Science.gov

Sample records for acid gas scrubber

  1. Acid gas removal in a confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, H.S.; Diehl, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports results of acid gas removal tests performed on a confined vortex scrubber. The confined vortex scrubber (CVS) was developed at the Energy Technology Office of Textron Defense Systems (ETO/TDS) under company as well as Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) funding. Previous tests on the CVS have demonstrated > 98% capture for sub-micron fly ash particles, as well as high mercury vapor removal from gas streams. In the recent tests water, sodium hydroxide, and sodium sulfite and bisulfite solutions were used to scrub out hydrochloric, acid gas (HCl) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) doped in air supplied to the CVS. The capture efficiency was determined as a function of acid gas concentration, liquor flow rate, and liquor type. When the liquor was supplied only inside the CVS squirrel cage the HCl removal efficiency varied from 85--100% while the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency varied from 60--80%. Significantly higher captures were obtained at 1/3 rd the liquor flow rate by spraying the liquor upstream of the CVS in the air inlet pipe, and increasing the liquor/gas contact time. Total HCl captures > 95% and SO{sub 2} captures > 85% were obtained at a liquid/gas ratio of only 2 gal/1,000 acf for acid gas concentrations of 200--1,800 ppmv. There were no significant differences in the SO{sub 2}, scrubbing ability of the three sodium solutions, and the HCl scrubbing ability of water and a sodium hydroxide solution. These results suggest that the acid gas capture in the CVS is mass transfer limited because of the extremely short gas residence times in the CVS.

  2. HYDROFLUORIC ACID SCRUBBER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    PANESKO JV; MERRITT HD

    2011-05-18

    Each year over a million gallons of water are used to scrub hydrogen fluoride (HP) vapors from waste off-gas streams. Use of other potential scrubber solutions such as potassium hydroxide (KOH), aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN), and monobasic aluminum nitrate (monoban) would result in significant volume reductions. A laboratory study was initiated to (1) demonstrate the effectiveness of these scrubber solutions to sorb HF, (2) determine if unexpected reactions occurred at flowsheet conditions, and (3) determine the consequences of deviation from flowsheet conditions. Caustic or aluminum scrubber solutions remove hydrogen fluoride from off-gas streams. Solids which appear with aluminum could be avoided by heating the scrubber solution.

  3. Adipic gets the acid test as flue gas scrubber additive

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, I.R.

    1980-02-11

    The first full-scale demonstration of adipic acid for such use, to be conducted early in the summer of 1980 in a 200 MW power plant burning high-sulfur coal, is designed to clarify the costs and show how to reduce losses of adipic acid via degradation. Adipic acid improves SO/sub 2/ removal by acting as a buffer to limit the pH drop normally occurring at the gas-liquid interface so that the higher SO/sub 2/ concentration in the surface film improves liquid-phase mass transfer; it also promotes higher limestone utilization. Prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority, a preliminary economic analysis for a 500 MW plant burning 4% sulfur coal indicates that the addition of 1500 ppM of adipic acid (limestone at $7/ton and the acid at $840/ton) would raise SO/sub 2/ removal from 90 to 95%, reduce the total capital investment from $41.5 to $39.5 million, and have a first year revenue requirement of $19.9 million vs. $20.9 million without the acid. The large-scale trial will also help clarify concern over unpleasant odors that have been reported at test sites of the limestone/adipic system; valeric acid has been identified as the cause.

  4. Environmental policy constraints for acidic exhaust gas scrubber discharges from ships.

    PubMed

    Ülpre, H; Eames, I

    2014-11-15

    Increasingly stringent environmental legislation on sulphur oxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels onboard ships (International Maritime Organization (IMO) Regulation 14) can be met by either refining the fuel to reduce sulphur content or by scrubbing the exhaust gases. Commonly used open loop marine scrubbers discharge warm acidic exhaust gas wash water into the sea, depressing its pH. The focus on this paper is on the physics and chemistry behind the disposal of acidic discharges in seawater. The IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 59/24/Add.1 Annex 9) requires the wash water to reach a pH greater than 6.5 at a distance of 4m from the point of discharge. We examine the engineering constraints, specifically size and number of ports, to identify the challenges of meeting regulatory compliance. PMID:25284442

  5. GAS-ATOMIZED SPRAY SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of fine particle collection efficiency measurements of a gas-atomized spray scrubber, cleaning effluent gas from a No. 7 gray iron cupola. Tests were made at several levels of pressure drop and liquid/gas ratio. Particle size measurements on inlet and out...

  6. Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-11-30

    The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

  7. Statistical modeling of ammonia absorption in an acid spray scrubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of acid spray wet scrubbers for recovering ammonia (NH3) emissions is promising due to its high NH3 removal efficiency, simplicity in design, and minimal pressure drop contribution on fans. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a lab-optimised acid spray scrubber...

  8. Assessment of Industrial VOC Gas-Scrubber Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H

    2004-02-13

    Gas scrubbers for air-pollution control of volatile organic compounds (VOC) cover a wide range of technologies. In this review, we have attempted to evaluate the single-pass scrubber destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs) for a range of gas-scrubber technologies. We have focused primarily on typical industrial DREs for the various technologies, typical problems, and any DRE-related experiential information available. The very limited literature citations found suggest significant differences between actual versus design performance in some technologies. The potentially significant role of maintenance in maintaining DREs was also investigated for those technologies. An in-depth portrayal of the entire gas scrubbing industry is elusive. Available literature sources suggest significant differences between actual versus design performance in some technologies. Lack of scrubber system maintenance can contribute to even larger variances. ''Typical'' industrial single-pass performance of commonly used VOC gas scrubbers generally ranged from {approx}80 to 99%. Imperfect solid and/or liquid particulates capture (possibly as low as 95% despite design for 99+% capture efficiency) can also lead to VOC releases. Changing the VOC composition in the gas stream without modifying scrubber equipment or operating conditions could also lead to significant deterioration in attainable destruction and removal efficiencies.

  9. FURTHER STUDY OF ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION IN FGD SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of investigations of adipic acid degradation to account for losses observed during earlier studies where it was used as an additive to improve SO2 scrubber performance. Bench-scale experiments identified the major species resulting from the oxidative degr...

  10. Velocity profile development for a poultry facility acid scrubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of the air velocity profile for 12 experimental configurations (ECs) of an acid scrubber was carried out using an equal area traverse method with a vane axial anemometer. Four velocity profile plots were created for each configuration to determine the four optimal ECs. ECs were selecte...

  11. Separation of Mercury from Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Produced Gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Hensman, Carl, E., P.h.D; Baker, Trevor

    2008-06-16

    Frontier Geosciences (Frontier; FGS) proposed for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER84669 that mercury control could be achieved in a wet scrubber by the addition of an amendment to the wet-FGD scrubber. To demonstrate this, a bench-scale scrubber and synthetic flue-gas supply was designed to simulate the limestone fed, wet-desulfurization units utilized by coal-fired power plants. Frontier maintains that the mercury released from these utilities can be controlled and reduced by modifying the existing equipment at installations where wet flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed. A key element of the proposal was FGS-PWN, a liquid-based mercury chelating agent, which can be employed as the amendment for removal of all mercury species which enter the wet-FGD scrubber. However, the equipment design presented in the proposal was inadequate to demonstrate these functions and no significant progress was made to substantiate these claims. As a result, funding for a Phase II continuation of this work will not be pursued. The key to implementing the technology as described in the proposal and report appears to be a high liquid-to-gas ratio (L/G) between the flue-gas and the scrubber liquor, a requirement not currently implemented in existing wet-FGD designs. It may be that this constraint can be reduced through parametric studies, but that was not apparent in this work. Unfortunately, the bench-scale system constructed for this project did not function as intended and the funds and time requested were exhausted before the separation studies could occur.

  12. Control of scale in flue gas scrubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.A.; Dewitt-Dick, D.B.

    1987-06-02

    This patent describes a flue gas desulfurization system in which sulfur dioxide-containing flue gas is passed in countercurrent flow with an aqueous calcium-bearing scrubbing liquor whereby the sulfur dioxide is removed from the flue gas by being absorbed by the scrubbing liquor and converted to calcium sulfite and/or calcium sulfate. The improvement of minimizing the formation of calcium scale on the surfaces of the system comprises maintaining in the scrubbing liquor about 0.1-25 ppm of a 1:1 diisobutylene-maleic anhydride copolymer having an average molecular weight of 11000. The copolymer is incorporated in the scrubbing liquor as a 10-15% aqueous dispersion.

  13. Stack Gas Scrubber Makes the Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes a year long test of successful sulfur dioxide removal from stack gas with a calcium oxide slurry. Sludge disposal problems are discussed. Cost is estimated at 0.6 mill per kwh not including sludge removal. A flow diagram and equations are included. (GH)

  14. Separation of Flue-Gas Scrubber Sludge into Marketable Products

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-28

    The reduction of sulfur oxides from high sulfur coal burning utility companies has resulted in the production of huge quantities of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge. A typical 400 MW power station burning a coal containing 3.5% sulfur by weight and using a limestone absorbent would produce approximately 177,000 tons (dry weight) of scrubber sludge per year. This brownish colored, finely divided material contains calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2 H{sub 2}O), calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), and various other impurities such as fly-ash and iron oxide particles. The physical separation of the components of scrubber sludge would result in the re-use of this material. The primary use would be conversion to a highly pure synthetic gypsum. This technical report concentrates on the effect of baffle configuration on the separation of calcium sulfite/sulfate from limestone. The position of the baffles as they related to the feed inlet, and the quantity of the baffles were examined. A clean calcium sulfite/sulfate (less than 2.0% limestone by weight) was achieved with the combination of water-only cyclone and horizontally baffled column.

  15. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1997-08-31

    A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium

  16. Flue gas SO 2/NO x control by combination of dry scrubber and electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfritch, D. J.; Feldman, P. L.

    This study examines the feasibility of adding an electron beam between the spray dryer and the fabric filter of "dry scrubber" flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The beam promises effective removal of nitrogen oxides (NO x) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2), even at higher coal-sulfur levels than usually economic for dry scrubbers. The beam excites gas molecules, promoting reactions that convert SO 2 and NO x to acids that then react with calcium compounds and are removed by the filter. The cost findings are promising for both manufacture and operation. The system uses commercially available components. The relatively low temperatures and high humidity downstream of the spray dryer favor economic beam operation. The beam removes SO 2, so the dryer can be run for economy, not high removal. Pilot scale tests will soon be carried out which are designed to verify earlier bench scale test results and to serve as the next step to full commercialization. It is expected that better than 90% SO 2 and NO x removal will be achieved.

  17. Pilot-scale field study for ammonia removal from lagoon biogas using an acid wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun; Hadlocon, Lara Jane; Manuzon, Roderick; Zhao, Lingying

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic activities in swine slurry storage and treatment generate biogas containing gaseous ammonia component which is a chemical agent that can cause adverse environmental impacts when released to the atmosphere. The aim of this pilot plant study was to remove ammonia from biogas generated in a covered lagoon, using a sulfuric acid wet scrubber. The data showed that, on average, the biogas contained 43.7 ppm of ammonia and its concentration was found to be exponentially related to the air temperature inside the lagoon. When the air temperature rose to 35°C and the biogas ammonia concentration reached 90 ppm, the mass transfer of ammonia/ammonium from the deeper liquid body to the interface between the air and liquid became a limiting factor. The biogas velocity was critical in affecting ammonia removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. A biogas flow velocity of 8 to 12 mm s(-1) was recommended to achieve a removal efficiency of greater than 60%. Stepwise regression revealed that the biogas velocity and air temperature, not the inlet ammonia concentration in biogas, affected the ammonia removal efficiency. Overall, when 73 g L(-1) (or 0.75 M) sulfuric acid solution was used as the scrubber solution, removal efficiencies varied from 0% to 100% with an average of 55% over a 40-d measurement period. Mass balance calculation based on ammonium-nitrogen concentration in final scrubber liquid showed that about 21.3 g of ammonia was collected from a total volume of 1169 m(3) of biogas, while the scrubber solution should still maintain its ammonia absorbing ability until its concentration reaches up to 1 M. These results showed promising use of sulfuric acid wet scrubber for ammonia removal in the digester biogas. PMID:24762182

  18. Simulation and evaluation of elemental mercury concentration increase in flue gas across a wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Chang, John C S; Ghorishi, S Behrooz

    2003-12-15

    Experimental data from a laboratory-scale wet scrubber simulator confirmed that oxidized mercury, Hg2+, can be reduced by aqueous S(IV) (sulfite and/or bisulfite) species and results in elemental mercury (HgO) emissions under typical wet FGD scrubber conditions. The S(IV)-induced Hg2+ reduction and Hg0 emission mechanism can be described by a model which assumes that only a fraction of the Hg2+ can be reduced, and the rate-controlling step of the overall process is a first-order reaction involving the Hg-S(IV) complexes. Experimental data and model simulations predict that the Hg2+ in the flue gas can cause rapid increase of Hg0 concentration in the flue gas across a FGD scrubber. Forced oxidation can enhance Hg2+ reduction and Hg0 emission by decreasing the S(IV) concentration in the scrubbing liquor. The model predictions also indicate that flue gas Hg0 increase across a wet FGD scrubber can be reduced by decreasing the pH, increasing S(IV) concentration, and lowering the temperature. PMID:14717192

  19. Gas pollutants removal in a single- and two-stage ejector-venturi scrubber.

    PubMed

    Gamisans, Xavier; Sarrà, Montserrrat; Lafuente, F Javier

    2002-03-29

    The absorption of SO(2) and NH(3) from the flue gas into NaOH and H(2)SO(4) solutions, respectively has been studied using an industrial scale ejector-venturi scrubber. A statistical methodology is presented to characterise the performance of the scrubber by varying several factors such as gas pollutant concentration, air flowrate and absorbing solution flowrate. Some types of venturi tube constructions were assessed, including the use of a two-stage venturi tube. The results showed a strong influence of the liquid scrubbing flowrate on pollutant removal efficiency. The initial pollutant concentration and the gas flowrate had a slight influence. The use of a two-stage venturi tube considerably improved the absorption efficiency, although it increased energy consumption. The results of this study will be applicable to the optimal design of venturi-based absorbers for gaseous pollution control or chemical reactors. PMID:11893424

  20. Effect of solution pH on SO2, NO(x), and Hg removal from simulated coal combustion flue gas in an oxidant-enhanced wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Krzyzynska, Renata; Hutson, Nick D

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a study on the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO(x) and Hg (both Hg0 and Hg2+) from a simulated flue gas by oxidant injection in a bench-simulated wet limestone scrubber for a wide range of slurry pH. The slurry pH strongly influenced the chemical mechanism in the scrubber and, therefore, affected pollutant removal. This paper also examines the potential ClO2(gas) reemission from a developed multipollutant scrubber at different slurry pHs. To better understand the chemical mechanisms at each slurry pH and to apply a mass balance to the process, detailed product ion analyses were performed for all experiments. Ion analysis covered three different chlorine species (chlorite, chloride, chlorate), sulfate, nitrite and nitrate. Different NO(x) removal efficiencies and mechanisms were found in acidic and alkaline pHs in the multipollutant scrubber. The acidic solution was favorable for NO and Hg0 oxidation, but increasing the slurry pH above 7.0 was disadvantageous for NO and Hg oxidation/removal. However the rate of NO(x) absorption (by percentage) was higher for the alkaline solution. PMID:22442937

  1. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  2. EVALUATION OF THREE INDUSTRIAL PARTICULATE SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field measurements, carried out on three full scale industrial scrubbers to determine scrubber performance characteristics, including particle collection efficiency as a function of particle diameter. The three scrubbers were different gas-atomized spr...

  3. Separation of the components of flue-gas scrubber sludge by froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. Currently, the major markets for scrubber sludge are for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. Other markets, such as paper manufacture and plastics fillers, have even more stringent quality requirements and will not accept raw sludge at all. In the work described in this paper, several reagents have been examined to determine their ability to selectively improve the flotation of the unreacted limestone contaminant away from the desirable products (calcium sulfite and gypsum). The most success has been achieved using a cationic collector, which shows a higher selectivity between calcium sulfite and calcium carbonate than do the anionic collectors that were studied.

  4. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  5. Semi-mechanistic modelling of ammonia absorption in an acid spray wet scrubber based on mass balance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model to describe reactive absorption of ammonia (NH3) in an acid spray scrubber was developed as a function of the combined overall mass transfer coefficient K. An experimental study of NH3 absorption using 1% dilute sulphuric acid was carried out under different operating conditions. An empiric...

  6. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1996--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1996-06-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite, gypsum, and unreacted limestone or lime, with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silicates, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem.

  7. Evaluation of methods to detect and control nitrification inhibition with specific application to incinerator flue-gas scrubber water

    SciTech Connect

    Daigger, G.T.; Sadick, T.E.

    1998-11-01

    Two procedures for determining the maximum specific growth rate of nitrifying bacteria in the presence of inhibitors were evaluated. One procedure uses a population of nitrifying bacteria and a short-term (6-hour) batch assay to determine the impact of the test wastewater on the maximum specific growth rate of the nitrifiers. The difference in the specific nitrification rate for the subject population between a control and the test wastewater quantifies the effect of the constituents in the test wastewater on the nitrifier maximum specific growth rate. The second procedure uses batch fill-and-draw bioreactors operated under steady-state conditions to determine the minimum mean cell residence time for growth of the nitrifiers. The need to assess nitrification inhibition at two large municipal wastewater treatment plants provided the opportunity to evaluate these two procedures. Incineration of biosolids is practiced at both of these plants, and it was shown that in-plant recycle of the multiple-hearth flue-gas scrubber water can be inhibitory to nitrification. Results from extensive testing indicated that hydrocyanic acid (HCN), present in the scrubber water, is the probable inhibitor. Consistent results were obtained at both plants. They indicated that HCN concentrations on the order of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/L resulted in a reduction in the nitrifier maximum specific growth rate of approximately 50%. Treatment methods were evaluated at each plant and implemented. At one plant, aerobic biological treatment of the incinerator sidestream is being practiced. At the other facility, cyanide is thermally destroyed in afterburners before contact with the wet scrubbing system.

  8. WHY DOES FLUE GAS ELEMENTAL MERCURY CONCENTRATION INCREASE ACROSS A WET SCRUBBER?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the results of research investigating the potential reduction of oxidized mercury (Hg2+) to elemental mercury (Hg0) and subsequent emission of Hg0 from wet scrubbers. Experiments were performed in a bench-scale, wet scrubber simulator containing solutions used...

  9. Demonstration of a steam jet scrubber off-gas system and the burner efficiency of a mixed waste incinerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, H; Charlesworth, D L

    1988-01-01

    A full-scale incinerator system, the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF), is being designed to process solid and liquid low-level radioactive, mixed, and RCRA hazardous waste. This facility will consist of a rotary kiln, secondary combustion chamber (SCC), and a wet off-gas system. A prototype steam jet scrubber off-gas system has been tested to verify design assumptions for the CIF. The scrubber wastewater will be immobilized in a cement matrix after the blowdown has been concentrated to a maximum solids concentration in a cross-flow filtration system. A sintered metal inertial filter system has been successfully tested. Burner efficiency was tested in a high intensity vortex burner, which destroyed the hazardous waste streams tested.

  10. Designing a scrubber for maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlmeister, M.E.; Baron, E.S.; Watts, J.

    1996-12-01

    Under Round 4 of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology program, New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG), in partnership with Saarberg-Holter-Umwelttechnik (SHU), Consolidation Coal Company and Stebbins Engineering and Manufacturing Company, has retrofitted a formic acid enhanced forced oxidation wet limestone scrubber on Units I and 2 at the Milliken Steam Electric Station. Units I and 2 are 1950s vintage Combustion Engineering tangentially fired pulverized coal units, which are rated at nominal 150 MW each and operate in balanced draft mode. The Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system for Unit 2 was placed into operation in January 1995 and the Unit I system in June 1995. The project incorporates several unique aspects: low pH operation; a ceramic tile-lined cocurrent/countercurrent, split module absorber; a wet stack supported on the roof of the FGD building; and closed loop, zero liquid discharge operation that produces commercial grade gypsum and calcium chloride brine. The project objectives include 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high sulfur coal, the production of marketable byproducts to minimize solid waste disposal, zero wastewater discharge, space-saving design, and minimization of maintenance requirements of a wet scrubber. The paper provides a brief overview of the project scrubber design relating to maintenance considerations. A discussion of the early results of the maintenance history is also provided. Repair techniques that have been developed and tested for ceramic tile lined modules are included. 1 fig.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-06-06

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample

  12. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second year, third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1995--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-06-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{sm_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}O), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silica, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. This project is studying the characteristics of flue-gas scrubber sludges from several sources. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product.

  13. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, June 1, 1996--August 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1996-09-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite, gypsum, and unreacted limestone or lime, with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silicates, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather then landfilling them. This project is studying the use of minimal-reagent froth flotation as the purification process, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product. In this quarter, the installation of a laboratory-scale flotation column was completed. In addition to the installation of the flotation column, research on the determination of the surface properties of the components of the scrubber sludge was continued. Auger electron spectroscopy was investigated as a method for determining the composition of the first few monolayers of unreacted limestone and calcium sulfite/sulfate particles.

  14. Designing a scrubber for maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlmeister, M.E.; Baron, E.S.; Watts, J.

    1996-07-01

    Under Round 4 of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology program, New York State Electric & Gas Corporation (NYSEG), in partnership with Saarberg-Holter-Umwelttechnik (SHU), Consolidation Coal Company and Stebbins Engineering and Manufacturing Company, has retrofitted a formic acid enhanced forced oxidation wet limestone scrubber on Units 1 and 2 at the Milliken Steam Electric Station. Units 1 and 2 are 1950s vintage Combustion Engineering tangentially fired pulverized coal units, which are rated at nominal 150 MW each and operate in balanced draft mode. The Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system for Unit 2 was placed into operation in January 1995 and the Unit 1 system in June 1995. The project incorporates several unique aspects: low pH operation; a ceramic tile-lined concurrent/countercurrent, split module absorber, a wet stack supported on the roof of the FGD building; and closed loop, zero liquid discharge operation that produces commercial grade gypsum and calcium chloride brine. The project objectives include 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high sulfur coal, the production of marketable byproducts to minimize solid waste disposal, zero wastewater discharge, space-saving design, and minimization of maintenance requirements of a wet scrubber.

  15. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2}, NOx, and Hg from coal flue gas using a NaClO{sub 2}-enhanced wet scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, N.D.; Krzyzynska, R.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2008-08-15

    A bench-scale study was conducted on the simultaneous removal Of SO{sub 2}, NOx, and mercury (both Hg{sup 0} and Hg{sup 2+}) from a simulated coal flue gas using a wet calcium carbonate scrubber. The multipollutant capacity of the scrubber was enhanced with the addition of the oxidizing salt, sodium chlorite. The results showed a maximum scrubbing of 100% for SO{sub 2} and Hg species and near complete NO oxidation with about 60% scrubbing of the resulting NOx species. The chlorite additive was less effective as an oxidant in the absence of SO{sub 2} and NO in the flue gas. Oxidation of NO and mercury were only about 50% and 80%, respectively, in the case of no SO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. The mercury oxidation was similarly affected by the absence of NO in the flue gas.

  16. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second year, second quarterly technical progress report, Quarter No. 6, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    KAwatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-03-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{sm_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}O), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silica, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. This project is studying the characteristics of flue-gas scrubber sludges from several sources, which is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product.

  17. Transport evaluation of a gas-liquid scrubber. [Five-tray, single-bubble-cap, single-downcomer, gas liquid contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brodner, A.J.; Bistline, J.E.; Weber, S.E.

    1982-10-01

    The hydraulics and the mass-transfer behavior of a five-tray, single-bubble-cap, single-downcomer, gas-liquid contactor were studied for use as a gas scrubber. Flooding was not observed at the maximum available liquid and gas flow rates of 0.32 and 464 L/min, respectively. The maximum liquid entrainment was 33% at a gross liquid flow rate of 0.05 L/min. The Murphree-tray efficiencies for absorption of CO/sub 2/ (5000 ppM in air) into demineralized water ranged from 0.14 to 0.74 for volumetric liquid-to-gas ratios of 4 x 10/sup -4/ and 2 x 10/sup -4/, respectively, for k/sub L/a values ranging from 0.088 to 0.36 min/sup -1/. 12 figures, 10 tables.

  18. USDOE Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project: Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark}. Final report: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Final Report provides available design, operational, and maintenance information, and marketing plans, on the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} demonstration Project at the Dragon Products company`s cement plant at Thomaston, Maine. In addition, data on pollutant removal efficiencies and system economics are reviewed. The Recovery Scrubber was developed to simultaneously address the emission of acid gas pollutants and the disposal of alkaline solid waste at a cement plant. The process, however, has general application to other combustion processes including waste or fossil fuel fired boilers. Selected chemistry of the exhaust gas, (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), selected chemistry of the cement plant kiln baghouse dust catch (before and after treatment by the Recovery Scrubber), and Dragon cement plant economics are presented. current marketing efforts and potential markets for the Recovery Scrubber in several industries are discussed.

  19. ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION MECHANISM IN AQUEOUS FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field and laboratory study of the adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. (Adding adipic acid to limestone-based, SO2 wet scrubbers increases SO2 removal and limestone utilization. However, as much as 80% ...

  20. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second year, fourth quarterly technical progress report, Quarter No. 8, June 1, 1995--August 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-09-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{sm_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}O), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silica, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This project is studying the use of minimal-reagent froth flotation as the purification process, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product.

  1. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Fourth year, first quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1996--December 31, 1996 (Quarter No. 13)

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1996-12-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{circ}0.5H{sub 2}O), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{circ}2H{sub 2}O), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH)2), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silicates, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This project is studying the use of minimal-reagent froth flotation as the purification process, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product.

  2. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Third year, second quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996 (Quarter {number_sign}10)

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This project is studying the use of minimal-reagent froth flotation as the purification process, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product. In the current quarter, research was focused on two different areas. The first part of this quarter the optimization of the feed slurry percent solids for the two inch water-only cyclone was completed. The optimization of the vortex finder, spigot diameter and inlet feed pressure was completed in the previous quarter. The second part of this quarter began the investigation of why water-only cycloning helps froth flotation performance. The hypothesis is that water-only cycloning scrubs the surface of the unreacted limestone. This scrubbing effect provides a clean calcium carbonate surface, which results in better flotation reagent adsorption. This study used the scanning electron microscope to investigate the surface of the unreacted limestone particles.

  3. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Third year, first quarterly technical progress report Quarter No. 9, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1995-12-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silicates, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather than landfilling them. This project is studying the use of minimal-reagent froth flotation as the purification process, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product.

  4. Salt extraction from hydrogen-sulfide scrubber solution using electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Kennedy, M.W.; McManus, D.; Nazarko, T.W.

    1995-05-01

    The buildup of undesirable sulfur compounds (sulfates and thiosulfates) reduces the scrubbing effectiveness of the LO-CAT I autocirculation sulfur recovery process from acid-gas stream. Among various processes, withdrawing and disposing of a portion of the scrubber solution and replacing this blowdown with fresh solution have been the practice in the industry. The application of the electrodialysis system to recycle the blowdown is presented. Experiments were carried out using electrodialysis to separate salts (sulfates and thiosulfates) from the LO-CAT I autocirculation scrubber solution containing organic chelating agents, iron, and various alkali-metal inorganic salts. The results indicated that the electrodialysis was successful in removing 50% of the salts from the scrubber solution with less than 8% loss of organic and 8% loss of carbonates. The fluxes of the undesired salt species were high even at low current densities (200 to 400 A/m{sup 2}).

  5. ENERGY UTILIZATION BY WET SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental bench-scale investigation of the comparative performance of particulate scrubbers that draw contacting power for gas/liquid contacting from the gas stream and from the liquid stream. The three synthetic polydisperse test aerosols used h...

  6. Removal of black carbon particles from experimental flue gas by surfactant solution in a new type of umbrella plate scrubber.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pei; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Zhao, Yapei; Zhan, Qi; Song, Jingke; Fan, Xiaopeng

    2013-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles were removed from experimental flue gas by the surfactant solutions of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether-9 (AEO-9) and polyoxy ethrlene nonyl phinyl ether-10 (TX-10), as well as AEO-9-SDBS, AEO-9-CTAB and SDBS-CTAB, in a new type of umbrella plate scrubber. Among the four independent surfactants, AEO-9 has the lowest surface tension, 35.9 mN/m, which resulted in the highest BC removal ratio among the alone surfactants. The experimental conditions were as follows: dust concentration = 3000 mg/m3; gas velocity = 14 m/s; liquid-gas ratio = 0.80 l/m3; and gas flow = 400 m3/h. When the mole ratio of the mixed surfactants was 1:1, the lowest surface tension could be detected among the studied mixed surfactants. According to the molecular interaction parameters (beta) and the mole ratio of surfactant 1 in the mixture (x1), the synergistic effects of AEO-9-SDBS and SDBS-CTAB solutions were obviously higher than those of AEO-9-TX-10 and AEO-9-CTAB. Therefore, AEO-9-SDBS solution had the lowest surface tension among the mixtures due to its beta < 0 and x1 = 0.85. The mixture solution of AEO-9-SDBS (1:1 mole ratio, 0.2 mmol/l) yielded the highest BC removal ratio, about 99.8%, and it was about 12% higher than that of only water, which was about 87.9%. The calculated critical micelle concentration was almost the same as that of the experimental concentration when the related equation was corrected by beta. PMID:23530320

  7. LIQUID ENTRAINMENT FROM A MOBILE BED SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement of liquid entrainment rate and drop size distribution in the exhaust gas stream from a mobile bed scrubber. The pilot plant scrubber was 46 cm square and was packed with 3.8 cm diameter hollow polyethylene spheres to a static depth of 25...

  8. SLUDGE OXIDATION IN LIMESTONE FGD SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental study of techniques suitable for forcing the oxidation of calcium sulfite (a throwaway product of flue gas desulfurization scrubbers now operating in the U.S.) to gypsum, over a range of scrubber operating conditions applicable to the u...

  9. Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, Jerry A.; Bosuego, Gail P.

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  10. Compliance testing of phosphoric acid anodizing line wet scrubber, metal bonding facility, Building 375, Kelly AFB, Texas. Final report, 5 January-10 January 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.A.

    1989-06-01

    At the request of HQ-SA-ALC/EM, personnel of the AFOEHL Air-Quality Function conducted source-emission testing of the exhaust from the phosphoric acid anodizing tank line, metal-bonding facility, Bldg 375, Kelly AFB TX. The survey was conducted to satisfy special conditions of Texas Air Control Board (TACB) Permit Exemption X-16361 which required determination of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, total chromium, and hexavalent chromium emissions from the wet scrubber control device on the anodizing-line exhaust system. TACB will analyze the emission results and make the final determination as to whether additional control is needed on the anodizing-line exhaust.

  11. Gas scrubbers used on pollution control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally-funded research on processes and equipment used in the removal of SO2, NOx, CO, CO2, organic compounds, and particulates. Design, performance, chemistry, and some of the gas flow characteristics for both stationary and mobile sources are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Gas scrubbers used on pollution control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally-funded research on processes and equipment used in the removal of SO2, NOx, CO, CO2, organic compounds, and particulates. Design, performance, chemistry, and some of the gas flow characteristics for both stationary and mobile sources are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Gas scrubbers used on pollution control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally-funded research on processes and equipment used in the removal of SO2, NOx, CO, CO2, organic compounds, and particulates. Design, performance, chemistry, and some of the gas flow characteristics for both stationary and mobile sources are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Experimental aspects of combined NOx and SO2 removal from flue-gas mixture in an integrated wet scrubber-electrochemical cell system.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara Pillai, K; Chung, Sang Joon; Raju, T; Moon, Il-Shik

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of some operating conditions on the simultaneous removal of NO(x) and SO2 from simulated NO-SO2-air flue-gas mixtures in a scrubber column. The gaseous components were absorbed into 6M HNO3 electrolyte in the scrubber in a counter-current mode, and were oxidatively removed by the Ag(II) mediator oxidant electrochemically generated in an electrochemical cell set-up. The integration of the electrochemical cell with the scrubber set-up ensured continuous regeneration of the Ag(II) mediator and its repeated reuse for NO(x) and SO2 removal purpose, thereby avoiding: (1) the usage of chemicals continuously for oxidation and (2) the production of secondary waste. The influences of packing material (raschig glass rings, raschig poly(vinylidene) fluoride rings, Jaeger tri-pack perfluoroalkoxy spheres), feed concentrations of NO and SO2 (100-400 ppm NO and 100-400 ppm SO2), superficial gas velocity (0.061-0.61ms(-1)) and liquid velocity (0.012-0.048 ms(-1)) were investigated. The raschig glass rings with high surface area provided highest NO removal efficiency. NO and NO(x) showed decreasing abatement at higher feed concentrations. The removal of nitrogen components was faster and also greater, when SO2 co-existed in the feed. Whereas the gas flow rate decreased the removal efficiency, the liquid flow rate increased it for NO and NOx. The flow rate effects were analyzed in terms of gas/liquid residence time and superficial liquid velocity/superficial gas velocity ratio. SO2 removal was total under all conditions. PMID:19500817

  15. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. First quarterly technical progress report, 1 September, 1993--30 November, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Shoop, K.

    1993-12-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. The vast majority of the sludge is simply landfilled, but with increasing landfilling costs this can cost the plant millions of dollars per year. Producing marketable materials from the sludge is a far more promising avenue, provided that the products can meet the necessary specifications at a reasonable cost. This project is investigating the surface properties of scrubber sludge, particularly of the calcium sulfite, since the surface chemistry of this material has never been studied in detail. Knowledge of these properties is critical for the development of a process that can produce a high-quality calcium sulfite or gypsum product while keeping process costs low enough that the material produced will be competitive with that from other, more conventional sources. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified gypsum or calcium sulfite product. The separated limestone will be a useful by-product, as it can be recycled to the scrubber, thus boosting the limestone utilization and improving process efficiency. Calcium sulfite will then be oxidized to gypsum, or separated as a salable product in its own right from sludges where it is present in sufficient quantity. The main product of the process will be either gypsum or calcium sulfite, depending on the characteristics of the sludge being processed. These products will be sufficiently pure to be easily marketed, rather than being landfilled.

  16. Confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards using a cleanup technology appropriate to small scale coal combustors. This to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber (CVS), which consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via vortex finder outlets, one at either end of the tube. Liquid is introduced into the chamber and is confined within the vortex chamber by the centrifugal force generated by the gas flow itself. This confined liquid forms a layer through which the flue gas is then forced to bubble, producing a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and efficient particulate cleanup. During this quarter a comprehensive series of cleanup experiments have been made for three CVS configurations. The first CVS configuration tested gave very efficient fine particulate removal at the design air mass flow rate (1 MM BUT/hr combustor exhaust flow), but had over 20{double prime}WC pressure drop. The first CVS configuration was then re-designed to produce the same very efficient particulate collection performance at a lower pressure drop. The current CVS configuration produces 99.4 percent cleanup of ultra-fine fly ash at the design air mass flow at a pressure drop of 12 {double prime}WC with a liquid/air flow ratio of 0.31/m{sup 3}. Unlike venturi scrubbers, the collection performance of the CVS is insensitive to dust loading and to liquid/air flow ratio.

  17. LIMESTONE SCRUBBER SLURRY AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report utilizes current understanding of limestone scrubbers for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to develop an effort into the optimization of automatic control for the recirculating slurry processes. The acknowledged methods of mathematical modeling, computer simulation, and ...

