student's t-test, p<0.05). Short- and long-term alterations of mRNA and protein levels of the GABA AR alpha1 subunit ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion may influence alterations in cell surface receptor subtype expression and GABA AR function following ischemic infarction and may be associated with formative mechanisms of poststroke epileptogenesis. PMID:18407248

  4. Pharmacology of GABA.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B

    1982-01-01

    GABA-ergic systems are involved in all the main functions of the brain. In most brain regions impairment of this system produces epileptic activity. GABA-mediated inhibitory function can be enhanced by drugs of at least seven different types. They act on the metabolism or synaptic release of GABA, or its reuptake into neurones of glia, or on various components of the GABA receptor complex (GABA recognition site, "benzodiazepine" receptor or chloride ionophore). Among such compounds, those which act most specifically and potently on GABA receptors remain primarily research tools. Among compounds in clinical use, valproate, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsant barbiturates al enhance GABA-mediated inhibition. In the future, new inhibitors of GABA uptake, new GABA agonists and potent inhibitors of GABA-transaminase are likely to become available. Trials of drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function have been made in a wide variety of neurological disorders. In most forms of epilepsy a therapeutic effect is evident. Real benefit from GABA therapies has not been demonstrated in the principal disorders of movement (Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease, dystonias), except in so far as they have a myoclonic or paroxysmal component. Among psychiatric disorders the acute symptoms of schizophrenia are exacerbated by enhanced GABA-ergic function. Abstinence syndromes (alcohol, barbiturate or narcotic withdrawal) are ameliorated by drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function, and there is some evidence for a beneficial action in anxiety states and mania. Attempts to relate the molecular neurobiology of GABA with clinical pharmacology are of very recent origin. Improved understanding of the variety of GABA receptor mechanisms will provide the key to the more selective pharmacological manipulations that are required for therapeutic success. PMID:6214305

  5. The neonicotinoid imidacloprid, and the pyrethroid deltamethrin, are antagonists of the insect Rdl GABA receptor.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Brooke, Basil D; Bermudez, Isabel; Jones, Andrew K

    2015-11-01

    A mutation in the second transmembrane domain of the GABA receptor subunit, Rdl, is associated with resistance to insecticides such as dieldrin and fipronil. Molecular cloning of Rdl cDNA from a strain of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, which is highly resistant to dieldrin revealed this mutation (A296G) as well as another mutation in the third transmembrane domain (T345M). Wild-type, A296G, T345M and A296G + T345M homomultimeric Rdl were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and their sensitivities to fipronil, deltamethrin, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT), imidacloprid and spinosad were measured using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Spinosad and DDT had no agonist or antagonist actions on Rdl. However, fipronil, deltamethrin and imidacloprid decreased GABA-evoked currents. These antagonistic actions were either reduced or abolished with the A296G and the A296G + T345M mutations while T345M alone appeared to have no significant effect. In conclusion, this study identifies another mutation in the mosquito Rdl that is associated with insecticide resistance. While T345M itself does not affect insecticide sensitivity, it may serve to offset the structural impact of A296G. The present study also highlights Rdl as a potential secondary target for neonicotinoids and pyrethroids. We show for the first time that deltamethrin (a pyrethroid insecticide) and imidacloprid (a neonicotinoid insecticide) act directly on the insect GABA receptor, Rdl. Our findings highlight Rdl as a potential secondary target of pyrethroids and neonicotinoids mutations in which may contribute to resistance to these widely used insecticides. PMID:26296809

  6. Pharmacodynamic effects and possible therapeutic uses of THIP, a specific GABA-agonist.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A V; Svendsen, O; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1982-10-22

    THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) is a potent and specific GABA receptor agonist which does not influence the GABA uptake system or GABA metabolizing enzymes. The specificity for the GABA receptor is also demonstrated by lack of action on monoaminergic, cholinergic, histaminergic or opiate receptors. Since in recent years GABA receptor stimulants-among others THIP--have become available many have speculated as to what clinical indication GABA-ergic stimulation might be an important element. The first suggestion was that GABA-ergic drugs by an inhibitory effect on the dopamine neurons would improve the antischizophrenic effect of neuroleptics and improve tardive dyskinesia. Furthermore, studies on brains of deceased Parkinson and Huntington's chorea patients have demonstrated a low level of GABA and its synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the basal ganglia. Also in epilepsy and diseases with dementia a deficit in the GABA system has been proposed. Therefore a therapeutic strategy for these diseases may be supplementary treatment with drugs which increase GABA receptor activity. Furthermore, recent results in humans have shown that GABA agonists perhaps also could be of benefit in mania and depressions. When considering the neurophysiological elements of nociception and muscle tone it is also reasonable to suggest that GABA-ergic stimulation may reduce pain perception and muscle tone. PMID:6292818

  7. Presynaptic GABAB Autoreceptor Regulation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Mediated [3H]-GABA Release from Mouse Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Grady, Sharon R.; Marks, Michael J.; Collins, Allan C.; Stitzel, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can elicit neurotransmitter release from presynaptic nerve terminals. Mechanisms contributing to cell-and-terminal specific regulation of nAChR-mediated neurotransmitter exocytosis are not fully understood. The experiments discussed here examine how activation of GABAB auto- and hetero-receptors suppress nAChR-mediated release of [3H]-GABA and [3H]-dopamine (3H-DA) from mouse striatal synaptosomes. Activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors with (R)-baclofen decreased both [3H]-GABA and [3H]-DA release evoked by potassium depolarization. However, when nAChRs were activated with ACh to evoke neurotransmitter release, (R)-baclofen had no effect on [3H]-DA release, but potently inhibited ACh-evoked [3H]-GABA release. Inhibition of nAChR-evoked [3H]-GABA release by (R)-baclofen was time sensitive and the effect was lost after prolonged exposure to the GABAB agonist. The early inhibitory effect of GABA activation on ACh-evoked [3H]-GABA release was partially attenuated by antagonists of the phosphatase, calcineurin. Furthermore, antagonists of protein kinase C (PKC) prevented the time-dependent loss of the inhibitory (R)-baclofen effect on [3H]-GABA release. These results suggest that α4β2*-nAChRs present on GABAergic nerve terminals in the striatum are subject to functional regulation by GABAB autoreceptors that is apparently cell-type specific, since it is absent from DAergic striatal nerve terminals. In addition, the functional modulation of α4β2*-type nAChRs on striatal GABAergic nerve terminals by GABAB autoreceptor activation is time-sensitive and appears to involve opposing actions of calcineurin and PKC. PMID:24953818

  8. Biphasic effects of direct, but not indirect, GABA mimetics and antagonists on haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Worms, P; Lloyd, K G

    1980-03-01

    At very low doses the GABA agonists SL 76002 and muscimol diminish haloperidol-induced catalepsy. At somewhat higher doses these compounds potentiate catalepsy. Biphasic effects on DA-receptor mediated functions have previously been noted with bicuculline and picrotoxinin. In contrast, manipulation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by GABA mimetics is also observed with dipropylacetate, delta-aminovaleric acid and gamma-acetylenic GABA. This GABA-mimetic potentiation of catakepsy was blocked by the coadministration of bicuculline. These results confirm and extend the hypothesis that GABA-neurons influence DA neuron function. Furthermore they suggest that more than one group of GABA receptors influence directly and/or indirectly DA neuronal function, with different resultant effects. PMID:7189827

  9. Tonotopic changes in GABA receptor expression in guinea pig inferior colliculus after partial unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Rodger, J; Mulders, W H A M; Robertson, D

    2010-06-25

    Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the topographic distribution of the alpha1 subunit of the GABA receptor (GABRA1) in guinea pig inferior colliculus after treatments that caused a unilateral loss of peripheral neural sensitivity in the high-frequency regions of the cochlea. Both forms of treatment (direct mechanical lesion of the cochlea and acoustic overstimulation) resulted in a significant decrease in GABRA1 labeling in regions of the contralateral inferior colliculus in which high-frequency sound stimuli are represented. This localized region of reduced inhibitory receptor expression corresponds to the region in which hyperactivity of inferior colliculus neurons has been shown to develop after such treatments. The results strengthen the notion of a causal link between reduced GABRA1 expression and neural hyperactivity in central auditory nuclei and provide a possible mechanism for the development of phantom auditory sensations, or tinnitus. PMID:20438718

  10. Etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC increase the GABA efficacy of recombinant α4β3δ and α4β3 GABAA receptors expressed in HEK cells

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W.; Otis, Thomas S.; Wallner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    General anesthetics, once thought to exert their effects through non-specific membrane effects, have highly specific ion channel targets that can silence neuronal populations in the nervous system, thereby causing unconsciousness and immobility, characteristic of general anesthesia. Inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs), particularly highly GABA-sensitive extrasynaptic receptor subtypes that give rise to sustained inhibitory currents, are uniquely sensititive to GABAAR-active anesthetics. A prominent population of extrasynaptic GABAARs is made up of α4, β2 or β3, and δ subunits. Considering the demonstrated importance of GABA receptor β3 subunits for in vivo anesthetic effects of etomidate and propofol, we decided to investigate the effects of GABA anesthetics on ”extrasynaptic” α4β3δ and also binary α4β3 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Consistent with previous work on similar receptor subtypes we show that maximal GABA currents through “extrasynaptic” α4β3δ receptors, receptors defined by sensitivity to EtOH (30 mM) and the β-carboline β-CCE (1 µM), are enhanced by the GABAAR-active anesthetics etomidate propofol, and the neurosteroid anesthetic THDOC. Furthermore, we show that receptors formed by α4β3 subunits alone also show high GABA sensitivity and that saturating GABA responses of α4β3 receptors are increased to the same extent by etomidate, propofol, and THDOC as are α4β3δ receptors. Therefore, both α4β3 and α4β3δ receptors show low GABA efficacy, and GABA is also a partial agonist on certain binary αβ receptor subtypes. Increasing GABA efficacy on α4/6β3δ and α4β3 receptors is likely to make an important contribution to the anesthetic effects of etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC. PMID:18778723

  11. GABA(A) receptor overexpression in the lateral hypothalamic area attenuates gastric ischemia‑reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Zhu, Tao; Xie, Guilin; Lou, Xiangxin; Li, Shibao; Zhou, Yan; Deng, Zhenxu; Chu, Dechang; Lou, Jiyu; Du, Dongshu

    2015-02-01

    Excessive activation of the greater splanchnic nerve (GSN) has previously been determined to contribute to the progression of gastric ischemia‑reperfusion (GI‑R) injury. The present study was designed to estimate the protective effects of GABAA receptor (GABA(A)R) overexpression in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) against GI‑R injury. The GI‑R injury model was induced in rats by clamping the celiac artery for 30 min and then reperfusing for 1 h. Microinjection of recombinant adenoviral vectors overexpressing GABA(A)R (Ad‑GABA(A)R) or control adenoviral vectors (Ad‑Con) into the LHA was conducted in GI‑R and normal control rats. Significant protective effects were observed on day 2 after Ad‑GABA(A)R treatment in the GI‑R injury rats. Ad‑GABA(A)R treatment reduced plasma norepinephrine levels, plasma angiotensin II levels and peripheral GSN activity, but increased the gastric mucosal blood flow, as compared with Ad‑Con treatment. These results indicate that adenoviral vector‑induced GABA(A)R overexpression in the LHA blunts GSN activity and subsequently alleviates the effects of gastric injury in GI‑R rats. PMID:25354809

  12. GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mutation A322D associated with autosomal dominant juvenile myoclonic epilepsy reduces the expression and alters the composition of wild type GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L; Botzolakis, Emanuel J; Hu, Ningning; Gallagher, Martin J

    2010-08-20

    A GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) alpha1 subunit mutation, A322D (AD), causes an autosomal dominant form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (ADJME). Previous studies demonstrated that the mutation caused alpha1(AD) subunit misfolding and rapid degradation, reducing its total and surface expression substantially. Here, we determined the effects of the residual alpha1(AD) subunit expression on wild type GABA(A)R expression to determine whether the AD mutation conferred a dominant negative effect. We found that although the alpha1(AD) subunit did not substitute for wild type alpha1 subunits on the cell surface, it reduced the surface expression of alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha3beta2gamma2 receptors by associating with the wild type subunits within the endoplasmic reticulum and preventing them from trafficking to the cell surface. The alpha1(AD) subunit reduced surface expression of alpha3beta2gamma2 receptors by a greater amount than alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, thus altering cell surface GABA(A)R composition. When transfected into cultured cortical neurons, the alpha1(AD) subunit altered the time course of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current kinetics and reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitudes. These findings demonstrated that, in addition to causing a heterozygous loss of function of alpha1(AD) subunits, this epilepsy mutation also elicited a modest dominant negative effect that likely shapes the epilepsy phenotype. PMID:20551311

  13. The inhibitory role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immunomodulation of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Zhaoqun; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter to suppress the immune-mediated pro-inflammatory reactions, and it has been used in the treatment of many inflammation-related diseases in vertebrates, while its immunomodulatory role in invertebrates has never been reported. In the present study, GABA was found to exist in the hemolymph of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and its concentration decreased slightly from 8.00 ± 0.37 μmol L(-1) at normal condition to 7.73 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1) at 6 h after LPS stimulation, and then increased to 9.34 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1), 8.86 ± 0.68 μmol L(-1) at 12 h and 48 h, respectively. After LPS stimulation, the mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (CgIL-17 and CgTNF) and immune effectors (CgSOD and CgBPI), and the protein expression of NOS increased significantly, and these increased trends were remarkably inhibited by GABA stimulation. At the same time, the phagocytosis rate and apoptosis rate of immunocytes also increased obviously after LPS stimulation, whereas the increase was repressed with the addition of GABA. The results collectively demonstrated that GABA was an indispensable inhibitory agent for both humoral and cellular immune response, which mainly functioned at the late phase of immune response to avoid the excess immune reactions and maintain the immune homeostasis. PMID:26975413

  14. Gamma-Aminobutyric acid and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy: a quantitative radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Pedersen, H.B.; McNamara, J.O.

    1985-10-01

    Quantitative radiohistochemistry was utilized to study alterations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors in the kindling model of epilepsy. The radioligands used for GABA and benzodiazepine receptors were (TH) muscimol and (TH)flunitrazepam, respectively. GABA receptor binding was increased by 22% in fascia dentata of the hippocampal formation but not in neocortex or substantia nigra of kindled rats. Within fascia dentata, GABA receptor binding was increased to an equivalent extent in stratum granulosum and throughout stratum moleculare; no increase was found in dentate hilus or stratum lacunosummoleculare or stratum radiatum of CA1. The increased binding was present at 24 hr but not at 28 days after the last kindled seizure. The direction, anatomic distribution, and time course of the increased GABA receptor binding were paralleled by increased benzodiazepine receptor binding. The anatomic distribution of the increased GABA receptor binding is consistent with a localization to somata and dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. The authors suggest that increased GABA and benzodiazepine receptor binding may contribute to enhanced inhibition of dentate granule cells demonstrated electrophysiologically in kindled animals.

  15. Retinoic Acid, GABA-ergic, and TGF-β Signaling Systems Are Involved in Human Cleft Palate Fibroblast Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Tiziano; Bellucci, Catia; Lilli, Cinzia; Pezzetti, Furio; Carinci, Francesco; Becchetti, Ennio; Carinci, Paolo; Stabellini, Giordano; Calvitti, Mario; Lumare, Eleonora; Bodo, Maria

    2006-01-01

    During embryogenesis, a complex interplay between extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, regulatory molecules, and growth factors mediates morphogenetic processes involved in palatogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), retinoic acid (RA), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic signaling systems are also potentially involved. Using [3H]glucosamine and [35S]methionine incorporation, anion exchange chromatography, semiquantitative radioactive RT-PCR, and a TGF-β binding assay, we aimed to verify the presence of phenotypic differences between primary cultures of secondary palate (SP) fibroblasts from 2-year-old subjects with familial nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (CLP-SP fibroblasts) and age-matched normal SP (N-SP) fibroblasts. The effects of RA—which, at pharmacologic doses, induces cleft palate in newborns of many species—were also studied. We found an altered ECM production in CLP-SP fibroblasts that synthesized and secreted more glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fibronectin (FN) compared with N-SP cells. In CLP-SP cells, TGF-β3 mRNA expression and TGF-β receptor number were higher and RA receptor-α (RARA) gene expression was increased. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that GABA receptor (GABRB3) mRNA expression was upregulated in human CLP-SP fibroblasts. In N-SP and CLP-SP fibroblasts, RA decreased GAG and FN secretion and increased TGF-β3 mRNA expression but reduced the number of TGF-β receptors. TGF-β receptor type I mRNA expression was decreased, TGF-β receptor type II was increased, and TGF-β receptor type III was not affected. RA treatment increased RARA gene expression in both cell populations but upregulated GABRB3 mRNA expression only in N-SP cells. These results show that CLP-SP fibroblasts compared with N-SP fibroblasts exhibit an abnormal phenotype in vitro and respond differently to RA treatment, and suggest that altered crosstalk between RA, GABAergic, and TGF-β signaling systems could be involved in human cleft

  16. Improvement in verbal memory following SSRI augmentation of antipsychotic treatment is associated with changes in the expression of mRNA encoding for the GABA-A receptor and BDNF in PMC of schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Silver, Henry; Mandiuk, Nina; Einoch, Reef; Susser, Ehud; Danovich, Lena; Bilker, Warren; Youdim, Moussa; Weinreb, Orly

    2015-05-01

    Verbal memory impairment in schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) systems. Recent evidence from animal and clinical studies that adding fluvoxamine to antipsychotics alters the expression of transcripts encoding for the GABA-A receptor and BDNF led us to postulate that fluvoxamine augmentation may improve memory in schizophrenia. To test this, we examined the effect of add-on fluvoxamine on verbal memory and other cognitive functions and related it to the expression of mRNA coding for the GABA-A receptor and BDNF in peripheral mononuclear cells (PMC) of schizophrenic patients. Twenty-nine patients completed a 6-week study in which fluvoxamine (100 mg/day) was added to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Verbal memory, abstraction working memory, object and face recognition, and psychomotor speed and clinical symptoms were assessed at baseline and after 3 and 6 weeks of treatment. Blood samples were taken at baseline and weeks 1, 3, and 6 and PMC was assayed for the GABA-A beta3 receptor and BDNF mRNA by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Associative and logical verbal memory improved significantly and showed a significant correlation with changes in PMC BDNF and GABA-A beta3 receptor mRNA, which increased during treatment. Abstraction and object recognition improved, but this did not correlate with PMC measures. Negative and positive symptoms improved significantly; the latter showed significant correlations with changes in PMC measures. Addition of fluvoxamine to antipsychotics improves verbal memory. It is postulated that the mechanism involves enhanced GABA-A receptor/BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:25756551

  17. GABA receptor subunit distribution and FMRP-mGluR5 signaling abnormalities in the cerebellum of subjects with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Folsom, Timothy D

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. GABAergic receptor abnormalities have been documented in several major psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism. Abnormal expression of mRNA and protein for multiple GABA receptors has also been observed in multiple brain regions leading to alterations in the balance between excitatory/inhibitory signaling in the brain with potential profound consequences for normal cognition and maintenance of mood and perception. Altered expression of GABAA receptor subunits has been documented in fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) knockout mice, suggesting that loss of its protein product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), impacts GABAA subunit expression. Recent postmortem studies from our laboratory have shown reduced expression of FMRP in the brains of subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and autism. FMRP acts as a translational repressor and, under normal conditions, inhibits metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated signaling. In fragile X syndrome (FXS), the absence of FMRP is hypothesized to lead to unregulated mGluR5 signaling, ultimately resulting in the behavioral and intellectual impairments associated with this disorder. Our laboratory has identified changes in mGluR5 expression in autism, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. In the current review article, we discuss our postmortem data on GABA receptors, FMRP, and mGluR5 levels and compare our results with other laboratories. Finally, we discuss the interactions between these molecules and the potential for new therapeutic interventions that target these interconnected signaling systems. PMID:25432637

  18. Importance of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) receptor C-termini for G-protein coupling.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, Sylvia; Schupp, Bettina J; Ikeda, Stephen R; Kuner, Rohini; Steigerwald, Frank; Kornau, Hans-Christian; Köhr, Georg

    2002-05-01

    Functional gamma-aminobutyric acid(B) (GABA(B)) receptors assemble from two subunits, GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2).) This heteromerization, which involves a C-terminal coiled-coil interaction, ensures efficient surface trafficking and agonist-dependent G-protein activation. In the present study, we took a closer look at the implications of the intracellular C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) for G-protein coupling. We generated a series of C-terminal mutants of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) and tested them for physical interaction, surface trafficking, coupling to adenylyl cyclase, and G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells as well as on endogenous calcium channels in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). We found that the C-terminal interaction contributes only partly to the heterodimeric assembly of the subunits, indicating the presence of an additional interaction site. The described endoplasmic reticulum retention signal within the C terminus of GABA(B(1)) functioned only in the context of specific amino acids, which constitute part of the GABA(B(1)) coiled-coil sequence. This finding may provide a link between the retention signal and its shielding by the coiled coil of GABA(B(2).) In HEK293 cells, we observed that the two well-known GABA(B) receptor antagonists [S-(R*,R*)]-[3-[[1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino]-2-hydroxypropyl](cyclohexylmethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP54626) and (+)-(2S)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911) CGP54626 and SCH50911 function as inverse agonists. The C termini of GABA(B(1)) and GABA(B(2)) strongly influenced agonist-independent G-protein coupling, although they were not necessary for agonist-dependent G-protein coupling. The C-terminal GABA(B) receptor mutants described here demonstrate that the active receptor conformation is stabilized by the coiled-coil interaction. Thus, the C-terminal conformation of the GABA(B) receptor may determine its

  19. Screening of GABA(A)-receptor gene mutations in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Lang, D; Burgunder, J-M; Kaelin-Lang, A

    2007-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that GABA-ergic neurotransmission plays a role in the pathogenesis of primary dystonia in humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mutations in the GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 genes encoding the alpha1, beta3, and gamma subunits of the GABA(A) receptor are involved in familial primary dystonia. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the above genes were amplified by PCR from genomic DNA in 28 patients who had primary dystonia and a positive family history but had no mutation in any other genes known to be involved in primary dystonia. The PCR products were analyzed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing of variant conformers compared with normal controls (n = 54). We found no mutations in these genes. We did, however, find a new polymorphism, 559 + 80G>A in intron 5 of GABRA1, and we also confirmed several that were previously reported, including 315C>T in exon 3 and 588C>T in exon 5 of GABRG2, but there were no significant differences between controls and patients in the allele and genotype frequencies of these polymorphisms. In conclusion, mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 appear not to play a major role in the development of familial primary dystonia. PMID:17880575

  20. Effect of diphenylhydantoin on gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinate activity in rat Purkinje cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, E; Gabra-Sanders, T

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of diphenylhydantoin (DPH) upon the levels of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and succinic dehydrogenase in rat Purkinje cells. DPH was administered over 26 days in chronic experiments using controls receiving the same injection vehicle without DPH. Animals in this group received daily 1.25 mg/kg body weight, 12.5 mg/kg body weight, and 50 mg/kg body weight DPH. Acute experiments were carried out over the course of not more than four days, three groups of animals receiving 75 mg/kg body weight, 87.5 mg/kg body weight, and 100 mg/kg body weight DPH. No effect upon succinic dehydrogenase could be demonstrated at any dose level. There was a significant progressive loss of GABA with increasing dosage of DPH. Images PMID:903771

  1. Synthesis of GABAA Receptor Agonists and Evaluation of their α-Subunit Selectivity and Orientation in the GABA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Michaela; Rabe, Holger; Strehle, Axelle; Dieler, Sandra; Debus, Fabian; Dannhardt, Gerd; Akabas, Myles H.; Lüddens, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Drugs used to treat various disorders target GABAA receptors. To develop α subunit selective compounds, we synthesized 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL) derivatives. The 3-isoxazolol moiety was substituted by 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-one, 1,3,5-oxadiazol-2-thione, and substituted 1,2,4-triazol-3-ol heterocycles with modifications to the basic piperidine substituent as well as substituents without basic nitrogen. Compounds were screened by [3H]muscimol binding and in patch-clamp experiments with heterologously expressed GABAA αiβ3γ2 receptors (i = 1–6). The effects of 5-aminomethyl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5d were comparable to GABA for all α subunit isoforms. 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-one 5a and 5-piperidin-4-yl-3H- [1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-thione 6a were weak agonists at α3–, α3–, and α5–containing receptors. When coapplied with GABA they were antagonistic inα2–, α4–, and α6–containing receptors and potentiated α3-containing receptors. 6a protected GABA binding site cysteine-substitution mutants α1F64C and α1S68C from reacting with methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate. 6a specifically covalently modified the α1R66C thiol, in the GABA binding site, through its oxadiazolethione sulfur. These results demonstrate the feasibility of synthesizing α subtype selective GABA mimetic drugs. PMID:18651727

  2. SSRI augmentation of antipsychotic alters expression of GABA(A) receptor and related genes in PMC of schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Silver, Henry; Susser, Ehud; Danovich, Lena; Bilker, Warren; Youdim, Moussa; Goldin, Vladimir; Weinreb, Orly

    2011-06-01

    Clinical studies have shown that negative symptoms of schizophrenia unresponsive to antipsychotic given alone can improve after augmentation with SSRI antidepressant. Laboratory investigations into the mechanism of this synergism showed that co-administration of SSRI and antipsychotic produces changes in GABA(A) receptor and related systems, which differ from the effects of each drug alone. To examine the clinical relevance of these findings, the current study examined the effects of SSRI augmentation treatment on GABA(A) receptor and related systems in schizophrenia patients. Schizophrenia patients with high levels of negative symptoms unresponsive to antipsychotic treatment received add-on fluvoxamine (100 mg/d). Blood was taken before and 1, 3 and 6 wk after adding fluvoxamine and peripheral mononuclear cells (PMC) isolated. RNA encoding for GABA(A)β3, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT7 receptors, PKCβ2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was assayed with real-time RT-PCR. Plasma BDNF protein was assayed using ELISA. Clinical symptoms were assessed with validated rating scales. We found significant increase in mRNA encoding for GABA(A)β3 and 5-HT2A, 5-HT7 receptors and BDNF and a reduction in PKCβ2 mRNA. Plasma BDNF protein concentrations were increased. There were significant correlations among the genes. Clinical symptoms improved significantly. mRNA expression of PKCβ2, 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 showed significant associations with clinical symptoms. Combined SSRI+antipsychotic treatment is associated with changes in GABA(A) receptor and in related signalling systems in patients. These changes may be part of the mechanism of clinically effective drug action and may prove to be biomarkers of pharmacological response. PMID:21208484

  3. Evidence for interaction between markers in GABA(A) receptor subunit genes in an Argentinean autism spectrum disorder population.

    PubMed

    Sesarini, Carla V; Costa, Lucas; Naymark, Muriel; Grañana, Nora; Cajal, Andrea R; García Coto, Miguel; Pallia, Roberto C; Argibay, Pablo F

    2014-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can be conceptualized as a genetic dysfunction that disrupts development and function of brain circuits mediating social cognition and language. At least some forms of ASD may be associated with high level of excitation in neural circuits, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been implicated in its etiology. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located within the GABA receptor (GABAR) subunit genes GABRA1, GABRG2, GABRB3, and GABRD were screened. A hundred and thirty-six Argentinean ASD patients and 150 controls were studied, and the contribution of the SNPs in the etiology of ASD was evaluated independently and/or through gene-gene interaction using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method. From the 18 SNP studied, 11 were not present in our Argentinean population (patients and controls) and 1 SNP had minor allele frequency < 0.1%. For the remaining six SNPs, none provided statistical significant association with ASD when considering allelic or genotypic frequencies. Non-significant association with ASD was found for the haplotype analysis. MDR identified evidence for synergy between markers in GABRB3 (chromosome 15) and GABRD (chromosome 1), suggesting potential gene-gene interaction across chromosomes associated with increased risk for autism (testing balanced accuracy: 0.6081 and cross-validation consistency: 10/10, P < 0.001). Considering our Argentinean ASD sample, it can be inferred that GABRB3 would be involved in the etiology of autism through interaction with GABRD. These results support the hypothesis that GABAR subunit genes are involved in autism, most likely via complex gene-gene interactions. PMID:24249596

  4. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways. PMID:26620318

  5. Pyrethroid insecticides and radioligand displacement from the GABA receptor chloride ionophore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Crofton, K.M.; Reiter, L.W.; Mailman, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Radioligand binding displacement studies were conducted to determine the effects of Type I and II pyrethroids on /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FLU), /sup 3/H-muscimol (MUS), and (/sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Competition experiments with /sup 3/H-FLU and /sup 3/H-MUS indicate a lack of competition for binding by the pyrethroids. Type I pyrethroids failed to compete for the binding of (/sup 35/S-TBPS at concentrations as high as 50 pM. Type II pyrethroids inhibited (/sup 35/S-TBPS binding to rat brain synaptosomes with Ki values ranging from 5-10 pM. The data presented suggest that the interaction of Type II pyrethroids with the GABA receptor-ionophore complex is restricted to a site near the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site.

  6. The Timing of the Excitatory-to-Inhibitory GABA Switch Is Regulated by the Oxytocin Receptor via KCC2.

    PubMed

    Leonzino, Marianna; Busnelli, Marta; Antonucci, Flavia; Verderio, Claudia; Mazzanti, Michele; Chini, Bice

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor (Oxtr) play a crucial role in the postnatal transition of neuronal GABA neurotransmission from excitatory to inhibitory, a developmental process known as the GABA switch. Using hippocampal neurons from Oxtr-null mice, we show that (1) Oxtr is necessary for the correct timing of the GABA switch by upregulating activity of the chloride cotransporter KCC2, (2) Oxtr, in a very early and narrow time window, directly modulates the functional activity of KCC2 by promoting its phosphorylation and insertion/stabilization at the neuronal surface, and (3) in the absence of Oxtr, electrophysiological alterations are recorded in mature neurons, a finding consistent with a reduced level of KCC2 and increased susceptibility to seizures observed in adult Oxtr-null mice. These data identify KCC2 as a key target of oxytocin in postnatal events that may be linked to pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27052180

  7. The Timing of the Excitatory-to-Inhibitory GABA Switch Is Regulated by the Oxytocin Receptor via KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Leonzino, Marianna; Busnelli, Marta; Antonucci, Flavia; Verderio, Claudia; Mazzanti, Michele; Chini, Bice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oxytocin and its receptor (Oxtr) play a crucial role in the postnatal transition of neuronal GABA neurotransmission from excitatory to inhibitory, a developmental process known as the GABA switch. Using hippocampal neurons from Oxtr-null mice, we show that (1) Oxtr is necessary for the correct timing of the GABA switch by upregulating activity of the chloride cotransporter KCC2, (2) Oxtr, in a very early and narrow time window, directly modulates the functional activity of KCC2 by promoting its phosphorylation and insertion/stabilization at the neuronal surface, and (3) in the absence of Oxtr, electrophysiological alterations are recorded in mature neurons, a finding consistent with a reduced level of KCC2 and increased susceptibility to seizures observed in adult Oxtr-null mice. These data identify KCC2 as a key target of oxytocin in postnatal events that may be linked to pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27052180

  8. Ethanol-related changes in benzodiazepine receptor ligand modulation of GABA[sub A] receptor-operated chloride channels: Relevance to ethanol tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This study focuses on how ethanol exposure affects biochemical processes associated with the GABA[sub A] complex in the mammalian CNS, and examines the role of these changes in the development of alcohol tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of control mice and those acutely or chronically exposed to alcohol were conducted. Radioligand binding using the low-affinity GABA[sub A] receptor-selective antagonist [[sup 3]H]SR95531 showed no changes in saturation binding analysis of receptor affinity or density. Muscimol-activated [sup 36]Cl[sup [minus

  9. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    PubMed

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  10. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, and genetic mapping of two Rdl-orthologous genes of GABA receptors in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guorui; Gao, Weiyue; Yang, Yihua; Wu, Yidong

    2010-06-01

    The Resistance to dieldrin (Rdl) gene encodes a subunit of the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor. Cyclodiene resistance in many insects is associated with replacement of a single amino acid (alanine at position 302) with either a serine or a glycine in the Rdl gene. Two Rdl-orthologous genes of GABA receptors (PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2) were cloned and sequenced from a susceptible strain (Roth) of Plutella xylostella. PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2 showed 84% and 77% identity with the Rdl gene of Drosophila melanogaster at an amino acid level, respectively. The coding regions of PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2 both comprise ten exons, with two alternative RNA-splicing forms in exon 3 of both genes. At the orthologous position of alanine-302 in D. melanogaster Rdl, PxGABARalpha1 has a conserved alanine at position 282. PxGABARalpha2 has a serine instead of an alanine at the equivalent position. With two informative DNA markers, both PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2 were mapped onto the Z chromosome of P. xylostella. PMID:20513056

  11. Mutations in y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase genes in plants or Pseudomonas syringae reduce bacterial virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a bacterial pathogen of Arabidopsis and tomato that grows in the apoplast. The non-protein amino acid '-amino butyric acid (GABA) is produced by Arabidopsis and tomato and is the most abundant amino acid in the apoplastic fluid of tomato. The DC3000 genome h...

