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Sample records for acid glycine histidine

  1. Histidyl-histidine catalysis of glycine condensation in fluctuating clay environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Histidyl-histidine is a remarkably effective catalyst of peptide bond formation in the reaction of glycine in a fluctuating (hot-dry, cold-wet) clay environment. It has shown turnover numbers (molecules of glycine incorporated in oligoglycines per molecule of catalyst) as high as 18 in a single cycle and as high as 52 overall. A number of other dipeptides were tested, as well as monomeric histidine, N-acetyl histidine, and imidazole, none of which showed turnover numbers greater than one. Histidyl-histidine is a model for a prebiotic protoenzyme, and implications for the development of a simple translation mechanism are discussed.

  2. Standard thermodynamic functions of Co2+ complexation with glycine and L-histidine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The enthalpies of the reactions between solutions of Co(NO3)2 and solutions of glycine (Gly) and L-histidine (His) are determined via direct calorimetry at different pH values and metal: ligand ratios using KNO3 as a background electrolyte ( T = 298.15 K, I = 0.2-1.0). The enthalpy changes upon the formation of cobalt glycinate complexes and Co2+ mixed-ligand complex, viz., glycine-L-histidine, were calculated. The standard thermodynamic parameters (Δr H°, Δr G°, Δr S°) of complexation are determined. The CoGlyHis complex is shown to be stable toward decomposition into homogeneous complexes.

  3. Chemiluminescence Detection of Serine, Proline, Glycine, Asparagine, Leucine, and Histidine by Using Corresponding Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases as Recognition Elements.

    PubMed

    Kugimiya, Akimitsu; Fukada, Rie

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of the concentration of free amino acids in biological samples is useful in clinical diagnostics. However, currently available methods are time consuming, potentially delaying diagnosis. Therefore, the development of more rapid analytical tools is needed. In this study, a chemiluminescence detection method for amino acids was developed, and the conditions for the enzyme reaction and assay were examined. For the recognition of each amino acid (here, serine, proline, glycine, asparagine, leucine, and histidine), the corresponding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) was employed, and multiple enzymatic reactions were combined with a luminol chemiluminescence reaction. This method provided selective quantification from 1 to 20 μM for serine, proline, glycine, and leucine; 1 to 60 μM for asparagine; and 1 to 150 μM for histidine. This assay, which utilized aaRSs for the detection of amino acids, could be useful for simple and rapid analysis of amino acids in clinical diagnostics. PMID:25935222

  4. Thermodynamics of the formation of the Ni2+-glycine-L-histidine complex in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.; Bychkova, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Ni2+-glycine-L-histidine system in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 with potassium nitrate as the supporting electrolyte has been investigated calorimetrically. Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H°, Δr G°, Δr S°) of complexation have been determined. The NiLY complex is highly stable with respect to decomposition into homoligand complexes.

  5. Enhanced trophic factor secretion by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells with Glycine-Histidine-Lysine (GHK)-modified alginate hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Soumia; Hughbanks, Marissa L.; Binder, Bernard Y.K.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Leach, J. Kent

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant proteins and cytokines are under broad preclinical and clinical investigation to promote angiogenesis, but their success is limited by ineffective delivery, lack of long-term stability, and excessive cost. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) secrete bioactive trophic factors, and thus, may provide an effective alternative to address these challenges. Glycine-Histidine-Lysine (GHK) is a peptide fragment of osteonectin (SPARC), a matricellular protein with reported proangiogenic potential. We examined the capacity of GHK to upregulate secretion of proangiogenic factors from human MSC in culture and when covalently coupled to alginate hydrogels. GHK had no apparent cytotoxic effects on MSC in culture over a wide range of concentrations. We detected a dose-dependent increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration in media conditioned by GHK-treated MSC, which increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tubule formation. We covalently coupled GHK to alginate using carbodiimide chemistry, and human MSC were entrapped in alginate hydrogels to assess VEGF secretion. Similar to monolayer culture, MSC responded to GHK-modified gels by secreting increased concentrations of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) compared to unmodified gels. The pre-treatment of MSC with antibodies to α6 and β1 integrins prior to entrapment in GHK-modified gels abrogated VEGF secretion, suggesting that the proangiogenic response of MSC was integrin-mediated. These data demonstrate that the proangiogenic potential of MSC can be significantly increased by the presentation of GHK with a biodegradable carrier, therefore increasing their clinical potential when used for tissue repair. PMID:24468583

  6. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Maleeva, Galyna; Buldakova, Svetlana; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision, and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analyzed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30 nM to 25 μM on α1–α3 and α1/β, α2/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10–25 μM) ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2, α2/β, and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S) in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs. PMID:26578878

  7. Nitrate and amino acid availability affects glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine in response to changes of salinity in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Fukaya, Minoru; Rai, Vandna; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-12-01

    A halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica thrives in extreme salinity with accumulation of a potent osmoprotectant glycine betaine. Recently, this cyanobacterium was shown to accumulate sunscreen molecule mycosporine-2-glycine significantly at high salinity. In this study, we investigated effects of nitrate and amino acid provision on the accumulation of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine. With elevated nitrate concentrations at high salinity, intracellular levels of both metabolites were enhanced. Six-fold high nitrate concentration increased the relative amounts of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine to be 1.5 and 2.0 folds compared with control condition : Increased levels were time- and dose-dependent manner. Exogenous supply of glycine/serine at high salinity resulted in the similar trends as observed in excess nitrate experiment. Intracellular level of glycine betaine increased ∼1.6 folds with glycine/serine supplementation. These supplementations also caused the increased level of mycosporine-2-glycine, namely 1.4 and 2 folds by glycine and serine, respectively. The transcription of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine biosynthetic genes was strongly induced under high-nitrate-salt condition. These results suggest the dependence of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine productions on substrate availability, and the effect of nitrate was possibly associated with stimulation of osmoprotectant increment in this extremophile. PMID:26474598

  8. Glycine as a d-amino acid surrogate in the K+-selectivity filter

    PubMed Central

    Valiyaveetil, Francis I.; Sekedat, Matthew; MacKinnon, Roderick; Muir, Tom W.