  18. SULFUR DIOXIDE OXIDATION IN SCRUBBER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report relates the liquid-phase oxidation kinetics of bisulfite and sulfite anions (determined in bench scale experiments) to conditions representative of limestone scrubbers used for flue gas desulfurization. The chemical reaction rates were determined for clear solutions an...

  19. Nitrogen tetroxide vapor scrubber using a recirculating liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisert, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Scrubbers required to reduce N2O4 contamination of nitrogen vent gas streams to a safe level to preclude health hazard to personnel and to preclude adverse environmental effects were developed. The scrubber principle involved is to absorb and neutralize the N2O4 component in a closed circuit circulating water/chemical solution in a vertical counter-flow, packed-tower configuration. The operational and performance test requirements for the scrubbers consist of demonstrating that the exit gas contamination level from the scrubbers does not exceed 150 ppm oxidizer under any flow conditions up to 400 scfm with inlet concentrations of up to 100,000 ppm oxidizer. Several problems were encountered during the performance testing that led to a series of investigations and supplementary testing. It was finally necessary to change the scrubber liquors in oxidizer scrubber to successfully achieve performance requirements. The scrubbers, the test configuration, and the various tests performed are described.

  20. TRACE METAL FATE IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH AN IONIZING WET SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. est ...

  1. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  2. Integration of a nonmetallic electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber for improved removal of particles and corrosive gas cleaning in semiconductor manufacturing industries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Yoa, Seok-Jun; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-08-01

    To remove particles in corrosive gases generated by semiconductor industries, we have developed a novel non-metallic, two-stage electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Carbon brush electrodes and grounded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) form the ionization stage, and polyvinyl chloride collection plates are used in the collection stage of the ESP The collection performance of the ESP downstream of a wet scrubber was evaluated with KC1, silica, and mist particles (0.01-10 pm), changing design and operation parameters such as the ESP length, voltage, and flow rate. A long-term and regeneration performance (12-hr) test was conducted at the maximum operation conditions of the scrubber and ESP and the performance was then demonstrated for 1 month with exhaust gases from wet scrubbers at the rooftop of a semiconductor manufacturing plant in Korea. The results showed that the electrical and collection performance of the ESP (16 channels, 400x400 mm2) was maintained with different grounded plate materials (stainless steel and CFRP) and different lengths of the ionization stage. The collection efficiency of the ESP at high air velocity was enhanced with increases in applied voltages and collection plate lengths. The ESP (16 channels with 100 mm length, 400x400 mm2x540 mm with a 10-mm gap) removed more than 90% of silica and mistparticles with 10 and 12 kV applied to the ESPat the air velocity of 2 m/s and liquid-to-gas ratio of 3.6 L/m3. Decreased performance after 13 hours ofcontinuous operation was recovered to the initial performance level by 5 min of water washing. Moreover during the 1-month operation at the demonstration site, the ESP showed average collection efficiencies of 97% based on particle number and 92% based on total particle mass, which were achieved with a much smaller specific corona power of 0.28 W/m3/hr compared with conventional ESPs. PMID:22916438

  3. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994 (Quarter No. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1994-03-01

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{lg_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}0), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{lg_bullet}2H{sub 2}0), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides; silica; and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. Currently, the only market for scrubber sludge is for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. This project is developing a process that can produce a high-quality calcium sulfite or gypsum product while keeping process costs low enough that the material produced will be competitive with that from other, more conventional sources. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified gypsum or calcium sulfite product. The separated limestone will be a useful by-product, as it can be recycled to the scrubber, thus boosting the limestone utilization and improving process efficiency. Calcium sulfite will then be oxidized to gypsum, or separated as a salable product in its own right from sludges where it is present in sufficient quantity. The main product of the process will be either gypsum or calcium sulfite, depending on the characteristics of the sludge being processed. These products will be sufficiently pure to be easily marketed, rather that being landfilled.

  4. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOEpatents

    Amrhein, Gerald T.

    2001-01-01

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  5. Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, K.; Gonzalez, E.; Zhou, C.Q.; Livengood, C.D.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1999-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury emissions from coal fired power plants, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has designed a flue gas simulation system to study the removal of elemental mercury. The simulated flue gas enters the system and combines with the inlet mercury vapor (from a calibrated permeation tube), carried by nitrogen gas. This combined gas continues past the flow meter and the pressure gage to the reactor inlet. Inside the reactor chamber, the flue gas is sprayed with NOXSORB{reg_sign} a chloric acid solution, which reacts with elemental mercury. The amount of reaction (oxidation) of elemental mercury is important since mercury in an oxidized form is highly soluble. In this form the Hg can be picked up downstream by a wet scrubber. Experiments on mercury removal from flue gases have been conducted at ANL, with the participation of a senior design team from Purdue University Calumet. A literature survey on the current and proposed mercury control legislation, along with the existing control technologies has been performed as part of the senior design project. The experimental results obtained at Argonne will be related to existing wet scrubber technology to determine the economic feasibility of mercury removal. A cost per pound of mercury analysis will be utilized.

  6. Low pressure drop wet scrubbers save energy and improve efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, M.L.; Phillips, N.D. )

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of wet scrubber design has responded to the need for increased efficiency without the traditional penalty of increased horsepower. This is accomplished by liquid power (ejector venturi) or a combination of gas power and air power (air atomized scrubber). For existing installations, a retrofit payback of 1-1/2 years or less is achievable. For new installations requiring a wet scrubber, an immediate realization of savings is possible.

  7. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  8. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  9. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary; Hilliard, Marcus

    2011-05-10

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  10. Rubber lining for FGD scrubbers for waste incinerator plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rullmann, H.E.

    1999-11-01

    Flue gas desulfurization scrubbers for waste incineration plants can be lined with soft rubber or hard rubber for corrosion protection. Hard rubber is cured under high temperature and pressure in an autoclave. The advantage of hard rubber is the excellent temperature and chemical resistance. The authors have experience with hard rubber lined scrubbers that are in service without failures for over 20 years.

  11. FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A SINGLE-STAGE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER - VOLUME II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. ...

  12. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  13. Wet Scrubber System Study. Volume I. Scrubber Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Seymour; And Others

    This handbook brings together previously scattered materials and clarifies their applicability to scrubber technology. The various aspects of scrubber use and present engineering design methods are reviewed, and actual experience on hundreds of scrubber installations in various industries is presented in a condensed form. Many related topics such…

  14. TRW CHARGED DROPLET SCRUBBER CORROSION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of corrosion studies to provide definitive data concerning the corrosive nature of coke-oven waste-heat flue gas and its effects on wet electrostatic precipitators, and specifically on TRW's Charged Droplet Scrubber (CDS). The study characterized the chem...

  15. MOBILE BED FLUX FORCE/CONDENSATION SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental determination of fine particle collection in mobile bed scrubbers. Particle collection efficiency increased greatly as the gas-phase pressure drop increased. With no water vapor condensation, the performance capability of a mobile bed s...

  16. A new era in scrubber technology beckons

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This article examines process technology and business arrangements necessary for third-party ownership and operation of advanced SO[sub 2] absorption technology at a utility power plant. The topics include advanced flue gas desulfurization design, waste product utilization, funding through the Clean Coal Technology program, spare capacity, and scrubber wastewater treatment.

  17. WET AND DRY SCRUBBERS FOR EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generally speaking, absorption equipment includes two major categories: Wet adsorption scrubbers (or wet scrubbers); Dry absorption scrubbers (or dry scrubbers).
    Wet scrubbers: As the name implies, wet scrubbers (also known as wet collectors) are devices which use a liquid fo...

  18. Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, E.; Livengood, C. D.; Martin, K.; Mendelsohn, M. H.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-05-19

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has designed a flue gas simulation system to study the removal of elemental mercury. The simulated flue gas enters the system and combines with the inlet mercury vapor (from a calibrated permeation tube), carried by nitrogen gas. This combined gas continues past the flow meter and the pressure gage to the reactor inlet. Inside the reactor chamber, the flue gas is sprayed with NOXSORB{reg_sign}, a chloric acid solution, which reacts with elemental mercury. The amount of reaction (oxidation) of elemental mercury is important since mercury in an oxidized form is highly soluble, In this form, the Hg can be picked up downstream by a wet scrubber from fossil-fuel burning utilities. Experiments on mercury removal from flue gases have been conducted at ANL, with the participation of a senior design team from Purdue University Calumet. Temperature variations ranging from room temperature to 350 F have been studied. Other parameters, such as the concentration of NOXSORB{reg_sign}, were also tested. Furthermore, pump speed and sprayer droplet sizes of the NOXSORB{reg_sign} solution were studied. A literature survey on the current and proposed mercury control legislation, along with the existing control technologies, has been performed as part of the senior design project. With guidance from ANL, an understanding of the simulation system has been developed. This information has been used to determine the mass transfer. Another literature survey was performed on the reaction kinetics of mercury. The information obtained was

  19. VENTURI SCRUBBER PERFORMANCE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a new model for predicting the particle collection performance of venturi scrubbers. It assumes that particles are collected by atomized liquid only in the throat section. The particle collection mechanism is inertial impaction, and the model uses a single drop...

  20. 4. View of the NE side primary scrubbers with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of the NE side primary scrubbers with the collector main alongside the mezzanine platform; looking NW. (Ryan) - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  1. Confined Vortex Scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards. This is to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber. This is the first quarterly technical progress report under this contract. Accordingly, a summary of the cleanup concept and the structure of the program is given here.

  2. FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A SINGLE-STAGE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL RESULTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. ...

  3. THE FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A SINGLE-STAGE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER - VOLUME II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. ...

  4. FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A SINGLE-STAGE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER - VOLUME I: TECHNICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. ...

  5. Impact of water sprays on scrubber ventilation effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Volkwein, J.C.; Wellman, T.S.

    1989-01-01

    The authors study the impact of a directional water spray system on a unique single-inlet dust scrubber on a low-profile mining machine. Tests were conducted in a full-scale model mine using a continuous mining machine. Tracer gas was introduced at the face and concentrations of the tracer gas were monitored at the face and in the return. Various parameters tested included mining position, depth of cut, brattice setback, and combinations of scrubber, and directional or symmetrical sprays. Results presented indicate that either water spray configuration improved the ventilation effectiveness of the scrubber by a factor of 2 to 3. Average face ventilation effectiveness (FVE) values for all testing of the scrubber and directional sprays were 0.95, versus 0.37 for a standard 20-ft blowing curtain without sprays. No FVE values were less than the standard 20-ft blowing results.

  6. Update: what's that scrubber going to cost?

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.W.

    2009-03-15

    Power published a summary of the flue gas desulfurization system scrubber cost survey conducted by the EUCG's Fossil Productivity Committee in the July 2007 issue. Although the detailed results of the latest survey are proprietary to EUCG members that participated in it, the paper presents the newest summary data. The bottom line is costs continue to rise but appear to be more predictable. 7 figs.

  7. Multiple angle single stage scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlie, L.

    1982-02-02

    A scrubber for cleansing flue gases is disclosed. The scrubber includes a housing which defines a channel. The channel includes a scrubber stage wherein vertically spaced rows of deflecting members of l-shaped cross-section are disposed. In a given row of deflecting members, a plurality of flow paths are defined between horizontally adjacent deflecting members. Each deflecting member has an upper arm and a lower arm. The lowermost edge of the lower arms of the deflecting members in one row are disposed between vertical projections from the uppermost edges of upper arms of deflecting members in a row below the last mentioned row.

  8. Selenium Partitioning and Removal Across a Wet FGD Scrubber at a Coal-Fired Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Senior, Constance L; Tyree, Corey A; Meeks, Noah D; Acharya, Chethan; McCain, Joseph D; Cushing, Kenneth M

    2015-12-15

    Selenium has unique fate and transport through a coal-fired power plant because of high vapor pressures of oxide (SeO2) in flue gas. This study was done at full-scale on a 900 MW coal-fired power plant with electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. The first objective was to quantify the partitioning of selenium between gas and condensed phases at the scrubber inlet and outlet. The second objective was to determine the effect of scrubber operation conditions (pH, mass transfer, SO2 removal) on Se removal in both particulate and vapor phases. During part of the testing, hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide) was injected upstream of the scrubber. Gas-phase selenium and particulate-bound selenium were measured as a function of particle size at the inlet and outlet of the scrubber. The total (both phases) removal of Se across the scrubber averaged 61%, and was enhanced when hydrated lime sorbent was injected. There was evidence of gas-to-particle conversion of selenium across the scrubber, based on the dependence of selenium concentration on particle diameter downstream of the scrubber and on thermodynamic calculations. PMID:26554426

  9. Nitrogen tetroxide scrubber data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, E. D.

    1978-01-01

    A major difficulty in the analysis of scrubber data is that of separating the physical effects, such as mass transfer, from the physico-chemical effects, such as reaction rates. This is especially true for the absorbtion of nitrogen tetroxide in the various liquids that were tested in the NASA-Kennedy Space Center Hypergolic Toxic Scrubber Program. A fruitful approach to correlating the data for outlet concentrations was to treat the overall absorbtion as a pseudo first-order absorbtion equation. This approach provided a method for normalizing the data to constant inlet concentration, constant sump liquor condition, and constant scrubbing time, and permitted evaluation of the test and fluid parameters that affected both absorbtion rate and scrubbing time. The analysis indicated that scrubber performance may be improved by optimizing liquor concentrations and liquor flowrate distributions.

  10. RECOVERY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE AND SULFUR FROM FGD SCRUBBER WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of key process steps in the proprietary Kel-S process for recovering calcium carbonate and sulfur from lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste. The steps are: reduction of the waste to calcium sulfide (using coal as...

  11. PREVENTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY REEMISSIONS FROM ILLINOIS COAL WET SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research conducted pilot plant tests to investigate techniques for controlling and reducing Hg0 re-emissions. A pilot-scale (0.01MW) wet scrubber was designed to simulate the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system. Hg0 re-emissions, manifested by...

  12. DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR AN OPTIMUM SCRUBBER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a review of the performance and operating experience of existing utility scrubber systems and the state-of-the-art in design of scrubber components. It also gives guidelines for the design of the optimum wet scrubber system, based on this review. The U...

  13. Numerical modelling of the memory effect in wet scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Löthgren, Carl-Johan; Andersson, Sven

    2008-08-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) can be absorbed in and desorbed from polypropylene (PP) tower packings in wet scrubbers utilized in waste incineration lines. This behaviour, also known as the memory effect, has been modelled using a gas phase-PP surface equilibrium and a numerical solid phase diffusion model describing the transport of PCDD/Fs inside the PP. The diffusivities and gas-PP partition coefficients of TCDD/F to HxCDD/Fs in PP have been estimated using the numerical model. Two incineration lines were modelled. In the first line, the absorption and desorption in PP test rods was followed before and after installation of a fabric filter that was placed before a wet scrubber. In the second incineration line, the accumulation of PCDD/Fs in a wet scrubber during start up periods and the subsequent decline during the following three months was modelled and compared to continuous two-week gas measurements after the scrubber. The obtained diffusivities in PP range from 10(-13) m(2)/s for TCDD to 10(-16) m(2)/s for HxCDD. Lower chlorinated homologues with a distinctive change in concentrations during the desorption period (e.g. TCDF) are easier to model, and show the best agreement between the two incineration lines. PMID:18457859

  14. Disposal of hypergolic propellants. Phase 6, task 1: The cryogenic scrubber prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J.; Sivik, H. E.; Folger, E.; Spearman, E.

    1976-01-01

    A cryogenic scrubber prototype (CSP) was evaluated as a means of removing monomethylhydrazine (MMH) vapor and dinitrogen textroxide (NTO) vapor from nitrogen or helium vent gas stream. The concept, laboratory data, design, construction and experimentation are discussed.

  15. ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF RECYCLE SO2-LIME SLURRY IN TCA (TURBULENT CONTACT ABSORBER) SCRUBBER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of flue gas desulfurization by a turbulent contact absorber (TCA) employing lime slurry, including the development of performance equations for the scrubber-hold tank recycle system. Performance characteristics investigated include pressure...

  16. Design procedure for sizing a submerged-bed scrubber for airborne particulate removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ruecker, C.M.; Scott, P.A.

    1987-04-01

    Performance correlations to design and operate the submerged bed scrubber were developed for various applications. Structural design procedure outlined in this report focuses on off-gas scrubbing for HLW vitrification applications; however, the method is appropriate for other applications.

  17. The study of modified calcium hydroxides with surfactants for acid gas removal during incineration.

    PubMed

    Tseng, H H; Wey, M Y; Lu, C Y

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to use additives to extend the sulfation reaction of the calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) used to control SO2 emission from incineration processes. There are two reasons for adding surfactants (surface-active agent): (1) to provide an appropriate dispersion of the Ca(OH)2', thus preventing particle agglomeration due to humidity; (2) to alter the sulfation reaction environment by adsorbing heterogeneous materials on the surface of the Ca(OH)2 to extend the adsorption equilibrium. A dry scrubber integrated with a fabric filter was employed to study the effect of surfactants on the removal efficiency of acid gas in the flue gas with Ca(OH)2 as the sorbent. The operating parameters evaluated include: (1) the different surfactants (calcium lignosulfonate, sodium lignosulfonate, alkyl naphthalene sodium sulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates) and (2) the composition of acid gas (i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NO) and hydrogen chloride (HCl)). The results show that modified Ca(OH)2 with surfactants could effectively decrease the emission of acid gas during incineration. Different additives had individual absorption efficiencies on different acid gases. On the whole, sodium lignosulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates had better sorption capacity for SO2 and NO, but not for HCl. In addition, when SO2 coexisted with NO and HCl, the concentration of NO and HCl will result in decrease or increase of the removal efficiency of SO2. PMID:11924579

  18. (Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber trademark , March 1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-03

    The Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} has been built and is being demonstrated on-line at the Dragon Products Plant in Thomaston, Maine. This Innovative Clean Coal Technology is using waste cement kiln dust (CKD) to scrub sulfur dioxide, some NO{sub x}, as well as a small amount of carbon dioxide from a coal burning kiln exhaust flue gas. The process also enables the cement plant to reuse the treated CKD, eliminating the need to landfill this material. Potassium, the offending contaminant in the CKD, is extracted in a useful form, potassium sulfate, which is used as a fertilizer. These useful products generate income from operation of this Recovery Scrubber. System start-up was begun in late December of 1990. At that time, several mechanical problems were encountered. These relatively minor problems were resolved enabling Phase III to begin on August 20, 1991. While inefficiencies are still being worked out, major program objectives are being met. Resolution of remaining operability problems is well in hand and should not hamper attainment of all project goals.

  19. Fluid placement of fixated scrubber sludge to reduce surface subsidence and to abate acid mine drainage in abandoned underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Meiers, R.J.; Golden, D.; Gray, R.; Yu, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL) began researching the use of fluid placement techniques of the fixated scrubber sludge (FSS) to reduce surface subsidence from underground coal mines to develop an economic alternative to low strength concrete grout. Abandoned underground coal mines surround property adjacent to IPL`s coal combustion by-product (CCBP) landfill at the Petersburg Generating Station. Landfill expansion into these areas is in question because of the high potential for sinkhole subsidence to develop. Sinkholes manifesting at the surface would put the integrity of a liner or runoff pond containment structure for a CCBP disposal facility at risk. The fluid placement techniques of the FSS as a subsidence abatement technology was demonstrated during an eight week period in September, October, and November 1994 at the Petersburg Generating Station. The success of this technology will be determined by the percentage of the mine void filled, strength of the FSS placed, and the overall effects on the hydrogeologic environment. The complete report for this project will be finalized in early 1996.

  20. Task 2.8 -- Mercury speciation and capture in scrubber solutions. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, S.R.

    1997-08-01

    Investigations into mercury control across conventional scrubber systems have precipitated questions concerning (1) the initial speciation between oxidized and elemental forms of mercury in flue gas from coal-fired boilers and, subsequently, (2) the effects of scrubber slurry composition and pH on the mercury forms. Mercury capture in scrubber slurry is highly dependent on its form. Oxidized mercury is highly water-soluble and can be removed by scrubber slurry, whereas elemental mercury is not and passes through the scrubber to the stack. The objectives of this project are to determine whether scrubber solutions convert either form of mercury to another and whether mercury capture is affected by pH.

  1. MEASURED FINE PARTICLE COLLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR NOVEL SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of performance tests to determine the fine particle collection of four novel scrubbers: a Lone Star Steel Steam-Hydro Scrubber, an Aronetics (Chemico) Two-Phase Jet Scrubber, an Entoleter Centrifield Scrubber, and a CEA Variable-Throat Venturi Scrubber. T...

  2. Oxidation chemistry of chloric acid in NOx/SOx and air toxic metal removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczur, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Chloric acid, HClO{sub 3}, is a new oxidizer which has recently been shown to be an effective agent in the simultaneous removal of NOx and/or SOx from combustion flue gases and various chemical processes, including nitrations and metal pickling. Aqueous chloric acid readily reacts with NO and SO{sub 2} even in dilute solutions at ambient temperatures. Chlorine dioxide, ClO{sub 2}, is formed as a chemical intermediate in the solution phase oxidation reactions. The oxidation by-products of NO include NO{sub 2} and nitric acid. The ClO{sub 2} generated from the solution phase reactions also participates in gas phase oxidation reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}. The combined solution phase and fast gas phase reaction chemistries provide the means for creating a new type of high performance NOx/SOx removal process. Wet scrubber based pilot plant tests have demonstrated up to 99% removal of NO. Additional recent research work has shown that chloric acid is an effective reagent for the removal of air toxic metals, such as elemental mercury, which are present in the waste gas output streams from incinerators, hydrogen from mercury cell chlor-alkali plants, and flue gases of coal-fired power plants. Work in this area is being conducted by Argonne National Laboratories and Olin. This paper discusses the oxidation chemistry of chloric acid and its unique solution and gas phase reactions with NO, SO{sub 2}, and air toxics in wet scrubber type process equipment. 32 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Removal of acid gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a method for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a stream of a treating agent consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of N-methyldiethanolamine and imidazole or a methyl substituted imidazole to thereby remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified gas stream from the absorption zone, discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone; and subsequently regenerating the enriched treating agent.

  4. Impact of water sprays on scrubber-ventilation effectiveness. Report of Investigations/1989

    SciTech Connect

    Volkwein, J.C.; Wellman, T.S.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a study to assess the impact of a directional water-spray system on a unique single-inlet dust scrubber on a low-profile mining machine. Tests were conducted in a full-scale model mine using a continuous-mining machine. Tracer gas was introduced at the face and concentrations of the tracer gas were monitored at the face and in the return. Various parameters tested included mining position, depth of cut, brattice setback, and combinations of scrubber, and directional or symmetrical sprays. Results indicated that either water-spray configuration improved the ventilation effectiveness of the scrubber by a factor of 2 to 3. Average face ventilation effectiveness (FVE) values for all testing of the scrubber and directional sprays were 0.95, versus 0.37 for a standard 20-ft blowing curtain without sprays. No FVE values were less than the standard 20-ft blowing results.

  5. CEA VARIABLE-THROAT VENTURI SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives detailed results of fractional and overall mass efficiency tests of a Combustion Equipment Associates(CEA) variable-throat venturi scrubber. The tests were performed on a full-scale scrubber used for controlling particles and SOx emissions from a pulverized-coal-...

  6. Water-powered scrubber aids ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Page, S.J.; Hughes, B.; Monroe, S.

    1984-12-01

    The paper reports work carried out under contract for the US Bureau of Mines on water-powered scrubbers built into a Marietta drum miner. The effectiveness of the scrubbers in reducing dust is illustrated. The advantages of the system are described and these include the promotion of airflow and the simultaneous scrubbing of the air. Some disadvantages are noted.

  7. Hypergolic oxidizer and fuel scrubber emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Barile, Ronald G.; Curran, Dan; Hodge, Tim; Lueck, Dale E.; Young, Rebecca C.

    1995-01-01

    Hypergolic fuels and oxidizer are emitted to the environment during fueling and deservicing shuttle and other spacecraft. Such emissions are difficult to measure due to the intermittent purge flow and to the presence of suspended scrubber liquor. A new method for emissions monitoring was introduced in a previous paper. This paper is a summary of the results of a one-year study of shuttle launch pads and orbiter processing facilities (OPF's) which proved that emissions can be determined from field scrubbers without direct measurement of vent flow rate and hypergol concentration. This new approach is based on the scrubber efficiency, which was measured during normal operations, and on the accumulated weight of hypergol captured in the scrubber liquor, which is part of the routine monitoring data of scrubber liquors. To validate this concept, three qualification tests were performed, logs were prepared for each of 16 hypergol scrubbers at KSC, the efficiencies of KSC scrubbers were measured during normal operations, and an estimate of the annual emissions was made based on the efficiencies and the propellant buildup data. The results have confirmed that the emissions from the KSC scrubbers can be monitored by measuring the buildup of hypergol propellant in the liquor, and then using the appropriate efficiency to calculate the emissions. There was good agreement between the calculated emissions based on outlet concentration and flow rate, and the emissions calculated from the propellant buildup and efficiency. The efficiencies of 12 KSC scrubbers, measured under actual servicing operations and special test conditions, were assumed to be valid for all subsequent operations until a significant change in hardware occurred. An estimate of the total emissions from 16 scrubbers for three years showed that 0.3 kg/yr of fuel and 234 kg/yr of oxidizer were emitted.

  8. Trace metal fate in a rotary-kiln incinerator with an ionizing wet scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.; Fournier, D.J.; Lee, J.W.; Carroll, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from 816 to 927 C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner temperature, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous constituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead) and four nonhazardous constituent trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and strontium). The test results indicate that cadmium and bismuth were relatively volatile, with an average of less than 40 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Arsenic, barium, chromium, copper, lead, magnesium, and strontium were relatively nonvolatile, with an average of greater than 80 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Observed relative metal volatilities generally agreed with the volatilities predicted based on vapor pressure/temperature relationships, with the exception of arsenic which was much less volatile than predicted. The volatility of cadmium, bismuth, and lead increased as kiln temperature was increased; the discharge distributions of the remaining metals were not significantly affected by changes in kiln temperature. Apparent scrubber collection efficiencies for the metals averaged 22 to 71 percent, and were generally higher for the less volatile metals. The overall average metal collection efficiency was 43 percent.

  9. Venturi/vortex scrubber technology for controlling/recycling chromium electroplating emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, K.J.; Qi, S.; Holden, B.; Helgeson, N.; Fraser, M.E.

    1999-03-01

    Chromium electroplating is an essential DOD process. Chromium has a combination of qualities that are very difficult to substitute, however, the process itself is inefficient, resulting in the production of byproduct gases that rise and create a mist of chromic acid (strongly regulated as an air pollutant) above the plating tank. Venturi/Vortex Scrubber Technology (VVST) was designed to control chromium electroplating emissions by collecting the gas bubbles before they burst at the solution`s surface. This project demonstrated the Venturi/Vortex Scrubber Technology at the Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB) in Albany, GA. This study concluded that the PLRS was able to reduce the flow rate of the current conventional ventilation system at the one tank chromium electroplating facility at MCLB Albany by 63 percent. If new ventilation and control equipment were to be installed at MCLB Albany, this system would offer a 25 percent reduction in capital costs and a 48 percent reduction in annual costs, representing 36 percent in life-cycle cost savings. This study also presented a strong case for the use of Spark-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for monitoring real-time chromium emissions above a chromium electroplating tank.

  10. Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} at the Dragon Products, Inc. Cement Plant located in Thomaston, Maine. 1990 Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The background and process of the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} are described. The Scrubber was developed for Dragon Cement Plant in Thomaston, Maine and facilitates a number of process improvements. The exhaust gas is scrubbed of SO{sub 2} with better than 90% efficiency. The kiln dust is cleaned of alkalines and so can be returned to kiln feed instead of dumped to landfill. Potassium sulfate in commercial quantity and purity can be recovered. Distilled water is recovered which also has commercial potential. Thus, various benefits are accrued and no waste streams remain for disposal. The process is applicable to both wet and dry process cement kilns and appears to have potential in any industry which generates acidic gaseous exhausts and/or basic solid or liquid wastes.

  11. Destruction of acid gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Fu, Yuan C.; Ekmann, J.M.; Boyle, J.M.

    1990-12-31

    A method of destroying NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in a combustion gas is disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable molecules in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combustion of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH{sub 2}, OH, CH and/or CH{sub 2}. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475--950{degrees}C. 1 fig.

  12. Destruction of acid gas emissions

    DOEpatents

    Mathur, Mahendra P.; Fu, Yuan C.; Ekmann, James M.; Boyle, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of destroying NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 in a combustion gas in disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable moleucles in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combination of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH.sub.2, OH.sup.-, CH and/or CH.sub.2. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475.degree.-950.degree. C.

  13. Ultimate disposal of scrubber wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohenour, B. C.

    1978-01-01

    Part of the initial concern with using the wet scrubbers on the hypergolic propellants was the subsequential disposal of the liquid wastes. To do this, consideration was given to all possible methods to reduce the volume of the wastes and stay within the guidelines established by the state and federal environmental protection agencies. One method that was proposed was the use of water hyacinths in disposal ponds to reduce the waste concentration in the effluent to less than EPA tolerable levels. This method was under consideration and even in use by private industry, municipal governments, and NASA for upgrading existing wastewater treatment facilities to a tertiary system. The use of water hyacinths in disposal ponds appears to be a very cost-effective method for reduction and disposal of hypergolic propellants.

  14. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  15. Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vivak Malhotra

    2010-01-31

    According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

  16. Retrofitting existing chemical scrubbers to biotrickling filters for H2S emission control

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, David; Deshusses, Marc A.

    2003-01-01

    Biological treatment is a promising alternative to conventional air-pollution control methods, but thus far biotreatment processes for odor control have always required much larger reactor volumes than chemical scrubbers. We converted an existing full-scale chemical scrubber to a biological trickling filter and showed that effective treatment of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the converted scrubber was possible even at gas contact times as low as 1.6 s. That is 8–20 times shorter than previous biotrickling filtration reports and comparable to usual contact times in chemical scrubbers. Significant removal of reduced sulfur compounds, ammonia, and volatile organic compounds present in traces in the air was also observed. Continuous operation for >8 months showed stable performance and robust behavior for H2S treatment, with pollutant-removal performance comparable to that achieved by using a chemical scrubber. Our study demonstrates that biotrickling filters can replace chemical scrubbers and be a safer, more economical technique for odor control. PMID:12740445

  17. Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vivak M. Malhotra

    2006-09-30

    Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

  18. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Shoop, K.

    1994-06-01

    Column flotation represents a significant improvement over conventional flotation for many applications. This improvement consists of increased selectivity between hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles, which allows the column to produce higher-purity products. A schematic of the column used is given in Figure 1. The basic procedure for the flotation column experiments was as follows: 500 grams of the sludge from Plant A (prepared as described in the Second Quarterly Report) was suspended at 40% solids in distilled water, to produce 1600 ml of slurry. Reagents were added, and the slurry was agitated vigorously for 1 minute. Frother was added to all of the water to be added to the column, at a rate of 0.03 grams/liter (approximately 0.4 kilograms per metric ton, Kg/mt). The frother used was Dowfroth 200 (a mixture of polypropylene glycol methyl ethers, with a mean molecular weight of 200). The column was started, all of the water flowrates were set as desired, and the drain valve was closed. As soon as the water level had reached the base of the feed inlet tube (approximately 1 minute after closing the drain valve), the 1600 ml feed slurry was added over a 15 second interval. This allowed the feed to be added to the column with a minimum of disturbance to the froth layer, and without causing either surging of the pulp level or large losses to the sinks product. Flotation was carried out for 9 minutes after closing the drain valve. Froth and sinks products were collected, filtered, dried at 45{degrees}C, weighed, and analyzed by thermogravimetic analysis. It is readily seen that, when no collector is added, the column produces a product that is markedly higher purity than that produced by conventional flotation. The addition of oleic acid collector to the column feed is not able to produce any further improvement in product quality, and only results in a loss of product recovery.

  19. Pilot Plant Testing of Elemental Mercury Reemission from a Wet Scrubber (2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the recent observations of elemental mercury (HgO) reemissions from a pilot-scale limestone wet scrubber. Simulated flue gas was generated by burning natural gas in a down-fired furnace and doped with 2000 ppm of sulfur dioxide (S02). Mercuric chloride (HgCl2...

  20. Machine-mounted scrubber helps ventilate face

    SciTech Connect

    Volkwein, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    The authors describe work carried out under contract for US Bureau of Mines on a machine-mounted scrubber system for ventilating the face during an extended advance. Underground tests showed that a suitable scrubber system can adequately ventilate the face at brattice setbacks up to 15m. Face methane levels were effectively controlled at large setbacks, but respirable dust levels increased by as much as 33% at the operator's cab at setbacks greater than 7.5m.

  1. High efficiency, low cost scrubber upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Klingspor, J.S.; Walters, M.

    1998-07-01

    ABB introduced the LS-2 technology; a limestone based wet FGD system, which is capable of producing high purity gypsum from low grade limestone, in late 1995. Drawing from 30,000 MWe of worldwide wet FGD experience, ABB has incorporated several innovations in the new system designed to reduce the overall cost of SO{sub 2} compliance. Collectively, these improvements are referred to as LS-2. The improvements include a compact high efficiency absorber, a simple dry grinding system, a closed coupled flue gas reheat system, and a tightly integrated dewatering system. The compact absorber includes features such a high velocity spray zone, significantly improved gas-liquid contact system, compact reaction tank, and a high velocity mist eliminator. The LS-2 system is being demonstrated at Ohio Edison's Niles Plant at the 130 MWe level, and this turnkey installation was designed and erected in a 20-month period. At Niles, all of the gypsum is sold to a local wallboard manufacturer. Many of the features included in the LS-2 design and demonstrated at Niles can be used to improve the efficiency and operation of existing systems including open spray towers and tray towers. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency can be significantly improved by installing the high efficiency LS-2 style spray header design and the unique wall rings. The absorber bypass can be eliminated or reduced by including the LS-2 style high velocity mist eliminator. Also, the LS-2 style spray header design combined with wall rings allow for an increase in absorber gas velocity at a maintained or improved performance without the need for costly upgrades of the absorber recycle pumps. the first upgrade using LS-2 technology was done at CPA's Coal Creek Station (2{times}545 MWe). The experience form the scrubber upgrade at Coal Creek is discussed along with operating results.

  2. COAL GASIFICATION/GAS CLEANUP TEST FACILITY: VOLUME I. DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an integrated fluidized-bed coal gasification reactor and acid gas removal system. The gasifier operates at 100 psig at up to 2000 F, and has a coal feed capacity of 50 lb/hr. The gas cleaning system contains a cyclone, a venturi scrubber, and an absorber/fla...

  3. The gas-phase acidity of nitrocyclopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmess, John E.; Wilson, Burton; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Bloor, John E.

    1992-09-01

    Nitrocyclopropane is 10.5 kcal mol-1 weaker as an acid in the gas phase than its open-chain analog, 2-nitropropane. This is attributed to the conflicting hybridization requirements for carbanion stabilization by the cyclopropyl ring and by the nitro group. Based on reactivities, the deprotonated form does not ring-open to either the 2-nitroallyl anion or the 1-nitroallyl anion.

