Science.gov

Sample records for acid gas stream

  1. Removal of acid gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a method for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a stream of a treating agent consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of N-methyldiethanolamine and imidazole or a methyl substituted imidazole to thereby remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified gas stream from the absorption zone, discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone; and subsequently regenerating the enriched treating agent.

  2. Treatment of gas streams for removal of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1987-09-29

    A method is described for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a treating agent to remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified hydrocarbon gas stream from the absorption zone, and discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone. The treating agent consists essentially of an aqueous solution of from about 40 to about 60 wt. % of N-methyldiethanolamine and from about 5 to about 15 wt. % of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine.

  3. Gas stream purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A gas stream purifier has been developed that is capable of removing corrosive acid, base, solvent, organic, inorganic, and water vapors as well as particulates from an inert mixed gas stream using only solid scrubbing agents. This small, lightweight purifier has demonstrated the ability to remove contaminants from an inert gas stream with a greater than 99 percent removal efficiency. The Gas Stream Purifier has outstanding market and sales potential in manufacturing, laboratory and science industries, medical, automotive, or any commercial industry where pollution, contamination, or gas stream purification is a concern. The purifier was developed under NASA contract NAS9-18200 Schedule A for use in the international Space Station. A patent application for the Gas Stream Purifier is currently on file with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  4. Denitrification of a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Tamony, A.E.; Youngson, C.R.

    1981-10-13

    Nitric oxide and other oxides of nitrogen is removed from a gas stream by contacting the gas stream with chlorine in the presence of water in the liquid phase and scrubbing the gas stream with an aqueous mixture of a hydrochloride and a hypochlorite.

  5. Gas stream cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, S.J.; Cicero, D.C.; Zeh, C.M.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of gas stream cleanup (GSCU) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Gas Stream Cleanup Program is to develop contaminant control strategies that meet environmental regulations and protect equipment in advanced coal conversion systems. Contaminant control systems are being developed for integration into seven advanced coal conversion processes: Pressurized fludized-bed combustion (PFBC), Direct coal-fueled turbine (DCFT), Intergrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), Gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), Gasification/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), Coal-fueled diesel (CFD), and Mild gasification (MG). These advanced coal conversion systems present a significant challenge for development of contaminant control systems because they generate multi-contaminant gas streams at high-pressures and high temperatures. Each of the seven advanced coal conversion systems incorporates distinct contaminant control strategies because each has different contaminant tolerance limits and operating conditions. 59 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Process and apparatus for recovery of sulfur from ammonia containing acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a Claus process for the recovery of sulfur, the steps comprising: passing a first stream containing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, and ammonia through a low temperature Claus catalytic conversion zone and depositing elemental sulfur and ammonium compounds on catalyst therein; deriving a regeneration stream from the Claus process and regenerating the resulting laden catalyst therewith vaporizing sulfur and ammonia therefrom and producing a regeneration effluent stream comprising elemental sulfur and ammonia; cooling the regeneration effluent stream and condensing elemental sulfur therefrom and producing a sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream; introducing at least a portion of the sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream into a hydrogenation zone and converting substantially all sulfur compounds therein to hydrogen sulfide. The resulting hydrogen sulfide containing stream is introduced into an ammonia removal zone. The resulting stream is contacted with a first aqueous stream and produces a second aqueous stream enriched in ammonia and a sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream reduced in ammonia content; removing ammonia from the second aqueous stream and producing an ammonia enriched stream; returning the sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream reduced in ammonia content to the Claus process adjacent and downstream of the point of derivation of the regeneration stream for the further recovery of sulfur therefrom; and introducing the ammonia enriched stream into an ammonia conversion zone and reducing the concentration of ammonia therein.

  7. Oxidation chemistry of chloric acid in NOx/SOx and air toxic metal removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczur, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Chloric acid, HClO{sub 3}, is a new oxidizer which has recently been shown to be an effective agent in the simultaneous removal of NOx and/or SOx from combustion flue gases and various chemical processes, including nitrations and metal pickling. Aqueous chloric acid readily reacts with NO and SO{sub 2} even in dilute solutions at ambient temperatures. Chlorine dioxide, ClO{sub 2}, is formed as a chemical intermediate in the solution phase oxidation reactions. The oxidation by-products of NO include NO{sub 2} and nitric acid. The ClO{sub 2} generated from the solution phase reactions also participates in gas phase oxidation reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}. The combined solution phase and fast gas phase reaction chemistries provide the means for creating a new type of high performance NOx/SOx removal process. Wet scrubber based pilot plant tests have demonstrated up to 99% removal of NO. Additional recent research work has shown that chloric acid is an effective reagent for the removal of air toxic metals, such as elemental mercury, which are present in the waste gas output streams from incinerators, hydrogen from mercury cell chlor-alkali plants, and flue gases of coal-fired power plants. Work in this area is being conducted by Argonne National Laboratories and Olin. This paper discusses the oxidation chemistry of chloric acid and its unique solution and gas phase reactions with NO, SO{sub 2}, and air toxics in wet scrubber type process equipment. 32 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING A PHOSPHORIC ACID FUEL CELL ON A MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL GAS STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phorsphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Th...

  9. Method for removing acid gases from a gaseous stream

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett; Zielke, Clyde W.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking a heavy aromatic polynuclear carbonaceous feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels boiling below about 475.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure by contacting the feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating a gaseous stream containing hydrogen, at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases from the molten metal halide and regenerating the molten metal halide, thereby producing a purified molten metal halide stream for recycle to the hydrocracking zone, an improvement comprising; contacting the gaseous acid gas, hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels-containing stream with the feedstock containing reactive alkaline constituents to remove acid gases from the acid gas containing stream. Optionally at least a portion of the hydrocarbon fuels are separated from gaseous stream containing hydrogen, hydrocarbon fuels and acid gases prior to contacting the gaseous stream with the feedstock.

  10. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by CuO-acid modified sepiolite as effective adsorbent and its regeneration with high-temperature gas stream.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Lin, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic adsorption of methylene blue dye onto CuO-acid modified sepiolite was investigated. Meanwhile, the equilibrium and kinetic data of the adsorption process were studied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, a high-temperature gas stream was applied to regenerate the adsorbent. The results showed that the Langmuir isotherm model was applied to describe the adsorption process. The positive value of enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. In the dynamic adsorption process, the best adsorption performance was achieved when the ratio of column height to diameter was 2.56 and the treatment capacity was 6 BV/h. The optimal scenario for regeneration experiments was the regeneration temperature of 550-650 °C, the space velocity of 100 min(-1) and the regeneration time of 10 min. The effective adsorption of CuO-acid modified sepiolite was kept for 12 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. PMID:27533859

  11. Electrolytic trapping of iodine from process gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Horner, Donald E.; Mailen, James C.; Posey, Franz A.

    1977-01-25

    A method for removing molecular, inorganic, and organic forms of iodine from process gas streams comprises the electrolytic oxidation of iodine in the presence of cobalt-III ions. The gas stream is passed through the anode compartment of a partitioned electrolytic cell having a nitric acid anolyte containing a catalytic amount of cobalt to cause the oxidation of effluent iodine species to aqueous soluble species.

  12. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  13. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  14. Continuous analysis of nitrogen dioxide in gas streams of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, W. T.; Kispert, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Analyzer and sampling system continuously monitors nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the feed and tail gas streams of a facility recovering nitric acid. The system, using a direct calorimetric approach, makes use of readily available equipment and is flexible and reliable in operation.

  15. Sulfur hexafluoride gas tracer studies in streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, D.E.; Gulliver, J.S.; Parkhill, K.L.

    1998-08-01

    Gas tracers are useful investigative tools in the study of reaeration and the fate of volatile organic contaminants in many natural streams. They enable the direct measurement of a variety of stream parameters, including the gas exchange rates between the stream and the atmosphere, as well as the spreading rate for dissolved pollutants downstream of a discharge point or spill site. The air-water mass transfer coefficients, dispersion coefficients, and mean residence times in two experimental streams and one natural stream are measured using a variation of the standard volatile tracer-dye technique. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is used as the volatile tracer and rhodamine WT is used as the conservative tracer. The low limit of quantification of SF{sub 6} makes it possible to inject SF{sub 6}-rich water into many streams and avoid complications with dosing a stream with a gaseous tracer. The experimental methods are described in detail. The SF{sub 6} measurements were extremely precise, producing smooth concentration time curves. The SF{sub 6} measurements collected in side-by-side experimental channels yielded similar values of the gas transfer coefficient.

  16. Gas stream cleaning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kunchal, S. Kumar; Erck, Louis J.; Harris, Harry A.

    1979-04-13

    An oil mist and solid particle laden gas from an oil shale retorting operation is initially treated with a temperature controlled oil spray and then by a coalescer to reduce the quantity of oil mist and remove most of the solid particle content of the gas stream and then finally treated by an electrostatic precipitator to essentially remove the oil mist remaining in the gas.

  17. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  18. Conversion method for gas streams containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Mallinson, Richard G.; Lobban, Lance; Liu, Chang-jun

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method of using the apparatus are provided for converting a gas stream containing hydrocarbons to a reaction product containing effluent molecules having at least one carbon atom, having at least one interior surface and at least one exterior surface, a first electrode and a second electrode with the first and second electrodes being selectively movable in relation to each other and positioned within the housing so as to be spatially disposed a predetermined distance from each other, a plasma discharge generator between the first and second electrodes, gas stream introducer and a collector for collecting the reaction product effluent produced by the reaction of the gas stream containing hydrocarbons with the plasma discharge between the first and second electrodes.

  19. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  20. Acidic stream mitigation by limestone sand addition

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, D.L.; Marich, A.J. Jr.; Largent, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Town Line Run watershed comprises an area of 3,600 wooded acres. The tributaries feeding the stream consist of sandstone springs that do not contribute alkalinity to the watershed, leaving the stream susceptible to acid precipitation. This has a negative affect on Iser`s Run, a native brook trout fishery above the confluence with Town Line Run. The objective in stream liming is to improve water chemistry by increasing pH, alkalinity, and reducing acidity, aluminum, and iron. Introducing crushed limestone directly into a stream from a dump truck is an inexpensive but temporary solution to accomplish this objective. In this type of liming operation, a bed of limestone is spread down the stream channel by the momentum of the stream from the introduction point, rather than manually. Water moving across this bed dissolves the limestone, increasing the pH, alkalinity, and calcium while decreasing the acidity, iron, and aluminum concentrations of the water. The size of the limestone particles is important for this purpose because particles that are too small (<150 microns) will carried away, while particles that are too large (>1000 microns) will remain at the introduction point. Our study placed 80 tons of sand-sized limestone (85% calcite) in the stream channel at a single point. Water samples were collected monthly at the following sites (1) directly upstream of the addition site, (2) 100 yards downstream of the site, and (3) 2500 yards downstream of the site. Other sample locations include (4) upstream and (5) downstream of the Town Line Run- Iser`s Run confluence and the Casselman River upstream (6) and downstream (7) of Town Line Run. The samples were analyzed for pH. Specific conductivity, Alkalinity, Acidity, Iron, Manganese, Aluminum, and Sulfate.

  1. Giant Intergalactic Gas Stream Longer Than Thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    A giant stream of gas flowing from neighbor galaxies around our own Milky Way is much longer and older than previously thought, astronomers have discovered. The new revelations provide a fresh insight on what started the gaseous intergalactic streamer. The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to fill important gaps in the picture of gas streaming outward from the Magellanic Clouds. The first evidence of such a flow, named the Magellanic Stream, was discovered more than 30 years ago, and subsequent observations added tantalizing suggestions that there was more. However, the earlier picture showed gaps that left unanswered whether this other gas was part of the same system. "We now have answered that question. The stream is continuous," said David Nidever, of the University of Virginia. "We now have a much more complete map of the Magellanic Stream," he added. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. The Magellanic Clouds are the Milky Way's two nearest neighbor galaxies, about 150,000 to 200,000 light-years distant from the Milky Way. Visible in the Southern Hemisphere, they are much smaller than our Galaxy and may have been distorted by its gravity. Nidever and his colleagues observed the Magellanic Stream for more than 100 hours with the GBT. They then combined their GBT data with that from earlier studies with other radio telescopes, including the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico, the Parkes telescope in Australia, and the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. The result shows that the stream is more than 40 percent longer than previously known with certainty. One consequence of the added length of the gas stream is that it must be older, the astronomers say. They now estimate the age of the stream at 2.5 billion years. The revised size and age of the Magellanic Stream also provides a new potential explanation for how the flow got started

  2. Recovering sulfur from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Linde AG (Hoellriegeiskreuth, Germany) has developed ClinSulf-SDP process, a two-reactor system that offers better than 99.5% sulfur recovery at low capital and operating costs. In a traditional Claus plant, sulfur-recovery rates of 99.3% can be achieved by combining a two- or three-stage Claus plant with a separate tail-gas cleanup unit (TGCU). Common TGCU methods include H{sub 2}S scrubbing, subdewpoint condensation and direct oxidation. Such combined units are not only costly and complicated to build and maintain, but many of today`s operators require higher sulfur-recovery rates--on the order of 99.3%--99.8%. The Clin-Sulf-SDP combines several catalytic stages of a Claus plant with a subdewpoint, tailgas-treatment system, and the process uses only two reactors. At the heart of the process are two identical, internally cooled reactors. Two four-way valves periodically reverse the sequence of the matching reactors, allowing them to alternate between sulfur-adsorption and catalyst-regeneration modes.

  3. PROCESS GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY STUDY OF A SELEXOL ACID GAS REMOVAL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Se...

  4. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  5. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1999-09-30

    The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

  6. Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1984-01-01

    Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

  7. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing-capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  8. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States, 2, Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlihy, Alan T.; Kaufmann, Philip R.; Mitch, Mark E.

    1991-04-01

    We examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probable sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern United States. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km2) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1180 km of acidic stream length and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  9. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchak, T.P.; Pontiu, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The nature of the collected ash has been identified as an issue creating barriers to the commercialization of advanced particle control technologies. Since most of the emphasis and extended operation of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) facilities have been with ceramic candle filters, problems with ash characteristics can be understood in terms of their effects on these control devices. This project is designed to identify the ways ash characteristics affect advanced particle control technologies, to construct and maintain a data base of HGCU ashes and their measured characteristics, and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these facilities. The key characteristics of the collected ash are the morphology of the overall ash aggregate (porosity, geometry of the pores, specific surface area, etc.), and the cohesivity of the aggregate. Our data base currently comprises 242 ash samples from 12 combustion and gasification (HGCU) sources.

  10. High-temperature gas stream cleanup test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ontko, J.; Chiang, T.

    1995-12-01

    The high-temperature gas stream cleanup facility at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center will provide a versatile platform for testing novel hot gas cleanup filtration concepts. The facility will be available for joint ventures with CRADA partners.

  11. Gas-film coefficients for streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for predicting the gas-film coefficient for the volatilization of organic solutes from streams are developed. The film coefficient is a function of windspeed and water temperature. The dependence of the coefficient on windspeed is determined from published information on the evaporation of water from a canal. The dependence of the coefficient on temperature is determined from laboratory studies on the evaporation of water. Procedures for adjusting the coefficients for different organic solutes are based on the molecular diffusion coefficient and the molecular weight. The molecular weight procedure is easiest to use because of the availability of molecular weights. However, the theoretical basis of the procedure is questionable. The diffusion coefficient procedure is supported by considerable data. Questions, however, remain regarding the exact dependence of the film coefficint on the diffusion coefficient. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficient procedure with a 0.68-power dependence be used when precise estimate of the gas-film coefficient are needed and that the molecular weight procedure be used when only approximate estimates are needed.

  12. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Hyatt, D.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Sjostrom, S.

    1998-11-10

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 11 figs.

  13. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  14. Software to Control and Monitor Gas Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Curley, Charles; Gore, Eric; Floyd, David; Lucas, Damion

    2012-01-01

    This software package interfaces with various gas stream devices such as pressure transducers, flow meters, flow controllers, valves, and analyzers such as a mass spectrometer. The software provides excellent user interfacing with various windows that provide time-domain graphs, valve state buttons, priority- colored messages, and warning icons. The user can configure the software to save as much or as little data as needed to a comma-delimited file. The software also includes an intuitive scripting language for automated processing. The configuration allows for the assignment of measured values or calibration so that raw signals can be viewed as usable pressures, flows, or concentrations in real time. The software is based on those used in two safety systems for shuttle processing and one volcanic gas analysis system. Mass analyzers typically have very unique applications and vary from job to job. As such, software available on the market is usually inadequate or targeted on a specific application (such as EPA methods). The goal was to develop powerful software that could be used with prototype systems. The key problem was to generalize the software to be easily and quickly reconfigurable. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the prior art consists of two primary methods. The first method was to utilize Lab- VIEW and a commercial data acquisition system. This method required rewriting code for each different application and only provided raw data. To obtain data in engineering units, manual calculations were required. The second method was to utilize one of the embedded computer systems developed for another system. This second method had the benefit of providing data in engineering units, but was limited in the number of control parameters.

  15. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  16. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-05

    This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

  17. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

  18. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-05

    This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97{reg_sign}. Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

  19. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary; Hilliard, Marcus

    2011-05-10

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  20. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Potius, D.; Snyder, T.

    1997-07-01

    The characteristics of entrained particles generated by advanced coal conversion technologies and the harsh flue gas environments from which these particles must be removed challenge current ceramic barrier filtration systems. Measurements have shown that the size distribution, morphology, and chemical composition of particles generated by pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and gasification processes differ significantly from the corresponding characteristics of conventional pulverized-coal ash particles. The entrained particulate matter from these advanced conversion technologies often comprise fine size distributions, irregular particle morphologies, high specific surface areas, and significant proportions of added sorbent material. These characteristics can create high ash cohesivity and high pressure losses through the filter cakes. In addition, the distributions of chemical constituents among the collected particles provide local, highly concentrated chemical species that promote reactions between adjacent particles that ultimately cause strong, nodular deposits to form in the filter vessel. These deposits can lead directly to bridging and filter element failure. This project is designed to address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic filter elements. The activities conducted under Task 1, Assessment of Ash Characteristics, are discussed in this paper. Activities conducted under Task 2, Testing and Failure Analysis of Ceramic Filters, are discussed in a separate paper included in the proceedings of the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference. The specific objectives of Task I include the generation of a data base of the key characteristics of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and the identification of relationships between HGCU ash properties and the operation and

  1. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This is the thirteenth quarterly report describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. APF operations have also been limited by the strength and durability of the ceramic materials that have served as barrier filters for the capture of entrained HGCU ashes. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analyses of ceramic filter elements currently used in operating APFs and the characterization and evaluation of new ceramic materials. Task I research activities during the past quarter included characterizations of additional ash samples from Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) facilities to the HGCU data base. Task I plans for the next quarter include characterization of samples collected during a site visit on January 20 to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Further work on the HGCU data base is also planned. Task 2 work during the past quarter included creep testing of a Coors P- I OOA- I specimen machined from Candle FC- 007 after 1166 hours in-service at the Karhula Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) facility. Samples are currently in preparation for microstructural evaluations of Coors P-IOOA-I.Sixteen cordierite rings manufactured by Specific Surfaces were received for testing. Three of the specimens were exposed to the PFBC environment at the PSDF. These specimens are currently being machined for testing.

  2. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This is the tenth in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task I is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task I during the past quarter, analyses were performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. A site visit was made to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to collect ash samples from the filter vessel and to document the condition of the filter vessel with still photographs and videotape. Particulate samples obtained during this visit are currently being analyzed for entry into the Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) data base. Preparations are being made for a review meeting on ash bridging to be held at Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center - Morgantown (DOE/FETC-MGN) in the near future. Most work on Task 2 was on hold pending receipt of additional funds; however, creep testing of Schumacher FT20 continued. The creep tests on Schumacher FT20 specimens just recently ended and data analysis and comparisons to other data are ongoing. A summary and analysis of these creep results will be sent out shortly. Creep

  3. Stream chemistry in the eastern United States. 2. Current sources of acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity streams

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Mitch, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors examined anion composition in National Stream Survey (NSS) data in order to evaluate the most probably sources of current acidity in acidic and low acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) streams in the eastern US. Acidic streams that had almost no organic influence (less than 10% of total anions) and sulfate and nitrate concentrations indicative of evaporative concentration of atmospheric deposition were classified as acidic due to acidic deposition. These acidic streams were located in small (<30 km{sup 2}) forested watersheds in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands (an estimated 1,950 km of stream length) and in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (1,250 km). Acidic streams affected primarily by acidic deposition but also influenced by naturally occurring organic anions accounted for another 1,180 km of acidic stream length, and were located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, plateau tops in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands, and the Florida Panhandle. The total length of streams acidic due to acid mine drainage in the NSS (4,590 km) was about the same as the total length of acidic streams likely affected by acidic deposition (4,380 km). Acidic streams whose acid anion composition was dominated by organics were located in Florida and the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. In Florida, most of the acidic streams were organic dominated, whereas about half of the streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain were organic dominated. Organic-dominated acidic streams were not observed in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Highlands.

  4. System and process for capture of acid gasses at elevated pressure from gaseous process streams

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Linehan, John C.; Rainbolt, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zheng, Feng

    2016-09-06

    A system, method, and material that enables the pressure-activated reversible chemical capture of acid gasses such as CO.sub.2 from gas volumes such as streams, flows or any other volume. Once the acid gas is chemically captured, the resulting product typically a zwitterionic salt, can be subjected to a reduced pressure whereupon the resulting product will release the captures acid gas and the capture material will be regenerated. The invention includes this process as well as the materials and systems for carrying out and enabling this process.

  5. A new Growing Neural Gas for clustering data streams.

    PubMed

    Ghesmoune, Mohammed; Lebbah, Mustapha; Azzag, Hanene

    2016-06-01

    Clustering data streams is becoming the most efficient way to cluster a massive dataset. This task requires a process capable of partitioning observations continuously with restrictions of memory and time. In this paper we present a new algorithm, called G-Stream, for clustering data streams by making one pass over the data. G-Stream is based on growing neural gas, that allows us to discover clusters of arbitrary shapes without any assumptions on the number of clusters. By using a reservoir, and applying a fading function, the quality of clustering is improved. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated on public datasets. PMID:26997530

  6. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  7. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-08-31

    This is the fifteenth quarterly report describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. Task 1 is designed to generate a data bank of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFs) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. APF operations have also been limited by the strength and durability of the ceramic materials that have served as barrier filters for the capture of entrained HGCU ashes. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analyses of ceramic filter elements currently used in operating APFs and the characterization and evaluation of new ceramic materials. Task 1 research activities during the past quarter included characterizations of samples collected during a site visit on May 18 to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) and a particulate sample collected in the Westinghouse filter at Sierra Pacific Power Company's Piñon Pine Power Project. Analysis of this Piñon Pine sample is ongoing: however, this report contains the results of analyses completed to date. Significant accomplishments were achieved on the HGCU data bank during this reporting quarter. The data bank was prepared for presentation at the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems 98 Conference scheduled for July, 1998. Task 2 work during the past quarter consisted of testing two Dupont PRD-66C candle filters, one McDermott ceramic composite candle filter, one Blasch 4-270 candle filter, and one Specific Surface cordierite candle filter. Tensile and thermal expansion testing is complete and the rest of the testing is in progress. Also, some 20-inch long Dupont

  8. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This is the eleventh in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task 1 during the past quarter, analyses were completed on samples obtained during a site visit to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. An additional analysis was performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. A manuscript and poster were prepared for presentation at the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference scheduled for July 22 - 24, 1997. A summary of recent project work covering the mechanisms responsible for ash deposit consolidation and ash bridging in APF`s collecting PFB ash was prepared and presented at FETC-MGN in early July. The material presented at that meeting is included in the manuscript prepared for the Contractor`s Conference and also in this report. Task 2 work during the past quarter included mechanical testing and microstructural examination of Schumacher FT20 and Pall 326 as- manufactured, after 540 hr in service at Karhula, and after 1166 hr in service at

  9. Nitrification in four acidic streams in southern New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schornick, James C., Jr.; Ram, Neil M.

    1978-01-01

    Four characteristically acidic streams in southern New Jersey were investigated to determine the effect of secondary effluent on nitrification in the receiving waters. Chemical and microbiological data were obtained at four sites on each stream. From these data seven factors were evaluated to determine the proclivity of each stream to nitrify. pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen were used to describe the general condition of the streams, while neutralization of alkalinity, nitrogen species concentration trends, biological and nitrogenous oxygen demand incubations, and nitrifying bacteria densities were used to determine the actual presence of nitrification in each stream. Each stream had a unique distribution of conditions, making it possible to qualitatively rank the streams according to their proclivity to nitrify. Hay StackBrook showes strong evidence for nitrification on the basis of all four nitrification indicators, whereas Landing Creek showed little, if any, evidence of nitrification. Hammonton Creek is apparently nitrifying, but because of the uncertainty in the downstream trends of the nitrogen species and a lower level of alkalinity neutralization, it is nitrifying less than Hay Stack Brook. Squankum Branch also showed some evidence for nitrification, mostly on the basis of the biological and nitrogenous oxygen demand incubations. Although these streams are acidic in character, acidity does not appear to be an exclusive factor in determining whether a stream will undergo nitrification. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas capture: a review.

    PubMed

    Mansourizadeh, A; Ismail, A F

    2009-11-15

    Membrane contactors using microporous membranes for acid gas removal have been extensively reviewed and discussed. The microporous membrane acts as a fixed interface between the gas and the liquid phase without dispersing one phase into another that offers a flexible modular and energy efficient device. The gas absorption process can offer a high selectivity and a high driving force for transport even at low concentrations. Using hollow fiber gas-liquid membrane contactors is a promising alternative to conventional gas absorption systems for acid gas capture from gas streams. Important aspects of membrane contactor as an efficient energy devise for acid gas removal including liquid absorbents, membrane characteristics, combination of membrane and absorbent, mass transfer, membrane modules, model development, advantages and disadvantages were critically discussed. In addition, current status and future potential in research and development of gas-liquid membrane contactors for acid gas removal were also briefly discussed. PMID:19616376

  11. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Pence, Dallas T.; Chou, Chun-Chao

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

  12. Indirect gas chromatographic measurement of water for process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A.

    1993-05-01

    This project was conducted to develop a moisture measurement method for process gas streams of fossil fuels. Objective was to from pyrolysis to measure the molar concentration of water in a gas stream without flow measurements. The method developed has been incorporated into the hydrocarbon gas analysis method currently used at Western Research Institute. A literature search of types of direct measuring moisture sensors was conducted, and a list of sensors available is given; most of them could not survive in the environment of the process streams. Indirect methods of measuring water involve changing the water via reaction to a compound that can be more readily measured. These methods react water with various reagents to form hydrogen, acetylene, and acetone. The method chose for this study uses a calcium carbide reaction column to convert the water present in the gas stream to acetylene for analysis. Relative deviation for the daily determination of water varied from 0.5 to 3.4%. The method chosen was tested for linearity over a wide range of gas stream water content. Response over 2 to 15 mole % water appears to be linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.991.

  13. High-temperature gas stream filter and method

    SciTech Connect

    Notestein, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to the removal of solid particulate material from high-temperature gas streams, and more particularly the removal of such particulate material by employing a barrier filter formed of a carbon-carbon composite provided by a porous carbon fiber substrate with open interstitial regions between adjacently disposed carbon fibers selectively restricted by carbon integrally attached to the carbon fibers of the substrate. In a typical utilization of a particulate-bearing hot gas stream, the particulate loading of the gas stream after cleaning is normally less than about 50 ppm and with essentially no particulates larger than about 10 microns. This carbon-carbon filter for removing particulate material of a particle size larger than a preselected particle size from a gas stream at a temperature greater than about 800 F, is produced by the steps which comprise: providing a substrate of carbonaceous fibers with pore-forming open interstitial regions between adjacently disposed fibers; and, sufficiently filling these open interstitial regions with carbon integrally attached to and supported by the fibers for providing the interstitial regions with throughgoing passage-ways of a pore size sufficient to provide for the passage of the gas stream while preventing the passage of particulate material larger than a preselected particle size.

  14. Stream primary producers relate positively to watershed natural gas measures in north-central Arkansas streams.

    PubMed

    Austin, Bradley J; Hardgrave, Natalia; Inlander, Ethan; Gallipeau, Cory; Entrekin, Sally; Evans-White, Michelle A

    2015-10-01

    Construction of unconventional natural gas (UNG) infrastructure (e.g., well pads, pipelines) is an increasingly common anthropogenic stressor that increases potential sediment erosion. Increased sediment inputs into nearby streams may decrease autotrophic processes through burial and scour, or sediment bound nutrients could have a positive effect through alleviating potential nutrient limitations. Ten streams with varying catchment UNG well densities (0-3.6 wells/km(2)) were sampled during winter and spring of 2010 and 2011 to examine relationships between landscape scale disturbances associated with UNG activity and stream periphyton [chlorophyll a (Chl a)] and gross primary production (GPP). Local scale variables including light availability and water column physicochemical variables were measured for each study site. Correlation analyses examined the relationships of autotrophic processes and local scale variables with the landscape scale variables percent pasture land use and UNG metrics (well density and well pad inverse flow path length). Both GPP and Chl a were primarily positively associated with the UNG activity metrics during most sample periods; however, neither landscape variables nor response variables correlated well with local scale factors. These positive correlations do not confirm causation, but they do suggest that it is possible that UNG development can alleviate one or more limiting factors on autotrophic production within these streams. A secondary manipulative study was used to examine the link between nutrient limitation and algal growth across a gradient of streams impacted by natural gas activity. Nitrogen limitation was common among minimally impacted stream reaches and was alleviated in streams with high UNG activity. These data provide evidence that UNG may stimulate the primary production of Fayetteville shale streams via alleviation of N-limitation. Restricting UNG activities from the riparian zone along with better enforcement of

  15. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Bischoff, Brian L.; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2016-07-19

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  16. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  17. Process for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, H.S.

    1987-02-03

    A process is described for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0 to 125 F approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO[sub 2] plus NO[sub x] is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO[sub 2] and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO[sub x]. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the gas stream and acid recovery. 4 figs.

  18. Process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0.degree. to 125.degree. F. approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO.sub.2 plus NO.sub.x is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO.sub.2 and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO.sub.x. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the gas stream and acid recovery.

  19. FILTER FOR HIGH VELOCITY GAS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, R.A.; Warner, H.F.

    1963-11-01

    An air filter that is particularly useful in air-sampling rockets is presented. The filter comprises a cellulose fiber mat having an evenly disposed thin coating of stearic acid. Protective loose weave fabric covers are stitched to the front and back of the fiber mat, the stitching being in the form of a sine wave spiraled from the midpoint of the mat out to its periphery. (AEC)

  20. Potential flue gas impurities in carbon dioxide streams separated from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Joo-Youp Lee; Tim C. Keener; Y. Jeffery Yang

    2009-06-15

    This study estimated the flue gas impurities to be included in the CO{sub 2} stream separated from a CO{sub 2} control unit for a different combination of air pollution control devices and different flue gas compositions. Specifically, the levels of acid gases and mercury vapor were estimated for the monoethanolamine (MEA)-based absorption process on the basis of published performance parameters of existing systems. Among the flue gas constituents considered, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is known to have the most adverse impact on MEA absorption. When a flue gas contains 3000 parts per million by volume (ppmv) SO{sub 2} and a wet flue gas desulfurization system achieves its 95% removal, approximately 2400 parts per million by weight (ppmw) SO{sub 2} could be included in the separated CO{sub 2} stream. In addition, the estimated concentration level was reduced to as low as 135 ppmw for the SO{sub 2} of less than 10 ppmv in the flue gas entering the MEA unit. Furthermore, heat-stable salt formation could further reduce the SO{sub 2} concentration below 40 ppmw in the separated CO{sub 2} stream. In this study, it is realized that the formation rates of heat-stable salts in MEA solution are not readily available in the literature and are critical to estimating the levels and compositions of flue gas impurities in sequestered CO{sub 2} streams. In addition to SO{sub 2}, mercury, and other impurities in separated CO{sub 2} streams could vary depending on pollutant removal at the power plants and impose potential impacts on groundwater. Such a variation and related process control in the upstream management of carbon separation have implications for groundwater protection at carbon sequestration sites and warrant necessary considerations in overall sequestration planning, engineering, and management. 63 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. Process for removing SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ compounds from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.

    1989-02-14

    A process is described for removing SO/sub x/ compounds from a feed gas stream and producing a purified gas stream of reduced SO/sub x/ content, which process comprises: contacting a feed gas stream containing SO/sub x/ compounds; withdrawing from step (1) a liquid stream of spent absorbent containing the absorbed SO/sub x/ compounds; regenerating the spent absorbent back to a form active for absorbing SO/sub x/ compounds; separating the products of step (3) into a liquid stream containing a regenerated absorbent and a product gas stream containing H/sub 2/S; recycling at least some of the liquid stream containing regenerated absorbent; and recovering the purified gas stream of reduced SO/sub x/ content and the product gas stream containing H/sub 2/S.

  2. Gas-rich and gas-poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations, we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second-order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109 M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few × 107 M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z = 10 is ˜10 per cent for objects with M ˜ 107 M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas-dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  3. Gas-rich and gas poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few× 107M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z=10 is ˜10% for objects with M ˜ 107M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  4. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-11-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  5. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  6. Iron Photoreduction and Oxidation in an Acidic Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Kimball, B. A.; Bencala, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  7. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  8. A method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1997-12-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  9. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.

    1999-05-04

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents. 7 figs.

  10. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  11. Selection of hydrate suppression methods for gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, S.D.; Covington, K.K.; Collie, J.T. III

    1999-07-01

    This paper will discuss and compare the methods used to suppress hydrate formation in natural gas streams. Included in the comparison will be regenerated systems using ethylene glycol and non-regenerated systems using methanol. A comparison will be made between the quantities of methanol and ethylene glycol required to achieve a given a suppression. A discussion of BTEX emissions resulting from the ethylene glycol regenerator along with the effect or process variables on these emissions is also given.

  12. Acid Rain Effects on Adirondack Streams - Results from the 2003-05 Western Adirondack Stream Survey (the WASS Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Roy, Karen M.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, Howard A.; Passy, Sophia I.; Bode, Robert W.; Capone, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally lakes have been the focus of acid rain assessments in the Adirondack region of New York. However, there is a growing recognition of the importance of streams as environmental indicators. Streams, like lakes, also provide important aquatic habitat, but streams more closely reflect acid rain effects on soils and forests and are more prone to acidification than lakes. Therefore, a large-scale assessment of streams was undertaken in the drainage basins of the Oswegatchie and Black Rivers; an area of 4,585 km2 in the western Adirondack region where acid rain levels tend to be highest in New York State.

  13. Ceramem filters for removal of particles from hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.A.; Goldsmith, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    The need for hot gas cleanup in the power, advanced coal conversion, process and incineration industries is well documented and extensive development is being undertaken to develop and demonstrate suitable filtration technologies. In general, process conditions include (a) oxidizing or reducing atmospheres, (b) temperatures to 1800{degree}F, (c) pressures to 300 psi, and (d) potentially corrosive components in the gas stream. The most developed technologies entail the use of candle or tube filters, which suffer from fragility, lack of oxidation/corrosion resistance, and high cost. The ceramic membrane filter described below offers the potential to eliminate these limitations.

  14. Streams in Catskill Mountains still susceptible to acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    Precipitation in North America has become less acidic over the past 2 decades because of reduced power plant emissions and compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments [Sirois, 19937rsqb;. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were developed to reduce the acidity of sensitive surface waters, which are primarily in upland forested environments, where acidified waters and associated high aluminum concentrations are toxic to many species of aquatic flora and fauna [Schindler et al., 1989]. Our studies show that in spite of less acidic precipitation, the buffering capacity of streams in upland forests of the Catskill Mountains in southeastern New York has not increased in recent years. These data suggest that long-term leaching by acid rain has lowered exchangeable calcium ion concentrations in the soil in upland areas, where the underlying, slow-weathering bedrock provides an inadequate supply of cations to neutralize acidity.

  15. Method and apparatus for decreased undesired particle emissions in gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Bustard, Cynthia Jean

    1999-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  16. Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C.; Lin, Haiqing; Thompson, Scott; Daniels, Ramin

    2012-03-06

    A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

  17. ESTIMATION OF THE TEMPERATURE RISE OF A MCU ACID STREAM PIPE IN NEAR PROXIMITY TO A SLUDGE STREAM PIPE

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; Michael Poirier, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-07-12

    Effluent streams from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will transfer to the tank farms and to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These streams will contain entrained solvent. A significant portion of the Strip Effluent (SE) pipeline (i.e., acid stream containing Isopar{reg_sign} L residues) length is within one inch of a sludge stream. Personnel envisioned the sludge stream temperature may reach 100 C during operation. The nearby SE stream may receive heat from the sludge stream and reach temperatures that may lead to flammability issues once the contents of the SE stream discharge into a larger reservoir. To this end, personnel used correlations from the literature to estimate the maximum temperature rise the SE stream may experience if the nearby sludge stream reaches boiling temperature. Several calculation methods were used to determine the temperature rise of the SE stream. One method considered a heat balance equation under steady state that employed correlation functions to estimate heat transfer rate. This method showed the maximum temperature of the acid stream (SE) may exceed 45 C when the nearby sludge stream is 80 C or higher. A second method used an effectiveness calculation used to predict the heat transfer rate in single pass heat exchanger. By envisioning the acid and sludge pipes as a parallel flow pipe-to-pipe heat exchanger, this method provides a conservative estimation of the maximum temperature rise. Assuming the contact area (i.e., the area over which the heat transfer occurs) is the whole pipe area, the results found by this method nearly matched the results found with the previous calculation method. It is recommended that the sludge stream be maintained below 80 C to minimize a flammable vapor hazard from occurring.

  18. Potential flue gas impurities in carbon dioxide streams separated from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Keener, Tim C; Yang, Y Jeffery

    2009-06-01

    For geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This study estimated the flue gas impurities to be included in the CO2 stream separated from a CO2 control unit for a different combination of air pollution control devices and different flue gas compositions. Specifically, the levels of acid gases and mercury vapor were estimated for the monoethanolamine (MEA)-based absorption process on the basis of published performance parameters of existing systems. Among the flue gas constituents considered, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is known to have the most adverse impact on MEA absorption. When a flue gas contains 3000 parts per million by volume (ppmv) SO2 and a wet flue gas desulfurization system achieves its 95% removal, approximately 2400 parts per million by weight (ppmw) SO2 could be included in the separated CO2 stream. In addition, the estimated concentration level was reduced to as low as 135 ppmw for the SO2 of less than 10 ppmv in the flue gas entering the MEA unit. Furthermore, heat-stable salt formation could further reduce the SO2 concentration below 40 ppmw in the separated CO2 stream. In this study, it is realized that the formation rates of heat-stable salts in MEA solution are not readily available in the literature and are critical to estimating the levels and compositions of flue gas impurities in sequestered CO2 streams. In addition to SO2, mercury, and other impurities in separated CO2 streams could vary depending on pollutant removal at the power plants and impose potential impacts on groundwater. Such a variation and related process control in the upstream management of carbon separation have implications for groundwater protection at carbon sequestration sites and warrant necessary considerations in overall sequestration planning

  19. Sources of acidic storm flow in an Appalachian Headwater Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swistock, Bryan R.; Dewalle, David R.; Sharpe, William E.

    1989-10-01

    A study was conducted to quantify the source of increased dissolved aluminum concentrations during acidic storm flows on a small Pennsylvania stream. Data for six episodes during fall 1986 and spring 1987 showed depressions in stream pH and increases in sulfates, conductivity, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved aluminum. Flow separation analyses were conducted using 18O as a tracer in a three-component mass balance tracer model. Results showed that soil water and groundwater are the dominant flow sources, accounting for approximately 20 and 75% of total flow during storms, respectively. Channel precipitation generally provided less than 5% of total flows. Hydrograph separation using aluminum agreed with 18O results, while other chemical parameters produced unsatisfactory results. The data support Hewlett's (1982) variable source area concept of storm flow generation with inputs of older, deep circulating groundwater from low-elevation source areas early in an event and later inputs of younger soil water and possibly shallow groundwater from expanding source areas at higher elevations. The results suggest that the most toxic runoff events for aquatic life occur during large storms when the greatest inputs of soil water cause elevated stream dissolved aluminum concentrations. Reductions in storm flow acidity and dissolved aluminum concentrations on this catchment will be most dependent upon changes in soil water and/or groundwater chemistry.

  20. The Interstellar Gas Dust Streams and Seeds of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleg, Khavroshkin; Vladislav, Tsyplakov

    Gas dust Streams from Double Stars & Lunar Seismicity. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on the ordinate axis the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on abscissa axis - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were used. Spectrum of the series disclosed time picks on hidden cosmological periodicities of lunar seismicity. A part of results (picks) presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. The explanation of that results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars systems and interacting of it with lunar surface. Information content of the Nakamura`s Catalog of moonquakes is very rich: from solar-earth tides to clustering among the meteoroid streams [1, 2]. The histograms from meteoroid impacts seismic data revealed the seismic wave responses of the Moon to solar oscillations and the action on the lunar surface by dust-gas plasma of meteoroid streams [3]. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on an axis of ordinates - the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on an abscissa - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were put aside [4]. Spectrum of the series of meteoroid streams seismicity disclosed time picks on orbital periods some planets and their satellites and solar oscillations [4, 5]. The research of peculiarities of histogram envelopes [3] and comparative common analysis solar bursts data and mass meteoroid distribution are confirmed [3, 4] and revealed Forbush`s effect for gas-dust plasma [6]. Hidden astrophysical periodicities of lunar seismicity were obtained early from an analysis of time series [7] which were similarity to series [4]. The path of results of [7] is presented in the Table where picks presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. Hypothesis for explanation of the Table results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars near

  1. Method For Enhanced Gas Monitoring In High Density Flow Streams

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Mulderink, Kenneth A.; Marin, Ovidiu

    2005-09-13

    A method for conducting laser absorption measurements in high temperature process streams having high levels of particulate matter is disclosed. An impinger is positioned substantially parallel to a laser beam propagation path and at upstream position relative to the laser beam. Beam shielding pipes shield the beam from the surrounding environment. Measurement is conducted only in the gap between the two shielding pipes where the beam propagates through the process gas. The impinger facilitates reduced particle presence in the measurement beam, resulting in improved SNR (signal-to-noise) and improved sensitivity and dynamic range of the measurement.

  2. Cryogenic process for removing acidic gases from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Ginnasi, A.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.; Vetere, A.

    1985-04-30

    Low temperature treatments are combined with solvent treatments using particularly selective solvents for stripping acidic gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide from natural gas or from synthetic gases. The preferred solvents are a wide range of compounds having an esteric or an etheric function in their molecule, but there are also examples of compounds which have the two functions simultaneously. The stripping process is comparatively simple, is efficient, especially for high contents of acidic gases in the raw gas streams, and is economically acceptable.

  3. Composite clay materials for removal of SOx from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.; Polansky, C.A.; Amarasekera, J.

    1993-07-06

    A method is described for preparing a composite material capable of removing SO[sub x] from a gas stream comprising the steps of: (a) providing a suspension containing a smectite clay in water; (b) dissolving an amount of sodium carbonate in the suspension of the clay; (c) adding a soluble alkaline earth metal salt in stoichiometric amount for reaction with the sodium carbonate to form an alkaline earth metal carbonate precipitate in the suspension with the clay; and (d) drying the suspension to provide the composite material, wherein when the composite material is heated, the SO[sub x], is removed from the gas. A method is described in accordance with claim 3 wherein the alkaline earth metal carbonate and clay are mixed with an iron salt selected from the group consisting of ferric chloride and ferric nitrate. A method is described in accordance with claim 3 wherein the alkaline earth metal is selected from the group consisting of magnesium and calcium.

  4. Method for directly recovering fluorine from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Orlett, Michael J.; Saraceno, Anthony J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a process for the direct recovery of gaseous fluorine from waste-gas streams or the like. The process comprises passing the gas stream through a bed of anhydrous K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6 pellets to fluorinate the same to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.7 and subsequently desorbing the fluorine by heating the K.sub.3 NiF.sub.7 pellets to a temperature re-converting them to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6. The efficiency of the fluorine-absorption step is maximized by operating in a selected and conveniently low temperature. The desorbed fluorine is highly pure and is at a pressure of several atmospheres. Preferably, the K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6 pellets are prepared by a method including the steps of forming agglomerates of hydrated K.sub.3 NiF.sub.5, sintering the agglomerates to form K.sub.3 NiF.sub.5 pellets of enhanced reactivity with respect to fluorine, and fluorinating the sintered pellets to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6.

  5. Catalytic process for removing toxic gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Baglio, J.A.; Gaudet, G.G.; Palilla, F.C.

    1983-02-22

    A multi-stage process for reducing the content of sulfurcontaining gases-notably hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide-in waste gas streams is provided. In the first stage, the gas stream is passed through a reaction zone at a temperature between about 150 and 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a pretreated novel catalyst of the formula xLn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in which Ln is yttrium or a rare earth element and T is cobalt, iron or nickel, and each of x and y is independently a number from 0 to 3, said catalyst being substantially non-crystalline and having a surface area of from about 10 m/sup 2//g to about 40 m/sup 2//g. The preferred catalyst is one in which Ln is lanthanum, T is cobalt, and x and y range from 1 to 3, including non-integers. The first stage yields a product stream having a reduced content of sulfur-containing gases, including specifically, substantial reduction of carbonyl sulfide and virtual elimination of carbon disulfide. An intermediate stage is a claus reaction, which may take place in one or more reaction zones, at temperatures less than about 130/sup 0/ C, in the presence of known catalysts such as bauxite, alumina or cobalt molybdates. The final stage is the air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide at a temperature between about 150 and 300/sup 0/ C in the presence of a catalyst usable in first stage.

  6. The Interstellar Gas Dust Streams and Seeds of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleg, Khavroshkin; Vladislav, Tsyplakov

    Gas dust Streams from Double Stars & Lunar Seismicity. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on the ordinate axis the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on abscissa axis - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were used. Spectrum of the series disclosed time picks on hidden cosmological periodicities of lunar seismicity. A part of results (picks) presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. The explanation of that results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars systems and interacting of it with lunar surface. Information content of the Nakamura`s Catalog of moonquakes is very rich: from solar-earth tides to clustering among the meteoroid streams [1, 2]. The histograms from meteoroid impacts seismic data revealed the seismic wave responses of the Moon to solar oscillations and the action on the lunar surface by dust-gas plasma of meteoroid streams [3]. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on an axis of ordinates - the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on an abscissa - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were put aside [4]. Spectrum of the series of meteoroid streams seismicity disclosed time picks on orbital periods some planets and their satellites and solar oscillations [4, 5]. The research of peculiarities of histogram envelopes [3] and comparative common analysis solar bursts data and mass meteoroid distribution are confirmed [3, 4] and revealed Forbush`s effect for gas-dust plasma [6]. Hidden astrophysical periodicities of lunar seismicity were obtained early from an analysis of time series [7] which were similarity to series [4]. The path of results of [7] is presented in the Table where picks presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. Hypothesis for explanation of the Table results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars near

  7. Method for cleansing noxious constituents from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.J.; Schauer, J.M.

    1982-05-18

    An apparatus and method for chemically altering and scrubbing the noxious constituents from foundry core manufacturing and arc welding operations is disclosed. An upstanding closed container is provided and a gas washing liquid is disposed within the container to a predetermined level. A horizontal baffle is mounted stationarily within the container at an elevation spaced above the level of the gas washing liquid therein and spaced peripheral portions of the baffle are spaced inwardly of the opposing inner surface of the container. A gas drive pipe extends into the container, downwardly past the baffle , and opens downwardly in a central lower portion of the container, below the baffle and near the bottom of the liquid. The container includes a top cover and an outlet duct is provided which opens outwardly of the container through a central portion of the cover. The gases are pumped into the drive pipe to achieve a critical velocity at the exit of the drive pipe of about 2, 300-20,000 linear feet per minu entering the liquid in a substantially vertical downward direction within the critical velocity range, small gascontaining bubbles, on the order of 1/8 - 3/8 inches in diameter, are formed as the gas stream rises, which bubbles impact against the horizontal baffle. The high velocity gases impart sufficient kinetic energy to the system to enable the necessary chemical reactions and scrubbing to proceed.