  12. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Interaction between the Neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid and GABAA Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Saxena, Nina C.; Conrad, Kevin A.; Hussain, Arif

    2004-07-01

    Interactions between the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAA receptor ion channels play an important role in the central nervous system. A statistical mechanics model is proposed for the interaction between GABA and GABAA receptors. The model provides good fits to the electrophysiology data as well as an estimation of receptor activation energies, and predicts the temperature dependence consistent with measurements. In addition, the model provides insights into single channel conductance measurements. This model is also applicable to other ligand-gated ion channels with similar pentameric structures.

  13. Estrous cycle regulation of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptor-mediated tonic inhibition and limbic epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Gangisetty, Omkaram; Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2013-07-01

    The ovarian cycle affects susceptibility to behavioral and neurologic conditions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. Deficits in cyclical fluctuations in steroid hormones and receptor plasticity play a central role in physiologic and pathophysiologic menstrual conditions. It has been suggested that synaptic GABA(A) receptors mediate phasic inhibition in the hippocampus and extrasynaptic receptors mediate tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus. Here we report a novel role of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABA(A) receptors as crucial mediators of the estrous cycle-related changes in neuronal excitability in mice, with hippocampus subfield specificity. In molecular and immunofluorescence studies, a significant increase occurred in δ-subunit, but not α4- and γ2-subunits, in the dentate gyrus during diestrus. However, δ-subunit upregulation was not evident in the CA1 region. The δ-subunit expression was undiminished by age and ovariectomy and in mice lacking progesterone receptors, but it was significantly reduced by finasteride, a neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor. Electrophysiologic studies confirmed greater potentiation of GABA currents by progesterone-derived neurosteroid allopregnanolone in dissociated dentate gyrus granule cells in diestrus than in CA1 pyramidal cells. The baseline conductance and allopregnanolone potentiation of tonic currents in dentate granule cells from hippocampal slices were higher than in CA1 pyramidal cells. In behavioral studies, susceptibility to hippocampus kindling epileptogenesis was lower in mice during diestrus. These results demonstrate the estrous cycle-related plasticity of neurosteroid-sensitive, δ-containing GABA(A) receptors that mediate tonic inhibition and seizure susceptibility. These findings may provide novel insight on molecular cascades of menstrual disorders like catamenial epilepsy, premenstrual syndrome, and migraine. PMID:23667248

  14. Anxiolytic-like effects of obovatol isolated from Magnolia obovata: involvement of GABA/benzodiazepine receptors complex.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Ju; Lee, Seung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Su; Kwon, Byoung-Mok; Ma, Yuan; Hwang, Bang-Yeon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2007-10-01

    This experiment was performed to investigate whether obovatol isolated from the leaves of Magnolia obovata has anxiolytic-like effects through GABA-benzodiazepine-receptors Cl(-) channel activation. The anxiolytic-like effects of obovatol in mice were examined using the elevated plus-maze and the automatic hole-board apparatus. Oral administration of obovatol (0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of open arm entries and the spent time on open arm in the elevated plus-maze test, compared with those of saline. Obovatol (0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) also produced anxiolytic-like effects, as reflected by an increase in head-dipping behaviors. These effects were comparable to those of diazepam (1.0 mg/kg), a well known anxiolytic drug. On the other hand, the anxiolytic-like effects of obovatol and diazepam were reversed by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, suggesting that the anxiolytic-like effects of obovatol were involved in GABA-benzodiazepine receptors complex. Obovatol was muscle relaxant by rota-rod test, but its effect was weaker than diazepam. Spontaneous locomotor activity also was inhibited by obovatol. Obovatol selectively increased the GABA(A) receptors alpha(1) subunit expression in amygdala of mouse brain. Obovatol also showed to bind to benzodiazepine receptors competitively in experiments using [(3)H]flunitrazepam in the cerebral cortex of mouse brain. Moreover, obovatol (10, 20 and 50 microM) increased Cl(-) influx and the increased Cl(-) influx was inhibited by flumazenil, in primary cultured neuronal cells and IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that obovatol has anxiolytic-like effects, and these pharmacological effects may be mediated by GABA-benzodiazepine receptors-activated Cl(-) channel opening. PMID:17698274

  15. Cloning, expression patterns, and chromosome localization of three human and two mouse homologues of GABA(A) receptor-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Xin, Y; Yu, L; Chen, Z; Zheng, L; Fu, Q; Jiang, J; Zhang, P; Gong, R; Zhao, S

    2001-06-15

    Type A receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter, contain alpha, beta, delta, gamma, and rho subunits. The gamma subunit has four subtypes: gamma1, gamma2, gamma3, andgamma4. GABA(A) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) was previously demonstrated to act as a linker protein between microtubules and the gamma2 subunit of GABA(A) receptors. However, no other linker proteins have been identified as mediating the linkage of microtubules and the remaining subunits of GABA(A) receptors. In this study we identified three human paralogues (GABARAPL1, GABARAPL2, and GABARAPL3) and two mouse orthologues (Gabarapl1 and Gabarapl2) of human GABARAP, all of which encoded 117 amino acids, as does Gabarapl. The expression patterns of GABARAPL1, GABARAPL2, and GABARAP in 16 adult tissues showed that they were expressed ubiquitously. The expression levels of GABARAPL1 as a 2.3-kb transcript were very high in brain, heart, peripheral blood leukocytes, liver, kidney, placenta, and skeletal muscle, very low in thymus and small intestine, and moderate in other tissues tested. The unique 1.35-kb transcript of GABARAPL2 was expressed at high levels in heart, brain, testis, prostate, ovary, spleen, and skeletal muscle, at very low levels in lung, thymus, and small intestine, and moderately in other tissues tested. For GABARAP, a 1.3-kb transcript was abundantly expressed in all tested tissues with small variation. The expression patterns of Gabarapl1 and Gabarapl2 were similar to those of their counterparts in human. In addition, GABARAPL1 was localized to human chromosome 12p12.3 and GABARAPL2 to 16q22.3-q24.1 by RH mapping, while GABARAP and GABARAPL3 were found to be localized at chromosomes 17p13.2 and 15q25.1, respectively, by searching the related databases. Sequence comparison of the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences shows that GABARAP, GABARAPL1, and GABARAPL2 are composed of four exons each, while GABARAPL3 is distributed only at

  16. Effects of NaCl Replacement with Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the Quality Characteristics and Sensorial Properties of Model Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Hyung-Yong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of γ-aminobutylic acid (GABA) on the quality and sensorial properties of both the GABA/NaCl complex and model meat products. GABA/NaCl complex was prepared by spray-drying, and the surface dimensions, morphology, rheology, and saltiness were characterized. For model meat products, pork patties were prepared by replacing NaCl with GABA. For characteristics of the complex, increasing GABA concentration increased the surface dimensions of the complex. However, GABA did not affect the rheological properties of solutions containing the complex. The addition of 2% GABA exhibited significantly higher saltiness than the control (no GABA treatment). In the case of pork patties, sensory testing indicated that the addition of GABA decreased the saltiness intensity. Both the intensity of juiciness and tenderness of patties containing GABA also scored lower than the control, based on the NaCl reduction. These results were consistent with the quality characteristics (cooking loss and texture profile analysis). Nevertheless, overall acceptability of the pork patties showed that up to 1.5%, patties containing GABA did not significantly differ from the control. Consequently, the results indicated that GABA has a potential application in meat products, but also manifested a deterioration of quality by the NaCl reduction, which warrants further exploration. PMID:26761294

  17. Effect of GABA on oxidative stress in the skeletal muscles and plasma free amino acids in mice fed high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z X; Xia, S F; Qiao, Y; Shi, Y H; Le, G W

    2015-06-01

    Increased levels of plasma free amino acids (pFAAs) can disturb the blood glucose levels in patients with obesity, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS) and are associated with enhanced protein oxidation. Oxidation of proteins, especially in the muscles, can promote protein degradation and elevate the levels of pFAAs. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a food additive, can reduce high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycaemia; however, the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GABA on protein oxidation and pFAAs changes. One hundred male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups that were fed with control diet, HFD and HFD supplied with 0.2%, 0.12% and 0.06% GABA in drinking water for 20 weeks respectively. HFD feeding led to muscular oxidative stress, protein oxidation, pFAA disorders, hyperglycaemia and augmented plasma GABA levels. Treatment with GABA restored normally fasting blood glucose level and dose-dependently inhibited body weight gains, muscular oxidation and protein degradation. While medium and low doses of GABA mitigated HFD-induced pFAA disorders, the high dose of GABA deteriorated the pFAA disorders. Medium dose of GABA increased the levels of GABA, but high dose of GABA reduced the levels of plasma GABA and increased the activity of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the liver. Therefore, treatment with GABA mitigated HFD-induced hyperglycaemia probably by repairing HFD-induced muscular oxidative stress and pFAA disorders in mice. Our data also suggest that an optimal dose of GABA is crucial for the prevention of excess GABA-related decrease in the levels of pFAA and GABA as well as obesity. PMID:25266692

  18. Rundown of GABA type A receptors is a dysfunction associated with human drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ragozzino, D.; Palma, E.; Di Angelantonio, S.; Amici, M.; Mascia, A.; Arcella, A.; Giangaspero, F.; Cantore, G.; Di Gennaro, G.; Manfredi, M.; Esposito, V.; Quarato, P. P.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacotherapeutic strategies have been difficult to develop for several forms of temporal lobe epilepsy, which are consequently treated by surgical resection. To examine this problem, we have studied the properties of transmitter receptors of tissues removed during surgical treatment. We find that when cell membranes, isolated from the temporal neocortex of patients afflicted with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), are injected into frog oocytes they acquire GABA type A receptors (GABAA-receptors) that display a marked rundown during repetitive applications of GABA. In contrast, GABAA-receptor function is stable in oocytes injected with cell membranes isolated from the temporal lobe of TLE patients afflicted with neoplastic, dysgenetic, traumatic, or ischemic temporal lesions (lesional TLE, LTLE). Use-dependent GABAA-receptor rundown is also found in the pyramidal neurons of TLE neocortical slices and is antagonized by BDNF. Pyramidal neurons in cortical slices of a traumatic LTLE patient did not show GABAA-receptor rundown. However, the apparent affinity of GABAA-receptor in oocytes microtransplanted with membranes from all of the epileptic patients studied was smaller than the affinity of receptors transplanted from the nonepileptic brain. We conclude that the use-dependent rundown of neocortical GABAA-receptor represents a TLE-specific dysfunction, whereas the reduced affinity may be a general feature of brains of both TLE and LTLE patients, and we speculate that our findings may help to develop new treatments for TLE and LTLE. PMID:16217016

  19. Changes in benzodiazepine-GABA receptor coupling in an accumbens-habenula circuit after chronic diazepam treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, R. R.; Pratt, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of subacute and of chronic diazepam treatment upon binding to the GABAA receptor have been examined by use of receptor autoradiography for determining flunitrazepam (FNZP) binding, GABA enhancement of FNZP binding. SR 95531 2-(3'-carboxy-2',propyl)-3-amino-6-p-methoxyphenylpyridazinium bromide) binding and GABA binding in parallel sections from rat brain. Prior to the autoradiographic procedures, a behavioural assessment of the rats was made in the elevated plus-maze test of anxiety. 2. Rats receiving diazepam either subacutely (3 days) or chronically (28 days) by both continuous release, from previously implanted subcutaneous silastic capsules, or by daily injection (5 mg kg-1) did not display changes in FNZP or GABA binding in any of the 47 brain structures analysed. Similarly, there were no significant effects of treatment upon mean total entries or on the open:total ratio for entries in the elevated plus-maze. 3. There were reductions in the GABA enhancement of FNZP binding in the nucleus accumbens and central grey after subacute diazepam treatment. This effect persisted in the nucleus accumbens after chronic treatment. Less marked effects occurred in the lateral habenula, dorsal raphe and substantia nigra pars compacta. In the dorsal tegmental nucleus, GABA enhancement of FNZP binding was enhanced after chronic treatment and this was accompanied by reductions in SR 95531 binding. Treatment did not otherwise affect SR 95531 binding, with the exception of the dorsal raphe where binding was decreased after subacute treatment. 4. In general, the patterns of binding produced by the two different treatment routes were very similar. However, SR 95531 binding was lower in certain hippocampal fields in the i.p. treated animals compared to the rats implanted with silastic capsules. 5. It is concluded that repeated administration of diazepam evokes changes in benzodiazepine and GABA receptor coupling, and to a lesser extent changes in low affinity GABA

  20. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  1. GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating fava bean (Vicia faba L.) under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was investigated. GABA content, GAD and DAO activity were significantly increased under hypoxia treatment. Glu and polyamine contents enhanced largely and thus supplied as sufficient substrates for GABA formation. In contrast, GABA content decreased, mainly in the embryo, after removing the hypoxia stress. DAO activity, Glu and polyamines contents decreased, while an increment of GAD activity was observed. This indicated that GAD activity can be not only regulated by hypoxia, but by the rapid growth of embryo after the recovery from hypoxia stress. When treated with AG, DAO activity was almost inhibited completely, and the GABA content decreased by 32.96% and 32.07% after treated for 3 and 5 days, respectively. Hence, it can be inferred that about 30% of GABA formed in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was supplied by polyamine degradation pathway. PMID:23017406

  2. Role for pro-inflammatory cytokines in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 in specific brain regions of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Yin, Jian; Qin, Wei; Sha, Suxu; Xu, Jun; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-03-01

    In general, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) contribute to regulation of epilepsy-associated pathophysiological processes in the central nerve system. In this report, we examined the specific activation of PICs, namely IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in rat brain after kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, we examined the role played by PICs in regulating expression of GABA transporter type 1 and 3 (GAT-1 and GAT-3, respectively), which are the two important subtypes of GATs responsible for the regulation of extracellular GABA levels in the brain. Our results show that IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly increased in the parietal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala of KA-rats as compared with sham control animals (P < 0.05, KA rats vs. control rats). KA-induced SE also significantly increased (P < 0.05 vs. controls) the protein expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 in those brain regions. In addition, central administration of antagonists to IL-1β and TNF-α receptors significantly attenuated amplified GAT-1 and GAT-3 (P < 0.05 vs. vehicle control for each antagonist group). However, antagonist to IL-6 receptor failed to attenuate enhancement in expression of GAT-1 and GAT-3 induced by KA-induced SE. Overall, our data demonstrate that PIC pathways are activated in the specific brain regions during SE which thereby selectively leads to upregulation of GABA transporters. As a result, it is likely that de-inhibition of GABA system is increased in the brain. This support a role for PICs in engagement of the adaptive mechanisms associated with epileptic activity, and has pharmacological implications to target specific PICs for neuronal dysfunction and vulnerability related to epilepsy. PMID:25708016

  3. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  4. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Yan McCurdy, Li; Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Emonet, Thierry; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  5. Fast detection of extrasynaptic GABA with a whole-cell sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Rasmus K.; Petersen, Anders V.; Schmitt, Nicole; Perrier, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory transmitter of the brain. It operates by binding to specific receptors located both inside and outside synapses. The extrasynaptic receptors are activated by spillover from GABAergic synapses and by ambient GABA in the extracellular space. Ambient GABA is essential for adjusting the excitability of neurons. However, due to the lack of suitable methods, little is known about its dynamics. Here we describe a new technique that allows detection of GABA transients and measurement of the steady state GABA concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution. We used a human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line that stably expresses GABAA receptors composed of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits. We recorded from such a HEK cell with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The presence of GABA near the HEK cell generated a measurable electric current whose magnitude increased with concentration. A fraction of the current did not inactivate during prolonged exposition to GABA. This technique, which we refer to as a “sniffer” allows the measurement of ambient GABA concentration inside nervous tissue with a resolution of few tens of nanomolars. In addition, the sniffer detects variations in the extrasynaptic GABA concentration with millisecond time resolution. Pilot experiments demonstrate that the sniffer is able to report spillover of GABA induced by synaptic activation in real time. This is the first report on a GABA sensor that combines the ability to detect fast transients and to measure steady concentrations. PMID:24860433

  6. SYSTEMIC ADMINISTRATION OF KAINIC ACID INCREASES GABA LEVELS IN PERFUSATE FROM THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF RATS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ventral hippocampi of male, Fischer-344 rats were implanted with microdialysis probes and the effects of systemically administered kainic acid (KA) (8 mg/kg, s.c.) on the in vivo release of amino acids were measured for four hours after administration. n order to measure GABA...

  7. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  8. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  9. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L-1 and 50 mg L-1, in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms. PMID:27446149

  10. Determination of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) in Rambutan Fruit cv. Rongrian by HPLC-ELSD and Separation of GABA from Rambutan Fruit Using Dowex 50W-X8 Column.

    PubMed

    Meeploy, Maneerat; Deewatthanawong, Rujira

    2016-03-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was validated for the determination of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in rambutan fruit without any sample pretreatment or derivatization. In the concentration range of 0.05-1.0 mg/mL GABA, the ELSD response was linear with a correlation coefficient (r) >0.999. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were found to be 0.7 and 2.0 µg/mL, respectively. The method enabled the complete separation of GABA in the aqueous extract of rambutan flesh from the impurity peaks at 45.7 min. The recoveries of sample added GABA were obtained in the range of 92.0-99.3%. Intraday and interday relative standard deviations were <5.3%. Repeatability of the extraction process showed the acceptable precision. From the analysis of GABA content in rambutan flesh, 0.71 ± 0.23 mg of GABA was found in 1 g fresh weight. The recovery of GABA after passing through the Dowex 50W-X8 column was 96.65%. The analytical methodology could be potentially applied to the detection and quantification of GABA in other fruits and complex matrices when a sufficient quantity is available. PMID:26590236

  11. GABA-A receptors and the response to CO(2) inhalation - a translational trans-species model of anxiety?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jayne E; Nutt, David J

    2008-07-01

    The mechanisms by which the inhalation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) produces anxiety and panic are not fully understood, although more recently there is evidence to suggest the involvement of a neural 'fear circuit'. We have suggested that this neural fear circuit is partly mediated by the brain noradrenaline network [Bailey, J.E., Argyropoulos, S.V., Lightman, S.L. and Nutt, D.J., (2003) Does the brain noradrenaline network mediate the effects of the CO(2) challenge? J Psychopharmacol 17(3): 252-259.]. However, we now review evidence that GABA-A may also play an important role in the modulation of CO(2)-induced anxiety. The review of this evidence starts with a key publication showing that 1 min of 35% CO(2)/65% air produced anxiogenic effects in a rat model of anxiety, to a similar extent to the anxiogenic betacarboline derivative FG7142, a benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist. The effects of both anxiogenic stimuli were abolished with pre-treatment with alprazolam (0.5 mg/kg), but only those of FG7142, not CO(2), was blocked by a benzodiazepine antagonist [Cuccheddu, T., Floris, S., Serra, M., Porceddu, L., Sanna, E., Biggio, G., (1995) Proconflict effect of carbon dioxide inhalation in rats. Life Sci 56: PL 321-324.]. Although the evidence from this study did not conclusively prove that CO(2) had an action to reduce GABA function, it was an experiment designed to be translational to compare what was known about CO(2)-induced anxiety in patients, and to also to explore if GABA mechanisms are involved. Additional evidence from the literature is found in the association between GABA and chemoreceptors, both in laboratory and human studies and GABA and anxiety disorders. Evidence of this association is found across species from stress-induced change in GABA levels in plants and insects to humans, where there is now much evidence of abnormalities in GABA/benzodiazepine receptors in anxiety and other psychiatric disorders. This paper reviews some of the evidence and

  12. Inhibitory effect of new quinolones on GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and its potentiation with felbinac in Xenopus oocytes injected with mouse-brain mRNA: correlation with convulsive potency in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, J; Yamamoto, K; Asanuma, A; Yanagisawa, K; Sawada, Y; Iga, T

    1997-08-01

    Convulsions induced by the interaction of new quinolone antimicrobial agents (NQs) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were previously reported, and blockade of GABA(A) receptor by NQs and its potentiation with NSAIDs were considered as one of its possible mechanisms. However, useful methodology for prediction of convulsive potencies of NQs with or without NSAIDs in vivo based on in vitro screening was not established. Therefore, we applied the Xenopus oocytes translation system of exogenous messenger RNA (mRNA) to examine the mechanism of convulsion induced by interaction of NQs and NSAIDs, and the relationship between convulsive potencies in vivo and inhibitory effect on GABA-induced current response in vitro was investigated. This system also has alternative possibility for the in vivo toxicological studies sacrificing innumerous animals. Glutamic acid, kainic acid, quisqualic acid, NMDA, and serotonin-induced currents were not modified by ENX of NQs and/or FLB of NSAIDs, while glycine- and ACh-induced currents were slightly inhibited. GABA (10 microM)-induced current was inhibited by norfloxacin (NFLX), ciprofloxacin, ENX, and ofloxacin (OFLX) with IC50 of 17, 33, 58, and 280 microM, respectively. IC50 of NQs decreased to 1/3 (OFLX)-1/165 (NFLX) in the presence of 10 microM FLB, while FLB did not modulate the GABA response in the absence of NQs. CSF concentration of ENX at the time of convulsion in clinical situation approximated the IC50 of ENX for the GABA response. The increase of incidence for NQs-induced convulsion by concomitant NSAIDs in vivo could also be explained by the potentiation of inhibitory effects of NQs with FLB in the normal range of CSF concentration of these drugs. We also examined convulsive potency (threshold dose for convulsion) in CNS by intracerebral infusion of NQs to mice with or without FLB pretreatment, and significant correlations between the convulsive potencies and IC50 of NQs for the GABA response were observed

  13. Differential expression of metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors at neocortical glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals

    PubMed Central

    Bragina, Luca; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Bassi, Silvia; Milanese, Marco; Bonanno, Giambattista; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (Glu) receptors (mGluRs) and GABAB receptors are highly expressed at presynaptic sites. To verify the possibility that the two classes of metabotropic receptors contribute to axon terminals heterogeneity, we studied the localization of mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7, and GABAB1 in VGLUT1-, VGLUT2-, and VGAT- positive terminals in the cerebral cortex of adult rats. VGLUT1-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (∼5%), mGluR5 (∼6%), mGluR2/3 (∼22%), mGluR7 (∼17%), and GABAB1 (∼40%); VGLUT2-positive terminals expressed mGluR1α (∼10%), mGluR5 (∼11%), mGluR2/3 (∼20%), mGluR7 (∼28%), and GABAB1 (∼25%); whereas VGAT-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (∼27%), mGluR5 (∼24%), mGluR2/3 (∼38%), mGluR7 (∼31%), and GABAB1 (∼19%). Control experiments ruled out the possibility that postsynaptic mGluRs and GABAB1 might have significantly biased our results. We also performed functional assays in synaptosomal preparations, and showed that all agonists modify Glu and GABA levels, which return to baseline upon exposure to antagonists. Overall, these findings indicate that mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7, and GABAB1 expression differ significantly between glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals, and that the robust expression of heteroreceptors may contribute to the homeostatic regulation of the balance between excitation and inhibition. PMID:26388733

  14. Antiplasmodial and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activities of five plants used in traditional medicine in Mali, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Bah, Sekou; Jäger, Anna K; Adsersen, Anne; Diallo, Drissa; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2007-04-01

    Extracts of five medicinal plants: Boscia angustifolia, Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longipedunculata, Stylosanthes erecta and Trichilia emetica, used traditionally in Malian traditional medicine were screened for in vitro antiplasmodial activity and GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor binding activity. Four extracts showed significant antiplasmodial activities, with the dichloromethane extract of leaf of Securidaca longipedunculata being the most active (IC(50) of 7 microg/ml [95% CI: 5-9]). The dichloromethane extract of leaf of Trichilia emetica, in addition to its antiplasmodial activity (IC(50): 12 microg/ml [95% CI: 12-14]), exhibited a good binding activity to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor, while water and methanol extracts of the same plant did not show any activity. A strong GABA(A)-receptor complex binding activity was observed in the methanol extract of aerial part of Stylosanthes erecta. The results in this study justify some of the traditional indications of the plants investigated and may thus be candidates for Improved Traditional Medicines in Mali. PMID:17126508

  15. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes.

  16. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes. PMID:27212081

  17. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes. PMID:27212081

  18. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S.; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  19. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  20. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  1. The production and characterization of monoclonal anti-bodies directed against the GABA sub a /benzodiazepine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallombardo, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic techniques have indicated that several subunits exist which may combine to form a family a GABA{sub a} receptor subtypes. Further investigations of the localization, structure and function of these receptor subtypes will require the use of subunit specific probes. In order to develop immunochemical markers for the GABA{sub a} subunits mice were immunized with purified receptor and antibody secreting hybridomas were formed. From these hybridomas six monoclonal antibodies were derived. All six monoclonal antibodies recognized the purified receptor in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and immunoblotted to a 50kD protein in the purified preparation. The mAbs A2, B2, E9, and H10 specifically recognized a 50kD protein band from rat brain membranes which was shown by two-dimensional electrophoresis to be the receptor subunit identified by photolabeling. The mAbs D5 and F7 preferentially recognized unique proteins in addition to the 50kD subunit. A procedure was developed for using mAbs B2 and F7 to immunoprecipitate the benzodiazepine binding site from solubilized brain membranes. A competitive binding assay and an analysis of crossreactivity were combined to divide the six monoclonal antibodies into groups recognizing at least four district epitopes. The monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that the 50kD subunit can be phosphorylated and they were used to follow the development of this subunit in the neonatal rat. The antibodies were able to label immunoreactive proteins in rat astrocytes and in three nematode species. These proteins may be structurally related to subunits of the GABA{sub a} or acetylcholine receptor.

  2. Salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) showing varying emamectin benzoate susceptibilities differ in neuronal acetylcholine receptor and GABA-gated chloride channel mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Caligid copepods, also called sea lice, are fish ectoparasites, some species of which cause significant problems in the mariculture of salmon, where the annual cost of infection is in excess of €300 million globally. At present, caligid control on farms is mainly achieved using medicinal treatments. However, the continued use of a restricted number of medicine actives potentially favours the development of drug resistance. Here, we report transcriptional changes in a laboratory strain of the caligid Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837) that is moderately (~7-fold) resistant to the avermectin compound emamectin benzoate (EMB), a component of the anti-salmon louse agent SLICE® (Merck Animal Health). Results Suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) was used to enrich transcripts differentially expressed between EMB-resistant (PT) and drug-susceptible (S) laboratory strains of L. salmonis. SSH libraries were subjected to 454 sequencing. Further L. salmonis transcript sequences were available as expressed sequence tags (EST) from GenBank. Contiguous sequences were generated from both SSH and EST sequences and annotated. Transcriptional responses in PT and S salmon lice were investigated using custom 15 K oligonucleotide microarrays designed using the above sequence resources. In the absence of EMB exposure, 359 targets differed in transcript abundance between the two strains, these genes being enriched for functions such as calcium ion binding, chitin metabolism and muscle structure. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel (GABA-Cl) and neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits showed significantly lower transcript levels in PT lice compared to S lice. Using RT-qPCR, the decrease in mRNA levels was estimated at ~1.4-fold for GABA-Cl and ~2.8-fold for nAChR. Salmon lice from the PT strain showed few transcriptional responses following acute exposure (1 or 3 h) to 200 μg L-1 of EMB, a drug concentration tolerated by PT lice, but

  3. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  4. Expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on neoplastic growth and prediction of prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain, but exerts physiologic effects other than that on neurotransmitter in non-neuronal peripheral tissues and organs. GABA may affect cancer growth through activation GABA receptors. We investigated the gene expression of GABA receptors in tissue of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and non-cancerous tissues, and found that the gene expression of GABA receptor phenotypes was correlated with tumorigenesis and clinical prognosis. Methods Sixty-one snap-frozen human samples of NSCLC tissues and paired non-cancerous tissues (5cm away from tumor) were analyzed. Gene expression of GABA receptors was detected by Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Survival times in relation to the expression of GABA receptor phenotypes were analyzed. Human NSCLC cell lines H1299, A549, H520, H460 and human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were used to determine the phenotypes of GABA inhibitory effects on cancer cell growth. The effects of exogenous administration of GABA on H1299 cell growth were examined. Results The gene expressions were significantly higher in NSCLC tissues than in the paired non-cancerous tissues for GABAA receptor subunit α3 (GABRA3, P = 0.030); for GABAA receptor subunit epsilon (GABRE, P = 0.036); and GABAB receptor subunit 2 (GABBR2, P = 0.005). Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with high expression of GABBR2 gene and low expression of GABRA3 gene had a better prognosis (P < 0.05). The administration of GABA resulted in suppressed proliferation of NSCLC cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The use of the GABA receptor antagonist CGP35348 could reverse the inhibitory effect. Conclusions The pattern of GABA receptor gene phenotype expression may be involved in the regulation of tumorigenesis. A high expression of GABBR2 with a low expression of GABRA3 may predict a better outcome. The treatment with GABA

  5. Impact of Precooling and Controlled-Atmosphere Storage on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Accumulation in Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Molin; Ndeurumio, Kessy H; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Zhuoyan

    2016-08-24

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruit cultivars 'Chuliang' and 'Shixia' were analyzed for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation after precooling and in controlled-atmosphere storage. Fruit were exposed to 5% O2 plus 3%, 5%, or 10% CO2 at 4 °C, and GABA and associated enzymes, aril firmness, and pericarp color were measured. Aril softening and pericarp browning were delayed by 5% CO2 + 5% O2. GABA concentrations and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) activities declined during storage at the higher-CO2 treatments. However, GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T; EC 2.6.1.19) activities in elevated CO2-treated fruit fluctuated during storage. GABA concentrations increased after precooling treatments. GAD activity and GABA-T activity were different between cultivars after precooling. GABA concentrations in fruit increased after 3 days of 10% CO2 + 5% O2 treatment and then declined as storage time increased. GABA accumulation was associated with stimulation of GAD activity rather than inhibition of GABA-T activity. PMID:27412947

  6. Phosphatase inhibitors remove the run-down of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the human epileptic brain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, E.; Ragozzino, D. A.; Di Angelantonio, S.; Spinelli, G.; Trettel, F.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Torchia, G.; Arcella, A.; Di Gennaro, G.; Quarato, P. P.; Esposito, V.; Cantore, G.; Miledi, R.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAA receptors) microtransplanted from the human epileptic brain to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes were compared with those recorded directly from neurons, or glial cells, in human brains slices. Cell membranes isolated from brain specimens, surgically obtained from six patients afflicted with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) were injected into frog oocytes. Within a few hours, these oocytes acquired GABAA receptors that generated GABA currents with an unusual run-down, which was inhibited by orthovanadate and okadaic acid. In contrast, receptors derived from membranes of a nonepileptic hippocampal uncus, membranes from mouse brain, or recombinant rat α1β2γ2-GABA receptors exhibited a much less pronounced GABA-current run-down. Moreover, the GABAA receptors of pyramidal neurons in temporal neocortex slices from the same six epileptic patients exhibited a stronger run-down than the receptors of rat pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, the GABAA receptors of neighboring glial cells remained substantially stable after repetitive activation. Therefore, the excessive GABA-current run-down observed in the membrane-injected oocytes recapitulates essentially what occurs in neurons, rather than in glial cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses from the same TLE neocortex specimens revealed that GABAA-receptor β1, β2, β3, and γ2 subunit mRNAs were significantly overexpressed (8- to 33-fold) compared with control autopsy tissues. Our results suggest that an abnormal GABA-receptor subunit transcription in the TLE brain leads to the expression of run-down-enhanced GABAA receptors. Blockage of phosphatases stabilizes the TLE GABAA receptors and strengthens GABAergic inhibition. It may be that this process can be targeted to develop new treatments for intractable epilepsy. PMID:15218107

  7. Synthesis of 4-substituted nipecotic acid derivatives and their evaluation as potential GABA uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hellenbrand, Tim; Höfner, Georg; Wein, Thomas; Wanner, Klaus T