  4. Mineralization of gaseous acetaldehyde by electrochemically generated Co(III) in H2SO4 with wet scrubber combinatorial system.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Muthuraman; Chung, Sang-Joon; Moon, Il-Shik

    2012-06-11

    Electrochemically generated Co(III) mediated catalytic room temperature incineration of acetaldehyde, which is one of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), combined with wet scrubbing system was developed and investigated. Depending on the electrolyte's type, absorption come removal efficiency is varied. In presence of electrogenerated Co(III) in sulfuric acid, acetaldehyde was mineralized to CO2 and not like only absorption in pure sulfuric acid. The Co(III) mediated catalytic incineration led to oxidative absorption and elimination to CO2, which was evidenced with titration, CO2, and cyclic voltammetric analyses. Experimental conditions, such as current density, concentration of mediator, and gas molar flow rate were optimized. By the optimization of the experimental conditions, the complete mineralization of acetaldehyde was realized at a room temperature using electrochemically generated Co(III) with wet scrubber combinatorial system. PMID:22551057

  5. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  6. Air scrubber for organic solvent removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hawes, P.B.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes an air scrubber. It comprises: a closed air loop; a cabinet within the air loop; a layer of permeable growth medium near the bottom of the cabinet containing aerobic microorganisms and plants; means for maintaining a portion of the growth medium submerged in water; an air space above the growth medium to accommodate the plants; and means for passing air upwardly through at least a portion of the submerged growth medium. An air scrubber as recited in claim 1 comprising a plurality of water outlets at differing elevations for adjusting the depth of water in the cabinet.

  7. The performance and operating mechanism of the ultrasonic scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J. R.; Ran, W.

    2014-11-01

    An ultrasonic standing wave field is commonly used to levitate drops, facilitating drop studies in several ways. In the typical use of such a standing wave field, drops are simply placed at the node of the field and thereby levitated. However, it is also true that any particles or drops located in the general vicinity of the nodes of an ultrasonic standing wave are drawn toward the nodes where they accrue. We have shown that this effect can be used to create an ``ultrasonic scrubber'', wherein the combination of a fine water mist and an ultrasonic standing wave field is used to remove particles (e.g. particulate pollutants) from a gas flow directed at the field (Ran, Saylor, & Holt, J. Aerosol Sci., 67, 104 (2014)). In this talk details are presented of the operating mechanism responsible for the success of this approach to scrubbing. The results of an experimental study are also presented showing the effect of the gas flow rate and droplet size distribution on the scavenging coefficient for one version of the ultrasonic scrubber. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Trace-metal fate in a rotary-kiln incinerator with an ionizing wet scrubber (journal article)

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.; Fournier, D.J.; Lee, J.W.; Carroll, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from 816 to 927 C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner temperature, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous constituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead) and four nonhazardous constituent trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and strontium). The test results indicate that cadmium and bismuth were relatively volatile, with an average of less than 40 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Arsenic, barium, chromium, copper, lead, magnesium, and strontium were relatively nonvolatile, with an average of greater than 80 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Observed relative metal volatilities generally agreed with the volatilities predicted based on vapor pressure/temperature relationships, with the exception of arsenic which was much less volatile than predicted. The volatility of cadmium, bismuth, and lead increased as kiln temperature was increased; the discharge distributions of the remaining metals were not significantly affected by changes in kiln temperature. Apparent scrubber collection efficiencies for the metals averaged 22 to 71 percent, and were generally higher for the less volatile metals. The overall average metal collection efficiency was 43 percent.

  9. MULTI-POLLUTANT WET SCRUBBER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Implementation of fine PM standards, EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule, and Clean Air Mercury Rule are leading to a focus on future reductions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and mercury emissions from power plants. Wet scrubber-based technologies are capable of pro...

  10. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives highlights of fine particle scrubber research performed by, or under the direction of, EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (IERL-RTP) at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The U.S. EPA has been actively involved in research and development in ...

  11. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  12. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  13. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Farthing, George A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  14. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  15. PERFORMANCE AND MODELING OF A HOT POTASSIUM CARBONATE ACID GAS REMOVAL SYSTEM IN TREATING COAL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the performance and modeling of a hot potassium carbonate (K2CO3) acid gas removal system (AGRS) in treating coal gas. Aqueous solutions of K2CO3, with and without amine additive, were used as the acid gas removal solvent in the Coal Gasification/Gas Cleaning...

  16. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  17. Safety measures during application of rubber linings in scrubber vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Brugghen, F.W. van der; Damen, A.C.M.

    1995-06-01

    Because of the presence of several kinds of inflammable material, flue gas treatment plants are prone to fire hazard during construction and maintenance work. Potential ignition sources are also present such as welding, grinding, heating and lighting. Once started, a fire will spread rapidly through the geometry of the installation. Several of these fires causing heavy damage have already occurred and are described shortly. A flue gas treatment plant is especially vulnerable during application of rubber lining. Very stringent safety and fire prevention measures have to be taken during such application. The measures taken during the renewal of the rubber lining in the scrubber vessel of Amer 8 power station of EPZ in Geertruidenberg (the Netherlands) are described. Furthermore, a short overview is given of the experience gained during this relining project.

  18. [Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark}, March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-03

    The Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} has been built and is being demonstrated on-line at the Dragon Products Plant in Thomaston, Maine. This Innovative Clean Coal Technology is using waste cement kiln dust (CKD) to scrub sulfur dioxide, some NO{sub x}, as well as a small amount of carbon dioxide from a coal burning kiln exhaust flue gas. The process also enables the cement plant to reuse the treated CKD, eliminating the need to landfill this material. Potassium, the offending contaminant in the CKD, is extracted in a useful form, potassium sulfate, which is used as a fertilizer. These useful products generate income from operation of this Recovery Scrubber. System start-up was begun in late December of 1990. At that time, several mechanical problems were encountered. These relatively minor problems were resolved enabling Phase III to begin on August 20, 1991. While inefficiencies are still being worked out, major program objectives are being met. Resolution of remaining operability problems is well in hand and should not hamper attainment of all project goals.

  19. Radon removal from flowing air by a water scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.; Denison, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    As part of a process that is being developed to vitrify tailings from Belgian Congo ore that is stored in large silos at a former U.S. Department of Energy uranium-processing facility in southwestern Ohio, process off-gas is produced that contains large concentrations of radon gas (on the order of hundreds of thousands of picocuries per litre). To meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency restrictions, the process off-gas must be stripped of its radon content before it is vented to the atmosphere. It is appropriate to consider a charcoal bed as part of an off-gas treatment system for the removal of radon at the vitrification facility. However, a difficulty arises in incorporating a charcoal bed into an off-gas treatment system at a vitrification facility. That difficulty is that the capability of the charcoal bed to capture and retain radon gas decreases with increasing bed temperature. Thus, it may be necessary to include a water scrubber in the off-gas treatment system to cool the process off-gas before it is passed through the charcoal bed.

  20. Development and evaluation of a full-scale spray scrubber for ammonia recovery and production of nitrogen fertilizer at poultry facilities.

    PubMed

    Hadlocon, Lara Jane S; Manuzon, Roderick B; Zhao, Lingying

    2015-01-01

    Significant ammonia emissions from animal facilities need to be controlled due to its negative impacts on human health and the environment. The use of acid spray scrubber is promising, as it simultaneously mitigates and recovers ammonia emission for fertilizer. Its low pressure drop contribution on axial fans makes it applicable on US farms. This study develops a full-scale acid spray scrubber to recover ammonia emissions from commercial poultry facilities and produce nitrogen fertilizer. The scrubber performance and economic feasibility were evaluated at a commercial poultry manure composting facility that released ammonia from exhaust fans with concentrations of 66-278 ppmv and total emission rate of 96,143 kg yr(-1). The scrubber consisted of 15 spray scrubber modules, each equipped with three full-cone nozzles that used dilute sulphuric acid as the medium. Each nozzle was operated at 0.59 MPa with a droplet size of 113 μm and liquid flow rate of 1.8 L min(-1). The scrubber was installed with a 1.3-m exhaust fan and field tested in four seasons. Results showed that the scrubber achieved high NH3 removal efficiencies (71-81%) and low pressure drop (<25 Pa). Estimated water and acid losses are 0.9 and 0.04 ml m(-3) air treated, respectively. Power consumption rate was between 89.48 and 107.48 kWh d(-1). The scrubber effluents containing 22-36% (m/v) ammonium sulphate are comparable to the commercial-grade nitrogen fertilizer. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the break-even time is one year. This study demonstrates that acid spray scrubbers can economically and effectively recover NH3 from animal facilities for fertilizer. PMID:25518983

  1. Hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas capture: a review.

    PubMed

    Mansourizadeh, A; Ismail, A F

    2009-11-15

    Membrane contactors using microporous membranes for acid gas removal have been extensively reviewed and discussed. The microporous membrane acts as a fixed interface between the gas and the liquid phase without dispersing one phase into another that offers a flexible modular and energy efficient device. The gas absorption process can offer a high selectivity and a high driving force for transport even at low concentrations. Using hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors is a promising alternative to conventional gas absorption systems for acid gas capture from gas streams. Important aspects of membrane contactor as an efficient energy devise for acid gas removal including liquid absorbents, membrane characteristics, combination of membrane and absorbent, mass transfer, membrane modules, model development, advantages and disadvantages were critically discussed. In addition, current status and future potential in research and development of gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas removal were also briefly discussed. PMID:19616376

  2. Assessment and optimisation of VOC mass transfer enhancement by advanced oxidation process in a compact wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Biard, Pierre-François; Couvert, Annabelle; Renner, Christophe; Levasseur, Jean-Pierre

    2009-09-01

    Dimethyl disulphide (DMDS) removal was investigated in a compact scrubber (hydraulic residence time approximately 20ms), composed of a wire mesh packing structure where liquid and gas flow at co-current and high gas superficial velocity (>12m s(-1)). In order to regenerate the scrubbing liquid and to maintain a driving force in the scrubber, ozone and hydrogen peroxide were added to water since they allow the generation of nonselective and highly reactive species, hydroxyl radicals HO(). Three ways of reagent distribution were tested. The influence of several parameters (liquid flow rate(s), ozone flow rate, pH and reagent concentrations) was investigated. The best configuration was obtained when ozone is transferred in the scrubbing liquid before introduction at the top of the scrubber simultaneously with the hydrogen peroxide solution, allowing to generate hydroxyl radical in the scrubber. With this configuration, DMDS removal could be increased from 16% with water to 34% at the same gas and liquid flow rates in the scrubber showing the potentiality of advanced oxidation process. PMID:19695665

  3. Examination of redirected continuous miner scrubber discharge configurations for exhaust face ventilation systems

    PubMed Central

    Organiscak, J.A.; Beck, T.W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) has recently studied several redirected scrubber discharge configurations in its full-scale continuous miner gallery for both dust and gas control when using an exhaust face ventilation system. Dust and gas measurements around the continuous mining machine in the laboratory showed that the conventional scrubber discharge directed outby the face with a 12.2-m (40-ft) exhaust curtain setback appeared to be one of the better configurations for controlling dust and gas. Redirecting all the air toward the face equally up both sides of the machine increased the dust and gas concentrations around the machine. When all of the air was redirected toward the face on the off-curtain side of the machine, gas accumulations tended to be reduced at the face, at the expense of increased dust levels in the return and on the curtain side of the mining machine. A 6.1-m (20-ft) exhaust curtain setback without the scrubber operating resulted in the lowest dust levels around the continuous mining machine, but this configuration resulted in some of the highest levels of dust in the return and gas on the off-curtain side of the mining face. Two field studies showed some similarities to the laboratory findings, with elevated dust levels at the rear corners of the continuous miner when all of the scrubber exhaust was redirected toward the face either up the off-tubing side or equally up both sides of the mining machine. PMID:26251566

  4. New process makes production of highly acid gas economical

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.F.; Vetere, A.

    1982-08-01

    Development of cryogenic processing combined with a new solvent for removing H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ from natural gas has significantly reduced the costs for plant equipment and the energy needed to run it. This results in much lower treatment costs per Mcf and makes natural gas containing as much as 80% acid gas profitable to produce.

  5. PROCESS GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY STUDY OF A SELEXOL ACID GAS REMOVAL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Se...

  6. A catalyst tackles odors in a single-stage scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, S.

    1995-05-01

    Chemical-oxidation systems are widely used to absorb and oxidize odorous organic compounds in industrial and municipal exhaust streams. By combining conventional chemical scrubbers with a proprietary catalytic treatment unit, ICI Katalco (Billingham, England) has produced a single-stage scrubber system that enhances removal efficiency during liquid-phase adsorption, and overcomes many of the process and cost disadvantages of a conventional scrubber. Organic vapors are absorbed by the sodium hypochlorite solution inside the single-column scrubber. The liquid leaving the tower is then passed through the fixed-bed Odorgard reactor, where absorbed organics are catalytically oxidized.

  7. Electrostatic control of acid mist emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R S; Brown, T D

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a two-phased study of the control of acid mist emissions using a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The goal of the study was to determine the degree of acid mist control that could be achieved when a compact WESP is used to replace or augment the mist eliminators in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Phase I of the study examined the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase II, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the model to project the performance of a retrofitted WESP.

  8. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccc of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccc of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a Scrubber liquor flow rate...

  15. High Temperature Life Testing of 80Ni-20Cr Wire in a Simulated Mars Atmosphere for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suit Gas Processing System (GPS) Carbon Dioxide Scrubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundersen, Cynthia; Hoffman, Christopher; Munoz, Bruno; Steohenson, Timothy; Thomas, Walter

    2008-01-01

    In support of the GPS for the SAM instrument suite built by GSFC, a life test facility was developed to test the suitability of 80Ni-20Cr wire, 0.0056 inches in diameter, for use as a heater element for the carbon dioxide scrubber. The wire would be required to operate at 1000 C in order to attain the 800 C required for regeneration of the getter. The wire also would need to operate in the Mars atmosphere, which consists mostly of CO2 at pressures between 4 and 12 torr. Data on the high temperature degradation mechanism of 80Ni-20Cr in low pressure CO2, together with the effects of thermal cycling, were unknown. In addition, the influence of work hardening of the wire during assembly and the potential for catastrophic grain growth also were unknown. Verification of the wire reliability as defined by the mission goals required the construction of a test facility that would accurately simulate the duty cycles in a simulated Mars atmosphere. The experimental set-up, along with the test protocol and results will be described.

  16. High Temperature Life Testing of 80Ni-20Cr Wire in a Simulated Mars Atmosphere for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite Gas Processing System (GPS) Carbon Dioxide Scrubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Christopher; Munoz, Bruno; Gundersen, Cynthia; Thomas, Walter, III; Stephenson, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    In support of the GPS for the SAM instrument suite built by NASA/GSFC, a life test facility was developed to test the suitability of 80Ni-20Cr alloy wire, 0.0142 cm diameter, for use as a heater element for the carbon dioxide scrubber. The element would be required to operate at 1000 C in order to attain the 800 C required for regeneration of the getter. The element also would need to operate in the Mars atmosphere, which consists mostly of CO2 at pressures between 4 and 12 torr. Data on the high temperature degradation mechanism of 80Ni- 20Cr in low pressure CO2, coupled with the effects of thermal cycling, were unknown. In addition, the influence of work hardening of the wire during assembly and the potential for catastrophic grain growth also were unknown. Verification of the element reliability as defined by the mission goals required the construction of a test facility that would accurately simulate the duty cycles in a simulated Mars atmosphere. The experimental set-up, along with the test protocol and results will be described.

  17. Treatment of gas streams for removal of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1987-09-29

    A method is described for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a treating agent to remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified hydrocarbon gas stream from the absorption zone, and discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone. The treating agent consists essentially of an aqueous solution of from about 40 to about 60 wt. % of N-methyldiethanolamine and from about 5 to about 15 wt. % of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine.

  18. AUGMENTATION OF FINE PARTICLE COLLECTION IN THE EPXP SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the A.P.T. electrostatically augmented particle by particle (EPxP) dry scrubber. It is analogous to a venturi scrubber except that it uses relatively large solid particles (instead of water drops) as collection centers for the fine particles...

  19. SPRAY CHARGING AND TRAPPING SCRUBBER FOR FUGITIVE PARTICLE EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental evaluation of the control of fugitive particle emissions (FPE) with a Spray Charging and Trapping (SCAT) Scrubber that uses an air curtain and/or jets to contain, convey, and divert the FPE into a charged spray scrubber. ...

  20. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: PERFORMANCE AND DESIGN MODEL FOR SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a capsule summary of the best available design models for wet scrubbers and their application to fine particulate control. Details of the models are reported in the Scrubber Handbook and other EPA publications listed in the bibliography. When EPA initiated its We...

  1. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  2. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WET SCRUBBERS UTILIZING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the key elements required to develop a sampling and analysis program for a wet scrubber using ion chromatography as the main analytical technique. The first part of the report describes a sampling program for two different types of wet scrubbers: the venturi/...

  3. Experimental investigation on the effect of liquid injection by multiple orifices in the formation of droplets in a Venturi scrubber.

    PubMed

    Guerra, V G; Gonçalves, J A S; Coury, J R

    2009-01-15

    Venturi scrubbers are widely utilized in gas cleaning. The cleansing elements in these scrubbers are droplets formed from the atomization of a liquid into a dust-laden gas. In industrial scrubbers, this liquid is injected through several orifices so that the cloud of droplets can be evenly distributed throughout the duct. The interaction between droplets when injected through many orifices, where opposite clouds of atomized liquid can reach each other, is to be expected. This work presents experimental measurements of droplet size measured in situ and the evidence of cloud interaction within a Venturi scrubber operating with multi-orifice jet injection. The influence of gas velocity, liquid flow rate and droplet size variation in the axial position after the point of the injection of the liquid were also evaluated for the different injection configurations. The experimental results showed that an increase in the liquid flow rate generated greater interaction between jets. The number of orifices had a significant influence on droplet size. In general, the increase in the velocity of the liquid jet and in the gas velocity favored the atomization process by reducing the size of the droplets. PMID:18462874

  4. IDENTIFICATION AND RESPONSES TO POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF SCR AND WET SCRUBBERS ON SUBMICRON PARTICULATE EMISSIONS AND PLUME CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers on coal-fired boilers have led to substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). However, observations of pilot- and full-scale tes...

  5. Parameters influencing the aerosol capture performance of the Submerged-Bed Scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Ruecker, C.M.; Scott, P.A.

    1987-04-01

    The Submerged-Bed Scrubber (SBS) is a novel air cleaning device that has been investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for scrubbing off gases from liquid-fed ceramic melters used to vitrify high-level waste (HLW). The concept for the SBS was originally conceived at Hanford for emergency venting of a reactor containment building. The SBS was adapted for use as a quenching scrubber at PNL because it can cool the hot melter off gas as well as remove over 90% of the airborne particles, thus meeting the minimum particulate decontamination factor (DF) of 10 required of a primary scrubber. The experiments in this study showed that the submicron aerosol DF for the SBS can exceed 100 under certain conditions. A conventional device, the ejector-venturi scrubber (EVS), has been previously used in this application. The EVS also adequately cools the hot gases from the melter while exhibiting aerosol removal DFs in the range of 5 to 30. In addition to achieving higher DFs than the EVS, however, the SBS has the advantage of being a passive system, better suited to the remote environment of an HLW processing system. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of the SBS and to improve the aerosol capture efficiency by modifying the operating procedure or the design. A partial factorial experimental matrix was completed to determine the main effects of aerosol solubility, inlet off-gas temperature, inlet off-gas flow rate, steam-to-air ratio, bed diameter and packing diameter on the particulate removal efficiency of the SBS. Several additional experiments were conducted to measure the influence of the inlet aerosol concentration and scrubbing-water concentration on aerosol-removal performance. 33 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Fate of trace metals in a rotary-kiln incinerator with a single-stage ionizing wet scrubber. Volume 1. Technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, D.J.; Waterland, L.R.

    1991-07-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from 816 to 927 C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner temperature, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous constituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead) and four nonhazardous constituent trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and strontium). The test results indicate that cadmium and bismuth were relatively volatile, with an average of less than 40 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Arsenic, barium, chromium, copper, lead, magnesium, and strontium were relatively nonvolatile, with an average of greater than 80 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Observed relative metal volatilities generally agreed with the volatilities predicted based on vapor pressure/temperature relationships, with the exception of arsenic which was much less volatile than predicted. The volatility of cadmium, bismuth, and lead increased as kiln temperature was increased; the discharge distributions of the remaining metals were not significantly affected by changes in kiln temperature. Apparent scrubber collection efficiencies for the metals averaged 22 to 71 percent, and were generally higher for the less volatile metals. The overall average metal collection efficiency was 43 percent.

  7. Elemental mercury removals observed in a laboratory-scale wet FGD scrubber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, J.; Huang, H.; Livengood, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    Published data are limited regarding gaseous mercury removal in wet scrubber flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The data that do exist show a wide variation in reported mercury removals, from about 5 to 95%. We have performed tests for the removal of gaseous elemental mercury in a well-controlled laboratory environment by using both conventional and modified configurations of an aqueous scrubber system. Results from these tests strongly suggest that the removal of elemental mercury in a wet scrubber system is controlled by liquid-film resistance. Our results have also led us to hypothesize that the mercury-containing species in a flue-gas stream consist of only two types: elemental mercury and oxidized mercury compounds. We further assert that the differences observed in mercury removal reflect different proportions of each of these two types of mercury-containing species. We suggest that the total mercury removal will be high when the actual, but unmeasured, proportion of oxidized mercury compounds is high.

  8. Laboratory evaluation of an aldehyde scrubber system specifically for the detection of acrolein.

    PubMed

    Knighton, W Berk; Herndon, Scott C; Shorter, Joanne H; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Zahniser, Mark S; Akiyama, Kenichi; Shimono, Akio; Kitasaka, Kazuya; Shimajiri, Hatsumi; Sugihara, Koichi

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of an aldehyde scrubber system to resolve isobaric aldehyde/alkene interferences in a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) by selectively removing the aldehydes from the gas mixture without loss of quantitative information for the alkene components. The aldehyde scrubber system uses a bisulfite solution, which scrubs carbonyl compounds from the gas stream by forming water-soluble carbonyl bisulfite addition products, and has been evaluated using a synthetic mixture of acrolein and isoprene. Trapping efficiencies of acrolein exceeded 97%, whereas the transmission efficiency of isoprene was better than 92%. Quantification of the PTR-MS response to acrolein was validated through an intercomparison study that included two derivatization methods, dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and O-(4-cyano-2-ethoxybenzyl)hydroxylamine (CNET), and a spectroscopic method using a quantum cascade laser infrared absorption spectroscopy (QCL) instrument. Finally, using cigarette smoke as a complex matrix, the acrolein content was assessed using the scrubber and compared with direct QCL-based detection. PMID:18069460

  9. ACID GAS REMOVAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CORONA RADICAL SHOWER SYSTEM FOR A TREATMENT OF STATIONARY ENGINE FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid gas removal experiments are carried out in large bench scale corona radical shower reactor. A simulated engine flue gas is air mixed with NO, SO2 and CH4. Optimums for acid gas removal rate have been conducted in terms of the ammonia to acid gas molar ratio, the applied volt...

  10. Determining the sulfuric acid fog concentration in coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zin'kovskaya, S.I.; Okhrimenko, E.L.; Sobko, L.V.

    1982-11-06

    A volumetric method for the analysis of sulfuric acid aerosols at levels of acid greater (25-40 g/m/sup 3/) than those (1 g/m/sup 3/) analyzable by current methods is described. Coke oven gas after acid scrubbing and electrofiltration is passed through a Schott filter (pressure drop 100 mm Hg), the sulfuric acid aerosol being condensed on the filter which is washed with water and the washings filtered with NaOH (0.01 N after electrofilter, 1.0 N after the acid towers) to methyl orange end point. The error is +/- 2%.

  11. Investigation of new hypergol scrubber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasscock, Barbara H.

    1994-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this work is to minimize the liquid waste generated from the scrubbing of hypergolic vent gases. In particular, nitrogen tetroxide, a strong oxidizer used in hypergolic propellant systems, is currently scrubbed with a sodium hydroxide solution resulting in a hazardous liquid waste. This study investigated the use of a solution of potassium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide for the nitrogen textroxide vent scrubber system. The potassium nitrate formed would be potentially usable as a fertilizer. The hydrogen peroxide is added to convert the potassium nitrite that is formed into more potassium nitrate. Smallscale laboratory tests were conducted to establish the stability of hydrogen peroxide in the proposed scrubbing solution and to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide in converting nitrite to nitrate.

  12. Organic acids emissions from natural-gas-fed engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, Efthimios; Tazerout, Mohand

    A natural-gas-fed spark-ignition engine, operating under lean conditions, is used for the study of the organic acids exhaust emissions. These pollutants are collected by passing a sample of exhaust gas into deionised water. The final solution is directly analysed by HPLC/UV at 204 nm. Only formic acid is emitted in detectable concentration under the experimental conditions used. Its concentration decreases with the three engine operating parameters studied: spark advance, volumetric efficiency and fuel/air equivalence ratio. Exhaust formic acid concentration is also linked with exhaust oxygen concentration and exhaust temperature. A comparison with other engines (SI engines fed with gasoline and compression ignition engines) from bibliographic data proves that natural-gas-fed engines emit less organic acids than the other two types of engines.

  13. Municipal sludge composting facility emissions -- comparison of wet scrubber and biofiltration control performance

    SciTech Connect

    Holzman, M.I.; Gammie, L.A.; Gilbert, P.E.; Budas, O.

    1997-12-31

    The Metropolitan District (MDC) Water Pollution Control Plant located in Hartford, Connecticut operates a state-of-the-art composting facility to process municipal sewage sludge. An air emissions test program was performed to determine emission rates of criteria and non-criteria pollutants and to evaluate the performance of two types of emissions/odor control systems (biofiltration and wet scrubbing). The purpose of this report is to further the limited available emissions and control performance data on a municipal sewage sludge composting facility operation. The MDC`s sludge composting facility consists of a Biocell train and a Cure Cell train, each of which can currently receive approximately 20 wet tons per hour of sludge at 60% of full capacity. The minimum retention time in each train is 10.5 days. Air emissions from the Biocell train are treated by both a biofiltration system and a three-stage wet scrubber system. The biofilter and wet scrubber system operate in parallel, so as to allow direct comparison of performance. Emissions from the Cure Cell train are treated by a single biofiltration system. The wet scrubber system consists of a first stage reducing absorber (ammonia solution), followed by a second stage oxidation absorber (sodium hypochlorite and sulfuric acid), and a final residual scrubber (sodium hydroxide solution). The two biofiltration systems are identically sized at 10,000 square feet surface area and three feet depth. The emissions testing program was designed to obtain simultaneous inlet and outlet data across each control device. The measured pollutants included organo-sulfides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, pinenes, terpenes, total reduced sulfur compounds, chlorinated hydrocarbons, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, ammonia, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds.

  14. Anchoring the gas-phase acidity scale: From formic acid to methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyet, Nicole; Villano, Stephanie M.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the gas-phase acidities of nine compounds: formic acid, acetic acid, 1,3-propanedithiol, 2-methyl-2-propanethiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol, 2-propanethiol, 1-propanethiol, ethanethiol, and methanethiol, with acidities ranging from 338.6 to 351.1 kcal mol-1 using proton transfer kinetics and the resulting equilibrium constants. These acids were anchored to the well-known acidity of hydrogen sulfide; the measured acidities are in good agreement with previous experimental values, but error bars are significantly reduced. The gas-phase acidity of 3-methyl-1-butanethiol was determined to be 347.1 (5) kcal mol-1; there were no previous measurements of this value. Entropies of deprotonation were calculated and enthalpies of deprotonation were determined.

  15. Fate of trace metals in a rotary-kiln incinerator with a single-stage ionizing wet scrubber. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, D.J.; Waterland, L.R.

    1991-07-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with an ionizing wet scrubber (IWS) for particulate and acid gas control. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from 816 to 927 C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner temperature, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous constituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead) and four nonhazardous constituent trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and strontium). Volume 2 contains the appendices to Volume 1. It presents the results in tables and graphs.

  16. Capture and release of mixed acid gasses with binding organic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J.; Yonker, Clement R.

    2010-09-21

    Reversible acid-gas binding organic liquid systems that permit separation and capture of one or more of several acid gases from a mixed gas stream, transport of the liquid, release of the acid gases from the ionic liquid and reuse of the liquid to bind more acid gas with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems. These systems utilize acid gas capture compounds made up of strong bases and weak acids that form salts when reacted with a selected acid gas, and which release these gases when a preselected triggering event occurs. The various new materials that make up this system can also be included in various other applications such as chemical sensors, chemical reactants, scrubbers, and separators that allow for the specific and separate removal of desired materials from a gas stream such as flue gas.

  17. Chemistry of HCN removal from coke-oven gas using ethylenethiourea

    SciTech Connect

    Markhovskii, L.F.; Brodovich, A.I.; Proicheva, A.G.; Shmyreva, N.N.

    1983-01-01

    An ethylenediamine (EDA) process developed for the purification of coke-oven gas of acid components is a cyclic process. The process can recover H/sub 2/S and HCN simultaneously. Laboratory and pilot plant data on the removal of HCN from coke-oven gas using this process and on the processing of the spent scrubber liquor are presented. Ethylenethiourea is recoverable from the spent liquor.

  18. EVALUATION OF AEROSOL EMISSIONS DOWNSTREAM OF AN AMMONIA-BASED SO2 SCRUBBER

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis L. Laudal

    2002-04-01

    Depending on the size and type of boiler, the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required specific reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. To meet these requirements, SO{sub 2} reduction strategies have included installing scrubbing technology, switching to a more expensive low-sulfur coal, or purchasing SO{sub 2} allowances. It is expected that over the next 10 years there will be an increase in the price of low-sulfur coals, but that higher-sulfur coal costs will remain the same. Technologies must be strongly considered that allow the use of high-sulfur fuels while at the same time meeting current and future SO{sub 2} emission limits. One such technology is the ammonia based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) (NH{sub 3}-based FGD) system manufactured by Marsulex Environmental Technologies (MET). The MET scrubber is a patented NH{sub 3}-based FGD process that efficiently converts SO{sub 2} (>95%) into a fertilizer product, ammonium sulfate ([NH{sub 4}]{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). A point of concern for the MET technology, as well as other FGD systems, is the emission of sulfuric acid/SO{sub 3} aerosols that could result in increased opacity at the stack. This is a direct result of firing high-sulfur fuels that naturally generate more SO{sub 3} than do low-sulfur coals. SO{sub 3} is formed during the coal combustion process. SO{sub 3} is converted to gaseous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by homogeneous condensation, leading to a submicron acid fume that is very difficult to capture in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The condensed acid can also combine with the fly ash in the duct and scale the duct wall, potentially resulting in corrosion of both metallic and nonmetallic surfaces. Therefore, SO{sub 3} in flue gas can have a significant impact on the performance of coal-fired utility boilers, air heaters, and ESPs. In addition to corrosion problems, excess SO{sub 3} emissions can result in plume opacity problems. Thus the Energy & Environmental Research

  19. 60. Historic plan of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, June 18, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Historic plan of Building 202 exhaust scrubber, June 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101261. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. 13. Building 202 exhaust scrubber water detention tank, looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Building 202 exhaust scrubber water detention tank, looking southeast from bed of Abram Creek. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  2. Looking Southwest to Dry and Wet Exterior Scrubbers at Rear ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southwest to Dry and Wet Exterior Scrubbers at Rear of Oxide Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Oxide Building & Oxide Loading Dock, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  3. CHARGED DROPLET SCRUBBER FOR FINE PARTICLE CONTROL: PILOT DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a successful Charged Droplet Scrubber (CDS) pilot demonstration of coke oven emissions control. It also describes the design, installation, and checkout of the demonstration system. The CDS uses electrically sprayed water droplets, accelerated through ...

  4. 9. Building 202 test stand B and exhaust scrubber stack, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Building 202 test stand B and exhaust scrubber stack, looking southwest from concrete apron north of Building 202 test cell. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. Renewal project improves scrubbers' long-term corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Weilert, C.V.; Ashton, S.M.; Campbell, F.W.; Norton, R.D.; Hamilton, R.

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a five-year scrubber renewal plan aimed at reducing corrosion-induced maintenance costs at its Gibbons Creek plant. Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) owns and operates the 443-MW Gibbons Creek Station. The scrubber system started up in 1982, but by late 1990 TMPA found it necessary to develop a 5-year scrubber renewal plan to improve its reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs. Upgrading the system's original construction materials became an important component of the plan. The Gibbons Creek Steam Electric Station, located near Carlos, Texas, consists of a single, lignite-fired unit. Fuel is supplied from a captive mine located adjacent to the plant site. Air pollution control equipment serving the plant includes an electrostatic precipitator and a wet limestone scrubber system.

  6. Looking South at south End of Green Room Including Scrubber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking South at south End of Green Room Including Scrubber for Incinerator within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  7. Scrubber and remote control system improves productivity and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Kost, J.

    1984-07-01

    The paper describes the development of a scrubber and remote control system for a continuous miner. Test results using the system and a greater depth of cut showed that productivity was increased without any sacrifice to health and safety. Approval has been obtained from MSHA for operation under a ventilation plan which allows a 40 aft cut and a face-to-brattice distance of 40 ft when the scrubber is in operation.

  8. Cryogenic process for removing acidic gases from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Ginnasi, A.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.; Vetere, A.

    1985-04-30

    Low temperature treatments are combined with solvent treatments using particularly selective solvents for stripping acidic gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide from natural gas or from synthetic gases. The preferred solvents are a wide range of compounds having an esteric or an etheric function in their molecule, but there are also examples of compounds which have the two functions simultaneously. The stripping process is comparatively simple, is efficient, especially for high contents of acidic gases in the raw gas streams, and is economically acceptable.

  9. Cryogenic process for fractionally removing acidic gases from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Ginnasi, A.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.; Vetere, A.

    1985-07-16

    A process is described for stripping acidic gases, mainly hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide, from natural gas or synthesis gas, especially when the percentages of such acidic gases are high and the conventional processes become economically objectionable. The process is based on the use of a number of selective solvents, generally belonging to the class of esters, ethers, mixed ester-ethers and lactones, in combination with sequential absorbing cycles which start from the stripping of hydrogen sulphide, and comprise the regeneration of the solvents used by several expansion cycles: H2S and CO2 are recovered and the regenerated solvents recycled.

  10. Acid gas extraction of pyridine from water

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, A.; Kaunisto, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pyridine was extracted from aqueous solutions initially containing 5 or 15 wt % pyridine by using liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide at 10 MPa as a solvent in a mechanically agitated countercurrent extraction column. The lowest pyridine concentration in the raffinate was 0.06 wt %, whereas the pyridine concentration in the extract was 86--94 wt %. From the initial amount of pyridine, 96--99% was transferred from the feed stream to the extract by using relatively small solvent-to-feed ratios of 2.8--4.6 (kg of solvent/kg of feed). The measured distribution coefficients for the water/pyridine/carbon dioxide system ranged from 0.3 to 1 (weight units), depending on the initial pyridine concentration in water. Carbon dioxide is a particularly suitable solvent for the extraction of pyridine from concentrated aqueous solutions. The efficiency may be the result of an acid-base interaction between weakly basic pyridine solute and weakly acidic carbon dioxide solvent in an aqueous environment.

  11. Investigation Of A Mercury Speciation Technique For Flue Gas Desulfurization Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to bene...