  8. Assessing sorbent injection mercury control effectiveness in flue gas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, T.R.; Richardson, C.F.; Chang, R.; Meserole, F.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.

    2000-01-01

    One promising approach for removing mercury from coal-fired, utility flue gas involves the direct injection of mercury sorbents. Although this method has been effective at removing mercury in municipal waste incinerators, tests conducted to date on utility coal-fired boilers show that mercury removal is much more difficult in utility flue gas. EPRI is conducting research to investigate mercury removal using sorbents in this application. Bench-scale, pilot-scale, and field tests have been conducted to determine the ability of different sorbents to remove mercury in simulated and actual flue gas streams. This paper focuses on recent bench-scale and field test results evaluating the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon and fly ash and the use of these results to develop a predictive mercury removal model. Field tests with activated carbon show that adsorption characteristics measured in the lab agree reasonably well with characteristics measured in the field. However, more laboratory and field data will be needed to identify other gas phase components which may impact performance. This will allow laboratory tests to better simulate field conditions and provide improved estimates of sorbent performance for specific sites. In addition to activated carbon results, bench-scale and modeling results using fly ash are presented which suggest that certain fly ashes are capable of adsorbing mercury.

  9. Groundtruthing and potential for predicting acid deposition impacts in headwater streams using bedrock geology, GIS, angling, and stream chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kirby, C S; McInerney, B; Turner, M D

    2008-04-15

    Atmospheric acid deposition is of environmental concern worldwide, and the determination of impacts in remote areas can be problematic. Rainwater in central Pennsylvania, USA, has a mean pH of approximately 4.4. Bedrock varies dramatically in its ability to neutralize acidity. A GIS database simplified reconnaissance of non-carbonate bedrock streams in the Valley and Ridge Province and identified potentially chronically impacted headwater streams, which were sampled for chemistry and brook trout. Stream sites (n=26) that originate in and flow through the Tuscarora had a median pH of 5.0 that was significantly different from other formations. Shawangunk streams (n=6) and non-Tuscarora streams (n=20) had a median pH of 6.0 and 6.3, respectively. Mean alkalinity for non-Tuscarora streams (2.6 mg/L CaCO(3)) was higher than the mean for Tuscarora streams (0.5 mg/L). Lower pH and alkalinity suggest that the buffering capability of the Tuscarora is inferior to that of adjacent sandstones. Dissolved aluminum concentrations were much higher for Tuscarora streams (0.2 mg/L; approximately the lethal limit for brook trout) than for non-Tuscarora streams (0.03 mg/L) or Shawangunk streams (0.02 mg/L). Hook-and-line methods determined the presence/absence of brook trout in 47 stream reaches with suitable habitat. Brook trout were observed in 21 of 22 non-Tuscarora streams, all 6 Shawangunk streams, and only 9 of 28 Tuscarora stream sites. Carefully-designed hook-and-line sampling can determine the presence or absence of brook trout and help confirm biological impacts of acid deposition. 15% of 334 km of Tuscarora stream lengths are listed as "impaired" due to atmospheric deposition by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. 65% of the 101 km of Tuscarora stream lengths examined in this study were impaired. PMID:18258282

  10. Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunald; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    A method for separating a target gas from a gaseous mixture using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids is presented. Industrial effluent streams may be cleaned by removing carbon dioxide from the stream by contacting the effluent stream with a 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquid compound.

  11. Process gas chromatography study of a Selexol acid gas removal system. Final report Mar-Sep 82

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The report gives results of continuous compositional monitoring by process gas chromatography (GC) for three gas streams associated with the Selexol acid gas removal system at the Bi-Gas pilot plant in Homer City, PA. Data were obtained from the inlet and outlet streams of the Selexol system during tests in April and May 1982. Product gas composition data were logged for 55 hours of plant operation. The Bi-Gas pilot plant, utilizing a two-stage, entrained-bed, high-pressure slagging gasifier, produces a product gas that is low in tars and heavy oils. This gas stream required very little cleanup prior to instrumental analysis. However, some problems were encountered in the analysis of the Selexol acid gas stream due to the presence of high levels of naphthalene. The process gas chromatographs performed well and remained very stable during the tests. Material balances based on GC analyses and process flow rate data show a high degree of material accountability. The H/sub 2/S removal efficiency of the Selexol absorber was about 99% during the tests.

  12. Coaxial twin-fluid atomization with pattern air gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei Ng, Chin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Coaxial twin-fluid atomization has numerous industrial applications, most notably fuel injection and spray coating. In the coating process of pharmaceutical tablets, the coaxial atomizing air stream is accompanied by two diametrically opposed side jets that impinge on the liquid/gas coaxial jets at an angle to produce an elliptical shape of the spray's cross section. Our study focuses on the influence of these side jets on the break up process and on the droplet velocity and diameter distribution along the cross section. The ultimate goal is to predict the size distribution and volume flux per unit area in the spray. With this predictive model, an optimal atomizing air/pattern air ratio can be found to achieve the desired coating result. This model is also crucial in scaling up the laboratory setup to production level. We have performed experiments with different atomized liquids, such as water and glycerine-water mixtures, that allow us to establish the effect of liquid viscosity, through the Ohnesorge number, in the spray characteristics. The gas Reynolds number of our experiments ranges from 9000 to 18000 and the Weber number ranges from 400 to 1600. We will present the effect of pattern air in terms of the resulting droplets size, droplet number density and velocity at various distances downstream of the nozzle where the effect of pattern air is significant.

  13. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Ganesan, Kumar

    2008-01-01

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  14. Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Livengood, C. David

    2006-10-10

    A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

  15. Gas stream cleanup papers from DOE/METC sponsored contractors review meetings in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R.C.; Kothari, V.P.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains gas stream cleanup papers that were presented at two contractors review meetings sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy in 1988. The two meetings were (1) the Eighth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting held May 10-12, 1988, and (2) the Annual Coal Fuel Heat Engines and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting held June 14-16, 1988. The purpose of the meetings was to present recent technical information on selected projects in the gasification, heat engines, and gas stream cleanup programs. The meetings provided a forum for the exchange and dissemination of gasification, heat engine, and gas stream cleanup research results generated under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy. The gas stream cleanup program was discussed in combination with the gasification and heat engines programs to emphasize the importance of approaching research on gas stream cleanup concepts from a system perspective. Gas stream cleanup is an integral part of all coal conversion technologies. Individual papers are processed separately for the data bases.

  16. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  17. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  18. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas F.; Robin, Allen M.; Wolfenbarger, James K.; Suggitt, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  19. Method and apparatus for decreased undesired particle emissions in gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Bustard, C.J.

    1999-04-13

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 5 figs.

  20. Sterically-hindered amines for acid-gas absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, G.; Ho, W.S.; Savage, D.W.; Chludzinski, G.R.; Wiechert, S. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes sterically hindered amines for removal of acid gases such as CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S from gaseous streams. Steric hindrance of amines reduces carbamate stability. Moderately hindered amines are characterized by high rates of CO/sub 2/ absorption and high capacities for CO/sub 2/. The moderately hindered amine in use with organic solvent has considerably higher capacity than the conventional amine-solvent system for simultaneous removal of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S from synthesis gas and natural gas. A severely-hindered-amine absorbent, characterized by a very low rate of CO/sub 2/ absorption, has much higher capacity and selectivity than the current industry standard absorbent, using the conventional methyldiethanolamine for selective removal of H/sub 2/S from CO/sub 2/-containing streams.

  1. Acid gas removal in a confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, H.S.; Diehl, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports results of acid gas removal tests performed on a confined vortex scrubber. The confined vortex scrubber (CVS) was developed at the Energy Technology Office of Textron Defense Systems (ETO/TDS) under company as well as Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) funding. Previous tests on the CVS have demonstrated > 98% capture for sub-micron fly ash particles, as well as high mercury vapor removal from gas streams. In the recent tests water, sodium hydroxide, and sodium sulfite and bisulfite solutions were used to scrub out hydrochloric, acid gas (HCl) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) doped in air supplied to the CVS. The capture efficiency was determined as a function of acid gas concentration, liquor flow rate, and liquor type. When the liquor was supplied only inside the CVS squirrel cage the HCl removal efficiency varied from 85--100% while the SO{sub 2} removal efficiency varied from 60--80%. Significantly higher captures were obtained at 1/3 rd the liquor flow rate by spraying the liquor upstream of the CVS in the air inlet pipe, and increasing the liquor/gas contact time. Total HCl captures > 95% and SO{sub 2} captures > 85% were obtained at a liquid/gas ratio of only 2 gal/1,000 acf for acid gas concentrations of 200--1,800 ppmv. There were no significant differences in the SO{sub 2}, scrubbing ability of the three sodium solutions, and the HCl scrubbing ability of water and a sodium hydroxide solution. These results suggest that the acid gas capture in the CVS is mass transfer limited because of the extremely short gas residence times in the CVS.

  2. Seasonal patterns in stream periphyton fatty acids and community benthic algal composition in six high quality headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honeyfield, Dale C.; Maloney, Kelly O.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are integral components of periphyton and differ among algal taxa. We examined seasonal patterns in periphyton fatty acids in six minimally disturbed headwater streams in Pennsylvania’s Appalachian Mountains, USA. Environmental data and periphyton were collected across four seasons for fatty acid and algal taxa content. Non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination suggested significant seasonal differences in fatty acids; an ordination on algal composition revealed similar seasonal patterns, but with slightly weaker separation of summer and fall. Summer and fall fatty acid profiles were driven by temperature, overstory cover, and conductivity and winter profiles by measures of stream size. Ordination on algal composition suggested that summer and fall communities were driven by overstory and temperature, whereas winter communities were driven by velocity. The physiologically important fatty acid 18:3ω6 was highest in summer and fall. Winter samples had the highest 20:3ω3. Six saturated fatty acids differed among the seasons. Periphyton fatty acids profiles appeared to reflect benthic algal species composition. This suggests that periphyton fatty acid composition can be useful in characterizing basal food resources and stream water quality.

  3. Toxic Acid Gas Absorber Design Considerations for Air Pollution Control in Process Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyele, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the design parameters for an absorber used for removal of toxic acid gas (in particular sulfur dioxide) from a process gas stream for environmental health protection purposes. Starting from the equilibrium data, Henry's law constant was determined from the slope of the y-x diagram. Based on mass balances across the absorber,…

  4. Hot gas stream application in micro-bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrijasevic, Daniela; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Smetana, Walter; Boehm, Stefan; Brenner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept for bonding micro-parts with dimensions in the range of 50 μm to 300 μm. Two different kinds of adhesives - polyurethane adhesive foil and hot melt glue - were applied to a basic substrate by different techniques. The focused and concentrated hot gas stream softened glue which had been applied in a solid state. Micro-parts were then embossed in the softened glue, or covered and shielded by it. In this way, a rigid and compact bond was obtained after cooling. For the positioning of micro-parts (optical fibers), it has been necessary to manufacture adequate V-grooves. Finite element analyses using the ANSYS TM program package were performed in order to evaluate parameters which govern the heat transfer to the adhesive and substrate respectively. Experimental results are in good agreement with results obtained by the numerical simulations. The advantages of this new approach are small system size, low capital costs, simple usage, applicability to many material combinations, easy integration into existing production lines, etc.

  5. Optical backscatter probe for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, James E; Partridge, William P

    2013-05-28

    A system for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream is disclosed. The system transmits light into a combustion gas stream, and thereafter detects a portion of the transmitted light as scattered light in an amount corresponding to the amount of particulates in the emissions. Purge gas may be supplied adjacent the light supply and the detector to reduce particles in the emissions from coating or otherwise compromising the transmission of light into the emissions and recovery of scattered light from the emissions.

  6. Activity of Microorganisms in Acid Mine Water I. Influence of Acid Water on Aerobic Heterotrophs of a Normal Stream

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Jon H.; Randles, C. I.; Dugan, P. R.

    1968-01-01

    Comparison of microbial content of acid-contaminated and nonacid-contaminated streams from the same geographical area indicated that nonacid streams contained relatively low numbers of acid-tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms. The acid-tolerant aerobes survived when acid entered the stream and actually increased in number to about 2 × 103 per ml until the pH approached 3.0. The organisms then represented the heterotrophic aerobic microflora of the streams comprised of a mixture of mine drainage and nonacid water. A stream which was entirely acid drainage did not have a similar microflora. Most gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria died out very rapidly in acidic water, and they comprised a very small percentage of the microbial population of the streams examined. Iron- and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria were present wherever mine water entered a stream system. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria predominated over iron oxidizers. Ecological data from the field were verified by laboratory experiments designed to simulate stream conditions. PMID:5650063

  7. Estimating the gas and dye quantities for modified tracer technique measurements of stream reaeration coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Measuring the reaeration coefficient of a stream with a modified tracer technique has been accomplished by injecting either ethylene or ethylene and propane together and a rhodamine-WT dye solution into the stream. The movement of the tracers through the stream reach after injection is described by a one-dimensional diffusion equation. The peak concentrations of the tracers at the downstream end of the reach depend on the concentrations of the tracers in the stream at the injection site, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, the mean water velocity, the length of the reach, and the duration of the injection period. The downstream gas concentrations also depend on the gas desorption coefficients of the reach. The concentrations of the tracer gases in the stream at the injection site depend on the flow rates of the gases through the injection diffusers, the efficiency of the gas absorption process, and the stream discharge. The concentration of dye in the stream at the injection site depends on the flow rate of the dye solution, the concentration of the dye solution, and the stream discharge. Equations for estimating the gas flow rates, the quantities of the gases, the dye concentration, and the quantity of dye together with procedures for determining the variables in these equations are presented. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Apparatus for removal of particulate matter from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peyton L.; Morse, John C.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the removal of particulate matter from the gaseous product stream of an entrained flow coal gasifier which apparatus includes an initial screen, an intermediate screen which is aligned with the direction of flow of the gaseous product stream and a final screen transversely disposed to the flow of gaseous product and which apparatus is capable of withstanding at least a pressure differential of about 10 psi (68.95 kPa) or greater at the temperatures of the gaseous product stream.

  9. Spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse gas abundance of urban streams: The role of urban infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/MethodsStreams and rivers are significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions globally. Water quality and watershed management, are likely to influence GHG emissions regionally. In urban-impacted watersheds, increased nitrogen loading, organic matter, and war...

  10. Chronic and episodic acidification of Adirondack streams from acid rain in 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Roy, K.M.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, H.A.; Capone, S.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Boylen, C.W.

    2008-01-01

    Limited information is available on streams in the Adirondack region of New York, although streams are more prone to acidification than the more studied Adirondack lakes. A stream assessment was therefore undertaken in the Oswegatchie and Black River drainages; an area of 4585 km2 in the western part of the Adirondack region. Acidification was evaluated with the newly developed base-cation surplus (BCS) and the conventional acid-neutralizing capacity by Gran titration (ANCG). During the survey when stream water was most acidic (March 2004), 105 of 188 streams (56%) were acidified based on the criterion of BCS < 0 ??eq L-1, whereas 29% were acidified based on an ANCG value < 0 ??eq L-1. During the survey when stream water was least acidic (August 2003), 15 of 129 streams (12%) were acidified based on the criterion of BCS < 0 ??eq L-1, whereas 5% were acidified based on ANCG value < 0 ??eq L -1. The contribution of acidic deposition to stream acidification was greater than that of strongly acidic organic acids in each of the surveys by factors ranging from approximately 2 to 5, but was greatest during spring snowmelt and least during elevated base flow in August. During snowmelt, the percentage attributable to acidic deposition was 81%, whereas during the October 2003 survey, when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were highest, this percentage was 66%. The total length of stream reaches estimated to be prone to acidification was 718 km out of a total of 1237 km of stream reaches that were assessed. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  11. Machine learning and hurdle models for improving regional predictions of stream water acid neutralizing capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povak, Nicholas A.; Hessburg, Paul F.; Reynolds, Keith M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Salter, R. Brion

    2013-06-01

    In many industrialized regions of the world, atmospherically deposited sulfur derived from industrial, nonpoint air pollution sources reduces stream water quality and results in acidic conditions that threaten aquatic resources. Accurate maps of predicted stream water acidity are an essential aid to managers who must identify acid-sensitive streams, potentially affected biota, and create resource protection strategies. In this study, we developed correlative models to predict the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of streams across the southern Appalachian Mountain region, USA. Models were developed using stream water chemistry data from 933 sampled locations and continuous maps of pertinent environmental and climatic predictors. Environmental predictors were averaged across the upslope contributing area for each sampled stream location and submitted to both statistical and machine-learning regression models. Predictor variables represented key aspects of the contributing geology, soils, climate, topography, and acidic deposition. To reduce model error rates, we employed hurdle modeling to screen out well-buffered sites and predict continuous ANC for the remainder of the stream network. Models predicted acid-sensitive streams in forested watersheds with small contributing areas, siliceous lithologies, cool and moist environments, low clay content soils, and moderate or higher dry sulfur deposition. Our results confirmed findings from other studies and further identified several influential climatic variables and variable interactions. Model predictions indicated that one quarter of the total stream network was sensitive to additional sulfur inputs (i.e., ANC < 100 µeq L-1), while <10% displayed much lower ANC (<50 µeq L-1). These methods may be readily adapted in other regions to assess stream water quality and potential biotic sensitivity to acidic inputs.

  12. Sources of alkalinity and acidity along an acid mine drainage remediated stream in SE Ohio: Hewett Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, K. L.; Lopez, D. A.; Bowman, J. R.; Kruse, N. A.; Mackey, A. L.; VanDervort, D.; Korenowsky, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the remediation of acid mine drainage impacted streams, it is important to locate and quantify the sources of acidity and alkalinity inputs. These parameters affect the long-term recovery of the stream habitat. Previous studies have focused on treating the remediation of AMD as point source pollution, targeting the main acid seep for remediation. However, in the interest of biological and chemical recovery, it is important to understand how sources of alkalinity and acidity, throughout the stream, affect water and sediment quality. The Hewett Fork watershed in Southeastern Ohio is impacted by AMD from the AS-14 mine complex in Carbondale, Ohio. In attempts to remediate the stream, the water is being treated with a continuous alkaline input from a calcium oxide doser. While the section of watershed furthest downstream from the doser is showing signs of recovery, the water chemistry and aquatic life near the doser are still impacted. The objective of this study is to examine and model the chemistry of the tributaries of Hewett Fork to see how they contribute to the alkalinity and acidity budgets of the main stem of the stream. By examining the inputs of tributaries into the main stem, this project aims to understand processes occurring during remediation throughout the entire stream. Discharge was measured during a dry period in October, 2012 and at a high flow in May, 2013. Field parameters such as pH, TDS, DO, alkalinity and acidity were also determined. Low flow data collected during fall sampling shows variable flow along the stream path, the stream gains water from ground water at some points while it loses water at others, potentially due to variable elevation of the water table. Flow data collected during spring sampling shows that Hewett Fork is a gaining stream during that period with inputs from groundwater contributing to increasing flow downstream. When using this data to calculate the net alkalinity load along the stream, there are areas with alkaline

  13. Method for removal and stabilization of mercury in mercury-containing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Broderick, Thomas E.

    2005-09-13

    The present invention is directed to a process and apparatus for removing and stabilizing mercury from mercury-containing gas streams. A gas stream containing vapor phase elemental and/or speciated mercury is contacted with reagent, such as an oxygen-containing oxidant, in a liquid environment to form a mercury-containing precipitate. The mercury-containing precipitate is kept or placed in solution and reacts with one or more additional reagents to form a solid, stable mercury-containing compound.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of a Streaming Gas Core Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.; Elazab, Samia S.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic instability of a streaming fluid jet (radius R0) ambient with streaming liquid is studied to the axisymmetric (m{=}0) and the non-axisymmetric (m{≥slant}1) disturbances (m is the azimuthal wavenumber). When the surface tension effect is suppressed; the jet is stable to all m{≥slant}0 for all wavelengths. In the absence of the magnetic field; the model is stable to all m{≥slant}1 for all wavelengths and also stable to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is equal to or shorter than 2π R0. While it is unstable only to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is longer than 2π R0. The streaming has a destabilizing effect. If the magnetic fields are sufficiently high, so that the Alfvén wave velocities are greater than the streaming velocities of the two fluids; the jet is stable against all disturbances and vice versa.

  15. A stream-based methane monitoring approach for evaluating groundwater impacts associated with unconventional gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Stolp, Bert J; Kimball, Briant A; Susong, David D; Marston, Thomas M; Gardner, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Gaining streams can provide an integrated signal of relatively large groundwater capture areas. In contrast to the point-specific nature of monitoring wells, gaining streams coalesce multiple flow paths. Impacts on groundwater quality from unconventional gas development may be evaluated at the watershed scale by the sampling of dissolved methane (CH4 ) along such streams. This paper describes a method for using stream CH4 concentrations, along with measurements of groundwater inflow and gas transfer velocity interpreted by 1-D stream transport modeling, to determine groundwater methane fluxes. While dissolved ionic tracers remain in the stream for long distances, the persistence of methane is not well documented. To test this method and evaluate CH4 persistence in a stream, a combined bromide (Br) and CH4 tracer injection was conducted on Nine-Mile Creek, a gaining stream in a gas development area in central Utah. A 35% gain in streamflow was determined from dilution of the Br tracer. The injected CH4 resulted in a fivefold increase in stream CH4 immediately below the injection site. CH4 and δ(13) CCH4 sampling showed it was not immediately lost to the atmosphere, but remained in the stream for more than 2000 m. A 1-D stream transport model simulating the decline in CH4 yielded an apparent gas transfer velocity of 4.5 m/d, describing the rate of loss to the atmosphere (possibly including some microbial consumption). The transport model was then calibrated to background stream CH4 in Nine-Mile Creek (prior to CH4 injection) in order to evaluate groundwater CH4 contributions. The total estimated CH4 load discharging to the stream along the study reach was 190 g/d, although using geochemical fingerprinting to determine its source was beyond the scope of the current study. This demonstrates the utility of stream-gas sampling as a reconnaissance tool for evaluating both natural and anthropogenic CH4 leakage from gas reservoirs into groundwater and surface water

  16. Stream macroinvertebrate communities across a gradient of natural gas development in the Fayetteville Shale.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica; Austin, Bradley J; Inlander, Ethan; Gallipeau, Cory; Evans-White, Michelle A; Entrekin, Sally

    2015-10-15

    Oil and gas extraction in shale plays expanded rapidly in the U.S. and is projected to expand globally in the coming decades. Arkansas has doubled the number of gas wells in the state since 2005 mostly by extracting gas from the Fayetteville Shale with activity concentrated in mixed pasture-deciduous forests. Concentrated well pads in close proximity to streams could have adverse effects on stream water quality and biota if sedimentation associated with developing infrastructure or contamination from fracturing fluid and waste occurs. Cumulative effects of gas activity and local habitat conditions on macroinvertebrate communities were investigated across a gradient of gas well activity (0.2-3.6 wells per km(2)) in ten stream catchments in spring 2010 and 2011. In 2010, macroinvertebrate density was positively related to well pad inverse flowpath distance from streams (r=0.84, p<0.001). Relatively tolerant mayflies Baetis and Caenis (r=0.64, p=0.04), filtering hydropsychid caddisflies (r=0.73, p=0.01), and chironomid midge densities (r=0.79, p=0.008) also increased in streams where more well pads were closer to stream channels. Macroinvertebrate trophic structure reflected environmental conditions with greater sediment and primary production in streams with more gas activity close to streams. However, stream water turbidity (r=0.69, p=0.02) and chlorophyll a (r=0.89, p<0.001) were the only in-stream variables correlated with gas well activities. In 2011, a year with record spring flooding, a different pattern emerged where mayfly density (p=0.74, p=0.01) and mayfly, stonefly, and caddisfly richness (r=0.78, p=0.008) increased in streams with greater well density and less silt cover. Hydrology and well pad placement in a catchment may interact to result in different relationships between biota and catchment activity between the two sample years. Our data show evidence of different macroinvertebrate communities expressed in catchments with different levels of gas

  17. URBANIZATION ALTERS FATTY ACID CONCENTRATIONS OF STREAM FOOD WEBS IN THE NARRAGANSETT BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization and associated human activities negatively affect stream algal and invertebrate assemblages, likely altering food webs. Our goal was to determine if urbanization affects food web essential fatty acids (EFAs) and if EFAs could be useful ecological indicators in monito...

  18. Biology in focus: better lives through better science: new hope for acid streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, Barnaby

    1998-01-01

    Across the nation, a toxic pollutant turns clean streams orange, kills fish and plant life, and smells like rotten eggs. The culprit is acid mine drainage, the poisonous water leaking from more than 500,000 abandoned and inactive mines in 32 states. The toxic discharge is a problem for operational mines as well. In the Appalachian coal region, for example, acid mine drainage has degraded more than 8,000 miles of streams and has left some aquatic habitats virtually lifeless.

  19. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, David E.; Hass, William J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

  20. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  1. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  2. Sensitivity of stream basins in Shenandoah National Park to acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, D.D.; Dise, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    Six synoptic surveys of 56 streams that drain the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, were conducted in cooperation with the University of Virginia to evaluate sensitivity of dilute headwater streams to acid deposition and to determine the degree of acidification of drainage basins. Flow-weighted alkalinity concentration of most streams is below 200 microequivalents per liter, which is considered the threshold of sensitivity. Streams draining resistant siliceous bedrocks have an extreme sensitivity (alkalinity below 20 microequivalents/L); those draining granite and granodiorite have a high degree of sensitivity (20 to 100 microequivalents/L); and streams draining metamorphosed volcanics have moderate to marginal sensitivity (100 to 200 microequivalents/L). A comparison of current stream water chemistry to that predicted by a model based on carbonic acid weathering reactions suggests that all basins in the Park shows signs of acidification by atmospheric deposition. Acidification is defined as a neutralization of stream water alkalinity and/or an increase in the base cation weathering rate. Acidification averages 50 microequivalents/L, which is fairly evenly distributed in the Park. However, the effects of acidification are most strongly felt in extremely sensitive basins, such as those underlain by the Antietam Formation, which have stream water pH values averaging 4.99 and a mineral acidity of 7 microequivalents/L. (USGS)

  3. Proceedings of the eight annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Longanbach, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Forty-three papers and 31 poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs at the contractors review meeting. This volume covers sessions one and two on systems for the production of power and systems for the production of industrial fuel gas. Individual projects of those sessions are processed separately for the data bases.

  4. Airfoil lance apparatus for homogeneous humidification and sorbent dispersion in a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Myers, R.B.; Yagiela, A.S.

    1990-12-25

    An apparatus for spraying an atomized mixture into a gas stream comprises a stream line airfoil member having a large radius leading edge and a small radius trailing edge. A nozzle assembly pierces the trailing edge of the airfoil member and is concentrically surrounded by a nacelle which directs shielding gas from the interior of the airfoil member around the nozzle assembly. Flowable medium to be atomized and atomizing gas for atomizing the medium are supplied in concentric conduits to the nozzle. A plurality of nozzles each surrounded by a nacelle are spaced along the trailing edge of the airfoil member. 3 figs.

  5. Airfoil lance apparatus for homogeneous humidification and sorbent dispersion in a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Robert B.; Yagiela, Anthony S.

    1990-12-25

    An apparatus for spraying an atomized mixture into a gas stream comprises a stream line airfoil member having a large radius leading edge and a small radius trailing edge. A nozzle assembly pierces the trailing edge of the airfoil member and is concentrically surrounded by a nacelle which directs shielding gas from the interior of the airfoil member around the nozzle assembly. Flowable medium to be atomized and atomizing gas for atomizing the medium are supplied in concentric conduits to the nozzle. A plurality of nozzles each surrounded by a nacelle are spaced along the trailing edge of the airfoil member.

  6. Destruction of acid gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Fu, Yuan C.; Ekmann, J.M.; Boyle, J.M.

    1990-12-31

    A method of destroying NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in a combustion gas is disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable molecules in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combustion of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH{sub 2}, OH, CH and/or CH{sub 2}. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475--950{degrees}C. 1 fig.

  7. Destruction of acid gas emissions

    DOEpatents

    Mathur, Mahendra P.; Fu, Yuan C.; Ekmann, James M.; Boyle, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of destroying NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 in a combustion gas in disclosed. The method includes generating active species by treating stable moleucles in a high temperature plasma. Ammonia, methane, steam, hydrogen, nitrogen or a combination of these gases can be selected as the stable molecules. The gases are subjected to plasma conditions sufficient to create free radicals, ions or excited atoms such as N, NH, NH.sub.2, OH.sup.-, CH and/or CH.sub.2. These active species are injected into a combustion gas at a location of sufficiently high temperature to maintain the species in active state and permit them to react with NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2. Typically the injection is made into the immediate post-combustion gases at temperatures of 475.degree.-950.degree. C.

  8. Proceedings of the eight annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Longanbach, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Research programs presented at the Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting are presented. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: To review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. To foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities. To facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 320 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 3-day meeting. Forty-three papers and 31 poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. This volume covers sessions three and four on systems for the production of synthesis gas and systems for the production of coproducts. Individual topics within each session are processed separately for the data bases.

  9. Downstream Warming and Headwater Acidity May Diminish Coldwater Habitat in Southern Appalachian Mountain Streams.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, T C; Sloat, M R; Sullivan, T J; Dolloff, C A; Hessburg, P F; Povak, N A; Jackson, W A; Sams, C

    2015-01-01

    Stream-dwelling species in the U.S. southern Appalachian Mountains region are particularly vulnerable to climate change and acidification. The objectives of this study were to quantify the spatial extent of contemporary suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive aquatic species and to forecast future habitat loss resulting from expected temperature increases on national forest lands in the southern Appalachian Mountain region. The goal of this study was to help watershed managers identify and assess stream reaches that are potentially vulnerable to warming, acidification, or both. To our knowledge, these results represent the first regional assessment of aquatic habitat suitability with respect to the combined effects of stream water temperature and acid-base status in the United States. Statistical models were developed to predict July mean daily maximum water temperatures and air-water temperature relations to determine potential changes in future stream water temperatures. The length of stream considered suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive species, based on temperature and acid neutralizing capacity thresholds of 20°C and 50 μeq/L, was variable throughout the national forests considered. Stream length displaying temperature above 20°C was generally more than five times greater than the length predicted to have acid neutralizing capacity below 50 μeq/L. It was uncommon for these two stressors to occur within the same stream segment. Results suggested that species' distributional shifts to colder, higher elevation habitats under a warming climate can be constrained by acidification of headwater streams. The approach used in this study can be applied to evaluate climate change impacts to stream water resources in other regions. PMID:26247361

  10. Downstream Warming and Headwater Acidity May Diminish Coldwater Habitat in Southern Appalachian Mountain Streams

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, W. A; Sams, C.

    2015-01-01

    Stream-dwelling species in the U.S. southern Appalachian Mountains region are particularly vulnerable to climate change and acidification. The objectives of this study were to quantify the spatial extent of contemporary suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive aquatic species and to forecast future habitat loss resulting from expected temperature increases on national forest lands in the southern Appalachian Mountain region. The goal of this study was to help watershed managers identify and assess stream reaches that are potentially vulnerable to warming, acidification, or both. To our knowledge, these results represent the first regional assessment of aquatic habitat suitability with respect to the combined effects of stream water temperature and acid-base status in the United States. Statistical models were developed to predict July mean daily maximum water temperatures and air-water temperature relations to determine potential changes in future stream water temperatures. The length of stream considered suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive species, based on temperature and acid neutralizing capacity thresholds of 20°C and 50 μeq/L, was variable throughout the national forests considered. Stream length displaying temperature above 20°C was generally more than five times greater than the length predicted to have acid neutralizing capacity below 50 μeq/L. It was uncommon for these two stressors to occur within the same stream segment. Results suggested that species’ distributional shifts to colder, higher elevation habitats under a warming climate can be constrained by acidification of headwater streams. The approach used in this study can be applied to evaluate climate change impacts to stream water resources in other regions. PMID:26247361

  11. STREAM CHEMISTRY IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES: I. SYNOPTIC SURVEY DESIGN, ACID-BASE STATUS, AND REGIONAL PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the regional acid-base status of streams in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern United States, spring baseflow chemistry was surveyed in a probability sample of 500 stream reaches representing a population of 64,300 reaches. Approximately half of the streams had acid neut...

  12. EFFECTS OF ACIDIC DEPOSITION ON STREAMS IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS AND PIEDMONT REGION OF THE MID-ATLANTIC UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the Mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the United States. ompilation of survey data from the Mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid-base status of streams. cidic stream...

  13. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  14. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic Stream with Mapped WHAM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Hernandez, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We present early stages of an Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). While the neutral component of the Stream may extend 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010), its ionized gas has not yet been studied in detail. Fox et al. 2014 find that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral and may extend 30° away from the H I emission. However, such absorption-line studies are not sensitive to the overall morphology of the ionized gas. Using targeted Hα emission observations of the Magellanic Stream, Barger et al. 2015 find that although the warm ionized gas tracks the neutral gas, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I emission at slightly offset velocities. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to diffuse emission (~ 10s of mR) and its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to isolate Stream emission, we are now conducting the first full Hα survey of its ionized component. Here we present early results, including spatial and kinematic comparisons to the well-established neutral profile of the Stream. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  15. The Role of Penetrating Gas Streams in Setting the Dynamical State of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, E.; Dekel, A.; Birnboim, Y.; Kravtsov, A.; Nagai, D.

    2016-06-01

    We utilize cosmological simulations of 16 galaxy clusters at redshifts z = 0 and z = 0.6 to study the effect of inflowing streams on the properties of the X-ray emitting intracluster medium. We find that the mass accretion occurs predominantly along streams that originate from the cosmic web and consist of heated gas. Clusters that are unrelaxed in terms of their X-ray morphology are characterized by higher mass inflow rates and deeper penetration of the streams, typically into the inner third of the virial radius. The penetrating streams generate elevated random motions, bulk flows and cold fronts. The degree of penetration of the streams may change over time such that clusters can switch from being unrelaxed to relaxed over a time-scale of several Gyrs.

  16. The role of penetrating gas streams in setting the dynamical state of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, E.; Dekel, A.; Birnboim, Y.; Kravtsov, A.; Nagai, D.

    2016-09-01

    We utilize cosmological simulations of 16 galaxy clusters at redshifts z = 0 and z = 0.6 to study the effect of inflowing streams on the properties of the X-ray emitting intracluster medium. We find that the mass accretion occurs predominantly along streams that originate from the cosmic web and consist of heated gas. Clusters that are unrelaxed in terms of their X-ray morphology are characterized by higher mass inflow rates and deeper penetration of the streams, typically into the inner third of the virial radius. The penetrating streams generate elevated random motions, bulk flows and cold fronts. The degree of penetration of the streams may change over time such that clusters can switch from being unrelaxed to relaxed over a time-scale of several giga years.

  17. Denitrification in Streams Impacted by Acid Mine Drainage: Effects of Iron, pH, and Potential Electron Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeseman, J. L.; Smith, R. L.; Silverstein, J.

    2003-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates between 8,000 and 16,000 km of streams on U.S. Forest Service land in the Western United States and more than 7,000 km of stream in the Eastern U.S. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in these acidic, heavy metal laden streams, however, denitrification can be inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to examine AMD sediments for bacteria capable of denitrification. The process of denitrification is known to increase pH, which may be particularly important in acidic environments. Denitrification potential was assessed in AMD sediments from several Colorado AMD impacted streams ranging from pH 2.6 to 4.91, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediments. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without any lag period, indicating that denitrification was actively occurring in these environments. Rates varied from 0.33 to 2.52 umoles NO3-N/ g-sediment/ day depending on the site. The pH of the microcosms increased between 0.23 to 1.49 pH units in 5 days, depending on the site. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of iron concentrations (Fe2+ and Fe3+), initial pH conditions, and several potential electron donors. Addition of iron above ambient concentrations seemed to have little effect on denitrification rates, whereas rates increased with increasing initial pH. The addition of carbon and hydrogen stimulated denitrification rates, which in turn increased the rise in pH. These results suggest that not only is denitrification possible in AMD streams, it may also be a useful remediation option, if suitable methods can be found to stimulate activity.

  18. Denitrification potential in stream sediments impacted by acid mine drainage: effects of pH, various electron donors, and iron.

    PubMed

    Baeseman, J L; Smith, R L; Silverstein, J

    2006-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates thousands of kilometers of stream in the western United States. At the same time, nitrogen loading to many mountain watersheds is increasing because of atmospheric deposition of nitrate and increased human use. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in acidic, heavy-metal-laden streams; however, it has been reported that one key process, denitrification, is inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the capacity for denitrification in acidified streams. Denitrification potential was assessed in sediments from several Colorado AMD-impacted streams, ranging from pH 2.60 to 4.54, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediment. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without a lag period, indicating that denitrification enzymes were expressed and functional in these systems. First-order denitrification potential rate constants varied from 0.046 to 2.964 day(-1). The pH of the microcosm water increased between 0.23 and 1.49 pH units during denitrification. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of initial pH, various electron donors, and iron (added as ferrous and ferric iron). Decreasing initial pH decreased denitrification; however, increasing pH had little effect on denitrification rates. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron decreased observed denitrification potential rate constants. The addition of glucose and natural organic matter stimulated denitrification potential. The addition of hydrogen had little effect, however, and denitrification activity in the microcosms decreased after acetate addition. These results suggest that denitrification can occur in AMD streams, and if stimulated within the environment, denitrification might reduce acidity. PMID:16463131

  19. Denitrification potential in stream sediments impacted by acid mine drainage: Effects of pH, various electron donors, and iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baeseman, J.L.; Smith, R.L.; Silverstein, J.

    2006-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates thousands of kilometers of stream in the western United States. At the same time, nitrogen loading to many mountain watersheds is increasing because of atmospheric deposition of nitrate and increased human use. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in acidic, heavy-metal-laden streams; however, it has been reported that one key process, denitrification, is inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the capacity for denitrification in acidified streams. Denitrification potential was assessed in sediments from several Colorado AMD-impacted streams, ranging from pH 2.60 to 4.54, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediment. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without a lag period, indicating that denitrification enzymes were expressed and functional in these systems. First-order denitrification potential rate constants varied from 0.046 to 2.964 day-1. The pH of the microcosm water increased between 0.23 and 1.49 pH units during denitrification. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of initial pH, various electron donors, and iron (added as ferrous and ferric iron). Decreasing initial pH decreased denitrification; however, increasing pH had little effect on denitrification rates. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron decreased observed denitrification potential rate constants. The addition of glucose and natural organic matter stimulated denitrification potential. The addition of hydrogen had little effect, however, and denitrification activity in the microcosms decreased after acetate addition. These results suggest that denitrification can occur in AMD streams, and if stimulated within the environment, denitrification might reduce acidity. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  20. The effects of land-use characteristics and acid sensitivity on the ecological status of Maryland coastal plain streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Scott, M.C.; Killen, W.D. Jr.; Anderson, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    A 2-year study was conducted to evaluate the ecological status of 12 acid-sensitive and 12 non-acid-sensitive Maryland coastal plain streams during the spring, summer, and fall of 1992 to 1993. An index of biotic integrity (IBI) for fish, chemical parameters, and physical habitat conditions were evaluated in these streams. Correlations of land-use activities (forested streams vs agricultural dominated streams) and watershed size were identified in the coastal plain streams with biological, chemical, and physical conditions. These data were also used to determine if a poor IBI for coastal plain stream fish can be related to stream sensitivity from acidic inputs. Physical habitat was more important than water quality in determining IBI values for the 2-year period. Acid sensitivity was also important in influencing the IBI but the influence of acid sensitivity was overshadowed by physical habitat. When variation in physical habitat was accounted for among sites, the IBI in nonacid-sensitive streams was higher than in acid-sensitive streams. Initial results demonstrated that IBI values were higher in agricultural dominated streams when compared to forested streams. Consideration of only two dominant land-use types caused oversimplification of these results because urban land use (often associated with negative effects) was positively correlated with forested streams and negatively correlated with agricultural streams.

  1. CHEMICAL FLUX IN AN ACID-STRESSED STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acidity of rain and snow falling on widely separated areas of the world has been increasing during the past 30 yr (refs 1-3). Acid rainfall consists of a dilute solution of sulphuric and nitric acids due to the oxidation and hydrolysis of airborne sulphur and nitrogen and fre...

  2. Heat Transfer to Bodies in a High-speed Rarified-Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Goodwin, Glen; Creager, Marcus O

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation to determine the equilibrium temperature and heat-transfer coefficients for transverse cylinders in a high-speed stream of rarefied gas measured over a range of Knudsen numbers (ratio of molecular-mean-free path to cylinder diameter) from 0.025 to 11.8 and for Mach numbers from 2.0 to 3.3. The range of free-stream Reynolds numbers was from 0.28 to 203. The models tested were 0.0010-, 0.0050-, 0.030-, 0.051-, 0.080-, and 0.126-inch -diameter cylinders held normal to the stream.

  3. PERSISTENT EPISODIC ACIDIFICATION OF STREAMS LINKED TO ACID RAIN EFFECTS ON SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Episodic acidification of streams, identified in the late 1980s as one of the most significant environmental problems caused by acidic deposition, had not been evaluated since the early 1990s despite decreasing levels of acidic deposition over the past decade. This analysis indic...

  4. Effects of aluminum and acidity of the drift, mortality, and molting of stream insects. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.; Haney, J.

    1986-01-01

    Responses of nine stream insects to short-term increases of acidity and aluminum concentrations in artificial streams were studied. For the mayflies studied (Stenonema modestum Ephemerella subvaria and E. catawba) drifting behavior increased when aluminum concentrations were elevated above 1 ppm and mortality was increased at pH 5. Three of the four caddisflies studied (Hydropsyche ssp., Macrostemum zebratum, and Chimarra obscurra) were affected by increased salinities in high aluminum treatments, but were not adversely affected by short-term increases in acidity or aluminum concentrations. Molting success of the insects was reduced by increased acidity.

  5. Bacterial Communities in Acidic and Circumneutral Streams

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Bogle, Mary Anna; Turner, Ralph R.; Elwood, Jerry W.; Mulholland, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between pH and the abundance and activity of bacteria in streams was examined as part of a study of the effect of acidification on stream communities. Of the bacterial communities examined, the epilithic community appeared to be the most significantly affected by acidification. Microbial biomass, as quantified by measuring the ATP level, on rock surfaces was significantly correlated with pH. Also, bacterial production by the epilithic bacteria, indicated by incorporation of tritiated thymidine into DNA, was always higher at high-pH sites than at low-pH sites of the same stream order and elevation. Bacterioplankton concentrations varied between 0.53 × 105 and 9.42 × 105 cells · ml−1 in the first- to fourth-order streams examined. The bacterioplankton concentration in one sample from a spring was 0.17 × 105 cells · ml−1. Bacterioplankton concentrations were not correlated with pH but were significantly correlated with seston concentrations. The correlation with seston is a result of increases in particle-associated bacteria at high seston concentrations. The proportion of bacterioplankton attached to particles varied from 0 to 70%. Bacterial numbers and production in the sediments were significantly correlated with the organic content of the sediment rather than with the pH of the overlying water. Thus, reduced abundance and activity of bacteria as a result of acidification could be detected only for the relatively active community on rock surfaces; this community was exposed to the low pH because of the unbuffered nature of its environment. PMID:16347283

  6. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  7. Process for recovery of sulfur values from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, W.G.; Arbo, J.C.; Gryka, G.E.

    1991-10-15

    This patent describes a method for recovering sulfur. It comprises contacting a gas containing SO{sub 2} in a gas contacting zone with a lean solution containing about a 1.0 to about 3.5 molar solution of potassium citrate at a pH from about 4.5-7.0 to form a rich solution containing from about 40 to about 160 grams per liter of SO{sub 2}; containing the rich solution with a gas containing H{sub 2}S in a reaction zone at a temperature above the melting point of sulfur to form liquid sulfur and a lean solution; removing the lean solution from the reaction zone; recovering the sulfur from the lean solution after the solution has contacted the H{sub 2}S; and passing the lean solution to the gas contacting zone to contract SO{sub 2}.

  8. Regenerable sorbents for CO.sub.2 capture from moderate and high temperature gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    2008-01-01

    A process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams comprising homogeneously mixing an alkali metal oxide, alkali metal hydroxide, alkaline earth metal oxide, alkaline earth metal hydroxide, alkali titanate, alkali zirconate, alkali silicate and combinations thereof with a binder selected from the group consisting of sodium ortho silicate, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO.sub.4.2H.sub.2O), alkali silicates, calcium aluminate, bentonite, inorganic clays and organic clays and combinations thereof and water; drying the mixture and placing the sorbent in a container permeable to a gas stream.

  9. Regulation of ice stream flow through subglacial formation of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsborrow, Monica; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Patton, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Variations in the flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers are a primary control on ice sheet stability, yet comprehensive understanding of the key processes operating at the ice-bed interface remains elusive. Basal resistance is critical, especially sticky spots--localized zones of high basal traction--for maintaining force balance in an otherwise well-lubricated/high-slip subglacial environment. Here we consider the influence of subglacial gas-hydrate formation on ice stream dynamics, and its potential to initiate and maintain sticky spots. Geophysical data document the geologic footprint of a major palaeo-ice-stream that drained the Barents Sea-Fennoscandian ice sheet approximately 20,000 years ago. Our results reveal a ~250 km2 sticky spot that coincided with subsurface shallow gas accumulations, seafloor fluid expulsion and a fault complex associated with deep hydrocarbon reservoirs. We propose that gas migrating from these reservoirs formed hydrates under high-pressure, low-temperature subglacial conditions. The gas hydrate desiccated, stiffened and thereby strengthened the subglacial sediments, promoting high traction--a sticky spot--that regulated ice stream flow. Deep hydrocarbon reservoirs are common beneath past and contemporary glaciated areas, implying that gas-hydrate regulation of subglacial dynamics could be a widespread phenomenon.

  10. Proceedings of the tenth annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Beeson, J.L.

    1990-08-01

    The Tenth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting was held August 28--30, 1990 at the Lakeview Resort and Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. To foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities. To facilitate interactive dialogue which would identify novel concepts that would make coal-based gasification and hot gas cleanup systems more attractive economically and environmentally. Two hundred thirty representatives of government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the three-day meeting. Thirty papers and thirty-three poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Scientists, engineers, and administrators discussed many of the issues facing those engaged in the research and development activities that constitute these programs. This document records Volume 1 of the proceedings of that meeting, and summarizes the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Individual papers have been catalogued separately.

  11. Proceedings of the tenth annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Beeson, J.L.

    1990-08-01

    The Tenth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting was held August 28--30, 1990 at the Lakview Resort and Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. To foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities. To facilitate interactive dialogue which would identify novel concepts that would make coal-based gasification and hot gas cleanup systems more attractive economically and environmentally. Two hundred thirty representatives of government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the three-day meeting. Thirty papers and thirty-three poster displays were resented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Scientists, engineers, and administrators discussed many of the issues facing those engaged in the research and development activities that constitute these programs. This document records the Volume 2 of the proceedings of that meeting, and summarizes the gasification and gas stream of cleanup programs. Individual papers have been catalogued separately.