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we disclose the design and synthesis of novel 4-susbtituted nipecotic acid derivatives as inhibitors of the GABA transporter mGAT1. Based on molecular modeling studies the compounds are assumed to adopt a binding pose similar to that of the potent mGAT1 inhibitor nipecotic acid. As substitution in 4-position should not cause an energetically unfavorable orientation of nipecotic acid as it is the case for N-substituted derivatives this is expected to lead to highly potent binders. For the synthesis of novel 4-substituted nipecotic acid derivatives a linear synthetic strategy was employed. As a key step, palladium catalyzed cross coupling reactions were used to attach the required biaryl moieties to the ω-position of the alkenyl- or alkynyl spacers of varying length in the 4-position of the nipecotic acid scaffold. The resulting amino acids were characterized with respect to their binding affinities and inhibitory potencies at mGAT1. Though the biological activities found were generally insignificant to poor, two compounds, one of which possesses a reasonable binding affinity for mGAT1, rac-57, the other a notable inhibitory potency at mGAT4, rac-84, both displaying a slight subtype selectivity for the individual transporters, could be identified. PMID:27039250

  8. Association analysis of GABA receptor subunit genes on 5q33 with heroin dependence in a Chinese male population.

    PubMed

    Loh, E W; Tang, N L S; Lee, D T S; Liu, S I; Stadlin, Alfreda

    2007-06-01

    GABAA receptor subunit genes clustered on 5q33 play a role in the development of alcoholism and methamphetamine use disorder without psychosis. The present study explored the possible contribution of the same subunit genes to the development of heroin dependence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GABAA receptor subunits GABRB2, GABRA6, GABRA1, and GABRG2 were examined in 178 male Han Chinese heroin-dependent and 170 male control subjects. A significant difference in allele frequency for the SNP rs211014 in the GABAAgamma2 receptor subunit gene between cases and controls was identified (P = 0.015). A possible mechanism for the involvement of the GABA receptor subunit genes on 5q33 in the development of heroin dependence is discussed. PMID:17440936

  9. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  10. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  11. New fluoro derivatives of the pyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]benzotriazine 5-oxide system: evaluation of fluorine binding properties in the benzodiazepine site on γ-aminobutyrric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor. Design, synthesis, biological, and molecular modeling investigation.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Gabriella; Ciciani, Giovanna; Bruni, Fabrizio; Selleri, Silvia; Guarino, Chiara; Melani, Fabrizio; Montali, Marina; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia; Ghelardini, Carla; Norcini, Monica; Ciattini, Samuele; Costanzo, Annarella

    2010-11-11

    In the search for potent ligands at the benzodiazepine site on the GABA(A) receptor, new fluoro derivatives of the pyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]benzotriazine system were synthesized to evaluate the importance of the introduction of a fluorine atom in this system. Biological and pharmacological studies indicate that the substitution at position 8 with a trifluoromethyl group confers pharmacological activity due to potential metabolic stability in comparison to inactive 8-methyl substituted analogues. In particular, the compound 3-(2-methoxybenzyloxycarbonyl)-8-trifluoromethylpyrazolo[5,1-c][1,2,4]benzotriazine 5-oxide (21) emerges because of its selective anxiolytic profile without side effects. An analysis of all the newly synthesized compounds in our pharmacophoric map confirms the essential interaction points for binding recognition and the important areas for affinity modulation. The fluorine atom was able to form a hydrogen bond interaction only when it is not in position 3. PMID:20939501

  12. Reactive oxygen species induced by presynaptic glutamate receptor activation is involved in [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain cortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A; Krupko, O; Himmelreich, N

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a response to presynaptic glutamate receptor activation, and the role of ROS in neurotransmitter (GABA) release. Experiments were performed with rat brain cortical synaptosomes using glutamate, NMDA and kainate as agonists of glutamate receptors. ROS production was evaluated with the fluorogenic compound dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA), and GABA release was studied using synaptosomes loaded with [(3)H]GABA. All agonists were found to stimulate ROS production, and specific antagonists of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors, dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-done (CNQX), significantly inhibited the ROS increase. Spontaneous as well as agonist-evoked ROS production was effectively attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a commonly used potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, that suggests a high contribution of NADPH-oxidase to this process. The replacement of glucose with pyruvate or the simultaneous presence of both substrates in the medium led to the decrease in spontaneous and NMDA-evoked ROS production, but to the increase in ROS production induced by kainate. Scavenging of agonist-evoked ROS production by a potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was tightly correlated with the inhibition of agonist-evoked GABA release. Together, these findings show that the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors induces an increase in ROS production, and there is a tight correlation between ROS production and GABA secretion. The pivotal role of kainate/AMPA receptors in ROS production is under discussion. PMID:22864357

  13. 4,5-Substituted 3-Isoxazolols with Insecticidal Activity Act as Competitive Antagonists of Housefly GABA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Genyan; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Furuta, Kenjiro; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2015-07-22

    The insect GABA receptor (GABAR), which is composed of five RDL subunits, represents an important target for insecticides. A series of 4,5-disubstituted 3-isoxazolols, including muscimol analogues, were synthesized and examined for their activities against four splice variants (ac, ad, bc, and bd) of housefly GABARs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Muscimol was a more potent agonist than GABA in all four splice variants, whereas synthesized analogues did not exhibit agonism but rather antagonism in housefly GABARs. The introduction of bicyclic aromatic groups at the 4-position of muscimol and the simultaneous replacement of the aminomethyl group with a carbamoyl group at the 5-position to afford six 4-aryl-5-carbamoyl-3-isoxazolols resulted in compounds that exhibited significantly enhanced antagonism with IC50 values in the low micromolar range in the ac variant. The inhibition of GABA-induced currents by 100 μM analogues was approximately 1.5-4-fold greater in the ac and bc variants than in the ad and bd variants. 4-(3-Biphenylyl)-5-carbamoyl-3-isoxazolol displayed competitive antagonism, with IC50 values of 30, 34, 107, and 96 μM in the ac, bc, ad, and bd variants, respectively, and exhibited moderate insecticidal activity against houseflies, with an LD50 value of 5.6 nmol/fly. These findings suggest that these 3-isoxazolol analogues are novel lead compounds for the design and development of insecticides that target the orthosteric site of housefly GABARs. PMID:26120732

  14. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-10-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  15. Possible intermolecular interaction between quinolones and biphenylacetic acid inhibits gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K; Kimura, Y; Tsutomi, Y; Hayakawa, I

    1994-01-01

    The combination of some new quinolone antibacterial agents with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA), a metabolite of fenbufen, is known to specifically induce functional blockade of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. The mechanisms of these drug interactions were further examined. Scatchard analysis of [3H]muscimol binding to rat brain plasma membranes in the presence of enoxacin and BPAA revealed that a significant decrease in the number of muscimol binding sites was produced without affecting the affinity of binding to the receptors. In the presence of norfloxacin, BPAA inhibited muscimol binding the most potently of the six BPAA-related compounds tested. Fenbufen and 9,10-dihydro-gamma-oxo-2-phenanthrenebutyric acid also inhibited the binding, and 4-biphenylcarboxylic acid and methyl 4-biphenylacetate inhibited it slightly, but 3-benzoylpropionic acid exhibited no competitive inhibition. Accordingly, hybrid molecules of norfloxacin and BPAA were synthesized for stereochemical analysis of these drug interactions. A hybrid with a -CONH(CH2)3- chain between norfloxacin and BPAA (flexible structure) inhibited muscimol binding, and intracisternal injection of this hybrid caused clonic convulsions in mice more potently than the combination of norfloxacin and BPAA did. In contrast, a hybrid linked by -CONH- (stretched structure) showed almost no such inhibitory effect. 1H NMR analysis indicated the presence of intramolecular attraction at the quinoline ring of the hybrid exhibiting the antagonistic activity. These results suggest the possibility that quinolones and BPAA interact with the GABA receptor at nearby sites and that the binding affinity of quinolones to the GABA receptors is largely enhanced by the intermolecular interaction with BPAA. PMID:7840564

  16. Inhibition of protein kinase C decreases sensitivity of GABA receptor subtype to fipronil insecticide in insect neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Laurence; Hamon, Alain; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Itier, Valérie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorylation by serine/threonine kinases has been described as a new mechanism for regulating the effects of insecticides on insect neuronal receptors and channels. Although insect GABA receptors are commercially important targets for insecticides (e.g. fipronil), their modulation by kinases is poorly understood and the influence of phosphorylation on insecticide sensitivity is unknown. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the modulatory effect of PKC and CaMKinase II on GABA receptor subtypes (GABAR1 and GABAR2) in DUM neurons isolated from the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG) of Periplaneta americana. Chloride currents through GABAR2 were selectively abolished by PMA and PDBu (the PKC activators) and potentiated by Gö6983, an inhibitor of PKC. Furthermore, using KN-62, a specific CaMKinase II inhibitor, we demonstrated that CaMKinase II activation was also involved in the regulation of GABAR2 function. In addition, using CdCl(2) (the calcium channel blocker) and LOE-908, a blocker of TRPγ, we revealed that calcium influx through TRPγ played an important role in kinase activations. Comparative studies performed with CACA, a selective agonist of GABAR1 in DUM neurons confirmed the involvement of these kinases in the specific regulation of GABAR2. Furthermore, our study reported that GABAR1 was less sensitive than GABAR2 to fipronil. This was demonstrated by the biphasic concentration-response curve and the current-voltage relationship established with both GABA and CACA. Finally, we demonstrated that GABAR2 was 10-fold less sensitive to fipronil following inhibition of PKC, whereas inhibition of CaMKinase II did not alter the effect of fipronil. PMID:21684305

  17. Segregation of Acetylcholine and GABA in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia: Functional Correlation.

    PubMed

    Elinos, Diana; Rodríguez, Raúl; Martínez, Luis Andres; Zetina, María Elena; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs) and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh) and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX). We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level of segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region showed larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons. PMID:27092054

  18. Segregation of Acetylcholine and GABA in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia: Functional Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Elinos, Diana; Rodríguez, Raúl; Martínez, Luis Andres; Zetina, María Elena; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs) and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh) and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX). We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level of segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region showed larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons. PMID:27092054

  19. Mapping of the {beta}{sub 2} subunit gene (GABRB2) to microdissected human chromosome 5q34-q35 defines a gene cluster for the most abundant GABA{sub A} receptor isoform

    SciTech Connect

    Russek, S.J.; Farb, D.H. |

    1994-10-01

    The {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA{sub A}R) is a multisubunit Cl{sup -} channel that mediates most fast inhibitory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. Molecular evolution has given rise to many genetic variants of GABA{sub A}R subunits, including {alpha}{sub 1-6}, {beta}{sub 1-4}, {gamma}{sub 1-4}, {sigma}, and {rho}{sub 1-2}, suggesting that an enormous number of combinations of subunits are possible. Here we report that the {beta}{sub 2} gene is located on chromosome 5q34-q35, defining a cluster comprising {alpha}{sub 1}, {beta}{sub 2}, and {gamma}{sub 2} genes that together code for the most abundant GABA{sub A}R isoform. The fact that intron position is conserved in the {beta}{sub 1-3} genes, taken together with the observation that chromosomes 4 and 15 also contain distinct {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene clusters, strongly suggests that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} cluster was duplicated and translocated to at least two different chromosomes. This organization of GABA{sub A}R gene clusters may have been preserved as linkage provides a mechanism for facilitating coordinate gene expression. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The cellular expression of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit during spermatogenesis in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Kiyoto; Okamoto, Keiko; Nomura, Sakashi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masahito; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2010-10-01

    GABA(A) receptors are pentamers in structure and are mainly composed of alpha, beta and gamma subunits. These receptors are known to function as chloride channels. We observed alpha5, beta1 and gamma3 subunit immunoreactivity in the mouse testes, specifically in the cytoplasm surrounding the nucleus in the spermatocytes and spermatids. In the current study, alpha1 subunit immunoreactivity was located in the nucleus of spermatogonia, spermatocytes and round spermatids. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that the alpha1 subunit was localized within the nucleus of pachytene and diplotene spermatocytes in the area of condensed chromatin rather than extended chromatin. Protein sequence analysis revealed that the alpha1 subunit included DM DNA binding domains that were related to transcription factors involved in testicular differentiation in adult mice. These findings suggest that the alpha1 subunit may undertake a gene transcription function during the maturation of germ cells. a1 immunoreactivity was also detected within the mitochondria of spermatocytes and in the acrosome of round and elongated spermatids. Although the precise physiological role of the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit in mitochondria remains unknown, we hypothesize that its function in the acrosome may be related to the acrosome reaction during fertilization or during spermatogenesis. PMID:20712007

  1. Genetic Association of Recovery from Eating Disorders: The Role of GABA Receptor SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Cinnamon S; Berrettini, Wade; Bergen, Andrew W; Magistretti, Pierre; Duvvuri, Vikas; Strober, Michael; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steve; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M; Halmi, Katherine A; Johnson, Craig; Kaplan, Allan S; Keel, Pamela; Klump, Kelly L; Mitchell, James; Treasure, Janet; Woodside, D Blake; Marzola, Enrica; Schork, Nicholas J; Kaye, Walter H

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up studies of eating disorders (EDs) suggest outcomes ranging from recovery to chronic illness or death, but predictors of outcome have not been consistently identified. We tested 5151 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in approximately 350 candidate genes for association with recovery from ED in 1878 women. Initial analyses focused on a strictly defined discovery cohort of women who were over age 25 years, carried a lifetime diagnosis of an ED, and for whom data were available regarding the presence (n=361 ongoing symptoms in the past year, ie, ‘ill') or absence (n=115 no symptoms in the past year, ie, ‘recovered') of ED symptoms. An intronic SNP (rs17536211) in GABRG1 showed the strongest statistical evidence of association (p=4.63 × 10−6, false discovery rate (FDR)=0.021, odds ratio (OR)=0.46). We replicated these findings in a more liberally defined cohort of women age 25 years or younger (n=464 ill, n=107 recovered; p=0.0336, OR=0.68; combined sample p=4.57 × 10−6, FDR=0.0049, OR=0.55). Enrichment analyses revealed that GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) SNPs were over-represented among SNPs associated at p<0.05 in both the discovery (Z=3.64, p=0.0003) and combined cohorts (Z=2.07, p=0.0388). In follow-up phenomic association analyses with a third independent cohort (n=154 ED cases, n=677 controls), rs17536211 was associated with trait anxiety (p=0.049), suggesting a possible mechanism through which this variant may influence ED outcome. These findings could provide new insights into the development of more effective interventions for the most treatment-resistant patients. PMID:21750581

  2. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil. PMID:19238461

  3. Modulation of GABA release from the thalamic reticular nucleus by cocaine and caffeine: role of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Goitia, Belén; Rivero-Echeto, María Celeste; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Gingrich, Jay A; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin receptors are targets of drug therapies for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Cocaine inhibits the re-uptake of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and noradrenaline, whereas caffeine blocks adenosine receptors and opens ryanodine receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum. We studied how 5-HT and adenosine affected spontaneous GABAergic transmission from thalamic reticular nucleus. We combined whole-cell patch clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) in ventrobasal thalamic neurons during local (puff) application of 5-HT in wild type (WT) or knockout mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A -/-). Inhibition of mIPSCs frequency by low (10 μM) and high (100 μM) 5-HT concentrations was observed in ventrobasal neurons from 5-HT2A -/- mice. In WT mice, only 100 μM 5-HT significantly reduced mIPSCs frequency. In 5-HT2A -/- mice, NAN-190, a specific 5-HT1A antagonist, prevented the 100 μM 5-HT inhibition while blocking H-currents that prolonged inhibition during post-puff periods. The inhibitory effects of 100 μM 5-HT were enhanced in cocaine binge-treated 5-HT2A -/- mice. Caffeine binge treatment did not affect 5-HT-mediated inhibition. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are present in pre-synaptic thalamic reticular nucleus terminals. Serotonergic-mediated inhibition of GABA release could underlie aberrant thalamocortical physiology described after repetitive consumption of cocaine. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A , 5-HT2A and A1 receptors are present in pre-synaptic TRN terminals. 5-HT1A and A1 receptors would down-regulate adenylate cyclase, whereas 5-HT1A would also increase the probability of the opening of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK). Sustained opening of GIRK channels would hyperpolarize pre-synaptic terminals activating H-currents, resulting in less GABA release. 5-HT2A -would activate PLC and IP3 , increasing intracellular [Ca(2+) ] and

  4. Interaction of pyracetam with specific /sup 3/H-imipramine binding sites and GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex of brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhanets, V.V.; Chakhbra, K.K.; Danchev, N.D.; Malin, K.M.; Rusakov, D.Yu.; Val'dman, A.V.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the effect of pyracetam on parameters of specific binding of tritium-imipramine and GABA-activated binding of tritium-flunitrazepam with rat brain membranes. The experimental method is described and it is shown that pyracetam and mebicar in experiments in vivo on normal animals can exert their anxiolytic action without the participation of bensodiazepine receptors. Either the interaction of pyracetam and mebicar with benzodiazeprine receptors has a different interpretation than competition of these compounds with specific binding sites of tritium-flunitrazepam, or in experiments on normal animals in vivo GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex does not accept pyracetam and mebicar, for it contains endogenous inhibitors of GABA-modulating action.

  5. Isoflurane modulates excitability in the mouse thalamus via GABA-dependent and GABA-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shui-Wang; Werner, David F; Homanics, Gregg E; Harrison, Neil L; Goldstein, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) synapse onto thalamocortical neurons in the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus, and this reticulo-thalamocortical pathway is considered an anatomic target for general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A mutant mouse was engineered to harbor two amino acid substitutions (S270H, L277A) in the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R) alpha1 subunit; this mutation abolished sensitivity to the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in recombinant GABA(A)-Rs, and reduced in vivo sensitivity to isoflurane in the loss-of-righting-reflex assay. We examined the effects of the double mutation on GABA(A)-R-mediated synaptic currents and isoflurane sensitivity by recording from thalamic neurons in brain slices. The double mutation accelerated the decay, and decreased the (1/2) width of, evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in VB neurons and attenuated isoflurane-induced prolongation of the eIPSC. The hypnotic zolpidem, a selective modulator of GABA(A)-Rs containing the alpha1 subunit, prolonged eIPSC duration regardless of genotype, indicating that mutant mice incorporate alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)-Rs into synapses. In RTN neurons, which lack the alpha1 subunit, eIPSC duration was longer than in VB, regardless of genotype. Isoflurane reduced the efficacy of GABAergic transmission from RTN to VB, independent of genotype, suggesting a presynaptic action in RTN neurons. Consistent with this observation, isoflurane inhibited both tonic action potential and rebound burst firing in the presence of GABA(A)-R blockade. The suppressed excitability in RTN neurons is likely mediated by isoflurane-enhanced Ba(2+)-sensitive, but 4-aminopyridine-insenstive, potassium conductances. We conclude that isoflurane enhances inhibition of thalamic neurons in VB via GABA(A)-R-dependent, but in RTN via GABA(A)-R-independent, mechanisms. PMID:18948126

  6. A novel α-conotoxin MII-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates [(3) H]-GABA release in the superficial layers of the mouse superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    McClure-Begley, Tristan D; Wageman, Charles R; Grady, Sharon R; Marks, Michael J; McIntosh, J Michael; Collins, Allan C; Whiteaker, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Mouse superficial superior colliculus (SuSC) contains dense GABAergic innervation and diverse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to investigate the subunit compositions of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) expressed on mouse SuSC GABAergic terminals. [(125) I]-Epibatidine competition-binding studies revealed that the α3β2* and α6β2* nicotinic subtype-selective peptide α-conotoxin MII-blocked binding to 40 ± 5% of SuSC nAChRs. Acetylcholine-evoked [(3) H]-GABA release from SuSC crude synaptosomal preparations is calcium dependent, blocked by the voltage-sensitive calcium channel blocker, cadmium, and the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine, but is unaffected by muscarinic, glutamatergic, P2X and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. Approximately 50% of nAChR-mediated SuSC [(3) H]-GABA release is inhibited by α-conotoxin MII. However, the highly α6β2*-subtype-selective α-conotoxin PIA did not affect [(3) H]-GABA release. Nicotinic subunit-null mutant mouse experiments revealed that ACh-stimulated SuSC [(3) H]-GABA release is entirely β2 subunit-dependent. α4 subunit deletion decreased total function by >90%, and eliminated α-conotoxin MII-resistant release. ACh-stimulated SuSC [(3) H]-GABA release was unaffected by β3, α5 or α6 nicotinic subunit deletions. Together, these data suggest that a significant proportion of mouse SuSC nicotinic agonist-evoked GABA-release is mediated by a novel, α-conotoxin MII-sensitive α3α4β2 nAChR. The remaining α-conotoxin MII-resistant, nAChR agonist-evoked SuSC GABA release appears to be mediated via α4β2* subtype nAChRs. PMID:22506481

  7. Effects of Salt Loading on the Regulation of Rat Hypothalamic Magnocellular Neurosecretory Cells by Ionotropic GABA and Glycine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Choe, K Y; Trudel, E; Bourque, C W

    2016-04-01

    Synaptic and extrasynaptic transmission mediated by ionotropic GABA and glycine receptors plays a critical role in shaping the action potential firing (spiking) activity of hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and therefore determines the rate at which vasopressin and oxytocin are released from the neurohypophysis. The inhibitory effect of these transmitters relies on the maintenance of a low concentration of intracellular chloride ions such that, when activated by GABA or glycine, a hyperpolarisation of the neuronal membrane potential results. In this review, we highlight the various ways by which the two types of inhibitory receptors contribute to homeostasis by fine-tuning the spiking rate of vasopressin-releasing magnocellular neurosecretory cells in a manner dependent on the hydration state of the animal. In addition, we review the currently available evidence on how the strength of these inhibitory pathways can be regulated during chronic hypernatraemia via a form of activity-dependent depolarisation of the chloride reversal potential, leading to an abolition of these inhibitory pathways potentially causing sodium-dependent elevations in blood pressure. PMID:26833894

  8. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  9. Valproic acid: brain and plasma levels of the drug and its metabolites, anticonvulsant effects and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nau, H; Löscher, W

    1982-03-01

    The slow onset and carry-over effect of valproic acid (VPA) therapy observed in some clinical as well as experimental animal studies have been examined by parallel pharmacokinetic and pharmacological investigations in a mouse model. VPA was rapidly transferred into brain and was cleared from that tissue with rates which exceeded plasma clearance rates. Of several VPA metabolites present in plasma, only one could be found in the brain: 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid. This metabolite was cleared from plasma and from brain slower than the parent drug. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations were increased within 15 min after VPA injection and remained significantly elevated for at least 8 h. A similar time course was found in regard to the increase of the electroconvulsive threshold (maximal seizures) induced by VPA administration. The activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase rose parallel to the elevation of brain GABA levels, whereas the activity of GABA aminotransferase was not affected. Whereas the rapid onset of the effect on electroconvulsive threshold and on GABA metabolism can be explained by the rapid entrance of VPA into brain, the carry-over effects observed correlated with the kinetics of the metabolite 2-propyl-2-pentenoic acid better than with those of VPA due to the persistence of this metabolite in brain. PMID:6801254

  10. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA. PMID:26471792

  11. The interactive role of CB(1) and GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Masoumeh; Komaki, Alireza; Karamian, Ruhollah; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Asadbegi, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is a cellular process underlying learning and memory. Cannabinoids are known to be powerful modulators of this kind of synaptic plasticity. Changes in GABAergic inhibition have also been shown to affect synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. GABA receptor type B (GABAB) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) exhibit overlapping anatomical localization in some brain areas including the hippocampus. CB1 and GABAB are also localized to the same cells and share a common signaling pathway in some brain areas. In this study, we examined the hippocampal effects of co-administrating AM251 and CGP55845, which are CB1 and GABAB antagonists, respectively, on LTP induction in the dentate gyrus (DG) of rats. LTP in the hippocampal area was induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the perforant path. Our results showed that HFS coupled with administration of the CB1 antagonist increased both the population spike (PS) amplitude and field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP). Conversely, the GABAB antagonist decreased these parameters along with decreased LTP induction. We also demonstrated that the co-administration of CB1 and GABAB antagonists had different effects on the PS amplitude and fEPSP slope. It is likely that GABAB receptor antagonists modulate cannabinoid outputs that cause a decrease in synaptic plastisity, while in the simultaneous consumption of two antagonists, CB1 antagonists can alter the release of GABA which in turn results in enhancement of LTP induction. These findings suggest that there are functional interactions between the CB1 and GABAB receptor in the hippocampus. PMID:26611204

  12. Expression of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Plasma Membrane Transporter-1 in Monkey and Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Giovanni; Rickman, Dennis W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the expression pattern of the predominant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 in Old World monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human retina. Methods GAT-1 was localized in retinal sections by using immunohistochemical techniques with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Double-labeling studies were performed with the GAT-1 antibody using antibodies to GABA, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the bipolar cell marker Mab115A10. Results The pattern of GAT-1 immunostaining was similar in human and monkey retinas. Numerous small immunoreactive somata were in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and were present rarely in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of all retinal regions. Medium GAT-1 somata were in the ganglion cell layer in the parafoveal and peripheral retinal regions. GAT-1 fibers were densely distributed throughout the IPL. Varicose processes, originating from both the IPL and somata in the INL, arborized in the outer plexiform layer (OPL), forming a sparse network in all retinal regions, except the fovea. Sparsely occurring GAT-1 processes were in the nerve fiber layer in parafoveal regions and near the optic nerve head but not in the optic nerve. In the INL, 99% of the GAT-1 somata contained GABA, and 66% of the GABA immunoreactive somata expressed GAT-1. GAT-1 immunoreactivity was in all VIP-containing cells, but it was absent in TH-immunoreactive amacrine cells and in Mab115A10 immunoreactive bipolar cells. Conclusions GAT-1 in primate retinas is expressed by amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. The predominant expression of GAT-1 in the inner retina is consistent with the idea that GABA transporters influence neurotransmission and thus participate in visual information processing in the retina. PMID:16565409

  13. [The radioprotective effect of GABA-tropic substances, gamma-hydroxybutyrate and piracetam].

    PubMed

    Kulinskiĭ, V I; Klimova, A D

    1993-01-01

    From experiments in mice, it is shown that with a radiation dose of 8 Gy (LD96) the radioprotective effect was exerted by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), substances that increase its concentration in tissues (progabide and valproate), and synthetic agonists of both receptor types, particularly baclofen, a GABA-receptor agonist. The radioprotective effect is also exerted by gamma-hydroxybutyrate, not piracetam. PMID:8469734

  14. The effect of BLA GABA(A) receptors in anxiolytic-like effect and aversive memory deficit induced by ACPA

    PubMed Central

    Kangarlu-Haghighi, Katayoon; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    The roles of GABAergic receptors of the Basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist (arachydonilcyclopropylamide; ACPA)-induced anxiolytic-like effect and aversive memory deficit in adult male mice were examined in elevated plus-maze task. Results showed that pre-test intra-peritoneal injection of ACPA induced anxiolytic-like effect (at dose of 0.05 mg/kg) and aversive memory deficit (at doses of 0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg). The results revealed that Pre-test intra-BLA infusion of muscimol (GABAA receptor agonist; at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 µg/mouse) or bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist; at all doses) impaired and did not alter aversive memory, respectively. All previous GABA agents did not have any effects on anxiety-like behaviors. Interestingly, pretreatment with a sub-threshold dose of muscimol (0.025 µg/mouse) and bicuculline (0.025 µg/mouse) did not alter anxiolytic-like behaviors induced by ACPA, while both drugs restored ACPA-induced amnesia. Moreover, muscimol or bicuculline increased and decreased ACPA-induced locomotor activity, respectively. Finally the data may indicate that BLA GABAA receptors have critical and different roles in anxiolytic-like effect, aversive memory deficit and locomotor activity induced by ACPA. PMID:26648818

  15. Early expression of glycine and GABA(A) receptors in developing spinal cord neurons. Effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Tapia, J C; Mentis, G Z; Navarrete, R; Nualart, F; Figueroa, E; Sánchez, A; Aguayo, L G

    2001-01-01

    Using fluorometric and immunocytochemical techniques, we found that high glycine concentrations or blockade of glycine receptors increases neurite outgrowth in developing mouse spinal cord neurons. Glycine- and GABA(A)-activated currents were demonstrated during applications of glycine and GABA (50-100 microM) in 5 days in vitro (DIV) neurons. Long application (> or =10 min) of 100 microM glycine desensitized the membrane response by more than 95%. Application of glutamate in the absence of external Mg(2+), at several membrane potentials, did not produce any detectable membrane response in these cells. Immunocytochemical studies with NR1 and GluR1 antibodies showed a delayed appearance of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors respectively. Spontaneous synaptic activity was readily observed in 5 DIV neurons. The use of various receptor antagonists (strychnine, bicuculline, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate [APV], 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione [CNQX]) revealed that this activity was predominantly glycinergic, and to a smaller extent, GABAergic. In the presence of bicuculline, APV and CNQX, we detected abundant spontaneous depolarizing potentials which often reached the action potential threshold. Further evidence for functional synaptic activity was provided by the detection of co-localization of gephyrin and synaptophysin at 5 DIV using confocal microscopy. Fluorometric studies with Fluo-3, a Ca(2+) indicator, in 5 DIV cultures showed the presence of spontaneous fluctuations associated with tetrodotoxin-sensitive synaptic events. The number of neurons displaying these fluctuations was significantly increased (>100%) when the cells were bathed in a strychnine-containing solution. On the other hand, these synaptically mediated Ca(2+) events were blocked by the co-application of strychnine and bicuculline. This suggests that glycine and GABA(A) receptors provide a fundamental regulation of both

  16. Effect of THIP and SL 76002, two clinically experimented GABA-mimetic compounds, on anterior pituitary GABA receptors and prolactin secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Apud, J.A.; Masotto, C.; Racagni, G.