  12. A confined vortex scrubber for fine particulate removal from flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, P.J.; Stickler, D.B.; Diehl, R.C. )

    1992-02-01

    An innovative cleanup concept, based on a confined vortex scrubber (CVS), for fine particulate removal from combustion flue gases has been developed, tested and verified. The CVS consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with multiple tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via two central tubes. Water is introduced into the chamber and is confined within the vortex chamber by the extremely high centrifugal forces generated by the gas flow. The confined water forms a layer through which the flue gas is forced to bubble. Due to the high radial acceleration, the bubbles generated are very small, leading to a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and extremely efficient fine particle cleanup. Collection efficiencies in excess of 99.5% have been measured for extremely fine fly ash. A collection efficiency of 98% has been measured for 0.3 micron diameter particles.

  13. Integration of chemical scrubber with sodium hypochlorite and surfactant for removal of hydrocarbons in cooking oil fume.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Han; Hsieh, Chu-Chin

    2010-10-15

    There are many types of technologies to control cooking oil fumes (COFs), but current typical technologies, such as electrostatic precipitator, conventional scrubber, catalyst, or condenser, are unable to efficiently remove the odorous materials present in COFs which are the primary cause of odor-complaint cases. There is also a lack of information about using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and surfactants to remove contaminants in COFs, and previous studies lack on-site investigations in restaurants. This study presents a chemical scrubber integrated with an automatic control system (ACS) to treat hydrocarbons (HCs) in COFs, and to monitor non-methane HCs (NMHC) and odor as indicators for its efficiency evaluation. The chemical scrubber effectively treats hydrophobic substances in COFs by combining surfactant and NaOCl under optimal operational conditions with NHMC removal efficiency as high as 85%. The mass transfer coefficient (K(L)a) of NMHC was enhanced by 50% under the NaOCl and surfactant conditions, as compared to typical wet scrubber. Further, this study establishes the fuzzy equations of the ACS, including the relationship between the removal efficiency and K(L)a, liquid/gas ratio, pH and C(NaOCl). PMID:20633996

  14. Interactions between greenhouse gas policies and acid rain control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.E.; Kane, R.L.; Mansueti, L.

    1997-12-31

    Conventional wisdom and much of the public policy debate have usually drawn a clean delineation between acid rain issues and global warming concerns. This traditional approach of evaluating one policy at a time is too simplistic to serve as a framework for electric utilities making major capital investment and fuel procurement decisions to comply with various environmental requirements. Potential Climate change regulation can affect acid rain compliance decisions, and acid rain compliance decisions will affect future GHG emissions. This paper explores two categories of linkages between these different environmental issues. First, the assumptions one makes regarding future climate change policies can have a profound impact on the economic attractiveness of various acid rain compliance strategies. Second, decisions regarding acid rain compliance strategy can have greenhouse gas implications that might prove more or less difficult to address in future climate change legislation.

  15. Reducing Benzene and Cresol Levels in National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Pilot-Scale Biorefinergy Scrubber Water

    SciTech Connect

    Buzek, M.L.; Phillips, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory converts biomass into energy by gasification or pyrolysis. The aqueous effluent generated in these processes must be disposed of as hazardous waste according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act because certain components exceed the regulatory concentration limit. Gas stripping of the scrubber water was investigated as a method of reducing benzene and cresol levels. A custom-designed packed-bed column was built and a half-factorial experimental design was implemented to determine the effects of gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, and column packing height on the final benzene concentration in the liquid. The experimental results show that packing height had a significant effect on final benzene concentration; gas flow rate and liquid flow rate had little effect. The effects of each design variable on final cresol concentration were not determined. Although the current column design did significantly reduce the benzene and cresol levels in the scrubber water, it did not reduce the concentrations below the regulatory limits. A full-factorial experimental design will be implemented with an increased packing height. Other variables, including column diameter and packing type, will be investigated to determine their effects on final benzene and cresol concentrations. Once the packed-bed column is determined to be effective in reducing contaminant concentrations below the regulatory limit, photocatalytic oxidation will be explored for remediating the benzene and cresol from the gas stream.

  16. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  17. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

  18. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1988-04-12

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

  19. Reclamation of acid, toxic coal spoils using wet flue gas desulfurization by-product, fly ash and sewage sludge. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kost, D.A.; Vimmerstedt, J.P.; Stehouwer, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    Establishment of vegetation on acid abandoned minelands requires modification of soil physical and chemical conditions. Covering the acid minesoil with topsoil or borrow soil is a common practice but this method may be restricted by availability of borrow soil and cause damage to the borrow site. An alternative approach is to use waste materials as soil amendments. There is a long history of using sewage sludge and fly ash as amendments for acid minesoils. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products are newer materials that are also promising amendments. Most flue gas sludges are mixtures of Calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}), calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}), calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}], and fly ash. Some scrubbing processes produce almost pure gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O). The primary purpose of the project is to evaluate two wet FGD by-products for effects on vegetation establishment and surface and ground water quality on an acid minesoil. One by-product from the Conesville, OH power plant (American Electric Power Service Corporation) contains primarily calcium sulfite and fly ash. The other by-product (Mg-gypsum FGD) from an experimental scrubber at the Zimmer power plant (Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company) is primarily gypsum with 4% magnesium hydroxide. These materials were compared with borrow soil and sewage sludge as minesoil amendments. Combinations of each FGD sludge with sewage sludge were also tested. This report summarizes two years of measurements of chemical composition of runoff water, ground water at two depths in the subsoil, soil chemical properties, elemental composition and yield of herbaceous ground cover, and elemental composition, survival and height of trees planted on plots treated with the various amendments. The borrow soil is the control for comparison with the other treatments.

  20. Substituent effects on the gas-phase acidity of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Volk, D.E. ); Gano, D.R. )

    1989-12-20

    In a previous paper, the gas-phase acidities of XH{sub n} compounds (X = C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl) were predicted with ab initio wave functions. At the MP4{sup 2} level of theory with extended basis sets acidities for these species were determined to be within 2 kcal/mol of experimental value. In the present work, with 6-31G(d) geometries and full MP4/MC-311++G{sup 6}(3df,2pd) energies, the effects of CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, OH, F, SiH{sub 3}, PH{sub 2}, SH, and Cl on the gas-phase acidity of silane are examined. Only a few related calculations have been carried out. All calculations were performed with Gaussian86, and all structures were verified as minima by diagonalizing the analytically determined hessians. Only the valence electrons were correlated in the perturbation theory calculations.

  1. Gas phase acidity measurement of local acidic groups in multifunctional species: controlling the binding sites in hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Andres; Baer, Tomas; Chana, Antonio; González, Javier; Dávalos, Juan Z

    2013-07-01

    The applicability of the extended kinetic method (EKM) to determine the gas phase acidities (GA) of different deprotonable groups within the same molecule was tested by measuring the acidities of cinnamic, coumaric, and caffeic acids. These molecules differ not only in the number of acidic groups but in their nature, intramolecular distances, and calculated GAs. In order to determine independently the GA of groups within the same molecule using the EKM, it is necessary to selectively prepare pure forms of the hydrogen-bound heterodimer. In this work, the selectivity was achieved by the use of solvents of different vapor pressure (water and acetonitrile), as well as by variation of the drying temperature in the ESI source, which affected the production of heterodimers with different solvation energies and gas-phase dissociation energies. A particularly surprising finding is that the calculated solvation enthalpies of water and the aprotic acetonitrile are essentially identical, and that the different gas-phase products generated are apparently the result of their different vapor pressures, which affects the drying mechanism. This approach for the selective preparation of heterodimers, which is based on the energetics, appears to be quite general and should prove useful for other studies that require the selective production of heterodimers in ESI sources. The experimental results were supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of both gas-phase and solvated species. The experimental thermochemical parameters (deprotonation ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) are in good agreement with the calculated values for the monofunctional cinnamic acid, as well as the multifunctional coumaric and caffeic acids. The measured GA for cinnamic acid is 334.5 ± 2.0 kcal/mol. The measured acidities for the COOH and OH groups of coumaric and caffeic acids are 332.7 ± 2.0, 318.7 ± 2.1, 332.2 ± 2.0, and 317.3 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:23799241

  2. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  3. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation

  4. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Eeee of... - Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent units a. 2. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a....

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccc of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... units) 3-hour rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Eeee of... - Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent units a. 2. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a....

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Daily (batch units). 3-hour rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes...

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Eeee of... - Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent units a. 2. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a....

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Daily (batch units). 3-hour rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Eeee of... - Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent units a. 2. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a....

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Daily (batch units). 3-hour rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccc of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... units) 3-hour rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling...

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Eeee of... - Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent units a. 2. Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling a....

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Cccc of... - Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... units) 3-hour rolling (continuous and intermittent units) a Pressure drop across the wet scrubber or amperage to wet scrubber Minimum pressure drop or amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling...

  16. The utilization of catalyst sorbent in scrubbing acid gases from incineration flue gas.

    PubMed

    Wey, Ming-Yen; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Fu, Cheng-Hao

    2002-04-01

    Catalyst sorbents based on alumina-supported CuO, CeO2, and CuO-CeO2 were applied to a dry scrubber to clean up the SO2/HCl/NO simultaneously from pilot-scale fluidized-bed incineration flue gas. In the presence of organic compounds, CO and the submicron particles SO2 and HCI removed by the fresh catalyst sorbents and NO reduced to N2 by NH3 under the catalysis of fresh and spent desulfurization/dechloridization (DeSO2/DeHCl) catalyst sorbents (copper compounds, Cu, CuO, and CuSO4) were evaluated in this paper. The fresh and spent catalyst sorbents were characterized by the Brunner-Emmett-Teller method (BET), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the elemental analyzer (EA). The study showed that the performances of CuO, CeO2, and CuO-CeO2/gamma-Al2O3 were better than that of Ca(OH)2. The removal efficiency of SO2 and HCl was 80-95% in the dry scrubber system. Under NH3/NO = 1, NO could not be reduced to N2 because it was difficult to control the ratio of air/fuel in the flue gas. For estimating the feasibility of regenerating the spent catalyst sorbents, BET and EA analyses were used. They indicated that the pore structures were nearly maintained and a small amount of carbon accumulated on their surface. PMID:12002190

  17. Scrubber and remote control system improves productivity and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Kust, J.

    1984-07-01

    The test program conducted at NREC No. 1 Mine clearly indicated that methane levels did not increase with greater depths of cut (up to 40 ft) and corresponding increases in the face-to-brattice distance and methane and respirable dust levels remained well within acceptable levels. By using the scrubber, remote control, and greater depth of cut, productivity is increased without any sacrifice to miner health and safety. Based on the test results, NREC recently received approval from MSHA to operate under a ventilation plan which allows a 40-ft cut and face-to-brattice distance of 40 ft when the scrubber is in operation.

  18. Process for producing and recovering elemental sulfur from acid gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. L.

    1985-03-26

    A system and process produce high actual levels of sulfur recovery from acid gas. The system includes two conventional Claus reactors and two cold bed adsorption (CBA) reactors. Four condensers are provided, one disposed before each of the catalytic reactors, and one disposed after the CBA reactor. The system includes a gas clean-up treatment zone for hydrogenation, drying and oxidation of gas to provide stoichiometric ratio of H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/. The gas is passed through the clean-up treatment zone prior to being fed to the first of the CBA reactors. The system is designed to operate either in a recovery mode or in a regeneration mode. In the recovery mode, the reactors are in series and the CBA reactors are operated below dew point of sulfur. In regeneration mode, effluent from the clean-up treatment zone is heated in a heat exchanger using effluent from the first catalytic reactor as the heat source. The resulting regeneration gas is fed to one of the two CBA reactors to vaporize sulfur and regenerate the catalyst. The vaporized sulfur is recovered in the condenser. The effluent from the condenser is passed to the other CBA reactor which is operated in the recovery mode during regeneration.

  19. Studies of chemical reduction of Fe(III)*EDTA in an SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} aqueous scrubber system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Keener, T.C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Livengood, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Ferrous*EDTA has been found to be an effective scrubbing agent for nitric oxide gas. A major process problem is oxidation of the iron to the ferric species, leading to a significant decrease in NO{sub x}-removal capability. Argonne National Laboratory discovered a class of organic compounds that, when used with ferrous*EDTA in a sodium carbonate chemistry, could maintain high levels of NO{sub x} removal. However, those antioxidant/reducing agents (A/R) are not effective in a lime-based chemistry. In recent reports, it has been found that ascorbic acid and related compounds are capable of maintaining stable NO{sub x} removals of about 50% (compared with about 15% without the agent) in a lime-based FGD chemistry with Fe(II)*EDTA. It is believed that the improved performance of Fe(II)*EDTA is due to the catalytic action of ascorbate in the Fe(III)*EDTA reduction system, where Fe(III)*EDTA is reduced by ascorbate and oxidized ascorbate is then reduced back to the ascorbate by sulfite/bisulfite anions, which come from the dissolution of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. In the present work, the kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbate and reduction of oxidized ascorbate by sulfite/bisulfite anions at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55 C) have been determined.

  20. FGD system capital and operating cost reductions based on improved thiosorbic scrubber system design and latest process innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Tseng, S.; Babu, M.

    1994-12-31

    Dravo Lime Company has operated the Miami Fort wet scrubber FGD pilot test unit since late 1989 and has continued in-house R&D to improve the economics of the magnesium-enhanced scrubbing process. Areas investigated include the scrubber configuration, flue gas velocity, spray nozzle type, droplet size, mist eliminator design, additives to inhibit oxidation, improved solids dewatering, etc. Also tested was the forced oxidation Thioclear process. The data gathered from the pilot plant and in-house programs were used to evaluate the capital and operating costs for the improved systems. These evaluations were made with eye towards the choices electric utilities will need to make in the near future to meet the Phase II emission limits mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. Some of the process modifications investigated, for example, the dewatering improvements apply to potential beneficial retrofit of existing FGD systems today.

  1. AMERICAN AIR FILTER KINPACTOR 10 X 56 VENTURI SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of an American Air Filter Kinpactor 10 x 56 venturi scrubber, operating on emissions from a large borax fusing furnace. Average total efficiency was 97.5% during the test period. The venturi was operated at a pressure drop of 110 cm W. C....

  2. 24. Historic view of Building 202 scrubber stack, August 1957. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic view of Building 202 scrubber stack, August 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-952D-1956. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. 27. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, July 31, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45650. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. 28. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Historic view of Building 202 exhaust scrubber stack, detail, July 31, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45648. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. EVALUATION OF A LIQUID CHEMICAL SCRUBBER SYSTEM FOR STYRENE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the styrene removal efficiency o a pilot-scale version of the QUAD Chemtact scrubber, quantified by continuously measuring the total hydrocarbon (THC) content of spray both exhaust air entering and exiting the device with THC analyzers and, ...

  6. APTB - INVESTIGATION OF MERCURY CONTROL IN WET FGD SCRUBBER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the high removal efficiency, wide applicability, and ability control emissions at a reasonable cost, wet FGD scrubbers are the method used tin the U.S. to control emissions from high sulfur coals. NOx emission control requirements are becoming increasing stringent and s...

  7. CENTURY INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS FRP-100 WET SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field test evaluation of the performance of the Century Industrial Products FRP-100 wet scrubber installed on a lightweight aggregate kiln. Inlet/outlet tests for particle size distribution with cascade impactors and extractive sampling with an elect...

  8. STUDY OF HORIZONTAL-SPRAY FLUX FORCE/CONDENSATION SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a laboratory pilot-scale evaluation of a Flux Force/Condensation (FF/C) scrubber for collecting fine particles, those smaller than 2 micrometers in diameter. FF/C scrubbing includes the effects of diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, Stefan flow, and part...

  9. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  10. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  11. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-09-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO{2/-} anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional γ or δ unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond π electrons during NO{2/-} rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples.

  12. Confined vortex scrubber. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1990--June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards using a cleanup technology appropriate to small scale coal combustors. This to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber (CVS), which consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via vortex finder outlets, one at either end of the tube. Liquid is introduced into the chamber and is confined within the vortex chamber by the centrifugal force generated by the gas flow itself. This confined liquid forms a layer through which the flue gas is then forced to bubble, producing a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and efficient particulate cleanup. During this quarter a comprehensive series of cleanup experiments have been made for three CVS configurations. The first CVS configuration tested gave very efficient fine particulate removal at the design air mass flow rate (1 MM BUT/hr combustor exhaust flow), but had over 20{double_prime}WC pressure drop. The first CVS configuration was then re-designed to produce the same very efficient particulate collection performance at a lower pressure drop. The current CVS configuration produces 99.4 percent cleanup of ultra-fine fly ash at the design air mass flow at a pressure drop of 12 {double_prime}WC with a liquid/air flow ratio of 0.31/m{sup 3}. Unlike venturi scrubbers, the collection performance of the CVS is insensitive to dust loading and to liquid/air flow ratio.

  13. Sterically-hindered amines for acid-gas absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, G.; Ho, W.S.; Savage, D.W.; Chludzinski, G.R.; Wiechert, S. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes sterically hindered amines for removal of acid gases such as CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S from gaseous streams. Steric hindrance of amines reduces carbamate stability. Moderately hindered amines are characterized by high rates of CO/sub 2/ absorption and high capacities for CO/sub 2/. The moderately hindered amine in use with organic solvent has considerably higher capacity than the conventional amine-solvent system for simultaneous removal of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S from synthesis gas and natural gas. A severely-hindered-amine absorbent, characterized by a very low rate of CO/sub 2/ absorption, has much higher capacity and selectivity than the current industry standard absorbent, using the conventional methyldiethanolamine for selective removal of H/sub 2/S from CO/sub 2/-containing streams.

  14. LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SCRUBBERS: USER'S HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handbook, intended for use of utility project managers and project engineers, provides guidance in selection, installation, and operation of a limestone FGD system, covering all phases from inception of the project through design, procurement, operation, and maintenance of th...

  15. PPS fibers allow gas bag filters to replace scrubbers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Wisconsin Electric Power Co. (WEPCO) met the latest federal clean air standards by installing a new pollution control system using fabric filter bags to trap superheated ash and other contaminants at its coal-fired Valley Power Plant. The 6-inch diameter, 20-foot-long filter bags are made form fibers produced by Amoco Fabrics and Fibers (Greenville, South Carolina) using Ryton{reg_sign} polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), an engineering thermoplastic produced by Phillips Chemical Co. (Bartlesville, Oklahoma). The Valley Power Plant produces steam-generated electricity and steam heat for customers in downtown Milwaukee. The plant`s pollution control system is fitted with four bag-house units, each serving one of the four coal-fired boilers. The system contains 18,000 filter bags (560 bags per module, with eight modules in each baghouse). Each house has 4,480 bags to handle a flue stream of up to 400,000 cubic feet per minute at temperatures between 280 F and 320 F.

  16. [Enantioseparation of 2-phenylcarboxylic acid esters by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueyan; Liu, Feipeng; Bian, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Chiral 2-arylcarboxylic acid derivatives are important intermediates for preparing 2-arylcarboxylic acids, which are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In order to separate 2-phenylcarboxylic acid ester enantiomers by capillary gas chromatography (CGC), 2, 6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin and 2,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin were used as CGC chiral stationary phases, separately, and their enantioseparation abilities to enantiomers of methyl 2-phenylbutanoate, ethyl 2-phenylbutanoate, isopropyl 2-phenylbutanoate, methyl 2-phenylpropionate and cyclopentyl 2-phenylpropionate were examined. It was found that methyl 2-phenylbutanoate, methyl 2-phenylpropionate and cyclopentyl 2-phenylpropionate were successfully separated by using 2,6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin and 2,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin as CGC chiral stationary phases, respectively. The enantiomer separation abilities of 2, 6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin to the three pairs of 2-phenylcarboxylic acid esters tested are superior to those of 2, 6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin. PMID:27319170

  17. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ROCKET EXHAUST SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an engineering study and design of methods for scrubbing the exhaust of static-tested solid rockets. Pollutants of major concern were hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride gases. The best process for removing these gases was found to be a gas-atomize...

  18. [Determination of dimethylbenzoic acid isomers in urine by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Kostrzewski, P; Wiaderna-Brycht, A; Czerski, B

    1994-01-01

    Trimethylobenzene (TMB) is a main ingredient of many organic solvents used in industry. In Farbasol (Polish trade name of the solvent) TMB occurs as a mixture of three isomers: pseudocumene (1, 2, 4-TMB) 30%; mesitylene (1, 3, 5-TMB) 15%; hemimellitene (1,2,3-TMB) 5%. As it is known in human organism, TMB is metabolized mainly to dimethylbenzoic (DMBA) and dimethylhippuric (DMHA) acids, and some authors suggest, that the acids excreted in urine can be biological indicators of exposure to TMB. This study was aimed at developing the method of determination of DMBA isomers in urine. Biological material was hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide and next extracted with diethyl ether. DMBA concentration in urine was determined by gas chromatography using a variant of quantitative analysis with internal standard (5-methyl-2-isopropylphenol, thymol). Analytical parameters of the developed method of determination of DMBA isomers in urine such as linearity, precision, reproducibility, stability (192 days, when urine samples stored at-18 degrees C), detectability limit (400 micrograms/dm3) have been fully compatible with the requirements of biological monitoring. In order to confirm the presence of DMBA isomers in urine, four volunteers were exposed (8 hours) to Farbasol in toxicological chamber. The TMB concentration in the air, determined by means of gas chromatograph (HP 5890), amounted to 100 mg/m3 (MAC value in Poland). In urine samples collected 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-; 2,6-; 3,4-; 3,5-dimethylbenzoic acids were identified by means of GC/MSD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8170375

  19. Carbon dioxide sequestration from industrial flue gas by Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Banerjee, Debopam; Das, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of using Chlorella sorokiniana for CO2 sequestration from industrial flue gas. The flue gas emitted from the oil producing industry contains mostly CO2 and H2S (15.6% (v/v) and 120 mg L(-1), respectively) along with nitrogen, methane, and other hydrocarbons. The high concentration of CO2 and H2S had an inhibitory effect on the growth of C. sorokiniana. Some efforts were made for the maximization of the algal biomass production using different techniques such as diluted flue gas, flue gas after passing through the scrubber, flue gas passing through serially connected photobioreactors and two different reactors. The highest reduction in the CO2 content of inlet flue gas was 4.1% (v/v). Some new pigments were observed in the flue gas sequestered biomass. Fatty acid composition in the total lipid was determined to evaluate its suitability for food, feed, and biofuel. PMID:24292202

  20. [Determination of docosahexaenoic acid in milk powder by gas chromatography using acid hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiping; Xiang, Dapeng; Li, Shuang; Xi, Xinglin; Chen, Wenrui

    2015-11-01

    A method to determine docosahexenoic acid (DHA) in milk powder by gas chromatography was established. The milk powder samples were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid, extracted to get total fatty acids by Soxhlet extractor, then esterified with potassium hydroxide methanol solution to form methyl esters, and treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate. The optimal experiment conditions were obtained from orthogonal experiment L9(3(3)) which performed with three factors and three levels, and it requires the reaction performed with 1 mol/L potassium hydroxide solution at 25 degrees C for 5 min. The derivative treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate was separated on a column of SP-2560 (100 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 μm), and determined in 55 min by temperature programming-gas chromatography. Good linearity was obtained in the range 5.0-300 mg/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.999 9. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 3.4%, 1.2% and 1.1% for the seven repeated experiments of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L of DHA, respectively. The limit of detection was 2 mg/kg, and the recoveries of DHA were in the range of 90.4%-93.5%. The results are satisfactory through the tests of practical samples. PMID:26939370

  1. Simultaneous treatment of NO and SO2 with aqueous NaClO2 solution in a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-03-21

    NO and SO2 gases that are generally produced in thermal power plants and incinerators were simultaneously removed by using a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator. The wet scrubber was used for the absorption and oxidation of NO and SO2, and non-thermal plasma was employed for the electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles. NO and SO2 gases were absorbed and oxidized by aerosol particles of NaClO2 solution in the wet scrubber. NO and SO2 reacted with the generated NaClO2 aerosol particles, NO2 gas, and aqueous ions such as NO2(-), NO3(-), HSO3(-), and SO4(2-). The aerosol particles were negatively charged and collected on the surface of grounded anode in the plasma electrostatic precipitator. The NO and SO2 removal efficiencies of the proposed system were 94.4% and 100% for gas concentrations of 500 mg/m(3) and a total gas flow rate of 60 Nm(3)/h, when the molar flow rate of NaClO2 and the gas-liquid contact time were /min and 1.25 s, respectively. The total amount and number of aerosol particles in the exhaust gas were reduced to 7.553 μg/m(3) and 210/cm(3) at the maximum plasma input power of 68.8 W, which are similar to the values for clean air. PMID:25497024

  2. Hydration of potassiated amino acids in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-12-01

    The thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of several potassiated amino acids was studied by measuring the gas-phase equilibria, AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n-1) + H(2)O = AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n) (AA = Gly, AL, Val, Met, Pro, and Phe), using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. The AAK(+) ions were obtained by electrospray and the equilibrium constants K(n-1,n) were measured in a pulsed reaction chamber at 10 mbar bath gas, N(2), containing a known partial pressure of water vapor. Determination of the equilibrium constants at different temperatures was used to obtain the DeltaH(n)(o), DeltaS(n)(o), and DeltaG(n)(o) values. The results indicate that the water binding energy in AAK(+)(H(2)O) decreases as the K(+) affinity to AA increases. This trend in binding energies is explained in terms of changes in the side-chain substituent, which delocalize the positive charge from K(+) to AA in AAK(+) complexes, varying the AAK(+)-H(2)O electrostatic interaction. PMID:17928233

  3. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  4. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  5. BENCH-SCALE EVALUATION OF CALCIUM SORBENTS FOR ACID GAS EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium sorbents for acid gas emission control were evaluated for effectiveness in removing SO2/HCl and SO2/NO from simulated incinerator and boiler flue gases. All tests were conducted in a bench-scale reactor (fixed-bed) simulating fabric filter conditions in an acid gas remova...

  6. An Experimental and Computational Study of the Gas-Phase Acidities of the Common Amino Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Chelsea E; Stover, Michele L; Bokatzian, Samantha S; Davis, John T M; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2015-07-30

    Using proton-transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and correlated molecular orbital theory at the G3(MP2) level, gas-phase acidities (GAs) and the associated structures for amides corresponding to the common amino acids have been determined for the first time. These values are important because amino acid amides are models for residues in peptides and proteins. For compounds whose most acidic site is the C-terminal amide nitrogen, two ions populations were observed experimentally with GAs that differ by 4-7 kcal/mol. The lower energy, more acidic structure accounts for the majority of the ions formed by electrospray ionization. G3(MP2) calculations predict that the lowest energy anionic conformer has a cis-like orientation of the [-C(═O)NH](-) group whereas the higher energy, less acidic conformer has a trans-like orientation of this group. These two distinct conformers were predicted for compounds with aliphatic, amide, basic, hydroxyl, and thioether side chains. For the most acidic amino acid amides (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, histidine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid amides) only one conformer was observed experimentally, and its experimental GA correlates with the theoretical GA related to side chain deprotonation. PMID:26196065

  7. Development of a Liquid Metal Based Fuel Gas Scrubbing System

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.F.; Swithenbank, J.; Sharifi, V.N.; Warner, N.

    2002-09-20

    The objective of this research project is to perform studies on an analogous room temperature packed bed scrubber operating under non-wetting conditions, providing insight and understanding towards the development of a high temperature packed bed gas scrubber irrigated by molten tin.

  8. Process gas chromatography study of a Selexol acid gas removal system. Final report Mar-Sep 82

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Selexol system during tests in April and May 1982. Product gas composition data were logged for 55 hours of plant operation. The Bi-Gas pilot plant, utilizing a two-stage, entrained-bed, high-pressure slagging gasifier, produces a product gas that is low in tars and heavy oils. This gas stream required very little cleanup prior to instrumental analysis. However, some problems were encountered in the analysis of the Selexol acid gas stream due to the presence of high levels of naphthalene. The process gas chromatographs performed well and remained very stable during the tests. Material balances based on GC analyses and process flow rate data show a high degree of material accountability. The H/sub 2/S removal efficiency of the Selexol absorber was about 99% during the tests.

  9. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an... reduction, fabric filter, an electrostatic precipitator, or a dry scrubber or limit emissions in some...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an... reduction, fabric filter, an electrostatic precipitator, or a dry scrubber or limit emissions in some...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers 3 Table 3 to Subpart DDDD of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...—Model Rule—Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers For these operating parameters You must establish...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dddd of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model Rule-Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers 3 Table 3 to Subpart DDDD of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...—Model Rule—Operating Limits for Wet Scrubbers For these operating parameters You must establish...

  13. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION: THE STATE OF THE ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal-fired electricity-generating plants may use SO2 scrubbers to meet the requirements of Phase II of the Acid Rain SO2 Reduction Program. Additionally, the use of scrubbers can result in reduction of Hg and other emissions from combustion sources. It is timely, therefore, to ex...

  14. Low Cost Geothermal Separators BLISS Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Douglas; Wai, King

    2000-05-26

    A new compact, low cost, and high performance separator is being developed to help reduce the installed and O and M cost of geothermal power generation. This device has been given the acronym ''BLISS'' that stands for ''Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber''. The device is the first of a series of separators, and in the case of injectates, scrubbers to address the cost-reduction needs of the industry. The BLISS is a multi-positional centrifugal separator primarily designed to be simply installed between pipe supports, in a horizontal position. This lower profile reduces the height safety concern for workers, and significantly reduces the total installation cost. The vessel can demand as little as one-quarter (25%) the amount of steel traditionally required to fabricate many large vertical separators. The compact nature and high separating efficiency of this device are directly attributable to a high centrifugal force coupled with boundary layer control. The pseudo isokinetic flow design imparts a self-cleaning and scale resistant feature. This polishing separator is designed to remove moderate amounts of liquid and entrained solids.

  15. Ammonia scrubber testing during IDMS SRAT and SME processing. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.

    1995-04-28

    This report summarizes results of the Integrated DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) Melter System (IDMS) ammonia scrubber testing during the PX-7 run (the 7th IDMS run with a Purex type sludge). Operation of the ammonia scrubber during IDMS Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing has been completed. The ammonia scrubber was successful in removing ammonia from the vapor stream to achieve NH3 concentrations far below the 10 ppM vapor exist design basis during SRAT processing. However, during SME processing, vapor NH3 concentrations as high as 450 ppM were measured exiting the scrubber. Problems during the SRAT and SME testing were vapor bypassing the scrubber and inefficient scrubbing of the ammonia at the end of the SME cycle (50% removal efficiency; 99.9% is design basis efficiency).

  16. Selection of an acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.B.; Jones, G.N.; Denton, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Acid gas contaminants, such as, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and mercaptans, must be removed to a very low level from a feed natural gas before it is liquefied. CO{sub 2} is typically removed to a level of about 100 ppm to prevent freezing during LNG processing. Sulfur compounds are removed to levels required by the eventual consumer of the gas. Acid-gas removal processes can be broadly classified as: solvent-based, adsorption, cryogenic or physical separation. The advantages and disadvantages of these processes will be discussed along with design and operating considerations. This paper will also discuss the important considerations affecting the choice of the best acid-gas removal process for LNG plants. Some of these considerations are: the remoteness of the LNG plant from the resource; the cost of the feed gas and the economics of minimizing capital expenditures; the ultimate disposition of the acid gas; potential for energy integration; and the composition, including LPG and conditions of the feed gas. The example of the selection of the acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant.

  17. Designing an optimized injection strategy for acid gas disposal without dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.A.; Svrcek, W.Y.; Monnery, W.D.; Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Wichert, E.; Reed, A.E.; Johnson, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    The economics of recovering sulfur from sour natural gas have become unfavorable for small fields. Hydrocarbon producing companies require a cost effective yet environmentally sound alternative method to deal with acid gas. Compressed acid gas reinjection into producing, depleted or non-producing formations has emerged as a viable alternative to traditional sulfur recovery. Most injection schemes include dehydration facilities to remove the saturated water from the gas, preventing corrosion and hydrate formation. An alternative, less costly approach is to keep the water in the vapor phase throughout the injection circuit, eliminating the need to dehydrate. To design an optimized injection strategy, determination of thermodynamic and physical properties such as water content, dewpoint, bubble point, hydrate conditions and density of the acid gas is necessary. Experiments were conducted to determine properties of an acid gas containing a nominal 10% H{sub 2}S with remaining 90% CO{sub 2} and a minor amount of methane. Results indicate that the acid gas can be cooled between compression stages to 40 C (104 F) without entering the two phase region. For an injection pressure of 17,700 kPa (2,567 psia), dehydration is not required to cool the compressed gas to 8 C (46 F) without hydrate formation or corrosion problems. At 9,000 kPa (1,305 psia) the gas can be safely cooled to {minus}2 C (28 F).

  18. CNG process, a new approach to physical-absorption acid-gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hise, R.E.; Massey, L.G.; Adler, R.J.; Brosilow, C.B.; Gardner, N.C.; Brown, W.R.; Cook, W.J.; Petrik, M.

    1982-01-01

    The CNG acid gas removal process embodies three novel features: (1) scrubbing with liquid carbon dioxide to remove all sulfurous molecules and other trace contaminants; (2) triple-point crystallization of carbon dioxide to concentrate sulfurous molecules and produce pure carbon dioxide; and (3) absorption of carbon dioxide with a slurry of solid carbon dioxide in organic carrier liquid. The CNG process is discussed and contrasted with existing acid gas removal technology as represented by the Benfield, Rectisol, and Selexol acid gas removal processes.