  12. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1981-01-06

    A process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO/sub 2/ at temperatures between 250* and 450* F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H/sub 2/, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H/sub 2/S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO, CS/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H/sub 2/S and subsequently removing the H/sub 2/S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  13. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  14. Superamphiphobic Silicon-Nanowire-Embedded Microsystem and In-Contact Flow Performance of Gas and Liquid Streams.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Ren, Wurong; Kim, Jin-Oh; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao; Sharma, Siddharth; Faustini, Marco; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-01-26

    Gas and liquid streams are invariably separated either by a solid wall or by a membrane for heat or mass transfer between the gas and liquid streams. Without the separating wall, the gas phase is present as bubbles in liquid or, in a microsystem, as gas plugs between slugs of liquid. Continuous and direct contact between the two moving streams of gas and liquid is quite an efficient way of achieving heat or mass transfer between the two phases. Here, we report a silicon nanowire built-in microsystem in which a liquid stream flows in contact with an underlying gas stream. The upper liquid stream does not penetrate into the lower gas stream due to the superamphiphobic nature of the silicon nanowires built into the bottom wall, thereby preserving the integrity of continuous gas and liquid streams, although they are flowing in contact. Due to the superamphiphobic nature of silicon nanowires, the microsystem provides the best possible interfacial mass transfer known to date between flowing gas and liquid phases, which can achieve excellent chemical performance in two-phase organic syntheses. PMID:26738843

  15. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  16. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  17. An optical gas temperature probe for high temperature fossil fuel process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.; Cook, R.L.; Lineberry, J.T.; Litchford, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Reported here are the results of a feasibility study of a modular optical gas temperature probe for direct measurement of gas temperature in fossil-fueled combustion streams. A probe based upon the spectroscopic technique of line reversal would be superior to currently available gas temperature technology. The study concluded that a modular form of the line reversal optical temperature probe is feasible and, as such. the probe should be a commercially viable product with potential economic benefits from improved monitoring and control of utility furnaces. Such a probe will have the capability of making direct measurements of gas temperature in hot (>1500 K) process streams of coal combustion systems and large-scale power plant facilities.

  18. Persistent episodic acidification of streams linked to acid rain effects on soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.

    2002-01-01

    Episodic acidification of streams, identified in the late 1980s as one of the most significant environmental problems caused by acidic deposition, had not been evaluated since the early 1990s despite decreasing levels of acidic deposition over the past decade. This analysis indicates that episodic acidification of streams in upland regions in the northeastern United States persists, and is likely to be much more widespread than chronic acidification. Depletion of exchangeable Ca in the mineral soil has decreased the neutralization capacity of soils and increased the role of the surface organic horizon in the neutralization of acidic soil water during episodes. Increased accumulation of N and S in the forest floor from decades of acidic deposition will delay the recovery of soil base status, and therefore, the elimination of acidic episodes, which is anticipated from decreasing emissions.

  19. Persistent episodic acidification of streams linked to acid rain effects on soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.

    Episodic acidification of streams, identified in the late 1980s as one of the most significant environmental problems caused by acidic deposition, had not been evaluated since the early 1990s despite decreasing levels of acidic deposition over the past decade. This analysis indicates that episodic acidification of streams in upland regions in the northeastern United States persists, and is likely to be much more widespread than chronic acidification. Depletion of exchangeable Ca in the mineral soil has decreased the neutralization capacity of soils and increased the role of the surface organic horizon in the neutralization of acidic soil water during episodes. Increased accumulation of N and S in the forest floor from decades of acidic deposition will delay the recovery of soil base status, and therefore, the elimination of acidic episodes, which is anticipated from decreasing emissions.

  20. Heat Transfer in a Turbulent Liquid or Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latzko, H.

    1944-01-01

    The,theory of heat.transfer from a solid body to a liquid stream could he presented previously** only with limiting assumptions about the movement of the fluid (potential flow, laminar frictional flow). (See references 1, 2, and 3). For turbulent flow, the most important practical case, the previous theoretical considerations did not go beyond dimensionless formulas and certain conclusions as to the analogy between the friction factor and the unit thermal conductance, (See references 4, 5, 6, and 7,) In order to obtain numerical results, an experimental treatment of the problem was resorted to, which gave rise to numerous investigations because of the importance of this problem in many branches of technology. However, the results of these investigations frequently deviate from one another. The experimental results are especially dependent upon the overall dimensions and the specific proportions of the equipment. In the present work, the attempt will be made to develop systematically the theory of the heat transfer and of the dependence of the unit thermal conductance upon shape and dimensions, using as a basis the velocity distribution for turbulent flow set up by Prandtl and Von Karman.

  1. Removal of I, Rn, Xe and Kr from off gas streams using PTFE membranes

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.; Lewis, Leroy C.

    1990-08-07

    A process for removing I, R, Xe and Kr which involves the passage of the off gas stream through a tube-in-shell assembly, whereby the tubing is a PTFE membrane which permits the selective passages of the gases for removing and isolating the gases.

  2. Removal of I, Rn, Xe and Kr from off gas streams using PTFE membranes

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.; Lewis, Leroy C.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing I, R, Xe and Kr which involves the passage of the off gas stream through a tube-in-shell assembly, whereby the tubing is a PTFE membrane which permits the selective passages of the gases for removing and isolating the gases.

  3. AMERICIUM SEPARATIONS FROM NITRIC ACID PROCESS EFFLUENT STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. BARR; G. JARVINEN; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    The aging of the US nuclear stockpile presents a number of challenges, including the ever-increasing radioactivity of plutonium residues from {sup 241}Am. Minimization of this weak gamma-emitter in process and waste solutions is desirable to reduce both worker exposure and the effects of radiolysis on the final waste product. Removal of americium from plutonium nitric acid processing effluents, however, is complicated by the presence of large.quantities of competing metals, particularly Fe and Al, and-strongly oxidizing acidic solutions. The reprocessing operation offers several points at which americium removal maybe attempted, and we are evaluating two classes of materials targeted at different steps in the process. Extraction chromatography resin materials loaded with three different alkylcarbamoyl phosphinates and phosphine oxides were accessed for Am removal efficiency and Am/Fe selectivity from 1-7 molar nitric acid solutions. Commercial and experimental mono- and bifunctional anion-exchange resins were evaluated for total alpha-activity removal from post-evaporator solutions whose composition, relative to the original nitric acid effluent, is reduced in acid and greatly increased in total salt content. With both classes of materials, americium/total alpha emission removal is sufficient to meet regulatory requirements even under sub-optimal conditions. Batch distribution coefficients, column performance data, and the effects of Fe-masking agents will be presented.

  4. Regeneration of an aqueous solution from an acid gas absorption process by matrix stripping

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Oyenekan, Babatunde A.

    2011-03-08

    Carbon dioxide and other acid gases are removed from gaseous streams using aqueous absorption and stripping processes. By replacing the conventional stripper used to regenerate the aqueous solvent and capture the acid gas with a matrix stripping configuration, less energy is consumed. The matrix stripping configuration uses two or more reboiled strippers at different pressures. The rich feed from the absorption equipment is split among the strippers, and partially regenerated solvent from the highest pressure stripper flows to the middle of sequentially lower pressure strippers in a "matrix" pattern. By selecting certain parameters of the matrix stripping configuration such that the total energy required by the strippers to achieve a desired percentage of acid gas removal from the gaseous stream is minimized, further energy savings can be realized.

  5. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Passy, Sophia I.

    2013-01-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  6. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B; Passy, Sophia I

    2013-09-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification,' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  7. The gas-phase acidity of nitrocyclopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmess, John E.; Wilson, Burton; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Bloor, John E.

    1992-09-01

    Nitrocyclopropane is 10.5 kcal mol-1 weaker as an acid in the gas phase than its open-chain analog, 2-nitropropane. This is attributed to the conflicting hybridization requirements for carbanion stabilization by the cyclopropyl ring and by the nitro group. Based on reactivities, the deprotonated form does not ring-open to either the 2-nitroallyl anion or the 1-nitroallyl anion.

  8. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  9. Development of a fluid friction control valve for pressure letdown in hot dirty gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.

    1990-09-01

    Control valves required for pressure letdown service in future commercial coal conversion plants will be subjected to severe service at a temperature and pressure as high as 1800{degree}F and 800 psig, respectively, in a gaseous environment leading to valve erosion and corrosion. This report describes the design and development of a fluid friction control valve (FFCV) for these severe pressure reduction applications. The FFCV is designed to dissipate friction-induced energy losses uniformly over an extended surface flow path, and thus eliminate pressure reduction taking place in a single-step process. This important feature of the FFCV, by which the fluid mixture velocity is significantly reduced, has the potential of minimizing or even eliminating the problems associated with conventional-type control valves. The component parts of the FFCV exposed to the hot gas flow stream were fabricated from Inconel Alloy 625, a high strength nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy used in high temperature corrosive environments. The FFCV underwent combined parametric and endurance tests at temperatures and pressures of up to 1500 F and 1000 psig, respectively, at gas stream flowrates of up to 100 lb/hr. To simulate abrasive ash/char particulate as found in conversion plant gas streams, three forms of silica powders were used. Over the course of 53 test runs, the FFCV was subjected to a cumulative endurance test duration of 164 hours, of which 55 hours were with silica particulate in the gas stream. During these tests the FFCV maintained its structural integrity and operated without clogging or jamming. Upon completion of testing, examination of the internal valve surfaces exposed to the gas stream showed no discernable erosion. 1 ref., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Use of stream chemistry for monitoring acidic deposition effects in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Momen, B.; Roy, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH were measured weekly from October 1991 through September 2001 in three streams in the western Adirondack Mountain region of New York to identify trends in stream chemistry that might be related to changes in acidic deposition. A decreasing trend in atmospheric deposition of SO42- was observed within the region over the 10-yr period, although most of the decrease occurred between 1991 and 1995. Both ANC and pH were inversely related to flow in all streams; therefore, a trend analysis was conducted on (i) the measured values of ANC and pH and (ii) the residuals of the concentration-discharge relations. In Buck Creek, ANC increased significantly (p 0.10). In Bald Mountain Brook, ANC and residuals of ANC increased significantly (p < 0.01), although the trend was diatonic-a distinct decrease from 1991 to 1996 was followed by a distinct increase from 1996 to 2001. In Fly Pond outlet, ANC and residuals of ANC increased over the study period (p < 0.01), although the trend of the residuals resulted largely from an abrupt increase in 1997. In general, the trends observed in the three streams are similar to results presented for Adirondack lakes in a previous study, and are consistent with the declining trend in atmospheric deposition for this region, although the observed trends in ANC and pH in streams could not be directly attributed to the trends in acidic deposition.

  11. Stream Vulnerability to Widespread and Emergent Stressors: A Focus on Unconventional Oil and Gas

    PubMed Central

    Entrekin, Sally A.; Maloney, Kelly O.; Kapo, Katherine E.; Walters, Annika W.; Evans-White, Michelle A.; Klemow, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple stressors threaten stream physical and biological quality, including elevated nutrients and other contaminants, riparian and in-stream habitat degradation and altered natural flow regime. Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development is one emerging stressor that spans the U.S. UOG development could alter stream sedimentation, riparian extent and composition, in-stream flow, and water quality. We developed indices to describe the watershed sensitivity and exposure to natural and anthropogenic disturbances and computed a vulnerability index from these two scores across stream catchments in six productive shale plays. We predicted that catchment vulnerability scores would vary across plays due to climatic, geologic and anthropogenic differences. Across-shale averages supported this prediction revealing differences in catchment sensitivity, exposure, and vulnerability scores that resulted from different natural and anthropogenic environmental conditions. For example, semi-arid Western shale play catchments (Mowry, Hilliard, and Bakken) tended to be more sensitive to stressors due to low annual average precipitation and extensive grassland. Catchments in the Barnett and Marcellus-Utica were naturally sensitive from more erosive soils and steeper catchment slopes, but these catchments also experienced areas with greater UOG densities and urbanization. Our analysis suggested Fayetteville and Barnett catchments were vulnerable due to existing anthropogenic exposure. However, all shale plays had catchments that spanned a wide vulnerability gradient. Our results identify vulnerable catchments that can help prioritize stream protection and monitoring efforts. Resource managers can also use these findings to guide local development activities to help reduce possible environmental effects. PMID:26397727

  12. Stream Vulnerability to Widespread and Emergent Stressors: A Focus on Unconventional Oil and Gas.

    PubMed

    Entrekin, Sally A; Maloney, Kelly O; Kapo, Katherine E; Walters, Annika W; Evans-White, Michelle A; Klemow, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple stressors threaten stream physical and biological quality, including elevated nutrients and other contaminants, riparian and in-stream habitat degradation and altered natural flow regime. Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development is one emerging stressor that spans the U.S. UOG development could alter stream sedimentation, riparian extent and composition, in-stream flow, and water quality. We developed indices to describe the watershed sensitivity and exposure to natural and anthropogenic disturbances and computed a vulnerability index from these two scores across stream catchments in six productive shale plays. We predicted that catchment vulnerability scores would vary across plays due to climatic, geologic and anthropogenic differences. Across-shale averages supported this prediction revealing differences in catchment sensitivity, exposure, and vulnerability scores that resulted from different natural and anthropogenic environmental conditions. For example, semi-arid Western shale play catchments (Mowry, Hilliard, and Bakken) tended to be more sensitive to stressors due to low annual average precipitation and extensive grassland. Catchments in the Barnett and Marcellus-Utica were naturally sensitive from more erosive soils and steeper catchment slopes, but these catchments also experienced areas with greater UOG densities and urbanization. Our analysis suggested Fayetteville and Barnett catchments were vulnerable due to existing anthropogenic exposure. However, all shale plays had catchments that spanned a wide vulnerability gradient. Our results identify vulnerable catchments that can help prioritize stream protection and monitoring efforts. Resource managers can also use these findings to guide local development activities to help reduce possible environmental effects. PMID:26397727

  13. Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion and Pre-Combustion Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Robinson, C.; Stevens, R.W.

    2007-08-01

    A novel liquid impregnated solid sorbent was developed for CO2 removal in the temperature range of ambient to 60 °C for both fixed bed and fluidized bed reactor applications. The sorbent is regenerable at 60-80 °C. Multi-cycle tests conducted in an atmospheric bench scale reactor with simulated flue gas demonstrated that the sorbent retains its CO2 sorption capacity with CO2 removal efficiency of about 99%. A second, novel solid sorbent containing mixture of alkali earth and alkali compounds was developed for CO2 removal at 200-315 °C from high pressure gas streams (i.e., suitable for IGCC systems). The sorbent showed very high capacity for CO2 removal from gas streams containing 28% CO2 at 200 °C and 11.2 atm during lab-scale flow reactor tests as well as regenerability at 375 °C.

  14. Calculation of supersonic stream parameters of a real gas from measurable quantities using FORTRAN 4 routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Sets of routines are presented that calculate such real-gas supersonic stream properties as velocity, density, enthalpy, entropy, and isentropic exponent. Two alternative sets of measurements are assumed: (1) stagnation pressure, stagnation temperature, and the pressure on the surface of a static-pressure wedge; or (2) pressure and temperature in a plenum upstream of a supersonic nozzle and the stagnation pressure at the exit of this nozzle. The routines are applicable to any gas whose properties are known. Explicit routines are presented for determining these properties for air, nitrogen, oxygen, normal hydrogen, para-hydrogen, helium, argon, steam, methane, and natural gas.

  15. Using fatty acids to fingerprint biofilm communities: a means to quickly and accurately assess stream quality.

    PubMed

    DeForest, Jared L; Drerup, Samuel A; Vis, Morgan L

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of lotic ecosystem quality plays an essential role to help determine the extent of environmental stress and the effectiveness of restoration activities. Methods that incorporate biological properties are considered ideal because they provide direct assessment of the end goal of a vigorous biological community. Our primary objective was to use biofilm lipids to develop an accurate biomonitoring tool that requires little expertise and time to facilitate assessment. A model was created of fatty acid biomarkers most associated with predetermined stream quality classification, exceptional warm water habitat (EWH), warm water habitat (WWH), and limited resource (LR-AMD), and validated along a gradient of known stream qualities. The fatty acid fingerprint of the biofilm community was statistically different (P = 0.03) and was generally unique to recognized stream quality. One striking difference was essential fatty acids (DHA, EPA, and ARA) were absent from LR-AMD and only recovered from WWH and EWH, 45 % more in EWH than WWH. Independently testing the model along a stream quality gradient, this model correctly categorized six of the seven sites, with no match due to low sample biomass. These results provide compelling evidence that biofilm fatty acid analysis can be a sensitive, accurate, and cost-effective biomonitoring tool. We conceive of future studies expanding this research to more in-depth studies of remediation efforts, determining the applicable geographic area for the method and the addition of multiple stressors with the possibility of distinguishing among stressors. PMID:27061804

  16. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  17. Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

    2013-09-01

    Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

  18. Downstream composition changes of acidic volcanic waters discharged into the Banyupahit stream, Ijen caldera, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, P.; Bernard, A.

    2000-04-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano contains extremely low pH (<0.4) waters with high SO 4 (˜70000 mg/kg), Cl (˜21000 mg/kg), F (˜1500 mg/kg), Al (˜5000 mg/kg), Fe (˜2000 mg/kg) and trace metal (Cu ˜0.5, Zn ˜4, Pb ˜3 mg/kg) contents. These brines seep outward through the western crater rim and reappear on the other side as streamlets, which form the headwaters of the Banyupahit stream. The Banyupahit first mixes with fresh rivers and thermal springs in the Ijen caldera and then irrigates a coastal agricultural plain which is 30 km from the summit crater. We discuss the downstream composition changes affecting the Banyupahit waters by using stable isotope, chemical and mineralogical data collected from sites along the stream length. The saturation of the stream waters with respect to minerals was evaluated with SOLVEQ and WATEQ4F and compared with the geochemical observations. An aluminous mineralogy (alunogen, pickeringite, tamarugite and kalinite) develops in the upper part of the Banyupahit due to concentration of the headwaters by evaporation. Downstream attenuation of dissolved element concentrations results principally from dilution and from mineral precipitation. The stream pH changes from ˜0 at the source to >4 close to the mouth. The δD and δ18O values and the relative SO 4-Cl-F contents of the Banyupahit waters indicate that the tributaries are mostly meteoric. Dissolved SO 4 in the acidic stream come only from the crater lake seepages and are not involved later in microbially mediated reactions, as shown by their δ34S and δ18O values. Re-equilibration of the stream SO 4 oxygen-isotope composition with H 2O from tributaries does not occur. Calcium, SiO 2, Al, Fe, K and SO 4 behave non-conservatively in the stream waters. Gypsum, silica (amorphous or poorly ordered), a basic aluminum hydroxysulfate (basaluminite?), K-jarosite and amorphous ferric hydroxide may exert a solubility control on these elements along the entire stream length, or in

  19. The energy and greenhouse-gas implications of internet video streaming in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehabi, Arman; Walker, Ben; Masanet, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The rapid growth of streaming video entertainment has recently received attention as a possibly less energy intensive alternative to the manufacturing and transportation of digital video discs (DVDs). This study utilizes a life-cycle assessment approach to estimate the primary energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions associated with video viewing through both traditional DVD methods and online video streaming. Base-case estimates for 2011 video viewing energy and CO2(e) emission intensities indicate video streaming can be more efficient than DVDs, depending on DVD viewing method. Video streaming benefits from relatively more efficient end-user devices than DVD viewing, though much of that savings is lost when accounting for the additional energy from network data transmission. Video streaming appears distinctly favorable when compared against any DVD viewing that includes consumer driving, which significantly increases the energy and CO2(e) emissions per viewing hour. Total US 2011 video viewing required about 192 PJ of primary energy and emitted about 10.5 billion kg of CO2(e). Shifting all 2011 DVD viewing to video streaming reduces the total primary energy use to about 162 PJ and the CO2(e) emissions to about 8.6 billion kg, representing a savings equivalent to the primary energy used to meet the electricity demand of nearly 200 000 US households each year. Sensitivity analysis indicates that results are most influenced by the end-user DVD player power demand, data transmission energy, and consumer travel for store DVDs. Data center energy use—both operational and embodied within the IT equipment—account for <1% of the total video streaming energy use. Results from this study indicate that designers and policy makers should focus on the efficiency of end-user devices and network transmission energy to curb future increases in energy use from the proliferation of video streaming.

  20. Stream measurements locate thermogenic methane fluxes in groundwater discharge in an area of shale-gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Grieve, Paul L; Hynek, Scott A; Brantley, Susan L; Solomon, D Kip; Risser, Dennis W

    2015-04-01

    The environmental impacts of shale-gas development on water resources, including methane migration to shallow groundwater, have been difficult to assess. Monitoring around gas wells is generally limited to domestic water-supply wells, which often are not situated along predominant groundwater flow paths. A new concept is tested here: combining stream hydrocarbon and noble-gas measurements with reach mass-balance modeling to estimate thermogenic methane concentrations and fluxes in groundwater discharging to streams and to constrain methane sources. In the Marcellus Formation shale-gas play of northern Pennsylvania (U.S.A.), we sampled methane in 15 streams as a reconnaissance tool to locate methane-laden groundwater discharge: concentrations up to 69 μg L(-1) were observed, with four streams ≥ 5 μg L(-1). Geochemical analyses of water from one stream with high methane (Sugar Run, Lycoming County) were consistent with Middle Devonian gases. After sampling was completed, we learned of a state regulator investigation of stray-gas migration from a nearby Marcellus Formation gas well. Modeling indicates a groundwater thermogenic methane flux of about 0.5 kg d(-1) discharging into Sugar Run, possibly from this fugitive gas source. Since flow paths often coalesce into gaining streams, stream methane monitoring provides the first watershed-scale method to assess groundwater contamination from shale-gas development. PMID:25786038

  1. Acid gas extraction of pyridine from water

    SciTech Connect

    Laitinen, A.; Kaunisto, J.

    2000-01-01

    Pyridine was extracted from aqueous solutions initially containing 5 or 15 wt % pyridine by using liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide at 10 MPa as a solvent in a mechanically agitated countercurrent extraction column. The lowest pyridine concentration in the raffinate was 0.06 wt %, whereas the pyridine concentration in the extract was 86--94 wt %. From the initial amount of pyridine, 96--99% was transferred from the feed stream to the extract by using relatively small solvent-to-feed ratios of 2.8--4.6 (kg of solvent/kg of feed). The measured distribution coefficients for the water/pyridine/carbon dioxide system ranged from 0.3 to 1 (weight units), depending on the initial pyridine concentration in water. Carbon dioxide is a particularly suitable solvent for the extraction of pyridine from concentrated aqueous solutions. The efficiency may be the result of an acid-base interaction between weakly basic pyridine solute and weakly acidic carbon dioxide solvent in an aqueous environment.

  2. Development of silver impregnated alumina for iodine separation from off-gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1995-02-01

    An inorganic iodine adsorbent, silver impregnated alumina (AgA), has been developed to separate iodine effectively from off-gas streams of nuclear facilities and to decrease the volume of waste (spent adsorbent). Iodine removal efficiency was improved at relatively high humidity by using alumina carrier with two different pore diameters. Waste volume reduction was achieved by impregnating relatively large amounts of silver into the alumina pores. The developed adsorbent was tested first with simulated off-gas streams under various experimental conditions and finally with actual off-gas streams of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant. The decontamination factor (DF) was about 100 with the AgA bed depth of 2cm at 70% relative humidity, which was a DF one order higher than that when AgA with one pore size was used. Iodine adsorption capacity was checked by passing excess iodine into the AgA bed. Values were about 0.12 and 0.35 g-I/cm`-AgA bed for 10 and 24wt% silver impregnated AgA, respectively. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the applicability of the developed AgA to the off-gas treatment system of nuclear facilities.

  3. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

  4. A gas stream clean-up filter and method for forming same

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Halow, J.S.; DeVault, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    A gas cleaning filter is formed in-situ within a vessel containing a fluidizable bed of granular material of a relatively large size fraction. A filter membrane provided by a porous metal or ceramic body or such a body supported a perforated screen on one side thereof is coated in-situ with a layer of the granular material from the fluidized bed by serially passing a bed-fluidizing gas stream through the bed of granular material and the membrane. The layer of granular material provides the filtering medium for the combined membrane-granular layer filter. The filter is not blinded by the granular material and provides for the removal of virtually all of the particulates from a process gas stream. The granular material can be at least partially provided by a material capable of chemically reacting with and removing sulfur compounds from the process gas stream. Low level radioactive waste containing organic material may be incinerated in a fluidized bed in communication with the described filter for removing particulates from the gaseous combustion products.

  5. Gas stream clean-up filter and method for forming same

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Joseph S.; DeVault, James; Halow, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas cleaning filter is formed in-situ within a vessel containing a fluidizable bed of granular material of a relatively large size fraction. A filter membrane provided by a porous metal or ceramic body or such a body supported a perforated screen on one side thereof is coated in-situ with a layer of the granular material from the fluidized bed by serially passing a bed-fluidizing gas stream through the bed of granular material and the membrane. The layer of granular material provides the filtering medium for the combined membrane-granular layer filter. The filter is not blinded by the granular material and provides for the removal of virtually all of the particulates from a process gas stream. The granular material can be at least partially provided by a material capable of chemically reacting with and removing sulfur compounds from the process gas stream. Low level radioactive waste containing organic material may be incinerated in a fluidized bed in communication with the described filter for removing particulates from the gaseous combustion products.

  6. Removal of VOCs from humidified gas streams using activated carbon cloth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Rood, M.J.; Larson, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of relative humidity (RH) on the adsorption of soluble (acetone) and insoluble (benzene) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with activated carbon cloths (ACC). A gravimetric balance was used in conjunction with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer to determine the individual amounts of water and VOC adsorbed on an ACC sample. RH values from 0 to 90% and organic concentrations from 350 to 1000 ppmv were examined. The presence of water vapor in the gas-stream along with acetone (350 and 500 ppmv) had little effect on the adsorption capacity of acetone even at 90% RH. Water vapor in the gas stream had little effect on the adsorption capacity of benzene (500 ppmv) until about 65% RH, when a rapid decrease resulted in the adsorption capacity of benzene with increasing RH. This RH was also about where capillary condensation of water vapor occurs within ACC pores. Water vapor condenses within the ACC pores, making them unavailable for benzene adsorption. Increasing benzene concentration can have a significant effect on the amount of water vapor adsorbed. At 86% RH and 500 ppmv, 284 mg/g water was adsorbed, while at 86% RH and 1000 ppmv, only 165 mg/g water was adsorbed. Water vapor was more inhibitory for benzene adsorption as benzene concentration in the gas stream decreased. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  8. Variation in photoreactivity of iron hydroxides taken from an acidic mountain stream

    SciTech Connect

    Hrncir, D.C.; McKnight, D.

    1998-07-15

    The photoreduction of iron hydroxides is known to exert significant influence over many biogeochemical processes in streams impacted by acid main drainage. Using laboratory and in-stream measurements, the variation in reactivity of iron hydroxides taken from a stream receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) was studied. The reactivity decreased for material collected at sites progressively downstream from the AMD inflow. In the presence of two simple organic ligands, photoreduction increased for the fresher iron hydroxides but remained unchanged for the older hydroxides. The importance of ligand coordination to the enhancement of photoreduction in natural waters was further demonstrated in experiments using two types of fulvic acids. In-stream measurements of hydrogen peroxide concentration are consistent with the conclusions drawn from the batch experiments. Iron hydroxides were observed to age over time, becoming less photoreactive. This aging was accompanied by an increase in crystallinity. The loss of photoreactivity for the older material can be explained by a decrease in the number of active surface sites, a change in the nature of the surface sites, or a combination of both.

  9. An evaluation of the effects of acid rain on low conductivity headwater streams in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, Ann E.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of water collected at 32 sites on headwater streams in Pennsylvania during low-flow conditions in 1970-80 were compared to pre-1971 data to evaluate whether acid rain had changed the chemistry of the streams in the previous decade. Most pH, alkalinity, and sulfate values of the samples collected in 1970-80 fell within the ranges of values for samples collected before 1971. The limited data indicate, however, that pH may have increased and alkalinity and sulfate may have decreased with time.

  10. Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

  11. Surprises from stream greenhouse gas emissions estimated at high resolution in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Wallin, Marcus; Klemedtsson, Leif; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Streams represent environments where terrestrial and aquatic habitats meet and has recently been recognized as disproportionally large emitters of CO2 in landscapes. However, previous estimates are often based on measurements with low resolution in time and space, and frequently CO2 concentrations are also estimated indirectly from alkalinity and pH measurements adding to the uncertainty. The capacity of streams to emit CH4 is presently also poorly understood. In this study, we performed regular and spatially distributed measurements of CO2 and CH4 water concentrations and gas exchange rates in a headwater stream network, aiming to resolve spatial and temporal variability in flux patterns. Multiple supplementary methods including tracer injections, CO2 sensor networks, drifting flux chambers, and stream section mass balances were performed. A locally validated spatiotemporal model with high accuracy and resolution was developed. The observed variability was high revealing high fluxes very locally or during short periods in time related to rapid hydrological events, highlighting the need to consider spatiotemporal variability in detail. Stream CH4 emissions were also surprisingly high compared to CO2 emissions.

  12. Removal of BTEX vapours from waste gas streams using silica aerogels of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Standeker, Suzana; Novak, Zoran; Knez, Zeljko

    2009-06-15

    Silica aerogels are alternative adsorbents to activated carbon (AC) for the removal and the recovery of organic vapours from gas streams. The adsorption capacity measurements of different silica aerogels were done by mini-column method. Continuous adsorption measurements show that silica aerogels are excellent adsorbents of BTEX vapours from waste gas stream. Compared to the most used adsorbents, such as AC and silica gel, aerogels exhibit capacities which enormously exceed that of both commonly used adsorbents. By increasing the degree of hydrophobicity, aerogels become less effective, but they do not adsorb water vapour from gas stream. Silica monolith aerogels with different degrees of hydrophobicity by incorporating methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) or trimethylethoxysilane (TMES) in standard sol-gel synthesis were prepared. Excellent properties of aerogels, obtained with the sol-gel synthesis, were preserved with supercritical drying with CO(2). The degree of hydrophobicity of the aerogels was tested by measuring the contact angle (theta) of a water droplet with the aerogel surface. The aerogels were also characterised by FTIR, nitrogen sorption and DSC/TG measurements. PMID:19095355

  13. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Eckels, D.E.; Hass, W.J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system is described for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses. 4 figs.

  14. PERFORMANCE AND MODELING OF A HOT POTASSIUM CARBONATE ACID GAS REMOVAL SYSTEM IN TREATING COAL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the performance and modeling of a hot potassium carbonate (K2CO3) acid gas removal system (AGRS) in treating coal gas. Aqueous solutions of K2CO3, with and without amine additive, were used as the acid gas removal solvent in the Coal Gasification/Gas Cleaning...

  15. Soil calcium status and the response of stream chemistry to changing acidic deposition rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Burns, Douglas A.; Stoddard, J.L.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Porter, J.H.; Thompson, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a decreasing trend in acidic deposition rates over the past two to three decades, acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States have shown minimal changes. Depletion of soil Ca pools has been suggested as a cause, although changes in soil Ca pools have not been directly related to long-term records of stream chemistry. To investigate this problem, a comprehensive watershed study was conducted in the Neversink River Basin, in the Catskill Mountains of New York, during 1991-1996. Spatial variations of atmospheric deposition, soil chemistry, and stream chemistry were evaluated over an elevation range of 817-1234 m to determine whether these factors exhibited elevational patterns. An increase in atmospheric deposition of SO4 with increasing elevation corresponded with upslope decreases of exchangeable soil base concentrations and acid-neutralizing capacity of stream water. Exchangeable base concentrations in homogeneous soil incubated within the soil profile for one year also decreased with increasing elevation. An elevational gradient in precipitation was not observed, and effects of a temperature gradient on soil properties were not detected. Laboratory leaching experiments with soils from this watershed showed that (1) concentrations of Ca in leachate increased as the concentrations of acid anions in added solution increased, and (2) the slope of this relationship was positively correlated with base saturation. Field and laboratory soil analyses are consistent with the interpretation that decreasing trends in acid-neutralizing capacity in stream water in the Neversink Basin, dating back to 1984, are the result of decreases in soil base saturation caused by acidic deposition.

  16. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  17. Transport and cycling of iron and hydrogen peroxide in a freshwater stream: Influence of organic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Voelker, B.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Carraway, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    An in-stream injection of two dissolved organic acids (phthalic and aspartic acids) was performed in an acidic mountain stream to assess the effects of organic acids on Fe photoreduction and H2O2 cycling. Results indicate that the fate of Fe is dependent on a net balance of oxidative and reductive processes, which can vary over a distance of several meters due to changes in incident light and other factors. Solution phase photoreduction rates were high in sunlit reaches and were enhanced by the organic acid addition but were also limited by the amount of ferric iron present in the water column. Fe oxide photoreduction from the streambed and colloids within the water column resulted in an increase in the diurnal load of total filterable Fe within the experimental reach, which also responded to increases in light and organic acids. Our results also suggest that Fe(II) oxidation increased in response to the organic acids, with the result of offsetting the increase in Fe(II) from photoreductive processes. Fe(II) was rapidly oxidized to Fe(III) after sunset and during the day within a well-shaded reach, presumably through microbial oxidation. H2O 2, a product of dissolved organic matter photolysis, increased downstream to maximum concentrations of 0.25 ??M midday. Kinetic calculations show that the buildup of H2O2 is controlled by reaction with Fe(III), but this has only a small effect on Fe(II) because of the small formation rates of H2O2 compared to those of Fe(II). The results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the effects of light and dissolved organic carbon into Fe reactive transport models to further our understanding of the fate of Fe in streams and lakes.

  18. Sensitivity of high-elevation streams in the Southern Blue Ridge Province to acidic deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Hudy, M.; Fowler, D.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Southern Blue Ridge Province, which encompasses parts of northern Georgia, eastern Tennessee, and western North Carolina, has been predicted to be sensitive to impacts from acidic deposition, owing to the chemical composition of the bedrock geology and soils. This study confirms the predicted potential sensitivity, quantifies the level of total alkalinity and describes the chemical characteristics of 30 headwater streams of this area. Water chemistry was measured five times between April 1983 and June 1984 at first and third order reaches of each stream during baseflow conditions. Sensitivity based on total alkalinity and the Calcite Saturation Index indicates that the headwater streams of the Province are vulnerable to acidification. Total alkalinity and p11 were generally higher in third order reaches (mean, 72 ?eq/? and 6.7) than in first order reaches (64 ?eq/? and 6.4). Ionic concentrations were low, averaging 310 and 340 ?eq/? in first and third order reaches, respectively. A single sampling appears adequate for evaluating sensitivity based on total alkalinity, but large temporal variability requires multiple sampling for the detection of changes in pH and alkalinity over time. Monitoring of stream water should continue in order to detect any subtle effects of acidic deposition on these unique resource systems.

  19. Colloid Transport and Surface-Subsurface Exchange in an Acid Mine Drainage-Impacted Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvell, A. S.; Ryan, J. N.; Ren, J.; McKnight, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloidal particles may provide an important control on the mobility of contaminants of concern; e.g., metals introduced into a stream from an acid mine drainage. In order to examine colloidal transport and surface-subsurface exchange, we injected synthesized ferrihydrite colloids along with a conservative tracer, bromide, into Lefthand Creek, a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage in northwestern Boulder County, Colorado. The ferrihydrite colloids were co-precipitated with yttrium to form yttrium-labelled colloids so that we could differentiate them from environmental colloids. Yttrium was measured in samples collected from the surface water and the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone samples were collected from a series of mini-piezometers embedded up to 1 m in depth and over a 61 m reach of the stream. A one-dimensional transient storage model (OTIS-P) was used to quantify parameters describing the transport of the conservative tracer and the colloids. Approximately 20% of the colloidal mass was lost over the 61 m reach. The loss of colloids is attributed to deposition in the shallow hyporheic zone. Laboratory column experiments demonstrated that the stream bed sediments effectively remove colloids from suspension at the pH, ionic strength, and dissolved organic matter concentration conditions occurring in Lefthand Creek.

  20. Metals and Colloids in the Hyporheic Zone of an Acid Mine Drainage-Contaminated Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvell, A. S.; Ryan, J. N.; McKnight, D. M.; Ren, J.

    2009-12-01

    A key component of human and ecological risk assessments of acid mine drainage is predicting the fate and transport of metals in receiving streams. In order to learn more about the processes that control metal removal in the stream, we studied the role of colloids and the exchange of stream water with the hyporheic zone in Lefthand Creek, a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage in northwestern Boulder County, Colorado. We installed a set of mini-piezometers in the streambed and sampled the hyporheic pore waters along a 90 m reach of the creek for metals, colloids, and other geochemical parameters in the water and sediments. We conducted tracer dilution tests to determine the extent and time scale of hyporheic exchange. The results of these investigations showed that hyporheic exchange is a significant process in the attenuation of metals. The conservative tracer (bromide) concentration reached plateaus of up to 80 % of the surface concentration at depths of 40 cm and up to only 5% at depths of 100 cm. Hydraulic residence times in the upper 40 cm range from 20 minutes at 5 cm depths to under 3 hours at 40 cm depths. Colloidal transport of some metals is significant; large fractions of lead and copper were associated with colloids composed primarily of iron and aluminum, while zinc was not significantly associated with colloids. Sequential extractions of the sediments showed that trace metals were incorporated in iron and manganese oxide coatings found on the streambed sediments.

  1. Freshwater benthic algal population and community changes due to acidity and aluminum-acid mixtures in artificial streams

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.; Amyot, D.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Communities of freshwater benthic algae were exposed to water acidified daily to pH 4.8 along and in mixtures with 50, 100, or 500 [mu]g L[sup [minus]1] Al. Daily acidification to nominal pH 4.8 in acidified treatments exposed algae to a range of pHs that led to a variety of Al species of different toxicity. Calcium concentrations in stream were higher in acidified and Al treatments on day 1, and dissolved Al in stream water was higher in the highest Al treatment on days 1, 7, and 28; otherwise acid and Al treatments did not significantly alter Al and Ca in the exposure water. Calcium bioaccumulation by periphyton was lower in acidified and Al treatments on all sampling days. Concentrations of Mg in water and periphyton did not differ between treatments. The artificial stream system generated alkalinity to buffer acidified water; the amount of generated alkalinity returned to approximately the same levels for the first week, but the amount of alkalinity generated during the second week appeared to decline, and acid-only and acid-Al mixtures diverged in their ability to generate alkalinity during the third and fourth weeks. Aluminum in acidified water inhibited abundance of diatoms and green and blue-green algae more than the effects of acid stress alone. The green filamentous alga Mougeotia showed a slight increase in abundance in the acid-only treatment. The middle-Al treatment generated more alkalinity and had higher abundance of some algal taxa on days 14 and 28, even though measured Al concentrations in water and periphyton fell between low- and high-Al-treatment levels. Community-level tests, combining a taxonomic analysis of algal population abundance with chemical analysis of water and bioaccumulation, provide valuable insight to assess anthropogenic stress.

  2. Succinic acid production on xylose-enriched biorefinery streams by Actinobacillus succinogenes in batch fermentation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Salvachua, Davinia; Mohagheghi, Ali; Smith, Holly; Bradfield, Michael F. A.; Nicol, Willie; Black, Brenna A.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dowe, Nancy; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-02-02

    Co-production of chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass alongside fuels holds promise for improving the economic outlook of integrated biorefineries. In current biochemical conversion processes that use thermochemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, fractionation of hemicellulose-derived and cellulose-derived sugar streams is possible using hydrothermal or dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), which then offers a route to parallel trains for fuel and chemical production from xylose- and glucose-enriched streams. Succinic acid (SA) is a co-product of particular interest in biorefineries because it could potentially displace petroleum-derived chemicals and polymer precursors for myriad applications. Furthermore, SA production from biomass-derived hydrolysates has not yet been fully exploredmore » or developed.« less

  3. Natural Versus Anthropogenic Remediation of Streams Impacted by Acid Mine Drainage in Southeast Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, T.; Lopez, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Three streams that have been affected by acid mine drainage in southeast Ohio have been investigated (Sulphur Run in the Federal Creek watershed, Rock Run in the Monday Creek watershed, and Buffer Run in the Raccoon Creek watershed). Sulphur Run neutralizes acidic inputs naturally due to its strong buffering capacity acquired from water-rock interactions with the abundant carbonate lithology surrounding the stream. Rock Run and Buffer Run have been anthropogenically remediated using successive alkalinity producing wetlands, open limestone channels, and alkaline capping of adjacent coal refuse piles. The objective of this study is to compare the water quality evolution of the three streams. For this purpose, water and sediment samples were collected for chemical analysis and in-situ flow rate, alkalinity, acidity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were measured. Preliminary results reveal that the pH of Sulphur Run, which never drops below 6.7, increases steadily along the flow path. Downstream of the remediation sites, the pH of Rock Run and Buffer Run is always below 4 and declines along the flow path, possibly due to a combination of additional acidic inputs downstream from the main source and the oxidation of metals, leading to hydrolysis reactions that produce additional hydrogen protons. The net alkalinity of Sulphur Run increases steadily downstream, reflecting the effectiveness of a continuous supply of alkaline material at neutralizing acidic inputs. Both Buffer Run and Rock Run are net acidic, suggesting that armoring of the open limestone channels by metal precipitates is impeding the recovery of water quality. The early results indicate that remediation schemes that do not mimic nature by providing a long term, steady supply of alkaline material appear to be ineffective.

  4. Photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase BTEX-contaminated waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Gratson, D A; Nimlos, M R; Wolfrum, E J

    1995-03-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been exploring heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) as a remediation technology for air streams contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes (BTEX). This research is a continuation of work performed on chlorinated organics. The photocatalytic oxidation of BTEX has been studied in the aqueous phase, however, a study by Turchi et al. showed a more economical system would involve stripping organic contaminants from the aqueous phase and treating the resulting gas stream. Another recent study by Turchi et al. indicated that PCO is cost competitive with such remediation technologies as activated carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration for some types of contaminated air streams. In this work we have examined the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene using ozone (0{sub 3}) as an additional oxidant. We varied the residence time in the PCO reactor, the initial concentration of the organic pollutant, and the initial ozone concentration in a single-pass reactor. Because aromatic hydrocarbons represent only a small fraction of the total hydrocarbons present in gasoline and other fuels, we also added octane to the reaction mixture to simulate the composition of air streams produced from soil-vapor-extraction or groundwater-stripping of sites contaminated with gasoline.

  5. Removal of ammonia from gas streams with dielectric barrier discharge plasmas.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lanyan; Huang, Li; Shu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Renxi; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2008-03-21

    We reported on the experimental study of gas-phase removal of ammonia (NH3) via dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure, in which we mainly concentrated on three aspects--influence of initial NH3 concentration, peak voltage, and gas residence time on NH3 removal efficiency. Effectiveness, e.g. the removal efficiency, specific energy density, absolute removal amount and energy yield, of the self-made DBD reactor had also been studied. Basic analysis on DBD physical parameters and its performance was made in comparison with previous investigation. Moreover, products were detected via ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Experimental results demonstrated the application potential of DBD as an alternative technology for odor-causing gases elimination from gas streams. PMID:17659834

  6. Removal of H2S from gas stream using combined plasma photolysis technique at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Xia, Lanyan; Ge, Xiaoxue; Jing, Hengye; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, H(2)S in gas stream was successfully decomposed at atmospheric pressure by dielectric barrier discharge plasma and VUV-UV radiation from a combined plasma photolysis reactor (CDBD). In comparison with DBD, CDBD enhanced H(2)S removal efficiency significantly at the same applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency was determined as a function of Kr pressure, applied voltage, inlet H(2)S concentration, and gas residence time. H(2)S removal efficiency could reach as high as 93% at inlet H(2)S concentration of 27.1 mg m(-3), residence time of 0.4 s, and applied voltage of 7.5 kV. The main products were discerned as H(2)O and SO(4)(2-) based on FTIR and IC analysis. PMID:22436586

  7. Spray process for the recovery of CO.sub.2 from a gas stream and a related apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Perry, Robert James; Wood, Benjamin Rue; Genovese, Sarah Elizabeth

    2014-02-11

    A method for recovering carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a gas stream is disclosed. The method includes the step of reacting CO.sub.2 in the gas stream with fine droplets of a liquid absorbent, so as to form a solid material in which the CO.sub.2 is bound. The solid material is then transported to a desorption site, where it is heated, to release substantially pure CO.sub.2 gas. The CO.sub.2 gas can then be collected and used or transported in any desired way. A related apparatus for recovering carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a gas stream is also described herein.

  8. The solvent absorption-extractive distillation (SAED) process for ethanol recovery from gas/vapor streams

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, M.C.

    1993-12-31

    A low energy system for ethanol recovery and dehydration has been developed. This system utilizes a solvent for (1) absorption of ethanol vapors, and then the same solvent for (2) extractive distillation. The ideal solvent for this process would have a high affinity for ethanol, and no affinity for water. Heavy alcohols such as dodecanol, and tridecanol, some phosphorals, and some fatty acids have been determined to meet the desired specifications. These solvents have the effect of making water more volatile than ethanol. Thus, a water stream is taken off initially in the dehydration column, and a near anhydrous ethanol stream is recovered from the ethanol/solvent stripper column. Thus the solvent serves dual uses (1) absorption media, and (2) dehydration media. The SAED process as conceptualized would use a solvent similar to solvents used for direct extractive separation of ethanol from aqueous ethanol solutions.

  9. Comparison of Three Bed Packings for the Biological Removal of Nitric Oxide from Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Flanagan, W. P.; Barnes, Charles Marshall; Barrett, Karen B.; Zaccardi, Larry Bryan; Apel, William Arnold

    2000-10-01

    Environmental and health issues coupled with increasingly stringent nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission standards indicates a need for the development of alternative low-cost technologies for the removal of NOx from gas streams. Biological NOx conversion offers promise as a novel treatment method. Thermophilic denitrifying bacteria indigenous to composts and soils are capable of converting NOx to environmentally benign nitrogen via a dissimilatory reductive pathway. The present study compares the performance of three bioreactor packing materials (compost, perlite, and biofoam) for the removal of nitric oxide (NO) from a simulated wet-scrubbed combustion gas. Although all three materials performed well (>85% NO removal) at residence times of 70-80 seconds, the compost performed better than the other materials at shorter residence times (13-44 seconds). The perlite and biofoam materials, however, both offer long-term thermal stability and lower pressure drop compared with compost. The feasibility of biological NOx conversion processes will depend on the combined factors of NOx removal ability and pressure drop. The results presented here suggest that the compost, perlite and biofoam systems, subject to further optimization, offer potential for the biological removal of NOx from gas streams.