    2004-01-01

    The K+ channel-selectivity filter consists of two absolutely conserved glycine residues. Crystal structures show that the first glycine in the selectivity filter, Gly-77 in KcsA, is in a left-handed helical conformation. Although the left-handed helical conformation is not favorable for the naturally occurring l-amino acids, it is favorable for the chirally opposite d-amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that Gly-77 can be replaced by d-Ala with almost complete retention of function. In contrast, substitution with an l-amino acid results in a nonfunctional channel. This finding suggests that glycine is used as a surrogate d-amino acid in the selectivity filter. The absolute conservation of glycine in the K+-selectivity filter can be explained as a result of glycine being the only natural amino acid that can play this role. PMID:15563591

  9. Active transport of. gamma. -aminobutyric acid and glycine into synaptic vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, P.E.; Fischer-Bovenkerk, C.; Ueda, T. )

    1989-05-01

    Although {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine are recognized as major amino acid inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, their storage is poorly understood. In this study the authors have characterized vesicular GABA and glycine uptakes in the cerebrum and spinal cord, respectively. They present evidence that GABA and glycine are each taken up into isolated synaptic vesicles in an ATP-dependent manner and that the uptake is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient. Uptake for both amino acids exhibited kinetics with low affinity similar to a vesicular glutamate uptake. The ATP-dependent GABA uptake was not inhibited by the putative amino acid neurotransmitters glycine, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by GABA analogs, agonists, and antagonists. Similarly, ATP-dependent glycine uptake was hardly affected by GABA, taurine, glutamate, or aspartate or by glycine analogs or antagonists. The GABA uptake was not affected by chloride, which is in contrast to the uptake of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, whereas the glycine uptake was slightly stimulated by low concentrations of chloride. Tissue distribution studies indicate that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distributed in different proportions in the cerebrum and spinal cord. These results suggest that the vesicular uptake systems for GABA, glycine, and glutamate are distinct from each other.

  10. Analysis of histidine and urocanic acid isomers by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hermann, K; Abeck, D

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative separation performance of a C18, C8 and C4 reversed-phase column was investigated for the separation of histidine and its metabolites histamine, 1-methyihistamine and trans- and cis-urocanic acid. Trans- and cis-urocanic acid were baseline separated from their precursor histidine on all three columns using isocratic elution with a mobile phase composed of 0.01 M aqueous TEAP pH 3.0 and acetonitrile at a ratio of 98:2 (v/v). However, histidine was not separated from histamine and 1-methyihistamine. Selecting the C8 column and introducing 0.005 M of the ion pairing reagent 1-octanesulfonic acid sodium salt into the aqueous solution and acetonitrile at a ratio of 90:10 (v/v), significantly improved the separation. The separation was also followed by a change in the retention times and the order of elution. The sequence of elution was histidine, cis-urocanic acid, trans-urocanic acid, histamine and 1-methylhistamine with retention times of 5.58 +/- 0.07, 7.03 +/- 0.15, 7.92 +/- 0.18, 18.77 +/- 0.24 and 20.79 +/- 0.21 min (mean +/- SD; n=5). The separation on the C8 column in the presence of the ion-pairing reagent was further improved with gradient elution that resulted in a reduction in the retention times and elution volumes of histamine and 1-methylhistamine. The detection limits of histidine and trans-urocanic acid at a wavelength of 210 nm and an injection volume of 0.05 ml were 5 x 10(-8) mol l(-1) (n=3). The kinetic of the in-vitro conversion of trans- into the cis-isomer after UV irradiation was depending on the time of exposure and the energy of the light source. UVB light induced a significantly faster conversion than UVA light. TUCA and cUCA samples kept at -25 degrees C were stable for up to 50 weeks. Samples, eluted from human skin showed various concentrations of histidine and trans- and cis-urocanic acid with an average of 1.69 +/- 0.33 x 10(-5) mol l(-1), 1.17 +/- 0.43 x 10(-5) mol l(-1) and 1.67 +/- 0.33 x 10(-5) mol l(-1), respectively

  11. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 170.50 Glycine...

  12. LHT1, a lysine- and histidine-specific amino acid transporter in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Bush, D R

    1997-01-01

    We have identified a new amino acid transporter from the Arabidopsis thaliana expressed sequence tag cDNA collection by functional complementation of a yeast amino acid transport mutant. Transport analysis of the expressed protein in yeast shows that it is a high-affinity transporter for both lysine (Lys) and histidine with Michaelis constant values of 175 and 400 microM, respectively. This transporter (LHT1, lysine histidine transporter) has little affinity for arginine when measured directly in uptake experiments or indirectly with substrate competition. The cDNA is 1.7 kb with an open reading frame that codes for a protein with 446 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 50.5 kD. Hydropathy analysis shows that LHT1 is an integral membrane protein with 9 to 10 putative membrane-spanning domains. Southern-blot analysis suggests that LHT1 is a single-copy gene in the Arabidopsis genome. RNA gel-blot analysis shows that this transporter is present in all tissues, with the strongest expression in young leaves, flowers, and siliques. Wholemount, in situ hybridization revealed that expression is further localized on the surface of roots in young seedlings and in pollen. Overall, LHT1 belongs to a new class of amino acid transporter that is specific for Lys and histidine, and, given its substrate specificity, it has significant promise as a tool for improving the Lys content of Lys-deficient grains. PMID:9390441

  13. Viscoelasticity of thin biomolecular films: a case study on nucleoporin phenylalanine-glycine repeats grafted to a histidine-tag capturing QCM-D sensor.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Nico B; Andersson, Fredrik I; Frey, Steffen; Richter, Ralf P