  19. Industry-Government-University Cooperative Research Program for the Development of Structural Materials from Sulfate-Rich FGD Scrubber Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    V. M. Malhotra; Y. P. Chugh

    2003-08-31

    The main aim of our project was to develop technology, which converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sulfate-rich scrubber sludge into value-added decorative materials. Specifically, we were to establish technology for fabricating cost effective but marketable materials, like countertops and decorative tiles from the sludge. In addition, we were to explore the feasibility of forming siding material from the sludge. At the end of the project, we were to establish the potential of our products by generating 64 countertop pieces and 64 tiles of various colors. In pursuit of our above-mentioned goals, we conducted Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the binders and co-processed binders to identify their curing behavior. Using our 6-inch x 6-inch and 4-inch x 4-inch high pressure and high temperature hardened stainless steel dies, we developed procedures to fabricate countertop and decorative tile materials. The composites, fabricated from sulfate-rich scrubber sludge, were subjected to mechanical tests using a three-point bending machine and a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). We compared our material's mechanical performance against commercially obtained countertops. We successfully established the procedures for the development of countertop and tile composites from scrubber sludge by mounting our materials on commercial boards. We fabricated more than 64 pieces of countertop material in at least 11 different colors having different patterns. In addition, more than 100 tiles in six different colors were fabricated. We also developed procedures by which the fabrication waste, up to 30-weight %, could be recycled in the manufacturing of our countertops and decorative tiles. Our experimental results indicated that our countertops had mechanical strength, which was comparable to high-end commercial countertop materials and contained substantially larger inorganic content than the commercial products. Our moisture

  20. Versatile microanalytical system with porous polypropylene capillary membrane for calibration gas generation and trace gaseous pollutants sampling applied to the analysis of formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and ammonia in outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lúcia H G; Melchert, Wanessa R; Rocha, Flavio R; Rocha, Fábio R P; Gutz, Ivano G R

    2010-11-15

    The analytical determination of atmospheric pollutants still presents challenges due to the low-level concentrations (frequently in the μg m(-3) range) and their variations with sampling site and time. In this work, a capillary membrane diffusion scrubber (CMDS) was scaled down to match with capillary electrophoresis (CE), a quick separation technique that requires nothing more than some nanoliters of sample and, when combined with capacitively coupled contactless conductometric detection (C(4)D), is particularly favorable for ionic species that do not absorb in the UV-vis region, like the target analytes formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and ammonium. The CMDS was coaxially assembled inside a PTFE tube and fed with acceptor phase (deionized water for species with a high Henry's constant such as formaldehyde and carboxylic acids, or acidic solution for ammonia sampling with equilibrium displacement to the non-volatile ammonium ion) at a low flow rate (8.3 nL s(-1)), while the sample was aspirated through the annular gap of the concentric tubes at 2.5 mL s(-1). A second unit, in all similar to the CMDS, was operated as a capillary membrane diffusion emitter (CMDE), generating a gas flow with know concentrations of ammonia for the evaluation of the CMDS. The fluids of the system were driven with inexpensive aquarium air pumps, and the collected samples were stored in vials cooled by a Peltier element. Complete protocols were developed for the analysis, in air, of NH(3), CH(3)COOH, HCOOH and, with a derivatization setup, CH(2)O, by associating the CMDS collection with the determination by CE-C(4)D. The ammonia concentrations obtained by electrophoresis were checked against the reference spectrophotometric method based on Berthelot's reaction. Sensitivity enhancements of this reference method were achieved by using a modified Berthelot reaction, solenoid micro-pumps for liquid propulsion and a long optical path cell based on a liquid core waveguide (LCW). All

  1. Evaluation of a liquid chemical scrubber system for styrene removal

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, L.; Merritt, R.; Williamson, A.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives results of a study of the styrene removal efficiency of a pilot-scale version of the QUAD Chemtact scrubber, quantified by continuously measuring the total hydrocarbon (THC) content of spray booth exhaust air entering and exiting the device with THC analyzers and, for some tests, by collecting EPA Method 18 samples (adsorption tube procedure) at the inlet and exit of the device. Average styrene removal efficiencies approached but were never >55%. The test was carried out at a facility (Eljer Plumbingware in Wilson, NC) that manufactures polyester bathtubs and shower stalls by spraying styrene-based resins onto molds in vented, open spray booths. A side stream of air, exhausted from one of the spray booths in the gel coating part of the process, was used for the test.

  2. Effects of ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on gas trapping in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four groups of 20 guinea pigs were sequentially exposed by inhalation to either air followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by air, or air followed by air to determine whether ozone preexposure sensitizes guinea pigs to the airway constrictive effects of sulfuric acid aerosol. All first exposures to ozone or air were 2 h in duration; all second exposures to sulfuric acid or air were for 1 h. All ozone and sulfuric acid exposures were 0.8 ppm and 12 mg/m3, respectively. Animals were observed for respiratory distress during exposure, and excised lungs were quantitated for trapped gas and wet/dry ratios. None of the guinea pigs developed dyspnea, and wet/dry ratios were not altered. Ozone significantly (p less than 0.05) increased trapped gas volumes, which were 44% (ozone-acid) to 68% (ozone-air) greater than in the air-air group. Trapped gas volume was 23% greater in the ozone-acid group than in the air-acid group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p less than 0.20). Thus, ozone increased gas trapping but did not significantly sensitize guinea pigs to the bronchoconstrictive action of sulfuric acid.

  3. [Sodium-enhanced limestone wet FGD in rotating-stream tray scrubber].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenshou; Wu, Zhongbiao; Li, Yue; Tan, Tianen

    2002-09-01

    Adding sodium sulfate to limestone slurry can increase SO2 removal efficiency. In this paper, sodium-enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization(FGD) tests were conducted in rotating-stream tray scrubber. Changes of SO2 removal efficiency and pH value with time were experimentally studied and, at different pH range, the dissolution rates of limestone etc. were analyzed. The effects of plate number on SO2 removal efficiency and pressure drop were investigated at temperature approximated to industrial operating value. The average plate efficiencies were calculated. According to the experimental results, increasing plate number could increase SO2 removal efficiency, but the average plate efficiency decreased. Under the experimental conditions, when the plate number was increased from 1 to 4, the removal efficiency was increased from 25.5% to 48.6% at the liquid-to-gas ratio of 4 L/m3, but the average plate efficiency was decreased from 25.5% to 15.3%. The equation of the relation between the average plate efficiency and plate number was obtained. PMID:12533938

  4. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  5. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  6. Use of a polishing scrubber with a fluid bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Toher, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Once viewed as {open_quotes}competitive{close_quotes} technologies, the circulating dry scrubber (CDS){reg_sign} and circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler are being used together to achieve enhanced performance with lower overall costs. The need to understand the synergy between these two technologies is driven by deregulation of the power industry and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Deregulation of power production in the US has spurred the growth of Independent Power Producers (IPP) who are responding to Industry`s demand for lower cost fuels, and close attention to annual operating costs. Utilities have to provide {open_quotes}open{close_quotes} access to their transmission lines allowing various IPP`s to connect with the end user. Industrial users can now choose from one of several sources of electricity with prices per kilowatt hour that are much lower than what they are currently being charged. The race is on to reduce power production costs and fuel can be the key in many cases. IPP`s and industry are banding together in very logical ways that can benefit both. Industry`s byproducts with heating value can be sold {open_quotes}over the fence{close_quotes} to an IPP who provides the industry with low cost steam and or electricity in return. However, many alternative lower cost fuels also have a higher emissions potential for criteria pollutants such a SO{sub 2}, NO{sub X}, particulate, or other emissions such as VOC`s and mercury which are more recently receiving attention. Cost effective management of these environmental issues must be an integral part of the project planning process. Three such cases are examined that involve the use of CFB`s with the CDS{reg_sign} as a polishing scrubber for SO{sub 2}. The first two cases involve repowering of existing facilities with petroleum coke as the fuel. The last case involves a new facility powered with low sulfur coal.

  7. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  8. Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

    2002-09-20

    In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

  9. Toxic Acid Gas Absorber Design Considerations for Air Pollution Control in Process Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyele, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the design parameters for an absorber used for removal of toxic acid gas (in particular sulfur dioxide) from a process gas stream for environmental health protection purposes. Starting from the equilibrium data, Henry's law constant was determined from the slope of the y-x diagram. Based on mass balances across the absorber,…

  10. Treatment of local scrubber wastewater for semiconductor by using photo-catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chung-Yi; Huang, Chien-Pin; Shang, Neng-Chou; Yu, Yue-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of local scrubber wastewater (LSW) from semiconductor manufacture by using ozonation, catalytic ozonation (ozone/Al(2)O(3) and ozone/TiO(2)-Al(2)O(3)), and photo-catalytic ozonation (UV/TiO(2)-Al(2)O(3), ozone/UV and ozone/UV/TiO(2)-Al(2)O(3)). The results show that catalyst Al(2)O(3) and TiO(2)-Al(2)O(3) promotes the TOC removal under the condition of neutral or alkaline buffer solution during catalytic ozonation of LSW. The Al(2)O(3) induces highest promotion in TOC removal efficiency, which is higher than ozone alone by 26% TOC removal under alkaline buffer solution. However, TiO(2)-Al(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3) cannot display the promotion in TOC removal under acidic condition. In addition, a pre-treatment of anion ion-exchange is employed and the result indicates that decreasing the anion ions concentration before AOPs can imply higher TOC removal during AOPs of LSW. In this study, ozone/UV under raw LSW acidic condition and ozone/Al(2)O(3) under alkaline buffer solution present 95% and 88% TOC removal rate respectively and show the higher TOC removal efficiency than other AOPs. Therefore, these two kinds of AOP can serve as the very viable AOP methods in the LSW reclamation for semiconductor. PMID:19494469

  11. THE ADIPIC ACID ENHANCED FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESS FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS. VOLUME 2. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of an adipic acid enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on industrial boilers at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base. The SO2 removal efficiency with the adipic acid averaged 94.3% over a 30-day period. This represents...

  12. OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS CONJUGATED WITH SULFITE OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times th...

  13. Rapid determination of dipicolinic acid in the spores of Clostridium species by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, M W; MacGee, J; Holland, J W

    1976-01-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic procedure has been developed to quantitate dipicolinic acid in bacterial spores. The culture, washed from a plate, was hydrolyzed with acid containing the internal standard, pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate, and then extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone. The internal standard and dipicolinic acid were then extracted into a small volume of trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide. Injection of the resultant quaternary ammonium salts into a gas chromatograph yielded, via thermal decomposition, the methyl ester derivatives of the dipicolinic acid and the internal standard. The amount of dipicolinic acid in the sample was determined from a standard curve. The method was sensitive to 100 ng of dipicolinic acid per sample and was 1,000 to 5,000 times more sensitive than the commonly used methods. Preparation of the sample required less than 1.5 h and less than 15 min of the analyst's time. PMID:942206

  14. Selective transport of amino acids into the gas phase: driving forces for amino acid solubilization in gas-phase reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Bennett, Andrew; Liu, Jianbo

    2011-01-28

    We report a study on encapsulation of various amino acids into gas-phase sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) reverse micelles, using electrospray ionization guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation of mass-selected reverse micellar ions with Xe was performed to probe structures of gas-phase micellar assemblies, identify solute-surfactant interactions, and determine preferential incorporation sites of amino acids. Integration into gas-phase reverse micelles depends upon amino acid hydrophobicity and charge state. For examples, glycine and protonated amino acids (such as protonated tryptophan) are encapsulated within the micellar core via electrostatic interactions; while neutral tryptophan is adsorbed in the surfactant layer. As verified using model polar hydrophobic compounds, the hydrophobic effect and solute-interface hydrogen-bonding do not provide sufficient driving force needed for interfacial solubilization of neutral tryptophan. Neutral tryptophan, with a zwitterionic structure, is intercalated at the micellar interface between surfactant molecules through complementary effects of electrostatic interactions between tryptophan backbone and AOT polar heads, and hydrophobic interactions between tryptophan side chain and AOT alkyl tails. Protonation of tryptophan could significantly improve its incorporation capacity into gas-phase reverse micelles, and displace its incorporation site from the micellar interfacial zone to the core; protonation of glycine, on the other hand, has little effect on its encapsulation capacity. Another interesting observation is that amino acids of different isoelectric points could be selectively encapsulated into, and transported by, reverse micelles from solution to the gas phase, based upon their competition for protonation and subsequent encapsulation within the micellar core. PMID:21140022

  15. SR-52 PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR PROGRAMS FOR VENTURI SCRUBBERS AND ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides useful tools for estimating particulate removal by venturi scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. Detailed descriptions are given for programs to predict the penetration (one minus efficiency) for each device. These programs are written specifically for th...

  16. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  17. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  18. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  19. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  20. A field demonstration of the use of wet and dry scrubber sludges in engineered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.E.; Cline, J.H.

    1995-03-01

    In a research program being performed at The Ohio State University, the agronomic and engineering properties of flue gas desulfurization by-products are being evaluated. The purpose of this project is to identify potentially beneficial uses for these materials and in so doing reduce the amount of by-product that must be disposed of in landfills. The results of the experimental program have demonstrated that FGD by-products possess the physical properties that should make them suitable for use as a select fill in a variety of construction projects. To verify the laboratory findings on a larger scale, work was begun on a number of field demonstration projects in which the behavior of the FGD could be evaluated under actual field conditions. Two of these field projects were conducted at an Ohio State University research farm where both wet and dry FGD materials were used to stabilize the soil bases in cattle feedlots. Ash from American Electric Power`s Tidd PFBC plant in Brilliant, Ohio was placed in three lots each designed to accommodate approximately fifty animals. Stability wet scrubber sludge from AEP`s Conesville, Ohio plant was placed at two hay bale storage and Winter feeding sites. The construction of the test plots is described. Visual inspections of the plots as well as laboratory tests on samples of the by-product collected at several times during the months since the FGD bases installed have shown that in general, the materials have performed satisfactorily.

  1. Gas Cluster Ion Beam Etching under Acetic Acid Vapor for Etch-Resistant Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Hinoura, Ryo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Hara, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Isao

    2013-05-01

    Gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) etching of etch-resistant materials under acetic acid vapor was studied for development of new manufacturing process of future nonvolatile memory. Etching depths of various etch-resistant materials (Pt, Ru, Ta, CoFe) with acetic acid vapor during O2-GCIB irradiations were 1.8-10.7 times higher than those without acetic acid. Also, etching depths of Ru, Ta, CoFe by Ar-GCIB with acetic acid vapor were 2.2-16.1 times higher than those without acetic acid. Even after etching of Pt, smoothing of Pt was realized using O2-GCIB under acetic acid. From XPS and angular distribution of sputtered Pt, it was shown that PtOx layer was formed on Pt after O2-GCIB irradiation. PtOx reacted with acetic acid by GCIB bombardments; as a result, increase of etching depth was observed.

  2. Technical letter report: Submerged bed scrubber sediment resuspension testing for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Herrington, M.G.

    1996-03-01

    During-vitrification operations in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), some feed components will be vented from the melter to the melter offgas cleaning equipment. The current HWVP reference process for melter off.-gas treatment includes a submerged bed scrubber (SBS) to provide the first stage of off-gas scrubbing and quenching. During most melter/off-gas test runs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with the Pilot Scale Ceramic Melter (PSCM) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), no significant quantities of sedimentation were accumulated in the SBS scrub tank. However, during test run SF-12, conducted at West Valley, approximately 6 in. of sedimentation accumulated in the scrub tank. This raised concerns that a similar accumulation could occur with the HWVP SBS, If such an accumulation rate occurred during a sustained melter run, the SBS would soon cease to function. To alleviate the potential for sedimentation buildup, the HWVP SBS design includes a sparge ring at the bottom of the scrub tank. The sparge ring will be operated intermittently to prevent buildup of solids which could interfere with circulation with the SBS Scrub tank. This report presents the results of testing conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the HWVP sparge ring design. Section 2 contains-the conclusions and recommendations; Section 3 summarizes the objectives; Section 4 describes the equipment and materials used; Section 5 gives the experimental approach; and Section 6 discusses the results. The appendices contain procedures for sediment resuspension testing and particle size distribution data for silica and sediment.

  3. GAS PERMEATION PROPERTIES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID). (R826733)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The need for the development of polymeric materials based on renewable resources has led to the development of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) which is being produced from a feedstock of corn rather than petroleum. The present study examines the permeation of nitrogen...

  4. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  5. Acid gas absorption in aqueous solutions of mixed amines

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.S.; Sandall, O.C.

    1996-12-31

    A mass transfer model has been developed to describe the rate of absorption (or desorption) of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} in aqueous blends of a tertiary and a secondary or a primary amine. The model is based on penetration theory, and all significant chemical reactions are incorporated in the model. The reactions are taken to be reversible, with reactions involving only a proton transfer considered to be at equilibrium. The particular amines studied in this research were methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), a tertiary amine, and diethanolamine (DEA), a secondary amine. Key physicochemical data needed in the model, such as diffusion coefficients, kinetic rate constants, and gas solubilities, were measured. Experimental absorption rates of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S were measured in a model gas-liquid contacting device and were compared with model predictions. Experiments were carried out for single amine solutions (both MDEA and DEA) and for amine blends.

  6. Mechanisms for nano particle removal in brush scrubber cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yating; Guo, Dan; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the nano particle (<100 nm) removal behavior in brush scrubber cleaning is presented based on experiment results and theoretical analysis. The forces on the particles in different situations are analyzed and discussed. The adhesion forces of the van der Waals force, the electrostatic force, the brush load and the static friction between the particle and the wafer are calculated. The contact elastic force, hydrodynamic drag force and friction between the brush and the particle are considered as removal forces and are evaluated. The porous structure and roughness surface of brush material are considered in the hydrodynamic model to describe the brush deformation and the flow field in the cleaning process. The porous structure will result in decrease of hydrodynamic drag force. There are four situations of the particles relative to the brush roughness asperities for which the forces on the particle are different. When the particle is in contact with a brush asperity or on the wafer surface and in a semi-infinite fluid flow field, the particle may be removed by hydrodynamic force and elastic force in the presence of surfactant. When the particle is embedded in the brush asperity, the remove will realized when the friction caused by adhesion between the brush and the particle overcome the adhesion force between particle and wafer surface. The removed particles will be in the flow field or adhered on the brush surface and may redeposit on the wafer surface.

  7. Evaluation of gas cooling for pressurized phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Skok, A. J.; Maru, H. C.; Kothmann, R. E.; Harry, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas cooling has already been demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. This paper presents theoretical and experimental investigation of gas cooling for pressurized PAFC. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  8. Evaluation of Gas-Cooled Pressurized Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells for Electric Utility Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faroque, M.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas-cooling was already demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. Theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-cooling for pressurized PAFC are presented. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas-Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas-Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  9. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed. PMID:26444488

  10. Collection and analysis of organic acids in exhaust gas. Comparison of different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, E.; Montagne, X.; Lahaye, J.

    This paper reports the development of a specific method to identify organic acids in exhaust gases. The organic acids are collected in two impingers containing liquids (pure water or Na 2CO 3 1% aqueous solution) and four cartridges containing solids (silica, fluorisil, alumina B and alumina N). Once collected, the acids are eluted of the solids by a hot water stream. These traps performances, in terms of organic acids collection and elution efficiency, are evaluated and compared. Two sources are used to produce the gas flow containing organic acids: one generates a flow whose concentration is known and stable, the other produces organic acids among other combustion products. For eluted solutions analysis, two methods are used: isocratic ionic chromatography/conductivity detection and GC/FID. Their efficiency in separating 10 aliphatic acids are compared. Their characteristics such as detection limits, detection linearity, repeatability and possible interferences with other components found in exhaust gases are determined. The stability of the organic acids solutions is also studied. Lastly, the use of these methods is illustrated by the analysis of the gas-phase organic acids exhausted by a spark ignition and by a diesel engine.

  11. Engineering Porous Organic Cage Crystals with Increased Acid Gas Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanghui; Hoffman, Christopher D; Liu, Yang; Bhattacharyya, Souryadeep; Tumuluri, Uma; Jue, Melinda L; Wu, Zili; Sholl, David S; Nair, Sankar; Jones, Christopher W; Lively, Ryan P

    2016-07-25

    Both known and new CC3-based porous organic cages are prepared and exposed to acidic SO2 in vapor and liquid conditions. Distinct differences in the stability of the CC3 cages exist depending on the chirality of the diamine linkers used. The acid catalyzed CC3 degradation mechanism is probed via in situ IR and a degradation pathway is proposed and supported with computational results. CC3 crystals synthesized with racemic mixtures of diaminocyclohexane exhibited enhanced stability compared to CC3-R and CC3-S. Confocal fluorescent microscope images reveal that the stability difference in CC3 species originates from an abundance of mesoporous grain boundaries in CC3-R and CC3-S, allowing facile access of aqueous SO2 throughout the crystal, promoting decomposition. These grain boundaries are absent from CC3 crystals made with racemic linkers. PMID:27253350

  12. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adam M; Carey, Spencer J; Pejlovas, Aaron M; Li, Kexin; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2015-04-14

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0(+)) = 1151.8(5), B(0(+)) = 100.3(5), C(0(+)) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0(-)) = 1152.2(5), B(0(-)) = 100.7(5), C(0(-)) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy. PMID:25877574

  13. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Adam M.; Carey, Spencer J.; Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Li, Kexin; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-04-01

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0+) = 1151.8(5), B(0+) = 100.3(5), C(0+) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0-) = 1152.2(5), B(0-) = 100.7(5), C(0-) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy.

  14. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Adam M.; Carey, Spencer J.; Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Li, Kexin; Kukolich, Stephen G.; Kang, Lu

    2015-04-14

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0{sup +}) = 1151.8(5), B(0{sup +}) = 100.3(5), C(0{sup +}) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0{sup −}) = 1152.2(5), B(0{sup −}) = 100.7(5), C(0{sup −}) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy.

  15. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey. PMID:10794629

  16. Gas-phase acidities of tetrahedral oxyacids from ab initio electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Dixon, D.A.; Kubicki, J.D.; Felmy, A.R.

    2000-05-04

    Density functional calculations have been performed on several protonation states of the oxyacids of Si, P, V, As, Cr, and S. Structures and vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with experimental values where these are available. A reasonably well-defined correlation between the calculated gas-phase acidities and the measured pK{sub a} in aqueous solution has been found. The pK{sub a}/gas-phase acidity slopes are consistent with those derived from previous molecular mechanics calculations on ferric hydrolysis and the first two acidity constants for orthosilicic acid. The successive deprotonation of other H{sub n}TO{sub 4} species, for a given tetrahedral anion T are roughly consistent with this slope, but not to the extent that there is a universal correlation among all species.

  17. Gas chromatography analysis of cellular fatty acids and neutral monosaccharides in the identification of lactobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, A F; Korkeala, H; Mononen, I

    1987-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids and monosaccharides in a group of 14 lactobacilli were analyzed by gas chromatography and the identity of the components was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the same bacterial sample, both monosaccharides and fatty acids were liberated by methanolysis, and in certain experiments, fatty acids alone were released by basic hydrolysis. The results indicate that basic hydrolysis gave more comprehensive information about the fatty acids, but the analysis of monosaccharides was found to be much more useful in distinguishing between different species of lactobacilli. The method described allowed differentiation of 11 of 14 Lactobacillus species, and even single colonies isolated from agar plates could be used for analysis without subculturing. PMID:3435147

  18. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  19. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  20. Shearer-mounted scrubbers, are they viable and cost-effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Wirch, S.; Jankowski, R.

    1995-12-31

    The issue of dust control in underground coal mines has been extensively studied by both government and industry. This research work has resulted in many techniques which control the dust or help miners avoid it. Control techniques either prevent the dust from becoming airborne or cleanse the air before it can be inhaled. Avoidance measures minimize the exposure of miners to the airborne dust by blowing the dust away from work areas or making it unnecessary for a miner to occupy a dusty region. One of several successful dust control measures in continuous miner sections is the use of a machine mounted scrubber which cleanses the air and helps to prevent the contaminated air from reaching areas frequented by mine personnel . Research on the application of scrubbers on longwall shearers began in the 1970s and continued into the 1980s. The most successful projects showed only moderate improvement when a scrubber system was mounted on a longwall shearer, and the less successful projects actually increased worker dust levels. There are many reasons that scrubbers have not been successfully applied on longwalls. The most significant of these is that longwalls have across the face ventilation and generally have high face air flows. Scrubbers tend to work best when they are the primary cause of ventilation. Therefore, their capture efficiencies on longwalls tend to suffer because of the exposure of the drums to the primary airflow. Other reasons scrubbers have not been implemented on longwalls include the successful application of an excellent water spray system, effective cutting techniques, and dispersion of dust sources. These techniques can help control drum generated dust, increase production, and limit the relative effectiveness of a scrubber.

  1. Determination of Free Fatty Acids and Triglycerides by Gas Chromatography Using Selective Esterification Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-11-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  2. Preparation of sphingolipid fatty acid methyl esters for determination by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    MacGee, J; Williams, M G

    1981-01-30

    Sphingolipid fatty acids are first converted to a mixture of free acids and their n-butyl esters by heating the specimen at 85 degree C in aqueous butanolic hydrogen chloride; the butyl esters are then saponified with methanolic potassium hydroxide. After acidification and extraction into hexane, the fatty acids are extracted into a very small volume of aqueous trimethyl(m-trifluorotolyl)ammonium hydroxide (TMTFTH), injection of an aliquot of the TMTFTH extract into the gas chromatograph yields the fatty acid methyl esters by pyrolytic methylation of the quaternary ammonium salts of the fatty acids. The preparation of a specimen ready for the gas--liquid chromatographic (GLC) analysis with quantitative recovery of the sphingolipid fatty acids can be accomplished in less than 2 h. By comparison, none of a number of well-accepted techniques for the release of sphingomyelin fatty acids by hydrolysis or methanolysis released the fatty acids quantitatively in less than 3 h, and all required additional manipulations before GLC analysis. PMID:7217267

  3. Field test of four methods for gas-phase ambient nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Hartsell, Benjamin E.; Luke, Winston T.; Rahmat Ullah, S. M.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Greg Huey, L.; Tate, Paul

    Three semi-continuous methods for detecting nitric acid (HNO 3) were tested against the annular denuder + filter pack (ADS) integrated collection technique at the Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) Sydney research station ˜20km downwind of the Tampa, Florida, urban core. The semi-continuous instruments included: two slightly differing implementations of the NOY-NO (total oxides of nitrogen minus that total denuded of HNO 3) denuder difference technique, one from the NOAA Air Resources Lab (ARL), and one from Atmospheric Research and Analysis, Inc. (ARA); the parallel plate wet diffusion scrubber + online ion chromatography technique from Texas Tech University (TTU); and the chemical ionization mass spectrometer from the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT). Twelve hour ADS samples were collected by the University of South Florida (USF). Results for 10 min samples computed from the various higher sampling frequencies of each semi-continuous instrument showed good agreement (R2>0.7) for afternoon periods of the highest production and accumulation of HNO 3. Further, agreement was within ±30% for these instruments even at HNO 3 concentrations <0.30ppb. The USF ADS results were biased low, however, by 44%, on average, compared to the corporate 12 h aggregated means from the semi-continuous methods, and by >60% for the nighttime samples; ADS results were below the corporate mean maximum HNO 3 concentration by >30% as well. The four instruments using semi-continuous methods, by contrast, were all within 10% of each other's 12 h mean mixing ratios. While only ARA employed a formal minimum detection limit at 0.050 ppb, error analysis with the other techniques established that at the same level of precision, TTU's effective limit was approximately the same as ARA's and that ARL's limit was 0.030 ppb; analysis for GIT showed no apparent effective limit at the levels of HNO 3 encountered in this field study. The importance of sample inlet height for

  4. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  5. Determination of nine catecholamine metabolites and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid in urine by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E B; Horsten, B P; Goldschmidt, H M

    1983-11-25

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of nine urinary acidic and alcoholic catecholamine metabolites and urinary 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid. Incubation of a urine sample in the presence of ascorbic acid, glucuronidase and acylase and subsequent extraction with ethyl acetate precedes derivatization to trimethylsilyl compounds, capillary gas chromatographic separation and flame-ionization detection. The automated dual injection procedure and the analytical characteristics of the proposed method are reported in detail. Special attention is paid to problems that occur in analysis on a routine basis. PMID:6200488

  6. THE ADIPIC ACID ENHANCED FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESS FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS. VOLUME 1. FIELD TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the effect of adding adipic acid on the SO2 removal of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on a coal-fired industrial boiler at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base near Columbus, OH. Emission data were collected in a...

  7. CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION MODULES FOR EULERIAN ACID DEPOSITION MODELS. VOLUME 1. THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the review and evaluation of mechanistic and kinetic data for the gas-phase reactions that lead to the production of acidic substances in the environment. A master mechanism is designed that treats oxides, sulfur dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, t...

  8. Inoculant effects on alfalfa silage: in vitro gas and volatile fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa silages from two similar trials, 15 treatments with an untreated control and 14 lactic acid bacterial inoculants, were analyzed for in vitro ruminal gas production. First cut (477 g DM/kg) and second cut (393 g DM/kg) alfalfa had been ensiled in glass jars for a minimum of 30 days at room te...

  9. Capillary gas chromatography determination of volatile organic acids in rain and fog samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    A fused silica capillary gas chromatography technique is described for the determination of volatile acids (C/sub 1/-C/sub 7/) in rain samples using p-bromophenacyl esters. As the sensitivity of this method is high (GC detection limit is ca. 10 pmol), a small volume of rain (25-50 mL) or fog (1-2 mL) is needed. Spiked experiments showed that the measured concentrations of volatile acids in the spiked rain samples linearly increased with a slope of approx.1 in proportion to the concentrations of volatile acids added in the rainwater. Repeated analyses of rain samples showed that relative standard deviations are less than or equal to 18% for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ acids, which are the major volatile acids.

  10. [Gas chromatographic determination of formic acid in urine as carbon monoxide (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Angerer, J

    1976-02-01

    A gas chromatographic method for determining formic acid in human urine is described. The analytical reliability of this method fullfills the criteria of statistical quality control. The rate of recovery is 101.2 to 105.7% the variability coefficients lie between 2.9 and 7.2%. The selectivity of this method is demonstrated by analysing a group of components normally occuring in urine which did not interfere with the determination of formic acid. The detection limit of about 4.3 mumol/1 formic acid in urine permits the determination of the concentration of formic acid in the urine of normal persons. The concentrations of formic acid in the urine of a group of normal persons lies between 0 and 2.79 mmol/1. The average concentration was 0.39 +/- 0.60 mmol/1. PMID:1249528

  11. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  12. Gas chromatography-vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy for analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Smuts, Jonathan; Bai, Ling; Walsh, Phillip; Armstrong, Daniel W; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    A new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography was recently developed and applied to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. VUV detection features full spectral acquisition in a wavelength range of 115-240nm, where virtually all chemical species absorb. VUV absorption spectra of 37 FAMEs, including saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated types were recorded. Unsaturated FAMEs show significantly different gas phase absorption profiles than saturated ones, and these classes can be easily distinguished with the VUV detector. Another advantage includes differentiating cis/trans-isomeric FAMEs (e.g. oleic acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester isomers) and the ability to use VUV data analysis software for deconvolution of co-eluting signals. As a universal detector, VUV also provides high specificity, sensitivity, and a fast data acquisition rate, making it a powerful tool for fatty acid screening when combined with gas chromatography. The fatty acid profile of several food oil samples (olive, canola, vegetable, corn, sunflower and peanut oils) were analyzed in this study to demonstrate applicability to real world samples. PMID:26471553

  13. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  14. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  15. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  16. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Oyenekan, Babatunde A.

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations. PMID:19803493

  18. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment..., 2011 § 60.648 Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas... dilute solutions are used. In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a...

  19. 40 CFR 60.5408 - What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure? 60.5408 Section 60.5408 Protection of Environment... § 60.5408 What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure... of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with a standard solution of iodine....

  20. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment..., 2011 § 60.648 Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas... dilute solutions are used. In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a...

  1. 40 CFR 60.5408 - What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure? 60.5408 Section 60.5408 Protection of Environment... § 60.5408 What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure... of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with a standard solution of iodine....

  2. An acid-gas removal system for upgrading subquality natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.; Leppin, D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Hooper, H.M.; Emmrich, G.; Moore, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop systems to reduce the cost of treating subquality natural gas. Based on over 1,000 laboratory experiments on vapor-liquid equilibria and mass transfer and simulation studies, the use of N-Formyl Morpholine as a solvent together with structured packings has the following advantages: high capacity for H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} removal; little or no refrigeration required; less loss of hydrocarbons (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}-C{sub 6}); and dehydration potential. To verify these findings and to obtain additional data base for scale-up, a field test unit capable of processing 1MMSCF/d of natural gas has been installed at the Shell Western E and P Inc. (SWEPI) Fandango processing plant site. The results of the testing at the Fandango site will be presented when available.

  3. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  4. Removal of fly-ash and dust particulate matters from syngas produced by gasification of coal by using a multi-stage dual-flow sieve plate wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Kurella, Swamy; Meikap, Bhim Charan

    2016-08-23

    In this work, fly-ash water scrubbing experiments were conducted in a three-stage lab-scale dual-flow sieve plate scrubber to observe the performance of scrubber in fly-ash removal at different operating conditions by varying the liquid rate, gas rate and inlet fly-ash loading. The percentage of fly-ash removal efficiency increases with increase in inlet fly-ash loading, gas flow rate and liquid flow rate, and height of the scrubber; 98.55% maximum percentage of fly-ash removal efficiency (ηFA) is achieved at 19.36 × 10(-4) Nm(3)/s gas flow rate (QG) and 48.183 × 10(-6) m(3)/s liquid flow rate (QL) at 25 × 10(-3) kg/Nm(3) inlet fly-ash loading (CFA,i). A model has also been developed for the prediction of fly-ash removal efficiency of the column using the experimental results. The predicted values calculated using the correlation matched well with the experimental results. Deviations observed between the experimental and the predicted values were less than 20%. PMID:27230635

  5. Effects of the methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on phenolic and miscanthus composites containing calcium sulfite scrubber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sean

    The purpose of this research is to test the effects of methyltrimethoxysilane coupling agent on composite material containing calcium sulfite obtained from the Southern Illinois Power Co-operative. This scrubber material and the miscanthus plant are of interest due to their use in coal burning power plants to reduce toxic emission. When calcium sulfate is passed through coal fire gas emissions it absorbs mercury and sulfur. In these composites it is used as filler to reduce cost. Miscanthus is a source of both cellulose reinforcement and some natural resin. This plant has low care requirements, little mineral content, useful energy return, and positive environmental effects. Under investigation is whether a post-cure procedure or a silane coupling agent will positively impact the composite. Hot pressing alone may not be enough to fully cure the phenolic. It is hoped that the silane will increase the strength characteristics of the composite by enhancing adhesion between the calcium sulfite and phenolic resin. Possible effects on the miscanthus by the silane will also be tested. Phenolic is being utilized because of its recycling and biodegradable properties along with cost effectiveness in mass production. Composite mechanical performance was measured through 3-point bending to measure flexural strength and strain at breakage. A dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) was used to find thermomechanical properties. The post-cure was found to be effective, particularly on the final composite containing silane. When methyltrimethoxysilane was added to the miscanthus prior to fabrication, it was found to reduce flexural strength and density. However the addition of methyltrimethoxysilane to the calcium sulfite altered thermo-mechanical properties to a state more like pure phenolic, with added flexibility and thermal stability.

  6. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  7. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  8. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  9. 40 CFR 60.5175 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection..., fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon injection, or afterburner, or if I limit... device other than a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, activated carbon...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Model Rule-Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Model Rule—Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers As stated in § 60.3023, you must...

  11. Feasibility of a machine-mounted scrubber system for ventilating coal-mine working faces. Open File report

    SciTech Connect

    Halfinger, G.

    1984-06-01

    Underground testing was carried out to determine the effectiveness of a machine-mounted scrubber system for ventilating the face during deep cutting. A continuous miner equipped with an integral flooded-bed dust scrubber system was instrumented. Methane and respirable dust data were collected at brattice setbacks of 25 ft (standard), 35 ft, and 50 ft (blowing ventilation) during production shifts.

  12. Activated carbon cleanup of the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the details of a recently developed novel process using activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur recovery units. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This effect is especially evident in split flow Claus plants which bypass some of the acid gas feed stream around the initial combustion step because of a low hydrogen sulfide concentration. This new clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}{sup +} hydrocarbons from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated using low pressure steam. A post regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. This technology was extensively pilot tested in Saudi Aramco`s facilities in Saudi Arabia. Full scale commercial units are planned for two plants in the near future with the first coming on-line in 1997. The process described here represents the first application of activated carbon in this service, and a patent has been applied for. The paper will discuss the pilot plant results and the issues involved in scale-up to commercial size.

  13. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  14. A sulfuric-acid process with near-zero SO2 gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, W.; Fattinger, V.; Keilpart, T.; Hamel, H.-J.

    1999-05-01

    A sulfuric-acid process has been developed that is able to handle low and variable SO2 concentrations with practically zero SO2 emissions (less than 3 ppm). The plant comprises two stages—a single-bed converter contact plant and a modified tower plant. Acids of 95 98% and/or oleum with up to 32% free SO3 can be produced in the first stage. Off-gas of the first stage is piped to the second stage, where the SO2 is converted to near nontracability while producing 76% strong acid. It is then returned to the contact plant to produce stronger acid or oleum. This process does not generate any additional disposable waste.