  10. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (cars) Gas Temperature Measurements in a Monodisperse Combusting Droplet Stream.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junyong

    1991-06-01

    This dissertation describes a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) instrument for spatially and temporally resolved non-intrusive temperature measurements in combustion environments. It presents a detailed description of the CARS system development and standard procedures to perform CARS gas temperature measurements,and procedures to analyze the CARS spectra for temperature determination. The dissertation also applies the CARS apparatus developed to a single monodisperse methanol droplet stream flame to demonstrate synchronous CARS temperature measurements. The measurements correlate the temperature field with the droplet position and give the local characteristics of the combusting droplet stream thermal field. These measurements are not possible with conventional thermal probes due to the perturbation caused by the probes and the poor temporal and spatial resolution. These CARS measurements are the first known non-intrusive characterization of the local temperature field near burning droplets. The experiments use a 50 μm diameter nozzle vibrated by a piezoelectric crystal to generate a monodisperse droplet stream with a droplet diameter of about 150 μm and droplet-to-droplet spacing of 10 droplet diameters. A frequency divider divides the crystal vibration frequency of 10 kHz 1000 times to synchronize the CARS laser firing (~ 10 Hz) with the droplet generation process. The results show that there is a small thermal wake behind each droplet in the stream. The temperature profile measured radially outward from the droplet has a local minimum near the droplet surface, rises to a maximum at about 7 droplet diameters away, and then falls to room temperature at a radial distance of 15 mm (100 droplet diameters). The temperature profile measured between two adjacent droplets on the stream axis is nearly flat, suggesting that individual flames do not surround each droplet. The local effects due to the presence of droplets completely disappear about 15 droplet

  11. Process for extractive-stripping of lean hydrocarbon gas streams at high pressure with a preferential physical solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, T.N.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes a process for selectively extracting hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon gas feed stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for extremely high recoveries according to any selected degree of a selected hydrocarbon component and heavier hydrocarbons within the group consisting of ethane, propane, butane, and pentane without the need simultaneously to recover hydrocarbons lighter than the selected hydrocarbon component from the hydrocarbon gas feed stream. The recoveries are: (a) ethane in amounts within the range of 2-100%, (b) propane in amounts within the range of 2-100%, (c) butane in amounts within the range of 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% by the following steps: (a) selectively extracting and stripping the hydrocarbon gas feed stream with the physical solvent to produce a residue hydrocarbon gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components, (b) distilling the rich solvent to produce: (1) the selected hydrocarbon component and heavier hydrocarbons as overhead product. The improvement comprises the selective enrichment of the hydrocarbon gas feed stream with recycle of a selected portion of the overhead product to the extracting and stripping step, whereby the extremely high recoveries according to the any selected degree are feasible without the excessive solvent flow rates or the high reboiler temperatures.

  12. Neutralization of sulfuric acid and immobilization of heavy metals in an acid rock drainage stream, East Mancos River, San Juan National Forest, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, W.A.; Parnell, R.A. Jr.; Bennett, J.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The East Mancos River of Southwestern Colorado is a stream naturally acidified by sulfuric acid produced by outcrops in its stream bed. In the headwaters of the river, two 20m dipslope exposures of fault breccias in the Entrada Sandstone are mineralized by pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and galena. Over a 13.4 km distance downstream, solution chemistry rapidly changes and a sequence of inorganic then organic stream coatings are observed. To describe the natural geochemical processes controlling acid anion and heavy metal concentrations in the river, five longitudinal profiles were completed during 1991 and 1992. Complete inorganic chemical analyses of 0.1 [mu]m filtered samples were performed. At each of the 16 water sampling stations, stream discharge was measured, and stream bed grab samples were collected for organic and inorganic characterization by optical petrography, x-ray diffraction, loss on ignition, and selective chemical dissolution. Sulfate, iron, aluminum, copper, zinc and hydrogen ion concentrations decrease steadily downstream. Moving downstream, the amount and composition of ferric oxyhydroxide precipitates decreases rapidly below the breccias. The co-existing iron phases include lepidocroicite, goethite, feroxyhyte, and ferrihydrite. At threshold stream compositions, epilithic coverings of bacteria and algae occur as iron precipitation ceases. Natural neutralization of sulfur acid and loss of heavy metals from solution occurs in excess of that expected by simple dilution of the initial acidic stream water. Abundances and compositions of stream bed precipitates are consistent with the observed losses of ions from the co-existing solution.

  13. Collection and analysis of organic acids in exhaust gas. Comparison of different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, E.; Montagne, X.; Lahaye, J.

    This paper reports the development of a specific method to identify organic acids in exhaust gases. The organic acids are collected in two impingers containing liquids (pure water or Na 2CO 3 1% aqueous solution) and four cartridges containing solids (silica, fluorisil, alumina B and alumina N). Once collected, the acids are eluted of the solids by a hot water stream. These traps performances, in terms of organic acids collection and elution efficiency, are evaluated and compared. Two sources are used to produce the gas flow containing organic acids: one generates a flow whose concentration is known and stable, the other produces organic acids among other combustion products. For eluted solutions analysis, two methods are used: isocratic ionic chromatography/conductivity detection and GC/FID. Their efficiency in separating 10 aliphatic acids are compared. Their characteristics such as detection limits, detection linearity, repeatability and possible interferences with other components found in exhaust gases are determined. The stability of the organic acids solutions is also studied. Lastly, the use of these methods is illustrated by the analysis of the gas-phase organic acids exhausted by a spark ignition and by a diesel engine.

  14. Means and method for the destruction of particles entrained in a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the destruction of particles entrained in a gas stream are disclosed. Destruction in the context of the subject invention means the fragmentation and/or vaporization of particles above a certain size limit. The subject invention contemplates destroying such particles by exposing them to intense bursts of laser light, such light having a frequency approximately equal to or less than the mean size of such particles. This invention is particularly adopted to the protection of turbine blades in open cycle coal-fired turbine systems. Means for introducing various chemical species and activating them by exposure to laser light are also disclosed.

  15. SIMULATIONS OF EARLY BARYONIC STRUCTURE FORMATION WITH STREAM VELOCITY. II. THE GAS FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Yoshida, Naoki; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-01-20

    Understanding the gas content of high-redshift halos is crucial for studying the formation of the first generation of galaxies and reionization. Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that the relative 'stream' velocity between the dark matter and baryons at the time of recombination-formally a second-order effect, but an unusually large one-can influence the later structure formation history of the universe. We quantify the effect of the stream velocity on the so-called characteristic mass-the minimum mass of a dark matter halo capable of retaining most of its baryons throughout its formation epoch-using three different high-resolution sets of cosmological simulations (with separate transfer functions for baryons and dark matter) that vary in box size, particle number, and the value of the relative velocity between the dark matter and baryons. In order to understand this effect theoretically, we generalize the linear theory filtering mass to properly account for the difference between the dark matter and baryonic density fluctuation evolution induced by the stream velocity. We show that the new filtering mass provides an accurate estimate for the characteristic mass, while other theoretical ansatzes for the characteristic mass are substantially less precise.

  16. Proceedings of the seventh annual coal-fueled heat engines and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, H.A.; Rekos, N.F.; Kothari, V.P.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-03-01

    The seventh Annual Coal-Fueled Heat Engines and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting was held March 26--28, 1990, at the Lakeview Resort and Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this annual meeting is to provide an opportunity for scientists and engineers working in heat engines and gas stream cleanup technologies to present their research results, exchange ideas, and discuss their future plans. About 300 attendees from industry, academia, and Government participated in this 3-day meeting. Almost 60 papers and poster presentations were given on the following topics: proof of concept, systems assessment; advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems; gas stream cleanup, two sessions; panel discussion: turbine emissions; panel discussion: diesel emissions; panel discussion: low cost fuels; and poster presentations. Individual projects were processed separately for the data bases.

  17. Electrochemical membrane separation of H{sub 2}S from reducing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.S.; Smith, D.S.; Winnick, J.

    1998-10-01

    An improved electrochemical membrane was tested with simulated coal gas having concentrations from 25 to 4,500 ppm H{sub 2}S. The process produces elemental hydrogen that enriches the process gas stream at the cathode and elemental sulfur vapor that emerges from the anode. Removal efficiencies average up to 90% at any inlet level; current efficiencies are near 100% at the high inlet concentrations, decreasing significantly at lower H{sub 2}S levels as the competing reduction of H{sub 2}O becomes more favored. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) materials can be used exclusively at the MCFC operating temperature of 650 C, with the low concentrations of H{sub 2}S, including the NiO cathode. At concentrations higher than about 60 ppm the operating temperature must be lowered approximately 50 C to avoid melting of the sulfided nickel cathode.

  18. Evaporation and heating of a single suspended coal-water slurry droplet in hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Shi-chune, Y.; Liu, L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaporation, heating, and burning of single coal-water slurry droplets are studied. The coal selected in this study is Pittsburgh Seam number 8 coal which is a medium volatile caking bituminous coal. The droplet is suspended on a microthermocouple and exposed to a hot gas stream. Temperature measurement and microscopic observation are performed in the parametric studies. The duration of water evaporation in CWS droplets decreases with the reduction of the droplet size, increasing of coal weight fraction, and increasing of gas temperature and velocity. The duration of heat-up is always significant due to the agglomeration. The CWS droplets are generally observed to swell like popcorn during heating. A model for the formation of the popped swelling is proposed and discussed.

  19. New process makes production of highly acid gas economical

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.F.; Vetere, A.

    1982-08-01

    Development of cryogenic processing combined with a new solvent for removing H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ from natural gas has significantly reduced the costs for plant equipment and the energy needed to run it. This results in much lower treatment costs per Mcf and makes natural gas containing as much as 80% acid gas profitable to produce.

  20. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  1. Analysis of trace contaminants in hot gas streams using time-weighted average solid-phase microextraction: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Woolcock, Patrick J; Koziel, Jacek A; Cai, Lingshuang; Johnston, Patrick A; Brown, Robert C

    2013-03-15

    Time-weighted average (TWA) passive sampling using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography was investigated as a new method of collecting, identifying and quantifying contaminants in process gas streams. Unlike previous TWA-SPME techniques using the retracted fiber configuration (fiber within needle) to monitor ambient conditions or relatively stagnant gases, this method was developed for fast-moving process gas streams at temperatures approaching 300 °C. The goal was to develop a consistent and reliable method of analyzing low concentrations of contaminants in hot gas streams without performing time-consuming exhaustive extraction with a slipstream. This work in particular aims to quantify trace tar compounds found in a syngas stream generated from biomass gasification. This paper evaluates the concept of retracted SPME at high temperatures by testing the three essential requirements for TWA passive sampling: (1) zero-sink assumption, (2) consistent and reliable response by the sampling device to changing concentrations, and (3) equal concentrations in the bulk gas stream relative to the face of the fiber syringe opening. Results indicated the method can accurately predict gas stream concentrations at elevated temperatures. Evidence was also discovered to validate the existence of a second boundary layer within the fiber during the adsorption/absorption process. This limits the technique to operating within reasonable mass loadings and loading rates, established by appropriate sampling depths and times for concentrations of interest. A limit of quantification for the benzene model tar system was estimated at 0.02 g m(-3) (8 ppm) with a limit of detection of 0.5 mg m(-3) (200 ppb). Using the appropriate conditions, the technique was applied to a pilot-scale fluidized-bed gasifier to verify its feasibility. Results from this test were in good agreement with literature and prior pilot plant operation, indicating the new method can measure low

  2. A droplet microfluidic approach to single-stream nucleic acid isolation and mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Jin; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a droplet microfluidic platform for genetic mutation detection from crude biosample is described. Single-stream integration of nucleic acid isolation and amplification is realized on a simple fluidic cartridge. Subsequent DNA melting curve is employed with signal normalizing algorithm to differentiate heterozygous K-ras codon 12 c.25G>A mutant from the wildtype. This technique showcases an alternative to modular bench-top approaches for genetic mutation screening, which is of interest to decentralized diagnostic platforms. PMID:25386112

  3. Process for CO.sub.2 capture using zeolites from high pressure and moderate temperature gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Stevens, Robert W.

    2012-03-06

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from a gas stream comprised of CO.sub.2 and other gaseous constituents using a zeolite sorbent in a swing-adsorption process, producing a high temperature CO.sub.2 stream at a higher CO.sub.2 pressure than the input gas stream. The method utilizes CO.sub.2 desorption in a CO.sub.2 atmosphere and effectively integrates heat transfers for optimizes overall efficiency. H.sub.2O adsorption does not preclude effective operation of the sorbent. The cycle may be incorporated in an IGCC for efficient pre-combustion CO.sub.2 capture. A particular application operates on shifted syngas at a temperature exceeding 200.degree. C. and produces a dry CO.sub.2 stream at low temperature and high CO.sub.2 pressure, greatly reducing any compression energy requirements which may be subsequently required.

  4. Vertical gas injection into liquid cross-stream beneath horizontal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Ho; Makiharju, Simo; Lee, Inwon; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Skin friction drag reduction on flat bottomed ships and barges can be achieved by creating an air layer immediately beneath the horizontal surface. The simplest way of introducing the gas is through circular orifices; however the dynamics of gas injection into liquid cross-streams under horizontal surfaces is not well understood. Experiments were conducted to investigate the development of the gas topology following its vertical injection through a horizontal surface. The liquid cross-flow, orifice diameter and gas flow rate were varied to investigate the effect of different ratios of momentum fluxes. The testing was performed on a 4.3 m long and 0.73 m wide barge model with air injection through a hole in the transparent bottom hull. The incoming boundary layer was measured via a pitot tube. Downstream distance based Reynolds number at the injection location was 5 × 105 through 4 × 106 . To observe the flow topology, still images and video were recorded from above the model (i.e. through the transparent hull), from beneath the bottom facing upward, and from the side at an oblique angle. The transition point of the flow topology was determined and analyzed.

  5. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-09-15

    The increased demand for the lanthanides in commercial products result in increased production of lanthanide containing ores, increasing public exposure to the lanthanides, both from various commercial products and from production wastes/effluents. This work investigates lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Lu) binding properties of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica supports (SAMMS®) that were functionalized with diphosphonic acid (DiPhos), acetamide phosphonic acid (AcPhos), propionamide phosphonic acid (ProPhos), and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) from natural waters (river, ground, and sea waters), acid solutions (to mimic certain industrial process streams), and dialysate and compares their performance to a high surface area activated carbon. The properties include sorption affinity, capacity, and sorption kinetics. Stability and regenerability of SAMMS materials were also investigated. Going from the acid side over to the alkaline side, the AcPhos- and DiPhos-SAMMS maintain their outstanding affinity for lanthanides, which enable the use of the materials in the systems where the pH may fluctuate. While the activated carbon is as effective as 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS for capturing lanthanides in natural (alkaline) waters, it has no affinity in acid solutions (pH 2.4) and low affinity in carbonate-rich dialysate. Over 99% of 100 ug/L of Gd in dialysate was removed by the ProPhos-SAMMS after ten minutes. SAMMS can be regenerated with an acid wash (0.5 M HCl) without losing the binding properties, for a number of regeneration cycles. In acid solutions, PhoPhos- and 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS have differing affinity along the lanthanide series, suggesting their potential for chromatographic lanthanide separations. Thus, SAMMS materials have a great potential to be used as sorbents in large scale treatment of lanthanides, lanthanide separation prior to analytical instruments, and sorbent dialyzers for lanthanide clearances.

  6. Application of the carbon dioxide-barium hydroxide hydrate gas-solid reaction for the treatment of dilute carbon dioxide-bearing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The removal of trace components from gas streams via irreversible gas-solid reactions in an area of interest to the chemical engineering profession. This research effort addresses the use of fixed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate flakes for the removal of an acid gas, CO/sub 2/, from air that contains approx. 330 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/. Areas of investigation encompassed: (1) an extensive literature review of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate chemistry, (2) microscale studies on 0.150-g samples to develop a better understanding of the reaction, (3) process studies at the macroscale level with 10.2-cm-ID fixed-bed reactors, and (4) the development of a model for predicting fixed-bed performance. Experimental studies indicated fixed beds of commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes at ambient temperatures to be capable of high CO/sub 2/-removal efficiencies (effluent concentrations <100 ppB), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop (1.8 kPa/m at a superficial gas velocity of 13 cm/s). Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O was determined to be more reactive toward CO/sub 2/ than either Ba(OH)/sub 2/.3H/sub 2/O or Ba(OH)/sub 2/.1H/sub 2/O. A key variable in the development of this fixed-bed process was relative humidity. Operation at conditions with effluent relative humidities >60% resulted in significant recrystallization and restructuring of the flake and subsequent pressure-drop problems.

  7. The effect of broadleaf woodland on aluminium speciation in stream water in an acid-sensitive area in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennifer L; Lynam, Philippa; Heal, Kate V; Palmer, Sheila M

    2012-11-15

    Acidification can result in the mobilisation and release of toxic inorganic monomeric aluminium (Al) species from soils into aquatic ecosystems. Although it is well-established that conifer trees enhance acidic atmospheric deposition and exacerbate soil and water acidification, the effect of broad-leaved woodland on soil and water acidification is less clear. This study investigated the effect of broadleaf woodland cover on the acid-base chemistry and Al species present in stream water, and processes controlling these in the acid-sensitive area around Loch Katrine, in the central Highlands, Scotland, UK, where broadleaf woodland expansion is occurring. A nested sampling approach was used to identify 22 stream sampling locations, in sub-catchments of 3.2-61 ha area and 0-45% broadleaf woodland cover. In addition, soils sampled from 68 locations were analysed to assess the influence of: (i) broadleaf woodland cover on soil characteristics and (ii) soil characteristics on stream water chemistry. Stream water pH was negatively correlated with sub-catchment % woodland cover, indicating that woodland cover is enhancing stream water acidification. Concentrations of all stream water Al species (monomeric total, organic and inorganic) were positively correlated with % woodland cover, although not significantly, but were below levels that are toxic to fish. Soil depth, O horizon depth and soil chemistry, particularly of the A horizon, appeared to be the dominant controls on stream water chemistry rather than woodland cover. There were significant differences in soil acid-base chemistry, with significantly lower O horizon pH and A horizon base saturation and higher A horizon exchangeable Al in the wooded catchments compared to the control. This is evidence that the mobile anion effect is already occurring in the study catchments and suggests that stream water acidification arising from broadleaf woodland expansion could occur, especially where tree density is high and acid

  8. Developing Critical Loads of acidity for streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, using PnET-BGC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraei, H.

    2015-12-01

    Acid deposition has impaired acid-sensitive streams and reduced aquatic biotic integrity in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) by decreasing pH and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Twelve streams in GRSM are listed by the state of Tennessee as impaired due to low stream pH (pH<6.0) under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. A dynamic biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was used to evaluate past, current and potential future changes in soil and water chemistry of watersheds of GRSM in response to changes in acid deposition. Calibrating 30 stream-watersheds in GRSM (including 12 listed impaired streams) to the long-term stream chemistry observations, the model was parameterized for the Park. The calibrated model was used to evaluate the level of atmospheric deposition above which harmful effects occur, known as "critical loads", for individual study watersheds. Estimated critical loads and exceedances (levels of deposition above the critical load) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition were depicted through geographic information system maps. Accuracy of model simulations in the presence of uncertainties in the estimated model parameters and inputs was assessed using three uncertainty and sensitivity techniques.

  9. Roles of Benthic Algae in the Structure, Function, and Assessment of Stream Ecosystems Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tens of thousands of stream kilometers around the world are degraded by a legacy of environmental impacts and acid mine drainage (AMD) caused by abandoned underground and surface mines, piles of discarded coal wastes, and tailings. Increased acidity, high concentrations of metals...

  10. Leaf Associated Microbial Activities in a Stream Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlief, Jeanette

    2004-11-01

    Microbial activity was assessed on birch leaves and plastic strips during 140 days of exposure at three sites in an acidic stream of the Lusatian post-mining landscape, Germany. The sites differed in their degrees of ochre deposition and acidification. The aim of the study was (1) to follow the microbial activities during leaf colonization, (2) to compare the effect of different environmental conditions on leaf associated microbial activities, and (3) to test the microbial availability of leaf litter in acidic mining waters. The activity peaked after 49 days and subsequently decreased gradually at all sites. A formation of iron plaques on leaf surfaces influenced associated microbial activity. It seemed that these plaques inhibit the microbial availability of leaf litter and serve as a microbial habitat by itself. (

  11. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with NHCO into a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  12. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  13. Selective removal of lanthanides from natural waters, acidic streams and dialysate.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, R Shane; Wiacek, Robert J; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-09-15

    The increased demand for the lanthanides in commercial products result in increased production of lanthanide containing ores, which increases public exposure to the lanthanides, both from various commercial products and from production wastes/effluents. This work investigates lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd and Lu) binding properties of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica supports (SAMMS), that were functionalized with diphosphonic acid (DiPhos), acetamide phosphonic acid (AcPhos), propionamide phosphonic acid (Prop-Phos), and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO), from natural waters (river, ground and sea waters), acid solutions (to mimic certain industrial process streams), and dialysate. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of the lanthanide sorption, as well as regenerability of SAMMS materials were investigated. Going from the acid side over to the alkaline side, the AcPhos- and DiPhos-SAMMS maintain their outstanding affinity for lanthanides, which enable the use of the materials in the systems where the pH may fluctuate. In acid solutions, Prop-Phos- and 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS have differing affinity along the lanthanide series, suggesting their use in chromatographic lanthanide separation. Over 95% of 100 microg/L of Gd in dialysate was removed by the Prop-Phos-SAMMS after 1 min and 99% over 10 min. SAMMS can be regenerated with an acid wash (0.5M HCl) without losing the binding properties. Thus, they have a great potential to be used as in large-scale treatment of lanthanides, lanthanide separation prior to analytical instruments, and in sorbent dialyzers for treatment of acute lanthanide poisoning. PMID:19345006

  14. Selective removal of lanthanides from natural waters, acidic streams and dialysate

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Addleman, R. Shane; Wiacek, Robert J.; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    The increased demand for the lanthanides in commercial products result in increased production of lanthanide containing ores, which increases public exposure to the lanthanides, both from various commercial products and from production wastes/effluents. This work investigates lanthanide (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd and Lu) binding properties of self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous silica supports (SAMMS™), that were functionalized with diphosphonic acid (DiPhos), acetamide phosphonic acid (AcPhos), propionamide phosphonic acid (Prop-Phos), and 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO), from natural waters (river, ground and sea waters), acid solutions (to mimic certain industrial process streams), and dialysate. The affinity, capacity, and kinetics of the lanthanide sorption, as well as regenerability of SAMMS materials were investigated. Going from the acid side over to the alkaline side, the AcPhos- and DiPhos-SAMMS maintain their outstanding affinity for lanthanides, which enable the use of the materials in the systems where the pH may fluctuate. In acid solutions, Prop-Phos- and 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS have differing affinity along the lanthanide series, suggesting their use in chromatographic lanthanide separation. Over 95% of 100 µg/L of Gd in dialysate was removed by the Prop-Phos-SAMMS after 1 min and 99% over 10 min. SAMMS can be regenerated with an acid wash (0.5 M HCl) without losing the binding properties. Thus, they have a great potential to be used as in large-scale treatment of lanthanides, lanthanide separation prior to analytical instruments, and in sorbent dialyzers for treatment of acute lanthanide poisoning. PMID:19345006

  15. Gas-cleaning technology for high-temperature, high-pressure gas streams. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Lippert, T.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents the results of work accomplished in 1983 under EPRI contract RP 1336-1 on the evaluation and development of hot gas clean up technology for pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). Reported are results of continued testing and evaluation of the woven-ceramic bag filter concept. A theoretical model for pulse jet cleaning is described and correlated with test results. All test work has been conducted on the modified, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) subscale test facility described. Work is also reported on the testing and evaluation of an advanced diagnostic instrument that is being developed to measure directly the deposition and removal of dust cake on the filter bag surface. 15 references, 71 figures, 12 tables.

  16. Hydrogeochemical characteristics of streams with and without acid mine drainage impacts: A paired catchment study in karst geology, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Tang, Changyuan; Wu, Pan; Strosnider, William H. J.; Han, Zhiwei

    2013-11-01

    A paired catchment study was used to assess karst hydrogeochemistry of two streams.Chemistry of streams with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) was very different.The observation was supported by PHREEQC modeling of equilibrium conditions.Ionic fluxes of AMD-impacted water were higher than that of non-AMD-impacted water.The higher ionic fluxes were predominantly controlled by the oxidation of pyrite.

  17. Enhancement of H{sup -} extraction from a compact source by streaming neutral gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenilla, Alexander; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kasuya, Toshiro; Wada, Motoi

    2006-03-15

    A new negative ion extraction geometry with streaming neutral gas injector (SNGI) was tested in its performance to enhance negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) at low operational pressure. The experiments were performed using a test ion source equipped with a SNGI having the wall perpendicular to the gas emission holes. The results showed that the SNGI was capable of reducing the operating pressure of the ion source from 0.14 to 0.07 Pa. At 0.14 Pa, the operation using the SNGI produced 20% more negative ions than the operation without SNGI. A compact ion source was constructed with a smaller SNGI and having a tapered wall for the gas injection nozzles. The neutral density distribution within the central region of the SNGI within the ion source was simulated using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. It was realized that the neutral density distribution produced by the SNGI with the tapered wall was at most 35% lower than a SNGI structure without the taper.

  18. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid and CO or other H-atom generating species is also present or added to the gas stream.

  19. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: Application of a reactive transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    A reactive transport model based on one-dimensional transport and equilibrium chemistry is applied to synoptic data from an acid mine drainage stream. Model inputs include streamflow estimates based on tracer dilution, inflow chemistry based on synoptic sampling, and equilibrium constants describing acid/base, complexation, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption reactions. The dominant features of observed spatial profiles in pH and metal concentration are reproduced along the 3.5-km study reach by simulating the precipitation of Fe(III) and Al solid phases and the sorption of Cu, As, and Pb onto freshly precipitated iron-(III) oxides. Given this quantitative description of existing conditions, additional simulations are conducted to estimate the streamwater quality that could result from two hypothetical remediation plans. Both remediation plans involve the addition of CaCO3 to raise the pH of a small, acidic inflow from ???2.4 to ???7.0. This pH increase results in a reduced metal load that is routed downstream by the reactive transport model, thereby providing an estimate of post-remediation water quality. The first remediation plan assumes a closed system wherein inflow Fe(II) is not oxidized by the treatment system; under the second remediation plan, an open system is assumed, and Fe(II) is oxidized within the treatment system. Both plans increase instream pH and substantially reduce total and dissolved concentrations of Al, As, Cu, and Fe(II+III) at the terminus of the study reach. Dissolved Pb concentrations are reduced by ???18% under the first remediation plan due to sorption onto iron-(III) oxides within the treatment system and stream channel. In contrast, iron(III) oxides are limiting under the second remediation plan, and removal of dissolved Pb occurs primarily within the treatment system. This limitation results in an increase in dissolved Pb concentrations over existing conditions as additional downstream sources of Pb are not attenuated by

  20. Landscape geomorphic characteristic impacts on greenhouse gas fluxes in exposed stream and riparian sediments.

    PubMed

    Vidon, Philippe; Serchan, Satish

    2016-07-13

    While excessive releases of greenhouse gases (GHG: N2O, CO2, CH4) to the atmosphere due to the burning of fossil fuel remains a concern, we also need to better quantify GHG emissions from natural systems. This study investigates GHG fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface in a series of 7 stream reaches (riparian zones + exposed streambed sediment) across a range of geomorphic locations from headwaters reaches to lowland wetland reaches. When riparian fluxes (RZ) are compared to fluxes from in-stream locations (IS) under summer baseflow conditions, total CO2-equivalent (CO2eq) emissions are approximately 5 times higher at RZ locations than at IS locations, with most CO2eq driven by CH4 production at RZ locations where wet conditions dominate (headwater wetlands, lowland wetlands). On a gas-by-gas basis, no clear differences in N2O fluxes between RZ and IS locations were observed regardless of locations (headwater vs. lowland reaches), while CO2 fluxes were significantly larger at RZ locations than IS locations. Methane fluxes were significantly higher in wetland-influenced reaches than other reaches for both RZ and IS locations. However, GHG fluxes were not consistently correlated to DOC, DO, NO3(-), NH4(+), or water temperature, stressing the limitations of using water quality parameters to predict GHG emissions at the floodplain scale, at least during summer baseflow conditions. As strategies are developed to further constrain GHG emission for whole watersheds, we propose that approaches linking landscape geomorphic characteristics to GHG fluxes at the soil-atmosphere interface offer a promising avenue to successfully predict GHG emissions in floodplains at the watershed scale. PMID:27306099

  1. The mixing of evaporating micron-size particles with a cross stream of gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, V. I.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Naberezhnova, G. V.; Stasenko, A. L.

    1982-06-01

    An analysis is presented of the dynamics and heat and mass transfer of micron-size particles with a known initial mass distribution, injected into a supersonic gas flow (such as that found in a gasdynamic laser). As an example, numerical results are presented on the acceleration of micron-size particles of carbonic acid by hydrogen. The obtained results make it possible to formulate a variational problem concerning the determination of the set of conditions (i.e., initial mass distribution of dispersed particles, gas parameters in the subsonic section of the nozzle, the angle at which the particles are injected into the gas flow, etc.) assuring the extremum of a certain functional of the physical parameters entailed in the mixing of high-speed two-phase flows.

  2. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

  3. Hyporheic exchange and fulvic acid redox reactions in an Alpine stream/wetland ecosystem, Colorado Front Range.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew P; McKnight, Diane M; Cory, Rose M; Williams, Mark W; Runkel, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    The influence of hyporheic zone interactions on the redox state of fulvic acids and other redox active species was investigated in an alpine stream and adjacent wetland, which is a more reducing environment. A tracer injection experiment using bromide (Br-) was conducted in the stream system. Simulations with a transport model showed that rates of exchange between the stream and hyporheic zone were rapid (alpha approximately 10(-3) s(-1)). Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence spectra was used to quantifythe redox state of dissolved fulvic acids. The rate coefficient for oxidation of reduced fulvic acids (lambda = 6.5 x 10(-3) s(-1)) in the stream indicates that electron-transfer reactions occur over short time scales. The rate coefficients for decay of ammonium (lambda = 1.2 x 10(-3) s(-1)) and production of nitrate (lambda = -1.0 x 10(-3) s(-1)) were opposite in sign but almost equal in magnitude. Our results suggest that fulvic acids are involved in rapid electron-transfer processes in and near the stream channel and may be important in determining ecological energy flow at the catchment scale. PMID:17051783

  4. Hyporheic exchange and fulvic acid redox reactions in an alpine stream/wetland ecosystem, Colorado front range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.P.; McKnight, Diane M.; Cory, R.M.; Williams, M.W.; Runkel, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of hyporheic zone interactions on the redox state of fulvic acids and other redox active species was investigated in an alpine stream and adjacent wetland, which is a more reducing environment. A tracer injection experiment using bromide (Br-) was conducted in the stream system. Simulations with a transport model showed that rates of exchange between the stream and hyporheic zone were rapid (?? ??? 10-3 s -1). Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence spectra was used to quantify the redox state of dissolved fulvic acids. The rate coefficient for oxidation of reduced fulvic acids (?? = 6.5 ?? 10-3 s -1) in the stream indicates that electron-transfer reactions occur over short time scales. The rate coefficients for decay of ammonium (?? = 1.2 ?? 10-3 s-1) and production of nitrate (?? = -1.0 ?? 10-3 s-1) were opposite in sign but almost equal in magnitude. Our results suggest that fulvic acids are involved in rapid electron-transfer processes in and near the stream channel and may be important in determining ecological energy flow at the catchment scale. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  5. Hydrogeochemical niches associated with hyporheic exchange beneath an acid mine drainage-contaminated stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Lance N.; Fitzgerald, Michael; Singha, Kamini; Gooseff, Michael N.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Burgos, William

    2013-09-01

    Biological low-pH Fe(II)-oxidation creates terraced iron formations (TIFs) that remove Fe(III) from solution. TIFs can be used for remediation of acid mine drainage (AMD), however, as sediment depth increases, Fe(III)-reduction in anoxic subsurface areas may compromise treatment effectiveness. In this study we used near-surface electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) and in situ pore-water samplers to spatially resolve bulk conductivity changes within a TIF formed in a stream emanating from a large abandoned deep clay mine in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, USA. Because of the high fluid electrical conductivity of the emergent AMD (1860 μS), fresh water (42 μS) was added as a dilution tracer to visualize the spatial and temporal extent of hyporheic exchange and to characterize subsurface flow paths. Distinct hydrogeochemical niches were identified in the shallow subsurface beneath the stream by overlaying relative groundwater velocities (derived from ERI) with pore-water chemistry profiles. Niches were classified based on relatively “fast” versus “slow” rates of hyporheic exchange and oxic versus anoxic conditions. Pore-water concentrations and speciation of iron, pH, and redox potential differed between subsurface flow regimes. The greatest extent of hyporheic exchange was beneath the center of the stream, where a shallower (<10 cm) Fe(II)-oxidizing zone was observed. Meanwhile, less hyporheic exchange was observed near the channel banks, concurrent with a more pronounced, deeper (>70 cm) Fe(II)-oxidizing zone. At these locations, relatively slower groundwater exchange may promote biotic Fe(II)-oxidation and improve the long-term stability of Fe sequestered in TIFs.

  6. Evaluating natural gas development impacts on stream ecosystems in an Upper Colorado River watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, J. M.; Bern, C.; Schmidt, T. S.; McDougal, R. R.; Clark, M. L.; Stricker, C. A.; Wolf, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Oil and gas development in the western United States is increasingly placing at odds the management of two critical natural resources: fossil fuels and water. Muddy Creek, part of the Upper Colorado River watershed, is a semi-arid catchment in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Muddy Creek flows throughout the year and includes both perennial and ephemeral tributaries. Primary land use includes livestock grazing, oil and gas development, and recreational activities. A multi-discipline study has been initiated to determine potential impacts of the projected increase of coal bed natural gas development. Hundreds of permits for drilling co-produced waters have been issued, but low energy prices have slowed development. A watershed assessment was conducted in 2010 to determine areas within the watershed that are more susceptible to mobilization of trace elements that occur in soils forming on marine shales. Soil, stream sediment, and water samples were collected and analyzed for major elements and a suite of trace elements, with arsenic and selenium identified as potential elements of concern. A study of benthic and riparian invertebrates is being conducted to evaluate the uptake of these elements into the food web at targeted locations in the Muddy Creek watershed. Continued work will address sources of salinity to Muddy Creek, and ultimately to the Upper Colorado River. Impacts from energy development can include mobilization of naturally occurring sulfate salts through soil disturbance. Formation waters currently discharged to the surface from two failed wells within the watershed will be evaluated for their contribution to salinity, as well as dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen species, and trace elements, to the Upper Colorado River. Upon completion, this study will provide a baseline that can assist in land-use management decisions as oil and gas extraction expands in the Upper Colorado River watershed.

  7. ACID GAS REMOVAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CORONA RADICAL SHOWER SYSTEM FOR A TREATMENT OF STATIONARY ENGINE FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid gas removal experiments are carried out in large bench scale corona radical shower reactor. A simulated engine flue gas is air mixed with NO, SO2 and CH4. Optimums for acid gas removal rate have been conducted in terms of the ammonia to acid gas molar ratio, the applied volt...

  8. Determining the sulfuric acid fog concentration in coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zin'kovskaya, S.I.; Okhrimenko, E.L.; Sobko, L.V.

    1982-11-06

    A volumetric method for the analysis of sulfuric acid aerosols at levels of acid greater (25-40 g/m/sup 3/) than those (1 g/m/sup 3/) analyzable by current methods is described. Coke oven gas after acid scrubbing and electrofiltration is passed through a Schott filter (pressure drop 100 mm Hg), the sulfuric acid aerosol being condensed on the filter which is washed with water and the washings filtered with NaOH (0.01 N after electrofilter, 1.0 N after the acid towers) to methyl orange end point. The error is +/- 2%.

  9. Activated carbon cleanup of the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the details of a recently developed novel process using activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur recovery units. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This effect is especially evident in split flow Claus plants which bypass some of the acid gas feed stream around the initial combustion step because of a low hydrogen sulfide concentration. This new clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}{sup +} hydrocarbons from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated using low pressure steam. A post regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. This technology was extensively pilot tested in Saudi Aramco`s facilities in Saudi Arabia. Full scale commercial units are planned for two plants in the near future with the first coming on-line in 1997. The process described here represents the first application of activated carbon in this service, and a patent has been applied for. The paper will discuss the pilot plant results and the issues involved in scale-up to commercial size.

  10. Acute effects of aluminum and acidity upon nine stream insects. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.; Haney, J.

    1984-09-01

    The effects of increased aluminum concentrations and decreased pH upon the larval stages of five caddisflies, two mayflies, a stonefly, and a beetle were tested. These insects were removed from two riffle habitats in southern New Hampshire, placed into artificial streams and subjected to additions of aluminum salts and sulfuric acid for a three-day period. Acute mortality and the drifting behavior over the three-day period were then analyzed using multiple linear regression. Aluminum additions caused increased mortality in the stonefly Nemoura nigratta and the caddisfly Macronema spp.; aluminum additions also increased the drift of the caddisfly Potamyia flava, but the response was small and likely due to the increased salinities in aluminum treatments.

  11. Detection of Naegleria sp. in a thermal, acidic stream in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Kathy B; Ferris, Michael J; Henson, Joan M

    2003-01-01

    An initial survey of sequences of PCR-amplified portions of the 18S rRNA genes from a community DNA clone library, prepared from an algal mat in a thermal, acidic stream in Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA, revealed among other sequences, several that matched Vahlkampfia. This finding prompted further investigation using primers specific for Naegleria. Sequences from a subsequent DNA clone library, prepared from the 5.8S rRNA gene and the adjacent internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA, closely matched Naegleria and formed an independent lineage within a clade containing Naegleria sturti and Naegleria niuginiensis. The sequences may represent a new Naegleria species. PMID:15132169

  12. Silver-mordenite for radiologic gas capture from complex streams. Dual catalytic CH3I decomposition and I confinement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Soelberg, Nick R.; Chapman, Karena W.

    2014-05-09

    The selective capture of radiological iodine (129I) is a persistent concern for safe nuclear energy. In these nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, the gas streams to be treated are extremely complex, containing several distinct iodine-containing molecules amongst a large variety of other species. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for radioiodine capture, reacting with molecular iodine (I2) to form AgI. However the mechanisms for organoiodine capture is not well understood. Here we investigate the capture of methyl iodide from complex mixed gas streams by combining chemical analysis of the effluent gas stream with in depth characterization of the recovered sorbent.more » Tools applied include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, micro X-ray fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. Moreover, the MOR zeolite catalyzes decomposition of the methyl iodide through formation of surface methoxy species (SMS), which subsequently reacts with water in the mixed gas stream to form methanol, and with methanol to form dimethyl ether, which are both detected downstream in the effluent. The liberated iodine reacts with Ag in the MOR pore to the form subnanometer AgI clusters, smaller than the MOR pores, suggesting that the iodine is both physically and chemically confined within the zeolite.« less

  13. On the Unsteady Breakup of a Liquid Jet by a Coaxial Gas Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Christopher M.; Lasheras, Juan; Hopfinger, Emil

    2000-11-01

    The breakup and atomization of a liquid jet by a high-momentum coaxial gas stream is investigated experimentally for unsteady flow of the central liquid. The unsteady flow is characterized by the impulsive start-up and stopping of the liquid jet by means of a square wave function. Phase-Doppler particle sizing methods and laser attenuation measurements are employed to characterize the flow field during these transient periods, with conditional measurements made on the phase of the injection pulse. Spray properties such as the liquid intact length, the critical turbulent breakup distance, droplet size distributions, and the concentration field are measured. Physical models are considered for the dependence of these quantities on various flow properties including the gas-to-liquid dynamic pressure ratio, the turbulent dissipation rate, the mass flux ratio, and nozzle dimensions. In all the cases investigated here, the atomization regime based on the aerodynamic Weber number and the liquid jet Reynolds number is characterized by 'fibre-type' breakup of the liquid.

  14. Atomization of a small-diameter liquid jet by a high-speed gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Christopher Michael

    The situation of a small-diameter liquid jet exposed to a large-diameter high-speed gas jet is investigated experimentally. Flow visualization and particle-sizing techniques are employed to examine both the initial breakup process and subsequent secondary atomization of the liquid. It is shown that nearly all of the breakup takes place in the near-field and that the bulk of the atomization is completed within the potential cone of the gas jet. The resultant drop size depends primarily on the gas velocity and to a weaker extent on the liquid mass flux. It is argued that the mechanism of primary atomization is similar to that of a liquid drop suddenly exposed to a high-speed gas stream. A phenomenological breakup model is proposed for the initial droplet size, based on the accelerative destabilization of the liquid jet surface by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Measurements of droplet sizes and surface wavelengths are shown to be in good agreement with the model predictions. The downstream evolution of the droplet-size distribution is also investigated, with consideration given to several secondary mechanisms including turbulent breakup, droplet-droplet collisions, and droplet acceleration. It is argued that the relative acceleration of droplets of different size classes, and energetic collisions between droplets, are together responsible for the experimentally observed variation of the mean drop size with downstream distance from the injection plane in the far-field of the spray. The feasibility of coaxial liquid-gas injection for pulse detonation engine (PDE) applications is additionally considered. The performance of coaxial atomizers under transient operating conditions appropriate to PDEs is analyzed along with the capability of this injection scheme to produce sufficiently small droplet sizes within restricted flow regimes. The ability to tailor the radial distributions of both the liquid mass flux and droplet sizes through the addition of swirl to the coaxial

  15. The Role of Alkalinity Inputs in the Composition of Sediments in AN Acid Mine Drainage Remediated Stream: Hewett Fork, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, D. L.; Korenowsky, R. K.; Kruse, N.; Bowman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Hewett Fork, a tributary of Raccoon Creek in SE Ohio, is severely impacted by acid mine drainage. This stream is being actively treated using a calcium oxide doser. In this work, we report the results of our investigations into the chemical effect of remediation in the stream throughout an evaluation of the chemical composition of its sediments. Results show that the grain size of the sediments is finer in the areas where high alkalinity loads enter the stream, at the output from the doser and downstream of the confluence with alkaline tributaries. The composition of heavy metals (magnesium, aluminum, calcium, nickel, zinc, manganese, potassium, lead, chromium, copper, cobalt and arsenic) is higher in concentration in the fine-grained sediments where alkalinity enters the stream, forming two peaks of high sediment concentration along the stream, one at the doser and the second after the confluence with alkaline tributaries. Iron has a different behavior with a higher sediment concentration downstream from the doser at the areas where the grain size is larger, due to the kinetics of the oxidation process for the formation of iron (III) minerals. These results suggest that in remediation of acid-mine-drainage impacted streams, alkalinity inputs along and oxidation processes are important for the storage of heavy metals in the sediments.

  16. Organic acids emissions from natural-gas-fed engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, Efthimios; Tazerout, Mohand

    A natural-gas-fed spark-ignition engine, operating under lean conditions, is used for the study of the organic acids exhaust emissions. These pollutants are collected by passing a sample of exhaust gas into deionised water. The final solution is directly analysed by HPLC/UV at 204 nm. Only formic acid is emitted in detectable concentration under the experimental conditions used. Its concentration decreases with the three engine operating parameters studied: spark advance, volumetric efficiency and fuel/air equivalence ratio. Exhaust formic acid concentration is also linked with exhaust oxygen concentration and exhaust temperature. A comparison with other engines (SI engines fed with gasoline and compression ignition engines) from bibliographic data proves that natural-gas-fed engines emit less organic acids than the other two types of engines.

  17. Anchoring the gas-phase acidity scale: From formic acid to methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyet, Nicole; Villano, Stephanie M.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the gas-phase acidities of nine compounds: formic acid, acetic acid, 1,3-propanedithiol, 2-methyl-2-propanethiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol, 2-propanethiol, 1-propanethiol, ethanethiol, and methanethiol, with acidities ranging from 338.6 to 351.1 kcal mol-1 using proton transfer kinetics and the resulting equilibrium constants. These acids were anchored to the well-known acidity of hydrogen sulfide; the measured acidities are in good agreement with previous experimental values, but error bars are significantly reduced. The gas-phase acidity of 3-methyl-1-butanethiol was determined to be 347.1 (5) kcal mol-1; there were no previous measurements of this value. Entropies of deprotonation were calculated and enthalpies of deprotonation were determined.

  18. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: gas streaming and dynamical M/L in rotationally supported systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, G.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Richards, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Lange, R.; Moffett, A.; Catinella, B.; Cortese, L.; Ho, I.-T.; Taylor, E. N.; Bryant, J. J.; Allen, J. T.; Sweet, S. M.; Croom, S. M.; Driver, S. P.; Goodwin, M.; Kelvin, L.; Green, A. W.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Owers, M. S.; Lawrence, J. S.; Lorente, N. P. F.

    2016-02-01

    Line-of-sight velocities of gas and stars can constrain dark matter (DM) within rotationally supported galaxies if they trace circular orbits extensively. Photometric asymmetries may signify non-circular motions, requiring spectra with dense spatial coverage. Our integral-field spectroscopy of 178 galaxies spanned the mass range of the Sydney-AAO Multi-object integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derived circular speed curves (CSCs) of gas and stars from non-parametric fits out to r ˜ 2re. For 12/14 with measured H I profiles, ionized gas and H I maximum velocities agreed. We fitted mass-follows-light models to 163 galaxies by approximating the radial light profile as nested, very flattened mass homeoids viewed as a Sérsic form. Fitting broad-band spectral energy distributions to Sloan Digital Sky Survey images gave median stellar mass/light 1.7 assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF) versus 2.6 dynamically. Two-thirds of the dynamical mass/light measures were consistent with star+remnant IMFs. One-fifth required upscaled starlight to fit, hence comparable mass of unobserved baryons and/or DM distributed like starlight across the SAMI aperture that came to dominate motions as the starlight CSCs declined rapidly. The rest had mass distributed differently from light. Subtracting fits of Sérsic radial profiles to 13 VIKING Z-band images revealed residual weak bars. Near the bar major axis, we assessed m = 2 streaming velocities, and found deviations usually <30 km s-1 from the CSC; three showed no deviation. Thus, asymmetries rarely influenced the CSC despite colocated shock-indicating, emission-line flux ratios in more than 2/3 of our sample.

  19. Variability of Near-stream, Sub-surface Major-ion and Tracer Concentrations in an Acid Mine Drainage Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Runkel, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    In acid mine drainage environments, tracer-injection and synoptic sampling approaches provide tools for making operational estimates of solute loading within a stream segment. Identifying sub-surface contaminant sources remains a challenge both for characterization of in-stream metal loading and hydrological process research. There is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along these flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Complicating the identification of inflows is the mixing of solute sources which may occur in the `near-stream' subsurface areas and specifically along hyporheic exchange flows (HEFs). In Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado), major-ion (SO42-, Cl-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) meter-scale sampling shows that subsurface inflows and likely HEFs occur in a hydro- geochemical setting of significant, one order-of-magnitude, spatial variation in the solute concentrations. Transient Storage Models (TSMs) are a tool for interpreting the in-stream responses of solute transport in streams influenced by hyporheic exchange flows. Simulations using the USGS TSM code OTIS are interpreted as suggesting that in Mineral Creek the strong concentration `tailing' of bromide following the tracer injection occurred, at least in part, from HEFs in a hydro - solute transport setting of likely multiple, dispersed and mixed sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the nominally gaining stream. In acid mine drainage environments, the ability to distinguish between local and deep solute sources is critical in modeling reactive transport along the stream, as well as in identifying the geochemical evolution of dispersed, subsurface inflows thorough the catchment.

  20. Water chemistry and ecotoxicity of an acid mine drainage-affected stream in subtropical China during a major flood event.