    2012-08-13

    Immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is useful for the controlled generation of biomolecular assemblies that can be readily characterized with in situ label-free surface-sensitive techniques. Here we analyze the performance of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) sensor surface that enables the selective and oriented immobilization of histidine-tagged molecules for morphological and interaction studies. More specifically, we characterize monolayers of natively unfolded nucleoporin domains that are rich in phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FGRDs). An FGRD meshwork is thought to be responsible for the selectivity of macromolecular transport across the nuclear pore complex between the cytosol and the nucleus of living cells. We demonstrate that nucleoporin FGRD films can be formed on His-tag Capturing Sensors with properties comparable to a previously reported immobilization platform based on supported lipid bilayers (SLB). Approaches to extract the film thickness and viscoelastic properties in a time-resolved manner from the QCM-D response are described, with particular emphasis on the practical implementation of viscoelastic modeling and a detailed analysis of the quality and reliability of the fit. By comparing the results with theoretical predictions for the viscoelastic properties of polymer solutions and gels, and experimental data from an atomic force microscopy indentation assay, we demonstrate that detailed analysis can provide novel insight into the morphology and dynamics of FG repeat domain films. The immobilization approach is simple and versatile, and can be easily extended to other His-tagged biomolecules. The data analysis procedure should be useful for the characterization of other ultrathin biomolecular and polymer films. PMID:22780202

  14. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    SciTech Connect

    Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  15. Structural, functional and optical studies on the amino acid doped glycine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Mahalingam, T.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of pure and amino acid (L-arginine) doped γ-glycine single crystals have been grown from aqueous solution by employing slow evaporation method. Morphological changes in different crystallographic planes were observed in the L-arginine doped γ-glycine crystals. Incorporation of L-arginine was confirmed qualitatively by FTIR spectroscopy. Powder X-ray diffraction was carried out to confirm γ-glycine and assess the single phase nature of the crystals. The lower cutoff wavelength was decreased by the influence of L-arginine in γ-glycine and this leads to an increase in the band gap. Nonlinear optical study revealed that L-arginine doping increases the SHG efficiency of the glycine crystal.

  16. trans-cis Configuration regulated supramolecular polymer gels and chirality transfer based on a bolaamphiphilic histidine and dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunfeng; Wang, Tianyu; Fu, Yunzhi; Liu, Minghua

    2016-01-25

    Supramolecular polymer gels based on the co-assembly of bolaamphiphilic l-histidine(BolaHis) and dicarboxylic acids are dependent on the molar ratios, flexibility and cis-trans configuration of acid molecules. Thus, oligomerized rigid cis-maleic acid or flexible trans-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid can form chiral supramolecular polymer gels with l-BolaHis. PMID:26617194

  17. Crystal Structures of the Histidine Acid Phosphatase from Francisella tularensis Provide Insight into Substrate Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-12-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water at acidic pH using an active-site histidine. The histidine acid phosphatase from the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis (FtHAP) has been implicated in intramacrophage survival and virulence, motivating interest in understanding the structure and mechanism of this enzyme. Here, we report a structure-based study of ligand recognition by FtHAP. The 1.70-{angstrom}-resolution structure of FtHAP complexed with the competitive inhibitor L(+)-tartrate was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Structures of the ligand-free enzyme and the complex with inorganic phosphate were determined at resolutions of 1.85 and 1.70 {angstrom}, respectively. The structure of the Asp261Ala mutant enzyme complexed with the substrate 3'-AMP was determined at 1.50 {angstrom} resolution to gain insight into substrate recognition. FtHAP exhibits a two-domain fold similar to that of human prostatic acid phosphatase, consisting of an {alpha}/{beta} core domain and a smaller domain that caps the core domain. The structures show that the core domain supplies the phosphoryl binding site, catalytic histidine (His17), and an aspartic acid residue (Asp261) that protonates the leaving group, while the cap domain contributes residues that enforce substrate preference. FtHAP and human prostatic acid phosphatase differ in the orientation of the crucial first helix of the cap domain, implying differences in the substrate preferences of the two enzymes. 3'-AMP binds in one end of a 15-{angstrom}-long tunnel, with the adenine clamped between Phe23 and Tyr135, and the ribose 2'-hydroxyl interacting with Gln132. The importance of the clamp is confirmed with site-directed mutagenesis; mutation of Phe23 and Tyr135 individually to Ala increases K{sub m} by factors of 7 and 10, respectively. The structural data are consistent with a role for FtHAP in scavenging phosphate from small

  18. Heat-initiated prebiotic formation of peptides from glycine/aspartic acid and glycine/valine in aqueous environment and clay suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Chandra Kala; Lata, Hem; Pathak, Hari Datt; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2009-04-01

    The effect of heat on the reaction system of glycine/aspartic acid and glycine/valine in the aqueous environment as well as in montmorillonite clay suspension with or without divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Ni2+) has been investigated at 85°C±5°C for varying periods under prebiotic drying and wetting conditions. The resulting products were analysed and characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Peptide formation appears to depend on the duration of heat effect, nature of reactant amino acids and, to some extent, on montmorillonite clay incorporated with divalent cations. In the glycine/aspartic acid system, oligomerization of glycine was limited up to trimer level (Gly)3 along with the formation of glycyl-aspartic acid, while linear and cyclic peptides of aspartic acid were not formed, whereas the glycine/valine system preferentially elongated homo-oligopeptide of glycine up to pentamer level (Gly)5 along with formation of hetero-peptides (Gly-Val and Val-Gly). These studies are relevant in the context of the prebiotic origin of proteins and the role of clay and metal ions in condensation and oligomerization of amino acids. The length of the bio-oligomer chain depends upon the reaction conditions. However, condensation into even a small length seems significant, as the same process would have taken millions of years in the primitive era of the Earth, leading to the first proteins.

  19. Analysis of Bacillus subtilis hut operon expression indicates that histidine-dependent induction is mediated primarily by transcriptional antitermination and that amino acid repression is mediated by two mechanisms: regulation of transcription initiation and inhibition of histidine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Wray, L V; Fisher, S H

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis hut operon is induced by histidine and subject to regulation by carbon catabolite repression and amino acid repression. A set of hut-lacZ transcriptional fusions was constructed and used to identify the cis-acting sites required for histidine induction and amino acid repression. Histidine induction was found to be primarily mediated by transcriptional antitermination at a palindromic sequence located immediately downstream of the first structural gene in the hut operon, hutP. High levels of histidine induction were observed only in hut-lacZ fusions which contained this palindromic sequence. The hutC1 mutation, which results in constitutive expression of the hut operon, was sequenced and found to contain a GC to TA transversion located within the stem-loop structure. Transcription of hut DNA in vitro revealed that the palindromic structure functions as a transcriptional terminator with wild-type hut DNA but not with hutC1 DNA. Two sites were found to be involved in amino acid repression of hut expression: (i) an operator, hutOA, which lies downstream of the hut promoter, and (ii) the hut terminator. The rate of [14C]histidine uptake in amino acid-grown cells was sixfold lower than that seen in cells grown without amino acids. Thus, inhibition of histidine transport in amino acid-grown cells indirectly regulates hut expression by interfering with histidine induction at the hut terminator. Images PMID:8071225

  20. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. (a) Heretofore, the Food and Drug Administration...