  15. Exploration of SO[subscript 2] Scrubbers: An Environmental Chemistry Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Amber L.; Leber, Phyllis A.; Yoder, Claude H.

    2009-01-01

    The remediation of acid rain by SO[subscript 2] scrubbing is integrated into a laboratory project appropriate for first-year chemistry students. By burning a small amount of sulfur and bubbling the gas produced through distilled water, the student first observes one of the reactions that produces acid rain. The student then tests four different…

  16. Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L.; Doctor, Richard D.; Wingender, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of simultaneously removing SO.sub.2 and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO.sub.2 and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled.

  17. Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

    1985-08-05

    A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

  18. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic... emission limits? If you use an air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, fabric...

  19. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic... emission limits? If you use an air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, fabric...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic... emission limits? If you use an air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, fabric...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4855 - How do I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic precipitator, or activated carbon... I establish operating limits if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, electrostatic... emission limits? If you use an air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, fabric...

  2. Characterization of naphthenic acids by gas chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Xavier; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Backus, Sean M; Peru, Kerry M; McMartin, Dena W; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Taguchi, Vince Y; Headley, John V

    2014-08-01

    During the bitumen extraction from the oil sands of Alberta, large volumes of process water containing naphthenic acids are stored in tailing ponds. The naphthenic acids along with other components in the processed waters are known to be toxic in aquatic environments. In view of the complex matrix and the toxicity of the processed waters, there is a need for complementary analytical techniques for comprehensive characterization of the naphthenic acid mixtures. This study reports the online gas chromatographic separation of naphthenic acid mixtures prior to ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry detection, using electron and chemical ionization. Two oil sands processed water samples and two groundwater samples were characterized to evaluate the performance of the instrumental technique. The high mass resolution of the system enabled visualization of the data using Kendrick mass defect plots. The addition of gas chromatographic separations enabled visualization of the data as unique compound class elution fingerprints. The technique is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for chemical fingerprinting of naphthenic acids. PMID:25001115

  3. Determination of carboxylic acids in oil samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.

    1981-03-01

    A combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for measuring carboxylic acids in oil samples without first going through solvent extraction and group separation is reported. The carboxylic acids in oils are directly derivatized to their corresponding methyl esters via anion formation in tetramethylammonium hydroxide/methanol/methyl iodide/n-butyl acetate solutions prior to GC/MS analysis using a glass wall coated capillary column. The reaction is mild, selective, and rapid. It can usually be carried out at room temperature and completed in 10 to 15 min. Multiple ion detection techniques (MID) can be readily used to further resolve methyl esters from other compounds if necessary.

  4. Ammonia Gas Sensing Behavior of Tanninsulfonic Acid Doped Polyaniline-TiO2 Composite

    PubMed Central

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Bourdo, Shawn E.; Sacre, Nicolas; Nair, Dev; Berry, Brian C.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO2 composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO2 in TANIPANI matrix. UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy studies provided information about the electronic interactions among tannin, polyaniline, and TiO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the metal oxide dispersions inside polyaniline matrix. Gas sensors were prepared by spin coating solutions of TANIPANI-TiO2 and TANIPANI composites onto glass slides. Sensors were tested at three different concentrations (20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 60 ppm) of ammonia gas at ambient temperature conditions by measuring the changes in surface resistivity of the films with respect to time. Ammonia gas sensing plots are presented showing the response values, response times and recovery times. The TANIPANI-TiO2 composite exhibited better response and shorter recovery times when compared to TANIPANI control and other polyaniline composites that have been reported in the literature. For the first time a proposed mechanism of gas sensing basing on the polaron band localization and its effects on the gas sensing behavior of polyaniline are reported. PMID:26501291

  5. Ammonia gas sensing behavior of tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline-TiO₂ composite.

    PubMed

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Bourdo, Shawn E; Sacre, Nicolas; Nair, Dev; Berry, Brian C; Biris, Alexandru S; Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO₂ composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO₂ in TANIPANI matrix. UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy studies provided information about the electronic interactions among tannin, polyaniline, and TiO₂. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the metal oxide dispersions inside polyaniline matrix. Gas sensors were prepared by spin coating solutions of TANIPANI-TiO₂ and TANIPANI composites onto glass slides. Sensors were tested at three different concentrations (20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 60 ppm) of ammonia gas at ambient temperature conditions by measuring the changes in surface resistivity of the films with respect to time. Ammonia gas sensing plots are presented showing the response values, response times and recovery times. The TANIPANI-TiO₂ composite exhibited better response and shorter recovery times when compared to TANIPANI control and other polyaniline composites that have been reported in the literature. For the first time a proposed mechanism of gas sensing basing on the polaron band localization and its effects on the gas sensing behavior of polyaniline are reported. PMID:26501291

  6. Uptake of Gas-Phase Nitric Acid by Water-Ice Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullerstam, M.; Abbatt, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    Nitric acid is a widespread molecule found in the atmosphere. It is mainly removed from the troposphere by wet or dry deposition. In colder regions such as the upper troposphere and tropopause where cirrus clouds are formed nitric acid can also be scavenged by cirrus ice particles. The uptake of gas-phase nitric acid by water-ice films has been re-examined with a coated-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) at 228K. Previous flow tube studies of this system have shown little dependence of the uptake over the partial pressure regime studied. In these studies the initial, short-term uptake has been the focus and the long term uptake has not been quantified. In this experimental setup it was possible to study the uptake of nitric acid at lower partial pressures resulting in a more atmospherically appropriate determination of the adsorption isotherm and the long term uptake has also been addressed. Measurement of the initial uptake coefficient representing a lower limit will also be presented. Finally, possible burial of nitric acid into the bulk of the ice during continuous growth of the ice film has been studied. In the atmosphere ice particles will be subject to cycles of evaporation and condensation which could cause the nitric acid to be encapsulated into the particle, especially since the major part of the adsorption has been proven to be irreversible. This could enhance the ice particles capacity of scavenging nitric acid.

  7. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  8. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres. PMID:26263321

  9. Formation of organic acids from the gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene was studied in static chamber experiments using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. Two isomers of C(7)-diacids and three isomers of C(7)-aldehydic acids were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Possible mechanisms of formation of these acids were investigated using different OH radical scavengers and relative humidities, and were compared to those reported earlier for the ozonolysis of beta-pinene. In addition, branching ratios for some of the individual reaction steps, e.g. the branching ratio between the two hydroperoxide channels of the C(7)-CI, were deduced from the quantitative product yield data. Branching ratios for POZ decomposition and the stabilisation/decomposition of the C(7-)CI were also obtained from measurements of the C(7) primary carbonyl product. PMID:19458821

  10. Electrons Mediate the Gas-Phase Oxidation of Formic Acid with Ozone.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Christian; Tang, Wai-Kit; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-08-26

    Gas-phase reactions of CO3 (.-) with formic acid are studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Signal loss indicates the release of a free electron, with the formation of neutral reaction products. This is corroborated by adding traces of SF6 to the reaction gas, which scavenges 38 % of the electrons. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction potential energy surface provide a reaction path for the formation of neutral carbon dioxide and water as the thermochemically favored products. From the literature, it is known that free electrons in the troposphere attach to O2 , which in turn transfer the electron to O3 . O3 (.-) reacts with CO2 to form CO3 (.-) . The reaction reported here formally closes the catalytic cycle for the oxidation of formic acid with ozone, catalyzed by free electrons. PMID:27400953

  11. Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

  12. EFFECTS OF INTERFACIAL PROPERTIES ON COLLECTION OF FINE PARTICLES BY WET SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of typical wet scrubber models to determine the effects of surface tension on particle removal efficiency. Particle capture (removal) is a two-step process: collision of a particle with a spray droplet, and coalescence with the droplet. A c...

  13. NATIONAL DUST COLLECTOR MODEL 850 VARIABLE ROD MODULE VENTURI SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a measurement of the performance of a National Dust Collector Model 850 variable rod module venturi scrubber at an industrial installation. Fine particle collection efficiency as a function of particle size was computed from the data collected. The scr...

  14. Laboratory Evaluation of Electrostatic Spray Wet Scrubber to Control Particulate Matter Emissions from Poultry Facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particulate matter (PM) is a major air pollutant emitted from animal production and has significant impacts on health and the environment. Abatement of PM emissions is imperative and effective PM control technologies are strongly needed. In this work, an electrostatic spray wet scrubber (ESWS) techn...

  15. Algal turf scrubbers: Periphyton production and nutrient recovery on a South Florida citrus farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a strong need to develop strategies that reduce nutrient loading to Florida’s waters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nutrient-removing ability and growth rate of periphyton, grown on an Algal Turf Scrubber (ATSTM) that received runoff from a citrus orchard operated by the ...

  16. 40 CFR 65.154 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the liquid to... which it is part, as specified in 40 CFR 63.100(k) (if the referencing subpart is 40 CFR part 63... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogen scrubbers and other...

  17. 40 CFR 65.154 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the liquid to... which it is part, as specified in 40 CFR 63.100(k) (if the referencing subpart is 40 CFR part 63... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogen scrubbers and other...

  18. 40 CFR 65.154 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the liquid to... which it is part, as specified in 40 CFR 63.100(k) (if the referencing subpart is 40 CFR part 63... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogen scrubbers and other...

  19. 40 CFR 65.154 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the liquid to... which it is part, as specified in 40 CFR 63.100(k) (if the referencing subpart is 40 CFR part 63... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogen scrubbers and other...

  20. 40 CFR 65.154 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the liquid to... which it is part, as specified in 40 CFR 63.100(k) (if the referencing subpart is 40 CFR part 63... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogen scrubbers and other...

  1. 40 CFR 63.994 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... is subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the... halogen scrubber or other halogen reduction technique used to reduce the vent stream halogen atom mass... subpart shall determine the halogen atom mass emission rate prior to the combustion device according...

  2. 40 CFR 63.994 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... is subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the... halogen scrubber or other halogen reduction technique used to reduce the vent stream halogen atom mass... subpart shall determine the halogen atom mass emission rate prior to the combustion device according...

  3. 40 CFR 63.994 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... is subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the... halogen scrubber or other halogen reduction technique used to reduce the vent stream halogen atom mass... subpart shall determine the halogen atom mass emission rate prior to the combustion device according...

  4. 40 CFR 63.994 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... is subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the... halogen scrubber or other halogen reduction technique used to reduce the vent stream halogen atom mass... subpart shall determine the halogen atom mass emission rate prior to the combustion device according...

  5. 40 CFR 63.994 - Halogen scrubbers and other halogen reduction devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... is subject to regulations in 40 CFR parts 264 through 266 that have required a determination of the... halogen scrubber or other halogen reduction technique used to reduce the vent stream halogen atom mass... subpart shall determine the halogen atom mass emission rate prior to the combustion device according...

  6. EVALUATION OF SOLIDS DEWATERING FOR A PILOT-SCALE THIOSORBIC LIME SO2 SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of solids dewatering for a pilot-scale thiosorbic lime SO2 scrubber. Pilot plant data showed that the dissolved magnesium in thiosorbic lime caused deterioration of solids dewatering properties. The slurry settling rate increased when the ...

  7. EFFECT OF LIMESTONE TYPE AND GRIND ON S02 SCRUBBER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effect of limestone type and grind on SO2 scrubber performance. It gives results of a comparison of the amount of limestone feed required as a function of particle size, to obtain a given SO2 removal efficiency and, thus, to verify the relative magnitude o...

  8. IN-STACK PLUME OPACITY FROM ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR/SCRUBBER SYSTEM AT HARRINGTON UNIT 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of theoretical modeling of particulate emission and in-stack plume opacity for the electrostatic precipitator (ESP)/scrubber system at Southwestern Public Service Company's Harrington Unit 1. The theoretical results of an emission rate of 17.8 ng/J and op...

  9. TI-59 PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR PROGRAMS FOR IN-STACK OPACITY, VENTURI SCRUBBERS, AND ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report explains the basic concepts of in-stack opacity as measured by in-stack opacity monitors. Also included are calculator programs that model the performance of venturi scrubbers and electrostatic precipitators. The effect of particulate control devices on in-stack opacit...

  10. Extended advance of continuous miner successfully ventilated with a scrubber in a blowing section

    SciTech Connect

    Volkwein, J.C.; Thimons, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Underground testing was carried out by Ingersoll-Rand, Inc., under contract to the Bureau of Mines to determine the effectiveness of a machine-mounted scrubber system for ventilating the face during an extended advance. A continuous miner equipped with an integral flooded-bed dust scrubber system was instrumented with methanometers and Real-time Aerosol Monitor (RAM) dust monitors. Methane and respirable dust data were collected at brattice setbacks of 7.5 m (current operating distance), 10.5 m, and 15 m (blowing ventilation) during production shifts. Results showed that a suitable machine-mounted scrubber system can adequately ventilate the face at brattice setbacks up to 15 m. No deterioration in ventilation performance was observed as brattice setbacks were increased from 7.5 m to 15 m. The scrubber system effectively controlled face methane levels at large setbacks, though respirable dust levels increased as much as 33 pct at the operator's cab at setbacks greater than 7.5 m.

  11. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON ELECTROSTATIC SCRUBBER TESTS AT A COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of a 1700 cu m/hr University of Washington Electrostatic Spray Scrubber pilot plant on a coal-fired boiler to demonstrate its effectiveness for controlling fine particle emissions. The multiple-pass, portable pilot plant combines oppositely charg...

  12. Determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by electron-capture and microcoulometric gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.; Lamar, William L.

    1967-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method using microcoulometric titration and electron-capture detection for the analysis of 2,4-D, silvex, 2,4,5-T, and other phenoxy acid herbicides in water is described. The herbicides are extracted from unfiltered water samples (800-1,000 ml) by use of ethyl ether ; then the herbicides are concentrated and esterilied. To allow the analyst a choice, two esterilication procedures--using either boron trifluoride-methanol or diazomethane--are evaluated. Microcoulometric gas chromatography is specific for the detection of halogenated compounds such as the phenoxy acid herbicides whereas it does not respond to nonhalogenated components. Microcoulometric gas chromatography requires care and patience. It is not convenient for rapid screening of l-liter samples that contain less than 1 microgram of the herbicide. Although electroncapture gas chromatography is less selective and more critically affected by interfering substances, it is, nevertheless, convenient and more sensitive than microcoulometric gas chromatography. Two different liquid phases are used in the gas chromatographic columns--DC-200 silicone in one column and QF-1 silicone in the other. The performance of both columns is improved by the addition of Carbowax 20M. The Gas Chrom Q support is coated with the liquid phases by the 'frontal-analysis' technique. The practical lower limits for measurement of the phenoxy acid herbicides in water primarily depend upon the sample size, interferences present, anal instrumentation used. With l-liter samples of water, the practical lower limits of measurement are 10 ppt (parts per trillion) for 2,4-D and 2 ppt for silvex and 2,4,5-T when electron-capture detection is used, and approximately 20 ppt for each herbicide when analyzed by microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Recoveries of the herbicides immediately after addition to unfiltered water samples averaged 92 percent for 2,4-D, 90 percent for silvex, and 98 percent for 2

  13. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS QUANTIFICATION OF JASMONIC ACID AND SALICYLIC ACID IN PLANTS BY VAPOR PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-CHEMICAL IONIZATION-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid represent important signaling compounds in plant defensive responses against other organisms. Here, we present a new method for the easy, sensitive and reproducible quantification of both compounds by vapor phase extraction and gas chromatography-positive ion chemic...

  15. Interaction of Gas Phase Oxalic Acid with Ammonia and its Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  16. Supramolecular Adducts of Cucurbit[7]uril and Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Ekaterina; Vilaseca, Marta; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Masliy, A. N.; Vicent, Cristian; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of the macrocyclic cavitand cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) with a series of amino acids (AA) with different side chains (Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) is investigated by ESI-MS techniques. The 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ adducts are observed as the base peak when equimolar Q7:AA solutions are electrosprayed, whereas the 1:2 [Q7 + 2AA + 2H]2+ dications are dominant when an excess of the amino acid is used. A combination of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and DFT calculations of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ (AA = Tyr, Val, and Ser) adducts is also reported and proven to be unsuccessful at discriminating between exclusion or inclusion-type conformations in the gas phase. Collision induced dissociation (CID) revealed that the preferred dissociation pathways of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ dications are strongly influenced by the identity of the amino acid side chain, whereas ion molecule reactions towards N-butylmethylamine displayed a common reactivity pattern comprising AA displacement. Special emphasis is given on the differences between the gas-phase behavior of the supramolecular adducts with amino acids (AA = Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) and those featuring basic (Lys and Arg) and aromatic (Tyr and Phe) side chains.

  17. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral. PMID:21696883

  18. Numerical simulation of flow in the wet scrubber for desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosád, Jan; Vít, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    This article deals with numerical simulation of flow and chemical reactions in absorber for desulfurization of flue-gas. The objective of the work is the investigation of effect of different nozzles types and their placement in spray layers. These nozzles distribute lime suspension into flue gas stream. The research includes two types of nozzles and four different arrangements of nozzles and spray layers. Conclusion describes the effect of nozzle types and their arrangements on the suspension concentration in absorber.

  19. Radiological engineering evaluation of the delay time line air scrubber located at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Huneycutt, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the addition of an air scrubber to an already existing delay line and whether it would scrub {sup 11}CO{sub 2}. There were three main objectives of this study. The first objective was to determine the scrubbing efficiency of the scrubber. The scrubbing efficiency was then used to predict the dose rates in the scrubber area and compare those values with measurements from radiological surveys. The third objective was to determine if the shield blocks were effective in reducing the dose rates in the scrubber area. The activities were measured before and during scrubber operation and this information was used to calculate the scrubbing efficiency and the efficiency of {sup 11}CO{sub 2} removal was determined to be around 50%. Microshield was then used to predict dose rates and compared those values with measurements from radiological surveys. This was also used to determine the that the shield blocks around the scrubber were effective in reducing the dose rates from the radiation field produced by the radionuclides in the scrubber.

  20. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  1. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  2. Laboratory/bench-scale testing and evaluation of A. P. T. dry-plate scrubber. 10th quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, K.

    1982-09-17

    The A.P.T. Dry Plate Scrubber uses a shallow, dense mobile bed of solid collector granules which move across a perforated plate. The gas stream containing fine particles and vapors is moved upward through the perforations to form high velocity gas jets. The fine particles are removed by inertial deposition onto the collector granules or by direct interception. Electrostatic forces also can be used to improve the collection efficiency and increase the adhesive forces between the particles and collectors. The DPS column consists of a series of collection stages (perforated plates) with the collectors either passing sequentially over each stage or being fed separately to each stage. The stages can be designed so as to promote the collection of large particles on the lower stages and the collection of fine particles and alkali vapors on the upper stages. The objective of this project is to conduct a bench scale experimental evaluation of the DPS at high temperature and pressure to determine its potential for controlling particulate and alkali vapor emissions from PFBC processes. The project is divided into two phases and seven major tasks as listed.

  3. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  4. Formation of Small Gas Phase Carbonyls from Heterogeneous Oxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Gao, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are emitted into the atmosphere from gas and diesel powered vehicles, cooking, plants, and marine biota. Field measurements have suggested that FAs, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), could make up an important contribution to the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols. Due to the existence of carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecules, PUFA are believed to be highly reactive towards atmospheric oxidants such as OH and NO3 radicals and ozone, which will contribute to aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity. Previous work from our group has shown that small carbonyls formed from the heterogeneous reaction of linoleic acid (LA) thin films with gas-phase O3. It is known that the formation of small carbonyls in the atmosphere is not only relevant to the atmospheric budget of volatile organic compounds but also to secondary organic aerosol formation. In the present study, using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) we again investigated carbonyl formation from the same reaction system, i.e. the heterogeneous ozonolysis of LA film. In addition to the previously reported carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA), a source of reactive oxygen species that is mutagenic, has been identified as a product for the first time. Small dicarbonyls, e.g. glyoxal, are expected to be formed from the further oxidation of MDA. In this presentation, the gas-phase chemistry of MDA with OH radicals using a newly built Teflon chamber in our group will also be presented.

  5. Sustainable synthesis of aldehydes, ketones or acids from neat alcohols using nitrogen dioxide gas, and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Naimi-Jamal, M Reza; Hamzeali, Hamideh; Mokhtari, Javad; Boy, Jürgen; Kaupp, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Benzylic alcohols are quantitatively oxidized by gaseous nitrogen dioxide to give pure aromatic aldehydes. The reaction gas mixtures are transformed to nitric acid, which renders the processes free of waste. The exothermic gas-liquid or gas-solid reactions profit from the solubility of nitrogen dioxide in the neat benzylic alcohols. The acid formed impedes further oxidation of the benzaldehydes. The neat isolated benzaldehydes and nitrogen dioxide quantitatively give the benzoic acids. Solid long-chain primary alcohols are directly and quantitatively oxidized with nitrogen dioxide gas to give the fatty acids in the solid state. The oxidations with ubiquitous nitrogen dioxide are extended to solid heterocyclic thioamides, which gives disulfides, and to diphenylamine, which gives tetraphenylhydrazine. These sustainable (green) specific oxidation procedures produce no dangerous residues from the oxidizing agent or from auxiliaries. PMID:19115303

  6. Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant U. S. Department Of Energy Office Of River Protection Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposition Project - Abstract # 13460

    SciTech Connect

    Yanochko, Ronald M; Corcoran, Connie

    2012-11-15

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

  7. Acid wash of second cycle solvent in the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock

    SciTech Connect

    York, W.R.

    1984-02-07

    Entrainment of contaminated water in the organic phase and poor phase disengagement is prevented in the second cycle scrubber, in a two cycle-uranium recovery process, by washing the organic solvent stream containing entrained H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ from the second cycle extractor, with a dilute aqueous sulfuric or nitric acid solution in an acid scrubber, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle stripper.

  8. Analysis of tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives in heavy gas oil from Brazilian naphthenic acids by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electron impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Vaz de Campos, Maria Cecília; Oliveira, Eniz Conceição; Filho, Pedro José Sanches; Piatnicki, Clarisse Maria Sartori; Caramão, Elina Bastos

    2006-02-10

    Naphthenic acids, C(n)H(2n+Z)O(2), are a complex mixture of alkyl-substituted acyclic and cycle-aliphatic carboxylic acids. The content of naphthenic acids and their derivatives in crude oils is very small, which hinders their extraction from matrixes of wide and varied composition. In this work, liquid-liquid extraction, followed by solid phase extraction with an ion exchange resin (Amberlyst A-27) and ultrasound desorption were used to isolate the acid fraction from heavy gas oil of Marlim petroleum (Campos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). The analysis was accomplished through gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electron impact ionization, after derivatization with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoracetamide (MTBDMSTFA). The results indicate the presence of carboxylic acids belonging to families of alicyclic and naphthenic compounds which contain up to four rings in the molecule. PMID:16439253

  9. Determination of volatile fatty acids in wastewater by solvent extraction and gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhize, Nontando T.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Momba, Maggy

    The purpose of this study was to develop a liquid-liquid extraction method for the analysis of volatile fatty acids collected at the elutriation units of Unit 3, 4 and 5 at Johannesburg Water-Northern Works Wastewater Treatment Plant. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method employing dichloromethane (DCM) and methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) as extracting solvents was used during the quantitative analysis of volatile fatty acids namely acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric and heptanoic acid. The detection of the extracts was by gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer operating under electron ionization mode (GC-EI-MS). The results showed that MTBE was a better extraction solvent than DCM as it gave much higher recoveries (>5 folds). On the other hand, the overall reactor performance for all the three units in the period when the samples were collected, which was measured by the ratio of propionic to acetic acid was good since the ratio o did not exceed 1.4 with the exception of the samples collected on the 3rd of October where the ratio exceeded 1.4 significantly. The concentration of acetic acid, another indicator for the reactor performance in all three units was way below 800 mg/L thus the digester balance was on par.

  10. Acid lakes from natural and anthropogenic causes

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, R.; Binetti, V.P.; Halterman, S.G.

    1981-01-30

    Lakes may be acid because of natural ecological conditions or because of anthropogenic activities. Apparently there has been a recent increase in acidity of many lakes in the northeastern United States. Factors that may be contributing to this increase include the use by utilities of precipitators, sulfur scrubbers, and tall stacks; the use of petroleum; and methods of combustion of fossil fuels.

  11. ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING A PHOSPHORIC ACID FUEL CELL ON A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL GAS STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phorsphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Th...

  12. Mathematical model for liquid-gas equilibrium in acetic acid fermentations

    PubMed

    Romero; Cantero

    1998-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to propose an adequate mathematical model for liquid-gas equilibrium in acetic acid fermentations. Three operation scales (laboratory, pilot plant, and industrial plant) were employed to obtain the sets of experimental data. The proposed model, based in the UNIFAC method for the estimation of activity coefficients of a solution consisting of several components, takes into account the effect of temperature. However, in the set of equations, it has been necessary to put in the degree of equilibrium (epsilon). This coefficient adequately reflects the physical conditions of fermentation equipment. The experimental and numerical results help to define the fundamental mechanisms for liquid-gas equilibrium in these systems and demonstrate the model validity in the three tested scales. It was also found that in an industrial setting, closed systems are those with lowest evaporation losses. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10099342

  13. Flue gas desulfurization: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R K; Jozewicz, W

    2001-12-01

    Coal-fired electricity-generating plants may use SO2 scrubbers to meet the requirements of Phase II of the Acid Rain SO2 Reduction Program. Additionally, the use of scrubbers can result in reduction of Hg and other emissions from combustion sources. It is timely, therefore, to examine the current status of SO2 scrubbing technologies. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the state of the art in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies for coal-fired boilers. Data on worldwide FGD applications reveal that wet FGD technologies, and specifically wet limestone FGD, have been predominantly selected over other FGD technologies. However, lime spray drying (LSD) is being used at the majority of the plants employing dry FGD technologies. Additional review of the U.S. FGD technology applications that began operation in 1991 through 1995 reveals that FGD processes of choice recently in the United States have been wet limestone FGD, magnesium-enhanced lime (MEL), and LSD. Further, of the wet limestone processes, limestone forced oxidation (LSFO) has been used most often in recent applications. The SO2 removal performance of scrubbers has been reviewed. Data reflect that most wet limestone and LSD installations appear to be capable of approximately 90% SO2 removal. Advanced, state-of-the-art wet scrubbers can provide SO2 removal in excess of 95%. Costs associated with state-of-the-art applications of LSFO, MEL, and LSD technologies have been analyzed with appropriate cost models. Analyses indicate that the capital cost of an LSD system is lower than those of same capacity LSFO and MEL systems, reflective of the relatively less complex hardware used in LSD. Analyses also reflect that, based on total annualized cost and SO2 removal requirements: (1) plants up to approximately 250 MWe in size and firing low- to medium-sulfur coals (i.e., coals with a sulfur content of 2% or lower) may use LSD; and (2) plants larger than 250 MWe and firing medium- to high-sulfur coals (i

  14. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic... filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, an electrostatic precipitator, or a... than a wet scrubber, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, fabric filter,...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units that... air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, or limit emissions in some other manner,...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units for Which Construction... scrubber to comply with the emission limitations? If you use an air pollution control device other than...

  17. 40 CFR 62.14640 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste... you use an air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, or limit emissions in some...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Model Rule-Operating Limits for Incinerators and Wet Scrubbers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... charge rate Continuous Every hour Daily for batch units. 3-hour rolling for continuous and intermittent... amperage Continuous Every 15 minutes 3-hour rolling. a 3. Scrubber liquor flow rate Minimum flow...

  19. [Gas chromatography in quantitative analysis of hydrocyanic acid and its salts in cadaveric blood].

    PubMed

    Iablochkin, V D

    2003-01-01

    A direct gas chromatography method was designed for the quantitative determination of cyanides (prussic acid) in cadaveric blood. Its sensitivity is 0.05 mg/ml. The routine volatile products, including substances, which emerge due to putrefaction of organic matters, do not affect the accuracy and reproducibility of the method; the exception is H-propanol that was used as the internal standard. The method was used in legal chemical expertise related with acute cyanide poisoning (suicide) as well as with poisoning of products of combustion of nonmetals (foam-rubber). The absolute error does not exceed 10% with a mean quadratic deviation of 0.0029-0.0033 mg. PMID:14689782

  20. Amonia gas: an improved reagent for chemical ionization mass spectrometry of bile acid methyl ester acetates

    SciTech Connect

    DeMark, B.R.; Klein, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ammonia chemical ionization mass spectra of 28 methyl ester acetate derivatives of bile acids and related compounds have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Advantages of ammonia ionization over the previously studied isobutane ionization include a 130 to 270% enhancement in the sensitivity of base peak monitoring, and direct determination of molecular weight from the base peak (M + NH/sub 4//sup +/) in the mass spectrum of any of the derivatives. Minor ions in the ammonia spectra also allow selective detection of 3-keto compounds and can indicate unsaturation or double bond conjugation in the molecule. The significance of these studies for the detection and quantitation of bile acids is discussed. 2 tables.

  1. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-10-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  2. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  3. Determination of the gas-phase acidities of cysteine-polyalanine peptides using the extended kinetic method.

    PubMed

    Tan, John P; Ren, Jianhua

    2007-02-01

    We determined the gas-phase acidities of two cysteine-polyalanine peptides, HSCA3 and HSCA4, using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer through application of the extended kinetic method with full entropy analysis. Five halogenated carboxylic acids were used as the reference acids. The negatively charged proton-bound dimers of the deprotonated peptides with the conjugate bases of the reference acids were generated by electrospray ionization. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were carried out at three collision energies. The enthalpies of deprotonation (Delta(acid)H) of the peptides were derived according to the linear relationship between the logarithms of the CID product ion branching ratios and the differences of the gas-phase acidities. The values were determined to be Delta(acid)H(HSCA3) = 317.3 +/- 2.4 kcal/mol and Delta(acid)H (HSCA4) = 316.2 +/- 3.9 kcal/mol. Large entropy effects (Delta(DeltaS) = 13-16 cal/mol K) were observed for these systems. Combining the enthalpies of deprotonation with the entropy term yielded the apparent gas-phase acidities (Delta(acid)G(app)) of 322.1 +/- 2.4 kcal/mol (HSCA3) and 320.1 +/- 3.9 kcal/mol (HSCA4), in agreement with the results obtained from the CID-bracketing experiments. Compared with that in the isolated cysteine residue, the thiol group in HSCA3,4 has a stronger gas-phase acidity by about 20 kcal/mol. This increased acidity is likely due to the stabilization of the negatively charged thiolate group through internal solvation. PMID:17067812

  4. Core acid treatment influence on well reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janishevskii, A.; Ezhova, A.

    2015-11-01

    The research involves investigation of the influence of hydrochloric acid (HCI-12%) and mud acid (mixture: HCl - 10% and HF - 3%) treatment on the Upper-Jurassic reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field wells. The sample collection included three lots of core cylinders from one and the same depth (all in all 42). Two lots of core cylinders were distributed as following: first lot - reservoir properties were determined, and, then thin sections were cut off from cylinder faces; second lot- core cylinders were exposed to hydrochloric acid treatment, then, after flushing the reservoir properties were determined, and thin sections were prepared. Based on the quantitative petrographic rock analysis, involvin 42 thin sections, the following factors were determined: granulometric mineral composition, cement content, intergranular contacts and pore space structure. According to the comparative analysis of initial samples, the following was determined: content decrease of feldspar, clay and mica fragments, mica, clay and carbonate cement; increase of pore spaces while in the investigated samples- on exposure of rocks to acids effective porosity and permeability value range is ambiguous.

  5. Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for gas-liquid chromatography[S

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Ken'ichi; Fukubayashi, Yumeto

    2010-01-01

    A convenient method using commercial aqueous concentrated HCl (conc. HCl; 35%, w/w) as an acid catalyst was developed for preparation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from sterol esters, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and FFAs for gas-liquid chromatography (GC). An 8% (w/v) solution of HCl in methanol/water (85:15, v/v) was prepared by diluting 9.7 ml of conc. HCl with 41.5 ml of methanol. Toluene (0.2 ml), methanol (1.5 ml), and the 8% HCl solution (0.3 ml) were added sequentially to the lipid sample. The final HCl concentration was 1.2% (w/v). This solution (2 ml) was incubated at 45°C overnight or heated at 100°C for 1–1.5 h. The amount of FFA formed in the presence of water derived from conc. HCl was estimated to be <1.4%. The yields of FAMEs were >96% for the above lipid classes and were the same as or better than those obtained by saponification/methylation or by acid-catalyzed methanolysis/methylation using commercial anhydrous HCl/methanol. The method developed here could be successfully applied to fatty acid analysis of various lipid samples, including fish oils, vegetable oils, and blood lipids by GC. PMID:19759389

  6. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  7. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  8. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.; Banerjee, D.

    1993-05-01

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a dependable technique for analysis of scrubber sludge, so that it would be possible to determine exactly how well a particular purification process was working. This technique was then used to characterize the sludge from a particular Illinois power station. In the current quarter, studies were carried out using froth flotation to produce a product that could be oxidized to high-purity gypsum. These experiments have been quite successful, due to certain properties of the limestone impurity that makes it easier to remove by this method than was expected.

  9. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1993-12-31

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project investigated methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Two processes were studied, both separately and in combination: Water-only cycloning, and froth flotation. A large fraction (30--40%) of the impurities in the sludge are contained in the coarser, higher-density particles, which are readily removed using a water-only cyclone. Much of the remaining impurities are hydrophobic, and can be removed by froth flotation. A combined cyclone/froth flotation process has been found to be suitable for producing a high-purity product from scrubber sludge at low cost.

  10. Effects of the particle residence time and the spray droplet size on the particle removal efficiencies in a wet scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J.; Hong, J.; Lee, H.; Shin, S.

    2010-06-01

    A new type of scrubbing system equipped with air-atomized spray nozzles, full cone type spray nozzles and the maze shape channels has been developed and the mass transfer mechanism to remove sub-micron particles is analyzed. There is a minimal time duration for the mixture of air and sprayed water droplets should remain in the scrubbing zone for the sub-micron particles and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas to diffuse and be captured by water droplets. The grown water droplets enter the maze shape channels which have sharp corners and bends to eliminate the water droplets by collision with the walls. As a result of applying the developed design methodology, the sub-micron particle removal efficiencies of the scrubber are found to be above 99% for the particles of 0.5-1 μm, 96% for those of 0.3-0.5 μm, and 86% for those smaller than 0.3 μm in diameter under the optimum operating condition.

  11. A new process and equipment for waste minimization: Conversion of NO(x) scrubber liquor to fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.; Barile, Ronald G.; Gamble, Paul H.; Lueck, Dale E.; Young, Rebecca C.

    1995-01-01

    A new emissions control system for the oxidizer scrubbers that eliminates the current oxidizer liquor waste and lowers the NO(x) emissions is described. Since fueling and deservicing spacecraft constitute the primary operations in which environmental emissions occur, this will eliminate the second largest waste stream at KSC. This effort is in accord with Executive Order No. 12856 (Federal Compliance with Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements, data 6 Aug. 1993) and Executive Order No. 12873 (Federal Acquisition, Recycling, and Waste Prevention, dated 20 Oct. 1993). A recent study found that the efficiencies of the oxidizer scrubbers during normal operations ranged from 70 percent to 99 percent. The new scrubber liquor starts with 1% hydrogen peroxide at a pH of 7 and the process control system adds hydrogen peroxide and potassium hydroxide to the scrubber liquor to maintain those initial conditions. The result is the formation of a solution of potassium nitrate, which is sold as a fertilizer. This report describes the equipment and procedures used to monitor and control the conversion of the scrubber liquor to fertilizer, while reducing the scrubber emissions.