    1987-03-02

    In the present study, the ability of three direct GABA agonists, muscimol, THIP and SL 76002 to displace /sup 3/H-GABA binding from anterior pituitary and medio-basal hypothalamus membranes was evaluated. Further, the effect of both THIP and SL 76002 on baseline prolactin levels or after stimulation of hormone release with haloperidol has been also studied. Either muscimol, THIP or SL 76002 have shown to posses 7-, 7- and 3-fold higher affinity, respectively, for the central nervous system than for the anterior pituitary /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites. Moreover, THIP and SL 76002 have demonstrated to be respectively, 25- and 1000- fold less potent than muscimol in inhibiting /sup 3/H- GABA binding at the level of the anterior pituitary and about 25- and 2700-fold less potent at the level of the medio-basal hypothalamus. Under basal conditions, either THIP or SL 76002 were ineffective to reduce prolactin release. However, after stimulation of prolactin secretion through blockade of the dopaminergic neurotransmission with haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg), both THIP (10 mg/kg) and SL 76002 (200 mg/kg) significantly counteracted the neuroleptic-induced prolactin rise with a potency which is in line with their ability to inhibit /sup 3/H-GABA binding in the anterior pituitary. The present results indicate that both compounds inhibit prolactin release under specific experimental situations probably through a GABAergic mechanism. In view of the endocrine effects of these GABA-mimetic compounds, the possibility arises for an application of these type of drugs in clinical neuroendocrinology. 35 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin in germinated buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianxiong; Wu, Tongjiao; Li, Huiying; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijie

    2016-06-15

    In the present study, the dual effects of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) treatment on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat were evaluated during germination. The results showed that SAEW treatment (pH 5.83, ACC of 20.3 mg/L) could promote the accumulation of GABA and rutin in germinated buckwheat. The GABA and rutin contents of SAEW-germinated buckwheat reached 143.20 and 739.9 mg/100 g respectively, which is significantly higher than those of control (P<0.05). Moreover, SAEW treatment could increase the activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and thus result in the GABA and rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat. The results suggested that SAEW treatment could promote the rutin accumulation of germinated buckwheat by influencing phenylpropanoid secondary metabolic pathway instead of the inhibition of rutin degrading enzyme (RDE) activity. In addition, SAEW treatment had no adverse impact on the sprouts growth and could reduce the microbial populations of germinated buckwheat during germination. PMID:26868552

  18. Altered pharmacology and GABA-A receptor subunit expression in dorsal midline thalamic neurons in limbic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Karthik; Sun, Chengsan; Bertram, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    The mediodorsal (MD) and paraventricular (PV) thalamic nuclei play a significant role in limbic epilepsy, and previous reports have shown changes in GABA-A receptor (GABAAR) mediated synaptic function. In this study, we examined changes in the pharmacology of GABAergic drugs and the expression of the GABAAR subunits in the MD and PV neurons in epilepsy. We observed nucleus specific changes in the sensitivity of sIPSCs to zolpidem and phenobarbital in MD and PV neurons from epileptic animals. In contrast, the magnitude of change in electrically evoked response (eIPSC) to zolpidem and phenobarbital were uniformly diminished in both MD and PV neurons in epilepsy. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that in epilepsy, there was a reduction in GAD65 expression and NeuN positive neurons in the MD neurons. Also, there was a decrease in immunoreactivity of the alpha1 and beta2/3 subunit of GABAARs, but not the gamma2 of the GABAAR in both MD and PV in epilepsy. These findings demonstrate significant alterations in the pharmacology of GABA and GABAARs in a key region for seizure generation, which may have implications for the physiology and pharmacology of limbic epilepsy. PMID:18992345

  19. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate [3H]GABA release in the globus pallidus of the rat when G(i) protein-receptor coupling is restricted: role of dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Brenda; Paz, Francisco; Florán, Leonor; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2009-03-01

    The motor effects of cannabinoids in the globus pallidus appear to be caused by increases in interstitial GABA. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, we investigated the effect of the selective cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) cannabinoid agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) on [(3)H]GABA release in slices of the rat globus pallidus. ACEA had two effects: concentrations between 10(-8) and 10(-6) M stimulated release, whereas higher concentrations (IC(50) approximately 10(-6) M) inhibited it. Another cannabinoid agonist, WIN-55,212-2, also had bimodal effects on release. Studies of cAMP production indicate that under conditions of low G(i/o), availability the coupling of CB1 receptors with G(i/o) proteins can be changed into CB1:G(s/olf) coupling; therefore, we determined the effects of conditions that limit G(i/o) availability on [(3)H]GABA release. Blockers of G(i/o) protein interactions, pertussis toxin and N-ethylmaleimide, transformed the inhibitory effects of ACEA on GABA release into stimulation. It also has been suggested that stimulation of D2 receptors can reduce G(i/o) availability. Blocking D2 receptors with sulpiride [(S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-2-methoxybenzamidersqb] or depleting dopamine with reserpine inhibited the ACEA-induced stimulation of release. Thus, the D2 dependence of stimulation is consistent with the proposal that D2 receptors reduce G(i/o) proteins available for binding to the CB1 receptor. In summary, CB1 receptor activation has dual effects on GABA release in the globus pallidus. Low concentrations stimulate release through a process that depends on activation of dopamine D2 receptors that may limit G(i/o) protein availability. Higher concentrations of cannabinoid inhibit GABA release through mechanisms that are independent of D2 receptor activation. PMID:19106171

  20. GABA-mediated regulation of the activity-dependent olfactory bulb dopaminergic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Yosuke; Sasaki, Hayato; Huerta, Patricio T.; Estevez, Alvaro G.; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) regulates the proliferation and migration of olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron progenitors derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ), but the role of GABA in the differentiation of these progenitors has been largely unexplored. This study examined the role of GABA in the differentiation of OB dopaminergic interneurons using neonatal forebrain organotypic slice cultures prepared from transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene promoter (ThGFP). KCl-mediated depolarization of the slices induced ThGFP expression. The addition of GABA to the depolarized slices further increased GFP fluorescence by inducing ThGFP expression in an additional set of periglomerular cells. These findings showed that GABA promoted differentiation of SVZ-derived OB dopaminergic interneurons and suggested that GABA indirectly regulated Th expression and OB dopaminergic neuron differentiation through an acceleration of the maturation rate for the dopaminergic progenitors. Additional studies revealed that the effect of GABA on ThGFP expression required activation of L- and P/Q-type Ca+2 channels as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors. These voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and GABA receptors have previously been shown to be required for the co-expressed GABAergic phenotype in the OB interneurons. Together, these findings suggest that Th expression and the differentiation of OB dopaminergic interneurons are coupled to the co-expressed GABAergic phenotype, and demonstrate a novel role for GABA in neurogenesis. PMID:19301430

  1. Synergistic action of GABA-A and NMDA receptors in the induction of long-term depression in glutamatergic synapses in the newborn rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Ivan; Riekki, Ruusu; Taira, Tomi

    2004-12-01

    We show that activation of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) promotes induction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synapses in the newborn rat hippocampal area CA1 in a developmentally restricted manner. In the newborn rat hippocampus two mechanistically different types of LTD of glutamatergic synapses could be induced under similar experimental conditions. The form of the LTD induced depended on the stimulation protocol and on the age of the animal. Low-frequency stimulation (1 Hz) with 100 stimuli induced a robust homosynaptic, reversible LTD at postnatal days 2-8 (P2-P8) but not at P14. This LTD was blocked by the NMDAR antagonist AP5 or by the GABA(A)R antagonist picrotoxin. Use of a low-chloride solution in the patch pipette resulting in E(GABA-A) < -70 mV blocked the NMDAR-dependent LTD, whereas clamping the cell to -40 mV during induction rescued it. In addition, it was possible to induce LTD at P14 with 100 stimuli if the cells were clamped to -40 mV during induction. Low-frequency stimulation with 900 stimuli induced a robust homosynaptic, reversible LTD both at P2-P8 and at P14. However, neither AP5 nor picrotoxin affected the LTD induced by 900 pulses at P2-P8. Instead, the 900 stimuli-induced LTD was blocked by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists when co-applied with AP5. We suggest that during the first postnatal week postsynaptic depolarization provided by the activation of GABA(A)Rs shifts the threshold for the LTD induction, making the synapses more prone to activity-induced plasticity. From the second postnatal week onwards, when the GABA(A) responses are already hyperpolarizing, different mechanisms for LTD induction prevail. PMID:15579156

  2. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by substances in the organic acid fraction of Japanese sake.

    PubMed

    Izu, Hanae; Shigemori, Kensuke; Eguchi, Masaya; Kawane, Shuhei; Fujii, Shouko; Kitamura, Yuji; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Yamada, Yasue

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substances present in Japanese sake on the response of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Sake was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. The fraction containing organic acids (OA fraction) showed agonist activities on the GABAA receptor. OA fractions from sake were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Of the 64 compounds identified, 13 compounds showed GABAA receptor agonist activities. Especially, l-lactic acid showed high agonist activity and its EC50 value was 37μM. Intraperitoneal injections of l-lactic acid, gluconic acid, and pyruvic acid (10, 10, and 5mg/kg BW, respectively), which showed agonistic activity on the GABAA receptor, led to significant anxiolytic effects during an elevated plus-maze test in mice. PMID:27507485

  3. Ondansetron reverses anti-hypersensitivity from clonidine in rats following peripheral nerve injury: Role of γ-amino butyric acid in α2-adrenoceptor and 5-HT3 serotonin receptor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Kimura, Masafumi; Yoshizumi, Masaru; Hobo, Shotaro; Obata, Hideaki; Eisenach, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Monoaminergic pathways, impinging an α2-adrenoceptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors, modulate nociceptive transmission, but their mechanisms and interactions after neuropathic injury are unknown. Here we examine these interactions in rodents after nerve injury. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats following L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) were used for either behavioral testing, in vivo microdialysis for γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and acetylcholine release, or synaptosome preparation for GABA release. Results Intrathecal administration of the α2-adrenoceptor agonist (clonidine) and 5-HT3 receptor agonist (chlorophenylbiguanide) reduced hypersensitivity in SNL rats via GABA receptor-mediated mechanisms. Clonidine increased GABA and acetylcholine release in vivo in the spinal cord of SNL rats but not in normal rats. Clonidine-induced spinal GABA release in SNL rats was blocked by α2-adrenergic and nicotinic cholinergic antagonists. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron decreased and chlorophenylbiguanide increased spinal GABA release in both normal and SNL rats. In synaptosomes from the spinal dorsal horn of SNL rats, pre-synaptic GABA release was increased by nicotinic agonists and decreased by muscarinic and α2-adrenergic agonists. Spinally administered ondansetron significantly reduced clonidine-induced anti-hypersensitivity and spinal GABA release in SNL rats. Conclusion These results suggest that spinal GABA contributes to anti-hypersensitivity from intrathecal α2-adrenergic and 5-HT3 receptor agonists in the neuropathic pain state, that cholinergic neuroplasticity after nerve injury is critical for α2-adrenoceptor-mediated GABA release, and that blockade of spinal 5-HT3 receptors reduces α2-adrenoceptor-mediated anti-hypersensitivity via reducing total GABA release. PMID:22722575

  4. GABA-A and NMDA receptor subunit mRNA expression is altered in the caudate but not the putamen of the postmortem brains of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Bhandage, Amol K.; Jin, Zhe; Bazov, Igor; Kononenko, Olga; Bakalkin, Georgy; Korpi, Esa R.; Birnir, Bryndis

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of alcohol by humans has been shown to lead to impairment of executive and cognitive functions. Here, we have studied the mRNA expression of ion channel receptors for glutamate and GABA in the dorsal striatum of post-mortem brains from alcoholics (n = 29) and normal controls (n = 29), with the focus on the caudate nucleus that is associated with the frontal cortex executive functions and automatic thinking and on the putamen area that is linked to motor cortices and automatic movements. The results obtained by qPCR assay revealed significant changes in the expression of specific excitatory ionotropic glutamate and inhibitory GABA-A receptor subunit genes in the caudate but not the putamen. Thus, in the caudate we found reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the GluN2A glutamate receptor and the δ, ε, and ρ2 GABA-A receptor subunits, and increased levels of the mRNAs encoding GluD1, GluD2, and GABA-A γ1 subunits in the alcoholics as compared to controls. Interestingly in the controls, 11 glutamate and 5 GABA-A receptor genes were more prominently expressed in the caudate than the putamen (fold-increase varied from 1.24 to 2.91). Differences in gene expression patterns between the striatal regions may underlie differences in associated behavioral outputs. Our results suggest an altered balance between caudate-mediated voluntarily controlled and automatic behaviors in alcoholics, including diminished executive control on goal-directed alcohol-seeking behavior. PMID:25538565

  5. Social isolation-induced increase in alpha and delta subunit gene expression is associated with a greater efficacy of ethanol on steroidogenesis and GABA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Serra, Mariangela; Mostallino, Maria Cristina; Talani, Giuseppe; Pisu, Maria Giuseppina; Carta, Mario; Mura, Maria Luisa; Floris, Ivan; Maciocco, Elisabetta; Sanna, Enrico; Biggio, Giovanni

    2006-07-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that social isolation of rats reduces both the cerebrocortical and plasma concentrations of 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-TH PROG), and potentiates the positive effects of acute ethanol administration on the concentrations of this neurosteroid. We now show that the ethanol-induced increase in 3alpha,5alpha-TH PROG is more pronounced in the brain than in the plasma of isolated rats. The ability of ethanol to inhibit isoniazid-induced convulsions is greater in isolated rats than in group-housed animals and this effect is prevented by treatment with finasteride. Social isolation modified the effects of ethanol on the amounts of steroidogenic regulatory protein mRNA and protein in the brain. Moreover, ethanol increased the amplitude of GABA(A) receptor-mediated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurones with greater potency in hippocampal slices prepared from socially isolated rats than in those from group-housed rats, an effect inhibited by finasteride. The amounts of the alpha(4) and delta subunits of the GABA(A) receptor in the hippocampus were increased in isolated rats as were GABA(A) receptor-mediated tonic inhibitory currents in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that social isolation results in changes in GABA(A) receptor expression in the brain, and in an enhancement of the stimulatory effect of ethanol on brain steroidogenesis, GABA(A) receptor function and associated behaviour. PMID:16805802

  6. Evidence for motivational effects elicited by activation of GABA-A or dopamine receptors in the nucleus accumbens shell

    PubMed Central

    Wirtshafter, David; Stratford, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Microinjections of the inhibitory GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol into the shell region of the nucleus accumbens (AcbSh) have been reported to induce large increases in food intake, but the effect of these injections on motivational processes is less clear. In the current study, bilateral injections of saline, muscimol (50 ng/side) or D-amphetamine (10 μg/side) were made into the AcbSh of rats trained to lever press on a progressive ratio schedule for food reward. Injections of both muscimol and amphetamine were found to produce a large increase in the breaking point relative to saline injections. This result suggests that inactivation of the AcbSh does not simply drive ingestive behavior, but also affects motivational processes assessed by the progressive ratio schedule. Breaking points were also increased by injections of amphetamine into the AcbSh. PMID:20598739

  7. Presynaptic Kainate Receptor Activation Preserves Asynchronous GABA Release Despite the Reduction in Synchronous Release from Hippocampal CCK Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus in mediated by a wide variety of different interneuron classes which are assumed to play different roles in network activity. Activation of presynaptic kainate receptors (KARs) has been shown to reduce inhibitory transmission but the interneuron class(es) at which they act is only recently beginning to emerge. Using paired recordings we show that KAR activation causes a decrease in presynaptic release from CCK- but not PV-containing interneurons and that this decrease is observed when pyramidal cells, but not interneurons, are the postsynaptic target. We also show that although the synchronous release component is reduced, the barrage of asynchronous GABA release from CCK interneurons during sustained firing is unaffected by KAR activation. This indicates that presynaptic KARs preserve and act in concert with asynchronous release to switch CCK interneurons from a phasic inhibition mode to produce prolonged inhibition during periods of intense activity. PMID:20720128

  8. [Effect of GABA receptor agonist phenibut on behavior and respiration of rabbits in the negative emotional situation].

    PubMed

    Ziablitseva, E A; Pavlova, I V

    2007-01-01

    The influence of systemic injection of GABA-receptor agonist--phenibut (40 mg/kg, s/c) on open field behavior, behavioral reactivity and changes in respiratory parameters after exposure of negative emotional stimuli was studied in three rabbit groups differentiated by locomotor activity in open field (active, passive and medium-active animals). The injection of phenibut results in decrease of rabbits horizontal locomotor activity and some components of research behavior in open field and also decrease of behavioral reactivity on emotional stimuli. At the same time the probability of both an active orienting exploratory or defensive reactions and passive reactions (freezing) were decreased. The influence of phenibut depended on typological features of rabbits: the most potent effect occurred upon behavior of active rabbits, less on passive animals and practically none on medium-active rabbits. The phenibut injection results in increase of duration of inhalation during exposure to emotional stimuli, whereas it decreased in normal. PMID:17944107

  9. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  10. Differential effects of the dual orexin receptor antagonist almorexant and the GABA(A)-α1 receptor modulator zolpidem, alone or combined with ethanol, on motor performance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Lecourt, Hugues; Strasser, Daniel S; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Jenck, François

    2011-03-01

    Current insomnia treatments such as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor modulators are associated with sedative and muscle-relaxant effects, which increase when drug intake is combined with alcohol. This study compared the novel sleep-enabling compound almorexant (ACT-078573-hydrochloride), a dual orexin receptor antagonist, with the positive GABA(A)-α1 receptor modulator zolpidem. Both compounds were administered alone or in combination with ethanol, and their effects on forced motor performance were determined in Wistar rats upon waking after treatment. To detect substance-induced sedation and myorelaxation, time spent on an accelerating rotating rod (rotarod) and forepaw grip strength were measured. Zolpidem (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and ethanol (0.32, 1, and 1.5 g/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently decreased rotarod performance and grip strength, whereas almorexant (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) did not. Doses of ethanol (0.32 and 1 g/kg), which were ineffective when administered alone, showed interactions with zolpidem (10 and 30 mg/kg) leading to reduced rotarod performance and grip strength; in contrast, combination of ethanol (0.32 and 1 g/kg) with almorexant (100 and 300 mg/kg) did not reduce performance or grip strength below ethanol alone. We conclude that unlike zolpidem, almorexant does not interfere with forced motor performance or grip strength in the rat, nor does it further increase the sedative effects of ethanol. Our results suggest that the effect of almorexant can be immediately reversed to full alertness like under physiological sleep, and that almorexant is less likely to show strong sedation, excessive myorelaxation, or interaction with alcohol than commonly prescribed hypnotics such as zolpidem. PMID:21150905

  11. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/-S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and trazolate, and a diaryl-triazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin

  12. Binding characteristics of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as a weak but selective GABAB receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Mathivet, P; Bernasconi, R; De Barry, J; Marescaux, C; Bittiger, H

    1997-02-19

    The aim of this study was to reexamine the concept that gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a weak but selective agonist at gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors, using binding experiments with several radioligands. Ki values of GHB were similar (approximately equal to 100 microM) in three agonist radioligand assays for GABAB receptors, [3H]baclofen (beta-para-chlorophenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid), [3H]CGP 27492 (3-aminopropyl-phosphinic acid) and [3H]GABA, in the presence of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine with rat cortical, cerebellar and hippocampal membranes. In competition experiments between GHB and the GABAB receptor antagonist, [3H]CGP 54626 (3-N [1-{(S)-3,4-dichlorophenyl}-ethylamino]-2-(S)-hydroxypropyl cyclo-hexylmethyl phosphinic acid), the IC50 values were significantly increased with 300 microM of 5'-guanyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), which suggested that guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) modulate GHB binding on GABAB receptors. The inhibition by GHB of [3H]CGP 27492 binding in cortical membranes was not altered in the presence of 0.3 or 3 mM of the two GHB dehydrogenase inhibitors, valproate and ethosuximide. Thus, GHB is not reconverted into GABA by GHB dehydrogenase. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that GHB is an endogenous weak but selective agonist at GABAB receptors. PMID:9083788

  13. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and tracazolate, and a diaryltriazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin and LY81067 on the saturable binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS in cortical membranes are compared. The present findings are consistent with the interpretation that /sup 35/S-TBPS bind at or near the picrotoxin-sensitive anion recognition sites of the GABA/benzodiazepine/picrotoxin receptor complex.

  14. New effects of GABAB receptor allosteric modulator rac-BHFF on ambient GABA, uptake/release, Em and synaptic vesicle acidification in nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Pozdnyakova, N; Dudarenko, M; Borisova, T

    2015-09-24

    Positive allosteric modulators of GABAB receptors have great therapeutic potential for medications of anxiety, depression, etc. The effects of recently discovered modulator rac-BHFF on the key characteristics of GABAergic neurotransmission were investigated in cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals of rats (synaptosomes). The ambient level of [(3)H]GABA that is a balance between release and uptake of the neurotransmitter increased significantly in the presence of rac-BHFF (at concentrations 10-30μM). The initial velocity of synaptosomal [(3)H]GABA uptake was suppressed by the modulator. In the presence of GABA transporter blocker NO-711, it was shown that rac-BHFF increased tonic release of [(3)H]GABA from synaptosomes (at concentrations 3-30μM). Rac-BHFF within the concentration range of 0.3-30μM did not enhance inhibiting effect of (±)-baclofen on depolarization-induced exocytotic release of [(3)H]GABA. Rac-BHFF (0.3-30μM) caused dose-dependent depolarization of the plasma membrane and dissipation of the proton gradient of synaptic vesicles in synaptosomes that was shown in the absence/presence of GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen using fluorescent dyes rhodamine 6G and acridine orange, respectively, and so, the above effects of rac-BHFF were not associated with the modulation of presynaptic GABAB receptors. Therefore, drug development strategy of positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors is to eliminate the above side effects of rac-BHFF in presynapse, and vice versa, these new properties of rac-BHFF may be exploited appropriately. PMID:26197223

  15. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate reduces mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation via GABA B receptor activation in mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiuhai; Mody, Istvan

    2003-10-24

    gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) naturally occurs in the brain, but its exogenous administration induces profound effects on the central nervous system in animals and humans. The intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of GHB on the activation (phosphorylation) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinases), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), were investigated. Acute administration of GHB (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) induced a fast and long lasting inhibition of MAP kinase phosphorylation in both frontal cortex and hippocampus. The reduced MAP kinase phosphorylation was observed in the CA1 and CA3 areas but not in the dentate gyrus. Pretreatment with the specific gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB), receptor antagonist CGP56999A (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) prevented the action of GHB, and the effect of GHB was mimicked by baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist, whereas the high affinity GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (200 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) had no effect on GHB-inhibited MAP kinase phosphorylation. Moreover, the GHB dehydrogenase inhibitor valproate (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), which inhibits the conversion of GHB into GABA, failed to block the effect of GHB on MAP kinase phosphorylation. Altogether, these data suggest that GHB, administered in vivo, reduces MAP kinase phosphorylation via a direct activation of GABAB receptors by GHB. In contrast, GHB (10 mm for 15 min) was found ineffective on MAP kinase phosphorylation in brain slices, indicating important differences in the conditions required for the second messenger activating action of GHB. PMID:12923192

  16. Design, synthesis and SAR studies of GABA uptake inhibitors derived from 2-substituted pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Tobias; Renukappa-Gutke, Thejavathi; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, we disclose the design and synthesis of a series of 2-substituted pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid as core structures and the N-arylalkyl derivatives thereof as potential GABA transport inhibitors. The 2-position in the side chain of pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid derivatives was substituted with alkyl, hydroxy and amino groups to modulate the activity and selectivity to mGAT1 and mGAT4 proteins. SAR studies of the compounds performed for the four mouse GABA transporter proteins (mGAT1-mGAT4) implied significant potencies and subtype selectivities for 2-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid derivatives. The racemate rac-(u)-13c exhibited the highest potency (pIC50 5.67) at and selectivity for mGAT1 in GABA uptake assays. In fact, the potency of rac-(u)-13c at hGAT-1 (pIC50 6.14) was even higher than its potency at mGAT1. These uptake results for rac-(u)-13c are in line with the binding affinities to the aforesaid proteins mGAT1 (pKi 6.99) and hGAT-1 (pKi 7.18) determined by MS Binding Assay based on NO711 as marker quantified by LC-ESI-MS-MS analysis. Interestingly, the 2-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidine-2-yl-acetic acid rac-(u)-13d containing 2-{[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)]methoxy} ethyl group at the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring showed high potency at mGAT4 and a comparatively better selectivity for this protein (>15 against mGAT3) than the well known mGAT4 uptake inhibitor (S)-SNAP-5114. PMID:25698617

  17. Determination of theanine, GABA, and other amino acids in green, oolong, black, and Pu-erh teas with dabsylation and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Syu, Kai-Yang; Lin, Chih-Li; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2008-09-10

    Dabsyl chloride (dimethylaminoazobenzene sulfonyl chloride), a useful chromophoric labeling reagent for amino acids and amines, was developed in this laboratory in 1975. Although several methods have been developed to determine various types of amino acids, a quick and easy method of determining theanine, GABA, and other amino acids has not been developed in one HPLC system. In this paper are analyzed the free amino acid contents of theanine and GABA in different teas (green tea, black tea, oolong tea, Pu-erh tea, and GABA tea) with a dabsylation and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system coupled with a detector at 425 nm absorbance. Two reverse phase columns, Hypersil GOLD and Zorbax ODS, were used and gave different resolutions of dabsyl amino acids in the gradient elution program. The data suggest that the tea source or the steps of tea-making may contribute to the theanine contents variations. High theanine contents of high-mountain tea were observed in both green tea and oolong tea. Furthermore, the raw (natural fermented) Pu-erh tea contained more theanine than ripe (wet fermented) Pu-erh tea, and the GABA contents in normal teas were generally lower than that in GABA tea. PMID:18652476

  18. Estrous cycle variations in GABA(A) receptor phosphorylation enable rapid modulation by anabolic androgenic steroids in the medial preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, J G; Porter, D M; Onakomaiya, M M; Penatti, C A A; Vithlani, M; Moss, S J; Clark, A S; Henderson, L P

    2012-12-13

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), synthetic testosterone derivatives that are used for ergogenic purposes, alter neurotransmission and behaviors mediated by GABA(A) receptors. Some of these effects may reflect direct and rapid action of these synthetic steroids at the receptor. The ability of other natural allosteric steroid modulators to alter GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents is dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex. Here we show that phosphorylation of the GABA(A) receptor complex immunoprecipitated by β(2)/β(3) subunit-specific antibodies from the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the mouse varies across the estrous cycle; with levels being significantly lower in estrus. Acute exposure to the AAS, 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-MeT), had no effect on the amplitude or kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the mPOA of estrous mice when phosphorylation was low, but increased the amplitude of these currents from mice in diestrus, when it was high. Inclusion of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin, in the recording pipette eliminated the ability of 17α-MeT to enhance currents from diestrous animals, suggesting that PKC-receptor phosphorylation is critical for the allosteric modulation elicited by AAS during this phase. In addition, a single injection of 17α-MeT was found to impair an mPOA-mediated behavior (nest building) in diestrus, but not in estrus. PKC is known to target specific serine residues in the β(3) subunit of the GABA(A) receptor. Although phosphorylation of these β(3) serine residues showed a similar profile across the cycle, as did phosphoserine in mPOA lysates immunoprecipitated with β2/β3 antibody (lower in estrus than in diestrus or proestrus), the differences were not significant. These data suggest that the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex regulates both the ability of AAS to modulate receptor function in the mPOA and the expression of a simple mPOA-dependent behavior through a

  19. Inhibition of thalamic excitability by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol: a selective role for delta-GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Herd, Murray B; Foister, Nicola; Chandra, Dev; Peden, Dianne R; Homanics, Gregg E; Brown, Verity J; Balfour, David J K; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2009-03-01

    The sedative and hypnotic agent 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP) is a GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist that preferentially activates delta-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (delta-GABA(A)Rs). To clarify the role of delta-GABA(A)Rs in mediating the sedative actions of THIP, we utilized mice lacking the alpha(1)- or delta-subunit in a combined electrophysiological and behavioural analysis. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were obtained from ventrobasal thalamic nucleus (VB) neurones at a holding potential of -60 mV. Application of bicuculline to wild-type (WT) VB neurones revealed a GABA(A)R-mediated tonic current of 92 +/- 19 pA, which was greatly reduced (13 +/- 5 pA) for VB neurones of delta(0/0) mice. Deletion of the delta- but not the alpha(1)-subunit dramatically reduced the THIP (1 mum)-induced inward current in these neurones (WT, -309 +/- 23 pA; delta(0/0), -18 +/- 3 pA; alpha(1) (0/0), -377 +/- 45 pA). Furthermore, THIP selectively decreased the excitability of WT and alpha(1) (0/0) but not delta(0/0) VB neurones. THIP did not affect the properties of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents in any of the genotypes. No differences in rotarod performance and locomotor activity were observed across the three genotypes. In WT mice, performance of these behaviours was impaired by THIP in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of THIP on rotarod performance was blunted for delta(0/0) but not alpha(1) (0/0) mice. We previously reported that deletion of the alpha(1)-subunit abolished synaptic GABA(A) responses of VB neurones. Therefore, collectively, these findings suggest that extrasynaptic delta-GABA(A)Rs vs. synaptic alpha(1)-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs of thalamocortical neurones represent an important molecular target underpinning the sedative actions of THIP. PMID:19302153

  20. Actions of agonists, fipronil and ivermectin on the predominant in vivo splice and edit variant (RDLbd, I/V) of the Drosophila GABA receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lees, Kristin; Musgaard, Maria; Suwanmanee, Siros; Buckingham, Steven David; Biggin, Philip; Sattelle, David

    2014-01-01

    Ionotropic GABA receptors are the targets for several classes of insecticides. One of the most widely-studied insect GABA receptors is RDL (resistance to dieldrin), originally isolated from Drosophila melanogaster. RDL undergoes alternative splicing and RNA editing, which influence the potency of GABA. Most work has focussed on minority isoforms. Here, we report the first characterisation of the predominant native splice variant and RNA edit, combining functional characterisation with molecular modelling of the agonist-binding region. The relative order of agonist potency is GABA> muscimol> TACA> β-alanine. The I/V edit does not alter the potency of GABA compared to RDLbd. Docking calculations suggest that these agonists bind and activate RDLbdI/V through a similar binding mode. TACA and β-alanine are predicted to bind with lower affinity than GABA, potentially explaining their lower potency, whereas the lower potency of muscimol and isoguvacine cannot be explained structurally from the docking calculations. The A301S (resistance to dieldrin) mutation reduced the potency of antagonists picrotoxin, fipronil and pyrafluprole but the I/V edit had no measurable effect. Ivermectin suppressed responses to GABA of RDLbdI/V, RDLbd and RDLbdI/VA301S. The dieldrin resistant variant also showed reduced sensitivity to Ivermectin. This study of a highly abundant insect GABA receptor isoform will help the design of new insecticides. PMID:24823815

  1. GABA(A) receptor subunit alteration-dependent diazepam insensitivity in the cerebellum of phospholipase C-related inactive protein knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroto; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Umebayashi, Hisanori; Fukami, Kiyoko; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nabekura, Junichi; Kanematsu, Takashi; Hirata, Masato

    2010-07-01

    The GABA(A) receptor, a pentamer composed predominantly of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. We have previously reported that phospholipase C-related inactive protein (PRIP) is a modulator of GABA(A) receptor trafficking and that knockout (KO) mice exhibit a diazepam-insensitive phenotype in the hippocampus. The alpha subunit affects diazepam sensitivity; alpha1, 2, 3, and 5 subunits assemble with any form of beta and the gamma2 subunits to produce diazepam-sensitive receptors, whereas alpha4 or alpha6/beta/gamma2 receptors are diazepam-insensitive. Here, we investigated how PRIP is implicated in the diazepam-insensitive phenotype using cerebellar granule cells in animals expressing predominantly the alpha6 subunit. The expression of alpha1/beta/gamma2 diazepam-sensitive receptors was decreased in the PRIP-1 and 2 double KO cerebellum without any change in the total number of benzodiazepine-binding sites as assessed by radioligand-binding assay. Since levels of the alpha6 subunit were increased, the alpha1/beta/gamma2 receptors might be replaced with alpha6 subunit-containing receptors. Then, we further performed autoradiographic and electrophysiologic analyses. These results suggest that the expression of alpha6/delta receptors was decreased in cerebellar granule neurons, while that of alpha6/gamma2 receptors was increased. PRIP-1 and 2 double KO mice exhibit a diazepam-insensitive phenotype because of a decrease in diazepam-sensitive (alpha1/gamma2) and increase in diazepam-insensitive (alpha6/gamma2) GABA(A) receptors in the cerebellar granule cells. PMID:20412381

  2. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  3. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  4. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  5. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Timothy S; Lightstone, Felice C

    2016-04-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  6. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. PMID:26033549

  7. Dodecyl Maltopyranoside Enabled Purification of Active Human GABA Type A Receptors for Deep and Direct Proteomic Sequencing*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Miller, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge in high-quality membrane proteomics is all about sample preparation prior to HPLC, and the cell-to-protein step poses a long-standing bottleneck. Traditional protein extraction methods apply ionic or poly-disperse detergents, harsh denaturation, and repeated protein/peptide precipitation/resolubilization afterward, but suffer low yield, low reproducibility, and low sequence coverage. Contrary to attempts to subdue, we resolved this challenge by providing proteins nature-and-activity-promoting conditions throughout preparation. Using 285-kDa hetero-pentameric human GABA type A receptor overexpressed in HEK293 as a model, we describe a n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside/cholesteryl hemisuccinate (DDM/CHS)-based affinity purification method, that produced active receptors, supported protease activity, and allowed high performance with both in-gel and direct gel-free proteomic analyses—without detergent removal. Unlike conventional belief that detergents must be removed before HPLC MS, the high-purity low-dose nonionic detergent DDM did not interfere with peptides, and obviated removal or desalting. Sonication or dropwise addition of detergent robustly solubilized over 90% of membrane pellets. The purification conditions were comparable to those applied in successful crystallizations of most membrane proteins. These results enabled streamlined proteomics of human synaptic membrane proteins, and more importantly, allowed directly coupling proteomics with crystallography to characterize both static and dynamic structures of membrane proteins in crystallization pipelines. PMID:25473089

  8. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation. PMID:26765954

  9. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Regulates Hippocampal GABA(A) Receptor Delta Subunit Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Follesa, Paolo; Floris, Gabriele; Asuni, Gino P.; Ibba, Antonio; Tocco, Maria G.; Zicca, Luca; Mercante, Beniamina; Deriu, Franca; Gorini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption causes structural and functional reorganization in the hippocampus and induces alterations in the gene expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs). Distinct forced intermittent exposure models have been used previously to investigate changes in GABAAR expression, with contrasting results. Here, we used repeated cycles of a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol paradigm to examine the relationship between voluntary, dependence-associated ethanol consumption, and GABAAR gene expression in mouse hippocampus. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to four 16-h ethanol vapor (or air) cycles in inhalation chambers alternated with limited-access two-bottle choice between ethanol (15%) and water consumption. The mice exposed to ethanol vapor showed significant increases in ethanol consumption compared to their air-matched controls. GABAAR alpha4 and delta subunit gene expression were measured by qRT-PCR at different stages. There were significant changes in GABAAR delta subunit transcript levels at different time points in ethanol-vapor exposed mice, while the alpha4 subunit levels remained unchanged. Correlated concurrent blood ethanol concentrations suggested that GABAAR delta subunit mRNA levels fluctuate depending on ethanol intoxication, dependence, and withdrawal state. Using a vapor-based Chronic Intermittent Ethanol procedure with combined two-bottle choice consumption, we corroborated previous evidences showing that discontinuous ethanol exposure affects GABAAR delta subunit expression but we did not observe changes in alpha4 subunit. These findings indicate that hippocampal GABAAR delta subunit expression changes transiently over the course of a Chronic Intermittent Ethanol paradigm associated with voluntary intake, in response to ethanol-mediated disturbance of GABAergic neurotransmission. PMID:26617492

  10. Mice with targeted genetic reduction of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunits display performance differences in Morris water maze tasks.