  1. Crystal structure and tartrate inhibition of Legionella pneumophila histidine acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J; Tanner, John J

    2015-11-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases (HAPs) utilize a nucleophilic histidine residue to catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water. HAPs function as protein phosphatases and pain suppressors in mammals, are essential for Giardia lamblia excystation, and contribute to virulence of the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis. Herein we report the first crystal structure and steady-state kinetics measurements of the HAP from Legionella pneumophila (LpHAP), also known as Legionella major acid phosphatase. The structure of LpHAP complexed with the inhibitor l(+)-tartrate was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Kinetics assays show that l(+)-tartrate is a 50-fold more potent inhibitor of LpHAP than of other HAPs. Electrostatic potential calculations provide insight into the basis for the enhanced tartrate potency: the tartrate pocket of LpHAP is more positive than other HAPs because of the absence of an ion pair partner for the second Arg of the conserved RHGXRXP HAP signature sequence. The structure also reveals that LpHAP has an atypically expansive active site entrance and lacks the nucleotide substrate base clamp found in other HAPs. These features imply that nucleoside monophosphates may not be preferred substrates. Kinetics measurements confirm that AMP is a relatively inefficient in vitro substrate of LpHAP. PMID:26380880

  2. Preparation and characterization of nanoparticles based on histidine-hyaluronic acid conjugates as doxorubicin carriers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-liang; Liu, Chen-guang; Wang, Xiao-lei; Huang, Zhen-hua

    2012-08-01

    Histidine-hyaluronic acid (His-HA) conjugates were synthesized using hyaluronic acid (HA) as a hydrophilic segment and histidine (His) as hydrophobic segment by 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) mediated coupling reactions. The structural characteristics of the His-HA conjugates were investigated using (1)H NMR. His-HA nanoparticles (HH-NPs) were prepared based on His-HA conjugates, and the characteristics of HH-NPs were investigated using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The particles were between 342 and 732 nm in size, depending on the degree of substitution (DS) of the His. TEM and SEM images indicated that the morphology of HH-NPs was spherical in shape. The critical aggregation concentrations of HH-NPs ranged from 0.034 to 0.125 mg/ml, which decreased with an increase in the DS of the His. Images of fluorescence microscopy indicate that HH-NPs were taken up by the cancer cell line (MCF-7), and significantly decreased by competition inhibition of free HA. From the cytotoxicity test, it was found that DOX-loaded HH-NPs exhibited similar dose and time-dependent cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells with free DOX. PMID:22580754

  3. The Infrared Spectrum of Matrix Isolated Aminoacetonitrile: A Precursor to the Amino Acid Glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    We present infrared (IR) spectral data from matrix isolation experiments and density functional theory calculations on the pre-biologically interesting molecule aminoacetonitrile, a precursor to glycine. We find that this nitrile has an unusually weak nitrile (C=N) stretch in the infrared, in contrast to expectations based on measurements and models of other nitriles under astrophysical conditions. The absence of an observable nitrile absorption feature in the infrared will make the IR search for this molecule considerably more difficult, and will raise estimates of upper limits on nitriles in interstellar and outer Solar System ices. This is also of relevance to assessing the formation routes of the amino acid glycine, since aminoacetonitrile is the putative precursor to glycine via the Strecker synthesis, the mechanism postulated to have produced the amino acids in meteorites.

  4. Origin of Glycine from Acid Hydrolysis of the β-Lactam Antibiotic A16886B

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, D. R.; Mabe, J. A.; Ellis, R.; Whitney, J. G.; Nagarajan, R.

    1972-01-01

    Structural analysis of two new β-lactam antibiotics, A16884A and A16886B, indicated that they, like cephalosporin C, were composed of modified valine and cysteine residues, and α-aminoadipic acid. However, acid hydrolysis of A16886B and A16884A produced three times as much glycine as did hydrolysis of cephalosporin C under the same conditions. Samples of A16886B-14C-6 and A16886B-14C-8 were prepared by the addition of cysteine-14C-3 and cystine-14C-1 to fermentations of Streptomyces clavuligerus. The specific activity of glycine obtained from hydrolysis of A16886B-14C-6 was considerably higher than that from hydrolysis of A16886B-14C-8. An explanation for the difference in amounts of glycine obtained from hydrolysis of these antibiotics is discussed. PMID:5045470

  5. Dietary histidine increases mouse skin urocanic acid levels and enhances UVB-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Reilly, S K; De Fabo, E C

    1991-04-01

    Urocanic Acid (UCA) exists in mammalian skin primarily as the trans isomer and is photoisomerized to cis UCA upon UVB absorption. Our previous studies indicated that the photoisomerization of UCA is the initiating event in UBV-induced suppression of cell-mediated immunity (tUCA----cUCA----immune suppression). The purpose of this study was to verify the role of UCA in UV-induced immune suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in BALB/c mice. Since UCA is a metabolite of the amino acid L-histidine, we reasoned that increased dietary levels of histidine should raise skin tUCA levels. If skin tUCA is the UVB photoreceptor for immune suppression, this increase should enhance UV-induced suppression of CHS. HPLC analysis of skin from BALB/c mice given a histidine-rich diet (10%) showed that the total amount of UCA is significantly higher in these animals than in mice fed a normal diet. Further, levels of suppression of CHS of 3% and 49% in control fed mice, induced by 4.8 and 7.2 kJ/m2 UVB were significantly increased to 21% and 71% respectively in histidine-fed animals at these same UVB doses. These findings provide additional support for the UCA model for immune suppression, and provide the first evidence that UV-induced immune suppression can be enhanced by a dietary component, L-histidine. PMID:1857737