    PubMed

    Lin, C; Wu, Y; Lu, W; Chen, A; Liu, Y

    2007-04-01

    Field and laboratory work was carried out to investigate the chemistry and ecotoxicity of stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a tributary catchment of the Pearl River in subtropical China during a major flood that corresponded to a return period of 100 years. The results indicate that stream water was affected by acid mine drainage from the Dabaoshan mine at least to a distance of 25 km downstream of the mine water discharge point. It appears that H(+) generated from sulfide oxidation in the waste rock dumps was readily available for exporting. The amount of H(+) being discharged into the receiving stream depended on the volume of out-flowing waters. However, there was a lag time for the discharges of the metals. This may be attributed to the slower release of metals, relative to H(+), because it might take more time for the dissolution of heavy metal-bearing compounds, particularly the sparsely soluble jarosites. Fe, Zn and Al were the major metals of potential toxicity contained in the AMD-affected stream water, followed by Mn, Cu, Pb, As, Cd and Ni. The concentrations of these metals in the water decreased rapidly down the stream. This corresponds with an increase in the concentrations of reactive heavy metal fractions in benthic mud down the stream, reflecting the precipitation of heavy metal compounds with increasing pH and their subsequent deposition in the streambed. Toxicity tests show that the AMD-affected stream water at 3.5 km downstream of the discharge point was highly toxic to the test organism. At 25 km downstream of the discharge point where stream water pH was as high as 5.75, marked toxic responses of the test organism were still observed. PMID:16979817

  1. Regenerative adsorption and removal of H2S from hot fuel gas streams by rare earth oxides.

    PubMed

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sakbodin, Mann; Wang, Zheng

    2006-06-01

    Sorbent materials that allow for high-temperature, regenerative desulfurization of fuel gas streams for the anode of a solid oxide fuel cell have been developed. Reversible adsorption of H2S on cerium and lanthanum oxide surfaces is demonstrated over many cycles at temperatures as high as 800 degrees C, on both fresh or presulfided sorbents, and at very high space velocities. The adsorption and desorption processes are very fast, and removal of H2S to sub-parts per million levels is achieved at very short (millisecond) contact times. Any type of sulfur-free gas, including water vapor, can be used to regenerate the sorbent surface. Preferably, the anode off-gas stream is used to sweep the desorbed H(2)S to a burner. PMID:16763145

  2. Global survey of the omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid in the blood stream of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Stark, Ken D; Van Elswyk, Mary E; Higgins, M Roberta; Weatherford, Charli A; Salem, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Studies reporting blood levels of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), were systematically identified in order to create a global map identifying countries and regions with different blood levels. Included studies were those of healthy adults, published in 1980 or later. A total of 298 studies met all inclusion criteria. Studies reported fatty acids in various blood fractions including plasma total lipids (33%), plasma phospholipid (32%), erythrocytes (32%) and whole blood (3.0%). Fatty acid data from each blood fraction were converted to relative weight percentages (wt.%) and then assigned to one of four discrete ranges (high, moderate, low, very low) corresponding to wt.% EPA+DHA in erythrocyte equivalents. Regions with high EPA+DHA blood levels (>8%) included the Sea of Japan, Scandinavia, and areas with indigenous populations or populations not fully adapted to Westernized food habits. Very low blood levels (≤4%) were observed in North America, Central and South America, Europe, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Africa. The present review reveals considerable variability in blood levels of EPA+DHA and the very low to low range of blood EPA+DHA for most of the world may increase global risk for chronic disease. PMID:27216485

  3. Investigating the Copper Isotope Composition of Red Mountain Creek: a Stream Affected by Acid Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, B. E.; Mathur, R.; Brantley, S. L.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the sources of metals and the processes that affect their transport in watersheds affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) is central to improving stream water quality. Using a new technique to address an old problem, we measured the 65Cu/63Cu ratios in filtered (pore size = 0.45μm or 0.22μm) and unfiltered samples of AMD-impacted streamwater collected during low-flow conditions from Red Mountain Creek near Silverton, Colorado. Red Mountain Creek is a small mountain stream receiving metal-rich, acidic drainage from acid-sulfate and quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration zones within dacitic-andesitic lavas and volcaniclastic sediments. We measured δ65Cu values [where δ65Cu = ((65Cu/63Cusample/65Cu/63Custandard) - 1) × 103] on a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer; instrumental mass bias was corrected by doping with the Johnson-Mattey Zn solution and bracketing with the NIST976 standard. All samples are enriched in 65Cu, with δ65Cu values ranging from 1.03 ± 0.10‰ to 3.76 ± 0.10‰ (2σ). Higher values correspond to an inflow emanating from a mineshaft that shows the highest Cu concentration (10.4 mg/L). As Cu becomes less concentrated downstream, the δ65Cu values generally decrease. At two of the three sample locations, the filtered samples are more enriched in 65Cu than the unfiltered samples, which contain suspended precipitates. These results are consistent with previous batch-leach experiments showing that during dissolution of chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and chalcocite (Cu2S) (with and without Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans), Cu released into solution by leaching was enriched in 65Cu and Cu precipitates were depleted relative to the starting sulfide minerals. This fractionation may indicate that biotic (e.g., microbial metabolism) and/or abiotic processes (e.g., metal sorption and mineral precipitation) induce isotope effects during Cu partitioning. Future measurements of 65Cu/63Cu ratios in primary Cu-sulfide minerals and

  4. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: application of a reactive transport model.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Robert L; Kimball, Briant A

    2002-03-01

    A reactive transport model based on one-dimensional transport and equilibrium chemistry is applied to synoptic data from an acid mine drainage stream. Model inputs include streamflow estimates based on tracer dilution, inflow chemistry based on synoptic sampling, and equilibrium constants describing acid/base, complexation, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption reactions. The dominant features of observed spatial profiles in pH and metal concentration are reproduced along the 3.5-km study reach by simulating the precipitation of Fe(III) and Al solid phases and the sorption of Cu, As, and Pb onto freshly precipitated iron(III) oxides. Given this quantitative description of existing conditions, additional simulations are conducted to estimate the streamwater quality that could result from two hypothetical remediation plans. Both remediation plans involve the addition of CaCO3 to raise the pH of a small, acidic inflow from approximately 2.4 to approximately 7.0. This pH increase results in a reduced metal load that is routed downstream by the reactive transport model, thereby providing an estimate of post-remediation water quality. The first remediation plan assumes a closed system wherein inflow Fe(II) is not oxidized by the treatment system; under the second remediation plan, an open system is assumed, and Fe(II) is oxidized within the treatment system. Both plans increase instream pH and substantially reduce total and dissolved concentrations of Al, As, Cu, and Fe(II+III) at the terminus of the study reach. Dissolved Pb concentrations are reduced by approximately 18% under the first remediation plan due to sorption onto iron(III) oxides within the treatment system and stream channel. In contrast, iron(III) oxides are limiting under the second remediation plan, and removal of dissolved Pb occurs primarily within the treatment system. This limitation results in an increase in dissolved Pb concentrations over existing conditions as additional downstream sources of

  5. Novel selective surface flow (SSF{sup TM}) membranes for the recovery of hydrogren from waste gas streams. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.

    1995-08-01

    The waste streams are off-gas streams from various chemical/refinery operations. In Phase I, the architecture of the membrane and the separation device were defined and demonstrated. The system consists of a shell-and-tube separator in which the gas to be separated is fed to the tube side, the product is collected as high pressure effluent and the permeate constitutes the waste/fuel stream. Each tube, which has the membrane coated on the interior, does the separation. A multi- tube separator device containing 1 ft{sup 2} membrane area was built and tested. The engineering data were used for designing a process for hydrogen recovery from a fluid catalytic cracker off-gas stream. First-pass economics showed that overall cost for hydrogen production is reduced by 35% vs on-purpose production of hydrogen by steam- methane reforming. The hydrogen recovery process using the SSF membrane results in at least 15% energy reduction and significant decrease in CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions.

  6. Carbon Gas Emissions from a Stream Network along Elevation and Vegetation Gradients in a Remote Northern Boreal Watershed (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegl, R. G.; Dornblaser, M.; Crawford, J. T.; Stets, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Gas emissions from inland waters are the product of the gas partial pressure gradient across the water-air interface, gas transfer velocity, and water surface area, all of which vary in space and time for flowing water systems. We combined discrete water sampling of carbon gases, continuous water quality and dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring using in situ sensors, stream water discharge monitoring, and water surface area estimates to determine CO2 and methane (CH4) emissions along a 300 km stream reach, originating above tree line and ending in flatlands, in a > 6100 km2 headwaters portion of the Beaver Creek watershed, central interior Alaska. Despite pronounced elevation and vegetation gradients in the watershed, areal stream CO2 yields were relatively constant as streams coursed from headwaters in the White Mountains downstream to the Yukon River. This was largely because stream surface area increases, offsetting the downstream decreases in both pCO2 and gas transfer velocity. In situ sensors tracked seasonal changes in pCO2 versus water discharge from spring ice melt into autumn. We attributed late summer increases in pCO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon to a shift in the proportions of surface runoff versus subsurface water sources to Beaver Creek, coincident with seasonal thaw of the active layer overlying permafrost in the watershed. This was conceptually similar to long-term patterns in aquatic carbon exports thought to be occurring in the Yukon River basin as a whole. Methane emissions to the atmosphere were relatively small, about one percent of CO2 emissions, but were continuous throughout the ice-free season, with aqueous pCH4 exceeding atmospheric pCH4 for all water samples.

  7. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  8. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  9. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This is the seventh in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed for this project. Our analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic barrier filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFs) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task 1 during the past quarter, we received and analyzed a hopper ash sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota`s Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). We also received six ash samples from the Ahlstrom 10 MWt Pressurized Fluidized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) facility located at Karhula, Finland. We selected one of the filter cake ashes from this batch of samples for detailed analyses. We continued our work on the HGCU data base we are constructing in Microsoft Access{reg_sign}. We have been entering a variety of information into the data base, including numerical values, short or long text entries, and photographs. Task 2 efforts during the past quarter focused on hoop tensile testing of Schumacher FT20 and Refractron candle filter elements removed from the Karhula APF after {approximately}540 hours of service.

  10. Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

    2004-04-01

    Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

  11. Predicting properties of gas and solid streams by intrinsic kinetics of fast pyrolysis of wood

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klinger, Jordan; Bar-Ziv, Ezra; Shonnard, David; Westover, Tyler; Emerson, Rachel

    2015-12-12

    Pyrolysis has the potential to create a biocrude oil from biomass sources that can be used as fuel or as feedstock for subsequent upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels or other chemicals. The product distribution/composition, however, is linked to the biomass source. This work investigates the products formed from pyrolysis of woody biomass with a previously developed chemical kinetics model. Different woody feedstocks reported in prior literature are placed on a common basis (moisture, ash, fixed carbon free) and normalized by initial elemental composition through ultimate analysis. Observed product distributions over the full devolatilization range are explored, reconstructed by the model, andmore » verified with independent experimental data collected with a microwave-assisted pyrolysis system. These trends include production of permanent gas (CO, CO2), char, and condensable (oil, water) species. Elementary compositions of these streams are also investigated. As a result, close agreement between literature data, model predictions, and independent experimental data indicate that the proposed model/method is able to predict the ideal distribution from fast pyrolysis given reaction temperature, residence time, and feedstock composition.« less

  12. Predicting properties of gas and solid streams by intrinsic kinetics of fast pyrolysis of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Jordan; Bar-Ziv, Ezra; Shonnard, David; Westover, Tyler; Emerson, Rachel

    2015-12-12

    Pyrolysis has the potential to create a biocrude oil from biomass sources that can be used as fuel or as feedstock for subsequent upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels or other chemicals. The product distribution/composition, however, is linked to the biomass source. This work investigates the products formed from pyrolysis of woody biomass with a previously developed chemical kinetics model. Different woody feedstocks reported in prior literature are placed on a common basis (moisture, ash, fixed carbon free) and normalized by initial elemental composition through ultimate analysis. Observed product distributions over the full devolatilization range are explored, reconstructed by the model, and verified with independent experimental data collected with a microwave-assisted pyrolysis system. These trends include production of permanent gas (CO, CO2), char, and condensable (oil, water) species. Elementary compositions of these streams are also investigated. As a result, close agreement between literature data, model predictions, and independent experimental data indicate that the proposed model/method is able to predict the ideal distribution from fast pyrolysis given reaction temperature, residence time, and feedstock composition.

  13. 2005 Crater Lake Formation, Lahar, Acidic Flood, and Gas Emission From Chiginagak Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J. R.; Scott, W. E.; McGimsey, R. G.; Jorgenson, J.

    2005-12-01

    A 400-m-wide crater lake developed in the formerly snow-and-ice-filled crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between August 2004 and June 2005, presumably due to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system. We are also evaluating the possible role of magma intrusion and degassing. In early summer 2005, clay-rich debris and an estimated 5.6 million cubic meters of acidic water from the crater exited through tunnels in the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 kilometers downstream, the acidic waters of the flood reached approximately 1.5 meters above current water levels and inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying at least the surface water of Mother Goose Lake (approximately 1 cubic kilometer in volume) and preventing the annual salmon run. No measurements of pH were taken until late August 2005. At that time the pH of water sampled from the Mother Goose Lake inlet, lake surface, and outlet stream (King Salmon River) was 3.2. Defoliation and leaf damage of vegetation along affected streams, in areas to heights of over 70 meters in elevation above flood level, indicates that a cloud of detrimental gas or aerosol accompanied the flood waters. Analysis of stream water, lake water, and vegetation samples is underway to better determine the agent responsible for the plant damage. This intriguing pattern of gas-damaged vegetation concentrated along and above the flood channels is cause for further investigation into potential hazards associated with Chiginagak's active crater lake. Anecdotal evidence from local lodge owners and aerial photographs from 1953 suggest that similar releases occurred in the mid-1970s and early 1950s.

  14. Cryogenic process for fractionally removing acidic gases from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Ginnasi, A.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.; Vetere, A.

    1985-07-16

    A process is described for stripping acidic gases, mainly hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide, from natural gas or synthesis gas, especially when the percentages of such acidic gases are high and the conventional processes become economically objectionable. The process is based on the use of a number of selective solvents, generally belonging to the class of esters, ethers, mixed ester-ethers and lactones, in combination with sequential absorbing cycles which start from the stripping of hydrogen sulphide, and comprise the regeneration of the solvents used by several expansion cycles: H2S and CO2 are recovered and the regenerated solvents recycled.

  15. Impact of Unconventional Shale Gas Waste Water Disposal on Surficial Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzarelli, I.; Akob, D.; Mumford, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The development of unconventional natural gas resources has been rapidly increasing in recent years, however, the environmental impacts and risks are not yet well understood. A single well can generate up to 5 million L of produced water (PW) consisting of a blend of the injected fluid and brine from a shale formation. With thousands of wells completed in the past decade, the scope of the challenge posed in the management of this wastewater becomes apparent. The USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Program is studying both intentional and unintentional releases of PW and waste solids. One method for the disposal of PW is underground injection; we are assessing the potential risks of this method through an intensive, interdisciplinary study at an injection disposal facility in the Wolf Creek watershed in WV. Disposal of PW via injection begun in 2002, with over 5.5 mil. L of PW injected to date. The facility consists of the injection well, a tank farm, and two former holding ponds (remediated in early 2014) and is bordered by two small tributaries of Wolf Creek. Water and sediments were acquired from these streams in June 2014, including sites upstream, within, and downstream from the facility. We are analyzing aqueous and solid phase geochemistry, mineralogy, hydrocarbon content, microbial community composition, and potential toxicity. Field measurements indicated that conductivity downstream (416 μS/cm) was elevated in comparison to upstream (74 μS/cm) waters. Preliminary data indicated elevated Cl- (115 mg/L) and Br- (0.88 mg/L) concentrations downstream, compared to 0.88 mg/L Cl- and <0.03 mg/L Br- upstream of the facility. Because elevated TDS is a marker of PW, these data provide a first indication that PW from the facility is impacting nearby streams. In addition, total Fe concentrations downstream were 8.1 mg/L, far in excess of the 0.13 mg/L found upstream from the facility, suggesting the potential for microbial Fe cycling. We are conducting a broad suite of

  16. Effects of coalbed natural gas development on fish assemblages in tributary streams of the Powder and Tongue rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, W.N.; Bramblett, R.G.; Zale, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    1. Extraction of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) often results in disposal of large quantities of CBNG product water, which may affect aquatic ecosystems. We evaluated the effects of CBNG development on fish assemblages in tributary streams of the Powder and Tongue rivers. We used treatment and control, impact versus reference sites comparisons, surveys of CBNG product-water streams and in situ fish survival approaches to determine if CBNG development affected fish assemblages.2. Several of our results suggested that CBNG development did not affect fish assemblages. Species richness and index of biotic integrity (IBI) scores were similar in streams with and streams without CBNG development, and overall biotic integrity was not related to the number or density of CBNG wells. Fish occurred in one stream that was composed largely or entirely of CBNG product water. Sentinel fish survived in cages at treatment sites where no or few fish were captured, suggesting that factors such as lack of stream connectivity rather than water quality limited fish abundance at these sites. Fish species richness did not differ significantly from 1994 to 2006 in comparisons of CBNG-developed and undeveloped streams. Biotic integrity declined from 1994 to 2006; however, declines occurred at both impact and reference sites, possibly because of long-term drought.3. Some evidence suggested that CBNG development negatively affected fish assemblages, or may do so over time. Specific conductivity was on average higher in treatment streams and was negatively related to biotic integrity. Four IBI species richness metrics were negatively correlated with the number or density of CBNG wells in the catchment above sampling sites. Bicarbonate, one of the primary ions in product water, was significantly higher in developed streams and may have limited abundance of longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae). Total dissolved solids, alkalinity, magnesium and sulphate were significantly higher in developed streams

  17. Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures in a research engine for gas stream temperatures cycling between 1067 and 1567 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Yeh, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures were obtained from tests conducted on air-cooled blades in a research turbojet engine, cycling between cruise and idle conditions. Transient data were recorded by a high speed data acquisition system. Temperatures at the same phase of each transient cycle were repeatable between cycles to within 3.9 K (7 F). Turbine inlet pressures were repeatable between cycles to within 0.32 N/sq cm (0.47 psia). The tests were conducted at a gas stream temperature of 1567 K (2360 F) at cruise, and 1067 K (1460 F) at idle conditions. The corresponding gas stream pressures were about 26.2 and 22.4 N/sq cm (38 and 32.5 psia) respectively. The nominal coolant inlet temperature was about 811 K (1000 F).

  18. No reduction using sublimination of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method of reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with an amount of HNCO at a temperature effective for heat-induced decomposition of cyanuric acid, said amount and temperature being effective for the resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream, said cyanuric acid being particulate and having a particle size of less than 90 .mu.m.

  19. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1996-05-21

    A method of reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with an amount of HNCO at a temperature effective for heat-induced decomposition of cyanuric acid, said amount and temperature being effective for the resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream, said cyanuric acid being particulate and having a particle size of less than 90 {micro}m. 1 fig.

  20. Responses of streams in central Appalachian Mountain region to reduced acidic deposition--comparisons with other regions in North America and Europe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yushun; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2009-03-15

    Data from 5 wet deposition stations and 21 streams during 1980-2006 were analyzed to investigate chemical responses of streams to reduced acidic deposition in the central Appalachian Mountain region of West Virginia, USA. Wet deposition of acidic anions (i.e., sulfate, nitrate, and chloride) and hydrogen ions decreased significantly during the studied time period. Stream sulfate showed a delayed response to the reduced acidic deposition, and showed a decrease in the 2000s (-5.54 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)) and the whole period (-0.49 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)). No significant trend of stream nitrate+nitrite and chloride was observed. Stream alkalinity increased in the 1990s (+23.33 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)) and the whole period (+7.26 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)). Stream hydrogen ions decreased in the 1990s (-0.002 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)), 2000s (-0.001 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)), and the whole period (-0.001 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)). Compared with most acidic streams and lakes in the United States and Europe, a lower decreasing rate of hydrogen ions and higher increasing rate of alkalinity were observed in the alkaline West Virginian streams in the 1990s. However, due to their initial negative or zero alkalinity values, those acidic streams showed a higher percent increase in alkalinity than that in the alkaline West Virginian streams (from 800 microeq L(-1) yr(-1) to 1200 microeq L(-1) yr(-1)). Total aluminum in the West Virginian streams decreased in the 1990s (-0.67 micromol L(-1) yr(-1)) and the whole period (-0.22 micromol L(-1) yr(-1)). The current study advanced our understanding of streams' responses to the reduced acidic deposition in the Mid-Appalachians since the passage of the 1970 and 1990 Amendments to the United States Clean Air Act (US CAAA). PMID:19073337

  1. Removal of plutonium and Americium from hydrochloric acid waste streams using extraction chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, L.D.; FitzPatrick, J.R.; Salazar, R.R.; Schake, B.S.; Martinez, B.T.

    1995-01-01

    Extraction chromatography is under development as a method to lower actinide activity levels in hydrochloric acid (HCl) effluent streams. Successful application of this technique for radioactive liquid waste treatment would provide a low activity feedstream for HCl recycle, reduce the loss of radioactivity to the environment in aqueous effluents, and lower the quantity and improve the form of solid waste generated. The extraction of plutonium and americium from HCl solutions was examined for several commercial and laboratory-produced sorbed resin materials. Polymer beads were coated with n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl- methylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and either tributyl phosphate (TBP), or diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP). Distribution coefficients for Pu and Am were measured by contact studies in 1-10 M HCl, while varying REDOX conditions, actinide loading levels, and resin formulations. Flow experiments were run to evaluate actinide loading and elution under varied conditions. Significant differences in the actinide distribution coefficients in contact experiments, and in actinide retention in flow experiments were observed as a function of resin formulation.

  2. A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii

    2008-12-15

    A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

  3. Response of macroinvertebrate communities to remediation-simulating conditions in Pennsylvania streams influenced by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Long, E.S.; Dropkin, D.S.

    2008-01-01

    We compared naturally alkaline streams with limestone lithology to freestone streams with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) to predict benthic macroinvertebrate community recovery from AMD in limestone-treated watersheds. Surrogate-recovered (limestone) and, in many cases, freestone systems had significantly higher macroinvertebrate densities; diversity; taxa richness; Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa; EPT/chironomid ratios; scraper/collector - gatherer ratios; herbivores; collector - filterers; and scrapers. AMD-influenced systems had significantly greater numbers of Diptera and collector - gatherers. An entire trophic level (herbivores) was 'restored' in surrogate-recovered streams, which also showed greater trophic specialization. Indicator analysis identified seven taxa (within Crustacea, Diptera, Nematoda, Trichoptera, and Ephemeroptera) as significant indicators of limestone systems and six taxa (within Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Tricoptera, Coleoptera, and Mollusca) as significant freestone indicators, all useful as biological indicators of recovery from AMD. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  4. Interactions between greenhouse gas policies and acid rain control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.E.; Kane, R.L.; Mansueti, L.

    1997-12-31

    Conventional wisdom and much of the public policy debate have usually drawn a clean delineation between acid rain issues and global warming concerns. This traditional approach of evaluating one policy at a time is too simplistic to serve as a framework for electric utilities making major capital investment and fuel procurement decisions to comply with various environmental requirements. Potential Climate change regulation can affect acid rain compliance decisions, and acid rain compliance decisions will affect future GHG emissions. This paper explores two categories of linkages between these different environmental issues. First, the assumptions one makes regarding future climate change policies can have a profound impact on the economic attractiveness of various acid rain compliance strategies. Second, decisions regarding acid rain compliance strategy can have greenhouse gas implications that might prove more or less difficult to address in future climate change legislation.

  5. ALMA FOLLOWS STREAMING OF DENSE GAS DOWN TO 40 pc FROM THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi, Kambiz; Pinol-Ferrer, Nuria; Lundgren, Andreas A.; Wiklind, Tommy; Kohno, Kotaro; Izumi, Takuma; Martin, Sergio; Espada, Daniel; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Sheth, Kartik; Turner, Jean; Van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-06-20

    We present a kinematic analysis of the dense molecular gas in the central 200 pc of the nearby galaxy NGC 1097, based on Cycle 0 observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use the HCN(4-3) line to trace the densest interstellar molecular gas (n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}), and quantify its kinematics, and estimate an inflow rate for the molecular gas. We find a striking similarity between the ALMA kinematic data and the analytic spiral inflow model that we have previously constructed based on ionized gas velocity fields on larger scales. We are able to follow dense gas streaming down to 40 pc distance from the supermassive black hole in this Seyfert 1 galaxy. In order to fulfill marginal stability, we deduce that the dense gas is confined to a very thin disk, and we derive a dense gas inflow rate of 0.09 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} at 40 pc radius. Combined with previous values from the H{alpha} and CO gas, we calculate a combined molecular and ionized gas inflow rate of {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} at 40 pc distance from the central supermassive black hole of NGC 1097.

  6. Analysis of survey data on the chemistry of twenty-three streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed: some implications of the impact of acid deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Janicki, A.; Cummins, R.

    1983-12-01

    A survey of the chemistry of 23 streams within the Chesapeake Bay watershed was conducted in the spring of 1983 to determine whether a potential for changes in water chemistry due to atmospheric inputs of acidic materials exists in any of these streams. Sampling was conducted weekly through the months of March and April. Three streams were identified as being likely affected by acid inputs due to relatively high H(+) and SO4(-2) concentrations and low alkalinities: Stockett's Run, Lyons Creek, and Muddy Creek. Elevated dissolved aluminum concentrations were observed in some Eastern Shore streams and are likely related to the predominance of clay soils in their watersheds.

  7. Growth and reproductive ecology of the eastern brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, in streams of differing vulnerability to acidic atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Light, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Three naturally infertile streams of differing vulnerability to acidic atmospheric deposition were studied to determine the status of their brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, populations and associated benthic communities. Of the three streams, Upper Three Runs was judged to be the least fertile, followed by Little Fishing Creek, with Roaring Run being the most fertile. The median weighted pH of acidic deposition impacting the watersheds was 3.8 for Upper Three Runs and 4.0 for Little Fishing Creek and Roaring Run. Brook trout from Roaring Run grew at a similar rate to those from Little Fishing Creek, with trout from Upper Three Runs showing the slowest growth. Roaring Run brook trout also had the highest relative condition of the three streams. Brook trout from Roaring Run and Little Fishing Creek generally matured one year later (age group II) than those from Upper Three Runs. Early maturity may be selected for in Upper Three Runs due to small annual increases in fecundity in higher age groups. Although the data were limited, there was a trend for brook trout from Upper Three Runs to produce fewer and larger ova. Roaring Run had higher volumes of benthos during fall and summer, and higher numbers during fall. Roaring Run and Little Fishing Creek had more, larger crayfish present, which added significantly to the volume of benthos in these streams. Qualitatively, Upper Three Runs had more shredders and fewer scrapers on a volume basis than the other two streams. On a per fish basis, the drift available to the fish in Roaring Run was always highest in volume, and highest in number during fall and spring. The brook trout from Roaring Run therefore had an advantage over those in the other two streams, by having a higher drift available per fish.

  8. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  9. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

  10. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1988-04-12

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

  11. Gas Generation and Hold-Up in Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Process Streams Containing Anti-Foam Agent (AFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2007-06-29

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify defense wastes stored at the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries that exhibit non-Newtonian rheological behavior. Such streams can accumulate hazardous quantities of thermally and radiolytically generated flammable gases. Experiments were performed in a bubble column to measure gas hold-up under various conditions to better understand flammable gas behavior in WTP processes. The two non-Newtonian slurries tested were kaolin-bentonite clay and a chemical surrogate of pretreated high-level waste (HLW) from Hanford Tank AZ-101. The addition of solutes, whether a salt or anti-foaming agent (AFA) decrease the bubble coalescence rate leading to smaller bubbles, lower bubble rise velocity and higher gas holdup. Gas holdup decreased with increasing yield stress and consistency. The impact of AFA on gas holdup in kaolin-bentonite clay was less than in simulated HLW, presumably because the AFA adsorbed onto the clay particles, rendering it unavailable to retard coalescence.

  12. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFs) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. APF operations have also been limited by the strength and durability of the ceramic materials that have served as barrier filters for the capture of entrained HGCU ashes. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analyses of ceramic filter elements currently used in operating APFs and the characterization and evaluation of new ceramic materials. Task 1 research activities during the past quarter included characterizations of samples collected during a site visit on January 20 to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Comparisons were made between laboratory analyses of these PSDF ashes and field data obtained from facility operation. In addition, selected laboratory techniques were reviewed to assess their reproducibility and the influence of non-ideal effects and differences between laboratory and filter conditions on the quantities measured. Further work on the HGCU data base is planned for the next quarter. Two Dupont PRD-66 candle filters, one McDermott candle filter, one Blasch candle filter, and one Specific Surfaces candle filter were received at SRI for testing. A test plan and cutting plan for these candles was developed. Acquisition of two of the Dupont PRD-66 candle filters will allow candle-to-candle variability to be examined.

  13. Aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in American dippers (Cinclus mexicanus) from a metal-impacted stream.

    PubMed

    Strom, Sean M; Ramsdell, Howard S; Archuleta, Andrew S

    2002-01-01

    Blood samples collected from adult and nestling American dippers (Cinclus mexicanus) along the Arkansas River (CO, USA), a stream impacted by discharges from historical mining operations, and a reference stream were analyzed for lead concentration and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity. Median ALAD activities of adult and nestling dippers from the Arkansas River were found to be significantly different from median ALAD activities of reference adults and nestlings (p = 0.002 and p = 0.028). Median ALAD activity for adult dippers from the Arkansas River was more than 50% lower relative to reference adults and activity approached a level close to 50% lower in nestlings from the same site. Median blood lead concentrations from adult (range 15.4-386.0 ppb) and nestling (range 12.1-323.0 ppb) dippers from the Arkansas River were found to be significantly different from median blood lead concentrations of reference adult (range 4.2-29.6 ppb) and nestling (range 4.2-8.2 ppb) dippers (p < 0.001 and p = 0.011). The median hematocrit level in adult dippers did not vary between sites (p = 0.73), whereas the median hematocrit level of nestling dippers from the reference site was significantly lower compared to Arkansas River nestlings (p = 0.042). Blood lead concentration in both adult and nestling dippers was found to be significantly correlated with invertebrate lead concentration (r = 0.81, p < 0.001 and r = 0.62, p = 0.01, respectively). Highly significant negative correlations were observed between blood lead concentration and ALAD activity in both adult and nestling dippers (r = -0.86, p < 0.001 and r = -0.84, p < 0.001, respectively). This study suggests that dippers (both adults and nestlings) from the Arkansas River have significantly lower ALAD activity and significantly higher blood lead concentrations compared to reference values. The measurement of ALAD activity may be a sensitive and accurate biomarker for environmental lead exposure in dippers

  14. Substituent effects on the gas-phase acidity of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Volk, D.E. ); Gano, D.R. )

    1989-12-20

    In a previous paper, the gas-phase acidities of XH{sub n} compounds (X = C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl) were predicted with ab initio wave functions. At the MP4{sup 2} level of theory with extended basis sets acidities for these species were determined to be within 2 kcal/mol of experimental value. In the present work, with 6-31G(d) geometries and full MP4/MC-311++G{sup 6}(3df,2pd) energies, the effects of CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, OH, F, SiH{sub 3}, PH{sub 2}, SH, and Cl on the gas-phase acidity of silane are examined. Only a few related calculations have been carried out. All calculations were performed with Gaussian86, and all structures were verified as minima by diagonalizing the analytically determined hessians. Only the valence electrons were correlated in the perturbation theory calculations.

  15. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues: Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.

    1996-12-09

    This is the eighth in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic barrier filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task I during the past quarter, additional analyses were performed on ashes from the Ahlstrom 10 MWt Pressurized Fluidized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) facility located at Karhula, Finland. Work continued on the HGCU data base being constructed in Microsoft Access. A variety of information has been entered into the data base, including numerical values, short or long text entries, and photographs. Detailed design of a bench top device for high temperature measurement of ash permeability has also begun. In addition to these activities, a paper was prepared and a poster was presented summarizing recent work performed under this contract at the 1996 DOE/METC Contractor`s Conference. A presentation was also given corresponding to the manuscript entitled Particle Characteristics and High-Temperature Filtration that was prepared for publication in the Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference held this September in Pittsburgh, PA. Arrangements have been made to be present at the DOE/METC Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) at the conclusion of the next run of the DOE/METC air blown Fluid Bed Gasifier (FBG). This visit will include on-site sampling to collect and characterize the filter cakes collected during FGB operation. Task 2 efforts during the past quarter focused on

  16. Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

    2014-07-08

    The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

  17. CHEMISTRY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND ORGANIC ACIDS IN TWO STREAMS DRAINING FORESTED WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration, major fractions, and contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOG) to stream chemistry were examined in two paired streams draining upland catchments in eastern Maine. oncentrations of DOC in East and West Bear Brooks were 183 +/- 73 and 169 +/- 70 umol CL-1 (...

  18. The effects of acidic deposition on streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont region of the mid-Atlantic United States

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufman, P.R. ); Church, M.R.; Wigington, P.J. Jr. ); Webb, J.R. ); Sale, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the US. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small (<20 km[sup 2]), upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. In the subpopulation in the mid-Appalachian area, data from various local surveys show that 6-27% of the streams are acidic, and about 25-50% have ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. After excluding streams with acid mine drainage, National Stream Survey estimates for the whole region show that there are 2330 km of acidic streams and 7500 km of streams with ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. Many of the streams with base flow ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1] become acidic during storm or snowmelt episodes. Sulfate from atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of strong acid anions in acid mid-Appalachian streams. Their low pH (median, 4.9) and high levels of inorganic monomeric aluminum (median, 129 [mu]g L[sup [minus]1]) leached through soils by acidic deposition are causing damage to aquatic biota. Quantification of the extent of biological effects, however, is not possible with available data. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated sulfur deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. Sulfur retention is likely to decrease in the future, resulting in further losses of stream ANC. 70 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Effects of gas stream temperature on homogeneous SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} conversion via natural gas reburning

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, D.J.; Khan, A.R.

    1998-07-01

    Because SO{sub 3} is more reactive than SO{sub 2}, applications for localized increases of SO{sub 3} concentrations in coal-fired power generation include lowering fly ash resistivity and improved performance of dry scrubbing systems to removal sulfur gas. Homogeneous superequilibrium of SO{sub 3} forms when SO{sub 2} passes through a flame in the presence of excess O{sub 2}. While this superequilibrium condition has been studied, little data exist about the effects of free stream gas temperature (as opposed to flame temperature) on this process. A pre-mixed methane flame was used to promote the conversion of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} in a drop tube furnace with free stream gas temperatures from 450--1,000K. Experimental results form solid sampling and SO{sub 2}/SO{sub 3} measurements via wet chemistry coupled with numeric modeling of reactions and species concentrations indicate that a lower free stream temperature reduces the maximum conversion of SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} and considerably extends the duration of the super-equilibrium state. Results also indicate that the homogeneous enhancement of sulfur reactivity and increased duration of superequilibrium may increase sulfur capture by dry sorbents.

  20. Gas phase acidity measurement of local acidic groups in multifunctional species: controlling the binding sites in hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Andres; Baer, Tomas; Chana, Antonio; González, Javier; Dávalos, Juan Z

    2013-07-01

    The applicability of the extended kinetic method (EKM) to determine the gas phase acidities (GA) of different deprotonable groups within the same molecule was tested by measuring the acidities of cinnamic, coumaric, and caffeic acids. These molecules differ not only in the number of acidic groups but in their nature, intramolecular distances, and calculated GAs. In order to determine independently the GA of groups within the same molecule using the EKM, it is necessary to selectively prepare pure forms of the hydrogen-bound heterodimer. In this work, the selectivity was achieved by the use of solvents of different vapor pressure (water and acetonitrile), as well as by variation of the drying temperature in the ESI source, which affected the production of heterodimers with different solvation energies and gas-phase dissociation energies. A particularly surprising finding is that the calculated solvation enthalpies of water and the aprotic acetonitrile are essentially identical, and that the different gas-phase products generated are apparently the result of their different vapor pressures, which affects the drying mechanism. This approach for the selective preparation of heterodimers, which is based on the energetics, appears to be quite general and should prove useful for other studies that require the selective production of heterodimers in ESI sources. The experimental results were supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of both gas-phase and solvated species. The experimental thermochemical parameters (deprotonation ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) are in good agreement with the calculated values for the monofunctional cinnamic acid, as well as the multifunctional coumaric and caffeic acids. The measured GA for cinnamic acid is 334.5 ± 2.0 kcal/mol. The measured acidities for the COOH and OH groups of coumaric and caffeic acids are 332.7 ± 2.0, 318.7 ± 2.1, 332.2 ± 2.0, and 317.3 ± 2.2 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:23799241

  1. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  2. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation

  3. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  4. Adipic gets the acid test as flue gas scrubber additive

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, I.R.

    1980-02-11

    The first full-scale demonstration of adipic acid for such use, to be conducted early in the summer of 1980 in a 200 MW power plant burning high-sulfur coal, is designed to clarify the costs and show how to reduce losses of adipic acid via degradation. Adipic acid improves SO/sub 2/ removal by acting as a buffer to limit the pH drop normally occurring at the gas-liquid interface so that the higher SO/sub 2/ concentration in the surface film improves liquid-phase mass transfer; it also promotes higher limestone utilization. Prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority, a preliminary economic analysis for a 500 MW plant burning 4% sulfur coal indicates that the addition of 1500 ppM of adipic acid (limestone at $7/ton and the acid at $840/ton) would raise SO/sub 2/ removal from 90 to 95%, reduce the total capital investment from $41.5 to $39.5 million, and have a first year revenue requirement of $19.9 million vs. $20.9 million without the acid. The large-scale trial will also help clarify concern over unpleasant odors that have been reported at test sites of the limestone/adipic system; valeric acid has been identified as the cause.

  5. The effects of riparian forestry on invertebrate drift and brown trout in upland streams of contrasting acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, S. J.; Jones, M. E.; Jones, M. C.; Phillips, D. R.

    Variations in macroinvertebrate drift and benthic invertebrate abundance were assessed in 30 upland Welsh streams of varying acidity (pH < 5.7 or pH.> 6.0) and riparian land-use (conifer, moorland or native broadleaf). The consequences for the diet and condition of wild brown trout Salmo trutta were also assessed. As expected from previous studies, there were significant reductions in benthic invertebrate abundance, aquatic drift density (by >60%), aquatic drift biomass (by >35%), total drift density (by >35%) and total drift biomass (by >20%) at acid sites by comparison with circumneutral sites due largely to the scarcity of mayflies. Absolute drift from terrestrial sources was unrelated to stream pH but formed a significantly greater proportion of total drift at acid sites (30-65% of density) than at circumneutral sites (20-40%) as aquatic contributions declined. Most of this apparent land use effect reflected significantly increased terrestrial drift under broadleaves. There was no significant reduction in terrestrial or aquatic drift at conifer forest sites per se after accounting for low pH. Trout diet varied substantially between locations partly reflecting variations in drift: significantly fewer mayflies and stoneflies were eaten at acid sites, and significantly more terrestrial prey were eaten under broadleaves. However, acidity did not reduce trout condition or gut-fullness. Unexpectedly, trout condition was significantly enhanced at conifer sites, irrespective of their pH. Hence, acidity has greater effects on the benthic abundance and drift density of invertebrates in upland streams than does riparian land use. However, trout forage flexibly enough to offset any possible food deficit, for example by switching to chironomids and terrestrial invertebrates. Enhanced terrestrial contributions to invertebrate drift from riparian broadleaf trees may be important in supplementing foraging opportunities for trout where aquatic prey are scarce. These data

  6. Changes in stream chemistry and biology in response to reduced levels of acid deposition during 1987-2003 in the Neversink River Basin, Catskill Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bode, R.W.; Passy, S.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric acid deposition has decreased in the northeastern United States since the 1970s, resulting in modest increases in pH, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), and decreases in inorganic monomeric aluminum (AlIM) concentrations since stream chemistry monitoring began in the 1980s in the acid-sensitive upper Neversink River basin in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Stream pH has increased by 0.01 units/year during 1987-2003 at three sites in the Neversink basin as determined by Seasonal Kendall trend analysis. In light of this observed decrease in stream acidity, we sampled 12 stream sites within the Neversink River watershed for water chemistry, macroinvertebrates, fish, and periphytic diatoms in 2003 to compare with a similar data set collected in 1987. Metrics and indices that reflect sensitivity to stream acidity were developed with these biological data to determine whether changes in stream biota over the intervening 16 years parallel those of stream chemistry. Statistical comparisons of data on stream chemistry and an acid biological assessment profile (Acid BAP) derived from invertebrate data showed no significant differences between the two years. For pH and ANC, however, values in 2003 were generally lower than those in 1987; this difference likely resulted from higher streamflow in summer 2003. Despite these likely flow-induced changes in summer 2003, an ordination and cluster analysis of macroinvertebrate taxa based on the Acid BAP indicated that the most acidic sites in the upstream half of the East Branch Neversink River form a statistically significant separate cluster consistent with less acidic stream conditions. This analysis is consistent with limited recovery of invertebrate species in the most acidic reaches of the river, but will require additional improvement in stream chemistry before a stronger conclusion can be drawn. Data on the fish and periphytic diatom communities in 2003 indicate that slimy sculpin had not extended their habitat

  7. Prospecting for zones of contaminated ground-water discharge to streams using bottom-sediment gas bubbles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    1991-01-01

    Decomposition of organic-rich bottom sediment in a tidal creek in Maryland results in production of gas bubbles in the bottom sediment during summer and fall. In areas where volatile organic contaminants discharge from ground water, through the bottom sediment, and into the creek, part of the volatile contamination diffuses into the gas bubbles and is released to the atmosphere by ebullition. Collection and analysis of gas bubbles for their volatile organic contaminant content indicate that relative concentrations of the volatile organic contaminants in the gas bubbles are substantially higher in areas where the same contaminants occur in the ground water that discharges to the streams. Analyses of the bubbles located an area of previously unknown ground-water contamination. The method developed for this study consisted of disturbing the bottom sediment to release gas bubbles, and then capturing the bubbles in a polyethylene bag at the water-column surface. The captured gas was transferred either into sealable polyethylene bags for immediate analysis with a photoionization detector or by syringe to glass tubes containing wires coated with an activated-carbon adsorbent. Relative concentrations were determined by mass spectral analysis for chloroform and trichloroethylene.

  8. pH dependence of iron photoreduction in a rocky mountain stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Kimball, B.A.; Runkel, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The redox speciation of dissolved iron and the transport of iron in acidic, metal-enriched streams is controlled by precipitation and dissolution of iron hydroxides, by photoreduction of dissolved ferric iron and hydrous iron oxides, and by oxidation of the resulting dissolved ferrous iron. We examined the pH dependence of these processes in an acidic mine-drainage stream, St Kevin Gulch, Colorado, by experimentally increasing the pH of the stream from about 4.0 to 6.5 and following the downstream changes in iron species. We used a solute transport model with variable flow to evaluate biogeochemical processes controlling downstream transport. We found that at pH 6.4 there was a rapid and large initial loss of ferrous iron concurrent with the precipitation of aluminium hydroxide. Below this reach, ferrous iron was conservative during the morning but there was a net downstream loss of ferrous iron around noon and in the afternoon. Calculation of net oxidation rates shows that the noontime loss rate was generally much faster than rates for the ferrous iron oxidation at pH 6 predicted by Singer and Stumm (1970. Science 167: 1121). The maintenance of ferrous iron concentrations in the morning is explained by the photoreduction of photoreactive ferric species, which are then depleted by noon. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. pH dependence of iron photoreduction in a rocky mountain stream affected by acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Diane M.; Kimball, Briant A.; Runkel, Robert L.

    2001-07-01

    The redox speciation of dissolved iron and the transport of iron in acidic, metal-enriched streams is controlled by precipitation and dissolution of iron hydroxides, by photoreduction of dissolved ferric iron and hydrous iron oxides, and by oxidation of the resulting dissolved ferrous iron. We examined the pH dependence of these processes in an acidic mine-drainage stream, St Kevin Gulch, Colorado, by experimentally increasing the pH of the stream from about 4·0 to 6·5 and following the downstream changes in iron species. We used a solute transport model with variable flow to evaluate biogeochemical processes controlling downstream transport. We found that at pH 6·4 there was a rapid and large initial loss of ferrous iron concurrent with the precipitation of aluminium hydroxide. Below this reach, ferrous iron was conservative during the morning but there was a net downstream loss of ferrous iron around noon and in the afternoon. Calculation of net oxidation rates shows that the noontime loss rate was generally much faster than rates for the ferrous iron oxidation at pH 6 predicted by Singer and Stumm (1970. Science 167: 1121). The maintenance of ferrous iron concentrations in the morning is explained by the photoreduction of photoreactive ferric species, which are then depleted by noon.

  10. Climate change and increased zinc concentrations in a Rocky Mountain acid rock drainage stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, C. M.; Todd, A. S.; McKnight, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Snake River Watershed in Colorado is impacted by acid rock drainage (ARD) originating from both natural sources and sources associated with the historic mining in the watershed. Downstream of mines, the high metal ion concentrations, low pH, and metal oxide deposition cause contamination which disrupts ecosystem functions, impairs biological diversity, and contaminates surface and groundwater drinking supplies. One obvious measure of the severity of this contamination is that the self-sustaining trout populations in the watershed are quite sparse. While elevated concentrations of numerous trace metals are present, dissolved zinc is used as an indicator of trout habitat water quality because the fish are so impacted by its presence. Water quality was monitored along the Snake River from 1980 to 1990 and since then less frequent sampling was conducted as part of research studies and efforts to designate portions of the watershed for mitigation. Metals concentrations during the seasonal low flows of September and October have been observed to increase significantly over that time. In particular, at a site in the headwaters well above the historic mining impacts, zinc concentrations, which were measured between 0.3 and 0.4 mg/L through the 1980s, have now exceeded 1.2 mg/L in the past several years. This four-fold increase in zinc concentrations is associated with an increase in sulfate concentrations, which indicates that these water quality changes are driven primarily by accelerated natural weathering of pyrite in the watershed. The observed increase in natural ARD - possibly the result of climate change - may have implications for mitigation. Currently, these trends are being evaluated by reanalyzing the archived samples to delineate the spatial and temporal changes in contamination. Processes which may be driving the accelerated natural weathering include the earlier occurrence of peak snowmelt due to climate change which causes lower stream flows and drier

  11. Catalysts, systems and methods to reduce NOX in an exhaust gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Castellano, Christopher R.; Moini, Ahmad; Koermer, Gerald S.; Furbeck, Howard

    2010-07-20

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having an SCR catalyst comprising silver tungstate on an alumina support. The emissions treatment system may be used for the treatment of exhaust streams from diesel engines and lean burn gasoline engines. An emissions treatment system may further comprise an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reducing agent upstream of the catalyst.

  12. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  13. Chemical and biological status of lakes and streams in the upper midwest: assessment of acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Eilers, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest - northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan - have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. Northcentral Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan together contain about 150-300 acidic lakes (ANC ≤ 0), whereas none have been found in Minnesota. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, Clearwater seepage lakes having small surface area, shallow depth, and low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. The spatial distribution of these acidic lakes parallels a west to east gradient of increasing sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition. Several of these acidic lakes exhibit chemical characteristics and biological changes consistent with those observed elsewhere in waters reported to be acidified by acidic deposition. However, an hypothesis of recent lake acidification is not supported by analyses of either historical chemical data or diatom remains in lake sediments, and natural sources of acidity and alternative ecological processes have not been conclusively eliminated as causative factors. Streams in this three-state region have high ANC and appear to be insensitive to acidic deposition. The species richness and composition of lacustrine fish communities in the region are partly related to pH and associated chemical factors. Sport fishes considered acid-sensitive and of primary concern with regard to acidification include walleye, smallmouth bass, and black crappie. The fishery in at least one lake, Morgan Lake in Wisconsin (pH 4.6), may have declined because of acidification. Given the general lack of quantitative fishery data for acidic Wisconsin and Michigan lakes, however, more general conclusions concerning impacts or the absence of impacts of acidification on the region's fishery resources are not possible.

  14. Metal toxicity inferred from algal population density, heterotrophic substrate use, and fatty acid profile in a small stream

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.; Lehman, R.M.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relations between metal concentrations in periphyton and the abundance of algal species, heterotrophic use of 95 carbon sources, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) of the periphyton in a small stream spanning a mine in Lemhi County, Idaho, USA. Two upstream two mine, and two downstream sites were examined. Elevated concentrations of As and Cu at the mine sites were associated with communities that were depleted of diatoms and filamentous blue-green algae and characterized by a low-diversity community dominated by a single blue-green alga and patchy populations of the diatom Achnanthidium minutissimum and a filamentous green alga. Carbon source use and PLFA profiles provided a rapid assessment of stream conditions that were consistent with algal taxonomy and with the hypotheses constructed from previous reports on periphyton responses to metal stress.