  12. Removal of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from primary aluminum air pollution control scrubber wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.R.; Dostal, K.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted at a primary aluminum plant to evaluate the removal of benzo(a)pyrene and other polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) from potline scrubber wastewater. Specific objectives included determining the need for granular activated carbon to remove the PAH's to 10 micrograms/l and evaluating the use of benzo(a)pyrene as an indicator for the removal of all PAH's.

  13. Confined Vortex Scrubber. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards. This is to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber. This is the first quarterly technical progress report under this contract. Accordingly, a summary of the cleanup concept and the structure of the program is given here.

  14. Investigation of the gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of aromatic dicarboxylic acids in a quadrupole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-11-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated aromatic dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Experimental results showed significant differences in the rate and extent of exchange when the relative position of the carboxylic acid groups varied. Spontaneous and near complete exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom occurred when the carboxylic acid groups were in the meta-position, whereas no additional exchange was observed for either the ortho- or para-isomers or for the structurally similar naphthalic acid. Computational investigations support the participation of several possible exchange mechanisms with the contribution of each relying heavily on the relative orientation of the acid moieties. A relay mechanism that bridges the deprotonation site and the labile hydrogen site appears to be responsible for the H/D exchange of not only the labile hydrogen atom of isophthalic acid, but also for the formation of a stable carbanion and corresponding subsequent exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom. The impact of hydrogen bonding on the relay mechanism is demonstrated by the reaction of phthalic acid as the extent and rate of reaction are greatly retarded by the favorable interaction of the two carboxylic acid groups. Finally, a flip-flop mechanism is likely responsible for the exchange of both terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid where the reactive sites are too remote for exchange via relay.

  15. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  16. Preparation of fatty acid methyl esters for gas-chromatographic analysis of marine lipids: insight studies.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana P; Malcata, F Xavier

    2005-06-29

    Assays for fatty acid composition in biological materials are commonly carried out by gas chromatography, after conversion of the lipid material into the corresponding methyl esters (FAME) via suitable derivatization reactions. Quantitative derivatization depends on the type of catalyst and processing conditions employed, as well as the solubility of said sample in the reaction medium. Most literature pertinent to derivatization has focused on differential comparison between alternative methods; although useful to find out the best method for a particular sample, additional studies on factors that may affect each step of FAME preparation are urged. In this work, the influence of various parameters in each step of derivatization reactions was studied, using both cod liver oil and microalgal biomass as model systems. The accuracies of said methodologies were tested via comparison with the AOCS standard method, whereas their reproducibility was assessed by analysis of variance of (replicated) data. Alkaline catalysts generated lower levels of long-chain unsaturated FAME than acidic ones. Among these, acetyl chloride and BF(3) were statistically equivalent to each other. The standard method, which involves alkaline treatment of samples before acidic methylation with BF(3), provided equivalent results when compared with acidic methylation with BF(3) alone. Polarity of the reaction medium was found to be of the utmost importance in the process: intermediate values of polarity [e.g., obtained by a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of methanol with diethyl ether or toluene] provided amounts of extracted polyunsaturated fatty acids statistically higher than those obtained via the standard method. PMID:15969474

  17. Study on removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas over activated coke treated by acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinfeng; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Song, Jingke; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yine

    2015-02-01

    This work addressed the investigation of activated coke (AC) treated by acids. Effects of AC samples, modified by ether different acids (H2SO4, HNO3 and HClO4) or HClO4 of varied concentrations, on Hg0 removal were studied under simulated flue gas conditions. In addition, effects of reaction temperature and individual flue gas components including O2, NO, SO2 and H2O were discussed. In the experiments, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to explore the surface properties of sorbents and possible mechanism of Hg0 oxidation. Results showed that AC sample treated by HClO4 of 4.5 mol/L exhibited maximum promotion of efficiency on Hg0 removal at 160 °C. NO was proved to be positive in the removal of Hg0. And SO2 displayed varied impact in capturing Hg0 due to the integrated reactions between SO2 and modified AC. The addition of O2 could improve the advancement further to some extent. Besides, the Hg0 removal capacity had a slight declination when H2O was added in gas flow. Based on the analysis of XPS and FTIR, the selected sample absorbed Hg0 mostly in chemical way. The reaction mechanism, deduced from results of characterization and performance of AC samples, indicated that Hg0 could firstly be absorbed on sorbent and then react with oxygen-containing (Csbnd O) or chlorine-containing groups (Csbnd Cl) on the surface of sorbent. And the products were mainly in forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and mercuric oxide (HgO).

  18. Recent Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) Studies Concerning the Formation of Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Douglas M.; Adams, Nigel G.; Babcock, Lucia M.

    2006-01-01

    Recently the simplest amino acid, glycine, has been detected in interstellar clouds, ISC, although this has since been contested. In order to substantiate either of these claims, plausible routes to amino acids need to be investigated. For gas phase synthesis, the SIFT technique has been employed to study simple amino acids via ion-molecule reactions of several ions of interstellar interest with methylamine, ethylamine, formic acid, acetic acid, and methyl formate. Carboxylic acid type ions were considered in the reactions involving the amines. In reactions where the carboxylic acid and methyl formate neutrals were studied, the reactant ions were primarily amine ion fragments. It was observed that the amines and acids preferentially fragment or accept a proton whenever energetically possible. NH3(+), however, uniquely reacted with the neutrals via atom abstraction to form NH4(+). These studies yielded a body of data relevant to astrochemistry, supplementing the available literature. However, the search for gas phase routes to amino acids using conventional molecules has been frustrated. Our most recent research investigates the fragmentation patterns of several amino acids and several possible routes have been suggested for future study.

  19. Analysis of phenolic acids as chloroformate derivatives using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Citová, Ivana; Sladkovský, Radek; Solich, Petr

    2006-07-28

    In the presented study, a simple and original procedure of phenolic acids derivatization treated by ethyl and methyl chloroformate performed in an aqueous media consisting of acetonitrile, water, methanol/ethanol and pyridine has been modified and optimized. Seven phenolic acid standards-caffeic, ferulic, gallic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic, syringic and vanillic were derivatized into corresponding methyl/ethyl esters and subsequently determined by the means of gas chromatography connected to the flame-ionisation detector (FID). Some selected validation parameters as linearity, detection and quantitation limits and peak area repeatability were valued. The total time of gas chromatography (GC) analysis was 24 min for methyl chloroformate and 30 min for ethyl chloroformate derivatization. The more suitable methyl chloroformate derivatization was used for further experiments on the possibility of multiple pre-concentration by the direct solid phase microextraction technique (SPME). For this purpose, polyacrylate (PA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibres were tested and the extraction conditions concerning time of extraction, temperature and time of desorption were optimized. The most polar PA fibre gave the best results under optimal extraction conditions (50 min extraction time, 25 degrees C extraction temperature and 10 min desorption time). As a result, the total time of SPME-GC analysis was 74 min and an increase in method sensitivity was reached. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) of p-coumaric, ferulic, syringic and vanillic acid esters after SPME pre-concentration were 0.02, 0.17, 0.2 and 0.2 microg mL(-1), respectively, showing approximately 10 times higher sensitivity in comparison with the original GC method. PMID:17723529

  20. Fast derivatization of fatty acids in different meat samples for gas chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ingrid Lima; Claus, Thiago; Oliveira Santos Júnior, Oscar; Almeida, Vitor Cinque; Magon, Thiago; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergilio

    2016-07-22

    In order to analyze the composition of fatty acids employing gas chromatography as the separation method, a derivatization of lipids using esterification and transesterification reactions is needed. The methodologies currently available are time consuming and use large amounts of sample and reagents. Thus, this work proposes a new procedure to carry out the derivatization of fatty acids without the need for prior extraction of lipids. The use of small amounts of sample (100mg) allows the analysis to be performed in specific parts of animals, in most cases without having them slaughtered. Another benefit is the use of small amounts of reagents (only 2mL of NaOH/Methanol and H2SO4/Methanol). The use of an experimental design procedure (Design Expert software) allows the optimization of the alkaline and acid reaction times. The procedure was validated for five minutes in both steps. The method was validated for bovine fat, beef, chicken, pork, fish and shrimp meats. The results for the merit figures of accuracy (from 101.07% to 109.18%), precision (RSDintra-day (from 0.65 to 3.93%), RSDinter-day (from 1.57 to 5.22%)), linearity (R(2)=0.9864) and robustness confirmed that the new method is satisfactory within the linear range of 2-30% of lipids in the sample. Besides the benefits of minimizing the amount of samples and reagents, the procedure enables gas chromatography sample preparation in a very short time compared with traditional procedures. PMID:27320376

  1. Scrubber for dispersing dust generated by longwall shearers

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.F.; Graham, G.W.

    1993-06-15

    A method for removing the dust from the operator' work area of a longwall shearer, said shearer having at least one rotating drum for shearing coal from the longwall coal face, said method is described comprising: producing a water mist having a particle size between 1 and 50 microns using water plus a compressed gas; directing said water mist along a confined path to induce an air flow along the path from one end toward the other end; and positioning said path so that dust-laden air is drawn from the operator's work area into said one end of the path and discharged from the other end of the path adjacent the longwall coal face.

  2. Operation and performance of a double-alkali scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtschale, J.R.; Dydo, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Santa Fe Energy Co. (SFEC) installed a double-alkali sulfur dioxide absorber at its Kern River field near Bakersfield, CA. The flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system is designed to remove 95% of the sulfur dioxide from the exhaust of eight oil-fired steam generators when 1.5 wt% sulfur fuel oil is burned. The chemistry of the double-alkali process and the results of compliance and performance emissions testing are presented. Sulfur dioxide emission results are analyzed. Performance tests showed that total outlet sulfur dioxide emissions were 28.7 lbm/hr (0.00363 kg/s). If offset emissions are included, the net sulfur dioxide emissions were 0.22 lbm/hr (0.00003 kg/s).

  3. Microscale analysis of amino acids using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ping; Yang, Xiao-Yuan; Hegeman, Adrian D; Gray, William M; Cohen, Jerry D

    2010-08-15

    To conduct studies of stable isotope incorporation and dilution in growing plants, a rapid microscale method for determination of amino acid profiles from minute amounts of plant samples was developed. The method involves solid-phase ion exchange followed by derivatization and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The procedure allowed the eluent to be derivatized directly with methyl chloroformate without sample lyophilization or other evaporation procedures. Sample extraction and derivatization required only ca. 30min and quantification of the 19 amino acids eluted from the cation exchange solid-phase extraction step from a single cotyledon (0.4mg fresh weight) or three etiolated 7-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings (0.1mg fresh weight) was easily accomplished in the selected ion monitoring mode. This method was especially useful for monitoring mass isotopic distribution of amino acids as illustrated by Arabidopsis seedlings that had been labeled with deuterium oxide and (15)N salts. Sample preparation was facile, rapid, economical, and the method is easily modified for integration into robotic systems for analysis with large numbers of samples. PMID:20663719

  4. Measurements of gas phase acids in diesel exhaust: a relevant source of HNCO?

    PubMed

    Wentzell, Jeremy J B; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Vlasenko, A; Staebler, Ralf; Lu, Gang; Poitras, Marie-Josée; Chan, Tak; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2013-07-16

    Gas-phase acids in light duty diesel (LDD) vehicle exhaust were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Fuel based emission factors (EF) and NOx ratios for these species were determined under differing steady state engine operating conditions. The derived HONO and HNO3 EFs agree well with literature values, with HONO being the single most important acidic emission. Of particular importance is the quantification of the EF for the toxic species, isocyanic acid (HNCO). The emission factors for HNCO ranged from 0.69 to 3.96 mg kgfuel(-1), and were significantly higher than previous biomass burning emission estimates. Further ambient urban measurements of HNCO demonstrated a clear relationship with the known traffic markers of benzene and toluene, demonstrating for the first time that urban commuter traffic is a source of HNCO. Estimates based upon the HNCO-benzene relationship indicate that upward of 23 tonnes of HNCO are released annually from commuter traffic in the Greater Toronto Area, far exceeding the amount possible from LDD alone. Nationally, 250 to 770 tonnes of HNCO may be emitted annually from on-road vehicles, likely representing the dominant source of exposure in urban areas, and with emissions comparable to that of biomass burning. PMID:23781923

  5. A validated method for gas chromatographic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tall fescue herbage.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A; Coe, Brenda L; Smith, Lori L; Huo, Cheng-Jun; Dougherty, Charles T; Strickland, James R

    2008-07-23

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in animals that is also found in plants and has been associated with plant responses to stress. A simple and relatively rapid method of GABA separation and quantification was developed from a commercially available kit for serum amino acids (Phenomenex EZ:faast) and validated for tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Extraction in ethanol/water (80:20, v/v) at ambient temperature yielded detectable amounts of GABA. Clean separation from other amino acids in 28 min was achieved by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID), using a 30 m, 5% phenyl/95% dimethylpolysiloxane column. The identity of the putative GABA peak was confirmed by GC with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The relatively small effects of the sample matrix on GABA measurement were verified by demonstrating slope parallelism of GABA curves prepared in the presence and absence of fescue extracts. Limits of quantification and detection were 2.00 and 1.00 nmol/100 microL, respectively. Method recoveries at two different spike levels were 96.4 and 94.2%, with coefficients of variation of 7.3 and 7.2%, respectively. PMID:18558696

  6. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours. PMID:22841594

  7. Synthesis of formamide and isocyanic acid after ion irradiation of frozen gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Urso, R. G.; Baratta, G. A.; Brucato, J. R.; Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Formamide (NH2HCO) and isocyanic acid (HNCO) have been observed as gaseous species in several astronomical environments such as cometary comae and pre- and proto-stellar objects. A debate is open on the formation route of those molecules, in particular if they are formed by chemical reactions in the gas phase and/or on grains. In this latter case it is relevant to understand if the formation occurs through surface reactions or is induced by energetic processing. Aims: We present arguments that support the formation of formamide in the solid phase by cosmic-ion-induced energetic processing of ices present as mantles of interstellar grains and on comets. Formamides, along with other molecules, are expelled in the gas phase when the physical parameters are appropriate to induce the desorption of ices. Methods: We have performed several laboratory experiments in which ice mixtures (H2O:CH4:N2, H2O:CH4:NH3, and CH3OH:N2) were bombarded with energetic (30-200 keV) ions (H+ or He+). FTIR spectroscopy was performed before, during, and after ion bombardment. In particular, the formation of HNCO and NH2HCO was measured quantiatively. Results: Energetic processing of ice can quantitatively reproduce the amount of NH2HCO observed in cometary comae and in many circumstellar regions. HNCO is also formed, but additional formation mechanisms are requested to quantitatively account for the astronomical observations. Conclusions: We suggest that energetic processing of ices in the pre- and proto-stellar regions and in comets is the main mechanism to produce formamide, which, once it is released in the gas phase because of desorption of ices, is observed in the gas phase in these astrophysical environments.

  8. Process for treatment of residual gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nolden, K.

    1980-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

  9. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  10. Formation of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid via gas phase oxidation of pinonic acid - a mass spectrometric study of SOA aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, L.; Reinnig, M. C.; Naumann, K. H.; Saathoff, H.; Mentel, T. F.; Donahue, N. M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS) and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known and very low volatile α-pinene SOA product, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.

  11. Formation of 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid via gas phase oxidation of pinonic acid - a mass spectrometric study of SOA aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, L.; Reinnig, M.-C.; Naumann, K. H.; Saathoff, H.; Mentel, T. F.; Donahue, N. M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the results of mass spectrometric investigations of the OH-initiated oxidative aging of α-pinene SOA under simulated tropospheric conditions at the large aerosol chamber facility AIDA, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In particular, the OH-initiated oxidation of pure pinic and pinonic acid, two well-known oxidation products of α-pinene, was investigated. Two complementary analytical techniques were used, on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry (APCI/MS) and filter sampling followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS). The results show that 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a very low volatile α-pinene SOA product and a tracer compound for terpene SOA, is formed from the oxidation of pinonic acid and that this oxidation takes place in the gas phase. This finding is confirmed by temperature-dependent aging experiments on whole SOA formed from α-pinene, in which the yield of MBTCA scales with the pinonic acid fraction in the gas phase. Based on the results, several feasible gas-phase radical mechanisms are discussed to explain the formation of MBTCA from OH-initiated pinonic acid oxidation.

  12. Shawnee flue gas desulfurization computer model users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhoff, F.A.; Torstrick, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    In conjunction with the US Enviromental Protection Agency sponsored Shawnee test program, Bechtel National, Inc., and the Tennessee Valley Authority jointly developed a computer model capable of projecting preliminary design and economics for lime- and limestone-scrubbing flue gas desulfurization systems. The model is capable of projecting relative economics for spray tower, turbulent contact absorber, and venturi-spray tower scrubbing options. It may be used to project the effect on system design and economics of variations in required SO/sub 2/ removal, scrubber operating parameters (gas velocity, liquid-to-gas (L/G) ration, alkali stoichiometry, liquor hold time in slurry recirculation tanks), reheat temperature, and scrubber bypass. It may also be used to evaluate alternative waste disposal methods or additives (MgO or adipic acid) on costs for the selected process. Although the model is not intended to project the economics of an individual system to a high degree of accuracy, it allows prospective users to quickly project comparative design and costs for limestone and lime case variations on a common design and cost basis. The users manual provides a general descripton of the Shawnee FGD computer model and detailed instructions for its use. It describes and explains the user-supplied input data which are required such as boiler size, coal characteristics, and SO/sub 2/ removal requirments. Output includes a material balance, equipment list, and detailed capital investment and annual revenue requirements. The users manual provides information concerning the use of the overall model as well as sample runs to serve as a guide to prospective users in identifying applications. The FORTRAN-based model is maintained by TVA, from whom copies or individual runs are available. 25 refs., 3 figs., 36 tabs.

  13. Study on the removal of NO(x) from simulated flue gas using acidic NaClO2 solution.

    PubMed

    Deshwal, Bal Raj; Lee, Si Hyun; Jung, Jong Hyeon; Shon, Byung Hyun; Lee, Hyung Keun

    2008-01-01

    The study on the removal of NO(x) from simulated flue gas has been carried out in a lab-scale bubbling reactor using acidic solutions of sodium chlorite. Experiments were performed at various pH values and inlet NO concentrations in the absence or presence of SO2 gas at 45 degrees C. The effect of SO2 on NO oxidation and NO2 absorption was critically examined. The oxidative ability of sodium chlorite was investigated at different pH values and it was found to be a better oxidant at a pH less than 4. In acidic medium, sodium chlorite decomposed into ClO2 gas, which is believed to participate in NO oxidation as well as in NO2 absorption. A plausible NO(x) removal mechanism using acidic sodium chlorite solution has been postulated. A maximum NO(x) removal efficiency of about 81% has been achieved. PMID:18572519

  14. Detection of a CO and NH3 gas mixture using carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are extremely sensitive to environmental gases. However, detection of mixture gas is still a challenge. Here, we report that 10 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH3) can be electrically detected using a carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT). CO and NH3 gases were mixed carefully with the same concentrations of 10 ppm. Our sensor showed faster response to the CO gas than the NH3 gas. The sensing properties and effect of carboxylic acid group were demonstrated, and C-SWCNT sensors with good repeatability and fast responses over a range of concentrations may be used as a simple and effective detection method of CO and NH3 mixture gas. PMID:23286690

  15. Characterizing toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant demonstrating the AFGD ICCT Project and a plant utilizing a dry scrubber/baghouse system: Bailly Station Units 7 and 8 and AFGD ICCT Project. Final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, E.B.

    1994-10-20

    This report describes results of assessment of the risk of emissions of hazardous air pollutants at one of the electric power stations, Bailly Station, which is also the site of a Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating the Pure Air Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization process (wet limestone). This station represents the configuration of no NO{sub x} reduction, particulate control with electrostatic precipitators, and SO{sub 2} control with a wet scrubber. The test was conducted September 3--6, 1993. Sixteen trace metals were determined along with 5 major metals. Other inorganic substances and organic compounds were also determined.

  16. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H. E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias E-mail: m.arenz@chem.ku.dk

    2015-02-15

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperature, i.e., very close to the actual conditions in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). The cell consists of a stainless steel flow field and a PEEK plastic cell body comprising the electrochemical cell, which exhibits a three electrode configuration. The cell body and flow field are braced using a KF-25 vacuum flange clamp, which allows an easy assembly of the setup. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on high surface area type electrocatalysts, but it also enables quick screening tests of HT-PEMFC catalysts under realistic conditions.

  17. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J.

    2013-06-01

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed.

  18. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for Clean Power and Syngas Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Amy, Fabrice; Hufton, Jeffrey; Bhadra, Shubhra; Weist, Edward; Lau, Garret; Jonas, Gordon

    2015-06-30

    Air Products has developed an acid gas removal technology based on adsorption (Sour PSA) that favorably compares with incumbent AGR technologies. During this DOE-sponsored study, Air Products has been able to increase the Sour PSA technology readiness level by successfully operating a two-bed test system on coal-derived sour syngas at the NCCC, validating the lifetime and performance of the adsorbent material. Both proprietary simulation and data obtained during the testing at NCCC were used to further refine the estimate of the performance of the Sour PSA technology when expanded to a commercial scale. In-house experiments on sweet syngas combined with simulation work allowed Air Products to develop new PSA cycles that allowed for further reduction in capital expenditure. Finally our techno economic analysis of the use the Sour PSA technology for both IGCC and coal-to-methanol applications suggests significant improvement of the unit cost of electricity and methanol compared to incumbent AGR technologies.

  19. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J

    2013-07-21

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed. PMID:23759928

  20. Acid gas treating by aqueous alkanolamines. Annual report, January-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandall, O.C.; Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the simulateneous absorption or desorption of CO2 and H2S into and from a mixed aqueous amine solvent consisting of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA). In work completed this year the authors have measured the density, viscosity and surface tension of pure MDEA and DEA over a range in temperatures. The diffusivity of N2O was measured in aqueous blends of MDEA and DEA at 50 wt% total amine for various ratios of DEA to MDEA over the temperature range 20 to 80 deg. C. A theoretically-based model has been developed for the correlation of the physical solubility of N2O in aqueous amine solutions. A penetration theory type model which was developed to describe acid gas absorption in aqueous amine solutions was used to carry out a sensitivity analysis for the various parameters affecting the rate of absorption of CO2 in MDEA solutions.

  1. Infrared and density functional theory studies of formic acid hydrate clusters in noble gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of formic acid hydrate clusters (HCOOH)m(H2O)n have been measured in noble gas matrices (Ar and Kr). The concentration dependence of the spectra and the comparison with a previous experimental study on HCOOH(H2O) and HCOOH(H2O)2 [Geoge et al., Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 60 (2004) 3225] led to the identification of large clusters. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP-DCP/6-31+G(2d,2p) level were carried out to determine the anharmonic vibrational properties of the clusters, enabling a consistent assignment of the observed vibrational peaks to specific clusters.

  2. A model of vapor-liquid equilibria for acid gas-alkanolamine-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Austgen, D.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A physico-chemical model was developed for representing liquid phase chemical equilibria and vapor-liquid (phase) equilibria of H{sub 2}SCO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water systems. The equilibrium composition of the liquid phase is determined by minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Activity coefficients are represented with the Electrolyte-NRTL equation treating both long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range binary interactions between liquid phase species. Vapor phase fugacity coefficients are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong-Soave Equation of State. Adjustable parameters of the model, binary interaction parameters and carbamate stability constants, were fitted on published binary system alkanolamine-water and ternary system (H{sub 2}S-alkanolamine-water, CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water) VLE data. The Data Regression System of ASPEN PLUS, based upon the Maximum Likelihood Principle, was used to estimate adjustable parameters. Ternary system measurements used in parameter estimation ranged in temperature from 25 to 120{degree}C in alkanolamine concentration from 1 to 5 M, in acid gas loading from 0 to 1.5 moles per mole alkanolamine, and in acid gas partial pressure from 0.1 to 1,000 kPa. Maximum likelihood estimates of ternary system H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} equilibrium partial pressures and liquid phase concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measurements for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) indicating that the model successfully represents ternary system data. The model was extended to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous mixtures of MDEA with MEA or DEA. The solubility was measured at 40 and 80{degree}C over a wide range of CO{sub 2} partial pressures. These measurements were used to estimate additional binary parameters of the mixed solvent systems.

  3. 2005 Crater Lake Formation, Lahar, Acidic Flood, and Gas Emission From Chiginagak Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J. R.; Scott, W. E.; McGimsey, R. G.; Jorgenson, J.

    2005-12-01

    A 400-m-wide crater lake developed in the formerly snow-and-ice-filled crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between August 2004 and June 2005, presumably due to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system. We are also evaluating the possible role of magma intrusion and degassing. In early summer 2005, clay-rich debris and an estimated 5.6 million cubic meters of acidic water from the crater exited through tunnels in the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 kilometers downstream, the acidic waters of the flood reached approximately 1.5 meters above current water levels and inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying at least the surface water of Mother Goose Lake (approximately 1 cubic kilometer in volume) and preventing the annual salmon run. No measurements of pH were taken until late August 2005. At that time the pH of water sampled from the Mother Goose Lake inlet, lake surface, and outlet stream (King Salmon River) was 3.2. Defoliation and leaf damage of vegetation along affected streams, in areas to heights of over 70 meters in elevation above flood level, indicates that a cloud of detrimental gas or aerosol accompanied the flood waters. Analysis of stream water, lake water, and vegetation samples is underway to better determine the agent responsible for the plant damage. This intriguing pattern of gas-damaged vegetation concentrated along and above the flood channels is cause for further investigation into potential hazards associated with Chiginagak's active crater lake. Anecdotal evidence from local lodge owners and aerial photographs from 1953 suggest that similar releases occurred in the mid-1970s and early 1950s.

  4. Aqueous absorbents and membranes for a new flue gas SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ removal process using electrodialysis for regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Drummond, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    A proposed process is described for removing SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ simultaneously from power-plant flue gas by passing the gas through a wet scrubber, followed by electrodialysis to remove sulfite and sulfate ions from the scrubbing liquor and thermal stripping to remove NO/sub x/. The sulfite and sulfate ions are used to produce sulfuric acid, while the stripped NO/sub x/ is reburned in the boiler. Preliminary tests of a bench-scale electrodialysis stack are described. Absorption and stripping tests of various aqueous absorbents in a one-meter column are also described; the tests were conducted to screen the absorbents for NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/ removal ability. Emphasis was on metal-chelate solutions. The best absorbent tested removed 98% of the NO and 99% of the SO/sub 2/ from simulated flue gas containing 5.9% oxygen.

  5. Macroscopic to microscopic studies of flue gas desulfurization byproducts for acid mine drainage mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.I.; Kalyoncu, R.S.; Finkelman, R.B.; Matos, G.R.; Barsotti, A.F.; Haefner, R.J.; Rowe, G.L. Jr.; Savela, C.E.; Eddy, J.I.

    1996-12-31

    The use of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions has resulted in the generation of large quantities of byproducts. These and other byproducts are being stockpiled at the very time that alkaline materials having high neutralization potential are needed to mitigate acid mine drainage (AMD). FGD byproducts are highly alkaline materials composed primarily of unreacted sorbents (lime or limestone and sulfates and sulfites of Ca). The American Coal Ash Association estimated that approximately 20 million tons of FGD material were generated by electric power utilities equipped with wet lime-limestone PGD systems in 1993. Less than 5% of this material has been put to beneficial use for agricultural soil amendments and for the production of wallboard and cement. Four USGS projects are examining FGD byproduct use to address these concerns. These projects involve (1) calculating the volume of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproduct generation and their geographic locations in relation to AMD, (2) determining byproduct chemistry and mineralogy, (3) evaluating hydrology and geochemistry of atmospheric fluidized bed combustion byproduct as soil amendment in Ohio, and (4) analyzing microbial degradation of gypsum in anoxic limestone drains in West Virginia.

  6. Hydration energies of sodiated amino acids from gas-phase equilibria determinations.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-07-01

    The sequential hydration of a number of sodiated amino acids is investigated using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. Ions produced continuously by electrospray are injected into the reaction chamber in the pulsed mode where the hydration equilibria, AANa+(H2O)n-1+H2O=AANa+(H2O)n (AA=Val, Pro, Met, Phe, and Gln), and the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constants are measured in the gas phase at 10 mbar (N2 bath gas and known pressure of H2O). The thermochemical properties, DeltaH degrees n, DeltaS degrees n, and DeltaG degrees n, for the hydrated systems are determined and discussed in conjunction with the structural forms. The results show that the binding energies of water to the AANa+ complexes decrease with the increasing number of water molecules. The present results from equilibrium measurements are compared to those from earlier studies obtained by other techniques. A correlation between the free energy changes for the addition of the first and second water molecules to AANa+, and the corresponding sodium ion affinities, is observed. Generally, the hydration free energy becomes weaker as the AA-Na+ bond strength increases. PMID:17559201

  7. Observations of gas phase hydrochloric acid in the polluted marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, Timia A.; Lerner, Brian M.; Williams, Eric J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Bertram, Timothy H.

    2014-06-01

    Ship-based measurements of gas phase hydrochloric acid (HCl), particulate chloride (pCl-), and reactive nitrogen oxides (NOy) were made in the polluted marine boundary layer along the California coastline during spring 2010. These observations are used to assess both the rate of Cl atom production from HCl and the role of direct HCl emissions and subsequent partitioning as a source for pCl-. Observations of HCl made in coastal Southern California are broadly correlated with NOz (NOz ≡ NOy - NOx), peaking at 11 A.M. The observed median HCl mixing ratio in Southern California is 1.3 ppb (interquartile range: 0.53-2.7 ppb), as compared to 0.19 ppb (interquartile range: 0.10-0.38 ppb) measured along the Sacramento River between San Francisco and Sacramento. Concurrent measurements of aerosol ion chemistry indicate that aerosol particles sampled in Northern California are heavily depleted in Cl-, corresponding to a mean pCl- deficit of 0.05 ± 0.03 (1σ) ppb for sub-10 µm aerosol particles. In comparison, aerosols measured in Southern California indicate that over 25% of particles showed an addition of Cl- to the particle population. Observations presented here suggest that primary sources of HCl, or gas phase chlorine precursors to HCl, are likely underestimated in the California Air Resource Board emissions inventory. These results highlight the need for future field observations designed to better constrain direct reactive halogen emissions.

  8. Collection of VLE data for acid gas-alkanolamine systems using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Frazier, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The industrial standard process for the purification of natural gas is to remove acid gases, mainly hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, by the absorption and reaction of these gases with alkanolamines. Inadequate data for vapor -- liquid equilibrium (VLE) hinder the industry from converting operations to more energy efficient amine mixtures and conserving energy. Some energy reductions have been realized in the past decade by applying such amine systems as hindered'' amines, methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and MDEA based amine mixtures. However, the lack of reliable and accurate fundamental VLE data impedes the commercial application of these more efficient alkanolamine systems. The first project objective is to improve the accuracy of vapor -- liquid equilibrium measurements at low hydrogen sulfide concentrations. The second project objective is to measure the VLE for amine mixtures. By improving the accuracy of the VLE measurements on MDEA and mixtures with other amines, energy saving can be quickly and confidently implemented in the many existing absorption units already in use. If about 25% of the existing 95.3 billion SCFD gas purification capacity is converted to these new amine systems, the energy savings are estimated to be about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} BTU/yr.

  9. Gas-Phase Thermal Tautomerization of Imidazole-Acetic Acid: Theoretical and Computational Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Saadullah G.; Osman, Osman I.; Elroby, Shaaban A.; Hilal, Rifaat H.

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase thermal tautomerization reaction between imidazole-4-acetic (I) and imidazole-5-acetic (II) acids was monitored using the traditional hybrid functional (B3LYP) and the long-range corrected functionals (CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD) with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The roles of the long-range and dispersion corrections on their geometrical parameters, thermodynamic functions, kinetics, dipole moments, Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital–Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO–LUMO) energy gaps and total hyperpolarizability were investigated. All tested levels of theory predicted the preference of I over II by 0.750–0.877 kcal/mol. The origin of predilection of I is assigned to the H-bonding interaction (nN8→σ*O14–H15). This interaction stabilized I by 15.07 kcal/mol. The gas-phase interconversion between the two tautomers assumed a 1,2-proton shift mechanism, with two transition states (TS), TS1 and TS2, having energy barriers of 47.67–49.92 and 49.55–52.69 kcal/mol, respectively, and an sp3-type intermediate. A water-assisted 1,3-proton shift route brought the barrier height down to less than 20 kcal/mol in gas-phase and less than 12 kcal/mol in solution. The relatively high values of total hyperpolarizability of I compared to II were interpreted and discussed. PMID:26556336

  10. Simultaneous removal of mercury, PCDD/F, and fine particles from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Korell, Jens; Paur, Hanns-R; Seifert, Helmut; Andersson, Sven

    2009-11-01

    A multifunctional scrubber (MFS) has been developed to reduce the complexity of flue gas cleaning plants. The MFS integrates an oxidizing scrubber equipped with a dioxin-absorbing tower packing material and a space charge electrostatic precipitator. All these processes have been previously developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. In the described multifunctional scrubber, mercury, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), and submicrometer particles are removed simultaneously. A MFS pilot plant with a flue gas volume flow of 250 m(3)/h has been installed in a slipstream of a waste incineration pilot plant. Pilot scale testing was performed to measure mercury, particles, and PCDD/F in the raw and clean gas. After optimization of the process these three flue gas components were separated from the flue gas in the range 87-97%. PMID:19924961

  11. Gas-aerosol cycling of ammonia and nitric acid in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Derksen, Jeroen

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric ammonia and nitric acid are present over NW Europe in large abundance. Observations made during the IMPACT measurement campaign (May 2008, Cabauw, The Netherlands) show a pronounced diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate on relatively dry days. Simultaneously, AERONET data show a distinct diurnal cycle in aerosol optical thickness (AOT). We used a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) and a detailed aerosol-cloud column model to help analyse the observations from this period. The study shows that the diurnal cycle in AOT is partly associated with particle number concentration, with distinct peaks in the morning and evening. More important is relative humidity (RH). RH maximizes in the night and early morning, decreases during the morning and increases again in the evening. The particle wet radius, and therefore AOT, changes accordingly. In addition, the RH variability also influences chemistry associated with ammonia and nitric acid (formation of ammonium nitrate, dissolution in aerosol water), resulting in the observed diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate. The additional aerosol matter increases the hygroscopicity of the particles, and this leads to further swelling by water vapor condensation and a further increase of AOT. During the day, as RH decreases and the particles shrink, aerosol ammonium and nitrate are again partly expelled to the gas phase. This behaviour contributes significantly to the observed diurnal cycle in AOT, and it illustrates the complexity of using AOT as a proxy for aerosol concentrations in aerosol climate studies in the case of heavily polluted areas.