  6. Metabolic profiling of plasma amino acids shows that histidine increases following the consumption of pork

    PubMed Central

    Samman, Samir; Crossett, Ben; Somers, Miles; Bell, Kirstine J; Lai, Nicole T; Sullivan, David R; Petocz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Amino acid (AA) status is determined by factors including nutrition, metabolic rate, and interactions between the metabolism of AA, carbohydrates, and lipids. Analysis of the plasma AA profile, together with markers of glucose and lipid metabolism, will shed light on metabolic regulation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the acute responses to the consumption of meals containing either pork (PM) or chicken (CM), and to identify relationships between plasma AA and markers of glycemic and lipemic control. A secondary aim was to explore AA predictors of plasma zinc concentrations. Ten healthy adults participated in a postprandial study on two separate occasions. In a randomized cross-over design, participants consumed PM or CM. The concentrations of 21 AA, glucose, insulin, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and zinc were determined over 5 hours postprandially. The meal composition did not influence glucose, insulin, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acid, or zinc concentrations. Plasma histidine was higher following the consumption of PM (P=0.014), with consistently higher changes observed after 60 minutes (P<0.001). Greater percentage increases were noted at limited time points for valine and leucine + isoleucine in those who consumed CM compared to PM. In linear regression, some AAs emerged as predictors of the metabolic responses, irrespective of the meal that was consumed. The present study demonstrates that a single meal of PM or CM produces a differential profile of AA in the postprandial state. The sustained increase in histidine following the consumption of a PM is consistent with the reported effects of lean pork on cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:24971025

  7. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Specific Administrative...

  8. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Specific Administrative...

  9. 21 CFR 170.50 - Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glycine (aminoacetic acid) in food for human consumption. 170.50 Section 170.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Specific Administrative...

  10. Complete amino acid sequence of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1979-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence has been determined for a fragment of human ceruloplasmin [ferroxidase; iron(II):oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.16.3.1]. The fragment (designated Cp F5) contains 159 amino acid residues and has a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains one free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. This fragment is present in most commercial preparations of ceruloplasmin, probably owing to proteolytic degradation, but can also be obtained by limited cleavage of single-chain ceruloplasmin with plasmin. Cp F5 probably is an intact domain attached to the COOH-terminal end of single-chain ceruloplasmin via a labile interdomain peptide bond. A model of the secondary structure predicted by empirical methods suggests that almost one-third of the amino acid residues are distributed in alpha helices, about a third in beta-sheet structure, and the remainder in beta turns and unidentified structures. Computer analysis of the amino acid sequence has not demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between this ceruloplasmin fragment and any other protein, but there is some evidence for an internal duplication. PMID:287005

  11. The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR controls the liver derived tumor suppressor histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Birkel, Manfred; Hambruch, Eva; Hornberger, Martin; Kinzel, Olaf; Perović-Ottstadt, Sanja; Schulz, Andreas; Hahn, Ulrike; Burnet, Michael; Kremoser, Claus

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is strongly expressed in liver and intestine, controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis and exerts tumor-protective functions in liver and intestine. Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an abundant plasma protein produced by the liver with the proposed function as a pattern recognition molecule involved in the clearance of immune complexes, necrotic cells and pathogens, the modulation of angiogenesis, the normalization of deranged endothelial vessel structure in tumors and tumor suppression. FXR recognition sequences were identified within a human HRG promoter fragment that mediated FXR/FXR-agonist dependent reporter gene activity in vitro. We show that HRG is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in human hepatoma cells, human upcyte® primary hepatocytes and 3D human liver microtissues in vitro and in mouse liver in vivo. Prolonged administration of the potent nonsteroidal FXR agonist PX20606 increases HRG levels in mouse plasma. Finally, daily oral administration of this FXR agonist for seven days resulted in a significant increase of HRG levels in the plasma of healthy human male volunteers during a clinical Phase I safety study. HRG might serve as a surrogate marker indicative of liver-specific FXR activation in future human clinical studies. Furthermore, potent FXR agonists might be beneficial in serious health conditions where HRG is reduced, for example, in hepatocellular carcinoma but also other solid cancers, liver failure, sepsis and pre-eclampsia. PMID:25363753

  12. Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic-triad histidine of a serine protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W; Wong, W Y; Farr-Jones, S; Shenvi, A B; Kettner, C A

    1988-10-01

    15N NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the active-site histidyl residue of alpha-lytic protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes. Two distinct types of complexes were observed: (1) Boronic acids that are analogues of substrates form complexes in which the active-site imidazole ring is protonated and both imidazole N-H protons are strongly hydrogen bonded. With the better inhibitors of the class this arrangement is stable over the pH range 4.0-10.5. The results are consistent with a putative tetrahedral intermediate like complex involving a negatively charged, tetrahedral boron atom covalently bonded to O gamma of the active-site serine. (2) Boronic acids that are not substrate analogues form complexes in which N epsilon 2 of the active-site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron atom of the inhibitor. The proton bound to N delta 1 of the histidine in these histidine-boronate adducts remains strongly hydrogen bonded, presumably to the active-site aspartate. Benzeneboronic acid, which falls in this category, forms an adduct with histidine. In both types of complexes the N-H protons of His-57 exchange unusually slowly as evidenced by the room temperature visibility of the low-field 1H resonances and the 15N-H spin couplings. These results, coupled with the kinetic data of the preceding paper [Kettner, C. A., Bone, R., Agard, D. A., & Bachovchin, W. W. (1988) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)], indicate that occupancy of the specificity subsites may be required to fully form the transition-state binding site. The significance of these findings for understanding inhibitor binding and the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases is discussed. PMID:3207700

  13. Improved Acid Stress Survival of Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Histidine Decarboxylation Pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524*

    PubMed Central

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5–6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  14. Improved acid stress survival of Lactococcus lactis expressing the histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524.