  15. Process for producing and recovering elemental sulfur from acid gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. L.

    1985-03-26

    A system and process produce high actual levels of sulfur recovery from acid gas. The system includes two conventional Claus reactors and two cold bed adsorption (CBA) reactors. Four condensers are provided, one disposed before each of the catalytic reactors, and one disposed after the CBA reactor. The system includes a gas clean-up treatment zone for hydrogenation, drying and oxidation of gas to provide stoichiometric ratio of H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/. The gas is passed through the clean-up treatment zone prior to being fed to the first of the CBA reactors. The system is designed to operate either in a recovery mode or in a regeneration mode. In the recovery mode, the reactors are in series and the CBA reactors are operated below dew point of sulfur. In regeneration mode, effluent from the clean-up treatment zone is heated in a heat exchanger using effluent from the first catalytic reactor as the heat source. The resulting regeneration gas is fed to one of the two CBA reactors to vaporize sulfur and regenerate the catalyst. The vaporized sulfur is recovered in the condenser. The effluent from the condenser is passed to the other CBA reactor which is operated in the recovery mode during regeneration.

  16. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  17. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN MORDENITE SORBENT FOR THE CAPTURE OF KRYPTON FROM USED NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING OFF-GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

    2014-04-01

    A novel new sorbent for the separation of krypton from off-gas streams resulting from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel has been developed and evaluated. A hydrogen mordenite powder was successfully incorporated into a macroporous polymer binder and formed into spherical beads. The engineered form sorbent retained the characteristic surface area and microporosity indicative of mordenite powder. The sorbent was evaluated for krypton adsorption capacities utilizing thermal swing operations achieving capacities of 100 mmol of krypton per kilogram of sorbent at a temperature of 191 K. A krypton adsorption isotherm was also obtained at 191 K with varying krypton feed gas concentrations. Adsorption/desorption cycling effects were also evaluated with results indicating that the sorbent experienced no decrease in krypton capacity throughout testing.

  19. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-09-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO{2/-} anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional γ or δ unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond π electrons during NO{2/-} rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples.

  20. Deformation and breakup of liquid drops in a gas stream at nearly critical Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzba, A.

    1990-04-01

    Experimentally determined values of the critical Weber number available from the literature are scattered over a very wide range of W(e)sub c from 2.2 to 99.6. To study one possible source of these discrepancies an experimental investigation was made of the deformation and breakup of water droplets at nearly critical Weber numbers. Experiments were conducted in a small horizontal wind tunnel. A continuous stream of uniform water droplets was allowed to fall perpendicularly to the continuous stream of air. The time histories of water droplets were recorded by using a high-speed camera. Five different basic behaviors of water droplets were recorded in the range of W(e) = 11 to 14. It was found that an increase in the Weber number in this region resulted in an increased percentage of droplets with regular bag type breakup.

  1. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Castellano, Christopher R.; Moini, Ahmad; Koermer, Gerald S.; Furbeck, Howard; Schmieg, Steven J.; Blint, Richard J.

    2011-05-17

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver and a platinum group metal on a particulate alumina support, the atomic fraction of the platinum group metal being less than or equal to about 0.25. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which silver is impregnated on alumina particles.

  2. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Koermer, Gerald S.; Moini, Ahmad; Furbeck, Howard; Castellano, Christopher R.

    2012-05-08

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver on a particulate alumina support, the silver having a diameter of less than about 20 nm. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which ionic silver is impregnated on particulate hydroxylated alumina particles.

  3. Water quality changes in acid mine drainage streams in Gangneung, Korea, 10 years after treatment with limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Moo Joon; Choi, Byoung Young; Lee, Giehyeon; Hwang, Yun Ho; Yang, Jung-Seok; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Kwon, Man Jae

    2015-12-01

    To determine the long-term effectiveness of the limestone treatment for acid mine drainage (AMD) in Gangneung, Korea, we investigated the elemental distribution in streams impacted by AMD and compared the results of previous studies before and approximately 10 years after the addition of limestone. Addition of limestone in 1999 leads to a pH increase in 2008, and with the exception of Ca, the elemental concentrations (e.g., Fe, Mn, Mg, Sr, Ni, Zn, S) in the streams decreased. The pH was 2.5–3 before the addition of limestone and remained stable at around 4.5–5 from 2008 to 2011, suggesting the reactivity of the added limestone was diminished and that an alternative approach is needed to increase the pH up to circumneutral range and maintain effective long-term treatment. To identify the processes causing the decrease in the elemental concentrations, we also examined the spatial (approximately 7 km) distribution over three different types of streams affected by the AMD. The elemental distribution was mainly controlled by physicochemical processes including redox reactions, dilution on mixing, and co-precipitation/adsorption with Fe (hydr)oxides.

  4. Biological removal of methanethiol from gas and water streams by using Thiobacillus thioparus: investigation of biodegradability and optimization of sulphur production.

    PubMed

    Badr, Kiumars; Bahmania, Mahmoud; Jahanmiri, Abdolhossein; Mowla, Dariush

    2014-08-01

    The present work mainly deals with biological oxidation, which was tested using the bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus in semi-batch bioreactor systems to evaluate the removal efficiencies and optimal conditions for the biodegradation of methanethiol (MT) in order to treat the natural gas and refinery output streams. The efficiency of this method is analysed by evaluating the concentration of MT in a bioreactor. The effect of operational parameters, such as initial concentration of MT, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), initial concentration of bacteria and reaction time on the degradation of MT, were studied. In this process, MT is converted into elemental sulphur particles as an intermediate in the oxidation process of MT to sulphate. The obtained results showed that the highest degradation rate occurred during the first 300 minutes of reaction time. The optimal conditions of the different initial MT concentrations with 0.3-0.6 bacteria OD, DO of 0.5 ppm, acidic pH value of 6.2 and temperature of 300C are obtained. Acidic pH and oxygen-limiting conditions were applied to obtain 80-85% selectivity for elemental sulphur formation in products. Under the optimal conditions, and for the highest (8.51 mM) and the lowest (0.53 mM) concentration of MT, the biological removal was about 89% and 94%, respectively. PMID:24956764

  5. Toxicological and chemical characterization of the process stream materials and gas combustion products of an experimental low-Btu coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hanson, R.L.; Royer, R.E.; Clark, C.R.; Henderson, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    The process gas stream of an experimental pressurized McDowell-Wellman stirred-bed low-Btu coal gasifier, and combustion products of the clean gas were characterized as to their mutagenic properties and chemical composition. Samples of aerosol droplets condensed from the gas were obtained at selected positions along the process stream using a condenser train. Mutagenicity was assessed using the Ames Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay (TA98, with and without rat liver S9). All materials required metabolic activation to be mutagenic. Droplets condensed from gas had a specific mugtagenicity of 6.7 reverants/..mu..g (50,000 revertants/liter of raw gas). Methylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, and nitrogen-containing compounds were positively identified in a highly mutagenic fraction of raw gas condensate. While gas cleanup by the humidifier-tar trap system and Venturi scrubber led to only a small reduction in specific mutagenicity of the cooled process stream material (4.1 revertants/..mu..g), a significant overall reduction in mutagenicity was achieved (to 2200 reverants/liter) due to a substantial reduction in the concentration of material in the gas. By the end of gas cleanup, gas condensates had no detectable mutagenic activity. Condensates of combustion product gas, which contained several polycyclic aromatic compounds, had a specific mutagenicity of 1.1 revertants/..mu..g (4.0 revertants/liter). Results indicate that the process stream material is potentially toxic and that care should be taken to limit exposure of workers to the aerosolized tars emitted in fugitive emissions. Health risks to general population resulting from exposure to gas combustion products are expected to be minimal. 28 references.

  6. [Enantioseparation of 2-phenylcarboxylic acid esters by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xueyan; Liu, Feipeng; Bian, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Chiral 2-arylcarboxylic acid derivatives are important intermediates for preparing 2-arylcarboxylic acids, which are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In order to separate 2-phenylcarboxylic acid ester enantiomers by capillary gas chromatography (CGC), 2, 6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin and 2,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin were used as CGC chiral stationary phases, separately, and their enantioseparation abilities to enantiomers of methyl 2-phenylbutanoate, ethyl 2-phenylbutanoate, isopropyl 2-phenylbutanoate, methyl 2-phenylpropionate and cyclopentyl 2-phenylpropionate were examined. It was found that methyl 2-phenylbutanoate, methyl 2-phenylpropionate and cyclopentyl 2-phenylpropionate were successfully separated by using 2,6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin and 2,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin as CGC chiral stationary phases, respectively. The enantiomer separation abilities of 2, 6-di-O-pentyl-3-O-butyryl-β-cyclodextrin to the three pairs of 2-phenylcarboxylic acid esters tested are superior to those of 2, 6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-heptanoyl-β-cyclodextrin. PMID:27319170

  7. Process and apparatus for separation of components of a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Charles R; Torczynski, John R; Brady, Patrick V; Gallis, Michail; Brooks, Carlton F

    2013-11-19

    A process and apparatus for separating a gas mixture comprising providing a slot in a gas separation channel (conceptualized as a laterally elongated Clusius-Dickel column), having a length through which a net cross-flow of the gas mixture may be established; applying a higher temperature to one side of the channel and a lower temperature on an opposite side of the channel thereby causing thermal-diffusion and buoyant-convection flow to occur in the slot; and establishing a net cross-flow of a gas mixture comprising at least one higher density gas component and at least one lower density gas component along the length of the slot, wherein the cross-flow causes, in combination with the convection flow, a spiraling flow in the slot; and wherein the spiral flow causes an increasing amount of separation of the higher density gas from the lower density gas along the length of the channel. The process may use one or more slots and/or channels.

  8. Process and apparatus for separation of components of a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Charles R.; Torczynski, John R.; Brady, Patrick V.; Gallis, Michail; Brooks, Carlton F.

    2014-06-17

    A process and apparatus for separating a gas mixture comprising providing a slot in a gas separation channel (conceptualized as a laterally elongated Clusius-Dickel column), having a length through which a net cross-flow of the gas mixture may be established; applying a higher temperature to one side of the channel and a lower temperature on an opposite side of the channel thereby causing thermal-diffusion and buoyant-convection flow to occur in the slot; and establishing a net cross-flow of a gas mixture comprising at least one higher density gas component and at least one lower density gas component along the length of the slot, wherein the cross-flow causes, in combination with the convection flow, a spiraling flow in the slot; and wherein the spiral flow causes an increasing amount of separation of the higher density gas from the lower density gas along the length of the channel. The process may use one or more slots and/or channels.

  9. Process and apparatus for separation of components of a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Charles R; Torczynski, John R; Brady, Patrick V; Gallis, Michail; Brooks, Carlton F

    2013-09-17

    A process and apparatus for separating a gas mixture comprising providing a slot in a gas separation channel (conceptualized as a laterally elongated Clusius-Dickel column), having a length through which a net cross-flow of the gas mixture may be established; applying a higher temperature to one side of the channel and a lower temperature on an opposite side of the channel thereby causing thermal-diffusion and buoyant-convection flow to occur in the slot; and establishing a net cross-flow of a gas mixture comprising at least one higher density gas component and at least one lower density gas component along the length of the slot, wherein the cross-flow causes, in combination with the convection flow, a spiraling flow in the slot; and wherein the spiral flow causes an increasing amount of separation of the higher density gas from the lower density gas along the length of the channel. The process may use one or more slots and/or channels.

  10. Potential Flue Gas Impurities in Carbon Dioxide Streams Separated from Coal-fired Power Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    For geological sequestration of CO2 separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This s...

  11. Effects of light and nutrients on periphyton and the fatty acid composition and somatic growth of invertebrate grazers in subtropical streams.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fen; Kainz, Martin J; Sheldon, Fran; Bunn, Stuart E

    2016-06-01

    Algal polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), essential for somatic growth and reproduction of aquatic animals, are influenced by ambient environmental conditions, including light and nutrients. Few studies have addressed the extent to which changes in algal PUFA can influence stream herbivore PUFA profiles and the implications for stream food webs. We manipulated subtropical stream periphyton by applying two light levels (open and shaded canopy) and two nutrient regimes (ambient and enriched) to investigate the response of PUFA and somatic growth in stream herbivores. After 6 weeks, the relative content of periphyton PUFA (%) changed distinctly and differed among treatments. Periphyton in the control treatment with open canopy showed a decline in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) relative to initial conditions, whereas shading increased EPA and total highly unsaturated FA (HUFA), but decreased α-linolenic acid (ALA), linoleic acid and total C18 PUFA. The interaction of open canopy and added nutrients increased periphyton ALA compared with initial conditions, while the combined effects of shading and added nutrients led to greater total HUFA. FA similarity between stream grazers (the mayfly Austrophlebioides and caddisfly Helicopsyche) and periphyton increased with periphyton HUFA content. In addition, the growth of large instars of both grazers also increased in response to increased periphyton HUFA %. Our findings show that environmental changes, associated with riparian canopy and nutrients, can lead to changes in periphyton PUFA composition that in turn affect growth and PUFA composition in stream grazers. PMID:26883960

  12. Use of Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Remedial Options for an Acid Mine Drainage Stream, With Emphasis on Prediction Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkel, R. L.; Kimball, B. A.; Walton-Day, K.; Verplanck, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Mineral Creek, a headwater stream in Southwestern Colorado, drains a sub-alpine watershed with numerous abandoned mines. A synoptic study conducted in 1999 indicates that the Mineral Creek watershed contributes 60% of the observed copper load for the Upper Animas River. In addition, zinc concentrations observed during the 1999 study exceed toxicity standards along the entire length of Mineral Creek. Given these findings, Mineral Creek is the potential site of future remedial actions to improve stream-water quality. Using the 1999 data, a reactive transport model was used to predict the effects of a small treatment system that neutralizes acidic inflow waters. Model application indicates that the treatment system would significantly improve water quality, producing higher pH values and lower dissolved metal concentrations downstream. Despite this progress, the results of model application may be of limited use for planning remediation, due to the potential uncertainty of model predictions (e.g. errors in the characterization of hydrologic and geochemical processes). An additional study was therefore conducted in 2005 to develop estimates of prediction uncertainty. The 2005 study implemented a paired-synoptic approach in which two synoptics were conducted under similar hydrologic conditions. The first synoptic was similar to the 1999 study in that the overall goal was to characterize stream-water quality under existing (acidic) conditions. The second synoptic study was conducted during a continuous sodium hydroxide injection that was designed to mimic a small treatment system. As in the initial model application, data collected under existing conditions (synoptic 1) will be used to calibrate the reactive transport model. Model inputs will then be modified to reflect the effects of treatment, and predictions of post-remediation water quality will be obtained by model application. The results of this application will then be compared to data from the post

  13. [Determination of dimethylbenzoic acid isomers in urine by gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Kostrzewski, P; Wiaderna-Brycht, A; Czerski, B

    1994-01-01

    Trimethylobenzene (TMB) is a main ingredient of many organic solvents used in industry. In Farbasol (Polish trade name of the solvent) TMB occurs as a mixture of three isomers: pseudocumene (1, 2, 4-TMB) 30%; mesitylene (1, 3, 5-TMB) 15%; hemimellitene (1,2,3-TMB) 5%. As it is known in human organism, TMB is metabolized mainly to dimethylbenzoic (DMBA) and dimethylhippuric (DMHA) acids, and some authors suggest, that the acids excreted in urine can be biological indicators of exposure to TMB. This study was aimed at developing the method of determination of DMBA isomers in urine. Biological material was hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide and next extracted with diethyl ether. DMBA concentration in urine was determined by gas chromatography using a variant of quantitative analysis with internal standard (5-methyl-2-isopropylphenol, thymol). Analytical parameters of the developed method of determination of DMBA isomers in urine such as linearity, precision, reproducibility, stability (192 days, when urine samples stored at-18 degrees C), detectability limit (400 micrograms/dm3) have been fully compatible with the requirements of biological monitoring. In order to confirm the presence of DMBA isomers in urine, four volunteers were exposed (8 hours) to Farbasol in toxicological chamber. The TMB concentration in the air, determined by means of gas chromatograph (HP 5890), amounted to 100 mg/m3 (MAC value in Poland). In urine samples collected 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-; 2,6-; 3,4-; 3,5-dimethylbenzoic acids were identified by means of GC/MSD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8170375

  14. Method and apparatus for filtering a stream of gas while drying waste lignocellulosic material

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, G.R.

    1983-09-27

    A method is disclosed for using comminuted lignocellulosic waste material such as flake-like wood and bark chips which have been stored outside includes placing the material in a filter bed by movement in a first direction, and thereafter passing polluted effluent gas from a boiler furnace, for example through said filter bed in a direction generally perpendicular to said first direction to filter pollutants from said effluent gas and simultaneously dry the comminuted lignocellulosic waste material. During drying of the material a portion of the material on the gas outlet side of the filter bed, toward which the effluent gas proceeds, is maintained at a moisture content which is greater than the average moisture content of the lignocellulosic material at the time it is placed into the filter bed. The lignocellulosic waste material is thereafter used as furnace fuel or as a furnace for an industrial process. A filter/dryer apparatus includes a vertically oriented filter bed for holding a quantity of filter material, with downwardly sloping, upwardly convex, horizontally extending louvers on a gas inlet side to retain the filter material. On a gas outlet side, a grid of vertical triangular bars defines a slotted surface to retain the filter material. The grid is reciprocatingly movable up and down and a horizontally movable shuttle is located beneath the filter bed. Means coordinate the movement of the grid and shuttle to move filter material downward through the filter bed of the apparatus.

  15. Effects of acidic precipitation on the water quality of streams in the Laurel Hill area, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, 1983-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, J.L.; Witt, E. C., III

    1990-01-01

    Five headwater streams in the Laurel Hill area in southwestern Pennsylvania were investigated from September 1983 through February 1986 to determine possible effects of acidic precipitation on water quality. Precipitation in the Laurel Hill area is among the most acidic in the Nation, with a mean volume-weighted pH of 4.06. Sulfate is the dominant acid-forming anion, averaging 3.6 milligrams per liter or about 50 kilograms per hectare in wet deposition alone. Nitrate averages about 2 milligrams per liter or 7 kilograms per hectare in the study area. Stream chemistry in the five streams is quite variable and apparently is influenced to a large degree by the bedrock geology and by small amounts of alkaline material in watershed soils. Three of the five streams with no or little acid-neutralizing capacity presently are devoid of fish because of low pH and elevated aluminum concentrations. Aluminum concentrations increase in the other two streams during rainfall and snowmelt despite comparatively higher base flow and acid-neutralizing capacities. Comparison of the chemistry of streamflow during 14 storm events at South Fork Bens Creek and North Fork Bens Creek reveals similar chemical responses when discharge suddenly increases. Concentrations of dissolved metals and sulfate increased during stormflow and snowmelt runoff, whereas concentrations of base cations, silica, and chloride decreased. Nitrate concentrations were not affected by rainfall runoff by tended to increase with snowmelt runoff.

  16. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for control of NO.sub.x emissions in a sulfur-containing gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly

    2015-08-11

    An exhaust gas treatment process, apparatus, and system for reducing the concentration of NOx, CO and hydrocarbons in a gas stream, such as an exhaust stream (29), via selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is provided. The process, apparatus and system include a catalytic bed (32) having a reducing only catalyst portion (34) and a downstream reducing-plus-oxidizing portion (36). Each portion (34, 36) includes an amount of tungsten. The reducing-plus-oxidizing catalyst portion (36) advantageously includes a greater amount of tungsten than the reducing catalyst portion (36) to markedly limit ammonia salt formation.

  17. SOURCES OF ACIDITY IN LAKES AND STREAMS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic surface waters in the United States sampled in the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS) were classified into three groups according to their probable sources of acidity: (1) organic-dominated waters, (2) watershed sulphate-dominated waters, and (3) deposition-dominated wat...

  18. Metagenomic analysis reveals adaptations to a cold-adapted lifestyle in a low-temperature acid mine drainage stream.

    PubMed

    Liljeqvist, Maria; Ossandon, Francisco J; González, Carolina; Rajan, Sukithar; Stell, Adam; Valdes, Jorge; Holmes, David S; Dopson, Mark

    2015-04-01

    An acid mine drainage (pH 2.5-2.7) stream biofilm situated 250 m below ground in the low-temperature (6-10°C) Kristineberg mine, northern Sweden, contained a microbial community equipped for growth at low temperature and acidic pH. Metagenomic sequencing of the biofilm and planktonic fractions identified the most abundant microorganism to be similar to the psychrotolerant acidophile, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans. In addition, metagenome contigs were most similar to other Acidithiobacillus species, an Acidobacteria-like species, and a Gallionellaceae-like species. Analyses of the metagenomes indicated functional characteristics previously characterized as related to growth at low temperature including cold-shock proteins, several pathways for the production of compatible solutes and an anti-freeze protein. In addition, genes were predicted to encode functions related to pH homeostasis and metal resistance related to growth in the acidic metal-containing mine water. Metagenome analyses identified microorganisms capable of nitrogen fixation and exhibiting a primarily autotrophic lifestyle driven by the oxidation of the ferrous iron and inorganic sulfur compounds contained in the sulfidic mine waters. The study identified a low diversity of abundant microorganisms adapted to a low-temperature acidic environment as well as identifying some of the strategies the microorganisms employ to grow in this extreme environment. PMID:25764459

  19. Humic substances and trace metals associated with Fe and Al oxides deposited in an acidic mountain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Wershaw, R. L.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Feder, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrous iron and aluminum oxides are deposited on the streambed in the confluence of the Snake River and Deer Creek, two streams in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The Snake River is acidic and has high concentrations of dissolved Fe and Al. These metals precipitate at the confluence with the pristine, neutral pH, Deer Creek because of the greater pH (4.5-6.0) in the confluence. The composition of the deposited oxides changes consistently with distance downstream, with the most upstream oxide samples having the greatest Fe and organic carbon content. Fulvic acid accounts for most of the organic content of the oxides. Results indicate that streambed oxides in the confluence are not saturated with respect to their capacity to sorb dissolved humic substances from streamwater. The contents of several trace metals (Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni and Co) also decrease with distance downstream and are correlated with both the Fe and organic carbon contents. Strong metal-binding sites associated with the sorbed fulvic acid are more than sufficient to account for the trace metal content of the oxides. Complexation of trace metals by sorbed fulvic acid may explain the observed downstream decrease in trace metal content.

  20. Wastewater disposal from unconventional oil and gas development degrades stream quality at a West Virginia injection facility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akob, Denise M.; Mumford, Adam; Orem, William H.; Engle, Mark A.; Klinges, Julia (Grace); Kent, Douglas B.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) resources has rapidly increased in recent years; however, the environmental impacts and risks are poorly understood. A single well can generate millions of liters of wastewater, representing a mixture of formation brine and injected hydraulic fracturing fluids. One of the most common methods for wastewater disposal is underground injection; we are assessing potential risks of this method through an intensive, interdisciplinary study at an injection disposal facility in West Virginia. In June 2014, waters collected downstream from the site had elevated specific conductance (416 μS/cm) and Na, Cl, Ba, Br, Sr, and Li concentrations, compared to upstream, background waters (conductivity, 74 μS/cm). Elevated TDS, a marker of UOG wastewater, provided an early indication of impacts in the stream. Wastewater inputs are also evident by changes in 87Sr/86Sr in streamwater adjacent to the disposal facility. Sediments downstream from the facility were enriched in Ra and had high bioavailable Fe(III) concentrations relative to upstream sediments. Microbial communities in downstream sediments had lower diversity and shifts in composition. Although the hydrologic pathways were not able to be assessed, these data provide evidence demonstrating that activities at the disposal facility are impacting a nearby stream and altering the biogeochemistry of nearby ecosystems.

  1. Wastewater Disposal from Unconventional Oil and Gas Development Degrades Stream Quality at a West Virginia Injection Facility.

    PubMed

    Akob, Denise M; Mumford, Adam C; Orem, William; Engle, Mark A; Klinges, J Grace; Kent, Douglas B; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M

    2016-06-01

    The development of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) resources has rapidly increased in recent years; however, the environmental impacts and risks are poorly understood. A single well can generate millions of liters of wastewater, representing a mixture of formation brine and injected hydraulic fracturing fluids. One of the most common methods for wastewater disposal is underground injection; we are assessing potential risks of this method through an intensive, interdisciplinary study at an injection disposal facility in West Virginia. In June 2014, waters collected downstream from the site had elevated specific conductance (416 μS/cm) and Na, Cl, Ba, Br, Sr, and Li concentrations, compared to upstream, background waters (conductivity, 74 μS/cm). Elevated TDS, a marker of UOG wastewater, provided an early indication of impacts in the stream. Wastewater inputs are also evident by changes in (87)Sr/(86)Sr in streamwater adjacent to the disposal facility. Sediments downstream from the facility were enriched in Ra and had high bioavailable Fe(III) concentrations relative to upstream sediments. Microbial communities in downstream sediments had lower diversity and shifts in composition. Although the hydrologic pathways were not able to be assessed, these data provide evidence demonstrating that activities at the disposal facility are impacting a nearby stream and altering the biogeochemistry of nearby ecosystems. PMID:27158829

  2. Effect of Remediation in the Chemical Evolution of Waters and Sediments Along Three Streams Impacted by Acid Mine Drainage in Southeast Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The chemical evolution of water and sediment along three streams impacted by acid mine drainage in southeast Ohio have been investigated (Sulphur Run in the Federal Creek watershed, Rock Run in the Monday Creek watershed, and Buffer Run in the Raccoon Creek watershed). Sulphur Run neutralizes acidic inputs naturally due to abundant carbonate lithology surrounding the stream. Rock Run and Buffer Run have been anthropogenically remediated using successive alkalinity producing wetlands (SAPS), open limestone channels, and alkaline capping of adjacent coal refuse piles. Sulphur Run has neutral to alkaline pH (which increases away from the AMD source), relatively low acidity and dissolved metals. It has the best overall water quality. However, sediment quality is poor due to mineral precipitation. At Rock Run and Buffer Run, water quality is poorer and pH is lower. Precipitation of metals is occurring at the SAPS and at the stream channel, but it is less significant due to higher solubility of metals at lower pH. Accumulation of metals in the sediments downstream of the SAPS suggests that metal-based compounds precipitated in the SAPS can be transported from there to the stream. In general, a constant supply of alkaline material (such as in watersheds rich in carbonates) may be more effective at improving water quality than passive treatment methods (e.g. SAPS), but without a means of retaining precipitates, sediment quality will be degraded by accumulation of metals in both, anthropogenically remediated AMD streams as well as in naturally remediated streams.

  3. HST Spatially Resolved Spectra of the Accretion Disc and Gas Stream of the Nova-Like Variable UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baptista, Raymundo; Horne, Keith; Wade, Richard A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Long, Knox S.; Rutten, Rene G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved eclipse spectroscopy of the nova-like variable UX UMa obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Faint Object Spectrograph (HST/FOS) on 1994 August and November is analysed with eclipse mapping techniques to produce spatially resolved spectra of its accretion disk and gas stream as a function of distance from the disk centre. The inner accretion disk is characterized by a blue continuum filled with absorption bands and lines, which cross over to emission with increasing disk radius, similar to that reported at optical wavelengths. The comparison of spatially resolved spectra at different azimuths reveals a significant asymmetry in the disk emission at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, with the disk side closest to the secondary star showing pronounced absorption by an 'iron curtain' and a Balmer jump in absorption. These results suggest the existence of an absorbing ring of cold gas whose density and/or vertical scale increase with disk radius. The spectrum of the infalling gas stream is noticeably different from the disc spectrum at the same radius suggesting that gas overflows through the impact point at the disk rim and continues along the stream trajectory, producing distinct emission down to 0.1 R(sub LI). The spectrum of the uneclipsed light shows prominent emission lines of Lyalpha, N v lambda1241, SiIV Lambda 1400, C IV Lambda 1550, HeII Lambda 1640, and MgII Lambda 2800, and a UV continuum rising towards longer wavelengths. The Balmer jump appears clearly in emission indicating that the uneclipsed light has an important contribution from optically thin gas. The lines and optically thin continuum emission are most probably emitted in a vertically extended disk chromosphere + wind. The radial temperature profiles of the continuum maps are well described by a steady-state disc model in the inner and intermediate disk regions (R greater than or equal to 0.3R(sub LI) ). There is evidence of an increase in the mass accretion rate from August to November

  4. Inferring temperature uniformity from gas composition measurements in a hydrogen combustion-heated hypersonic flow stream

    SciTech Connect

    Olstad, S.J.

    1995-08-01

    The application of a method for determining the temperature of an oxygen-replenished air stream heated to 2600 K by a hydrogen burner is reviewed and discussed. The purpose of the measurements is to determine the spatial uniformity of the temperature in the core flow of a ramjet test facility. The technique involves sampling the product gases at the exit of the test section nozzle to infer the makeup of the reactant gases entering the burner. Knowing also the temperature of the inlet gases and assuming the flow is at chemical equilibrium, the adiabatic flame temperature is determined using an industry accepted chemical equilibrium computer code. Local temperature depressions are estimated from heat loss calculations. A description of the method, hardware and procedures is presented, along with local heat loss estimates and uncertainty assessments. The uncertainty of the method is estimated at {+-}31 K, and the spatial uniformity was measured within {+-}35 K.

  5. Adsorption of copper, cadmium and zinc on suspended sediments in a stream contaminated by acid mine drainage: The effect of seasonal changes in dissolved organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Macalady, D.L.; Ranville, J.F.; Smith, K.S.; Daniel, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The release of metal-rich, acidic waters from abandoned mining operations is a major problem in Colorado and throughout the Western United States. In Colorado, over 600 km of stream reach are estimated to be affected by such releases (Wentz, 1974). The metals released adversely affect stream biota, including fish. It is therefore important to understand the chemical processes which influence metal transport in these waters. The report details studies of the role of suspended sediments with respect to the transport of several important trace metals in a stream impacted by acid mine drainage. The role of streambed sediments was studied in the same system as part of an earlier project (Acid Mine Drainage: streambed sorption of copper, cadmium and zinc, PB--93-118263).

  6. [Determination of docosahexaenoic acid in milk powder by gas chromatography using acid hydrolysis].

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiping; Xiang, Dapeng; Li, Shuang; Xi, Xinglin; Chen, Wenrui

    2015-11-01

    A method to determine docosahexenoic acid (DHA) in milk powder by gas chromatography was established. The milk powder samples were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid, extracted to get total fatty acids by Soxhlet extractor, then esterified with potassium hydroxide methanol solution to form methyl esters, and treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate. The optimal experiment conditions were obtained from orthogonal experiment L9(3(3)) which performed with three factors and three levels, and it requires the reaction performed with 1 mol/L potassium hydroxide solution at 25 degrees C for 5 min. The derivative treated with sodium hydrogen sulfate was separated on a column of SP-2560 (100 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 μm), and determined in 55 min by temperature programming-gas chromatography. Good linearity was obtained in the range 5.0-300 mg/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.999 9. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 3.4%, 1.2% and 1.1% for the seven repeated experiments of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L of DHA, respectively. The limit of detection was 2 mg/kg, and the recoveries of DHA were in the range of 90.4%-93.5%. The results are satisfactory through the tests of practical samples. PMID:26939370

  7. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  8. Hydration of potassiated amino acids in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-12-01

    The thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of several potassiated amino acids was studied by measuring the gas-phase equilibria, AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n-1) + H(2)O = AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n) (AA = Gly, AL, Val, Met, Pro, and Phe), using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. The AAK(+) ions were obtained by electrospray and the equilibrium constants K(n-1,n) were measured in a pulsed reaction chamber at 10 mbar bath gas, N(2), containing a known partial pressure of water vapor. Determination of the equilibrium constants at different temperatures was used to obtain the DeltaH(n)(o), DeltaS(n)(o), and DeltaG(n)(o) values. The results indicate that the water binding energy in AAK(+)(H(2)O) decreases as the K(+) affinity to AA increases. This trend in binding energies is explained in terms of changes in the side-chain substituent, which delocalize the positive charge from K(+) to AA in AAK(+) complexes, varying the AAK(+)-H(2)O electrostatic interaction. PMID:17928233

  9. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  10. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  11. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  12. Some spectral and pulsation characteristics of a horizontal gas-liquid stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovnyi, P. M.

    1980-07-01

    In the experiments described, the turbulence characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid pipe flow were studied, using a 6 m long, 19-mm-diam tube. The inlet temperature of the suspension was maintained at 25 C. The friction energy spectra and the relative intensity of the friction pulsations were measured. The spectral and pulsation characteristics were obtained by an electrodiffusion technique which provided reliable data on the pulsations of the wall shear stress.

  13. Effect of morphology of sulfurized materials in the retention of mercury from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Guijarro, M.I.; Mendioroz, S.; Munoz, V.

    1998-03-01

    Mercury pollution sources are chloralkali industries, metal sulfide ore smelting, gold refining, cement production, industrial applications of metals, and, especially, fossil fuel combustion and incineration of sewage sludge or municipal garbage. The retention of mercury vapor by sulfur supported on sepiolite has been studied, and the utility of sepiolite as a dispersant for the active phase, sulfur, has been thoroughly ascertained. Samples with 10% S supported on sepiolite of varying size and shape have been prepared from powders sulfurized by reaction/deposit, and their efficiency in depurating air streams with 95 ppm mercury has been tested in a dynamic system using a fixed-bed glass reactor and fluid velocities ranging from 3.1 to 18.9 cm/s. From breakthrough curves under various sets of conditions, the importance of mass transfer under the process conditions has been proven. The progress of the reaction is limited by the resistance to reactant diffusion inside the solid through the layer of product formed. Sulfur reaction to HgS is reduced to an external zone of the solid, giving rise to an egg-shell deposit whose extension is related to sulfur dispersion and porosity of the adsorbent. Then, conversion and capacity of the samples are related to their porosity and S/V ratio. The use of SEM helps to confirm those statements. The 10% S samples compare well with the more conventional S/activated carbon, with their use being advantageous for the low price and abundance of the substrate.

  14. Silver-mordenite for radiologic gas capture from complex streams. Dual catalytic CH3I decomposition and I confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Soelberg, Nick R.; Chapman, Karena W.

    2014-05-09

    The selective capture of radiological iodine (129I) is a persistent concern for safe nuclear energy. In these nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, the gas streams to be treated are extremely complex, containing several distinct iodine-containing molecules amongst a large variety of other species. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for radioiodine capture, reacting with molecular iodine (I2) to form AgI. However the mechanisms for organoiodine capture is not well understood. Here we investigate the capture of methyl iodide from complex mixed gas streams by combining chemical analysis of the effluent gas stream with in depth characterization of the recovered sorbent. Tools applied include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, micro X-ray fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. Moreover, the MOR zeolite catalyzes decomposition of the methyl iodide through formation of surface methoxy species (SMS), which subsequently reacts with water in the mixed gas stream to form methanol, and with methanol to form dimethyl ether, which are both detected downstream in the effluent. The liberated iodine reacts with Ag in the MOR pore to the form subnanometer AgI clusters, smaller than the MOR pores, suggesting that the iodine is both physically and chemically confined within the zeolite.

  15. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  16. Examining spatial patterns in polycyclic aromatic compounds measured in stream macroinvertebrates near a small subarctic oil and gas operation.

    PubMed

    Korosi, J B; Eickmeyer, D C; Chin, K S; Palmer, M J; Kimpe, L E; Blais, J M

    2016-03-01

    The Cameron River runs through a small, remote petrochemical development in the Cameron Hills (Northwest Territories, Canada). In order to evaluate the exposure of aquatic biota to contaminants from oil and gas activities, we measured polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in macroinvertebrates collected from sites and tributaries along the Cameron River, including upstream and downstream of the development, and sites located near drilled wells (developed). Macroinvertebrate tissue PAC burdens ranged from 0.2-2.8 μg g(-1) lipid for unsubstituted compounds, and from 4.2-63.2 μg g(-1) lipid for alkylated compounds, relatively low compared to similar studies from more industrialized regions in North America. There was no significant difference in tissue PAC burdens between upstream, downstream, or developed sites (p = 0.12), although alkyl PACs in five out of seven developed sites were higher than the regional average. Petrogenic PACs were dominant in most samples, including alkyl fluorines, alkyl phenanthrene/anthracenes, and alkyl dibenzothiophenes. Minimal changes in PAC composition in macroinvertebrate tissues were detected along the Cameron River, with the exception of the two sites furthest downstream that had high concentrations of C3-C4 naphthalene. Overall, our results suggest that oil and gas development in the Cameron Hills has not resulted in substantial increases in PAC bioaccumulation in stream macroinvertebrates, although the potential that alkyl naphthalenes are being transported downstream from the development warrants further attention. PMID:26911593

  17. Contemporary Trends in the Acid-Base Status of the Two Acid-Sensitive Streams in Western Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Keith N.; Kline, Kathleen M.; Morgan, Raymond P., II; Castro, Nancy M.; Negley, Timothy L.

    2008-01-01

    Recovery of streamwater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting from declines in regional acid deposition was examined using contemporary (1990-2005) data from two long-term monitoring stations located on the Appalachian Plateau in western Maryland, U.S. Two computational methods were used to estimate daily, monthly, and annual fluxes and discharge-weighted concentrations of ANC, sulfate, nitrate, and base cations over the period of record, and two statistical methods were used to evaluate long-term trends in fluxes and concentrations. The methods used to estimate concentrations, as well as the, statistical techniques, produced very similar results, underlining the robustness of the identified trends. We found clear evidence that streamwater sulfate concentrations have declined at an average rate of about 3 (microns)eq L(exp -1) yr(exp -1) at the two sites due to a 34% reduction in wet atmospheric sulfur deposition. Trends in nitrate concentrations appear to be related to other watershed factors, especially forest disturbance. The best evidence of recovery is based on a doubling of ANC (from 21 to 42 (microns)eq L(exp -1) at the more acid-sensitive site over the 16-year period. A slowing, or possible reversal, in the sulfate, nitrate, and SBC trends is evident in our data and may portend a decline in the rate of--or end to--further recovery.

  18. Contemporary trends in the acid-base status of two acid-sensitive streams in Western Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Keith N. Eshleman; Kathleen M. Kline; Raymond P. Morgan II; Nancy M. Castro; Timothy L. Negley

    2008-01-01

    Recovery of streamwater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting from declines in regional acid deposition was examined using contemporary (1990-2005) data from two long-term monitoring stations located on the Appalachian Plateau in western Maryland, U.S. Two computational methods were used to estimate daily, monthly, and annual fluxes and discharge-weighted concentrations of ANC, sulfate, nitrate, and base cations over the period of record, and two statistical methods were used to evaluate long-term trends in fluxes and concentrations. The methods used to estimate concentrations, as well as the statistical techniques, produced very similar results, underlining the robustness of the identified trends. We found clear evidence that streamwater sulfate concentrations have declined at an average rate of about 3 {mu}eq L{sup -1} yr{sup -1} at the two sites due to a 34% reduction in wet atmospheric sulfur deposition. Trends in nitrate concentrations appear to be related to other watershed factors, especially forest disturbance. The best evidence of recovery is based on a doubling of ANC (from 21 to 42 {mu}eq L{sup -1}) at the more acid-sensitive site over the 16-year period. A slowing, or possible reversal, in the sulfate, nitrate, and SBC trends is evident in our data and may portend a decline in the rate of or end to further recovery. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    PubMed

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  20. Influence of liquid and gas flow rates on sulfuric acid mist removal from air by packed bed tower

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The possible emission of sulfuric acid mists from a laboratory scale, counter-current packed bed tower operated with a caustic scrubbing solution was studied. Acid mists were applied through a local exhaust hood. The emissions from the packed bed tower were monitored in three different categories of gas flow rate as well as three liquid flow rates, while other influencing parameters were kept almost constant. Air sampling and sulfuric acid measurement were carried out iso-kinetically using USEPA method 8. The acid mists were measured by the barium-thorin titration method. According to the results when the gas flow rate increased from 10 L/s to 30 L/s, the average removal efficiency increased significantly (p < 0.001) from 76.8 ± 1.8% to 85.7 ± 1.2%. Analysis of covariance method followed by Tukey post-hoc test of 92 tests did not show a significant change in removal efficiency between liquid flow rates of 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 L/min (p = 0.811). On the other hand, with fixed pressure loss across the tower, by increasing the liquid/gas (L/G) mass ratio, the average removal efficiency decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 89.9% at L/G of <2 to 83.1% at L/G of 2–3 and further to 80.2% at L/G of >3, respectively. L/G of 2–3 was recommended for designing purposes of a packed tower for sulfuric acid mists and vapors removal from contaminated air stream. PMID:23369487

  1. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  2. Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kloosterman, Jeff

    2012-12-31

    Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

  3. BENCH-SCALE EVALUATION OF CALCIUM SORBENTS FOR ACID GAS EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium sorbents for acid gas emission control were evaluated for effectiveness in removing SO2/HCl and SO2/NO from simulated incinerator and boiler flue gases. All tests were conducted in a bench-scale reactor (fixed-bed) simulating fabric filter conditions in an acid gas remova...

  4. Diel cycling of zinc in a stream impacted by acid rock drainage: Initial results from a new in situ Zn analyzer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Nimick, D.A.; Gammons, C.H.; Wanty, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many trace metals undergo dramatic diel (24-h) cycles in near neutral pH streams with metal concentrations reproducibly changing up to 500% during the diel period (Nimick et al., 2003). To examine diel zinc cycles in streams affected by acid rock drainage, we have developed a novel instrument, the Zn-DigiScan, to continuously monitor in situ zinc concentrations in near real-time. Initial results from a 3-day deployment at Fisher Creek, Montana have demonstrated the ability of the Zn-DigiScan to record diel Zn cycling at levels below 100 ??g/l. Longer deployments of this instrument could be used to examine the effects of episodic events such as rainstorms and snowmelt pulses on zinc loading in streams affected by acid rock drainage. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  5. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  6. Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35 degrees C.

  7. Field testing of a probe to measure fouling in an industrial flue gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Sohal, M.S.

    1990-11-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology sponsors work in the area of measuring and mitigating fouling in heat exchangers. This report describes the design and fabrication of a gas-side fouling measuring device, and its testing in an industrial environment. The report gives details of the probe fabrication, material used, controllers, other instrumentation required for various measurements, and computer system needed for recording the data. The calibration constants for measuring the heat flux with the heat fluxmeter were determined. The report also describes the field test location, the tests performed, the data collected, and the data analysis. The conclusions of the tests performed were summarized. Although fouling deposits on the probe were minimal, the tests proved that the probe is capable of measuring the fouling in a harsh industrial environment. 17 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Solid sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35.degree. C.

  9. An Experimental and Computational Study of the Gas-Phase Acidities of the Common Amino Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Chelsea E; Stover, Michele L; Bokatzian, Samantha S; Davis, John T M; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2015-07-30

    Using proton-transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and correlated molecular orbital theory at the G3(MP2) level, gas-phase acidities (GAs) and the associated structures for amides corresponding to the common amino acids have been determined for the first time. These values are important because amino acid amides are models for residues in peptides and proteins. For compounds whose most acidic site is the C-terminal amide nitrogen, two ions populations were observed experimentally with GAs that differ by 4-7 kcal/mol. The lower energy, more acidic structure accounts for the majority of the ions formed by electrospray ionization. G3(MP2) calculations predict that the lowest energy anionic conformer has a cis-like orientation of the [-C(═O)NH](-) group whereas the higher energy, less acidic conformer has a trans-like orientation of this group. These two distinct conformers were predicted for compounds with aliphatic, amide, basic, hydroxyl, and thioether side chains. For the most acidic amino acid amides (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, histidine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid amides) only one conformer was observed experimentally, and its experimental GA correlates with the theoretical GA related to side chain deprotonation. PMID:26196065

  10. Sulfur, Protein Size Distribution, and Free Amino Acids in Flour Mill Streams and Their Relationship to Dough Rheology and Breadmaking Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in sulfur content, protein size distribution, and free amino acids among flour mill streams (FMS) and their relationships to dough rheology and breadmaking traits. Information from this study would likely lead to more precise blending of FMS in comme...

  11. Synthesis of activated carbon from oil fly ash for removal of H2S from gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Zaheer; Shawabkeh, Reyad A.; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Al-Baghli, Nadhir; Eic, Mladen

    2015-02-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is made from waste oil fly ash (OFA) which is produced in large quantities from power generation plants through combustion of heavy fuel oil. OFA contains ∼80% carbon that makes it suitable for producing AC by physicochemical treatments using a mixture of HNO3, H2SO4, and H3PO4 acids to remove non-carbonaceous impurities. The acid treated OFA is then activated by CO2 at 990 °C. The physico-chemical treatments of OFA have increased the surface area from 4 to 375 m2/g. Surface morphology and pore volume of AC are characterized by combined SEM and EDX techniques. Elemental analysis shows that sulfur content is reduced from 7.1 wt% in untreated OFA to 0.51 wt% for the treated OFA. The AC is further treated with HNO3 and NH4OH solutions in order to attach the carboxylic and amine groups on the surface, respectively. FTIR characterization is used to confirm the presence of the functional groups on the surface of AC at different stages of its development. The performance of functionalized AC samples is tested for the removal of H2S from a synthetic natural gas by carrying out breakthrough experiments. The results from these tests have shown maximum adsorption capacity of 0.3001 mg/g for NH4OH functionalized activated carbon with 86.43% regeneration efficiency. The ammonium hydroxide treated AC is found to be more effective for H2S removal than acid treated AC as confirmed by breakthrough experiments. The results indicate that the presence of more acidic functionalities on the surface reduces the H2S adsorption efficiency from the gas mixture.

  12. Diel behavior of rare earth elements in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Wood, S.A.; Nimick, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Diel (24-h) changes in concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) were investigated in Fisher Creek, a mountain stream in Montana that receives acid mine drainage in its headwaters. Three simultaneous 24-h samplings were conducted at an upstream station (pH = 3.3), an intermediate station (pH = 5.5), and a downstream station (pH = 6.8). The REE were found to behave conservatively at the two upstream stations. At the downstream station, REE partitioned into suspended particles to a degree that varied with the time of day, and concentrations of dissolved REE were 2.9- to 9.4-fold (190% to 830%) higher in the early morning vs. the late afternoon. The decrease in dissolved REE concentrations during the day coincided with a corresponding increase in the concentration of REE in suspended particles, such that diel changes in the total REE concentrations were relatively minor (27% to 55% increase at night). Across the lanthanide series, the heavy REE partitioned into the suspended solid phase to a greater extent than the light REE. Filtered samples from the downstream station showed a decrease in shale-normalized REE concentration across the lanthanide series, with positive anomalies at La and Gd, and a negative Eu anomaly. As the temperature of the creek increased in the afternoon, the slope of the REE profile steepened and the magnitude of the anomalies increased. The above observations are explained by cyclic adsorption of REE onto suspended particles of hydrous ferric and aluminum oxides (HFO, HAO). Conditional partition coefficients for each REE between the suspended solids and the aqueous phase reached a maximum at 1700 hours and a minimum at 0700 hours. This pattern is attributed to diel variations in stream temperature, possibly reinforced by kinetic factors (i.e., slower rates of reaction at night than during the day). Estimates of the enthalpy of adsorption of each REE onto suspended particles based on the field results averaged +82 kJ/mol and are similar in

  13. Diel behavior of rare earth elements in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Wood, Scott A.; Nimick, David A.