  12. Stable isotope dilution method for the determination of guanidinoacetic acid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    For more than 30 years, guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), together with other guanidino compounds, has been proposed as an important marker for renal failure, in kidney transplantation, and for renal metabolism, especially for the metabolic activity of the renal proximal tubules. Since the discovery of the first patient with guanidinoacetic acid methyltransferase deficiency in 1994 by Stöckler et al. (Pediatr. Res. 1994; 36: 409), GAA has become of great interest for all laboratories involved in the diagnosis of metabolic diseases. In the literature there are several methods described for the determination of GAA, ranging from ion-exchange chromatography with post-column derivatisation, enzymatic methods, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS). Here a stable isotope dilution method for quantitative and accurate determination of GAA in urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid is described. GAA is converted to the bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine di(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) derivative by stepwise derivatisation with hexafluoroacetylacetone and N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Analysis can be performed using a standard benchtop GC/MS system. For quantitative GAA determination with 1,2-(13)C-GAA as internal standard, selected ion monitoring is performed using m/z 460/462, with m/z 432/433 and 375/376 as qualifiers. PMID:12661026

  13. Determination of methacrylic acid in food simulants by pyrolytic butylation-gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongping; Qiu, Ruofeng; Liu, Tingfei; Huang, Yilei; Zhu, Zuoyi; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    An on-line pyrolytic butylation approach was proposed to determine methacrylic acid (MA) in food simulants by gas chromatography (GC) without an expensive pyrolyzer. MA in food simulants was converted into butyl methacrylate in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) without any pretreatment at 330°C in the injection-port, contributing to high GC signal response. The derivatizing conditions for the proposed method were optimized, namely the injection-port temperature, type and amount of the organic alkaline used for derivatization. A series of standard solutions of MA in the range of 1.0-50mg/kg were analyzed with correlation coefficient r≥0.9975. The limits of detection (LODs) were less than 0.15mg/kg for MA in four matrix simulants (distilled water, 3%w/v acetic acid, 10%v/v ethanol, and isooctane). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for retention time, peak height and peak area were all less than 3.88%. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of MA migrating from plastic cup samples, with recoveries of added MA in the range of 96.5-123.0%. Direct injection of the simulants into the GC system after migration tests, without any pretreatment step, makes the developed method of great value for rapid screening analysis of samples in bulks. PMID:27262371

  14. Validation of an enantioselective analysis for (l)-pidolic acid by chiral gas chromatography with derivatization.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, John J; Li, Mingshu; Boyd, Aisha

    2016-02-20

    A sensitive and rapid analytical method has been validated for the enantiomeric purity determination of l-pidolic acid, a biological lactam and metabolite of glutamic acid commonly found in urine, skin, bones, brain and is available commercially as a food supplement. An efficient, two-step achiral derivatization was implemented which consisted of an alkylation step (using HCl-IPA) followed by an acylation step (using TFAA) of the carboxy and amide functional groups. This allowed detection with high sensitivity using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The described procedure employs a CP-Chiralsil-L Val column (25m×0.25mm) at a constant flow rate of 1.5mLmin(-1), a gradient temperature program from 80°C to 160°C and an injector and detector temperature of 250°C. The proposed method was validated according to ICH Q2 standards and included such parameters as specificity, system precision, analyst repeatability, intermediate precision, accuracy, linearity, LOD/LOQ and solution stability. PMID:26710173

  15. Perfluorosulfonic acid membrane catalysts for optical sensing of anhydrides in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Ayyadurai, Subasri M; Worrall, Adam D; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Angelopoulos, Anastasios P

    2010-07-15

    Continuous, on-site monitoring of personal exposure levels to occupational chemical hazards in ambient air is a long-standing analytical challenge. Such monitoring is required to institute appropriate health measures but is often limited by the time delays associated with batch air sampling and the need for off-site instrumental analyses. In this work, we report on the first attempt to use the catalytic properties of perfluorosulfonic acid (PSA) membranes to obtain a rapid, selective, and highly sensitive optical response to trimellitic anhydride (TMA) in the gas phase for portable sensor device application. TMA is used as starting material for various organic products and is recognized to be an extremely toxic agent by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Resorcinol dye is shown to become immobilized in PSA membranes and diffusionally constrain an orange brown product that results from acid-catalyzed reaction with more rapidly diffusing TMA molecules. FTIR, UV/vis, reaction selectivity to TMA versus trimellitic acid (TMLA), and homogeneous synthesis are used to infer 5,7- dihydroxyanthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid as the acylation product of the reaction. The color response has a sensitivity to at least 3 parts per billion (ppb) TMA exposure and, in addition to TMLA, excludes maleic anhydride (MA) and phthalic anhydride (PA). Solvent extraction at long times is used to determine that the resorcinol extinction coefficient in 1100 EW PSA membrane has a value of 1210 m(2)/g at 271.01 nm versus a value of 2010 m(2)/g at 275.22 nm in 50 vol% ethanol/water solution. The hypsochromic wavelength shift and reduced extinction coefficient suggest that the polar perfluorosulfonic acid groups in the membrane provide the thermodynamic driving force for diffusion and immobilization. At a resorcinol concentration of 0.376 g/L in the membrane, a partition coefficient of nearly unity is obtained between the membrane and solution concentrations and a

  16. Evaluation of the models available for the prediction of pressure drop in venturi scrubbers.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J A; Alonso, D F; Costa, M A; Azzopardi, B J; Coury, J R

    2001-01-29

    The major running cost derived from the operation of venturi scrubbers is pressure drop. In the present study, the predictions of different models are compared to experimental data from venturi scrubbers of different sizes (throat diameter from 1.9 to 16cm), geometries, operating variables and liquid injection arrangements. As a result, it is concluded that most of the models must be used with caution. Much attention must be paid to the validity of the assumptions employed in the mathematical models. The equations proposed by Calvert [Scrubbing, Air Pollution, 3rd Edition, Vol. IV, Academic Press, New York, 1982], Yung et al. [JAPCA 27 (1977) 348] or Hesketh [Atomization and cloud behaviour in wet scrubbers, in: Proceedings of the US-USSR Symposium Control Fine Particulate Emissions 1974, San Francisco, 15-18 January 1974] produce good results only in very specific situations. The model proposed by Boll [Ind. Eng. Chem. Fundam. 12 (1973) 40] is simple, easy to compute and agrees reasonably well with the experimental data. Unfortunately, it cannot predict the effect of different liquid injection arrangements. The model by Azzopardi and coworkers [Filtr. Sep. 21 (1984) 196; Trans. IchemE. 69B (1991) 237; Chem Eng. J. 67 (1997) 9] was the only one to give good predictions for all the range of variables studied. On the other hand, this model is not simple and requires from the engineer an additional effort in terms of computation. In order to apply this model to the rectangular geometry, the concept of hydraulic equivalent diameter was used. PMID:11118688

  17. Occurrence of anthropogenic fog and ice from Widows Creek Unit 8 wet scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.H.; Fagen, L.C.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the results of a modeling study of the effect of the Widows Creek Steam Plant Unit 8 scrubbed plume upon ambient ice and fog formation within 20 km of the plant. The effect of the scrubber on reducing ambient SO/sub 2/ near the plant is also investigated. All investigations are repeated for three levels of scrubber reheat: high, medium, and low. The level of plume reheat determines the final height of the scrubbed plume and strongly affects the concentration of water vapor at ground level. Thus, the level of plume reheat is strongly reflected in levels of anthropogenic fog and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) (i.e., environmental impact is always predicted to be greater at a low reheat level than at a high reheat level). Very little impact of anthropogenic ice is predicted under any reheat level. At the worst case (lowest reheat), only 2 percent of the area around the Widows Creek Steam Plant is predicted to be impacted once per year and none of the area is predicted to be impacted twice or more. Anthropogenic fog is predicted to have a low impact over a large area (55 percent of the area at one occurrence of fog per year, low reheat) and to have a higher impact over a small area (10 percent of the area at 10 occurrences of fog per year, low reheat). It is assumed the scrubber removed 88 percent of the SO/sub 2/ in the plume. Because of reduced plume rise, however, ambient SO/sub 2/ concentrations are often not reduced by 88 percent. Under low reheat, for example, nearly 25 percent of the area near Widows Creek Steam Plant is predicted to experience a reduction in annual averaged SO/sub 2/ concentrations of less than 75 percent. Under medium reheat, however, this area of impact is reduced from 25 percent to less than 2 percent.

  18. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  19. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  20. A method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1997-12-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  1. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.

    1999-05-04

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents. 7 figs.

  2. Evaluation of a sunscreen photoprotective effect by ascorbic acid assessment in human dermis using microdialysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Nathalie; Mac-Mary, Sophie; Muret, Patrice; Makki, Safwat; Aubin, Francois; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Heusèle, Catherine; S, Schnebert; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation causes adverse effects like sunburn, photosensitivity reactions or immunologic suppression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photo-protective outcome of a sunscreen cream (SPF8) by the determination of erythema indexes and the assessment of ascorbic acid and its metabolites in human dermis. These substances were used as markers of oxidative effect. Eight healthy female subjects were enrolled in this study. Two abdominal areas were exposed to solar simulated irradiation with three minimal erythema dose, one with SPF8 application and the other site without SPF8 application. Two other areas were used as control, one without SPF8 application and the other site after SPF8 application. Ascorbic acid and its metabolites (dehydroascorbic acid, threonic acid, oxalic acid and xylose) were collected from human dermis by microdialysis and assessed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Irradiated site without sunscreen application had significantly demonstrated lower dermis ascorbic acid concentrations and a higher erythema index than the three other sites (P < 0.05). Threonic acid, oxalic acid and xylose dermis concentrations were significantly higher in site III than in the control site I (P < 0.05). The protected-irradiated site did not show erythema formation and there was stability of ascorbic acid dermis concentrations with non-variation in its metabolites. The assessment of ascorbic acid and its metabolites in human dermis could be an efficient tool to demonstrate the oxidative process and consequently to control the efficiency of sunscreen creams against undesirable UV effects. PMID:15740589

  3. Analysis of four pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in several bioactive botanicals with gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Moldoveanu, Serban C; Scott, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid acids including betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids were reported to have health beneficial properties such as antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as the capability to inhibit "in vitro" the development of various cancer cell types. For this reason betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids are used as neutraceuticals. For the analysis of the pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in complex plant materials, an improved scheme was developed, involving a qualitative screening using silylation and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis, followed by quantitation using a novel liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure. The use of the two methods provides more reliable information regarding the plant materials with unknown composition. Besides betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids that were analyzed, by this procedure a fourth pentacyclic triterpenoid acid was identified and quantitated that was not previously reported to be present in plants. This acid has been identified as 3β-3-hydroxy-lupa-18,20(29)-dien-28-oic acid. The newly identified acid has a structure as a derivative of lupane, although lupane with a double bond in the 18-position was not previously reported as present in plants. The new liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure developed for this study offers a very low limit of quantitation, excellent precision, and robustness. Rosemary was found to contain the largest levels of pentacyclic triterpenoid acids among all the analyzed botanicals. PMID:26549610

  4. Chemical Structure of Copper in Incineration Dry Scrubber and Bag Filter Ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, M. C.; Wang, H. Paul; Peng, C. Y.; Huang, C. H.; Wei Yuling

    2007-02-02

    Speciation of copper in waste incineration fly ashes (dry scrubber (DS) and bag filter (BF)) has been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structural (XANES) spectroscopy in the present work. Copper species such as metallic Cu, CuO, Cu(OH)2, and a small amount of CuCO3 in the fly ashes could be distinguished by semi-quantitative analysis of the edge spectra. Interestingly, nano CuO (37%) were found in the BF fly ash, that might account for its relatively high leachability of copper.

  5. Chemical Structure of Copper in Incineration Dry Scrubber and Bag Filter Ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, M. C.; Wang, H. Paul; Peng, C. Y.; Huang, C. H.; Wei, Yu-Ling

    2007-02-01

    Speciation of copper in waste incineration fly ashes (dry scrubber (DS) and bag filter (BF)) has been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structural (XANES) spectroscopy in the present work. Copper species such as metallic Cu, CuO, Cu(OH)2, and a small amount of CuCO3 in the fly ashes could be distinguished by semi-quantitative analysis of the edge spectra. Interestingly, nano CuO (37%) were found in the BF fly ash, that might account for its relatively high leachability of copper.

  6. Theoretical studies of fundamental pathways for alkaline hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters in gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, C.G.; Landry, D.W.; Ornstein, R.L.

    2000-02-23

    Fundamental reaction pathways for the alkaline hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters, RCOOR{prime}, were examined through a series of first-principle calculations. The reactions of six representative esters with hydroxide ion were studied in the gas phase. A total of three competing reaction pathways were found and theoretically confirmed for each of the esters examined: bimolecular base-catalyzed acyl-oxygen cleavage (B{sub AC}2), bimolecular base-catalyzed alkyl-oxygen cleavage (B{sub AL}2), and carbonyl oxygen exchange with hydroxide. For the two-step B{sub AC}2 process, this is the first theoretical study to consider the individual sub-steps of the reaction process and to consider substituent effects. For the carbonyl oxygen exchange with hydroxide and for the one-step B{sub AL}2 process, the authors report here the first quantitative theoretical results for the reaction pathways and for the energy barriers. The energy barrier calculated for the second step of the B{sub AC}2 process, that is, the decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate, is larger in the gas phase than that of the first step, that is, the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate, for all but one of the esters examined. The exception, CH{sub 3}COOC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}, does not have an {alpha} hydrogen in the leaving group. The highest energy barrier calculated for the B{sub AC}2 process is always lower than the barriers for the oxygen exchange and for the B{sub AL}2 process. The difference between the barrier for the B{sub AL}2 process and the highest barrier for the B{sub AC}2 process is only {approximately}1--3 kcal/mol for the methyl esters, but becomes much larger for the others. Substitution of an {alpha} hydrogen in R{prime} with a methyl group considerably increases the energy barrier for the B{sub AL}2 process, and significantly decreases the energy barrier for the second step of the B{sub AC}2 process. The calculated substituent shifts of the energy barrier for the first step of the

  7. Measuring Gas-Phase Basicities of Amino Acids Using an Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunderlin, Lee S.; Ryzhov, Victor; Keller, Lanea M. M.; Gaillard, Elizabeth R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is performed to measure the relative gas-phase basicities of a series of five amino acids to compare the results to literature values. The experiments use the kinetic method for deriving ion thermochemistry and allow students to perform accurate measurements of thermodynamics in a relatively short time.

  8. Gas phase C{sub 2}-C{sub 10} organic acids concentrations in the Los Angeles atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, C.G.; Fraser, M.P.; Cass, G.R.

    1999-02-15

    The atmospheric concentrations of gas-phase C{sub 2}--C{sub 10} monocarboxylic and benzoic acids are reported in samples collected during a severe Los Angeles area photochemical smog episode. Average urban concentrations are 10--50 {times} greater than concentrations observed at a remote background location, indicating an anthropogenic origin for these compounds. Average urban concentrations during the episode were 16.1 {micro}g m{sup {minus}3} (6.6 ppb) for acetic acid and 1.67 {micro}g m{sup {minus}3} (0.55 ppb) for propionic acid, with progressively lesser amounts as the carbon chain length of the acids is increased. Spatial and diurnal variations in atmospheric organic acids concentrations point to the importance of both direct emissions from primary sources and formation by photochemical reaction of precursor compounds.

  9. Characterization of Benthic Microbial Community Structure by High-Resolution Gas Chromatography of Fatty Acid Methyl Esters

    PubMed Central

    Bobbie, Ronald J.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Fatty acids are a widely studied group of lipids of sufficient taxonomic diversity to be useful in defining microbial community structure. The extraordinary resolution of glass capillary gas-liquid chromatography can be utilized to separate and tentatively identify large numbers of fatty acid methyl esters derived from the lipids of estuarine detritus and marine benthic microbiota without the bias of selective methods requiring culture or recovery of the microbes. The gas-liquid chromatographic analyses are both reproducible and highly sensitive, and the recovery of fatty acids is quantitative. The analyses can be automated, and the diagnostic technique of mass spectral fragmentation analysis can be readily applied. Splitless injection on glass capillary gas chromatographic columns detected by mass spectral selective ion monitoring provides an ultrasensitive and definitive monitoring system. Reciprocal mixtures of bacteria and fungi, when extracted and analyzed, showed progressive changes of distinctive fatty acid methyl esters derived from the lipids. By manipulating the environment of an estuarine detrital microbial community with antibiotics and culture conditions, it was possible to produce a community greatly enriched in eucaryotic fungi, as evidenced by scanning electron microscopic morphology. The fatty acid methyl esters from the lipids in the fungus-enriched detritus showed enrichment of the C18 dienoic and the C18 and C20 polyenoic esters. Manipulation of the detrital microbiota that increased the procaryotic population resulted in an absence of large structures typical of fungal mycelia or diatoms, as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, and a significantly larger proportion of anteiso- and isobranched C15 fatty acid esters, C17 cyclopropane fatty acid esters, and the cis-vaccenic isomer of the C18 monoenoic fatty acid esters. As determined by these techniques, a marine settling community showed greater differences in bacterial as contrasted to

  10. Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

  11. Investigating the Weak to Evaluate the Strong: An Experimental Determination of the Electron Binding Energy of Carborane Anions and the Gas phase Acidity of Carborane Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew M; Wang, Xue B; Reed, Christopher A; Wang, Lai S; Kass, Steven R

    2009-12-23

    Five CHB11X6Y5- carborane anions from the series X = Br, Cl, I and Y = H, Cl, CH3 were generated by electrospray ionization, and their reactivity with a series of Brønsted acids and electron transfer reagents were examined in the gas phase. The undecachlorocarborane acid, H(CHB11Cl11), was found to be far more acidic than the former record holder, (1-C4F9SO2)2NH (i.e., ΔH°acid = 241 ± 29 vs 291.1 ± 2.2 kcal mol-1) and bridges the gas-phase acidity and basicity scales for the first time. Its conjugate base, CHB11Cl11-, was found by photoelectron spectroscopy to have a remarkably large electron binding energy (6.35 ± 0.02 eV) but the value for the (1-C4F9SO2)2N- anion is even larger (6.5 ± 0.1 eV). Consequently, it is the weak H-(CHB11Cl11) BDE (70.0 kcal mol-1, G3(MP2)) compared to the strong BDE of (1-C4F9SO2)2N-H (127.4 ± 3.2 kcal mol-1) that accounts for the greater acidity of carborane acids.

  12. Gas/particle partitioning of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids at a suburban site in Saitama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Linfa; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kubota, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Wang, Qingyue; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids (diacids) exhibit semivolatile behavior in the atmosphere, but their partitioning between the gaseous and particulate phases is still unclear. An annular denuder-filter pack system with a cyclone PM 2.5 was employed to investigate the gaseous and particulate phase concentrations of diacids, with high collection efficiency of most target compounds. Saturated diacids, unsaturated diacids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls were determined in gaseous and particulate samples collected from a suburban site in Japan, during 2007 summer, 2008 late-winter and early-winter. The concentrations of gaseous and particulate diacids in early-winter were lower than those in summer, but higher than those in late-winter. Individual diacid in gaseous phase showed a relatively good correlation with ambient oxidants, but a low correlation with NO gas (a primary pollutant). Particulate fraction to the total amount ( FP) of individual acid was larger in winter than in summer, and also was larger at night than in the daytime. In the same sample, individual diacid and ketocarboxylic acid had higher particulate phase occurrence ( FP > 56% in summer), whereas unsaturated diacid had higher gaseous phase occurrence ( FP < 18% in summer). In summer, gas/particle partitioning of diacids varied diurnally; FP values of oxalic and glyoxylic acids increased from their lowest values in the morning to their highest values at night, exhibiting the similar diurnal variation of relative humidity in the atmosphere. The higher humidity at night may lead to the formation of droplets in which water-soluble gaseous phases can dissolve, thus promoting gas-to-particle conversion. These results suggest that gas/particle partitioning of diacids depends not only on the concentrations in the gaseous phase by photochemical oxidation, but also on the characteristics of the atmosphere (e.g., temperature, sunlight, and relative humidity) and the aerosols (e.g., acidity

  13. Conformational preferences of γ-aminobutyric acid in the gas phase and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Il Keun; Kang, Young Kee

    2012-09-01

    The conformational study of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been carried out at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the gas phase and the SMD M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in water. In the gas phase, the folded conformation gG1 with gauche- and gauche+ conformations for the Cβsbnd Cα and Cγsbnd Cβ bonds, respectively, is found to be lowest in energy and enthalpy, which can be ascribed to the favored hyperconjugative n → π* interaction between the lone electron pair of the amine nitrogen atom and the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic group and the favored antiparallel dipole-dipole interaction between the Nsbnd H bond and the Cdbnd O bond. In addition, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group and the amine Nsbnd H group have contributed to stabilize some low-energy conformers. However, the most preferred conformation is found to be tG1 and more stable by 0.4 kcal/mol in ΔG than the conformer gG1, in which the favored entropic term due to the conformational flexibility and the other favored n → σ*, σ → σ*, and π → σ* interactions seem to play a role. The conformational preferences of the neutral GABA calculated by ΔG's are reasonably consistent with the populations deduced from FT microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets combined with laser ablation. In water, the two folded conformers Gg and gG of the zwitterionic GABA are dominantly populated, each of which has the population of 47%, and the hydrogen bond between the ammonium Nsbnd H group and the lone electron pair of the Csbnd O- group seems to be crucial in stabilizing these conformers. Our calculated result that the folded conformers preferentially exist in water is consistent with the 1H NMR experiments in D2O.

  14. Oxidation of North Dakota scrubber sludge for soil amendment and production of gypsum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Moe, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    Cooperative Power`s Coal Creek Station (CCS) the North Dakota Industrial Commission, and the US Department of Energy provided funds for a research project at the Energy and Environmental Research Center. The goals of the project were (1) to determine conditions for the conversion of scrubber sludge to gypsum simulating an ex situ process on the laboratory scale; (2) to determine the feasibility of scaleup of the process; (3) if warranted, to demonstrate the ex situ process for conversion on the pilot scale; and (4) to evaluate the quality and handling characteristics of the gypsum produced on the pilot scale. The process development and demonstration phases of this project were successfully completed focusing on ex situ oxidation using air at low pH. The potential to produce a high-purity gypsum on a commercial scale is excellent. The results of this project demonstrate the feasibility of converting CCS scrubber sludge to gypsum exhibiting characteristics appropriate for agricultural application as soil amendment as well as for use in gypsum wallboard production. Gypsum of a purity of over 98% containing acceptable levels of potentially problematic constituents was produced in the laboratory and in a pilot-scale demonstration.

  15. Integration of advanced oxidation processes at mild conditions in wet scrubbers for odourous sulphur compounds treatment.

    PubMed

    Vega, Esther; Martin, Maria J; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of different advanced oxidation processes on the treatment of a multicomponent aqueous solution containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide (0.5 mg L(-1) of each sulphur compound) was investigated with the objective to assess which one is the most suitable treatment to be coupled in wet scrubbers used in odour treatment facilities. UV/H2O2, Fenton, photo-Fenton and ozone treatments were tested at mild conditions and the oxidation efficiency obtained was compared. The oxidation tests were carried out in magnetically stirred cylindrical quartz reactors using the same molar concentration of oxidants (hydrogen peroxide or ozone). The results show that ozone and photo-Fenton are the most efficient treatments, achieving up to 95% of sulphur compounds oxidation and a mineralisation degree around 70% in 10 min. Furthermore, the total costs of the treatments taking into account the capital and operational costs were also estimated for a comparative purpose. The economic analysis revealed that the Fenton treatment is the most economical option to be integrated in a wet scrubber to remove volatile organic sulphur compounds, as long as there are no space constraints to install the required reactor volume. In the case of reactor volume limitation or retrofitting complexities, the ozone and photo-Fenton treatments should be considered as viable alternatives. PMID:24873715

  16. A preliminary report on the derivatization-gas chromatographic determination of nalidixic acid and 3,7-dicarboxynalidixic acid in urine.

    PubMed

    Wu, S M; Chen, S H; Wu, H L

    1989-11-01

    A preliminary study on the gas chromatographic analysis of urine spiked with nalidixic acid and 3,7-dicarboxynalidixic acid is described. The method is based on the transfer of an ion-pair of NA or CNA with tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (benzalkonium chloride) from alkaline aqueous solution into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), the organic phase, where these salts are derivatized with pentafluorobenzyl bromide. The derivatives formed by this process are chromatographed on an analytical column packed with 1.5% OV-101 and detected with a flame-ionization detector. Several parameters affecting the transfer and/or derivatization of NA or CNA were investigated. These parameters include the phase transfer catalyst employed, the organic solvent used, the concentration of the acid and base added, the amount of derivatizing agent required, and reaction time and temperature. PMID:2634117

  17. Penetration of methyl isocyanate through organic vapor and acid gas respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Berardinelli, S P

    1987-04-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a volatile, toxic chemical [Threshold Limit Value (TLV) = 0.02 ppm] used to manufacture carbamate pesticides. The principal manufacturer of MIC is Union Carbide, and the site of production is Institute, West Virginia. In light of the December 1984 Bhopal, India disaster and possible safety problems at the Institute facility, NIOSH conducted this research as a basis upon which to recommend protective equipment that might be used in an emergency situation where extremely high MIC concentrations might be encountered. Both protective clothing and respirators were evaluated. In particular, NIOSH studied air-purifying respirators in order to assess their effectiveness against MIC vapor penetration. NIOSH does not recommend any air purifying respirator for MIC because of its high toxicity and lack of warning properties and because no effective end of service life indicator currently is available for MIC. This report addresses only MIC penetration through air-purifying cartridges at challenge concentrations designed to simulate emergency escape conditions. Another report addresses the protective clothing issue. The results presented are for two different manufacturers' organic vapor (OV) and acid gas cartridges. Penetration tests were conducted at three or four MIC challenge concentrations and at three different humidity conditions. In general, breakthrough times (1% of challenge concentration) were very short (less than 20 min). Also, high relative humidity was found to decrease the breakthrough time of MIC. PMID:3591646

  18. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, D James; Kroll, Jay A; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 ((3)B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited (1)B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  19. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. PMID:26624519

  20. Effect of Dichlorphenamide on Gas Exchange and CSF Acid-Base State in Chronic Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Naimark, Arnold; Cherniack, Reuben M.

    1966-01-01

    Dichlorphenamide was administered to 13 patients with chronic respiratory failure, and the effects on gas exchange at rest and during exercise and on the acid-base state of CSF were observed. The ventilation for a given level of CO2 production was increased both at rest and during exercise, resulting in an increased arterial Po2 and decreased Pco2. The ventilatory stimulation paralleled the development of a metabolic acidosis but was not associated with tissue CO2 accumulation. Indeed, CSF Pco2 and the oxygenated mixed venous (rebreathing) Pco2 fell by the same amount as arterial Pco2. The level of CO2 elimination after two minutes of exercise was as great for a given work load after dichlorphenamide as before. These findings do not support the view that the drug impairs CO2 transport from tissues either at rest or during exercise. They are most consistent with the view that the primary locus of action of dichlorphenamide in therapeutic doses is the kidney. The metabolic acidosis which results is likely the basis of the respiratory stimulatin, perhaps by its effects on the CSF H2CO3-HCO3 - system. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase in the red cell and choroid plexus are probably unimportant effects. ImagesFig. 4 PMID:5901159

  1. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF).

  2. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF). PMID:27417675

  3. Optimizing Techology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2004-01-31

    More than 56,000 coal quality data records from five public data sets have been selected for use in this project. These data will be used to create maps showing where coals with low mercury and acid-gas emissions might be found for power plants classified by air-pollution controls. Average coal quality values, calculated for 51,156 commercial coals by U.S. county-of-origin, are listed in the appendix. Coal moisture values are calculated for commercially shipped coal from 163 U.S. counties, where the raw assay data (including mercury and chlorine values) are reported on a dry basis. The calculated moisture values are verified by comparison with observed moisture values in commercial coal. Moisture in commercial U.S. coal shows provincial variation. For example, high volatile C bituminous rank coal from the Interior province has 3% to 4% more moisture than equivalent Rocky Mountain province coal. Mott-Spooner difference values are calculated for 4,957 data records for coals collected from coal mines and exploration drill holes. About 90% of the records have Mott-Spooner difference values within {+-}250 Btu/lb.

  4. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  5. A simple and rapid one-time method to evaluate the non-acidic gas content from bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Bassard, David; André, Laura; Dotal, Nicolas; Valentin, Ludovic; Nonus, Maurice; Pauss, André; Ribeiro, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a rapid less than 2 min and low-cost method involving the use of alkali solution to capture the acidic gasses from a biogas, thereby providing an estimate of the percentage of non-acidic gasses. Such a method was mentioned in the literature but never fully described or optimized. After sampling an aliquot of gas from bioprocess, gas was injected in a sealed flask with a 3 M NaOH solution, and after equilibrium was obtained, the non-acidic gas volume was measured. The method was first calibrated with certified gasses with an accuracy observed between 98 and 105%. Regarding the validation step, certified standard gas mixtures and nine biogas-laboratory batch reactors were used, the overall accuracy reported was 103 + 3%. This rapid and low-cost method may either be used in laboratory conditions as a quick and low cost alternative to standard analysis equipment or in addition as a routine field control method used on full-scale plants. PMID:23743732

  6. Determination of the optimum conditions for boric acid extraction with carbon dioxide gas in aqueous media from colemanite containing arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Ata, O.N.; Colak, S.; Copur, M.; Celik, C.

    2000-02-01

    The Taguchi method was used to determine optimum conditions for the boric acid extraction from colemanite ore containing As in aqueous media saturated by CO{sub 2} gas. After the parameters were determined to be efficient on the extraction efficiency, the experimental series with two steps were carried out. The chosen experimental parameters for the first series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 25--70 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.091 to 0.333; (3) gas flow rate (in mL/min), 66.70--711; (4) mean particle size, {minus}100 to {minus}10 mesh; (5) stirring speed, 200--600 rpm; (6) reaction time, 10--90 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.091; gas flow rate, 711 (in mL/min); particle size, {minus}100 mesh; stirring speed, 500 rpm; reaction time, 90 min. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite containing As was approximately 54%. Chosen experimental parameters for the second series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 60--80 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.1000 to 0.167; (3) gas pressure (in atm), 1.5; 2.7; (4) reaction time, 45--120 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.1; gas pressure, 2.7 atm; reaction time, 120 min. Under these optimum conditions the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite ore was approximately 75%. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from calcined colemanite ore was approximately 99.55%.

  7. Electrochemical reduction of CO₂ to organic acids by a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guang; Wang, Hui; Bian, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Pd-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd-MWNTs) catalysts for the conversion of CO₂ to organic acids were prepared by the ethylene glycol reduction and fully characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) technologies. The amorphous Pd particles with an average size of 5.7 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Functional groups of the MWNTs played a key role in the palladium deposition. The results indicated that Pd-MWNTs could transform CO₂ into organic acid with high catalytic activity and CO₂ could take part in the reduction reaction directly. Additionally, the electrochemical reduction of CO₂ was investigated by a diaphragm electrolysis device, using a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode as a cathode and a Ti/RuO₂ net as an anode. The main products in present system were formic acid and acetic acid identified by ion chromatograph. The selectivity of the products could be achieved by reaction conditions changing. The optimum faraday efficiencies of formic and acetic acids formed on the Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode at 4₂V electrode voltages under 1 atm CO₂ were 34.5% and 52.3%, respectively. PMID:24453849

  8. Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Organic Acids by a Pd-MWNTs Gas-Diffusion Electrode in Aqueous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guang; Bian, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Pd-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd-MWNTs) catalysts for the conversion of CO2 to organic acids were prepared by the ethylene glycol reduction and fully characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) technologies. The amorphous Pd particles with an average size of 5.7 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Functional groups of the MWNTs played a key role in the palladium deposition. The results indicated that Pd-MWNTs could transform CO2 into organic acid with high catalytic activity and CO2 could take part in the reduction reaction directly. Additionally, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 was investigated by a diaphragm electrolysis device, using a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode as a cathode and a Ti/RuO2 net as an anode. The main products in present system were formic acid and acetic acid identified by ion chromatograph. The selectivity of the products could be achieved by reaction conditions changing. The optimum faraday efficiencies of formic and acetic acids formed on the Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode at 4 V electrode voltages under 1 atm CO2 were 34.5% and 52.3%, respectively. PMID:24453849

  9. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., fabric filter, activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, or an electrostatic... Limitations and Operating Limits § 60.2115 What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter, activated... carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, fabric filter, or an electrostatic precipitator...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Model... revised text is set forth as follows: § 60.2680 What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter..., activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, fabric filter, or an...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units for Which Construction..., the revised text is set forth as follows: § 60.2115 What if I do not use a wet scrubber, fabric filter..., activated carbon injection, selective noncatalytic reduction, fabric filter, or an...

  12. CAPITAL AND O AND M COST RELATIONSHIPS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION: ADDENDUM NO. 1 - IONIZING WET SCRUBBER COSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report addresses certain cost aspects of hazardous waste incineration; specifically capital and operating costs for ionizing wet scrubbers (IWS). It is an addendum to a more comprehensive report 'Capital and O&M Cost Relationships for Hazardous Waste Incineration,' which dev...

  13. THE FATE OF TRACE METALS IN A ROTARY KILN INCINERATOR WITH A VENTURI/PACKED COLUMN SCRUBBER - VOLUME II: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 5-week series of pilot-scale incineration tests, employing a synthetic waste feed, was performed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a venturi scrubber/p...

  14. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF SOLID SOLUTION FORMATION IN LIME AND LIMESTONE SO2 SCRUBBERS. VOLUME I. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical and experimental study to characterize the coprecipitation of calcium sulfate with calcium sulfite hemihydrate. A coprecipitation product had been suggested to explain the mechanism by which sulfate could be precipitated from a scrubber s...

  15. MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATOR EQUIPPED WITH A STATE-OF-THE-ART WET SCRUBBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over a six-week period, 11 tests were performed at the U.S. EPA Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a Calvert Flux-Forcer/Condensation Scrubber pilot plant as the primary a...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2115 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the initial performance test and continuously monitored thereafter. You must not conduct the initial... established during the initial performance test and continuously monitored thereafter. You must not conduct... scrubber to comply with the emission limitations? If you use an air pollution control device other than...

  17. 40 CFR 60.3024 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... thereafter. You must not conduct the initial performance test until after the petition has been approved by... if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations? If you use an air pollution... emission limitations under § 60.3022, you must petition EPA for specific operating limits, the values...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... You must not conduct the initial performance test until after the petition has been approved by the... continuously monitored thereafter. You must not conduct the initial performance test until after the petition... § 60.2680 What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations? If you use...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2917 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limitations under § 60.2915, you must petition EPA for specific operating limits, the values of which are to be established during the initial performance test and then continuously monitored thereafter. You... use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations? If you use an air pollution control...

  20. High-solids paint overspray aerosols in a spray painting booth: particle size analysis and scrubber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.L.; D'arcy, J.B.; Schreck, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    Particle size distributions of high-solids acrylic-enamel paint overspray aerosols were determined isokinetically in a typical downdraft spray painting booth in which a 7-stage cascade impactor was used. Three different industrial paint atomizers were used, and the paint aerosols were characterized before and after a paint both scrubber. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of a metallic basecoat and an acrylic clearcoat paint aerosol from air-atomized spray guns ranged from 4-12 ..mu..m and was dependent on atomization pressure. When the paint booth was operated under controlled conditions simulating those in a plant, the collection efficiency of paint overspray aerosols by a paint scrubber was found to be size dependent and decreased sharply for particles smaller than 2 ..mu..m to as low as 64% for clearcoat paint particles of 0.6 ..mu..m. Improvement in the overall particulate removal efficiency can be achieved by optimizing the spray painting operations so as to produce the least amount of fine overspray paint aerosols less than 2 ..mu..m. Maintaining a higher static pressure drop across the paint both scrubber also will improve scrubber performance.