    PubMed

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L; Lolkema, Juke S

    2012-03-30

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5-6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  15. Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic-triad histidine of a serine protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Wong, W.Y.L.; Farr-Jones, S. ); Shenvi, A.B.; Kettner, C.A. )

    1988-10-04

    {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the active-site histidyl residue of {alpha}-lytic protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes. Two distinct types of complexes were observed: (1) Boronic acids that are analogues of substrates form complexes in which the active-site imidazole ring is protonated and both imidazole N-H protons are strongly hydrogen bonded. (2) Boronic acids that are not substrate analogues form complexes in which N{sup {epsilon}2} of the active-site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron atom of the inhibitor. The proton bound to N{sup {delta}1} of the histidine in these histidine-boronate adducts remains strongly hydrogen bonded, presumably to the active-site aspartate. In both types of complexes the N-H protons of His-57 exchange unusually slowly as evidenced by the room temperature visibility of the low-field {sup 1}H resonances and the {sup 15}N-H spin couplings. These results indicate that occupancy of the specificity subsites may be required to fully form the transition-state binding site. The significance of these findings for understanding inhibitor binding and the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases is discussed.

  16. Histidine and other amino acids in blood and urine after administration of Bretschneider solution (HTK) for cardioplegic arrest in patients: effects on N-metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teloh, Johanna K; Dohle, Daniel-Sebastian; Petersen, Miriam; Verhaegh, Rabea; Waack, Indra N; Roehrborn, Friederike; Jakob, Heinz; de Groot, Herbert

    2016-06-01

    Bretschneider (histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate, HTK) solution employed for induction of cardioplegic arrest possesses a high histidine concentration (198 mM). Due to the large volume administered, massive amounts of histidine are incorporated. The aim of the study was to evaluate alterations in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism originating from histidine degradation. Between 07/2014 and 10/2014, a total of 29 consecutive patients scheduled for elective isolated coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were enrolled in this prospective observational study. The patients received 1.6 L cardioplegic Bretschneider solution on average. Blood gas and urine samples obtained were analyzed for amino acid as well as urea and ammonium concentrations. After CPB initiation, plasma histidine concentration greatly increased to 21,000 µM to reach 8000 µM at the end. Within the operative period, plasma concentrations of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, alanine, and glutamine increased variable in magnitude. During the same time, urinary analysis revealed histidine excretion of 19,500 µmol in total and marked elevations in glutamate and glutamine excretion. The absolute amounts of urea and ammonium excreted additionally were 3 mmol and 8 mmol, respectively. Already during CPB, distinct amounts of the histidine administered are metabolized, mainly to other amino acids, but only small amounts to urea and ammonia. Thus, the impact of the histidine incorporated on acid-base status in the intraoperative phase is minor. On the other hand, intraoperative provision of several amino acids arising from histidine metabolism might mitigate postaggression syndrome. PMID:26922473

  17. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedhosseini, E. Ivanov, M.; Bdikin, I.; Vasileva, D.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-21

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  18. Tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in ferroelectric amino acid glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyedhosseini, E.; Bdikin, I.; Ivanov, M.; Vasileva, D.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Bioorganic ferroelectrics and piezoelectrics are becoming increasingly important in view of their intrinsic compatibility with biological environment and biofunctionality combined with strong piezoelectric effect and a switchable polarization at room temperature. Here, we study tip-induced domain structures and polarization switching in the smallest amino acid β-glycine, representing a broad class of non-centrosymmetric amino acids. We show that β-glycine is indeed a room-temperature ferroelectric and polarization can be switched by applying a bias to non-polar cuts via a conducting tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamics of these in-plane domains is studied as a function of an applied voltage and pulse duration. The domain shape is dictated by polarization screening at the domain boundaries and mediated by growth defects. Thermodynamic theory is applied to explain the domain propagation induced by the AFM tip. Our findings suggest that the properties of β-glycine are controlled by the charged domain walls which in turn can be manipulated by an external bias.

  19. Histidine decarboxylase and urinary methylimidazoleacetic acid in gastric neuroendocrine cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Grimelius, Lars; Granerus, Göran; Stridsberg, Mats; Falkmer, Sture E; Janson, Eva T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression in normal and neoplastic gastric neuroendocrine cells in relationship to the main histamine metabolite. METHODS: Control tissues from fundus (n = 3) and corpus (n = 3) mucosa of six patients undergoing operations for gastric adenocarcinoma, biopsy and/or gastric surgical specimens from 64 patients with primary gastric neuroendocrine tumours (GNETs), as well as metastases from 22 of these patients, were investigated using conventional immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence with commercial antibodies vs vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2), HDC and ghrelin. The urinary excretion of the main histamine metabolite methylimidazoleacetic acid (U-MeImAA) was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography in 27 of the 64 patients. RESULTS: In the gastric mucosa of the control tissues, co-localization studies identified neuroendocrine cells that showed immunoreactivity only to VMAT-2 and others with reactivity only to HDC. A third cell population co-expressed both antigens. There was no co-expression of HDC and ghrelin. Similar results were obtained in the foci of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia associated with chronic atrophic gastritis type A and also in the tumours. The relative incidence of the three aforementioned markers varied in the tumours that were examined using conventional immunohistochemistry. All of these GNETs revealed both VMAT-2 and HDC immunoreactivity, and their metastases showed an immunohistochemical pattern and frequency similar to that of their primary tumours. In four patients, increased U-MeImAA excretion was detected, but only two of the patients exhibited related endocrine symptoms. CONCLUSION: Human enterochromaffin-like cells appear to partially co-express VMAT-2 and HDC. Co-expression of VMAT-2 and HDC might be required for increased histamine production in patients with GNETs. PMID:26715806

  20. Tautomerism, acid-base equilibria, and H-bonding of the six histidines in subtilisin BPN' by NMR.

    PubMed

    Day, Regina M; Thalhauser, Craig J; Sudmeier, James L; Vincent, Matthew P; Torchilin, Ekaterina V; Sanford, David G; Bachovchin, Christopher W; Bachovchin, William W