    PubMed

    Berry, Raymond B; Werner, David F; Wang, Xiaofei; Jablonski, Monica M; Homanics, Gregg E; Mittleman, Guy; Matthews, Douglas B

    2008-10-01

    Recent research has begun to demonstrate that specific subunits of GABA(A) receptors may be involved in the normal expression of specific behaviors. The present research used mice with GABA(A) receptors whose alpha1 subunits contained mutations of serine 270 to histidine and leucine 277 to alanine in the TM2 region. The purpose was an attempt to examine the possible role that this particular subunit may have in learning the spatial and nonspatial version of the Morris water maze task. Mutant animals, compared to controls, displayed elevated levels of pool circling in both the spatial task and the nonspatial task. These results suggested that normal performance of the spatial and nonspatial water maze tasks may be dependent upon a natural alpha1 subunit array. PMID:18625330

  11. Loose protein packing around the extracellular half of the GABA(A) receptor beta1 subunit M2 channel-lining segment.

    PubMed

    Goren, Eric N; Reeves, David C; Akabas, Myles H

    2004-03-19

    GABA(A) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels formed by the pseudosymmetrical assembly of five homologous subunits around the central channel axis. The five M2 membrane-spanning segments largely line the channel. In the present work we probed the water surface accessibility of the beta(1) subunit M2 segment using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. We assayed the reaction of the negatively charged sulfhydryl-specific reagent, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate (pCMBS(-)), by its effect on subsequent currents elicited by EC(50) and saturating GABA concentrations. pCMBS(-), applied with GABA, reacted with 14 of the 19 residues tested. At the M2 cytoplasmic end from 2' to 6' only beta(1)A252C (2') and beta(1)T256C (6') were pCMBS(-)-reactive in the presence of GABA. We infer that the M2 segments are tightly packed in this region. Toward the extracellular half of M2 all residues from beta(1)T262C (12') through beta(1)E270C (20') reacted with pCMBS(-) applied with GABA. We infer that this region is highly mobile and loosely packed against the rest of the protein. Based on differences in pCMBS(-) reaction rates two domains can be distinguished on the putative channel-lining side of M2. A faster reacting domain includes the 2', 9', 12', 13', and 16' residues. The slower reacting face contains the 6', 10', and 14' residues. We hypothesize that these may represent the channel-lining faces in the closed and open states and that gating involves an 80-100 degrees rotation of the M2 segments. These results are consistent with the loose packing of the M2 segments inferred from the structure of the homologous Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. PMID:14715650

  12. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor stimulation during adolescence impairs the maturation of GABA function in the adult rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cass, D K; Flores-Barrera, E; Thomases, D R; Vital, W F; Caballero, A; Tseng, K Y

    2014-05-01

    Converging epidemiological studies indicate that cannabis abuse during adolescence increases the risk of developing psychosis and prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent cognitive impairments later in life. However, the mechanisms underlying the adolescent susceptibility to chronic cannabis exposure are poorly understood. Given that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis binds to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the present study was designed to determine the impact of a CB1 receptor agonist (WIN) during specific windows of adolescence on the functional maturation of the rat PFC. By means of local field potential recordings and ventral hippocampal stimulation in vivo, we found that a history of WIN exposure during early (postnatal days - P35-40) or mid-(P40-45) adolescence, but not in late adolescence (P50-55) or adulthood (P75-80), is sufficient to yield a state of frequency-dependent prefrontal disinhibition in adulthood comparable to that seen in the juvenile PFC. Remarkably, this prefrontal disinhibition could be normalized following a single acute local infusion of the GABA-Aα1 positive allosteric modulator Indiplon, suggesting that adolescent exposure to WIN causes a functional downregulation of GABAergic transmission in the PFC. Accordingly, in vitro recordings from adult rats exposed to WIN during adolescence demonstrate that local prefrontal GABAergic transmission onto layer V pyramidal neurons is markedly reduced to the level seen in the P30-35 PFC. Together, these results indicate that early and mid-adolescence constitute a critical period during which repeated CB1 receptor stimulation is sufficient to elicit an enduring state of PFC network disinhibition resulting from a developmental impairment of local prefrontal GABAergic transmission. PMID:24589887

  14. GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation123

    PubMed Central

    Toossi, Hanieh; del Cid-Pellitero, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep–wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep–wake state. PMID:27294196

  15. GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Toossi, Hanieh; Del Cid-Pellitero, Esther; Jones, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep-wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep-wake state. PMID:27294196

  16. Complex control of GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Megan K; Wang, Xusheng; Adler, Adrienne L; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal), even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer 4-100 fold

  17. Insulin signaling, lifespan and stress resistance are modulated by metabotropic GABA receptors on insulin producing cells in the brain of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Enell, Lina E; Kapan, Neval; Söderberg, Jeannette A E; Kahsai, Lily; Nässel, Dick R

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like peptides (ILPs) regulate growth, reproduction, metabolic homeostasis, life span and stress resistance in worms, flies and mammals. A set of insulin producing cells (IPCs) in the Drosophila brain that express three ILPs (DILP2, 3 and 5) have been the main focus of interest in hormonal DILP signaling. Little is, however, known about factors that regulate DILP production and release by these IPCs. Here we show that the IPCs express the metabotropic GABA(B) receptor (GBR), but not the ionotropic GABA(A) receptor subunit RDL. Diminishing the GBR expression on these cells by targeted RNA interference abbreviates life span, decreases metabolic stress resistance and alters carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at stress, but not growth in Drosophila. A direct effect of diminishing GBR on IPCs is an increase in DILP immunofluorescence in these cells, an effect that is accentuated at starvation. Knockdown of irk3, possibly part of a G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channel that may link to GBRs, phenocopies GBR knockdown in starvation experiments. Our experiments suggest that the GBR is involved in inhibitory control of DILP production and release in adult flies at metabolic stress and that this receptor mediates a GABA signal from brain interneurons that may convey nutritional signals. This is the first demonstration of a neurotransmitter that inhibits insulin signaling in its regulation of metabolism, stress and life span in an invertebrate brain. PMID:21209905

  18. GABA(A) receptor expression and inhibitory post-synaptic currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Kueh, S L L; Head, S I; Morley, J W

    2008-02-01

    1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the second most common fatal genetic disease and arises as a consequence of an absence or disruption of the protein dystrophin. In addition to wasting of the skeletal musculature, boys with DMD have a significant degree of cognitive impairment. 2. We show here that there is no difference between littermate control and mdx mice (a murine model of DMD) in the overall expression of the GABA(A) receptor a1-subunit, supporting the suggestion that it is the clustering at the synapse that is affected and not the expression of the GABA(A) receptor protein. 3. We report a significant reduction in both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells of mdx mice compared with littermate controls, consistent with the reported reduction in the number and size of GABA(A) receptor clusters immunoreactive for a1- and a2-subunits at the post-synaptic densities. 4. These results may explain some of the behavioural problems and cognitive impairment reported in DMD. PMID:17941889

  19. GABA's Control of Stem and Cancer Cell Proliferation in Adult Neural and Peripheral Niches

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stephanie Z.; Bordey, Angélique

    2010-01-01

    Aside from traditional neurotransmission and regulation of secretion, γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) through GABAA receptors negatively regulates proliferation of pluripotent and neural stem cells in embryonic and adult tissue. There has also been evidence that GABAergic signaling and its control over proliferation is not only limited to the nervous system, but is widespread through peripheral organs containing adult stem cells. GABA has emerged as a tumor signaling molecule in the periphery that controls the proliferation of tumor cells and perhaps tumor stem cells. Here, we will discuss GABA's presence as a near-universal signal that may be altered in tumor cells resulting in modified mitotic activity. PMID:19509127

  20. The repertoire of olfactory C family G protein-coupled receptors in zebrafish: candidate chemosensory receptors for amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Alioto, Tyler S; Ngai, John

    2006-01-01

    Background Vertebrate odorant receptors comprise at least three types of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): the OR, V1R, and V2R/V2R-like receptors, the latter group belonging to the C family of GPCRs. These receptor families are thought to receive chemosensory information from a wide spectrum of odorant and pheromonal cues that influence critical animal behaviors such as feeding, reproduction and other social interactions. Results Using genome database mining and other informatics approaches, we identified and characterized the repertoire of 54 intact "V2R-like" olfactory C family GPCRs in the zebrafish. Phylogenetic analysis – which also included a set of 34 C family GPCRs from fugu – places the fish olfactory receptors in three major groups, which are related to but clearly distinct from other C family GPCRs, including the calcium sensing receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptors, GABA-B receptor, T1R taste receptors, and the major group of V2R vomeronasal receptor families. Interestingly, an analysis of sequence conservation and selective pressure in the zebrafish receptors revealed the retention of a conserved sequence motif previously shown to be required for ligand binding in other amino acid receptors. Conclusion Based on our findings, we propose that the repertoire of zebrafish olfactory C family GPCRs has evolved to allow the detection and discrimination of a spectrum of amino acid and/or amino acid-based compounds, which are potent olfactory cues in fish. Furthermore, as the major groups of fish receptors and mammalian V2R receptors appear to have diverged significantly from a common ancestral gene(s), these receptors likely mediate chemosensation of different classes of chemical structures by their respective organisms. PMID:17156446

  1. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  2. Effects of the GABA receptor agonist phenibut on behavior and respiration in rabbits in emotionally negative situations.

    PubMed

    Zyablitseva, E A; Pavlova, I V

    2008-07-01

    Three groups of rabbits differing in terms of movement activity in an open field (active, passive, and intermediate animals) were used to study the effects of systemic administration of the GABA receptor agonist phenibut (40 mg/kg, s.c.) on behavior in the open field, behavioral reactivity, and changes in measures of respiration during exposure to emotionally negative stimuli. Phenibut administration led to decreases in horizontal movement activity and some elements of investigative behavior in rabbits in the open field, along with decreases in the reactivity of the animals to emotionally significant stimuli. There were reductions in the probabilities of both active (orientational-investigative, active defensive) and passive defensive (freezing) reactions. The effects of phenibut depended on the typological characteristics of the rabbits: its actions on behavior were most marked in active rabbits and were less marked in passive animals; phenibut had virtually no effect on the behavior of intermediate rabbits. The duration of inhalation by the rabbits on exposure to emotionally significant stimuli increased after phenibut, which contrasted with a reduction seen in normal animals; this is evidence for changes in the autonomic reactivity of the animals. PMID:18607733

  3. POSTTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION OF GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE 67 BY INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA: Evidence for the involvement of dopamine D1 receptor signaling$

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Kumar, Ganesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with sleep apnea leads to cardio-respiratory morbidities. Previous studies have shown that IH alters the synthesis of neurotransmitters including catecholamines and neuropeptides in brainstem regions associated with regulation of cardio-respiratory functions. GABA, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has been implicated in cardio-respiratory control. GABA synthesis is primarily catalyzed by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Here, we tested the hypothesis that IH like its effect on other transmitters also alters GABA synthesis. The impact of IH on GABA synthesis was investigated in pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells, a neuronal cell line which is known to express active form of GAD67 in the cytosolic fraction and also assessed the underlying mechanisms contributing to IH-evoked response. Exposure of cell cultures to IH decreased GAD67 activity and GABA level. IH-evoked decrease in GAD67 activity was due to increased cAMP - protein kinase A (PKA) - dependent phosphorylation of GAD67, but not as a result of changes in either GAD67 mRNA or protein expression. PKA inhibitor restored GAD67 activity and GABA levels in IH treated cells. PC12 cells express dopamine 1 receptor (D1R), a G-protein coupled receptor whose activation increased adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Treatment with either D1R antagonist or AC inhibitor reversed IH-evoked GAD67 inhibition. Silencing D1R expression with siRNA reversed cAMP elevation and GAD67 inhibition by IH. These results provide evidence for the role of D1R-cAMP-PKA signaling in IH mediated inhibition of GAD67 via protein phosphorylation resulting in down regulation of GABA synthesis. PMID:20969567

  4. Anxiolytic-like actions of the hexane extract from leaves of Annona cherimolia in two anxiety paradigms: possible involvement of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex.

    PubMed

    López-Rubalcava, C; Piña-Medina, B; Estrada-Reyes, R; Heinze, G; Martínez-Vázquez, M

    2006-01-11

    A hexane extract of leaves of Annona cherimolia produced anxiolytic-like actions when administered to mice and tested in two animal models of anxiety: the mouse avoidance exploratory behavior and the burying behavior tests. In order to discard unspecific drug-actions on general activity, all treatments studied in the anxiety paradigms were also analyzed in the open field test. Results showed that A. cherimolia induced anxiolytic-like actions at the doses of 6.25, 12.5, 25.0 and 50.0 mg/kg. Picrotoxin (0.25 mg/kg), a GABA-gated chloride ion channel blocker, antagonized the anxiolytic-like actions of A. cherimolia, while a sub-effective dose of muscimol (0.5 mg/kg), a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist, facilitated the effects of a sub-optimal dose of A. cherimolia (3.12 mg/kg). Thus, the involvement of the GABA(A) receptor complex in the anxiolytic-like actions of A. cherimolia hexane extract is suggested. In addition the extract was also able to enhance the duration of sodium pentobarbital induced sleeping time. Taken together, results indicate that the hexane extract of A. cherimolia has depressant activity on the Central Nervous System and could interact with the GABA(A) receptor complex. On the other hand, the chromatographic separation of this extract led to the isolation of palmitone, and beta-sitosterol as major constituents. In addition a GC-MS study of some fractions revealed the presence of several compounds such beta-cariophyllene, beta-selinene, alpha-cubebene, and linalool that have been reported to show effects on behavior that could explain some of the extract effects. PMID:16122763

  5. Expression of GABA receptor subunits in the hippocampus and thalamus after experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Drexel, Meinrad; Puhakka, Noora; Kirchmair, Elke; Hörtnagl, Heide; Pitkänen, Asla; Sperk, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability worldwide and often associated with post-traumatic epilepsy. We recently demonstrated that TBI induces acquired GABAA receptors channelopathy that associates with hyperexcitability in granule cell layer (GCL). We now assessed the expression of GABAA and GABAB receptor subunit mRNAs between 6 h and 6 months post-TBI in the hippocampus and thalamus. The expression of major GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs (α1, α2, α5, β2, β3, γ2 and δ) was, often bilaterally, down-regulated in the GCL and in the CA3 pyramidal cells. Instead, expression of α4 (GCL, CA3, CA1), α5 (CA1) and γ2 (GCL, CA3, CA1) mRNA was up-regulated after 10 d and/or 4 months. Many of these changes were reversible. In the thalamus, we found decreases in α1, α4, β2, γ2 and δ mRNAs in the laterodorsal thalamus and in the area combining the posterior thalamic nuclear group, ventroposterolateral and ventroposteromedial complex at 6 h to 4 months post-TBI. Unlike in the hippocampus, thalamic subunit down-regulations were irreversible and limited to the ipsilateral side. However, contralaterally there was up-regulation of the subunits δ and α4 6 h and 4 months after TBI, respectively. PCR array analysis suggested a mild long-lasting GABAA receptor channelopathy in the GCL and thalamus after TBI. Whereas TBI induces transient changes in the expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the hippocampus (presumably representing compensatory mechanisms), alterations of GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs in the thalamus are long-lasting and related to degeneration of receptor-containing neurons in thalamo-cortical relay nuclei. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘GABAergic Signaling in Health and Disease’. PMID:25229716

  6. General, kappa, delta and mu opioid receptor antagonists mediate feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist baclofen in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens shell in rats: reciprocal and regional interactions.

    PubMed

    Miner, Patricia; Shimonova, Lyudmila; Khaimov, Arthur; Borukhova, Yaffa; Ilyayeva, Ester; Ranaldi, Robert; Bodnar, Richard J

    2012-03-14

    Food intake is significantly increased following administration of agonists of GABA and opioid receptors into the nucleus accumbens shell (NACs) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects mu-opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Correspondingly, general or selective opioid receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects GABA agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Regional interactions have been evaluated in feeding studies by administering antagonists in one site prior to agonist administration in a second site. Thus, opioid antagonist-opioid agonist and GABA antagonist-GABA agonist feeding interactions have been identified between the VTA and NACs. However, pretreatment with GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonists in the VTA failed to affect mu opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the NACs, and correspondingly, these antagonists administered in the NACs failed to affect mu opioid-induced feeding elicited from the VTA. To evaluate whether regional and reciprocal VTA and NACs feeding interactions occur for opioid receptor modulation of GABA agonist-mediated feeding, the present study examined whether feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist, baclofen microinjected into the NACs was dose-dependently blocked by pretreatment with general (naltrexone: NTX), mu (beta-funaltrexamine: BFNA), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine: NBNI) or delta (naltrindole: NTI) opioid antagonists in the VTA, and correspondingly, whether VTA baclofen-induced feeding was dose-dependently blocked by NACs pretreatment with NTX, BFNA, NBNI or NTI in rats. Bilateral pairs of cannulae aimed at the VTA and NACs were stereotaxically implanted in rats, and their food intakes were assessed following vehicle and baclofen (200 ng) in each site. Baclofen produced similar magnitudes of increased food intake following VTA and NACs treatment. Baclofen

  7. Functional characterization of ivermectin binding sites in α1β2γ2L GABA(A) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragon, Argel; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are therapeutic targets for many indications including sedation, anesthesia and anxiolysis. There is, however, considerable scope for the development of new therapeutics with improved beneficial effects and reduced side-effect profiles. The anthelminthic drug, ivermectin, activates the GABAAR although its binding site is not known. The molecular site of action of ivermectin has, however, been defined by crystallography in the homologous glutamate-gated chloride channel. Resolving the molecular mechanisms of ivermectin binding to α1β2γ2L GABAARs may provide insights into the design of improved therapeutics. Given that ivermectin binds to subunit interfaces, we sought to define (1) which subunit interface sites it binds to, (2) whether these sites are equivalent in terms of ivermectin sensitivity or efficacy, and (3) how many must be occupied for maximal efficacy. Our approach involved precluding ivermectin from binding to particular interfaces by introducing bulky M3 domain 36′F sidechains to the “+” side of those interfaces. We thereby demonstrated that ivermectin produces irreversible channel activation only when it binds to the single γ2L-β2 interface site. When it binds to α1-β2 sites it elicits potentiation of GABA-gated currents but has no irreversible activating effect. Ivermectin cannot bind to the β2-α1 interface site due to its endogenous bulky 36′ methionine. Replacing this with an alanine creates a functional site at this interface, but surprisingly it is inhibitory. Molecular docking simulations reveal that the γ2L-β2 interface forms more contacts with ivermectin than the other interfaces, possibly explaining why ivermectin appears to bind irreversibly at this interface. This study demonstrates unexpectedly stark pharmacological differences among GABAAR ivermectin binding sites. PMID:26441518

  8. NMDA and GABA receptors as potential targets in cough hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom that can be difficult to treat. It is proposed to be part of a cough hypersensitivity syndrome characterised by troublesome coughing often triggered by low levels of thermal, mechanical or chemical exposure. Upper airway and laryngeal neural dysfunction may also be present. There is evidence that this hypersensitivity may be due to sensory nerve damage caused by inflammatory, infective and allergic factors. Antitussive therapies based on opioid medications are generally not efficacious. Antagonists of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the brain stem and use of GABAB receptor agonists such as baclofen acting centrally and possibly peripherally may represent novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25792008

  9. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (I GABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited I GABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I GABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  11. Promoters inducible by aromatic amino acids and γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) for metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujin; Lee, Kyusung; Bae, Sang-Jeong; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2015-03-01

    A wide range of promoters with different strengths and regulatory mechanisms are valuable tools in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. While there are many constitutive promoters available, the number of inducible promoters is still limited for pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed aromatic amino-acid-inducible promoters based on the binding sites of Aro80 transcription factor, which is involved in the catabolism of aromatic amino acids through transcriptional activation of ARO9 and ARO10 genes in response to aromatic amino acids. A dynamic range of tryptophan-inducible promoter strengths can be obtained by modulating the number of Aro80 binding sites, plasmid copy numbers, and tryptophan concentrations. Using low and high copy number plasmid vectors and different tryptophan concentrations, a 29-fold range of fluorescence intensities of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter could be achieved from a synthetic U4C ARO9 promoter, which is composed of four repeats of Aro80 binding half site (CCG) and ARO9 core promoter element. The U4C ARO9 promoter was applied to express alsS and alsD genes from Bacillus subtilis for acetoin production in S. cerevisiae, resulting in a gradual increase in acetoin titers depending on tryptophan concentrations. Furthermore, we demonstrated that γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-inducible UGA4 promoter, regulated by Uga3, can also be used in metabolic engineering as a dose-dependent inducible promoter. The wide range of controllable expression levels provided by these tryptophan- and GABA-inducible promoters might contribute to fine-tuning gene expression levels and timing for the optimization of pathways in metabolic engineering. PMID:25573467

  12. Effect of GABA, a bacterial metabolite, on Pseudomonas fluorescens surface properties and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dagorn, Audrey; Chapalain, Annelise; Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Chevalier, Sylvie; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-01-01

    Different bacterial species and, particularly Pseudomonas fluorescens, can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and express GABA-binding proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of GABA on the virulence and biofilm formation activity of different strains of P. fluorescens. Exposure of a psychotropic strain of P. fluorescens (MF37) to GABA (10-5 M) increased its necrotic-like activity on eukaryotic (glial) cells, but reduced its apoptotic effect. Conversely, muscimol and bicuculline, the selective agonist and antagonist of eukaryote GABAA receptors, respectively, were ineffective. P. fluorescens MF37 did not produce biosurfactants, and its caseinase, esterase, amylase, hemolytic activity or pyoverdine productions were unchanged. In contrast, the effect of GABA was associated to rearrangements of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure, particularly in the lipid A region. The surface hydrophobicity of MF37 was marginally modified, and GABA reduced its biofilm formation activity on PVC, but not on glass, although the initial adhesion was increased. Five other P. fluorescens strains were studied, and only one, MFP05, a strain isolated from human skin, showed structural differences of biofilm maturation after exposure to GABA. These results reveal that GABA can regulate the LPS structure and cytotoxicity of P. fluorescens, but that this property is specific to some strains. PMID:23743829

  13. Effect of GABA, a Bacterial Metabolite, on Pseudomonas fluorescens Surface Properties and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dagorn, Audrey; Chapalain, Annelise; Mijouin, Lily; Hillion, Mélanie; Duclairoir-Poc, Cécile; Chevalier, Sylvie; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Different bacterial species and, particularly Pseudomonas fluorescens, can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and express GABA-binding proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of GABA on the virulence and biofilm formation activity of different strains of P. fluorescens. Exposure of a psychotropic strain of P. fluorescens (MF37) to GABA (10−5 M) increased its necrotic-like activity on eukaryotic (glial) cells, but reduced its apoptotic effect. Conversely, muscimol and bicuculline, the selective agonist and antagonist of eukaryote GABAA receptors, respectively, were ineffective. P. fluorescens MF37 did not produce biosurfactants, and its caseinase, esterase, amylase, hemolytic activity or pyoverdine productions were unchanged. In contrast, the effect of GABA was associated to rearrangements of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure, particularly in the lipid A region. The surface hydrophobicity of MF37 was marginally modified, and GABA reduced its biofilm formation activity on PVC, but not on glass, although the initial adhesion was increased. Five other P. fluorescens strains were studied, and only one, MFP05, a strain isolated from human skin, showed structural differences of biofilm maturation after exposure to GABA. These results reveal that GABA can regulate the LPS structure and cytotoxicity of P. fluorescens, but that this property is specific to some strains. PMID:23743829

  14. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of (TH)triazolam binding in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of (TH)TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37C). Saturation studies of (TH)TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100 M) showed a GABA-shift. At 0C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables.

  15. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Andres D.; Gotter, Anthony L.; Fox, Steven V.; Tannenbaum, Pamela L.; Yao, Lihang; Tye, Spencer J.; McDonald, Terrence; Brunner, Joseph; Garson, Susan L.; Reiss, Duane R.; Kuduk, Scott D.; Coleman, Paul J.; Uslaner, Jason M.; Hodgson, Robert; Browne, Susan E.; Renger, John J.; Winrow, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacological properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone, and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam [0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally (PO)] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.5 g/kg) induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO) nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO) impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone, and diazepam) and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development. PMID:24399926

  16. Generation of Functional Inhibitory Synapses Incorporating Defined Combinations of GABA(A) or Glycine Receptor Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Christine L.; Zhang, Yan; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain is mediated by wide range of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and glycine receptor (GlyR) isoforms, each with different physiological and pharmacological properties. Because multiple isoforms are expressed simultaneously in most neurons, it is difficult to define the properties of individual isoforms under synaptic stimulation conditions in vivo. Although recombinant expression systems permit the expression of individual isoforms in isolation, they require exogenous agonist application which cannot mimic the dynamic neurotransmitter profile characteristic of native synapses. We describe a neuron-HEK293 cell co-culture technique for generating inhibitory synapses incorporating defined combinations of GABAAR or GlyR subunits. Primary neuronal cultures, prepared from embryonic rat cerebral cortex or spinal cord, are used to provide presynaptic GABAergic and glycinergic terminals, respectively. When the cultures are mature, HEK293 cells expressing the subunits of interest plus neuroligin 2A are plated onto the neurons, which rapidly form synapses onto HEK293 cells. Patch clamp electrophysiology is then used to analyze the physiological and pharmacological properties of the inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by the recombinant receptors. The method is suitable for investigating the kinetic properties or the effects of drugs on inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by defined GABAAR or GlyR isoforms of interest, the effects of hereditary disease mutations on the formation and function of both types of synapses, and synaptogenesis and synaptic clustering mechanisms. The entire cell preparation procedure takes 2–5 weeks. PMID:26778954

  17. PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES AND THE GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID (ALPHA) RECEPTOR COMPLEX: MOTOR ACTIVITY AND THE ACOUSTIC STARTLE RESPONSE IN THE RAT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two behavioral tests, locomotor activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR), were utilized to test for dose-addition of cismethrin, a Type I, or deltamethrin, a Type II pyrethroid, with compounds active to the gamma-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor complex (picrotoxin, musc...

  18. GABA(A) receptors containing (alpha)5 subunits in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal fields regulate ethanol-motivated behaviors: an extended ethanol reward circuitry.

    PubMed

    June, H L; Harvey, S C; Foster, K L; McKay, P F; Cummings, R; Garcia, M; Mason, D; Grey, C; McCane, S; Williams, L S; Johnson, T B; He, X; Rock, S; Cook, J M

    2001-03-15

    GABA receptors within the mesolimbic circuitry have been proposed to play a role in regulating alcohol-seeking behaviors in the alcohol-preferring (P) rat. However, the precise GABA(A) receptor subunit(s) mediating the reinforcing properties of EtOH remains unknown. We examined the capacity of intrahippocampal infusions of an alpha5 subunit-selective ( approximately 75-fold) benzodiazepine (BDZ) inverse agonist [i.e., RY 023 (RY) (tert-butyl 8-(trimethylsilyl) acetylene-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5a] [1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate)] to alter lever pressing maintained by concurrent presentation of EtOH (10% v/v) and a saccharin solution (0.05% w/v). Bilateral (1.5-20 microgram) and unilateral (0.01-40 microgram) RY dose-dependently reduced EtOH-maintained responding, with saccharin-maintained responding being reduced only with the highest doses (e.g., 20 and 40 microgram). The competitive BDZ antagonist ZK 93426 (ZK) (7 microgram) reversed the RY-induced suppression on EtOH-maintained responding, confirming that the effect was mediated via the BDZ site on the GABA(A) receptor complex. Intrahippocampal modulation of the EtOH-maintained responding was site-specific; no antagonism by RY after intra-accumbens [nucleus accumbens (NACC)] and intraventral tegmental [ventral tegmental area (VTA)] infusions was observed. Because the VTA and NACC contain very high densities of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits, respectively, we determined whether RY exhibited a "negative" or "neutral" pharmacological profile at recombinant alpha1beta3gamma2, alpha2beta3gamma2, and alpha5beta3gamma2 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. RY produced "classic" inverse agonism at all alpha receptor subtypes; thus, a neutral efficacy was not sufficient to explain the failure of RY to alter EtOH responding in the NACC or VTA. The results provide the first demonstration that the alpha5-containing GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus play an important role in regulating Et

  19. Isothiouronium compounds as gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, R. D.; Dickenson, H. W.; Hiern, B. P.; Johnston, G. A.; Kazlauskas, R.