    2005-08-01

    Diel (24-h) changes in concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) were investigated in Fisher Creek, a mountain stream in Montana that receives acid mine drainage in its headwaters. Three simultaneous 24-h samplings were conducted at an upstream station (pH = 3.3), an intermediate station (pH = 5.5), and a downstream station (pH = 6.8). The REE were found to behave conservatively at the two upstream stations. At the downstream station, REE partitioned into suspended particles to a degree that varied with the time of day, and concentrations of dissolved REE were 2.9- to 9.4-fold (190% to 830%) higher in the early morning vs. the late afternoon. The decrease in dissolved REE concentrations during the day coincided with a corresponding increase in the concentration of REE in suspended particles, such that diel changes in the total REE concentrations were relatively minor (27% to 55% increase at night). Across the lanthanide series, the heavy REE partitioned into the suspended solid phase to a greater extent than the light REE. Filtered samples from the downstream station showed a decrease in shale-normalized REE concentration across the lanthanide series, with positive anomalies at La and Gd, and a negative Eu anomaly. As the temperature of the creek increased in the afternoon, the slope of the REE profile steepened and the magnitude of the anomalies increased. The above observations are explained by cyclic adsorption of REE onto suspended particles of hydrous ferric and aluminum oxides (HFO, HAO). Conditional partition coefficients for each REE between the suspended solids and the aqueous phase reached a maximum at 1700 hours and a minimum at 0700 hours. This pattern is attributed to diel variations in stream temperature, possibly reinforced by kinetic factors (i.e., slower rates of reaction at night than during the day). Estimates of the enthalpy of adsorption of each REE onto suspended particles based on the field results averaged +82 kJ/mol and are similar in

  14. Silica-based waste form for immobilization of iodine from reprocessing plant off-gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyáš, Josef; Canfield, Nathan; Sulaiman, Sannoh; Zumhoff, Mac

    2016-08-01

    A high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine and a feasible consolidation to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel) an attractive choice for the removal and sequestration of iodine compounds from the off-gas of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Hot uniaxial pressing of iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel (20.2 mass% iodine) at 1200 °C for 30 min under 29 MPa pressure provided a partially sintered product with residual open porosity of 16.9% that retained ∼93% of sorbed iodine. Highly iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel was successfully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1200 °C with a 30-min hold and under 207 MPa. The fully densified waste form had a bulk density of 3.3 × 103 kg/m3 and contained ∼39 mass% iodine. The iodine was retained in the form of nano- and micro-particles of AgI that were uniformly distributed inside and along boundaries of fused silica grains.

  15. Evaluation of different solvent extraction methods for removing actinides from high acid waste streams

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L. ); Rogers, J. )

    1991-01-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, anion exchange is used to recover plutonium from nitric acid solutions. Although this approach recovers >99%, trace amounts of plutonium and other actinides remain the effluent and require additional processing. Currently, a ferric hydroxide carrier precipitation is used to remove the trace actinides and the resulting sludge is cemented. Because it costs approximately $10,000 per drum for disposal, we are developing an additional polishing step so that the effluent actinide levels are reduced to below 100 nCi/g. This would allow the resulting waste sludge to disposed as low-level waste at approximately $200 per drum. We are investigating various solvent extraction techniques for removing actinides. The most promising are chelating resins and membrane-based liquid-liquid solvent extraction. This report details some of our preliminary results. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Preparation of sorbent pellets with high integrity for sorption of CO.sub.2 from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    2016-05-10

    Method for the production of a CO.sub.2 sorbent prepared by integrating a clay substrate, basic alkali salt, amine liquid, hydraulic binder, and a liquid binder. The basic alkali salt is present relative to the clay substrate in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 50 parts per 100 parts of the clay substrate. The amine liquid is present relative to a clay-alkali combination in a weight ratio of from about 1 part to about 10 parts per 10 parts of the clay-alkali combination. The clay substrate and basic alkali salt may be combined in a solid-solid heterogeneous mixture and followed by introduction of the amine liquid. Alternatively, an alkaline solution may be blended with the amine solution prior to contacting the clay substrate. The clay-alkali-amine CO.sub.2 sorbent is particularly advantageous for low temperature CO.sub.2 removal cycles in a gas stream having a CO.sub.2 concentration less than around 2000 ppm and an oxygen concentration around 21%, such as air.

  17. Silver-Mordenite for Radiologic Gas Capture from Complex Streams: Dual Catalytic CH3I Decomposition and I Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Tina M. Nenoff; Mark Rodriguez; Nick Soelberg; Karena W. Chapman

    2014-12-01

    The effective capture and storage of radiological iodine (129I) remains a strong concern for safe nuclear waste storage and safe nuclear energy. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for iodine capture. In nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, complex gas streams will be present and the need for high selectivity of all iodine containing compounds is of the utmost importance for safety and the environment. In particular, a molecular level understanding of the sorption of organic iodine compounds is not well understood. Here we probe the structure and distribution of methyl iodide sorbed by silver-containing MOR using a combination of crystallographic and materials characterization techniques including: infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, Micro-X-ray Fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. The iodine is captured inside the MOR pore in the form of AgI nanoparticles, that is consistent with the pores sizes of the MOR, indicating that the molecule is both physically and chemically captured in the Ag-MOR. The organic component is surface catalyzed by the zeolite via the formation of Surface Methoxy Species (SMS) that result in downstream organics of dimethyl ether and methanol formation.

  18. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates. PMID:26150069

  19. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: a model post audit.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Robert L; Kimball, Briant A; Walton-Day, Katherine; Verplanck, Philip L; Broshears, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    A post audit for a reactive transport model used to evaluate acid mine drainage treatment systems is presented herein. The post audit is based on a paired synoptic approach in which hydrogeochemical data are collected at low (existing conditions) and elevated (following treatment) pH. Data obtained under existing, low-pH conditions are used for calibration, and the resultant model is used to predict metal concentrations observed following treatment. Predictions for Al, As, Fe, H(+), and Pb accurately reproduce the observed reduction in dissolved concentrations afforded by the treatment system, and the information provided in regard to standard attainment is also accurate (predictions correctly indicate attainment or nonattainment of water quality standards for 19 of 25 cases). Errors associated with Cd, Cu, and Zn are attributed to misspecification of sorbent mass (precipitated Fe). In addition to these specific results, the post audit provides insight in regard to calibration and sensitivity analysis that is contrary to conventional wisdom. Steps taken during the calibration process to improve simulations of As sorption were ultimately detrimental to the predictive results, for example, and the sensitivity analysis failed to bracket observed metal concentrations. PMID:22074087

  20. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: A model post audit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; Walton-Day, K.; Verplanck, P.L.; Broshears, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    A post audit for a reactive transport model used to evaluate acid mine drainage treatment systems is presented herein. The post audit is based on a paired synoptic approach in which hydrogeochemical data are collected at low (existing conditions) and elevated (following treatment) pH. Data obtained under existing, low-pH conditions are used for calibration, and the resultant model is used to predict metal concentrations observed following treatment. Predictions for Al, As, Fe, H +, and Pb accurately reproduce the observed reduction in dissolved concentrations afforded by the treatment system, and the information provided in regard to standard attainment is also accurate (predictions correctly indicate attainment or nonattainment of water quality standards for 19 of 25 cases). Errors associated with Cd, Cu, and Zn are attributed to misspecification of sorbent mass (precipitated Fe). In addition to these specific results, the post audit provides insight in regard to calibration and sensitivity analysis that is contrary to conventional wisdom. Steps taken during the calibration process to improve simulations of As sorption were ultimately detrimental to the predictive results, for example, and the sensitivity analysis failed to bracket observed metal concentrations.

  1. Evaluating remedial alternatives for an acid mine drainage stream: a model post audit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Verplanck, Philip L.; Broshears, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    A post audit for a reactive transport model used to evaluate acid mine drainage treatment systems is presented herein. The post audit is based on a paired synoptic approach in which hydrogeochemical data are collected at low (existing conditions) and elevated (following treatment) pH. Data obtained under existing, low-pH conditions are used for calibration, and the resultant model is used to predict metal concentrations observed following treatment. Predictions for Al, As, Fe, H+, and Pb accurately reproduce the observed reduction in dissolved concentrations afforded by the treatment system, and the information provided in regard to standard attainment is also accurate (predictions correctly indicate attainment or nonattainment of water quality standards for 19 of 25 cases). Errors associated with Cd, Cu, and Zn are attributed to misspecification of sorbent mass (precipitated Fe). In addition to these specific results, the post audit provides insight in regard to calibration and sensitivity analysis that is contrary to conventional wisdom. Steps taken during the calibration process to improve simulations of As sorption were ultimately detrimental to the predictive results, for example, and the sensitivity analysis failed to bracket observed metal concentrations.

  2. Influences of acid mine drainage and thermal enrichment on stream fish reproduction and larval survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hafs, Andrew W.; Horn, C.D.; Mazik, P.M.; Hartman, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) and thermal enrichment on the reproduction of fishes were investigated through a larval-trapping survey in the Stony River watershed, Grant County, WV. Trapping was conducted at seven sites from 26 March to 2 July 2004. Overall larval catch was low (379 individuals in 220 hours of trapping). More larval White Suckers were captured than all other species. Vectors fitted to nonparametric multidimensional scaling ordinations suggested that temperature was highly correlated to fish communities captured at our sites. Survival of larval Fathead Minnows was examined in situ at six sites from 13 May to 11 June 2004 in the same system. Larval survival was lower, but not significantly different between sites directly downstream of AMD-impacted tributaries (40% survival) and non-AMD sites (52% survival). The lower survival was caused by a significant mortality event at one site that coincided with acute pH depression in an AMD tributary immediately upstream of the site. Results from a Cox proportional hazard test suggests that low pH is having a significant negative influence on larval fish survival in this system. The results from this research indicate that the combination of low pH events and elevated temperature are negatively influencing the larval fish populations of the Stony River watershed. Management actions that address these problems would have the potential to substantially increase both reproduction rates and larval survival, therefore greatly enhancing the fishery.

  3. Selection of an acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.B.; Jones, G.N.; Denton, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Acid gas contaminants, such as, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and mercaptans, must be removed to a very low level from a feed natural gas before it is liquefied. CO{sub 2} is typically removed to a level of about 100 ppm to prevent freezing during LNG processing. Sulfur compounds are removed to levels required by the eventual consumer of the gas. Acid-gas removal processes can be broadly classified as: solvent-based, adsorption, cryogenic or physical separation. The advantages and disadvantages of these processes will be discussed along with design and operating considerations. This paper will also discuss the important considerations affecting the choice of the best acid-gas removal process for LNG plants. Some of these considerations are: the remoteness of the LNG plant from the resource; the cost of the feed gas and the economics of minimizing capital expenditures; the ultimate disposition of the acid gas; potential for energy integration; and the composition, including LPG and conditions of the feed gas. The example of the selection of the acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant.

  4. Designing an optimized injection strategy for acid gas disposal without dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.A.; Svrcek, W.Y.; Monnery, W.D.; Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Bennion, D.B.; Thomas, F.B.; Wichert, E.; Reed, A.E.; Johnson, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    The economics of recovering sulfur from sour natural gas have become unfavorable for small fields. Hydrocarbon producing companies require a cost effective yet environmentally sound alternative method to deal with acid gas. Compressed acid gas reinjection into producing, depleted or non-producing formations has emerged as a viable alternative to traditional sulfur recovery. Most injection schemes include dehydration facilities to remove the saturated water from the gas, preventing corrosion and hydrate formation. An alternative, less costly approach is to keep the water in the vapor phase throughout the injection circuit, eliminating the need to dehydrate. To design an optimized injection strategy, determination of thermodynamic and physical properties such as water content, dewpoint, bubble point, hydrate conditions and density of the acid gas is necessary. Experiments were conducted to determine properties of an acid gas containing a nominal 10% H{sub 2}S with remaining 90% CO{sub 2} and a minor amount of methane. Results indicate that the acid gas can be cooled between compression stages to 40 C (104 F) without entering the two phase region. For an injection pressure of 17,700 kPa (2,567 psia), dehydration is not required to cool the compressed gas to 8 C (46 F) without hydrate formation or corrosion problems. At 9,000 kPa (1,305 psia) the gas can be safely cooled to {minus}2 C (28 F).

  5. 220Rn as a method for identifying point sources of groundwater discharge: Expanding the dissolved gas tool kit in groundwater stream water interactions. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, P.

    2013-12-01

    The most commonly used dissolved gas environmental tracer technique for estimating groundwater discharge to streams is 222Rn. 222Rn has very low background in surface water and has a relatively long retention time in stream water, providing a high sensitivity for detecting groundwater discharge. Given the gas exchange velocity and half-life of 222Rn groundwater input signal can persist for over 5 km, making identification of point source discharge difficult. 220Rn (Thoron), is produced in the subsurface along with 222Rn, but has a half-life of 55.6s and decays away rapidly once it enters stream water. Thus, 220Rn is an ideal tracer for identifying point locations of groundwater discharge. 220 can be measured in conjunction with 222Rn providing a convenient methodology for identifying diffuse and point discharges of groundwater. The conditions required for measuring 220Rn, methodology for measuring 220Rn and characteristics of 222Rn and 220Rn signals in groundwater-stream water applications will be discussed. Initial results from a field investigation utilizing these tracers in the Jemez River in Northern New Mexico will be presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Contribution of diffuse inputs to the aqueous mass load of perfluoroalkyl acids in river and stream catchments in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Kyu; Li, Dong-Hao; Shoeib, Mahiba; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies disagree regarding the contributions of point versus non-point sources to the aqueous mass loads of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). This study investigated the longitudinal change in PFAA mass load from upstream to downstream stations along rivers and/or streams to assess the relative contributions of point versus nonpoint inputs. With concentrations 10 to 100 times higher than running water, point sources such as wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluent and airport ditch-outlet (ADO) water were separated from neighboring upstream and downstream running waters using principal component analysis. Source waters were characterized by certain predominant components [e.g., perfluorobutylsulfonate (PFBS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in WWTP effluent and perfluorohexylsulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctylsulfonate (PFOS) in ADO water], which were minor components of running water. From a mass balance assessment of PFAA mass load, certain compounds such as PFOA and PFBS dominated the contribution of point sources to the mass load in the running water at downstream stations or in small catchment basins with high levels of industrial activity. Most of the mass load in the investigated catchments was attributable to upstream running water with a minor influence from industrial, commercial, and domestic human activities. Furthermore, the negative relationship of per capita emission factors (hereafter, EFs) with population density and a lower contribution of PFAA from WWTPs (~30% on average) compared to the running water-derived mass load at the national level indicated that diffuse inputs were more important contributors to aqueous PFAA contamination in each catchment basin as well as the entire watershed of the country (Korea). Volatile precursor compounds, which are readily dispersed to neighboring basins and transformed to PFAAs in the ambient environment, can be an important source of these diffuse inputs and will become more significant over time

  7. Precipitation of iron, sodium, and potassium impurities from synthetic solutions modeling spent acid streams from a chemical coal cleaning process

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.A.; Richardson, R.G.; Markuszewski, R. ); Levine, A.D. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents experiments on treating model spent acid streams from a chemical coal cleaning process by double salt precipitation which indicated that simple heating of solutions containing Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} caused jarosite (KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}) to form preferentially to natrojarosite (NaFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}), and precipitate yields were higher than when Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was the only alkali sulfate present. Virtually all of the K, about 90% of the Fe, and about 30% of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2 {minus}} could be precipitated at 95{degrees}C, while little or no Na was removed. However, simply heating Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution up to 95{degrees}C for {lt}12 hours did not produce adequate precipitate yields. When Na was the only alkali metal present, the Fe concentration in the solution had to be increased to avoid formation of undesirable iron compounds.

  8. Recent advancements in the "water-window" microscopy with laser-plasma SXR source based on a double stream gas-puff target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, P. W.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of our recent developments, regarding "water-window" soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy based on a laser-plasma double stream gas puff target sources is presented. The work, presented herein, describes two approaches to SXR microscopy. The first one is a low spatial resolution, achromatic SXR microscopy, employing Wolter type-I objective. The second one is a nanometer spatial resolution SXR microscopy, with the use of a Fresnel zone plate objective, for imaging various objects with quasimonochromatic light, emitted from a double stream gas puff target based short wavelength source. The developments regarding both systems are presented, as well as the possible applications, for which the SXR microscope was already employed. Such compact, table-top size, laboratory type microscopy setups may be employed in the near future for complementary-like studies to other, often used, microscopy techniques.

  9. CNG process, a new approach to physical-absorption acid-gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hise, R.E.; Massey, L.G.; Adler, R.J.; Brosilow, C.B.; Gardner, N.C.; Brown, W.R.; Cook, W.J.; Petrik, M.

    1982-01-01

    The CNG acid gas removal process embodies three novel features: (1) scrubbing with liquid carbon dioxide to remove all sulfurous molecules and other trace contaminants; (2) triple-point crystallization of carbon dioxide to concentrate sulfurous molecules and produce pure carbon dioxide; and (3) absorption of carbon dioxide with a slurry of solid carbon dioxide in organic carrier liquid. The CNG process is discussed and contrasted with existing acid gas removal technology as represented by the Benfield, Rectisol, and Selexol acid gas removal processes.

  10. Reactive solute transport in an acidic stream: Experimental pH increase and simulation of controls on pH, aluminum, and iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    Solute transport simulations quantitatively constrained hydrologic and geochemical hypotheses about field observations of a pH modification in an acid mine drainage stream. Carbonate chemistry, the formation of solid phases, and buffering interactions with the stream bed were important factors in explaining the behavior of pH, aluminum, and iron. The precipitation of microcrystalline gibbsite accounted for the behavior of aluminum; precipitation of Fe(OH)3 explained the general pattern of iron solubility. The dynamic experiment revealed limitations on assumptions that reactions were controlled only by equilibrium chemistry. Temporal variation in relative rates of photoreduction and oxidation influenced iron behavior. Kinetic limitations on ferrous iron oxidation and hydrous oxide precipitation and the effects of these limitations on field filtration were evident. Kinetic restraints also characterized interaction between the water column and the stream bed, including sorption and desorption of protons from iron oxides at the sediment-water interface and post-injection dissolution of the precipitated aluminum solid phase.

  11. Process studies for a new method of removing H/sub 2/S from industrial gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, D.W.; Lynn, S.

    1986-07-01

    A process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal-derived gas streams has been developed. The basis for the process is the absorption of H/sub 2/S into a polar organic solvent where it is reacted with dissolved sulfur dioxide to form elemental sulfur. After sulfur is crystallized from solution, the solvent is stripped to remove dissolved gases and water formed by the reaction. The SO/sub 2/ is generated by burning a portion of the sulfur in a furnace where the heat of combustion is used to generate high pressure steam. The SO/sub 2/ is absorbed into part of the lean solvent to form the solution necessary for the first step. The kinetics of the reaction between H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ dissolved in mixtures of N,N-Dimethylaniline (DMA)/ Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether and DMA/Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl Ether was studied by following the temperature rise in an adiabatic calorimeter. This irreversible reaction was found to be first-order in both H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/, with an approximates heat of reaction of 28 kcal/mole of SO/sub 2/. The sole products of the reaction appear to be elemental sulfur and water. The presence of DMA increases the value of the second-order rate constant by an order of magnitude over that obtained in the glycol ethers alone. Addition of other tertiary aromatic amines enhances the observed kinetics; heterocyclic amines (e.g., pyridine derivatives) have been found to be 10 to 100 times more effective as catalysts when compared to DMA.

  12. Effects of ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on gas trapping in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four groups of 20 guinea pigs were sequentially exposed by inhalation to either air followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by air, or air followed by air to determine whether ozone preexposure sensitizes guinea pigs to the airway constrictive effects of sulfuric acid aerosol. All first exposures to ozone or air were 2 h in duration; all second exposures to sulfuric acid or air were for 1 h. All ozone and sulfuric acid exposures were 0.8 ppm and 12 mg/m3, respectively. Animals were observed for respiratory distress during exposure, and excised lungs were quantitated for trapped gas and wet/dry ratios. None of the guinea pigs developed dyspnea, and wet/dry ratios were not altered. Ozone significantly (p less than 0.05) increased trapped gas volumes, which were 44% (ozone-acid) to 68% (ozone-air) greater than in the air-air group. Trapped gas volume was 23% greater in the ozone-acid group than in the air-acid group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p less than 0.20). Thus, ozone increased gas trapping but did not significantly sensitize guinea pigs to the bronchoconstrictive action of sulfuric acid.

  13. Development of a gas phase source for perfluoroalkyl acids to examine atmospheric sampling methods.

    PubMed

    MacInnis, John J; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Young, Cora J

    2016-06-21

    An inability to produce environmentally relevant gaseous mixing ratios of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), ubiquitous global contaminants, limits the analytical reliability of atmospheric chemists to make accurate gas and particulate measurements that are demonstrably free of interferences due to sampling artefacts. A gas phase source for PFAAs based on the acid displacement mechanism using perfluoropropionate (PFPrA), perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been constructed. The displacement efficiency of gas phase perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is inversely related to chain length. Decreasing displacement efficiencies for PFPrA, PFBA, PFHxA, and PFOA were 90% ± 20%, 40% ± 10%, 40% ± 10%, 9% ± 4%, respectively. Generating detectable amounts of gas phase perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) was not possible. It is likely that lower vapour pressure and much higher acidity play a role in this lack of emission. PFCA emission rates were not elevated by increasing relative humidity (25%-75%), nor flow rate of carrier gas from 33-111 sccm. Overall, reproducible gaseous production of PFCAs was within the error of the production of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a displacing acid (±20%) and was accomplished using a dry nitrogen flow of 33 ± 2 sccm. A reproducible mass emission rate of 0.97 ± 0.10 ng min(-1) (n = 8) was observed for PFBA. This is equivalent to an atmospheric mixing ratio of 12 ppmv, which is easily diluted to environmentally relevant mixing ratios of PFBA. Conversely, generating gas phase perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) by sublimating the solid acid under the same conditions produced a mass emission rate of 2800 ng min(-1), which is equivalent to a mixing ratio of 18 ppthv and over a million times higher than suspected atmospheric levels. Thus, for analytical certification of atmospheric sampling methods, generating gas phase standards for PFCAs is best accomplished using acid displacement under dry conditions

  14. Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

    2002-09-20

    In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

  15. MARYLAND BIOLOGICAL STREAM SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Maryland Biological Stream Survey (MBSS) is a multi-year probability-based sampling program designed to assess the status of biological resources in non-tidal streams of Maryland. The MBSS is quantifying the extent to which acidic deposition and other human activities have af...

  16. THE ADIPIC ACID ENHANCED FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESS FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS. VOLUME 2. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of an adipic acid enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on industrial boilers at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base. The SO2 removal efficiency with the adipic acid averaged 94.3% over a 30-day period. This represents...

  17. OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS CONJUGATED WITH SULFITE OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times th...

  18. ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION MECHANISM IN AQUEOUS FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field and laboratory study of the adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. (Adding adipic acid to limestone-based, SO2 wet scrubbers increases SO2 removal and limestone utilization. However, as much as 80% ...

  19. Rapid determination of dipicolinic acid in the spores of Clostridium species by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, M W; MacGee, J; Holland, J W

    1976-01-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic procedure has been developed to quantitate dipicolinic acid in bacterial spores. The culture, washed from a plate, was hydrolyzed with acid containing the internal standard, pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate, and then extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone. The internal standard and dipicolinic acid were then extracted into a small volume of trimethylphenylammonium hydroxide. Injection of the resultant quaternary ammonium salts into a gas chromatograph yielded, via thermal decomposition, the methyl ester derivatives of the dipicolinic acid and the internal standard. The amount of dipicolinic acid in the sample was determined from a standard curve. The method was sensitive to 100 ng of dipicolinic acid per sample and was 1,000 to 5,000 times more sensitive than the commonly used methods. Preparation of the sample required less than 1.5 h and less than 15 min of the analyst's time. PMID:942206

  20. Selective transport of amino acids into the gas phase: driving forces for amino acid solubilization in gas-phase reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Bennett, Andrew; Liu, Jianbo

    2011-01-28

    We report a study on encapsulation of various amino acids into gas-phase sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) reverse micelles, using electrospray ionization guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation of mass-selected reverse micellar ions with Xe was performed to probe structures of gas-phase micellar assemblies, identify solute-surfactant interactions, and determine preferential incorporation sites of amino acids. Integration into gas-phase reverse micelles depends upon amino acid hydrophobicity and charge state. For examples, glycine and protonated amino acids (such as protonated tryptophan) are encapsulated within the micellar core via electrostatic interactions; while neutral tryptophan is adsorbed in the surfactant layer. As verified using model polar hydrophobic compounds, the hydrophobic effect and solute-interface hydrogen-bonding do not provide sufficient driving force needed for interfacial solubilization of neutral tryptophan. Neutral tryptophan, with a zwitterionic structure, is intercalated at the micellar interface between surfactant molecules through complementary effects of electrostatic interactions between tryptophan backbone and AOT polar heads, and hydrophobic interactions between tryptophan side chain and AOT alkyl tails. Protonation of tryptophan could significantly improve its incorporation capacity into gas-phase reverse micelles, and displace its incorporation site from the micellar interfacial zone to the core; protonation of glycine, on the other hand, has little effect on its encapsulation capacity. Another interesting observation is that amino acids of different isoelectric points could be selectively encapsulated into, and transported by, reverse micelles from solution to the gas phase, based upon their competition for protonation and subsequent encapsulation within the micellar core. PMID:21140022

  1. Explaining the Spatial Variability in Stream Acid Buffering Chemistry and Aquatic Biota in the Neversink River Watershed, Catskill Mountains, New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Walter, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Neversink River Watershed (NRW) originates at the highest point in the Catskill Mountains and is sensitive to changing patterns in acidic deposition, precipitation, and air temperature. Despite reductions in fossil fuel emission since the Clean Air Act, past acidic deposition has accelerated the leaching of cations from the soil and reduced the stores of base cations necessary for buffering stream acidity. The goal of this study was to investigate connections between different watershed ‘features’ and the apparently complex spatial patterns of stream buffering chemistry (specifically, acid neutralizing capacity ANC and Ca concentrations) and aquatic biota (macroinvertebrate and fish populations). The ten nested NRW watersheds (2.0 km^2 to 176.0 km^2) have relatively homogeneous bedrock geology, forested cover, and soil series; therefore, we hypothesized that differing distributions of hydrological flowpaths between the watersheds control the variability in stream buffering chemistry and aquatic biota. However because the flowpath distributions are not directly measurable, this study used step-wise linear regression to develop relationships between watershed ‘features’ and buffering chemistry. The regression results showed that the mean ratio of precipitation to stream runoff (or runoff ratio) from twenty non-winter storm events explained more than 81% of the variability in mean summer ANC and Ca concentrations. The results also suggested that steeper (higher mean slope) more channelized watersheds (larger drainage density) are more susceptible to stream acidity and negative impacts on biota. A simple linear relationship (using no discharge or water chemistry measurements) was able to explain buffering chemistry and aquatic biota populations in 17 additional NRW watersheds (0.3 km^2 to 160.0 km^2), including 60-80% of the variability in macroinvertebrate populations (EPT richness and BAP) and 50-60% of the variability in fish density and species richness

  2. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  3. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  4. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  5. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  6. The role of clay minerals and fulvic acid to the complexation of Na, Mg, and Ca in stream flows from adjacent forested head watersheds composed of different vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terajima, Tomomi; Moriizumi, Mihoko; Nakamura, Tomohiro

    2010-05-01

    In order to understand the complexation and flow process in metal elements under a fresh water environment, discharges of Na, Mg, and Ca were measured in streams of adjacent forested head watersheds composed of coniferous evergreen- and deciduous broad leaf- trees. Total elements (T-Na, T-Mg, and T-Ca) and ions (Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+) in stream flows which passed through 0.45 μm filters were measured with an ICP and Ion-chromatograph. The remainders of total elements and ions were equated with complex compounds. Then the discharges of Si and fulvic acid, which respectively are the representatives of ligands by clay minerals and humic substances, provided the relationship between the compound discharges and the complexation process of the above metal elements. Even if Na, Mg, and Ca are believed to be mostly free ions in fresh water environments, the rates of the compounds to the total elements ranged 10 to 40 % in the coniferous watershed and 20 to 60 % in the deciduous watersheds. The compounds sometimes occupied more than half of the total elements; this was predominant in the deciduous watershed. These mean that the discharge of compounds is not negligible in watershed hydrology. Possible complexation processes in metal elements are #1) Hydration, #2) Adsorption or substitution with clay minerals, #3) Mineral complex, #4) Adsorption with humic substances as represented by fulvic acid, and #5) Chelate with organic acids as oxalate, formic acid, and pyrrole. Under fresh water environments, #2 and #4 must be the most potential processes of the complexation in metal elements. The relationship between the compounds, Si, and fulvic acid, therefore, supplies useful information to presume the status of the compounds. The compounds-Si relations in both watersheds showed linear correlations (r=0.79 to 0.99) for a stream base flow and stream flow in a small rainstorm. The linear correlations, however, occurred only for the stream flow in the compounds-Si relations at a big

  7. A Literature Survey to Identify Potentially Volatile Iodine-Bearing Species Present in Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, S. H.; Spencer, B. B.; Strachan, D. M.; Jubin, R. T.; Soelberg, N. R.; Riley, B. J.

    2015-06-30

    Four radionuclides have been identified as being sufficiently volatile in the reprocessing of nuclear fuel that their gaseous release needs to be controlled to meet regulatory requirements (Jubin et al. 2011, 2012). These radionuclides are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Of these, 129I has the longest half-life and potentially high biological impact. Accordingly, control of the release of 129I is most critical with respect to the regulations for the release of radioactive material in stack emissions. It is estimated that current EPA regulations (EPA 2010) would require any reprocessing plant in the United States to limit 129I release to less than 0.05 Ci/MTIHM for a typical fuel burnup of 55 gigawatt days per metric tonne (GWd/t) (Jubin 2011). The study of inorganic iodide in off-gas systems has been almost exclusively limited to I2 and the focus of organic iodide studies has been CH3I. In this document, we provide the results of an examination of publically available literature that is relevant to the presence and sources of both inorganic and organic iodine-bearing species in reprocessing plants. We especially focus on those that have the potential to be poorly sequestered with traditional capture methodologies. Based on the results of the literature survey and some limited thermodynamic modeling, the inorganic iodine species hypoiodous acid (HOI) and iodine monochloride (ICl) were identified as potentially low-sorbing iodine species that could present in off-gas systems. Organic species of interest included both short chain alkyl iodides such as methyl iodide (CH3I) and longer alkyl iodides up to iodododecane (C10H21I). It was found that fuel dissolution may provide conditions conducive to HOI formation and has been shown to result in volatile long-chain alkyl iodides, though these may not volatilize until later in the reprocessing sequence. Solvent extraction processes were found to be significant sources of various organic iodine-bearing species; formation of these

  8. Gas Cluster Ion Beam Etching under Acetic Acid Vapor for Etch-Resistant Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Hinoura, Ryo; Toyoda, Noriaki; Hara, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Isao

    2013-05-01

    Gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) etching of etch-resistant materials under acetic acid vapor was studied for development of new manufacturing process of future nonvolatile memory. Etching depths of various etch-resistant materials (Pt, Ru, Ta, CoFe) with acetic acid vapor during O2-GCIB irradiations were 1.8-10.7 times higher than those without acetic acid. Also, etching depths of Ru, Ta, CoFe by Ar-GCIB with acetic acid vapor were 2.2-16.1 times higher than those without acetic acid. Even after etching of Pt, smoothing of Pt was realized using O2-GCIB under acetic acid. From XPS and angular distribution of sputtered Pt, it was shown that PtOx layer was formed on Pt after O2-GCIB irradiation. PtOx reacted with acetic acid by GCIB bombardments; as a result, increase of etching depth was observed.

  9. GAS PERMEATION PROPERTIES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID). (R826733)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The need for the development of polymeric materials based on renewable resources has led to the development of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) which is being produced from a feedstock of corn rather than petroleum. The present study examines the permeation of nitrogen...

  10. Characterization and optimization of images acquired by a compact soft X-ray microscope based on a double stream gas-puff target source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fahad Nawaz, M.; Bartnik, A.; Węgrzyński, L.; Jancarek, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2016-04-01

    Using a table-top size soft X-ray (SXR) microscope, based on a laser plasma source with a double stream gas-puff target and a Fresnel zone plate objective, series of images of test samples were acquired. Characterization and optimization of the acquisition parameters were studied and evaluated in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR). Conclusions for the optimization of SXR imaging were reached. Similar SNR measurements might be performed to characterize other SXR imaging systems as well. Software enabling live calculation of the SNR during the image acquisition might be introduced in future in the compact imaging systems for optimal image acquisition or for benchmarking purposes.

  11. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  12. Hydrologic and geochemical factors affecting the chemistry of small headwater streams in response to acidic deposition on Catoctin Mountain, north-central Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, K.C.; Bricker, O.P.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrologic and water-quality data were collected at a precipitation-collection station and from two small watersheds on Catoctin Mountain, north- central Maryland, as part of an investigation of episodic acidification and its effects on streamwater quality. Data were collected from June 1990 through December 1993. Descriptions of the water shed instrumentation, data-collection techniques, and laboratory methods used to conduct the studies are included. Data that were collected on precipitation, throughfall, soil water, ground water, and streamwater during base flow and stormflow indicate that the streams undergo episodic acidification during storms. Both streams showed decreases in pH to less than 5.0 standard units during stormflow. The acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of both streams decreased during stormflow, and the ANC of one of the streams, Bear Branch, became negative. The chemistries of the different types of waters that were sampled indicate that shallow subsurface water with minimal residence time in the watersheds is routed to the streams to become stormflow and is the cause of the episodic acidification observed. Three-component hydrograph separations were performed on the data collected during several storms in each watershed. The hydrograph separations of all of the storms indicate that throughfall contributed 0 to 50 percent of the stormflow, soil water contributed 0 to 80 percent, and ground water contributed 20 to 90 percent. The results of the hydrograph separations indicate that, in general, the watershed with higher hydraulic gradients tends to have shallower and shorter flow paths than the watershed with lower hydraulic gradients.

  13. Acid gas absorption in aqueous solutions of mixed amines

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.S.; Sandall, O.C.

    1996-12-31

    A mass transfer model has been developed to describe the rate of absorption (or desorption) of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} in aqueous blends of a tertiary and a secondary or a primary amine. The model is based on penetration theory, and all significant chemical reactions are incorporated in the model. The reactions are taken to be reversible, with reactions involving only a proton transfer considered to be at equilibrium. The particular amines studied in this research were methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), a tertiary amine, and diethanolamine (DEA), a secondary amine. Key physicochemical data needed in the model, such as diffusion coefficients, kinetic rate constants, and gas solubilities, were measured. Experimental absorption rates of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S were measured in a model gas-liquid contacting device and were compared with model predictions. Experiments were carried out for single amine solutions (both MDEA and DEA) and for amine blends.

  14. Evaluation of gas cooling for pressurized phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooque, M.; Skok, A. J.; Maru, H. C.; Kothmann, R. E.; Harry, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas cooling has already been demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. This paper presents theoretical and experimental investigation of gas cooling for pressurized PAFC. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  15. Evaluation of Gas-Cooled Pressurized Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells for Electric Utility Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faroque, M.

    1983-01-01

    Gas cooling is a more reliable, less expensive and a more simple alternative to conventional liquid cooling for heat removal from the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC). The feasibility of gas-cooling was already demonstrated in atmospheric pressure stacks. Theoretical and experimental investigations of gas-cooling for pressurized PAFC are presented. Two approaches to gas cooling, Distributed Gas-Cooling (DIGAS) and Separated Gas-Cooling (SGC) were considered, and a theoretical comparison on the basis of cell performance indicated SGC to be superior to DIGAS. The feasibility of SGC was experimentally demonstrated by operating a 45-cell stack for 700 hours at pressure, and determining thermal response and the effect of other related parameters.

  16. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed. PMID:26444488

  17. Engineering Porous Organic Cage Crystals with Increased Acid Gas Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanghui; Hoffman, Christopher D; Liu, Yang; Bhattacharyya, Souryadeep; Tumuluri, Uma; Jue, Melinda L; Wu, Zili; Sholl, David S; Nair, Sankar; Jones, Christopher W; Lively, Ryan P

    2016-07-25

    Both known and new CC3-based porous organic cages are prepared and exposed to acidic SO2 in vapor and liquid conditions. Distinct differences in the stability of the CC3 cages exist depending on the chirality of the diamine linkers used. The acid catalyzed CC3 degradation mechanism is probed via in situ IR and a degradation pathway is proposed and supported with computational results. CC3 crystals synthesized with racemic mixtures of diaminocyclohexane exhibited enhanced stability compared to CC3-R and CC3-S. Confocal fluorescent microscope images reveal that the stability difference in CC3 species originates from an abundance of mesoporous grain boundaries in CC3-R and CC3-S, allowing facile access of aqueous SO2 throughout the crystal, promoting decomposition. These grain boundaries are absent from CC3 crystals made with racemic linkers. PMID:27253350

  18. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adam M; Carey, Spencer J; Pejlovas, Aaron M; Li, Kexin; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2015-04-14

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0(+)) = 1151.8(5), B(0(+)) = 100.3(5), C(0(+)) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0(-)) = 1152.2(5), B(0(-)) = 100.7(5), C(0(-)) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy. PMID:25877574

  19. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Adam M.; Carey, Spencer J.; Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Li, Kexin; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-04-01

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0+) = 1151.8(5), B(0+) = 100.3(5), C(0+) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0-) = 1152.2(5), B(0-) = 100.7(5), C(0-) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy.

  20. Gas phase measurements of mono-fluoro-benzoic acids and the dimer of 3-fluoro-benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Adam M.; Carey, Spencer J.; Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Li, Kexin; Kukolich, Stephen G.; Kang, Lu

    2015-04-14

    The microwave spectrum of the mono-fluoro-benzoic acids, 2-fluoro-, 3-fluoro-, and 4-fluoro-benzoic acid have been measured in the frequency range of 4-14 GHz using a pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Measured rotational transition lines were assigned and fit using a rigid rotor Hamiltonian. Assignments were made for 3 conformers of 2-fluorobenzoic acid, 2 conformers of 3-fluorobenzoic acid, and 1 conformer of 4-fluorobenzoic acid. Additionally, the gas phase homodimer of 3-fluorobenzoic acid was detected, and the spectra showed evidence of proton tunneling. Experimental rotational constants are A(0{sup +}) = 1151.8(5), B(0{sup +}) = 100.3(5), C(0{sup +}) = 87.64(3) MHz and A(0{sup −}) = 1152.2(5), B(0{sup −}) = 100.7(5), C(0{sup −}) = 88.85(3) MHz for the two ground vibrational states split by the proton tunneling motion. The tunneling splitting (ΔE) is approximately 560 MHz. This homodimer appears to be the largest carboxylic acid dimer observed with F-T microwave spectroscopy.

  1. Gas chromatographic organic acid profiling analysis of brandies and whiskeys for pattern recognition analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Y J; Kim, K R; Kim, J H

    1999-06-01

    An efficient gas chromatographic profiling and pattern recognition method is described for brandy and whiskey samples according to their organic acid contents. It involves solid-phase extraction of organic acids using Chromosorb P with subsequent conversion to stable tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives for the direct analysis by capillary column gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 12 organic acids were reproducibly identified in liquor samples (1 mL). When the GC profiles were simplified to their retention index spectra, characteristic patterns were obtained for each liquor sample as well as for each group average. Stepwise discriminant analysis provided star symbols characteristic for each liquor sample and group average. As expected, canonical discriminant analysis correctly classified 23 liquor samples studied into two groups of either brandy or whiskey. PMID:10794629

  2. Evaluation of the impact of acid mine drainage on the chemistry and the macrobenthos in the Carolina stream (San Luis, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Tripole, Susana; Gonzalez, Patricia; Vallania, Adriana; Garbagnati, Marcela; Mallea, Miguel

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of acid mine drainage on the chemistry and the macrobenthos of the Carolina stream (San Luis - Argentina). Samples were obtained in the years 1997-1998 at two sites: site C(1), located 200 m upstream of the drainage, and site C(2), located 800 m downstream. The system buffer capacity was evaluated in the non - contaminated site by means of the buffer index calculation. The physico - chemical changes observed as a consequence of the contribution of acid mine drainage (AMD) were: a decreasing of pH and an increase in the ionic concentration, especially sulfate and Fe coming from the oxidation produced by chemiolithotrophic bacteria. The values obtained indicated a low buffer capacity and a high intrinsic vulnerability of the system to resist the impact originated by the AMD, producing a remarkable decreasing of pH of the receiving stream. These changes caused modifications in the original benthic community that was replaced by organisms more tolerant to the acid stress. A reduction in the abundance and in the taxonomic richness of the benthic macroinvertebrates was observed when compared with the reference station. An increase in the proportion of Chironomidae and of Acari and a decrease in the proportion of the remaining taxa were observed. The most sensitive groups were Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera and Mollusca. The community was mostly affected by the following variables: pH, conductivity, sulfate and dissolved total Fe. PMID:16565803

  3. Gas-phase acidities of tetrahedral oxyacids from ab initio electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Dixon, D.A.; Kubicki, J.D.; Felmy, A.R.

    2000-05-04

    Density functional calculations have been performed on several protonation states of the oxyacids of Si, P, V, As, Cr, and S. Structures and vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with experimental values where these are available. A reasonably well-defined correlation between the calculated gas-phase acidities and the measured pK{sub a} in aqueous solution has been found. The pK{sub a}/gas-phase acidity slopes are consistent with those derived from previous molecular mechanics calculations on ferric hydrolysis and the first two acidity constants for orthosilicic acid. The successive deprotonation of other H{sub n}TO{sub 4} species, for a given tetrahedral anion T are roughly consistent with this slope, but not to the extent that there is a universal correlation among all species.

  4. Gas chromatography analysis of cellular fatty acids and neutral monosaccharides in the identification of lactobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, A F; Korkeala, H; Mononen, I

    1987-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids and monosaccharides in a group of 14 lactobacilli were analyzed by gas chromatography and the identity of the components was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the same bacterial sample, both monosaccharides and fatty acids were liberated by methanolysis, and in certain experiments, fatty acids alone were released by basic hydrolysis. The results indicate that basic hydrolysis gave more comprehensive information about the fatty acids, but the analysis of monosaccharides was found to be much more useful in distinguishing between different species of lactobacilli. The method described allowed differentiation of 11 of 14 Lactobacillus species, and even single colonies isolated from agar plates could be used for analysis without subculturing. PMID:3435147

  5. MODELING THE HYDROGEOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF A STREAM TO ACID DEPOSITION USING THE ENHANCED TRICKLE-DOWN MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The enhanced trickle-down model was applied to White Oak Run, a second-order stream, located in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, on the western slope of the Blue Ridge Mountains. alibration of the model was performed using five years of field data collected at the site. im...

  6. Calculating the Energy Cost of CO2 Removal in a Coal Based Gas Turbine Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Generation System with an Isolated Anode Stream

    SciTech Connect

    Vanosdol, J G; Gemmen, R S; Liese, E A

    2007-10-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in identifying carbon capturing technologies that can be applied to fossil fuel power generation plants.CO2 capture technologies seek to reduce the amount of CO2 that would normally be emitted into the atmosphere from the daily operation of these plants. In terms of system efficiency and operating costs, this carbon capture is expensive. Further, the additional equipment that would be used to capture CO2 emissions greatly adds to the complexity of the system. There has also been significant interest in coal based gas turbine fuel cell hybrid power plants. A hybrid power plant can have much greater system efficiency than a normal gas turbine power plant because the heat that is normally unused in a standalone solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is recovered and used to drive a power producing turbine. It is thought that the increased system efficiency of the hybrid system might compensate for the increased expense of performing carbon capture. In order to provide some analytical insight on this tradeoff we present a 100 MW class coal fired gas turbine SOFC hybrid power generation system. The hybrid system operates at a pressure ratio of 6, and uses heat recuperation and cathode air recirculation to control the SOFC inlet temperature and the temperature change across the SOFC. A carbon capture scheme is added to this system in order to calculate the relative energy cost in terms of system efficiency due to CO2 compression. The carbon capture is performed by burning the unused fuel from the SOFC in an isolated anode stream using pure O2 injection. The resulting heat that is generated from this process is then used to drive a secondary turbine that is placed in the anode exhaust stream where more work is extracted. With an isolated anode stream, the products of combustion from this secondary combustion process are mostly water and carbon dioxide. The water by-product is

  7. Determination of Free Fatty Acids and Triglycerides by Gas Chromatography Using Selective Esterification Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-11-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  8. Preparation of sphingolipid fatty acid methyl esters for determination by gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    MacGee, J; Williams, M G

    1981-01-30

    Sphingolipid fatty acids are first converted to a mixture of free acids and their n-butyl esters by heating the specimen at 85 degree C in aqueous butanolic hydrogen chloride; the butyl esters are then saponified with methanolic potassium hydroxide. After acidification and extraction into hexane, the fatty acids are extracted into a very small volume of aqueous trimethyl(m-trifluorotolyl)ammonium hydroxide (TMTFTH), injection of an aliquot of the TMTFTH extract into the gas chromatograph yields the fatty acid methyl esters by pyrolytic methylation of the quaternary ammonium salts of the fatty acids. The preparation of a specimen ready for the gas--liquid chromatographic (GLC) analysis with quantitative recovery of the sphingolipid fatty acids can be accomplished in less than 2 h. By comparison, none of a number of well-accepted techniques for the release of sphingomyelin fatty acids by hydrolysis or methanolysis released the fatty acids quantitatively in less than 3 h, and all required additional manipulations before GLC analysis. PMID:7217267

  9. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL STATUS OF LAKES AND STREAMS IN THE UPPER MIDWEST: ASSESSMENT OF ACIDIC DEPOSITION EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest--northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan--have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, clearw...

  10. Role of hydrous iron oxide formation in attenuation and diel cycling of dissolved trace metals in a stream affected by acid rock drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, S.R.; Gammons, C.H.; Jones, C.A.; Nimick, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mining-impacted streams have been shown to undergo diel (24-h) fluctuations in concentrations of major and trace elements. Fisher Creek in south-central Montana, USA receives acid rock drainage (ARD) from natural and mining-related sources. A previous diel field study found substantial changes in dissolved metal concentrations at three sites with differing pH regimes during a 24-h period in August 2002. The current work discusses follow-up field sampling of Fisher Creek as well as field and laboratory experiments that examine in greater detail the underlying processes involved in the observed diel concentration changes. The field experiments employed in-stream chambers that were either transparent or opaque to light, filled with stream water and sediment (cobbles coated with hydrous Fe and Al oxides), and placed in the stream to maintain the same temperature. Three sets of laboratory experiments were performed: (1) equilibration of a Cu(II) and Zn(II) containing solution with Fisher Creek stream sediment at pH 6.9 and different temperatures; (2) titration of Fisher Creek water from pH 3.1 to 7 under four different isothermal conditions; and (3) analysis of the effects of temperature on the interaction of an Fe(II) containing solution with Fisher Creek stream sediment under non-oxidizing conditions. Results of these studies are consistent with a model in which Cu, Fe(II), and to a lesser extent Zn, are adsorbed or co-precipitated with hydrous Fe and Al oxides as the pH of Fisher Creek increases from 5.3 to 7.0. The extent of metal attenuation is strongly temperature-dependent, being more pronounced in warm vs. cold water. Furthermore, the sorption/co-precipitation process is shown to be irreversible; once the Cu, Zn, and Fe(II) are removed from solution in warm water, a decrease in temperature does not release the metals back to the water column. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. Capture and release of mixed acid gasses with binding organic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J.; Yonker, Clement R.

    2010-09-21

    Reversible acid-gas binding organic liquid systems that permit separation and capture of one or more of several acid gases from a mixed gas stream, transport of the liquid, release of the acid gases from the ionic liquid and reuse of the liquid to bind more acid gas with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems. These systems utilize acid gas capture compounds made up of strong bases and weak acids that form salts when reacted with a selected acid gas, and which release these gases when a preselected triggering event occurs. The various new materials that make up this system can also be included in various other applications such as chemical sensors, chemical reactants, scrubbers, and separators that allow for the specific and separate removal of desired materials from a gas stream such as flue gas.