    2003-04-01

    We have determined by (15)N, (1)H, and (13)C NMR, the chemical behavior of the six histidines in subtilisin BPN' and their PMSF and peptide boronic acid complexes in aqueous solution as a function of pH in the range of from 5 to 11, and have assigned every (15)N, (1)H, C(epsilon 1), and C(delta2) resonance of all His side chains in resting enzyme. Four of the six histidine residues (17, 39, 67, and 226) are neutrally charged and do not titrate. One histidine (238), located on the protein surface, titrates with pK(a) = 7.30 +/- 0.03 at 25 degrees C, having rapid proton exchange, but restricted mobility. The active site histidine (64) in mutant N155A titrates with a pK(a) value of 7.9 +/- 0.3 and sluggish proton exchange behavior, as shown by two-site exchange computer lineshape simulation. His 64 in resting enzyme contains an extremely high C(epsilon 1)-H proton chemical shift of 9.30 parts per million (ppm) owing to a conserved C(epsilon 1)-H(.)O=C H-bond from the active site imidazole to a backbone carbonyl group, which is found in all known serine proteases representing all four superfamilies. Only His 226, and His 64 at high pH, exist as the rare N(delta1)-H tautomer, exhibiting (13)C(delta1) chemical shifts approximately 9 ppm higher than those for N(epsilon 2)-H tautomers. His 64 in the PMSF complex, unlike that in the resting enzyme, is highly mobile in its low pH form, as shown by (15)N-(1)H NOE effects, and titrates with rapid proton exchange kinetics linked to a pK(a) value of 7.47 +/- 0.02. PMID:12649438

  1. Tautomerism, acid-base equilibria, and H-bonding of the six histidines in subtilisin BPN′ by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Thalhauser, Craig J.; Sudmeier, James L.; Vincent, Matthew P.; Torchilin, Ekaterina V.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, Christopher W.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2003-01-01

    We have determined by 15N, 1H, and 13C NMR, the chemical behavior of the six histidines in subtilisin BPN′ and their PMSF and peptide boronic acid complexes in aqueous solution as a function of pH in the range of from 5 to 11, and have assigned every 15N, 1H, Cɛ1, and Cδ2 resonance of all His side chains in resting enzyme. Four of the six histidine residues (17, 39, 67, and 226) are neutrally charged and do not titrate. One histidine (238), located on the protein surface, titrates with pKa = 7.30 ± 0.03 at 25°C, having rapid proton exchange, but restricted mobility. The active site histidine (64) in mutant N155A titrates with a pKa value of 7.9 ± 0.3 and sluggish proton exchange behavior, as shown by two-site exchange computer lineshape simulation. His 64 in resting enzyme contains an extremely high Cɛ1-H proton chemical shift of 9.30 parts per million (ppm) owing to a conserved Cɛ1-H. . .O=C H-bond from the active site imidazole to a backbone carbonyl group, which is found in all known serine proteases representing all four superfamilies. Only His 226, and His 64 at high pH, exist as the rare Nδ1-H tautomer, exhibiting 13Cδ1 chemical shifts ~9 ppm higher than those for Nɛ2-H tautomers. His 64 in the PMSF complex, unlike that in the resting enzyme, is highly mobile in its low pH form, as shown by 15N-1H NOE effects, and titrates with rapid proton exchange kinetics linked to a pKa value of 7.47 ± 0.02. PMID:12649438

  2. First report for voltammetric determination of methyldopa in the presence of folic acid and glycine.

    PubMed

    Molaakbari, Elahe; Mostafavi, Ali; Beitollahi, Hadi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a carbon paste electrode modified with TiO2 nanoparticles and ferrocene monocarboxylic acid (FM) was used to prepare a novel electrochemical sensor. The objective of this novel electrode modification was to seek new electrochemical performances for the detection of methyldopa in the presence of folic acid and glycine. The peak potentials recorded in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) of pH7.0 were 325, 750 and 880 mV vs. Ag/AgCl/KCl (3.0M) for methyldopa, folic acid and glycine, respectively. Under the optimum pH of 7.0, the oxidation of methyldopa occurred at a potential about 160 mV less positive than that of the unmodified carbon paste electrode (CPE). The response of catalytic current with methyldopa concentration showed a linear relation in the range from 2.0×10(-7) to 1.0×10(-4)M with a detection limit of 8.0 (± 0.2)×10(-8)M. PMID:24433900

  3. Identification of serine and histidine adducts in complexes of trypsin and trypsinogen with peptide and nonpeptide boronic acid inhibitors by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsilikounas, E; Kettner, C A; Bachovchin, W W

    1992-12-29

    We have previously shown, in 15N NMR studies of the enzyme's active site histidine residue, that boronic acid inhibitors can form two distinct types of complexes with alpha-lytic protease. Inhibitors that are structural analogs of good alpha-lytic protease substrates form transition-state-like tetrahedral complexes with the active site serine whereas those that are not form complexes in which N epsilon 2 of the active site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron of the inhibitor. This study also demonstrated that the serine and histidine adduct complexes exhibit quite distinctive and characteristic low-field 1H NMR spectra [Bachovchin, W. W., Wong, W. Y. L., Farr-Jones, S., Shenvi, A. B., & Kettner, C. A. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7689-7697]. Here we have used low-field 1H NMR diagnostically for a series of boronic acid inhibitor complexes of trypsin and trypsinogen. The results show that H-D-Val-Leu-boroArg and Ac-Gly-boroArg, analogs of good trypsin substrates, form transition-state-like serine adducts with trypsin, whereas the nonsubstrate analog inhibitors boric acid, methane boronic acid, butane boronic acid, and triethanolamine borate all form histidine adducts, thereby paralleling the previous results obtained with alpha-lytic protease. However, with trypsinogen, Ac-Gly-boroArg forms predominantly a histidine adduct while H-D-Val-Leu-boroArg forms both histidine and serine adducts, with the histidine adduct predominating below pH 8.0 and the serine adduct predominating above pH 8.0.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1463754

  4. Theoretical study of the adsorption of histidine amino acid on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S. J.; Makinistian, L.; Albanesi, E.