    1986-01-01

    Analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) incorporating an isothiouronium salt as a replacement for a protonated amino functional group have been investigated for activity on: GABA receptors in the guinea-pig ileum; [3H]-GABA and [3H]-diazepam binding to rat brain membranes; and GABA uptake and transamination. For the homologous series of omega-isothiouronium alkanoic acids, maximum GABA-mimetic activity was found at 3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]propanoic acid. Introduction of unsaturation into this compound gave two isomeric conformationally restricted analogues. The trans isomer was inactive at GABA receptors while the cis compound ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid (ZAPA)) was more potent than muscimol and GABA as a GABA agonist with respect to low affinity GABA receptor sites. Both isomers were moderately potent at inhibiting the uptake of [3H]-GABA into rat brain slices. Comparison of possible conformations of the two unsaturated isomers by interactive computer graphics modelling and comparison with muscimol has led to a plausible active conformation of ZAPA, which may be a selective and potent agonist for low affinity GABA binding sites. PMID:3015310

  20. Differences in the negative allosteric modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors elicited by 4'-chlorodiazepam and by a beta-carboline-3-carboxylate ester: a study with natural and reconstituted receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Puia, G; Santi, M R; Vicini, S; Pritchett, D B; Seeburg, P H; Costa, E

    1989-01-01

    Cl- currents elicited by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) application were recorded with the whole-cell tight-seal technique from voltage-clamped cortical neurons of neonatal rats in primary culture. The peripheral benzodiazepine recognition site ligand 4'-chlorodiazepam [Ro 5-4864; 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-1-methyl-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2H-[1,4]-benzodiazep in-2- one] inhibited the GABA-generated currents in a dose-dependent manner. Also, a beta-carboline (DMCM; 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate methyl ester), acting as a negative allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, reduced the intensity of GABA-generated currents with similar efficacy but greater potency. Flumazenil (Ro 15-1788; 8-fluro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo-[1,5-a] [1,4]-benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate ethyl ester) antagonized DMCM inhibition but not that elicited by 4'-chlorodiazepam. The isoquinoline carboxamide PK 11195, an antagonist of 4'-chlorodiazepam effects in other systems, failed to antagonize the action of 4'-chlorodiazepam. The transient expression of various molecular forms of GABAA receptors in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293 allowed a study of the minimal structural requirements for the inhibition of GABA-induced Cl- currents by bicuculline, picrotoxin, 4'-chlorodiazepam, and DMCM. GABA-elicited Cl- currents in cells coexpressing alpha 1 and beta 1 subunits of GABAA receptors were inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not by DMCM or 4'-chlorodiazepam. Conversely, the GABA currents in cells coexpressing alpha 1 beta 1 and gamma 2 subunits were inhibited by bicuculline, picrotoxin, 4'-chlorodiazepam, and DMCM. Since the Cl- currents generated by GABA in some molecular forms of GABAA receptors are inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin only, 4'-chlorodiazepam cannot be acting isosterically with picrotoxin. PMID:2476816

  1. Sleep-promoting effects of the GABA/5-HTP mixture in vertebrate models.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ki-Bae; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the sleep-promoting effect of combined γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) on sleep quality and quantity in vertebrate models. Pentobarbital-induced sleep test and electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis were applied to investigate sleep latency, duration, total sleeping time and sleep quality of two amino acids and GABA/5-HTP mixture. In addition, real-time PCR and HPLC analysis were applied to analyze the signaling pathway. The GABA/5-HTP mixture significantly regulated the sleep latency, duration (p<0.005), and also increased the sleep quality than single administration of the amino acids (p<0.000). Long-term administration increased the transcript levels of GABAA receptor (1.37-fold, p<0.000) and also increased the GABA content compared with the control group 12h after administration (1.43-fold, p<0.000). Our available evidence suggests that the GABA/5-HTP mixture modulates both GABAergic and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, the sleep architecture can be controlled by the regulation of GABAA receptor and GABA content with 5-HTP. PMID:27150227

  2. Alcohol use disorders and current pharmacological therapies: the role of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Olsen, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are defined as alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, which create large problems both for society and for the drinkers themselves. To date, no therapeutic can effectively solve these problems. Understanding the underlying mechanisms leading to AUD is critically important for developing effective and safe pharmacological therapies. Benzodiazepines (BZs) are used to reduce the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. However, frequent use of BZs causes cross-tolerance, dependence, and cross-addiction to alcohol. The FDA-approved naltrexone and acamprosate have shown mixed results in clinical trials. Naltrexone is effective to treat alcohol dependence (decreased length and frequency of drinking bouts), but its severe side effects, including withdrawal symptoms, are difficult to overcome. Acamprosate showed efficacy for treating alcohol dependence in European trials, but two large US trials have failed to confirm the efficacy. Another FDA-approved medication, disulfiram, does not diminish craving, and it causes a peripheral neuropathy. Kudzu is the only natural medication mentioned by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, but its mechanisms of action are not yet established. It has been recently shown that dihydromyricetin, a flavonoid purified from Hovenia, has unique effects on GABAA receptors and blocks ethanol intoxication and withdrawal in alcoholic animal models. In this article, we review the role of GABAA receptors in the treatment of AUD and currently available and potentially novel pharmacological agents. PMID:25066321

  3. Enhanced GABA Transmission Drives Bradykinesia Following Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Julia C; Friend, Danielle M; Kaplan, Alanna R; Shin, Jung Hoon; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-05-18

    Bradykinesia is a prominent phenotype of Parkinson's disease, depression, and other neurological conditions. Disruption of dopamine (DA) transmission plays an important role, but progress in understanding the exact mechanisms driving slowness of movement has been impeded due to the heterogeneity of DA receptor distribution on multiple cell types within the striatum. Here we show that selective deletion of DA D2 receptors (D2Rs) from indirect-pathway medium spiny neurons (iMSNs) is sufficient to impair locomotor activity, phenocopying DA depletion models of Parkinson's disease, despite this mouse model having intact DA transmission. There was a robust enhancement of GABAergic transmission and a reduction of in vivo firing in striatal and pallidal neurons. Mimicking D2R signaling in iMSNs with Gi-DREADDs restored the level of tonic GABAergic transmission and rescued the motor deficit. These findings indicate that DA, through D2R activation in iMSNs, regulates motor output by constraining the strength of GABAergic transmission. PMID:27196975

  4. Molecular and Functional Diversity of GABA-A Receptors in the Enteric Nervous System of the Mouse Colon

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Mohsen; Brown, James F.; Mills, Jeremy; Bhandari, Pradeep; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rudolph, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) provides the intrinsic neural control of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and regulates virtually all GI functions. Altered neuronal activity within the ENS underlies various GI disorders with stress being a key contributing factor. Thus, elucidating the expression and function of the neurotransmitter systems, which determine neuronal excitability within the ENS, such as the GABA-GABAA receptor (GABAAR) system, could reveal novel therapeutic targets for such GI disorders. Molecular and functionally diverse GABAARs modulate rapid GABAergic-mediated regulation of neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. However, the cellular and subcellular GABAAR subunit expression patterns within neurochemically defined cellular circuits of the mouse ENS, together with the functional contribution of GABAAR subtypes to GI contractility remains to be determined. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that immunoreactivity for the GABAAR gamma (γ) 2 and alphas (α) 1, 2, 3 subunits was located on somatodendritic surfaces of neurochemically distinct myenteric plexus neurons, while being on axonal compartments of submucosal plexus neurons. In contrast, immunoreactivity for the α4–5 subunits was only detected in myenteric plexus neurons. Furthermore, α-γ2 subunit immunoreactivity was located on non-neuronal interstitial cells of Cajal. In organ bath studies, GABAAR subtype-specific ligands had contrasting effects on the force and frequency of spontaneous colonic longitudinal smooth muscle contractions. Finally, enhancement of γ2-GABAAR function with alprazolam reversed the stress-induced increase in the force of spontaneous colonic contractions. The study demonstrates the molecular and functional diversity of the GABAAR system within the mouse colon providing a framework for developing GABAAR-based therapeutics in GI disorders. PMID:25080596

  5. GABAB receptor constituents revealed by tandem affinity purification from transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bartoi, Tudor; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Du, Dan; Köhr, Georg; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-07-01

    GABA(B) receptors function as heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors for the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Receptor subtypes, based on isoforms of the ligand-binding subunit GABA(B1), are thought to involve a differential set of associated proteins. Here, we describe two mouse lines that allow a straightforward biochemical isolation of GABA(B) receptors. The transgenic mice express GABA(B1) isoforms that contain sequences for a two-step affinity purification, in addition to their endogenous subunit repertoire. Comparative analyses of purified samples from the transgenic mice and wild-type control animals revealed two novel components of the GABA(B1) complex. One of the identified proteins, potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing protein 12, associates with heterodimeric GABA(B) receptors via the GABA(B2) subunit. In transfected hippocampal neurons, potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing protein 12 augmented axonal surface targeting of GABA(B2). The mice equipped with tags on GABA(B1) facilitate validation and identification of native binding partners of GABA(B) receptors, providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of synaptic modulation. PMID:20406808

  6. Differential effects of GABA in modulating nociceptive vs. non-nociceptive synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Summers, T; Peterson, W; Miiller, E; Burrell, B D

    2015-07-01

    GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) -mediated signaling is normally associated with synaptic inhibition due to ionotropic GABA receptors that gate an inward Cl(-) current, hyperpolarizing the membrane potential. However, there are also situations where ionotropic GABA receptors trigger a Cl(-) efflux that results in depolarization. The well-characterized central nervous system of the medicinal leech was used to study the functional significance of opposing effects of GABA at the synaptic circuit level. Specifically, we focused on synapses made by the nociceptive N cell and the non-nociceptive P (pressure) cell that converge onto a common postsynaptic target. It is already known that GABA hyperpolarizes the P cell, but depolarizes the N cell and that inhibition of ionotropic GABA receptors by bicuculline (BIC) has opposing effects on the synapses made by these two inputs; enhancing P cell synaptic transmission, but depressing N cell synapses. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the opposing effects of GABA were due to differences in Cl(-) homeostasis between the two presynaptic neurons. VU 0240551 (VU), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) exporter K-Cl co-transporter isoform 2 (KCC2), attenuated GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the non-nociceptive afferent while bumetanide (BUM), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) importer Na-K-Cl co-transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), reduced GABA-mediated depolarization of the nociceptive neuron. VU treatment also enhanced P cell synaptic signaling, similar to the previously observed effects of BIC and consistent with the idea that GABA inhibits synaptic signaling at the presynaptic level. BUM treatment depressed N cell synapses, again similar to what is observed following BIC treatment and suggests that GABA has an excitatory effect on these synapses. The opposing effects of GABA could also be observed at the behavioral level with BIC and VU increasing responsiveness to non-nociceptive stimulation while BIC and BUM decreased responsiveness

  7. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K. Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25485164

  8. Differential antagonism of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine-induced seizures by agents acting at NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Velíšková, Jana; Stanton, Patric K.; Velíšek, Libor

    2012-11-15

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TMDT) is a highly lethal neuroactive rodenticide responsible for many accidental and intentional poisonings in mainland China. Ease of synthesis, water solubility, potency, and difficulty to treat make TMDT a potential weapon for terrorist activity. We characterized TMDT-induced convulsions and mortality in male C57BL/6 mice. TMDT (ip) produced a continuum of twitches, clonic, and tonic–clonic seizures decreasing in onset latency and increasing in severity with increasing dose; 0.4 mg/kg was 100% lethal. The NMDA antagonist, ketamine (35 mg/kg) injected ip immediately after the first TMDT-induced seizure, did not change number of tonic–clonic seizures or lethality, but increased the number of clonic seizures. Doubling the ketamine dose decreased tonic–clonic seizures and eliminated lethality through a 60 min observation period. Treating mice with another NMDA antagonist, MK-801, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg ip, showed similar effects as low and high doses of ketamine, respectively, and prevented lethality, converting status epilepticus EEG activity to isolated interictal discharges. Treatment with these agents 15 min prior to TMDT administration did not increase their effectiveness. Post-treatment with the GABA{sub A} receptor allosteric enhancer diazepam (5 mg/kg) greatly reduced seizure manifestations and prevented lethality 60 min post-TMDT, but ictal events were evident in EEG recordings and, hours post-treatment, mice experienced status epilepticus and died. Thus, TMDT is a highly potent and lethal convulsant for which single-dose benzodiazepine treatment is inadequate in managing electrographic seizures or lethality. Repeated benzodiazepine dosing or combined application of benzodiazepines and NMDA receptor antagonists is more likely to be effective in treating TMDT poisoning. -- Highlights: ► TMDT produces convulsions and lethality at low doses in mice. ► Diazepam pre- or post-treatments inhibit TMDT-induced convulsions and death

  9. Relation between increased anxiety and reduced expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABA(A) receptors in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Raud, Sirli; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Innos, Jürgen; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2009-08-28

    Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. In clinical studies a relation between mutations in the Wfs1 gene and increased susceptibility for mood disorders has been established. According to our previous studies, mice lacking Wfs1 gene displayed increased anxiety in stressful environment. As the GABA-ergic system plays a significant role in the regulation of anxiety, we analyzed the expression of GABA-related genes in the forebrain structures of wild-type and Wfs1-deficient mice. Experimentally naïve Wfs1-deficient animals displayed a significant down-regulation of alpha1 (Gabra1) and alpha2 (Gabra2) subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the temporal lobe and frontal cortex. Exposure of wild-type mice to the elevated plus-maze decreased levels of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the temporal lobe. A similar tendency was also established in the frontal cortex of wild-type animals exposed to behavioral test. In Wfs1-deficient mice the elevated plus-maze exposure did not induce further changes in the expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes. By contrast, the expression of Gad1 and Gad2 genes, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of GABA, was not significantly affected by the exposure of mice to the elevated plus-maze or by the invalidation of Wfs1 gene. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that increased anxiety of Wfs1-deficient mice is probably linked to reduced expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the frontal cortex and temporal lobe. PMID:19477223

  10. Imidase catalyzing desymmetric imide hydrolysis forming optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Masutoshi; Hibi, Makoto; Shizawa, Hiroaki; Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Yasohara, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Ogawa, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The recent use of optically active 3-substituted gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs in human therapeutics has identified a need for an efficient, stereoselective method of their synthesis. Here, bacterial strains were screened for enzymes capable of stereospecific hydrolysis of 3-substituted glutarimides to generate (R)-3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides. The bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis NBRC13111 and Burkholderia phytofirmans DSM17436 were discovered to hydrolyze 3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutarimide (CGI) to (R)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutaric acid monoamide (CGM) with 98.1% enantiomeric excess (e.e.) and 97.5% e.e., respectively. B. phytofirmans DSM17436 could also hydrolyze 3-isobutyl glutarimide (IBI) to produce (R)-3-isobutyl glutaric acid monoamide (IBM) with 94.9% e.e. BpIH, an imidase, was purified from B. phytofirmans DSM17436 and found to generate (R)-CGM from CGI with specific activity of 0.95 U/mg. The amino acid sequence of BpIH had a 75% sequence identity to that of allantoinase from A. faecalis NBRC13111 (AfIH). The purified recombinant BpIH and AfIH catalyzed (R)-selective hydrolysis of CGI and IBI. In addition, a preliminary investigation of the enzymatic properties of BpIH and AfIH revealed that both enzymes were stable in the range of pH 6-10, with an optimal pH of 9.0, stable at temperatures below 40 °C, and were not metalloproteins. These results indicate that the use of this class of hydrolase to generate optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamide could simplify the production of specific chiral GABA analogs for drug therapeutics. PMID:26205522

  11. Brainstem node for loss of consciousness due to GABA(A) receptor-active anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Minert, Anne; Devor, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    The molecular agents that induce loss of consciousness during anesthesia are classically believed to act by binding to cognate transmembrane receptors widely distributed in the CNS and critically suppressing local processing and network connectivity. However, previous work has shown that microinjection of anesthetics into a localized region of the brainstem mesopontine tegmentum (MPTA) rapidly and reversibly induces anesthesia in the absence of global spread. This implies that functional extinction is determined by neural pathways rather than vascular distribution of the anesthetic agent. But does clinical (systemic-induced) anesthesia employ MPTA-linked circuitry? Here we show that cell-selective lesioning of the MPTA in rats does not, in itself, induce anesthesia or coma. However, it increases the systemic dose of pentobarbital required to induce anesthesia, in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. Such lesions also affect emergence, extending the duration of anesthesia. Off-target and sham lesions were ineffective. Combined with the prior microinjection data, we conclude that drug delivery to the MPTA is sufficient to induce loss-of-consciousness and that neurons in this locus are necessary for anesthetic induction at clinically relevant doses. Together, the results support an architecture for anesthesia with the MPTA serving as a key node in an endogenous network of dedicated pathways that switch between wake and unconsciousness. As such, the MPTA might also play a role in syncope, concussion and sleep. PMID:26436687

  12. MicroRNA-mediated GABA Aα-1 receptor subunit down-regulation in adult spinal cord following neonatal cystitis-induced chronic visceral pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Jyoti N; Pochiraju, Soumya; Pochiraju, Soumiya; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Bruckert, Mitchell; Addya, Sankar; Yadav, Priyanka; Miranda, Adrian; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani

    2013-01-01

    The nociceptive transmission under pathological chronic pain conditions involves transcriptional and/or translational alteration in spinal neurotransmitters, receptor expressions, and modification of neuronal functions. Studies indicate the involvement of microRNA (miRNA) - mediated transcriptional deregulation in the pathophysiology of acute and chronic pain. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that long-term cross-organ colonic hypersensitivity in neonatal zymosan-induced cystitis is due to miRNA-mediated posttranscriptional suppression of the developing spinal GABAergic system. Cystitis was produced by intravesicular injection of zymosan (1% in saline) into the bladder during postnatal (P) days P14 through P16 and spinal dorsal horns (L6-S1) were collected either on P60 (unchallenged groups) or on P30 after a zymosan re-challenge on P29 (re-challenged groups). miRNA arrays and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed significant, but differential, up-regulation of mature miR-181a in the L6-S1 spinal dorsal horns from zymosan-treated rats compared with saline-treated controls in both the unchallenged and re-challenged groups. The target gene analysis demonstrated multiple complementary binding sites in miR-181a for GABA(A) receptor subunit GABA(Aα-1) gene with a miRSVR score of -1.83. An increase in miR-181a concomitantly resulted in significant down-regulation of GABA(Aα-1) receptor subunit gene and protein expression in adult spinal cords from rats with neonatal cystitis. Intrathecal administration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol failed to attenuate the viscero-motor response (VMR) to colon distension in rats with neonatal cystitis, whereas in adult zymosan-treated rats the drug produced significant decrease in VMR. These results support an integral role for miRNA-mediated transcriptional deregulation of the GABAergic system in neonatal cystitis-induced chronic pelvic pain. PMID:23273104

  13. Long-Range Regulatory Polymorphisms Affecting a GABA Receptor Constitute a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) for Social Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bendesky, Andres; Pitts, Jason; Rockman, Matthew V.; Chen, William C.; Tan, Man-Wah; Kruglyak, Leonid; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation is a social behavior that varies between and within species, providing a model to study the genetic basis of behavioral diversity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, aggregation is regulated by environmental context and by two neuromodulatory pathways, one dependent on the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1 and one dependent on the TGF-β family protein DAF-7. To gain further insight into the genetic regulation of aggregation, we characterize natural variation underlying behavioral differences between two wild-type C. elegans strains, N2 and CB4856. Using quantitative genetic techniques, including a survey of chromosome substitution strains and QTL analysis of recombinant inbred lines, we identify three new QTLs affecting aggregation in addition to the two known N2 mutations in npr-1 and glb-5. Fine-mapping with near-isogenic lines localized one QTL, accounting for 5%–8% of the behavioral variance between N2 and CB4856, 3′ to the transcript of the GABA neurotransmitter receptor gene exp-1. Quantitative complementation tests demonstrated that this QTL affects exp-1, identifying exp-1 and GABA signaling as new regulators of aggregation. exp-1 interacts genetically with the daf-7 TGF-β pathway, which integrates food availability and population density, and exp-1 mutations affect the level of daf-7 expression. Our results add to growing evidence that genetic variation affecting neurotransmitter receptor genes is a source of natural behavioral variation. PMID:23284308

  14. Identification of dehydroabietc acid from Boswellia thurifera resin as a positive GABAA receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Diana C; Raith, Melanie; De Mieri, Maria; Schöffmann, Angela; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay with Xenopus laevis oocytes, a petroleum ether extract (100 μg/mL) of the resin of Boswellia thurifera (Burseraceae) potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) through receptors of the subtype α₁β₂γ₂s by 319.8% ± 79.8%. With the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling, three known terpenoids, dehydroabietic acid (1), incensole (2), and AKBA (3), were identified in the active fractions of the extract. Structure elucidation was achieved by means of HR-MS and microprobe 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Compound 1 induced significant receptor modulation in the oocyte assay, with a maximal potentiation of IGABA of 397.5% ± 34.0%, and EC₅₀ of 8.7 μM ± 1.3 μM. This is the first report of dehydroabietic acid as a positive GABAA receptor modulator. PMID:25200370

  15. Consequences of prenatal exposure to diazepam on the respiratory parameters, respiratory network activity and gene expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABA(A) receptor in newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Picard, Nathalie; Guenin, Stéphanie; Perrin, Yolande; Hilaire, Gérard; Larnicol, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Diazepam (DZP) enhances GABA action at GABA(A) receptor. Chronic prenatal administration of DZP delays the appearance of neonatal reflexes. We examined whether maternal intake of DZP might affect respiratory control system in newborn rats (0-3 day-old). This study was conducted on unrestrained animals and medulla-spinal cord preparations. In addition, the level of expression of the genes encoding for the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of the GABA(A) receptor was assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In rats exposed to DZP, the respiratory frequency was significantly lower and the tidal volume higher than in controls with no significant alteration of the minute ventilation. The recovery from moderate hypoxia was delayed compared to controls. The respiratory-like frequency of medullary spinal cord preparation from DZP-exposed neonates was higher than in the control group. Acute applications of DZP (1 microM) to these preparations increased respiratory-like frequency in both groups, but this facilitation was attenuated following prenatal DZP exposure. The present data indicate that prenatal exposure to DZP alters both eupneic breathing and the respiratory response to hypoxia. These effects might partly be ascribed to the down-regulation of the expression of genes encoding GABA(A) receptor subunits. On the other hand, the effects of DZP exposure on reduced preparations suggested changes in the GABA(A) receptor efficiency and/or disruption of the normal development of the medullary respiratory network. PMID:18085262

  16. Nuclear receptors in bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and vitamin D receptor, and play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, energy, and drug metabolism. These xenobiotic/endobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors regulate phase I oxidation, phase II conjugation, and phase III transport in bile acid and drug metabolism in the digestive system. Integration of bile acid metabolism with drug metabolism controls absorption, transport, and metabolism of nutrients and drugs to maintain metabolic homeostasis and also protects against liver injury, inflammation, and related metabolic diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile-acid–based drugs targeting nuclear receptors are in clinical trials for treating cholestatic liver diseases and fatty liver disease. PMID:23330546

  17. GABA(B) receptors play an essential role in maintaining sleep during the second half of the night in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, Florian; Kołodziejczyk, Agata; Yoshii, Taishi; Rieger, Dirk; Nässel, Dick R; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2013-10-15

    GABAergic signalling is important for normal sleep in humans and flies. Here we advance the current understanding of GABAergic modulation of daily sleep patterns by focusing on the role of slow metabotropic GABAB receptors in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We asked whether GABAB-R2 receptors are regulatory elements in sleep regulation in addition to the already identified fast ionotropic Rdl GABAA receptors. By immunocytochemical and reporter-based techniques we show that the pigment dispersing factor (PDF)-positive ventrolateral clock neurons (LNv) express GABAB-R2 receptors. Downregulation of GABAB-R2 receptors in the large PDF neurons (l-LNv) by RNAi reduced sleep maintenance in the second half of the night, whereas sleep latency at the beginning of the night that was previously shown to depend on ionotropic Rdl GABAA receptors remained unaltered. Our results confirm the role of the l-LNv neurons as an important part of the sleep circuit in D. melanogaster and also identify the GABAB-R2 receptors as the thus far missing component in GABA-signalling that is essential for sleep maintenance. Despite the significant effects on sleep, we did not observe any changes in circadian behaviour in flies with downregulated GABAB-R2 receptors, indicating that the regulation of sleep maintenance via l-LNv neurons is independent of their function in the circadian clock circuit. PMID:24068350

  18. Effects of cocaine history on postsynaptic GABA receptors on dorsal raphe serotonin neurons in a stress-induced relapse model in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Kirby, Lynn G

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system plays an important role in stress-related psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Stressors and stress hormones can inhibit the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system, which composes the majority of forebrain-projecting 5-HT. This inhibition is mediated via stimulation of GABA synaptic activity at DRN-5-HT neurons. Using swim stress-induced reinstatement of morphine conditioned place-preference, recent data from our laboratory indicate that morphine history sensitizes DRN-5-HT neurons to GABAergic inhibitory effects of stress. Moreover, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of the serotonergic DRN is required for this reinstatement. In our current experiment, we tested the hypothesis that GABAergic sensitization of DRN-5-HT neurons is a neuroadaptation elicited by multiple classes of abused drugs across multiple models of stress-induced relapse by applying a chemical stressor (yohimbine) to induce reinstatement of previously extinguished cocaine self-administration in Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of GABA synaptic activity in DRN-5-HT neurons were conducted after the reinstatement. Behavioral data indicate that yohimbine triggered reinstatement of cocaine self-administration. Electrophysiology data indicate that 5-HT neurons in the cocaine group exposed to yohimbine had increased amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents compared to yoked-saline controls exposed to yohimbine or unstressed animals in both drug groups. These data, together with previous findings, indicate that interaction between psychostimulant or opioid history and chemical or physical stressors may increase postsynaptic GABA receptor density and/or sensitivity in DRN-5-HT neurons. Such mechanisms may result in serotonergic hypofunction and consequent dysphoric mood states which confer vulnerability to stress-induced drug reinstatement. PMID:26640169

  19. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J.; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  20. A novel action of highly specific acaricide; bifenazate as a synergist for a GABA-gated chloride channel of Tetranychus urticae [Acari: Tetranychidae].

    PubMed

    Hiragaki, Susumu; Kobayashi, Takeru; Ochiai, Noriaki; Toshima, Kayoko; Dekeyser, Mark A; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Makio

    2012-06-01

    Bifenazate is a very selective acaricide that controls the spider mite, Tetranychus urticae. Bifenazate is the first example of a carbazate acaricide. Its mode of action remains unclear. Bifenazate and its active metabolite diazene induce paralysis in spider mites, suggesting that they may act on the nervous system. Here we have employed a homologue (TuGABAR) of RDL (Resistance to dieldrin), a subunit of ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor, from T. urticae to investigate the action of bifenazate and its active metabolite diazene on this receptor function. Although neither acaricide showed a GABA agonist action, 30 μM of bifenazate or diazene significantly enhanced the GABA-induced response of TuGABAR in a dose-dependent manner, shifting the EC(50) of GABA from 24.8 μM to 4.83 μM and 10.8 μM, respectively. This action demonstrates a positive allosteric modulator effect of bifenazate on T. urticae GABA receptors. This synergistic action is likely the result of bifenazate binding to a site distinct from that of the GABA binding site causing a conformational change that affects the magnitude of the GABA response. Precisely how the observed GABA synergist action correlates with the acaricidal activity of bifenazate, if at all, has yet to be determined. PMID:22330756

  1. Dihydropyrimidinone positive modulation of delta-subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors, including an epilepsy-linked mutant variant.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan W; Mabry, John; Polisar, Jason G; Eagen, Kyle P; Ganem, Bruce; Hess, George P

    2010-06-15

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A) receptors) are ligand-gated chloride channels that play a central role in signal transmission within the mammalian central nervous system. Compounds that modulate specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes containing the delta-subunit are scarce but would be valuable research tools and starting points for potential therapeutic agents. Here we report a class of dihydropyrimidinone (DHPM) heterocycles that preferentially potentiate peak currents of recombinant GABA(A) receptor subtypes containing the delta-subunit expressed in HEK293T cells. Using the three-component Biginelli reaction, 13 DHPMs with structural features similar to those of the barbiturate phenobarbital were synthesized; one DHPM used (monastrol) is commercially available. An up to approximately 3-fold increase in the current from recombinant alpha1beta2delta receptors was observed with the DHPM compound JM-II-43A or monastrol when co-applied with saturating GABA concentrations, similar to the current potentiation observed with the nonselective potentiating compounds phenobarbital and tracazolate. No agonist activity was observed for the DHPMs at the concentrations tested. A kinetic model was used in conjunction with dose-dependent measurements to calculate apparent dissociation constant values for JM-II-43A (400 muM) and monastrol (200 microM) at saturating GABA concentrations. We examined recombinant receptors composed of combinations of subunits alpha1, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, beta2, beta3, gamma2L, and delta with JM-II-43A to demonstrate the preference for potentiation of delta-subunit-containing receptors. Lastly, reduced currents from receptors containing the mutated delta(E177A) subunit, described by Dibbens et al. [(2004) Hum. Mol. Genet. 13, 1315-1319] as a heritable susceptibility allele for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, are also potentiated by these DHPMs. PMID:20450160

  2. The GABA(B) receptor positive modulator BHF177 attenuated anxiety, but not conditioned fear, in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Kaczanowska, Katarzyna; Finn, M G; Markou, Athina; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2015-10-01

    GABAB (γ-aminobutyric acid B) receptors may be a therapeutic target for anxiety disorders. Here we characterized the effects of the GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) BHF177 on conditioned and unconditioned physiological responses to threat in the light-enhanced startle (LES), stress-induced hyperthermia, and fear-potentiated startle (FPS) procedures in rats. The effects of BHF177 on LES were compared with those of the GABAB receptor agonists baclofen and CGP44532, and the positive control buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist with anxiolytic activity in humans. Baclofen (0.4, 0.9 and 1.25 mg/kg) and CGP44532 (0.065, 0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) administration had significant sedative, but not anxiolytic, activity reflected in overall decrease in the startle response in the LES tests. BHF177 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) had no effect on LES, nor did it produce an overall sedative effect. Interesting, however, when rats were grouped by high and low LES responses, BHF177 had anxiolytic-like effects only on LES in high, but not low, LES responding rats. BHF177 also blocked stress-induced hyperthermia, but had no effect on conditioned fear responses in the FPS test. Buspirone (1 and 3 mg/kg) had an anxiolytic-like profile in both LES and FPS tests. These results indicate that BHF177 may specifically attenuate unconditioned anxiety in individuals that exhibit a high anxiety state, and has fewer sedative effects than direct agonists. Thus, BHF177 or other GABAB receptor PAMs may be promising compounds for alleviating increased anxiety seen in various psychiatric disorders with a superior side-effect profile compared to GABAB receptor agonists. PMID:26002628

  3. Methamphetamine-induced enhancement of hippocampal long-term potentiation is modulated by NMDA and GABA receptors in the shell-accumbens.

    PubMed

    Heysieattalab, Soomaayeh; Naghdi, Nasser; Hosseinmardi, Narges; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Haghparast, Abbas; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-08-01

    Addictive drugs modulate synaptic transmission in the meso-corticolimbic system by hijacking normal adaptive forms of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. Psychostimulants such as METH have been shown to affect hippocampal synaptic plasticity, albeit with a less understood synaptic mechanism. METH is one of the most addictive drugs that elicit long-term alterations in the synaptic plasticity in brain areas involved in reinforcement learning and reward processing. Dopamine transporter (DAT) is one of the main targets of METH. As a substrate for DAT, METH decreases dopamine uptake and increases dopamine efflux via the transporter in the target brain regions such as nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus. Due to cross talk between NAc and hippocampus, stimulation of NAc has been shown to alter hippocampal plasticity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that manipulation of glutamatergic and GABA-ergic systems in the shell-NAc modulates METH-induced enhancement of long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Rats treated with METH (four injections of 5 mg/kg) exhibited enhanced LTP as compared to saline-treated animals. Intra-NAc infusion of muscimol (GABA receptor agonist) decreased METH-induced enhancement of dentate gyrus (DG)-LTP, while infusion of AP5 (NMDA receptor antagonist) prevented METH-induced enhancement of LTP. These data support the interpretation that reducing NAc activity can ameliorate METH-induced hippocampal LTP through a hippocampus-NAc-VTA circuit loop. Synapse 70:325-335, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27029021

  4. Novel subunit-specific tonic GABA currents and differential effects of ethanol in the central amygdala of CRF receptor-1 reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Herman, Melissa A; Contet, Candice; Justice, Nicholas J; Vale, Wylie; Roberto, Marisa

    2013-02-20

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is an important integrative site for the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, such as ethanol. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 (CRF1) receptors in the CeA plays a critical role in the development of ethanol dependence, but these neurons remain uncharacterized. Using CRF1:GFP reporter mice and a combined electrophysiological/immunohistochemical approach, we found that CRF1 neurons exhibit an α1 GABA(A) receptor subunit-mediated tonic conductance that is driven by action potential-dependent GABA release. In contrast, unlabeled CeA neurons displayed a δ subunit-mediated tonic conductance that is enhanced by ethanol. Ethanol increased the firing discharge of CRF1 neurons and decreased the firing discharge of unlabeled CeA neurons. Retrograde tracing studies indicate that CeA CRF1 neurons project into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Together, these data demonstrate subunit-specific tonic signaling and provide mechanistic insight into the specific effects of ethanol on CeA microcircuitry. PMID:23426657

  5. Closing the loop on the GABA shunt in plants: are GABA metabolism and signaling entwined?

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Simon; Fromm, Hillel

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is found in uni- and multi-cellular organisms and is involved in many aspects of plant life cycle. GABA metabolism occurs by the action of evolutionary conserved enzymes that constitute the GABA shunt, bypassing two steps of the TCA cycle. The central position of GABA in the interface between plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism is well established. In parallel, there is evidence to support a role for GABA as a signaling molecule in plants. Here we cover some of the recent findings on GABA metabolism and signaling in plants and further suggest that the metabolic and signaling aspects of GABA may actually be inseparable. PMID:26106401

  6. GABA shapes the dynamics of bistable perception.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Anouk M; Knapen, Tomas; Scholte, H Steven; St John-Saaltink, Elexa; Donner, Tobias H; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-05-01

    Sometimes, perception fluctuates spontaneously between two distinct interpretations of a constant sensory input. These bistable perceptual phenomena provide a unique window into the neural mechanisms that create the contents of conscious perception. Models of bistable perception posit that mutual inhibition between stimulus-selective neural populations in visual cortex plays a key role in these spontaneous perceptual fluctuations. However, a direct link between neural inhibition and bistable perception has not yet been established experimentally. Here, we link perceptual dynamics in three distinct bistable visual illusions (binocular rivalry, motion-induced blindness, and structure from motion) to measurements of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in human visual cortex (as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and to pharmacological stimulation of the GABAA receptor by means of lorazepam. As predicted by a model of neural interactions underlying bistability, both higher GABA concentrations in visual cortex and lorazepam administration induced slower perceptual dynamics, as reflected in a reduced number of perceptual switches and a lengthening of percept durations. Thus, we show that GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter, shapes the dynamics of bistable perception. These results pave the way for future studies into the competitive neural interactions across the visual cortical hierarchy that elicit conscious perception. PMID:23602476

  7. Development of ligands at γ-aminobutyrric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subtype as new agents for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Gabriella; Ciciani, Giovanna; Bruni, Fabrizio; Selleri, Silvia; Martini, Claudia; Daniele, Simona; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Costanzo, Annarella

    2011-12-15

    The identification of compounds with selective anxiolytic-like effects, exerted through the benzodiazepine site on γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors, and that show pronounced antihyperalgesia in several pain models, has oriented research towards the development of new agents for the relief of pain. Starting from our previously reported ligands at the benzodiazepine site on GABA(A) receptors showing selective anxiolytic-like effects, we have designed new compounds with the aim of identifying those devoid of the typical side effects of the classical benzodiazepines. Our preliminary results indicate that compounds 4, 10(±) and 11 have a very promising antihyperalgesic profile in different animal pain models (peripheral mono-neuropathy, STZ-induced hyperalgesia). In particular 11 exhibits high potency since it exerted its protective effect starting from the dose of 3mg/kg po, after single injection. PMID:22094278