  12. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  13. Carbon nanocomposite sorbent and methods of using the same for separation of one or more materials from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Edwin S; Pavlish, John H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to carbon nanocomposite sorbents. The present invention provides carbon nanocomposite sorbents, methods for making the same, and methods for separation of a pollutant from a gas that includes that pollutant. Various embodiments provide a method for reducing the mercury content of a mercury-containing gas.

  14. Determination of nine catecholamine metabolites and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid in urine by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E B; Horsten, B P; Goldschmidt, H M

    1983-11-25

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of nine urinary acidic and alcoholic catecholamine metabolites and urinary 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid. Incubation of a urine sample in the presence of ascorbic acid, glucuronidase and acylase and subsequent extraction with ethyl acetate precedes derivatization to trimethylsilyl compounds, capillary gas chromatographic separation and flame-ionization detection. The automated dual injection procedure and the analytical characteristics of the proposed method are reported in detail. Special attention is paid to problems that occur in analysis on a routine basis. PMID:6200488

  15. Fermentative utilization of coffee mucilage using Bacillus coagulans and investigation of down-stream processing of fermentation broth for optically pure l(+)-lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Neu, Anna-Katrin; Pleissner, Daniel; Mehlmann, Kerstin; Schneider, Roland; Puerta-Quintero, Gloria Inés; Venus, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    In this study, mucilage, a residue from coffee production, was investigated as substrate in fermentative l(+)-lactic acid production. Mucilage was provided as liquid suspension consisting glucose, galactose, fructose, xylose and sucrose as free sugars (up to 60gL(-1)), and used directly as medium in Bacillus coagulans batch fermentations carried out at 2 and 50L scales. Using mucilage and 5gL(-1) yeast extract as additional nitrogen source, more than 40gL(-1) lactic acid was obtained. Productivity and yield were 4-5gL(-1)h(-1) and 0.70-0.77g lactic acid per g of free sugars, respectively, irrespective the scale. Similar yield was found when no yeast extract was supplied, the productivity, however, was 1.5gL(-1)h(-1). Down-stream processing of culture broth, including filtration, electrodialysis, ion exchange chromatography and distillation, resulted in a pure lactic acid formulation containing 930gL(-1)l(+)-lactic acid. Optical purity was 99.8%. PMID:27035470

  16. THE ADIPIC ACID ENHANCED FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION PROCESS FOR INDUSTRIAL BOILERS. VOLUME 1. FIELD TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the effect of adding adipic acid on the SO2 removal of a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on a coal-fired industrial boiler at Rickenbacker Air National Guard Base near Columbus, OH. Emission data were collected in a...

  17. CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION MODULES FOR EULERIAN ACID DEPOSITION MODELS. VOLUME 1. THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the review and evaluation of mechanistic and kinetic data for the gas-phase reactions that lead to the production of acidic substances in the environment. A master mechanism is designed that treats oxides, sulfur dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, t...

  18. Inoculant effects on alfalfa silage: in vitro gas and volatile fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa silages from two similar trials, 15 treatments with an untreated control and 14 lactic acid bacterial inoculants, were analyzed for in vitro ruminal gas production. First cut (477 g DM/kg) and second cut (393 g DM/kg) alfalfa had been ensiled in glass jars for a minimum of 30 days at room te...

  19. The study of modified calcium hydroxides with surfactants for acid gas removal during incineration.

    PubMed

    Tseng, H H; Wey, M Y; Lu, C Y

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to use additives to extend the sulfation reaction of the calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) used to control SO2 emission from incineration processes. There are two reasons for adding surfactants (surface-active agent): (1) to provide an appropriate dispersion of the Ca(OH)2', thus preventing particle agglomeration due to humidity; (2) to alter the sulfation reaction environment by adsorbing heterogeneous materials on the surface of the Ca(OH)2 to extend the adsorption equilibrium. A dry scrubber integrated with a fabric filter was employed to study the effect of surfactants on the removal efficiency of acid gas in the flue gas with Ca(OH)2 as the sorbent. The operating parameters evaluated include: (1) the different surfactants (calcium lignosulfonate, sodium lignosulfonate, alkyl naphthalene sodium sulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates) and (2) the composition of acid gas (i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NO) and hydrogen chloride (HCl)). The results show that modified Ca(OH)2 with surfactants could effectively decrease the emission of acid gas during incineration. Different additives had individual absorption efficiencies on different acid gases. On the whole, sodium lignosulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates had better sorption capacity for SO2 and NO, but not for HCl. In addition, when SO2 coexisted with NO and HCl, the concentration of NO and HCl will result in decrease or increase of the removal efficiency of SO2. PMID:11924579

  20. Analysis of pure tar substances (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in the gas stream using ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution (MCR).

    PubMed

    Weide, Tobias; Guschin, Viktor; Becker, Wolfgang; Koelle, Sabine; Maier, Simon; Seidelt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of tar, mostly characterized as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), describes a topic that has been researched for years. An online analysis of tar in the gas stream in particular is needed to characterize the tar conversion or formation in the biomass gasification process. The online analysis in the gas is carried out with ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy (190-720 nm). This online analysis is performed with a measuring cell developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT). To this day, online tar measurements using UV-Vis spectroscopy have not been carried out in detail. Therefore, PAHs are analyzed as follows. The measurements are split into different steps. The first step to prove the online method is to vaporize single tar substances. These experiments show that a qualitative analysis of PAHs in the gas stream with the used measurement setup is possible. Furthermore, it is shown that the method provides very exact results, so that a differentiation of various PAHs is possible. The next step is to vaporize a PAH mixture. This step consists of vaporizing five pure substances almost simultaneously. The interpretation of the resulting data is made using a chemometric interpretation method, the multivariate curve resolution (MCR). The verification of the calculated results is the main aim of this experiment. It has been shown that the tar mixture can be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively (in arbitrary units) in detail using the MCR. Finally it is the main goal of this paper to show the first steps in the applicability of the UV-Vis spectroscopy and the measurement setup on online tar analysis in view of characterizing the biomass gasification process. Due to that, the gasification plant (at the laboratory scale), developed and constructed by the Fraunhofer ICT, has been used to vaporize these substances. Using this gasification plant for the experiments enables the usage of the measurement setup also for the

  1. Hydrology and water quality of the headwaters of the River Severn: Stream acidity recovery and interactions with plantation forestry under an improving pollution climate.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin; Robinson, Mark; Reynolds, Brian; Neal, Margaret; Rowland, Philip; Grant, Simon; Norris, David; Williams, Bronwen; Sleep, Darren; Lawlor, Alan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents new information on the hydrology and water quality of the eroding peatland headwaters of the River Severn in mid-Wales and links it to the impact of plantation conifer forestry further down the catchment. The Upper Hafren is dominated by low-growing peatland vegetation, with an average annual precipitation of around 2650 mm with around 250 mm evaporation. With low catchment permeability, stream response to rainfall is "flashy" with the rising limb to peak stormflow typically under an hour. The water quality is characteristically "dilute"; stormflow is acidic and enriched in aluminium and iron from the acid organic soil inputs. Baseflow is circum-neutral and calcium and bicarbonate bearing due to the inputs of groundwater enriched from weathering of the underlying rocks. Annual cycling is observed for the nutrients reflecting uptake and decomposition processes linked to the vegetation and for arsenic implying seasonal water-logging within the peat soils and underlying glacial drift. Over the decadal scale, sulphate and nitrate concentrations have declined while Gran alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon and iron have increased, indicating a reduction in stream acidification. Within the forested areas the water quality is slightly more concentrated and acidic, transgressing the boundary for acid neutralisation capacity as a threshold for biological damage. Annual sulphate and aluminium concentrations are double those observed in the Upper Hafren, reflecting the influence of forestry and the greater ability of trees to scavenge pollutant inputs from gaseous and mist/cloud-water sources compared to short vegetation. Acidification is decreasing more rapidly in the forest compared to the eroding peatland possibly due to the progressive harvesting of the mature forest reducing the scavenging of acidifying inputs. For the Lower Hafren, long-term average annual precipitation is slightly lower, with lower average altitude, at around 2520mm and evaporation

  2. Capillary gas chromatography determination of volatile organic acids in rain and fog samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1984-08-01

    A fused silica capillary gas chromatography technique is described for the determination of volatile acids (C/sub 1/-C/sub 7/) in rain samples using p-bromophenacyl esters. As the sensitivity of this method is high (GC detection limit is ca. 10 pmol), a small volume of rain (25-50 mL) or fog (1-2 mL) is needed. Spiked experiments showed that the measured concentrations of volatile acids in the spiked rain samples linearly increased with a slope of approx.1 in proportion to the concentrations of volatile acids added in the rainwater. Repeated analyses of rain samples showed that relative standard deviations are less than or equal to 18% for C/sub 1/, C/sub 2/, and C/sub 3/ acids, which are the major volatile acids.

  3. [Gas chromatographic determination of formic acid in urine as carbon monoxide (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Angerer, J

    1976-02-01

    A gas chromatographic method for determining formic acid in human urine is described. The analytical reliability of this method fullfills the criteria of statistical quality control. The rate of recovery is 101.2 to 105.7% the variability coefficients lie between 2.9 and 7.2%. The selectivity of this method is demonstrated by analysing a group of components normally occuring in urine which did not interfere with the determination of formic acid. The detection limit of about 4.3 mumol/1 formic acid in urine permits the determination of the concentration of formic acid in the urine of normal persons. The concentrations of formic acid in the urine of a group of normal persons lies between 0 and 2.79 mmol/1. The average concentration was 0.39 +/- 0.60 mmol/1. PMID:1249528

  4. Gas chromatography-vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy for analysis of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Smuts, Jonathan; Bai, Ling; Walsh, Phillip; Armstrong, Daniel W; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    A new vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detector for gas chromatography was recently developed and applied to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. VUV detection features full spectral acquisition in a wavelength range of 115-240nm, where virtually all chemical species absorb. VUV absorption spectra of 37 FAMEs, including saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated types were recorded. Unsaturated FAMEs show significantly different gas phase absorption profiles than saturated ones, and these classes can be easily distinguished with the VUV detector. Another advantage includes differentiating cis/trans-isomeric FAMEs (e.g. oleic acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester isomers) and the ability to use VUV data analysis software for deconvolution of co-eluting signals. As a universal detector, VUV also provides high specificity, sensitivity, and a fast data acquisition rate, making it a powerful tool for fatty acid screening when combined with gas chromatography. The fatty acid profile of several food oil samples (olive, canola, vegetable, corn, sunflower and peanut oils) were analyzed in this study to demonstrate applicability to real world samples. PMID:26471553

  5. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  6. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  7. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-08-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations. PMID:19803493

  9. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment..., 2011 § 60.648 Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas... dilute solutions are used. In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a...

  10. 40 CFR 60.5408 - What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure? 60.5408 Section 60.5408 Protection of Environment... § 60.5408 What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure... of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with a standard solution of iodine....

  11. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment..., 2011 § 60.648 Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas... dilute solutions are used. In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a...

  12. 40 CFR 60.5408 - What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure? 60.5408 Section 60.5408 Protection of Environment... § 60.5408 What is an optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure... of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with a standard solution of iodine....

  13. Assessing impacts of unconventional natural gas extraction on microbial communities in headwater stream ecosystems in Northwestern Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Ryan; Solomon, Caroline; Brislawn, Colin J; Wright, Justin R; Rosenberger, Abigail; McClure, Erin E; Grube, Alyssa M; Peterson, Mark P; Keddache, Mehdi; Mason, Olivia U; Hazen, Terry C; Grant, Christopher J; Lamendella, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have increased dramatically in Pennsylvania Marcellus shale formations, however the potential for major environmental impacts are still incompletely understood. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed to characterize the microbial community structure of water, sediment, bryophyte, and biofilm samples from 26 headwater stream sites in northwestern Pennsylvania with different histories of fracking activity within Marcellus shale formations. Further, we describe the relationship between microbial community structure and environmental parameters measured. Approximately 3.2 million 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from a total of 58 samples. Microbial community analyses showed significant reductions in species richness as well as evenness in sites with Marcellus shale activity. Beta diversity analyses revealed distinct microbial community structure between sites with and without Marcellus shale activity. For example, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) within the Acetobacteracea, Methylocystaceae, Acidobacteriaceae, and Phenylobacterium were greater than three log-fold more abundant in MSA+ sites as compared to MSA- sites. Further, several of these OTUs were strongly negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with the number of wellpads in a watershed. It should be noted that many of the OTUs enriched in MSA+ sites are putative acidophilic and/or methanotrophic populations. This study revealed apparent shifts in the autochthonous microbial communities and highlighted potential members that could be responding to changing stream conditions as a result of nascent industrial activity in these aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25408683

  14. Assessing impacts of unconventional natural gas extraction on microbial communities in headwater stream ecosystems in Northwestern Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, Ryan; Solomon, Caroline; Brislawn, Colin J.; Wright, Justin R.; Rosenberger, Abigail; McClure, Erin E.; Grube, Alyssa M.; Peterson, Mark P.; Keddache, Mehdi; Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Grant, Christopher J.; Lamendella, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have increased dramatically in Pennsylvania Marcellus shale formations, however the potential for major environmental impacts are still incompletely understood. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed to characterize the microbial community structure of water, sediment, bryophyte, and biofilm samples from 26 headwater stream sites in northwestern Pennsylvania with different histories of fracking activity within Marcellus shale formations. Further, we describe the relationship between microbial community structure and environmental parameters measured. Approximately 3.2 million 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from a total of 58 samples. Microbial community analyses showed significant reductions in species richness as well as evenness in sites with Marcellus shale activity. Beta diversity analyses revealed distinct microbial community structure between sites with and without Marcellus shale activity. For example, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) within the Acetobacteracea, Methylocystaceae, Acidobacteriaceae, and Phenylobacterium were greater than three log-fold more abundant in MSA+ sites as compared to MSA− sites. Further, several of these OTUs were strongly negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with the number of wellpads in a watershed. It should be noted that many of the OTUs enriched in MSA+ sites are putative acidophilic and/or methanotrophic populations. This study revealed apparent shifts in the autochthonous microbial communities and highlighted potential members that could be responding to changing stream conditions as a result of nascent industrial activity in these aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25408683

  15. An acid-gas removal system for upgrading subquality natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.; Leppin, D.; Shoemaker, H.D.; Hooper, H.M.; Emmrich, G.; Moore, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop systems to reduce the cost of treating subquality natural gas. Based on over 1,000 laboratory experiments on vapor-liquid equilibria and mass transfer and simulation studies, the use of N-Formyl Morpholine as a solvent together with structured packings has the following advantages: high capacity for H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} removal; little or no refrigeration required; less loss of hydrocarbons (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}-C{sub 6}); and dehydration potential. To verify these findings and to obtain additional data base for scale-up, a field test unit capable of processing 1MMSCF/d of natural gas has been installed at the Shell Western E and P Inc. (SWEPI) Fandango processing plant site. The results of the testing at the Fandango site will be presented when available.

  16. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  17. Fuel-cell engine stream conditioning system

    DOEpatents

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A stream conditioning system for a fuel cell gas management system or fuel cell engine. The stream conditioning system manages species potential in at least one fuel cell reactant stream. A species transfer device is located in the path of at least one reactant stream of a fuel cell's inlet or outlet, which transfer device conditions that stream to improve the efficiency of the fuel cell. The species transfer device incorporates an exchange media and a sorbent. The fuel cell gas management system can include a cathode loop with the stream conditioning system transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell related to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  18. Experimental studies of selective acid gas removal: Absorption of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide into aqueous methyldiethanolamine using packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The use of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) for selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from acid gas streams has been studied in a 2 inch column packed with 1/4 inch ceramic Intalox saddles. The column was operated in a counter-current, steady state fashion. The feed gas composition varied between 1 and 5 mole % hydrogen sulfide and between 0 and 50 mole % carbon dioxide. In order to assist the development of packed column absorption models, the rate at which pure carbon dioxide absorbs into 2 M MDEA was measured as a function of pressure, liquid flow rate and packed bed length. The importance of end effects was carefully evaluated. In addition, draining and tracer methods were used to estimate the amount of static holdup present in the column. Using classical draining methods, as much as 50 % of the total holdup was found to be static. However, according to the step decrease in tracer method, less than 5 % of the total holdup was static. Since the step decrease in tracer method measures the amount of static holdup present in the bed under irrigated conditions, it seems likely that the draining method provides an unrealistic estimate of static holdup. Thus, although the notion of static holdup may be useful as a means of correlating mass transfer coefficients, the data indicate that very little static holdup exists in the column under irrigated conditions. Hence, in the absence of a mechanistically sound model, the choice of whether to use static holdup or dispersion as a means of accounting for deviations from plug flow in the liquid phase should be made on the basis of computational convenience.

  19. 'Molecular Basket' sorbents for separation of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S from various gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.L.; Wang, X.X.; Song, C.S.

    2009-04-15

    A new generation of 'molecular basket' sorbents (MBS) has been developed by the optimum combination of the nanoporous material and CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S-philic polymer sorbent to increase the accessible sorption sites for CO{sub 2} capture from flue gas (Postdecarbonization), and for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S separation from the reduced gases, such as synthesis gas, reformate (Predecarbonization), natural gas, coal/biomass gasification gas, and biogas. The sorption capacity of 140 mg of CO{sub 2}/g of sorb was achieved at 15 kPa CO{sub 2} partial pressure, which shows superior performance in comparison with other known sorbents. In addition, an exceptional dependence of MBS sorption performance on temperature for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S was found and discussed at a molecular level via the computational chemistry approach. On the basis of the fundamental understanding of MBS sorption characteristics, an innovative sorption process was proposed and demonstrated at the laboratory scale for removing and recovering CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S, respectively, from a model gas. The present study provides a new approach for development of the novel CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S sorbents and may have a major impact on the advance of science and technology for CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S capture and separation from various gases.

  20. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  1. A sulfuric-acid process with near-zero SO2 gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, W.; Fattinger, V.; Keilpart, T.; Hamel, H.-J.

    1999-05-01

    A sulfuric-acid process has been developed that is able to handle low and variable SO2 concentrations with practically zero SO2 emissions (less than 3 ppm). The plant comprises two stages—a single-bed converter contact plant and a modified tower plant. Acids of 95 98% and/or oleum with up to 32% free SO3 can be produced in the first stage. Off-gas of the first stage is piped to the second stage, where the SO2 is converted to near nontracability while producing 76% strong acid. It is then returned to the contact plant to produce stronger acid or oleum. This process does not generate any additional disposable waste.

  2. Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum: biocatalyst in the production of sulfur and organic carbon from a gas stream containing H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Cork, D.J.; Garunas, R.; Sajjad, A.

    1983-03-01

    Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum (ATCC 17092) was grown in a 1-liter continuously stirred tank reactor (800-ml liquid volume) at pH 6.8, 30/sup 0/C, saturated light intensity, and gas flow rate of 23.6 ml/min from a gas cylinder blend consisting of 3.9 mol% H/sub 2/S, 9.2 mol% CO/sub 2/, 86.4 mol% N/sub 2/, and 0.5 mol% H/sub 2/. This is the first demonstration of photoautotrophic growth of a Chlorobium sp. on a continuous inorganic gas feed. A significant potential exists for applying this photoautotrophic process to desulfurization and CO/sub 2/ fixation of gases containing acidic components (H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/).

  3. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOEpatents

    Bravo, Jose Luis; Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-04-03

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  4. Accounting for Dispersion and time-dependent Input Signals during Gas Tracer Tests and their Effect on the Estimation of Reaeration, Respiration and Photosynthesis in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Julia; Osenbrück, Karsten; Olaf, Cirpka

    2015-04-01

    The variation of dissolved oxygen (DO) in streams, are caused by a number of processes, of which respiration and primary production are considered to be the most important ones (Odum, 1956; Staehr et al., 2012). Measuring respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams based on recorded time series of DO requires good knowledge on the reaeration fluxes at the given locations. For this, gas tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration coefficients determined from the observed decrease in gas concentration along the stretch (Genereux and Hemond, 1990): ( ) --1- -cup- k2 = t2 - t1 ln Rcdown (1) with the gas concentrations measured at an upstream location, cup[ML-3], and a downstream location, cdown. t1[T] andt2 [T] denote the measurement times at the two locations and R [-] represents the recovery rate which can also be obtained from conservative tracer data. The typical procedure for analysis, however, contains a number of assumptions, as it neglects dispersion and does not take into account possible fluctuations of the input signal. We derive the influence of these aspects mathematically and illustrate them on the basis of field data obtained from a propane gas tracer test. For this, we compare the reaeration coefficients obtained from approaches with dispersion and/or a time-dependent input signals to the standard approach. Travel times and travel time distributions between the different measurement stations are obtained from a simultaneously performed conservative tracer test with fluorescein. In order to show the carry-over effect to metabolic rates, we furthermore estimate respiration and photosynthesis rates from the calculated reaeration coefficients and measured oxygen data. This way, we are able to show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and the impact of the time-dependent input concentration cannot be disregarded either. When estimated reaeration rates are used to calculate respiration and photosynthesis from measured

  5. Recognition of a Biofilm at the Sediment-Water Interface of AN Acid Mine Drainage-Contaminated Stream, and its Role in Controlling Iron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boult, Stephen; Johnson, Nicholas; Curtis, Charles

    1997-03-01

    Material collected over a month on plates attached to the bed of the Afon Goch, Anglesey, a stream highly contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD), was either examined intact by electron microscopy or suspended and cultured to reveal the presence of microbiota. Certain of the aerobic microbiota were identified, the genus Pseudomonas formed the commonest isolate and cultures of Serratia plymuthica were grown in order to compare the biofilms formed with the material collected in the Afon Goch. The material at the sediment-water interface of the Afon Goch was of similar underlying morphology to that of the cultured biofilms. However, the former had a superficial granular coating of equidimensional (60-100 nm) and evenly spaced iron rich particles (determined by X-ray microanalysis). The sediment-water interface of this AMD-contaminated stream is therefore best described as a highly contaminated biofilm. Evidence from previous work suggests that the streambed is active in iron removal from the water column. The intimate association of iron with microbiota at the streambed, therefore, implies that iron flux prediction may not be possible from physical and chemical data alone but requires knowledge of biofilm physiology and ecology.Microbially mediated metal precipitation, both by single bacteria and by biofilms, has been reported elsewhere but mass balance considerations suggest that this explanation cannot hold good for the large amounts of iron hydroxide depositing from waters of the prevalent pH and redox status. Filtered stream water analyses indicate the presence of colloidal iron hydroxide and also its removal downstream where ochreous (iron hydroxide rich) material accumulates. The process of iron immobilization is likely to be the attraction and physical trapping of colloidal iron hydroxide by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which constitute the matrix of biofilms.

  6. Photochemical removal of NpF sub 6 and PuF sub 6 from UF sub 6 gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    A novel photochemical method of removing reactive fluorides from UF{sub 6} gas has been discovered. This method reduces generated waste to little more than the volume of the removed impurities, minimizes loss of UF{sub 6}, and can produce a recyclable by-product, fluorine gas. In our new method, impure UF{sub 6}, is exposed to ultraviolet light which dissociates the UF{sub 6} to UF{sub 5} and fluorine atom. Impurities which chemically react with UF{sub 5} are reduced and form solid compounds easily removed from the gas while UF{sub 5} is converted back to UF{sub 6}. Proof-of-concept testing involved UF{sub 6} containing NpF{sub 6} and PuF{sub 6} with CO added as a fluorine atom scavenger. In a single photolysis step, greater than 5000-fold reduction of PuF{sub 6} was demonstrated while reducing NpF{sub 6} by more than 40-fold. This process is likely to remove corrosion and fission product fluorides that are more reactive than UF{sub 6} and has been demonstrated without an added fluorine atom scavenger by periodically removing photogenerated fluorine gas. 44 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Characterization of naphthenic acids by gas chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Xavier; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Backus, Sean M; Peru, Kerry M; McMartin, Dena W; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Taguchi, Vince Y; Headley, John V

    2014-08-01

    During the bitumen extraction from the oil sands of Alberta, large volumes of process water containing naphthenic acids are stored in tailing ponds. The naphthenic acids along with other components in the processed waters are known to be toxic in aquatic environments. In view of the complex matrix and the toxicity of the processed waters, there is a need for complementary analytical techniques for comprehensive characterization of the naphthenic acid mixtures. This study reports the online gas chromatographic separation of naphthenic acid mixtures prior to ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry detection, using electron and chemical ionization. Two oil sands processed water samples and two groundwater samples were characterized to evaluate the performance of the instrumental technique. The high mass resolution of the system enabled visualization of the data using Kendrick mass defect plots. The addition of gas chromatographic separations enabled visualization of the data as unique compound class elution fingerprints. The technique is demonstrated to be a valuable tool for chemical fingerprinting of naphthenic acids. PMID:25001115

  8. Determination of carboxylic acids in oil samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.

    1981-03-01

    A combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method for measuring carboxylic acids in oil samples without first going through solvent extraction and group separation is reported. The carboxylic acids in oils are directly derivatized to their corresponding methyl esters via anion formation in tetramethylammonium hydroxide/methanol/methyl iodide/n-butyl acetate solutions prior to GC/MS analysis using a glass wall coated capillary column. The reaction is mild, selective, and rapid. It can usually be carried out at room temperature and completed in 10 to 15 min. Multiple ion detection techniques (MID) can be readily used to further resolve methyl esters from other compounds if necessary.

  9. Ammonia Gas Sensing Behavior of Tanninsulfonic Acid Doped Polyaniline-TiO2 Composite

    PubMed Central

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Bourdo, Shawn E.; Sacre, Nicolas; Nair, Dev; Berry, Brian C.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO2 composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO2 in TANIPANI matrix. UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy studies provided information about the electronic interactions among tannin, polyaniline, and TiO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the metal oxide dispersions inside polyaniline matrix. Gas sensors were prepared by spin coating solutions of TANIPANI-TiO2 and TANIPANI composites onto glass slides. Sensors were tested at three different concentrations (20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 60 ppm) of ammonia gas at ambient temperature conditions by measuring the changes in surface resistivity of the films with respect to time. Ammonia gas sensing plots are presented showing the response values, response times and recovery times. The TANIPANI-TiO2 composite exhibited better response and shorter recovery times when compared to TANIPANI control and other polyaniline composites that have been reported in the literature. For the first time a proposed mechanism of gas sensing basing on the polaron band localization and its effects on the gas sensing behavior of polyaniline are reported. PMID:26501291

  10. Ammonia gas sensing behavior of tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline-TiO₂ composite.

    PubMed

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Bourdo, Shawn E; Sacre, Nicolas; Nair, Dev; Berry, Brian C; Biris, Alexandru S; Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-01-01

    A highly active tannin doped polyaniline-TiO₂ composite ammonia gas sensor was developed and the mechanism behind the gas sensing activity was reported for the first time. A tanninsulfonic acid doped polyaniline (TANIPANI)-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was synthesized by an in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of tanninsulfonic acid and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to determine the incorporation of TiO₂ in TANIPANI matrix. UV-Visible and infrared spectroscopy studies provided information about the electronic interactions among tannin, polyaniline, and TiO₂. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the metal oxide dispersions inside polyaniline matrix. Gas sensors were prepared by spin coating solutions of TANIPANI-TiO₂ and TANIPANI composites onto glass slides. Sensors were tested at three different concentrations (20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 60 ppm) of ammonia gas at ambient temperature conditions by measuring the changes in surface resistivity of the films with respect to time. Ammonia gas sensing plots are presented showing the response values, response times and recovery times. The TANIPANI-TiO₂ composite exhibited better response and shorter recovery times when compared to TANIPANI control and other polyaniline composites that have been reported in the literature. For the first time a proposed mechanism of gas sensing basing on the polaron band localization and its effects on the gas sensing behavior of polyaniline are reported. PMID:26501291

  11. Uptake of Gas-Phase Nitric Acid by Water-Ice Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullerstam, M.; Abbatt, J. P.

    2004-05-01

    Nitric acid is a widespread molecule found in the atmosphere. It is mainly removed from the troposphere by wet or dry deposition. In colder regions such as the upper troposphere and tropopause where cirrus clouds are formed nitric acid can also be scavenged by cirrus ice particles. The uptake of gas-phase nitric acid by water-ice films has been re-examined with a coated-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) at 228K. Previous flow tube studies of this system have shown little dependence of the uptake over the partial pressure regime studied. In these studies the initial, short-term uptake has been the focus and the long term uptake has not been quantified. In this experimental setup it was possible to study the uptake of nitric acid at lower partial pressures resulting in a more atmospherically appropriate determination of the adsorption isotherm and the long term uptake has also been addressed. Measurement of the initial uptake coefficient representing a lower limit will also be presented. Finally, possible burial of nitric acid into the bulk of the ice during continuous growth of the ice film has been studied. In the atmosphere ice particles will be subject to cycles of evaporation and condensation which could cause the nitric acid to be encapsulated into the particle, especially since the major part of the adsorption has been proven to be irreversible. This could enhance the ice particles capacity of scavenging nitric acid.

  12. Fatty acid composition, oxidative stability and sensory quality of meat from broiler chicken fed autolysate from bacteria grown on natural gas.

    PubMed

    Overland, M; Skrede, A

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial autolysate, a down stream product of bacterial biomass grown on natural gas by mainly the methanotrophic bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus, was fed at 8% as is to broiler chickens from 1 to 35 days of age for studies of fatty acid composition, lipid oxidation and sensory quality of thigh meat stored frozen for 6 month at -18 °C or -80 °C. Lipid oxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and volatile profile by dynamic headspace gas chromatography. Adding bacterial autolysate to diets did not affect the total content of saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids in thigh meat, but increased the levels of C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C16:1n-7 and reduced the levels of C18:1n-7, C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 fatty acids. Feeding of bacterial autolysate tended (p < 0.08) to reduce TBARS of meat samples. Contents of volatiles were generally low, but feeding of bacterial autolysate significantly reduced levels of butanal (p < 0.04) and tended to reduce levels of hexanal (p < 0.11), pentanal (p < 0.09), 1-penten-3-ol (p < 0.08) and butanone (p < 0.08). Bacterial autolysate had no effects on sensory quality parameters of meat related to odour and flavour. To conclude, adding bacterial autolysate to diets did not affect the relative proportion of saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids, but reduced content of volatiles in frozen-stored broiler meat. The reduced susceptibility to lipid oxidation in broiler meat may be related to antioxidant properties of the bacterial autolysate. PMID:21831229

  13. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  14. Adaptation of a commercially available 200 kW natural gas fuel cell power plant for operation on a hydrogen rich gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Maston, V.A.

    1997-12-01

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) has designed a hydrogen fueled fuel cell power plant based on a modification of its standard natural gas fueled PC25{trademark} C fuel cell power plant. The natural gas fueled PC25 C is a 200 kW, fuel cell power plant that is commercially available. The program to accomplish the fuel change involved deleting the natural gas processing elements, designing a new fuel pretreatment subsystem, modifying the water and thermal management subsystem, developing a hydrogen burner to combust unconsumed hydrogen, and modifying the control system. Additionally, the required modifications to the manufacturing and assembly procedures necessary to allow the hydrogen fueled power plant to be manufactured in conjunction with the on-going production of the standard PC25 C power plants were identified. This work establishes the design and manufacturing plan for the 200 kW hydrogen fueled PC25 power plant.

  15. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres. PMID:26263321

  16. Formation of organic acids from the gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpinolene was studied in static chamber experiments using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. Two isomers of C(7)-diacids and three isomers of C(7)-aldehydic acids were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Possible mechanisms of formation of these acids were investigated using different OH radical scavengers and relative humidities, and were compared to those reported earlier for the ozonolysis of beta-pinene. In addition, branching ratios for some of the individual reaction steps, e.g. the branching ratio between the two hydroperoxide channels of the C(7)-CI, were deduced from the quantitative product yield data. Branching ratios for POZ decomposition and the stabilisation/decomposition of the C(7-)CI were also obtained from measurements of the C(7) primary carbonyl product. PMID:19458821

  17. Electrons Mediate the Gas-Phase Oxidation of Formic Acid with Ozone.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Christian; Tang, Wai-Kit; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-08-26

    Gas-phase reactions of CO3 (.-) with formic acid are studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Signal loss indicates the release of a free electron, with the formation of neutral reaction products. This is corroborated by adding traces of SF6 to the reaction gas, which scavenges 38 % of the electrons. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction potential energy surface provide a reaction path for the formation of neutral carbon dioxide and water as the thermochemically favored products. From the literature, it is known that free electrons in the troposphere attach to O2 , which in turn transfer the electron to O3 . O3 (.-) reacts with CO2 to form CO3 (.-) . The reaction reported here formally closes the catalytic cycle for the oxidation of formic acid with ozone, catalyzed by free electrons. PMID:27400953

  18. Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

  19. Distribution of Hg, As and Se in material and flue gas streams from preheater-precalciner cement kilns and vertical shaft cement kilns in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dahai; Peng, Zheng; Ding, Qiong; Karstensen, Kåre Helge; Engelsen, Christian J; Li, Li; Ren, Yong; Jiang, Chen

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of Hg, As, and Se in cement production. Two types of cement plants were studied, including the vertical shaft kiln (VSK) and preheater-precalciner kiln (PPK) processes. Determination of Hg, As, and Se in the main material and gas streams were performed. It was found that recycling of particulate matter captured by an air pollution control device caused a significant enrichment of Hg and As inside both processes. The total quantity of Hg entering the process and the quantity emitted to the atmosphere were found to be 10-109 and 6.3-38 mg, respectively, per ton of clinker produced. The average Hg emission was calculated to be around 41% of the total mercury input. The emissions found complied with the European Union (EU) limit and exceeded partly the U.S. limit. Furthermore, it was found that oxidized mercury was the dominant species in the PPK process, whereas the reduced form was dominant in the VSK process, due to the oxidizing and reducing gas conditions, respectively. Regarding the distribution of As and Se, the major amounts were bound to the solid materials, that is, cement clinker and particulate matter. Based on cement production data in China in 2013, the annual emissions of Hg and As were estimated to be in the range of 8.6-52 and 4.1-9.5 tons, respectively. PMID:26037967

  20. Determination of phenoxy acid herbicides in water by electron-capture and microcoulometric gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.; Lamar, William L.

    1967-01-01

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method using microcoulometric titration and electron-capture detection for the analysis of 2,4-D, silvex, 2,4,5-T, and other phenoxy acid herbicides in water is described. The herbicides are extracted from unfiltered water samples (800-1,000 ml) by use of ethyl ether ; then the herbicides are concentrated and esterilied. To allow the analyst a choice, two esterilication procedures--using either boron trifluoride-methanol or diazomethane--are evaluated. Microcoulometric gas chromatography is specific for the detection of halogenated compounds such as the phenoxy acid herbicides whereas it does not respond to nonhalogenated components. Microcoulometric gas chromatography requires care and patience. It is not convenient for rapid screening of l-liter samples that contain less than 1 microgram of the herbicide. Although electroncapture gas chromatography is less selective and more critically affected by interfering substances, it is, nevertheless, convenient and more sensitive than microcoulometric gas chromatography. Two different liquid phases are used in the gas chromatographic columns--DC-200 silicone in one column and QF-1 silicone in the other. The performance of both columns is improved by the addition of Carbowax 20M. The Gas Chrom Q support is coated with the liquid phases by the 'frontal-analysis' technique. The practical lower limits for measurement of the phenoxy acid herbicides in water primarily depend upon the sample size, interferences present, anal instrumentation used. With l-liter samples of water, the practical lower limits of measurement are 10 ppt (parts per trillion) for 2,4-D and 2 ppt for silvex and 2,4,5-T when electron-capture detection is used, and approximately 20 ppt for each herbicide when analyzed by microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Recoveries of the herbicides immediately after addition to unfiltered water samples averaged 92 percent for 2,4-D, 90 percent for silvex, and 98 percent for 2

  1. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  2. SIMULTANEOUS QUANTIFICATION OF JASMONIC ACID AND SALICYLIC ACID IN PLANTS BY VAPOR PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-CHEMICAL IONIZATION-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid represent important signaling compounds in plant defensive responses against other organisms. Here, we present a new method for the easy, sensitive and reproducible quantification of both compounds by vapor phase extraction and gas chromatography-positive ion chemic...

  3. MW Spectroscopy Coupled with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization: Succinic Acid in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Estibaliz; Ecija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Castano, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Godfrey, Peter D.; McNaughton, Don; Jahn, Michaela K.; Nair, K. P. Rajappan; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2013-06-01

    Recent lab and field measurements have indicated critical roles of organic acids in enhancing new atmospheric aerosol formation. In order to understand the nucleation process, here we report an experimental and theoretical investigation of chemical structure of succinic acid. We have used the technique of Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy (FTMW). Succinic acid was vaporized by UV ultrafast laser ablation to suppress thermal decomposition processes^a and seeded into an expanding stream of Ne forming a supersonic jet. The rotational spectrum detected the presence of a single most stable conformation in the cm- mm- wave regions for which accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters have been determined. The study was extended to all monosubstituted isotopic species (^{13}C, ^{18}O, D(O)), which were positively identified, leading to an accurate determination of the effective and substitution structures of the molecule. The experimental study was supplemented by ab initio (MP2) and DFT (M06-2X and B3LYP) calculations. ^{a} E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 51, 3119-3124, 2012.

  4. Interaction of Gas Phase Oxalic Acid with Ammonia and its Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  5. Supramolecular Adducts of Cucurbit[7]uril and Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Ekaterina; Vilaseca, Marta; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Masliy, A. N.; Vicent, Cristian; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of the macrocyclic cavitand cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) with a series of amino acids (AA) with different side chains (Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) is investigated by ESI-MS techniques. The 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ adducts are observed as the base peak when equimolar Q7:AA solutions are electrosprayed, whereas the 1:2 [Q7 + 2AA + 2H]2+ dications are dominant when an excess of the amino acid is used. A combination of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and DFT calculations of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ (AA = Tyr, Val, and Ser) adducts is also reported and proven to be unsuccessful at discriminating between exclusion or inclusion-type conformations in the gas phase. Collision induced dissociation (CID) revealed that the preferred dissociation pathways of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ dications are strongly influenced by the identity of the amino acid side chain, whereas ion molecule reactions towards N-butylmethylamine displayed a common reactivity pattern comprising AA displacement. Special emphasis is given on the differences between the gas-phase behavior of the supramolecular adducts with amino acids (AA = Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) and those featuring basic (Lys and Arg) and aromatic (Tyr and Phe) side chains.

  6. SO2 gas adsorption by modified kaolin clays: influence of previous heating and time acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Volzone, Cristina; Ortiga, Jose

    2011-10-01

    Modified kaolin clays were used as adsorbents for SO(2) gas adsorptions. The clays were heated up to 900 °C previous to acid treatments with 0.5 N sulfuric acid solutions at boiling temperature during different times up to 1440 min. Equilibrium adsorption at 25 °C and 0.1 MPa was carried out by using a volumetric apparatus. The samples were characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis. The heating of the clays followed by acid treatment improved the adsorption capacity of the kaolin clays. The presence of amorphous silica and hydroxyl in the final products improved SO(2) adsorption capacity. Better properties for SO(2) adsorption were found in kaolin rich in not well ordered kaolinite clay mineral. PMID:21696883

  7. PALLADIUM/COPPER ALLOY COMPOSITE MEMBRANES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN SEPARATION FROM COAL-DERIVED GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Douglas Way

    2001-07-31

    Recent advances have shown that Pd-Cu composite membranes are not susceptible to the mechanical, embrittlement, and poisoning problems that have prevented widespread industrial use of Pd for high temperature H2 separation. These membranes consist of a thin ({approx}1 mm) film of metal deposited on the inner surface of a porous metal or ceramic tube. Based on preliminary results, thin Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} films are expected to exhibit hydrogen flux up to ten times larger than commercial polymer membranes for H2 separation, and resist poisoning by H{sub 2}S and other sulfur compounds typical of coal gas. Similar Pd-membranes have been operated at temperatures as high as 750 C. The overall objective of the proposed project is to demonstrate the feasibility of using sequential electroless plating to fabricate Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 4}0 alloy membranes on porous supports for H{sub 2} separation. These following advantages of these membranes for processing of coal-derived gas will be demonstrated: High H{sub 2} flux; Sulfur tolerant, even at very high total sulfur levels (1000 ppm); Operation at temperatures well above 500 C; and Resistance to embrittlement and degradation by thermal cycling. The proposed research plan is designed to providing a fundamental understanding of: Factors important in membrane fabrication; Optimization of membrane structure and composition; Effect of temperature, pressure, and gas composition on H{sub 2} flux and membrane selectivity; and How this membrane technology can be integrated in coal gasification-fuel cell systems.

  8. CONNECTICUT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named streams in Connecticut. It includes two Shapefiles with line and polygon features. Both Shapefiles should be used together. The polygon shapefile fills in open water streams such as the Connecticut River as well as Long Island Sound. T...

  9. Stream Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J.

    Stream processors, like other multi core architectures partition their functional units and storage into multiple processing elements. In contrast to typical architectures, which contain symmetric general-purpose cores and a cache hierarchy, stream processors have a significantly leaner design. Stream processors are specifically designed for the stream execution model, in which applications have large amounts of explicit parallel computation, structured and predictable control, and memory accesses that can be performed at a coarse granularity. Applications in the streaming model are expressed in a gather-compute-scatter form, yielding programs with explicit control over transferring data to and from on-chip memory. Relying on these characteristics, which are common to many media processing and scientific computing applications, stream architectures redefine the boundary between software and hardware responsibilities with software bearing much of the complexity required to manage concurrency, locality, and latency tolerance. Thus, stream processors have minimal control consisting of fetching medium- and coarse-grained instructions and executing them directly on the many ALUs. Moreover, the on-chip storage hierarchy of stream processors is under explicit software control, as is all communication, eliminating the need for complex reactive hardware mechanisms.

  10. Market entry mode and competency building of Western oil companies in the Russian up stream oil and gas industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Paul M.

    This dissertation investigated the market entry and competency building strategies within the context of the Russian oil and gas industry. The study was designed to be of interest to business practitioners and academics given the growing importance of fossil fuel in the energy balance of the global economy and the importance of Russia as a supplier and purchaser in the international market. The study's mixed methodology provides an understanding on the environmental factors that are postulated to impact foreign direct investment flow into Russia and the oil and gas sector. A case study of a fictitiously named Western-Russo oil company was conducted to provide a deep understanding of how capability is viewed by Russian and Western employees and the factors that influences the implementation of a successful competency development program. The case was centered on the development of a Well-Site supervisor group within a Western-Russian oil company. Findings of the study showed that there was no correlation between corruption and foreign direct investment inflow into the Russian economy. The findings also showed that both Russian and Western employees in the oil and gas industry are less focused on nontechnical competency development issues, that Western employees are more orientated towards the bottom-line than Russian employees, and that both groups see operational management as a core competency. In the area of financial management and technology application, there were significant differences in the viewpoint of both groups. Western employees saw a stronger need for financial management and less need for technology application when compared to their Russian counterparts. The results have implications for Western business contemplating entering the Russian oil and gas industry. Western firms need to understand the key drivers that will help them overcome the social and cultural barriers between Western and Russian employees. The role of the company leader is very

  11. Spatial and Temporal Trends in Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from a Temperate Floodplain Along a Stream-Riparian-Upland Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensor, B. L.; Scott, D.; Strahm, B. D.; Thomas, R. Q.; Hester, E. T.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing floodplain and wetland restoration activity has raised concerns about potential impacts on the release of greenhouse gases (GHG) to the atmosphere due to restored connectivity between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Research has shown GHG fluxes from hydrologically active landscapes such as floodplains and wetlands vary spatially and temporally in response to primary controls including soil moisture, soil temperature, and available nutrients. In this ongoing study, we are measuring GHG fluxes at six locations 24 times over a year within an Appalachian floodplain. Site locations are based on dominant landscape positions and hydrologic activity along a topographic gradient including the stream margin, an active slough, and the upland area. GHG fluxes are measured using a Picarro G2508 Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry GHG Analyzer employing the static chamber method. We are also conducting large synoptic sampling of GHG fluxes across the floodplain surface during the wet and dry seasons to explore spatial heterogeneity trends between extreme soil moisture conditions. Data collected thus far has shown correlations between CO2 and soil temperature and soil moisture. CH4 and N2O fluxes have shown to largely depend on degree of saturation in the soil. By the conclusion of our project, we predict temporal patterns in GHG fluxes and soil nutrient content that reflect an increase in microbial function and the release of CO2, CH4, and N2O during warmer and wetter seasons. Spatially, we hypothesize differences in GHG fluxes based on the frequency and duration of the floodpulse at the various locations similar to patterns we have seen thus far of increased production in CH4 and N2O at the intermittently flooded versus dry locations.

  12. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  13. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  14. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-10-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  15. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-09-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  16. Novel sorbent development and evaluation for the capture of krypton and xenon from nuclear fuel reprocessing off-gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, T.G.; Greenhalgh, M.R.; Law, J.D.

    2013-07-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, Idaho National Laboratory sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up. (authors)

  17. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  18. Formation of Small Gas Phase Carbonyls from Heterogeneous Oxidation of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A.; Gao, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are emitted into the atmosphere from gas and diesel powered vehicles, cooking, plants, and marine biota. Field measurements have suggested that FAs, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), could make up an important contribution to the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols. Due to the existence of carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecules, PUFA are believed to be highly reactive towards atmospheric oxidants such as OH and NO3 radicals and ozone, which will contribute to aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei activity. Previous work from our group has shown that small carbonyls formed from the heterogeneous reaction of linoleic acid (LA) thin films with gas-phase O3. It is known that the formation of small carbonyls in the atmosphere is not only relevant to the atmospheric budget of volatile organic compounds but also to secondary organic aerosol formation. In the present study, using an online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and off-line gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) we again investigated carbonyl formation from the same reaction system, i.e. the heterogeneous ozonolysis of LA film. In addition to the previously reported carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA), a source of reactive oxygen species that is mutagenic, has been identified as a product for the first time. Small dicarbonyls, e.g. glyoxal, are expected to be formed from the further oxidation of MDA. In this presentation, the gas-phase chemistry of MDA with OH radicals using a newly built Teflon chamber in our group will also be presented.

  19. Sustainable synthesis of aldehydes, ketones or acids from neat alcohols using nitrogen dioxide gas, and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Naimi-Jamal, M Reza; Hamzeali, Hamideh; Mokhtari, Javad; Boy, Jürgen; Kaupp, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Benzylic alcohols are quantitatively oxidized by gaseous nitrogen dioxide to give pure aromatic aldehydes. The reaction gas mixtures are transformed to nitric acid, which renders the processes free of waste. The exothermic gas-liquid or gas-solid reactions profit from the solubility of nitrogen dioxide in the neat benzylic alcohols. The acid formed impedes further oxidation of the benzaldehydes. The neat isolated benzaldehydes and nitrogen dioxide quantitatively give the benzoic acids. Solid long-chain primary alcohols are directly and quantitatively oxidized with nitrogen dioxide gas to give the fatty acids in the solid state. The oxidations with ubiquitous nitrogen dioxide are extended to solid heterocyclic thioamides, which gives disulfides, and to diphenylamine, which gives tetraphenylhydrazine. These sustainable (green) specific oxidation procedures produce no dangerous residues from the oxidizing agent or from auxiliaries. PMID:19115303

  20. Ligand-modified polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration with electrostatic attachment of ligands. 2. Use of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid/cationic polyelectrolyte mixtures to remove both cations and anions from aqueous streams

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, M. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK ); Christian, S.D.; Tucker, E.E.; Taylor, R.W.; Scamehorn, J.F. )

    1994-12-01

    A mixture of a cationic polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) or PDADMAC, and the anionic ligand diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) can be added to aqueous streams as a water-soluble colloid to bind simultaneously divalent cations, such as Cu[sup 2+] and Pb[sup 2+], and anions, such as CrO[sub 4][sup 2[minus