  8. GABA-mediated inhibition of the anaphylactic response in the guinea-pig trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, G.; Franchi-Micheli, S.; Mugnai, S.; Bindi, D.; Zilletti, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. In sensitized guinea-pigs, the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAmimetic drugs have been investigated on tracheal segments contracted by cumulative application of an allergen (ovoalbumin, OA) and on serosal mast cells. The same drugs have also been tested on activation of alveolar macrophages isolated from unsensitized guinea-pigs. 2. Superfusion with GABA (1-1000 microM) reduced the contraction intensity of tracheal strips. The effect of GABA (100 microM) was not affected by the carrier blockers, nipecotic acid and beta-alanine (300 microM each). It was mimicked by the GABAB agonist (-)-baclofen (100 microM) but not 3-aminopropanephosphinic acid (100 microM, 3-APA). The GABAA agonist, isoguvacine (100 microM) did not exert any effect. GABA (10 microM)-induced inhibition of tracheal contractions was reduced by the GABAB antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen (100 microM, 2-HS), but not by the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline (30 microM). 3. The reduction in contraction intensity induced by GABA (100 microM) was prevented by a 40 min preincubation of tracheal strips with capsaicin (10 microM), but not tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM). The effect of GABA (1000 microM) was absent after preincubation with indomethacin (2.8 microM) but unmodified when nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA, 3.3 microM) was used. Finally, removal of the epithelium prevented the GABA effect. 4. Anaphylactic histamine release from serosal mast cells isolated from sensitized animals was not affected either by GABA (10-1000 microM) or the selective receptor agonists (-)-baclofen (0.1-1000 microM) and isoguvacine (10-1000 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582447

  9. Modulation of spontaneous intracellular Ca²⁺ fluctuations and spontaneous cholinergic transmission in rat chromaffin cells in situ by endogenous GABA acting on GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Tzitzitlini, Alejandre-García; Pedro, Segura-Chama; Martha, Pérez-Armendáriz E; Rodolfo, Delgado-Lezama; Arturo, Hernández-Cruz

    2016-02-01

    Using fluorescence [Ca(2+)]i imaging in rat adrenal slices, we characterized the effects of agonists and antagonists of the GABAA receptor (GABAA-R) on resting intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i fluctuations (SCFs) in hundreds of individual chromaffin cells (CCs) recorded simultaneously in situ. Muscimol, a GABAA-R agonist (20 μM; 25 s), induced an increase of resting [Ca(2+)]i in 43 ± 3 % of CCs, a decrease in 26 ± 2 %, and no response in 30 ± 5 %. In Ca(2+)-free external medium, SCFs ceased completely and muscimol failed to elicit [Ca(2+)]i rises. All muscimol-induced [Ca(2+)]i changes were blocked by the GABAA-R antagonist bicuculline, suggesting that they result from changes in membrane potential depending on the cell's Cl(-) equilibrium potential. Unexpectedly, bicuculline increased the amplitude and frequency of SCFs in 54 % of CCs, revealing a tonic inhibition of SCFs by ambient GABA acting through GABAA-R. Mecamylamine (a specific nicotinic cholinergic blocker) decreased basal SCF activity in 18 % of CCs and inhibited bicuculline-induced SCF intensification, suggesting that spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release from nerve endings contributes to SCF generation in CCs in situ and that blockade of presynaptic GABAA-Rs intensifies SCFs in part through the disinhibition of spontaneous cholinergic transmission. Electrophysiological experiments confirmed that spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents recorded from CCs in situ were enhanced by bicuculline. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a regulatory effect of endogenous GABA on synaptic currents and SCFs of adrenal CCs. These findings denote a novel GABA-mediated presynaptic and postsynaptic regulatory mechanism of CC activity which may participate in the control of catecholamine secretion. PMID:26490458

  10. Exercise reduces GABA synaptic input onto NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons via NK1 receptor internalization in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bechtold, Andrea G.; Tabor, Jocelyn; Bonham, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    A single bout of mild to moderate exercise can lead to a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive subjects, namely post-exercise hypotension (PEH). The full expression of PEH requires a functioning baroreflex, hypertension and activation of muscle afferents (exercise), suggesting that interactions in the neural networks regulating exercise and blood pressure result in this fall in blood pressure. The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the first brain site that receives inputs from nerves carrying blood pressure and muscle activity information, making it an ideal site for integrating cardiovascular responses to exercise. During exercise, muscle afferents excite NTS GABA neurons via substance P and microinjection of a substance P-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) antagonist into the NTS attenuates PEH. The data suggest that an interaction between the substance P NK1-R and GABAergic transmission in the NTS may contribute to PEH. We performed voltage-clamping on NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). All animals were sacrificed within 30 min and the patch-clamp recordings were performed 2-8 hr after the sham/exercise protocol. The data showed that a single bout of exercise reduces 1) the frequency but not the amplitude of GABA spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPCs), 2) endogenous substance P influence on sIPSC frequency, and 3) sIPSC frequency response to exogenous application of substance P. Furthermore, immunofluorescence labeling in NTS show an increased substance P NK1-R internalization on GABA neurons. The data suggest that exercise-induced NK1-R internalization results in a reduced intrinsic inhibitory input to the neurons in the baroreflex pathway. PMID:19261870

  11. Use of sourdough fermentation and pseudo-cereals and leguminous flours for the making of a functional bread enriched of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-02-28

    Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis PU1, previously selected for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), were used for sourdough fermentation of cereal, pseudo-cereal and leguminous flours. Chickpea, amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat were the flours most suitable to be enriched of GABA. The parameters of sourdough fermentation were optimized. Addition of 0.1mM pyridoxal phosphate, dough yield of 160, inoculum of 5 x 10(7)CFU/g of starter bacteria and fermentation for 24h at 30 degrees C were found to be the optimal conditions. A blend of buckwheat, amaranth, chickpea and quinoa flours (ratio 1:1:5.3:1) was selected and fermented with baker's yeast (non-conventional flour bread, NCB) or with Lb. plantarum C48 sourdough (non-conventional flour sourdough bread, NCSB) and compared to baker's yeast started wheat flour bread (WFB). NCSB had the highest concentration of free amino acids and GABA (ca. 4467 and 504 mg/kg, respectively). The concentration of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of NCSB bread was the highest, as well as the rate of in vitro starch hydrolysis was the lowest. Texture analysis showed that sourdough fermentation enhances several characteristics of NCSB with respect to NCB, thus approaching the features of WFB. Sensory analysis showed that sourdough fermentation allowed to get good palatability and overall taste appreciation. PMID:20071045

  12. Presynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid responses in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pickles, H G

    1979-01-01

    1. Potential changes were recorded from the lateral olfactory tract in slices of rat olfactory cortex in vitro at room temperature. 2. Superfused gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) usually produced dose-related depolarization of the lateral olfactory tract. Muscimol and 3-aminopropanesulphonic acid appeared more potent depolarizing agents than GABA, and glycine and taurine appeared less potent. Carbachol and glutamate were virtually ineffective. 3. The GABA responses were at least partially Cl- dependent. 4. (+)-Bicuculline and higher concentrations of strychnine antagonized the GABA but not the glycine-induced depolarizations. Paradoxically, responses to high doses of GABA were sometimes potentiated by both bicuculline and strychnine. 5. It is suggested that GABA receptors could occur as widely on nerve terminals as they do postsynaptically in the CNS, where GABA could be involved in the modulation of transmitter output. PMID:760898

  13. Dopamine D2-like receptors selectively block N-type Ca2+ channels to reduce GABA release onto rat striatal cholinergic interneurones

    PubMed Central

    Momiyama, Toshihiko; Koga, Eiko

    2001-01-01

    The modulatory roles of dopamine (DA) in inhibitory transmission onto striatal large cholinergic interneurones were investigated in rat brain slices using patch-clamp recording. Pharmacologically isolated GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs were recorded by focal stimulation within the striatum. Bath application of DA reversibly suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50, 10.0 μm). A D2-like receptor agonist, quinpirole (3–30 μm), also suppressed the IPSCs, whereas a D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 81297, did not affect IPSCs. Sulpiride, a D2-like receptor antagonist, blocked the DA-induced suppression of IPSCs (apparent dissociation constant (KB), 0.36 μm), while a D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH 23390 (10 μm), had no effect. DA (30 μm) reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) without changing their amplitude distribution, suggesting that GABA release was inhibited, whereas the sensitivity of postsynaptic GABAA receptors was not affected. The effect of DA on the frequency of mIPSCs was diminished when extracellular Ca2+ was replaced by Mg2+ (5 mm), indicating that DA affected the Ca2+ entry into the presynaptic terminal. An N-type Ca2+ channel selective blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CgTX, 3 μm), suppressed IPSCs by 65.4%, whereas a P/Q-type Ca2+ channel selective blocker, ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-Aga-IVA, 200 nm), suppressed IPSCs by 78.4%. Simultaneous application of both blockers suppressed IPSCs by 95.9%. Assuming a 3rd power relationship between Ca2+ concentration and transmitter release, the contribution of N-, P/Q- and other types of Ca2+ channels to presynaptic Ca2+ entry is estimated to be, respectively, 29.8, 40.0 and 34.5% at this synapse. After the application of ω-CgTX, DA (30 μm) no longer affected IPSCs. In contrast, ω-Aga-IVA did not alter the level of suppression by DA, suggesting that the action of DA was selective for N-type Ca2+ channels. A G protein alkylating agent, N

  14. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH, whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels include TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K(+) channels, voltage-activated K(+) channels, L-type Ca(2+) channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl(-) channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  15. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels comprise TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K+ channels, voltage-activated K+ channels, L-type Ca2+ channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl− channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  16. A comparison of gamma-aminobutyric acid and the semi-rigid analogues 4-aminotetrolic acid, 4-aminocrotonic acid and imidazole-4-acetic acid on the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bowery, N G; Jones, G P

    1976-01-01

    1 The rat superior cervical ganglion possesses receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This can be demonstrated in vitro by recording the changes in ganglionic surface potential which occur after the addition of GABA to the bathing solution. 2 The action of three conformationally-restricted analogues of GABA namely 4-aminotetrolic acid (4-ATA), trans 4-aminocrotonic acid (4-ACA) and imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA) have been examined for activity at this peripheral receptor. 3 All three analogues depolarized the ganglion in a manner similar to GABA. Their actions were transient and were 'occluded' by GABA; also the dose-response curve in each case was parallel to that of GABA. Molar potencies relative to GABA (= 1) were 4-ACA = 1.48, IAA = 0.100, 4-ATA = 0.0028. 4 The action of each analogue could be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline and tetramethylenedisulphotetramine at doses which had relatively little effect on responses to the cholinomimetic carbachol. 5 4-ACA and IAA (1 mM) significantly reduced the ganglionic accumulation of [3H]-GABA (0.2 muM) by 88% and 58% respectively whereas 4-ATA (1 mM), caused no significant reduction in [3H]-GABA accumulation. PMID:1260178

  17. Valerenic acid derivatives as novel subunit-selective GABAA receptor ligands –in vitro and in vivo characterization

    PubMed Central

    Khom, S; Strommer, B; Ramharter, J; Schwarz, T; Schwarzer, C; Erker, T; Ecker, GF; Mulzer, J; Hering, S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Subunit-specific modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptors can help to assess the physiological function of receptors with different subunit composition and also provide the basis for the development of new drugs. Valerenic acid (VA) was recently identified as a β2/3 subunit-specific modulator of GABAA receptors with anxiolytic potential. The aim of the present study was to generate VA derivatives as novel GABAA receptor modulators and to gain insight into the structure–activity relation of this molecule. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The carboxyl group of VA was substituted by an uncharged amide or amides with different chain length. Modulation of GABAA receptors composed of different subunit compositions by the VA derivatives was studied in Xenopus oocytes by means of the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. Half-maximal stimulation of GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) through GABAA receptors (EC50) and efficacies (maximal stimulation of IGABA) were estimated. Anxiolytic activity of the VA derivatives was studied in mice, applying the elevated plus maze test. KEY RESULTS Valerenic acid amide (VA-A) displayed the highest efficacy (more than twofold greater IGABA enhancement than VA) and highest potency (EC50= 13.7 ± 2.3 µM) on α1β3 receptors. Higher efficacy and potency of VA-A were also observed on α1β2γ2s and α3β3γ2s receptors. Anxiolytic effects were most pronounced for VA-A. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Valerenic acid derivatives with higher efficacy and affinity can be generated. Greater in vitro action of the amide derivative correlated with a more pronounced anxiolytic effect in vivo. The data give further confidence in targeting β3 subunit containing GABAA receptors for development of anxiolytics. PMID:20718740

  18. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  19. 2-Guanidine-4-methylquinazoline acts as a novel competitive antagonist of A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xian; Zhu, Michael X; Xu, Tian-Le

    2013-12-01

    The pentameric A type γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system and have long been considered as important pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of multiple neurological or psychological disorders. Here, we show that 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), a recently identified acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) modulator, strongly and preferentially inhibits GABAAR among the major neurotransmitter-gated ion channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. GMQ inhibited GABA (1 μM)-induced currents in a competitive manner, with an IC50 (0.39±0.05 μM) comparable to that of bicuculline. Schild analysis revealed a slope of 1.04±0.06 for GMQ on α1β2 GABAARs expressed in HEK293T cells. Single-channel analysis showed that GMQ decreased open probability of GABAARs without affecting conductance. Moreover, GMQ inhibited GABAergic neurotransmission in hippocampal neurons, while having no significant effect on the basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and the intrinsic excitability of neurons. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we further demonstrated that mutations at Glu155 of β2 subunit and Phe64 of α1 subunit, both located inside the GABA binding pocket, profoundly decreased the sensitivity of the receptor to both GABA and GMQ. Interestingly, these mutations did not significantly affect the inhibition by amiloride, a diuretic structurally similar to GMQ and a known GABAAR inhibitor. We conclude that GMQ represents a novel chemical structure that acts, possibly, by competing with GABA binding to GABAARs. It is anticipated that GMQ and its analogs will facilitate the development of new chemical probes for GABAARs. PMID:23916476

  20. Testing the silence of mutations: Transcriptomic and behavioral studies of GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunit knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Osterndorff-Kahanek, E; Ponomarev, I; Homanics, G E; Blednov, Y A

    2011-01-13

    Knock-in mice were constructed with mutations in the α1 (H(270), A(277)) and α2 (H(270), A(277)) subunits of the GABAA receptor, which resulted in receptors that lacked modulation by ethanol but retained normal responses to GABA in vitro. A key question is whether these mutant receptors also function normally in vivo. Perturbation of brain function was evaluated by gene expression profiling in the cerebral cortex and by behavioral pharmacology experiments with GABAergic drugs. Analysis of individual transcripts found only six transcripts that were changed in α1 knock-in mice and three in the α2 mutants (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Two transcripts that are sensitive to neuronal activity, Arc and Fos, increased about 250% in the α2 mutants, and about 50% in the α1 mutants. Behavioral effects (loss of righting reflex, rotarod) of flurazepam and pentobarbital were not different between α2 mutants and wild-type, but they were enhanced for α1 knock-in mice. These results indicate that introduction of these mutations in the α2 subunit of the GABAA receptor does not produce marked perturbation of brain function, as measured by gene expression and GABAergic behavioral responses, but the same mutations in the α1 subunit produce more pronounced changes, especially in GABAergic function. PMID:21056629

  1. AMPA and GABA(A/B) receptor subunit expression in the cuneate nucleus of adult squirrel monkeys during peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mowery, Todd M; Kostylev, Polina V; Garraghty, Preston E

    2014-01-24

    The primate somatosensory neuroaxis provides an excellent model system with which to investigate adult neural plasticity. Here, we report immunohistochemical staining data for AMPA and GABAA/B receptor subunits in the cuneate nucleus of adult squirrel monkeys 1 and 5 months after median nerve compression. This method of nerve injury allowed the investigation of the way in which patterns of receptor correlates change during peripheral nerve regeneration. These results are compared to cortical data collected within the same animals. As observed in the cortex, the pattern of subunit staining in the brainstem 1 month after nerve compression suggests that the sensory deprived nucleus enters a state of reorganization. That is, the expression of GluR2/3 AMPA receptor subunits is significantly increased, while GABA α1 and GABABR1b receptor subunits are significantly decreased. Five months after nerve injury, the pattern of subunit expression is again very similar to that observed in the infragranular layers of cortex. At this later time we observe a significant increase in GluR2/3 and GABABR1a, with no change in GABAAα1, and a significant decrease in GABABR1b. Together these results suggest that during reorganization and recovery from injury the brainstem and cortex are governed by homogeneous mechanisms of plasticity. PMID:24315976

  2. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  3. L-DOPA Reverses the Increased Free Amino Acids Tissue Levels Induced by Dopamine Depletion and Rises GABA and Tyrosine in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; García-Sanz, Patricia; Herranz, Antonio S; Asensio, María-José; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-07-01

    Perturbations in the cerebral levels of various amino acids are associated with neurological disorders, and previous studies have suggested that such alterations have a role in the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the direct effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment, that produces dyskinesia, on neural tissue amino acid concentrations have not been explored in detail. To evaluate whether striatal amino acid concentrations are altered in peak dose dyskinesia, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian mice were treated chronically with L-DOPA and tissue amino acid concentrations were assessed by HPLC analysis. These experiments revealed that neither 6-OHDA nor L-DOPA treatment are able to alter glutamate in the striatum. However, glutamine increases after 6-OHDA and returns back to normal levels with L-DOPA treatment, suggesting increased striatal glutamatergic transmission with lack of dopamine. In addition, glycine and taurine levels are increased following dopamine denervation and restored to normal levels by L-DOPA. Interestingly, dyskinetic animals showed increased levels of GABA and tyrosine, while aspartate striatal tissue levels are not altered. Overall, our results indicate that chronic L-DOPA treatment, besides normalizing the altered levels of some amino acids after 6-OHDA, robustly increases striatal GABA and tyrosine levels which may in turn contribute to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. PMID:26966009

  4. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T; Oyama, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-11-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response. The benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, slightly augmented the GABA response at concentrations between 3 x 10 7M and 3 x 10 5 M. 3. These results show clear differences in the effects on the GABA response between these four categories of compounds known to affect the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABA/ benzodiazepine receptor-chloride channel complex. Our experimental system of frog isolated sensory neurones and a 'concentration

  5. Genetic mapping of the beta 1 GABA receptor gene to human chromosome 4, using a tetranucleotide repeat polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, M; Lucas-Derse, S; Bolos, A; O'Brien, S J; Kirkness, E F; Fraser, C M; Goldman, D

    1991-01-01

    As more coding loci for functional human genes are described, there is a growing need to identify DNA polymorphisms in specific genes. By examining DNA sequences within the introns of the beta 1 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor gene, GABARB1, we found a tetranucleotide repeat sequence (GATA). Amplification of this region by using PCR revealed seven alleles and a high degree of polymorphism (PIC = .75) in human populations. DNAs from the CEPH families were typed for the GABARB1 intron polymorphism and were analyzed with respect to 20 linked markers on chromosome 4. The results permit placement of GABARB1 on the linkage map of chromosome 4, between D4S104 and ALB. These results affirm that sequence analysis of noncoding segments included within or adjacent to functional genes has value as a strategy to detect highly informative polymorphisms. Images Figure 2 PMID:1652891

  6. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  7. Serotonin 5-HT1B receptor-mediated calcium influx-independent presynaptic inhibition of GABA release onto rat basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Nishijo, Takuma; Momiyama, Toshihiko

    2016-07-01

    Modulatory roles of serotonin (5-HT) in GABAergic transmission onto basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were investigated, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the rat brain slices. GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were evoked by focal stimulation. Bath application of 5-HT (0.1-300 μm) reversibly suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of a 5-HT1B receptor agonist, CP93129, also suppressed the evoked IPSCs, whereas a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT had little effect on the evoked IPSCs amplitude. In the presence of NAS-181, a 5-HT1B receptor antagonist, 5-HT-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs was antagonised, whereas NAN-190, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist did not antagonise the 5-HT-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs. Bath application of 5-HT reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs without changing their amplitude distribution. The effect of 5-HT on miniature IPSCs remained unchanged when extracellular Ca(2+) was replaced by Mg(2+) . The paired-pulse ratio was increased by CP93129. In the presence of ω-CgTX, the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-Aga-TK, the P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, or SNX-482, the R-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, 5-HT could still inhibit the evoked IPSCs. 4-AP, a K(+) channel blocker, enhanced the evoked IPSCs, and CP93129 had no longer inhibitory effect in the presence of 4-AP. CP93129 increased the number of action potentials elicited by depolarising current pulses. These results suggest that activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors on the terminals of GABAergic afferents to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons inhibits GABA release in Ca(2+) influx-independent manner by modulation of K(+) channels, leading to enhancement of neuronal activities. PMID:27177433

  8. Novel functions of GABA signaling in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adalto; Zhang, Yonggang; Hu, Wenhui

    2013-10-01

    Neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA) through ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors plays key roles in modulating the development, plasticity and function of neuronal networks. GABA is inhibitory in mature neurons but excitatory in immature neurons, neuroblasts and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). The switch from excitatory to inhibitory occurs following the development of glutamatergic synaptic input and results from the dynamic changes in the expression of Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter NKCC1 driving Cl(-) influx and neuron-specific K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter KCC2 driving Cl(-) efflux. The developmental transition of KCC2 expression is regulated by Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. The excitatory GABA signaling during early neurogenesis is important to the activity/experience-induced regulation of NSC quiescence, NPC proliferation, neuroblast migration and newborn neuronal maturation/functional integration. The inhibitory GABA signaling allows for the sparse and static functional networking essential for learning/memory development and maintenance. PMID:24285940

  9. Novel functions of GABA signaling in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    PONTES, Adalto; ZHANG, Yonggang; HU, Wenhui

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA) through ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors plays key roles in modulating the development, plasticity and function of neuronal networks. GABA is inhibitory in mature neurons but excitatory in immature neurons, neuroblasts and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). The switch from excitatory to inhibitory occurs following the development of glutamatergic synaptic input and results from the dynamic changes in the expression of Na+/K+/2Cl− co-transporter NKCC1 driving Cl− influx and neuron-specific K+/Cl− co-transporter KCC2 driving Cl− efflux. The developmental transition of KCC2 expression is regulated by Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. The excitatory GABA signaling during early neurogenesis is important to the activity/experience-induced regulation of NSC quiescence, NPC proliferation, neuroblast migration and newborn neuronal maturation/functional integration. The inhibitory GABA signaling allows for the sparse and static functional networking essential for learning/memory development and maintenance. PMID:24285940

  10. Amino Acid Derivatives as Bitter Taste Receptor (T2R) Blockers*

    PubMed Central

    Pydi, Sai P.; Sobotkiewicz, Tyler; Billakanti, Rohini; Bhullar, Rajinder P.; Loewen, Michele C.; Chelikani, Prashen

    2014-01-01

    In humans, the 25 bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) are activated by hundreds of structurally diverse bitter compounds. However, only five antagonists or bitter blockers are known. In this study, using molecular modeling guided site-directed mutagenesis, we elucidated the ligand-binding pocket of T2R4. We found seven amino acids located in the extracellular side of transmembrane 3 (TM3), TM4, extracellular loop 2 (ECL2), and ECL3 to be involved in T2R4 binding to its agonist quinine. ECL2 residues Asn-173 and Thr-174 are essential for quinine binding. Guided by a molecular model of T2R4, a number of amino acid derivatives were screened for their ability to bind to T2R4. These predictions were tested by calcium imaging assays that led to identification of γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA) and Nα,Nα-bis(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine (BCML) as competitive inhibitors of quinine-activated T2R4 with an IC50 of 3.2 ± 0.3 μm and 59 ± 18 nm, respectively. Interestingly, pharmacological characterization using a constitutively active mutant of T2R4 reveals that GABA acts as an antagonist, whereas BCML acts as an inverse agonist on T2R4. Site-directed mutagenesis confirms that the two novel bitter blockers share the same orthosteric site as the agonist quinine. The signature residues Ala-90 and Lys-270 play important roles in interacting with BCML and GABA, respectively. This is the first report to characterize a T2R endogenous antagonist and an inverse agonist. The novel bitter blockers will facilitate physiological studies focused on understanding the roles of T2Rs in extraoral tissues. PMID:25059668

  11. Effects of γ-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor Activation on Counterregulatory Responses to Subsequent Exercise in Individuals With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hedrington, Maka S; Mikeladze, Maia; Tate, Donna B; Younk, Lisa M; Davis, Ian; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-09-01

    The effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor activation on physiologic responses during next-day exercise in type 1 diabetes are unknown. To test the hypothesis that GABA A activation with the benzodiazepine alprazolam would blunt counterregulatory responses during subsequent exercise, 29 (15 male, 14 female) individuals with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c 7.8 ± 1%) were studied during separate 2-day protocols. Day 1 consisted of morning and afternoon 2-h euglycemic or 2.9 mmol/L hypoglycemic clamps with or without 1 mg alprazolam given 30 min before each clamp. Day 2 consisted of a 90-min euglycemic cycling exercise at 50% VO2max Tritiated glucose was used to measure glucose kinetics. Despite equivalent day 2 insulin (93 ± 6 pmol/L) and glucose levels (5.3 ± 0.1 mmol/L), plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone responses were similarly reduced after alprazolam or day 1 hypoglycemia compared with euglycemic control. Endogenous glucose production, lipolysis (glycerol, nonesterified fatty acid), and glycogenolysis (lactate) were also reduced during day 2 exercise after day 1 GABA A activation. We conclude that activation of GABA A receptors with alprazolam can result in widespread neuroendocrine, autonomic nervous system, and metabolic counterregulatory failure during subsequent submaximal exercise and may increase the risk of exercise-associated hypoglycemia in individuals with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27217489

  12. Binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonist, to membranes of the bovine retina.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    1 The binding of [3H]-muscimol, a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist, to crude membrane preparations of bovine retina was studied, using a filtration method to isolate membrane-bound ligand. 2 Specific binding was found to be saturable and occurred at two binding sites with affinity constants of 4.3 nM and 38.2 nM. 3 Binding was sodium-independent, enhanced by both freezing and Triton X-100 treatment but abolished with sodium laurylsulphate. 4 The binding sites demonstrated a high degree of pharmacological specificity, GABA being a potent displacer of [3H]-muscimol. 5 A higher degree of [3H]-muscimol binding was associated with subcellular fractions enriched with photoreceptor synaptosomes rather than with fractions enriched with conventional synaptosomes. PMID:7470740

  13. Electrophysiological evidence for 4-isobutyl-3-isopropylbicyclophosphorothionate as a selective blocker of insect GABA-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Yuki; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Furutani, Shogo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    Invertebrate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls), which function as inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors, are important targets of insecticides and antiparasitic agents. The antagonism of GABACls and GluCls by 4-isobutyl-3-isopropylbicyclophosphorothionate (PS-14) was examined in cultured cockroach and rat neurons using a whole-cell patch-clamp method. The results indicated that PS-14 selectively blocks cockroach GABACls relative to cockroach GluCls and rat GABACls. PS-14 represents a useful probe for the study of insect GABA receptors. PMID:23591113

  14. Affinities and densities of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-09-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using (/sup 3/H)muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  15. Structure-activity relationships of seco-prezizaane and picrotoxane/picrodendrane terpenoids by Quasar receptor-surface modeling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas J; Gurrath, Marion; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2004-08-01

    The seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenes pseudoanisatin and parviflorolide from Illicium are noncompetitive antagonists at housefly (Musca domestica) gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. They show selectivity toward the insect receptor and thus represent new leads toward selective insecticides. Based on the binding data for 13 seco-prezizaane terpenoids and 17 picrotoxane and picrodendrane-type terpenoids to housefly and rat GABA receptors, a QSAR study was conducted by quasi-atomistic receptor-surface modeling (Quasar). The resulting models provide insight into the structural basis of selectivity and properties of the binding sites at GABA receptor-coupled chloride channels of insects and mammals. PMID:15246092

  16. G-protein-coupled receptors for neurotransmitter amino acids: C-terminal tails, crowded signalosomes.

    PubMed Central

    El Far, Oussama; Betz, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a superfamily of highly diverse integral membrane proteins that transduce external signals to different subcellular compartments, including nuclei, via trimeric G-proteins. By differential activation of diffusible G(alpha) and membrane-bound G(beta)gamma subunits, GPCRs might act on both cytoplasmic/intracellular and plasma-membrane-bound effector systems. The coupling efficiency and the plasma membrane localization of GPCRs are regulated by a variety of interacting proteins. In this review, we discuss recently disclosed protein interactions found with the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail regions of two types of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors, the group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and the gamma-aminobutyric acid type-B receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Calmodulin binding to mGluR7 and other group III mGluRs may provide a Ca(2+)-dependent switch for unidirectional (G(alpha)) versus bidirectional (G(alpha) and G(beta)gamma) signalling to downstream effector proteins. In addition, clustering of mGluR7 by PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1), a polyspecific PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg1/ZO-1) domain containing synaptic organizer protein, sheds light on how higher-order receptor complexes with regulatory enzymes (or 'signalosomes') could be formed. The interaction of GABA(B)Rs with the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and the transcription factor ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4) suggests novel regulatory pathways for G-protein signalling, cytoskeletal reorganization and nuclear gene expression: processes that may all contribute to synaptic plasticity. PMID:12006104

  17. Diffuse perineuronal nets and modified pyramidal cells immunoreactive for glutamate and the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit form a unique entity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Härtig, Wolfgang; Bringmann, Andreas; Grosche, Jens; Wohlfarth, Kai; Zuschratter, Werner; Brückner, Gert

    2003-12-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) consisting of polyanionic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) and other extracellular matrix components create an exceptional microenvironment around certain types of neurons. In rat neocortex, three types of PNs can be distinguished after staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) by their different morphological structure: lattice-like PNs associated with subpopulations of nonpyramidal neurons, weakly labeled PNs showing a pyramidal morphology, and diffuse PNs that possess a thick, strongly labeled matrix sheath located mainly in layer VIb above the white matter. The type of neuron surrounded by diffuse nets has not been described so far. This study is focused on the cytochemical and morphological characteristics of neurons associated with diffusely contoured PNs in rat parietal cortex using immunocytochemical staining, intracellular injection, and retrograde tracing methods. Cells surrounded by diffuse PNs were glutamate-immunoreactive in contrast to nonpyramidal, net-associated neurons that showed immunoreactivity for GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1b. Both groups of PN-ensheathed cells were mostly immunoreactive for the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit. Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons surrounded by diffuse PNs displayed the morphological properties of modified pyramidal cells with intracortical main axons. Many neurons with diffuse PNs were retrogradely labeled over a long distance after Fluoro-Gold tracer injection in the parietal cortex, but remained unlabeled after intrathalamic injection. We conclude that neurons associated with diffuse PNs are a subpopulation of glutamatergic modified pyramidal cells that could act as excitatory long-range intracortically projecting neurons. PMID:14769362

  18. Maternal Separation during Breastfeeding Induces Gender-Dependent Changes in Anxiety and the GABA-A Receptor Alpha-Subunit in Adult Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    León Rodríguez, Diego Armando; Dueñas, Zulma

    2013-01-01

    Different models of rodent maternal separation (MS) have been used to investigate long-term neurobiological and behavioral changes, associated with early stress. However, few studies have involved the analysis of sex-related differences in central anxiety modulation. This study investigated whether MS during breastfeeding affected adult males and females in terms of anxiety and brain GABA-A receptor-alpha-subunit immunoreactivity. The brain areas analyzed were the amygdale (AM), hippocampus (HP), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), medial preoptic area (POA) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Rats were housed under a reversed light/dark cycle (lights off at 7∶00 h) with access to water and food ad libitum. Animals underwent MS twice daily during the dark cycle from postnatal day 1 to postnatal day 21. Behavior was tested when rats were 65–70 days old using the elevated plus maze and after brains were treated for immunohistochemistry. We found that separated females spent more time in the open arms and showed more head dipping behavior compared with controls. The separated males spent more time in the center of the maze and engaged in more stretching behavior than the controls. Immunohistochemistry showed that separated females had less immunostained cells in the HP, mPFC, PVN and POA, while separated males had fewer immunolabeled cells in the PFC, PVN and AM. These results could indicate that MS has gender-specific effects on anxiety behaviors and that these effects are likely related to developmental alterations involving GABA-A neurotransmission. PMID:23826356

  19. Acute increases in synaptic GABA detectable in the living human brain: a [¹¹C]Ro15-4513 PET study.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Myers, Jim F; Kalk, Nicola J; Watson, Ben J; Erritzoe, David; Wilson, Sue J; Cunningham, Vincent J; Riano Barros, Daniela; Hammers, Alexander; Turkheimer, Federico E; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2014-10-01

    The inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitter system is associated with the regulation of normal cognitive functions and dysregulation has been reported in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and addictions. Investigating the role of GABA in both health and disease has been constrained by difficulties in measuring acute changes in synaptic GABA using neurochemical imaging. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute increases in synaptic GABA are detectable in the living human brain using the inverse agonist GABA-benzodiazepine receptor (GABA-BZR) positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, [(11)C]Ro15-4513. We examined the effect of 15 mg oral tiagabine, which increases synaptic GABA by inhibiting the GAT1 GABA uptake transporter, on [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding in 12 male participants using a paired, double blind, placebo-controlled protocol. Spectral analysis was used to examine synaptic α1 and extrasynaptic α5 GABA-BZR subtype availability in brain regions with high levels of [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding. We also examined the test-retest reliability of α1 and a5-specific [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding in a separate cohort of 4 participants using the same spectral analysis protocol. Tiagabine administration produced significant reductions in hippocampal, parahippocampal, amygdala and anterior cingulate synaptic α1 [(11)C]Ro15-4513 binding, and a trend significance reduction in the nucleus accumbens. These reductions were greater than test-retest reliability, indicating that they are not the result of chance observations. Our results suggest that acute increases in endogenous synaptic GABA are detectable in the living human brain using [(11)C]Ro15-4513 PET. These findings have potentially major implications for the investigation of GABA function in brain disorders and in the development of new treatments targeting this neurotransmitter system. PMID:24844747

  20. GABA and glycine in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    GABA and glycine are major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the CNS and act on receptors coupled to chloride channels. During early developmental periods, both GABA and glycine depolarize membrane potentials due to the relatively high intracellular Cl(-) concentration. Therefore, they can act as excitatory neurotransmitters. GABA and glycine are involved in spontaneous neural network activities in the immature CNS such as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in neonatal hippocampal neurons, which are generated by the synchronous activity of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal neurons. GDPs and GDP-like activities in the developing brains are thought to be important for the activity-dependent functiogenesis through Ca(2+) influx and/or other intracellular signaling pathways activated by depolarization or stimulation of metabotropic receptors. However, if GABA and glycine do not shift from excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmitters at the birth and in maturation, it may result in neural disorders including autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26951057

  1. Modulation of a recombinant invertebrate γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-chloride channel complex by isoflurane: effects of a point mutation in the M2 domain

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Michelle D; Lees, George

    1997-01-01

    Inhalational anaesthetics modulate ligand-gated ion channels at clinical concentrations. In this paper we address submolecular mechanisms for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor modulation by isoflurane. Wild-type Drosophila melanogaster homo-oligomeric GABA receptors were characterized and compared with an ion-channel mutant (alanine substituted to a serine in M2) by means of two-electrode voltage-clamp in membrane-invariant Xenopus oocytes. Both channel receptor isoforms generated outwardly rectifying, bicuculline-insensitive currents with reversal potentials characteristic of a chloride current. As previously shown, the point mutation in the M2 domain conferred a profound resistance to the blocking action of 10 μM picrotoxinin (PTX): circa 7 fold reduction at the GABA EC20. Isoflurane, 195–389 μM, enhanced GABA conductance in both receptor variants by significantly increasing the affinity of the agonist for its receptor without changing Hill slope or maximal response. Relative potencies were statistically indistinguishable. Isoflurane concentration-response curves (on circa GABA EC25) demonstrated that enhancement was effected at around 100–195 μM for both receptor subtypes, but a dramatic divergence was evident at concentrations above 400 μM: wild-type receptors exhibited concentration-dependent block, whilst mutant conductances continued to increase over the same concentration range, showing no tendency to saturate (up to 3330 μM). The above divergence was not attributable to differential desensitization: neither wild-type nor mutant conductance desensitized significantly (P>0.05) in the absence or presence of anaesthetic. This work demonstrates that modulatory sites for anaesthetic are present on a relatively primitive insect ion channel. The depression of GABA response at high isoflurane concentrations, in WT receptors, (typical of a variety of anaesthetic agents) may reflect low affinity channel block via the PTX site. The non

  2. Targeting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) carriers to the brain: potential relevance as antiepileptic pro-drugs.

    PubMed

    Semreen, Mohammad H; El-Shorbagi, Abdel-Nasser; Al-Tel, Taleb H; Alsalahat, Izzeddin M M

    2010-05-01

    The search for antiepileptic compounds with more selective activity continues to be an area of intensive investigation in medicinal chemistry. 3,5-Disubstituted tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-thiadiazine-2-thione (THTT) derivatives, 3a-g, potential prodrugs incorporating the neurotransmitter GABA were synthesized and studied for crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Compounds were prepared from primary amines and carbon disulfide to give dithiocarbamates 2a-g which upon reaction in situ with formaldehyde provided the intermediates Ia-g. Addition of Ia-g onto GABA furnished the title compounds 3a-g. The structures were verified by spectral data and the amounts of the compounds in the brain were investigated by using HPLC. The concentration profiles of the tested compounds in mice brain were determined and the in vivo anticonvulsant activity was measured. PMID:20632978

  3. GABAB receptor-mediated activation of astrocytes by gamma-hydroxybutyric acid

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Timothy; Chen, Lixin; Emri, Zsuzsa; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Errington, Adam C.; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Parri, H. Rheinallt

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolite gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) shows a variety of behavioural effects when administered to animals and humans, including reward/addiction properties and absence seizures. At the cellular level, these actions of GHB are mediated by activation of neuronal GABAB receptors (GABABRs) where it acts as a weak agonist. Because astrocytes respond to endogenous and exogenously applied GABA by activation of both GABAA and GABABRs, here we investigated the action of GHB on astrocytes on the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventrobasal (VB) thalamic nucleus, two brain areas involved in the reward and proepileptic action of GHB, respectively, and compared it with that of the potent GABABR agonist baclofen. We found that GHB and baclofen elicited dose-dependent (ED50: 1.6 mM and 1.3 µM, respectively) transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ in VTA and VB astrocytes of young mice and rats, which were accounted for by activation of their GABABRs and mediated by Ca2+ release from intracellular store release. In contrast, prolonged GHB and baclofen exposure caused a reduction in spontaneous astrocyte activity and glutamate release from VTA astrocytes. These findings have key (patho)physiological implications for our understanding of the addictive and proepileptic actions of GHB. PMID:25225100

  4. GABA(A) Receptor Pi (GABRP) Stimulates Basal-like Breast Cancer Cell Migration through Activation of Extracellular-regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2)*

    PubMed Central

    Sizemore, Gina M.; Sizemore, Steven T.; Seachrist, Darcie D.; Keri, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease comprised of distinct subtypes predictive of patient outcome. Tumors of the basal-like subtype have a poor prognosis due to inherent aggressiveness and the lack of targeted therapeutics. Basal-like tumors typically lack estrogen receptor-α, progesterone receptor and HER2/ERBB2, or in other words they are triple negative (TN). Continued evaluation of basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) biology is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets. Expression of the pi subunit of the GABA(A) receptor (GABRP) is associated with the BLBC/TN subtype, and herein, we reveal its expression also correlates with metastases to the brain and poorer patient outcome. GABRP expression in breast cancer cell lines also demonstrates a significant correlation with the basal-like subtype suggesting that GABRP functions in the initiation and/or progression of basal-like tumors. To address this postulate, we stably silenced GABRP in two BLBC cell lines, HCC1187 and HCC70 cells. Decreased GABRP reduces in vitro tumorigenic potential and migration concurrent with alterations in the cytoskeleton, specifically diminished cellular protrusions and expression of the BLBC-associated cytokeratins, KRT5, KRT6B, KRT14, and KRT17. Silencing GABRP also decreases phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in both cell lines and selective inhibition of ERK1/2 similarly decreases the basal-like cytokeratins as well as migration. Combined, these data reveal a GABRP-ERK1/2-cytokeratin axis that maintains the migratory phenotype of basal-like breast cancer. GABRP is a component of a cell surface receptor, thus, these findings suggest that targeting this new signaling axis may have therapeutic potential in BLBC. PMID:25012653

  5. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  6. Interactions between opioid-peptides-containing pathways and GABA(A)-receptors-mediated systems modulate panic-like-induced behaviors elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Fabrício; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-08-01

    Aiming to clarify the effect of interactive interconnections between the endogenous opioid peptides-neural links and GABAergic pathways on panic-like responses, in the present work, the effect of the peripheral and central administration of morphine or the non-specific opioid receptors antagonist naloxone was evaluated on the fear-induced responses (defensive attention, defensive immobility and escape behavior) elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. Central microinjections of opioid drugs in the inferior colliculus were also performed followed by local administration of the GABA(A)-receptor antagonist bicuculline. The defensive behavior elicited by the blockade of GABAergic receptors in the inferior colliculus had been quantitatively analyzed, recording the number of crossing, jump, rotation and rearing, in each minute, during 30 min, in the open-field test. The opioid receptors stimulation with morphine decreased the defensive attention, the defensive immobility and escape behavior thresholds, and the non-specific opioid receptors blockade caused opposite effects, enhancing the defensive behavior thresholds. These effects were corroborated by either the stimulation or the inhibition of opioid receptors followed by the GABA(A) receptor blockade with bicuculline, microinjected into the inferior colliculus. There was a significant increase in the diverse fear-induced responses caused by bicuculline with the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus with morphine, and the opposite effect was recorded after the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus nuclei with naloxone followed by bicuculline local administration. These findings suggest an interaction between endogenous opioid-peptides-containing connections and GABA(A)-receptor-mediated system with direct influence on the organization of the panic-like or fear-induced responses elaborated in the inferior colliculus during critical emotional states. PMID:16797498

  7. [Role of GABA-A receptors in mechanism of psychotropic action of pyrrol[1,2-a][1,4]diazepines studied using drug discrimination technique in Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Korolev, A O; Kalinina, T S; Volkova, A V; Mokrov, G V; Kudriashov, N V; Voronina, T A

    2014-01-01

    The role of GABA-A receptors in psychotropic effects of pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazepine derivatives GMAL-24 and GMAL-27 has been studied on an operant method with liquid reinforcement of drug discrimination in male Wistar rats. It is established that, in substitution tests, GMAL-24 (2, 5, 10 mg/kg) and GMAL-27 (2, 5, 10 mg/kg) do not produce interoceptive effects of phenazepam (1 mg/kg) and fail to inhibit interoceptive effects of corasol (20 mg/kg). The obtained results indicate that pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazepine derivatives do not exhibit GABA-A receptor-positive modulator properties in vivo. PMID:25102727

  8. Phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA): a tranquilizer and nootropic drug.

    PubMed

    Lapin, I

    2001-01-01

    Phenibut (beta-phenyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid HCl) is a neuropsychotropic drug that was discovered and introduced into clinical practice in Russia in the 1960s. It has anxiolytic and nootropic (cognition enhancing) effects. It acts as a GABA-mimetic, primarily at GABA(B) and, to some extent, at GABA(A) receptors. It also stimulates dopamine receptors and antagonizes beta-phenethylamine (PEA), a putative endogenous anxiogenic. The psychopharmacological activity of phenibut is similar to that of baclofen, a p-Cl-derivative of phenibut. This article reviews the structure-activity relationship of phenibut and its derivatives. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the position of the phenyl ring, the role of the carboxyl group, and the activity of optical isomers. Comparison of phenibut with piracetam and diazepam reveals similarities and differences in their pharmacological and clinical effects. Phenibut is widely used in Russia to relieve tension, anxiety, and fear, to improve sleep in psychosomatic or neurotic patients; as well as a pre- or post-operative medication. It is also used in the therapy of disorders characterized by asthenia and depression, as well as in post-traumatic stress, stuttering and vestibular disorders. PMID:11830761

  9. Developmental expression of retinoic acid receptors (RARs)

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Here, I review the developmental expression features of genes encoding the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the 'retinoid X' or rexinoid receptors (RXRs). The first detailed expression studies were performed in the mouse over two decades ago, following the cloning of the murine Rar genes. These studies revealed complex expression features at all stages of post-implantation development, one receptor gene (Rara) showing widespread expression, the two others (Rarb and Rarg) with highly regionalized and/or cell type-specific expression in both neural and non-neural tissues. Rxr genes also have either widespread (Rxra, Rxrb), or highly-restricted (Rxrg) expression patterns. Studies performed in zebrafish and Xenopus demonstrated expression of Rar and Rxr genes (both maternal and zygotic), at early pre-gastrulation stages. The eventual characterization of specific enzymes involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (retinol/retinaldehyde dehydrogenases), or the triggering of its catabolism (CYP26 cytochrome P450s), all of them showing differential expression patterns, led to a clearer understanding of the phenomenons regulated by retinoic acid signaling during development. Functional studies involving targeted gene disruptions in the mouse, and additional approaches such as dominant negative receptor expression in other models, have pinpointed the specific, versus partly redundant, roles of the RARs and RXRs in many developing organ systems. These pleiotropic roles are summarized hereafter in relationship to the receptors’ expression patterns. PMID:19471585

  10. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Fukuda, T.; Oyama, Y.; Akaike, N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2574062

  11. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  12. Selective antagonism of the GABAA receptor by ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Green, M A; Halliwell, R F

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) synergistically inhibit γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of these two drugs on other neuronal ligand-gated ion channels. Agonist-evoked depolarizations were recorded from rat vagus and optic nerves in vitro by use of an extracellular recording technique. GABA (50 μM)-evoked responses, in the vagus nerve in vitro, were inhibited by bicuculline (0.3–10 μM) and picrotoxin (0.3–10 μM), with IC50 values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.2 μM (1.1–1.4) and 3.6 μM (3.0–4.3), respectively, and were potentiated by sodium pentobarbitone (30 μM) and diazepam (1 μM) to (mean±s.e.mean) 168±18% and 117±4% of control, respectively. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.5 μM)-evoked responses were inhibited by MDL 72222 (1 μM) to 10±4% of control; DMPP (10 μM)-evoked responses were inhibited by hexamethonium (100 μM) to 12±5% of control, and αbMeATP (30 μM)-evoked responses were inhibited by PPADS (10 μM) to 21±5% of control. Together, these data are consistent with activation of GABAA, 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors, respectively. Ciprofloxacin (10–3000 μM) inhibited GABAA-mediated responses in the vagus nerve with an IC50 (and 95% CI) of 202 μM (148–275). BPAA (1–1000 μM) had little or no effect on the GABAA-mediated response but concentration-dependently potentiated the effects of ciprofloxacin by up to 33,000 times. Responses mediated by 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors in the vagus nerve and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the optic nerve were little or unaffected by ciprofloxacin (100 μM), BPAA (100 μM) or the combination of these drugs (both at 100 μM). GABA (1 mM)-evoked responses in the optic nerve were inhibited by bicuculline with an IC50 of 3.6 μM (2.8–4.5), a value not significantly different from that determined in the vagus

  13. Expression of GABAB receptors in magnocellular neurosecretory cells of male, virgin female and lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Richards, D S; Villalba, R M; Alvarez, F J; Stern, J E

    2005-07-01

    GABA is one of the key neurotransmitters that regulate the firing activity of neurones in the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. In the present study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to study the distribution and subcellular localisation of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors in magnocellular neurones in the SON and PVN. Robust GABA(B) receptor immunoreactivity (GABA(B)R; both subunit 1 and subunit 2 of the heterodimer), was observed in the SON and PVN. At the light microcope level, GABA(B)R immonoreactivity displayed a clustered pattern localised both intracytoplasmically and at the plasma membrane. Densitometry analysis indicated that GABA(B)R immunoreactivity was significantly more intense in vasopressin cells than in oxytocin cells, both in male, virgin female and lactating rats, and was denser in males than in virgin females. Light and electron microscope studies indicated that cytoplasmic GABA(B)R was localised in various organelles, including the Golgi, early endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting the cycling of the receptor within the endocytic and trafficking pathways. Some smaller clusters at the level of the cell plasma membrane were apposed to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactive boutons, and appeared to be colocalised with gephyrin, a constituent protein of the postsynaptic density at inhibitory synapses. The presence of GABA(B)R immunoreactivity at synaptic and extrasynaptic sites was supported by electron microscopy. These results provide anatomical evidence for the expression of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptors in magnocellular neurosecretory cells. PMID:15946159

  14. Brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) detection in vivo with the J-editing (1) H MRS technique: a comprehensive methodological evaluation of sensitivity enhancement, macromolecule contamination and test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Shungu, Dikoma C; Mao, Xiangling; Gonzales, Robyn; Soones, Tacara N; Dyke, Jonathan P; van der Veen, Jan Willem; Kegeles, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Abnormalities in brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. However, in vivo GABA detection by (1) H MRS presents significant challenges arising from the low brain concentration, overlap by much stronger resonances and contamination by mobile macromolecule (MM) signals. This study addresses these impediments to reliable brain GABA detection with the J-editing difference technique on a 3-T MR system in healthy human subjects by: (i) assessing the sensitivity gains attainable with an eight-channel phased-array head coil; (ii) determining the magnitude and anatomic variation of the contamination of GABA by MM; and (iii) estimating the test-retest reliability of the measurement of GABA with this method. Sensitivity gains and test-retest reliability were examined in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), whereas MM levels were compared across three cortical regions: DLPFC, the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the occipital cortex (OCC). A three-fold higher GABA detection sensitivity was attained with the eight-channel head coil compared with the standard single-channel head coil in DLPFC. Despite significant anatomical variation in GABA + MM and MM across the three brain regions (p < 0.05), the contribution of MM to GABA + MM was relatively stable across the three voxels, ranging from 41% to 49%, a non-significant regional variation (p = 0.58). The test-retest reliability of GABA measurement, expressed as either the ratio to voxel tissue water (W) or to total creatine, was found to be very high for both the single-channel coil and the eight-channel phased-array coil. For the eight-channel coil, for example, Pearson's correlation coefficient of test vs. retest for GABA/W was 0.98 (R(2)  = 0.96, p = 0.0007), the percentage coefficient of variation (CV) was 1.25% and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.98. Similar reliability was also found for the co-edited resonance

  15. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Producing Bacteria on In vitro Rumen Fermentation, Biogenic Amine Production and Anti-oxidation Using Corn Meal as Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bum Seung; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Jeong, Chang Dae; Soriano, Alvin P.; Lee, Ho-Il; Nam, Ki-Chang; Ha, Jong K.; Lee, Sang Suk

    2013-01-01

    The effects and significance of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) producing bacteria (GPB) on in vitro rumen fermentation and reduction of biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, and tyramine) using corn meal as a substrate were determined. Ruminal samples collected from ruminally fistulated Holstein cows served as inoculum and corn was used as substrate at 2% dry matter (DM). Different inclusion rates of GPB and GABA were evaluated. After incubation, addition of GPB had no significant effect on in vitro fermentation pH and total gas production, but significantly increased the ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) concentration and reduced the total biogenic amines production (p<0.05). Furthermore, antioxidation activity was improved as indicated by the significantly higher concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) among treated samples when compared to the control (p<0.05). Additionally, 0.2% GPB was established as the optimum inclusion level. Taken together, these results suggest the potential of utilizing GPB as feed additives to improve growth performance in ruminants by reducing biogenic amines and increasing anti-oxidation. PMID:25049853

  16. Molecular size of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor purified from mammalian cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Mamalaki, C; Barnard, E A; Stephenson, F A

    1989-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of both the soluble and purified gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor of bovine or rat cerebral cortex has been investigated in solution in Triton X-100 or in 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulphonate (CHAPS). In all the hydrodynamic separations made, it was found that the binding activities for GABA, benzodiazepine, and (where detectable) t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate comigrated. Conditions were established for gel exclusion chromatography and for sucrose density gradient velocity sedimentation that maintain the GABAA receptor in a nonaggregated form. Using these conditions, the molecular weight of the bovine GABAA receptor in the above-mentioned detergents was calculated using the H2O/2H2O method. A value of Mr 230,000-240,000 was calculated for the bovine pure GABAA receptor purified in sodium deoxycholate/Triton X-100 media. A value of Mr 284,000-290,000 was calculated for the nonaggregated bovine or rat cortex receptor in CHAPS, but the Stokes radius is smaller in the latter than in the former medium and the detergent binding in CHAPS is underestimated. Thus the deduced Mr, 240,000, is the best estimate by this method. PMID:2535707

  17. [The pharmacological differences between kynurenine- and korazol-induced seizures (the participation of GABA-B receptors and dopamine)].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1998-01-01

    In experiments of male SHR (nonbred) and C57B1/6 mice [correction of rats] bicucullin intensified corasole-induced convulsions but had no effect on kynurenine convulsions, removed the anticonvulsive effect of phenibut against kynurenine and did not affect the anticonvulsive effect of diazepam against corasole. Phenibut and baclofen reduced the anticonvulsive effect of diazepam against corasole and caffeine. Haloperidol increased kynurenine-induced convulsions and had no effect on those caused by corasole. Dopamine removed the effect of haloperidol. Haloperidol and 6-oxydopamine weakened the sedative effect of phenibut. Blockade of GAMAB-receptors and weakening of dopaminergic activity are important in the mechanisms of kynurenine convulsions, and blockage of GABAA-receptors unrelated to it is important in the mechanisms of corasole convulsions. A functional antagonism in anticonvulsive activity may exist between these receptors. Bicucullin may probably have an effect both on GABAA- and GABAB-receptors. PMID:9621167

  18. Mapping of the {alpha}{sub 4} subunit gene (GABRA4) to human chromosome 4 defines an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 1} gene cluster: Further evidence that modern GABA{sub a} receptor gene clusters are derived from an ancestral cluster

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, P.J.; Farb, D.H.; Russek, S.J.

    1995-04-10

    We demonstrated previously that an {alpha}{sub 1}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} gene cluster of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA{sub A}) receptor is located on human chromosome 5q34-q35 and that an ancestral {alpha}-{beta}-{gamma} gene cluster probably spawned clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, and 15. Here, we report that the {alpha}{sub 4} gene (GABRA4) maps to human chromosome 4p14-q12, defining a cluster comprising the {alpha}{sub 2}, {alpha}{sub 4}, {beta}{sub 1}, and {gamma}{sub 1} genes. The existence of an {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 4}-{beta}{sub 1}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 4 and an {alpha}{sub 1}-{alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{sub 2}-{gamma}{sub 2} cluster on chromosome 5 provides further evidence that the number of ancestral GABA{sub A} receptor subunit genes has been expanded by duplication within an ancestral gene cluster. Moreover, if duplication of the {alpha} gene occurred before duplication of the ancestral gene cluster, then a heretofore undiscovered subtype of a subunit should be located on human chromosome 15q11-q13 within an {alpha}{sub 5}-{alpha}{sub x}-{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}{sub 3} gene cluster at the locus for Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. GABA transporters control GABAergic neurotransmission in the mouse subplate.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, P; Kirischuk, S; Luhmann, H J

    2015-09-24

    The subplate is a transient layer between the cortical plate and intermediate zone in the developing cortex. Thalamo-cortical axons form temporary synapses on subplate neurons (SPns) before invading the cortical plate. Neuronal activity within the subplate is of critical importance for the development of neocortical circuits and architecture. Although both glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs on SPns were reported, short-term plasticity of GABAergic transmission has not been investigated yet. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (GPSCs) were recorded from SPns in coronal neocortical slices prepared from postnatal day 3-4 mice using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Evoked GPSCs (eGPSCs) elicited by electrical paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse depression at all interstimulus intervals tested. Baclofen, a specific GABAB receptor (GABABR) agonist, reduced eGPSC amplitudes and increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR), suggesting presynaptic location of functional GABABRs. Baclofen-induced effects were alleviated by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP55845), a selective GABABR blocker. Moreover, CGP55845 increased eGPSC amplitudes and decreased PPR even under control conditions, indicating that GABABRs are tonically activated by ambient GABA. Because extracellular GABA concentration is mainly regulated by GABA transporters (GATs), we asked whether GATs release GABA. 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)amino]oxy]ethyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid (NNC-711) (10μM), a selective GAT-1 blocker, increased eGPSC decay time, decreased eGPSC amplitudes and PPR. The two last effects but not the first one were blocked by CGP55845, indicating that GAT-1 blockade causes an elevation of extracellular GABA concentration and in turn activation of extrasynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs. 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP-5114), a specific GAT-2/3 blocker, failed

  20. Discriminative stimulus effects of the GABAB receptor-positive modulator rac-BHFF: comparison with GABAB receptor agonists and drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2013-03-01

    GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators are thought to have advantages as potential medications for anxiety, depression, and drug addiction. They may have fewer side effects than GABA(B) receptor agonists, because selective enhancement of activated receptors could have effects different from nonselective activation of all receptors. To examine this, pigeons were trained to discriminate the GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator (R,S)-5,7-di-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-3-trifluoromethyl-3H-benzofuran-2-one (rac-BHFF) from its vehicle. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not mimicked by the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen and γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), not by diazepam, and not by alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine, whose self-administration has been reported to be attenuated by GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators. The discriminative stimulus effects of rac-BHFF were not antagonized by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist 3-aminopropyl (diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) but were attenuated by the less efficacious GABA(B) receptor-positive modulator 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropyl)phenol (CGP7930), suggesting the possibility that rac-BHFF produces its discriminative stimulus effects by directly activating GABA(B2) subunits of GABA(B) receptors. At a dose 10-fold lower than the training dose, rac-BHFF enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of baclofen, but not of GHB. This study provides evidence that the effects of GABA(B) receptor-positive modulators are not identical to those of GABA(B) receptor agonists. In addition, the results suggest that positive modulation of GABA(B) receptors does not produce discriminative stimulus effects similar to those of benzodiazepines, alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine. Finally, the finding that rac-BHFF enhanced effects of baclofen but not of GHB is consistent with converging evidence that the populations of GABA(B) receptors mediating the effects of baclofen and GHB are not identical. PMID:23275067

  1. [The influence of the GABA-B receptor antagonists 2-hydoxysaclofen and faclofen on the sedative effect of fenibut and baclofen].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1995-01-01

    Pretreatment of NIH-Swiss mice with HYS (8 mg/kg) is shown to reduce the inhibiting effect (namely, the reduction of the locomotion rate and the number of horizontal movements) of PHE (80 mg/kg) and do not affect the action of an equipotent dose (4 mg/kg) of BAC. BAC induced shortening of the locomotion period is reduced by HYS. HYS appeared to be inactive with respect to inhibiting effect of PHE. PHE and BAC shortening of the distance covered was insensitive to HYS administration. HYS reduces decrease in the rate and duration of rearings induced by PHE. PHA (8 mg/kg) do not change the sedative effect of PHE and BAC on locomotion, attenuated the PHE-induced inhibition of rearings and increase the effect of BAC. It is suggested that GABA-B receptors affect the inhibitory action of PHE rather strong than that of BAC and differ in the inhibition of horizontal and vertical components of the locomotor activity of mice. PMID:8704585

  2. Susceptibility effects of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) variants and parental monitoring on externalizing behavior trajectories: Risk and protection conveyed by the minor allele.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Elisa M; Villafuerte, Sandra; Heitzeg, Mary M; Burmeister, Margit; Zucker, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Understanding factors increasing susceptibility to social contexts and predicting psychopathology can help identify targets for prevention. Persistently high externalizing behavior in adolescence is predictive of psychopathology in adulthood. Parental monitoring predicts low externalizing behavior, yet youth likely vary in the degree to which they are affected by parents. Genetic variants of GABA receptor subunit alpha-2 (GABRA2) may increase susceptibility to parental monitoring, thus impacting externalizing trajectories. We had several objectives: (a) to determine whether GABRA2 (rs279827, rs279826, rs279858) moderates the relationship between a component of parental monitoring, parental knowledge, and externalizing trajectories; (b) to test the form of this interaction to assess whether GABRA2 variants reflect risk (diathesis-stress) or susceptibility (differential susceptibility) factors; and (c) to clarify GABRA2 associations on the development of problem behavior. This prospective study (N = 504) identified three externalizing trajectory classes (i.e., low, decreasing, and high) across adolescence. A GABRA2 × Parental Monitoring effect on class membership was observed, such that A-carriers were largely unaffected by parental monitoring, whereas class membership for those with the GG genotype was affected by parental monitoring. Findings support differential susceptibility in GABRA2. PMID:25797587

  3. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mariko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate) of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via reactions catalyzed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase, GABA transaminase, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development. PMID:26322056

  4. Oxytocin regulates changes of extracellular glutamate and GABA levels induced by methamphetamine in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia; Han, Wen-Yan; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Li-Hui; Dong, Ying-Xu; Wang, Fang; Song, Ming; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2012-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, affects adaptive processes of the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the effects of OT on extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) induced by methamphetamine (MAP) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DHC) of freely moving mice, using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The results showed that OT had no effect on basal Glu levels, but attenuated MAP-induced Glu increase in the mPFC and decrease in the DHC. OT increased the basal levels of extracellular GABA in mPFC and DHC of mice, and inhibited the MAP-induced GABA decrease in DHC. Western blot results indicated that OT significantly inhibited the increased glutamatergic receptor (NR1 subunit) levels in the PFC after acute MAP administration, whereas OT further enhanced the elevated levels of glutamatergic transporter (GLT1) induced by MAP in the hippocampus of mice. Atosiban, a selective inhibitor of OT receptor, antagonized the effects of OT. The results provided the first neurochemical evidence that OT, which exerted its action via its receptor, decreased Glu release induced by MAP, and attenuated the changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission partially via regulation of NR1 and GLT1 expression. OT-induced extracellular GABA increase also suggests that OT acts potentially as an inhibitory neuromodulator in mPFC and DHC of mice. PMID:22507692

  5. The ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Lin; Cui, Ying-Jun; Lang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Yan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2010-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a very important inhibitory neurotransmitter in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. GABA receptors (GABARs) are known to be the molecular targets of a class of insecticides. Members of the GABAR gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, a model insect of Lepidoptera, have been identified and characterized in this study. All putative silkworm GABAR cDNAs were cloned using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bombyx mori appears to have the largest insect GABAR gene family known to date, including three RDL, one LCCH3, and one GRD subunit. The silkworm RDL1 gene has RNA-editing sites, and the RDL1 and RDL3 genes possess alternative splicing. These mRNA modifications enhance the diversity of the silkworm's GABAR gene family. In addition, truncated transcripts were found for the RDL1 and LCCH3 genes. In particular, the three RDL subunits may have arisen from two duplication events. PMID:20924418

  6. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  7. GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated effects in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Giotti, A; Luzzi, S; Spagnesi, S; Zilletti, L

    1983-03-01

    1 The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related substances were examined in guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle.2 GABA at doses ranging from 10(-7) M to 3 x 10(-6) M elicited a relaxation while at higher doses (3 x 10(-6) M - 10(-4) M), as previously described, it caused a contraction followed by relaxation.3 GABA-induced relaxation was bicuculline-insensitive, was mimicked by (-)-baclofen but not by homotaurine and muscimol. The effect of baclofen was stereospecific. GABA- and (-)-baclofen-induced relaxations were dose-dependent and their ED(50) values were similar. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between GABA and (-)-baclofen.4 The bicuculline-insensitive relaxation induced by GABA and (-)-baclofen was prevented by tetrodotoxin and hyoscine but not by phentolamine plus propranolol, naloxone or theophylline.5 In preparations in which the muscle tone was raised by histamine or prostaglandin F(2alpha), GABA and (-)-baclofen induced relaxation to the same extent as before increasing the tone. If the tone was raised by DMPP, a greater bicuculline-insensitive relaxation occurred.6 Contraction caused by GABA was bicuculline-sensitive and was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol. Contraction was dose-dependent and muscimol was about three times more potent than GABA or homotaurine. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between the contractile effects of GABA and those of homotaurine or muscimol.7 Bicuculline competitively antagonized the contractile effects of GABA, homotaurine and muscimol and gave closely similar pA(2) values. The slope of the Schild plot for the above drugs was near 1, confirming the competitive nature of the antagonism.8 The bicuculline-sensitive contraction induced by GABA, homotaurine and muscimol was abolished by tetrodotoxin and was non-competitively antagonized by hyoscine, while it was unaffected by hexamethonium, mepyramine and methysergide.9 It is concluded that two receptors mediate the GABA effects in guinea

  8. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and