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated how the interactions between biomolecules and graphene play a crucial role in the characterization and functionalization of biosensors. In this paper we present a theoretical study of the adsorption of histidine on graphene using density functional theory (DFT). In order to evaluate the relevance of including the carboxyl (-COOH) and amino (-NH2) groups in the calculations, we considered i) the histidine complete (i.e., with its carboxyl and its amino groups included), and ii) the histidine’s imidazole ring alone. We calculated the density of states for the two systems before and after adsorption. Furthermore, we compared the results of three approximations of the exchange and correlation interactions: local density (LDA), the generalized gradients by Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (GGA-PBE), and one including van der Waals forces (DFT-D2). We found that the adsorption energy calculated by DFT-D2 is higher than the other two: Eads-DFT-D2 >E ads-LDA >E ads-GGA . We report the existence of charge transfer from graphene to the molecule when the adsorption occurs; this charge transfer turns up to be greater for the complete histidine than for the imidazole ring alone. Our results revealed that including the carboxyl and amino groups generates a shift in the states of imidazole ring towards EF .

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a molecule called glycine. This molecule is an amino acid , which is a building block of proteins. Glycine ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Genetic Brain Disorders Health ...

  6. The Use of p-Aminobenzoic Acid as a Probe Substance for the Targeted Profiling of Glycine Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Nortje, Carla; van der Sluis, Rencia; van Dijk, Alberdina Aike; Erasmus, Elardus

    2016-03-01

    Glycine conjugation facilitates the metabolism of toxic aromatic acids, capable of disrupting mitochondrial integrity. Owing to the high exposure to toxic substrates, characterization of individual glycine conjugation capacity, and its regulatory factors has become increasingly important. Aspirin and benzoate have been employed for this purpose; however, adverse reactions, aspirin intolerance, and Reye's syndrome in children are substantial drawbacks. The goal of this study was to investigate p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as an alternative glycine conjugation probe. Ten human volunteers participated in a PABA challenge test, and p-aminohippuric acid (PAHA), p-acetamidobenzoic acid, and p-acetamidohippuric acid were quantified in urine. The glycine N-acyltransferase gene of the volunteers was also screened for two polymorphisms associated with normal and increased enzyme activity. All of the individuals were homozygous for increased enzyme activity, but excretion of PAHA varied significantly (16-56%, hippurate ratio). The intricacies of PABA metabolism revealed possible limiting factors and the potential of PABA as an indicator of Phase 0 biotransformation. PMID:26484797

  7. Pharmacological PPARα Activation Markedly Alters Plasma Turnover of the Amino Acids Glycine, Serine and Arginine in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Anette; Turner, Nigel; Hansson, Göran I.; Wallenius, Kristina; Oakes, Nicholas D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study extends previously reported PPARα agonist WY 14,643 (30 µmol/kg/day for 4 weeks) effects on circulating amino acid concentrations in rats fed a 48% saturated fat diet. Steady-state tracer experiments were used to examine in vivo kinetic mechanisms underlying altered plasma serine, glycine and arginine levels. Urinary urea and creatinine excretion were measured to assess whole-body amino acid catabolism. WY 14,643 treated animals demonstrated reduced efficiency to convert food consumed to body weight gain while liver weight was increased compared to controls. WY 14,643 raised total amino acid concentration (38%), largely explained by glycine, serine and threonine increases. 3H-glycine, 14C-serine and 14C-arginine tracer studies revealed elevated rates of appearance (Ra) for glycine (45.5±5.8 versus 17.4±2.7 µmol/kg/min) and serine (21.0±1.4 versus 12.0±1.0) in WY 14,643 versus control. Arginine was substantially decreased (−62%) in plasma with estimated Ra reduced from 3.1±0.3 to 1.2±0.2 µmol/kg/min in control versus WY 14,643. Nitrogen excretion over 24 hours was unaltered. Hepatic arginase activity was substantially decreased by WY 14,643 treatment. In conclusion, PPARα agonism potently alters metabolism of several specific amino acids in the rat. The changes in circulating levels of serine, glycine and arginine reflected altered fluxes into the plasma rather than changes in clearance or catabolism. This suggests that PPARα has an important role in modulating serine, glycine and arginine de novo synthesis. PMID:25486018

  8. Primary structure of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin. II. Amino acid sequence of the tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1980-04-10

    Amino acid sequence studies of tryptic peptides isolated from a histidine-rich fragment (Cp F5) of human ceruloplasmin are described. Nineteen tryptic peptides were isolated from unmodified Cp F5 and five tryptic peptides were isolated from citraconylated Cp F5. These peptides, together with the cyanogen bromide fragments reported previously, allowed the assembly of the complete sequence of Cp F5. The fragment has 159 residues and a molecular weight of 18,650; it lacks carbohydrate, is rich in histidine, and contains 1 free cysteine that may be part of a copper-binding site. Human ceruloplasmin is a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of about 130,000 that is readily cleaved to large fragments by proteolytic enzymes; the relationships of Cp F5 to intact ceruloplasmin and to structural subunits earlier proposed is described. Cp F5 probably is an intact globular domain that is attached to the COOH-terminal end of ceruloplasmin by a labile interdomain peptide bond. PMID:6987230

  9. Toxicity and intracellular accumulation of bile acids in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes: role of glycine conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sagnik; Bijsmans, Ingrid T G W; van Mil, Saskia W C; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2014-03-01

    Excessive intrahepatic accumulation of bile acids (BAs) is a key mechanism underlying cholestasis. The aim of this study was to quantitatively explore the relationship between cytotoxicity of BAs and their intracellular accumulation in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH). Following exposure of SCRH (on day-1 after seeding) to various BAs for 24h, glycine-conjugated BAs were most potent in exerting toxicity. Moreover, unconjugated BAs showed significantly higher toxicity in day-1 compared to day-3 SCRH. When day-1/-3 SCRH were exposed (0.5-4h) to 5-100μM (C)DCA, intracellular levels of unconjugated (C)DCA were similar, while intracellular levels of glycine conjugates were up to 4-fold lower in day-3 compared to day-1 SCRH. Sinusoidal efflux was by far the predominant efflux pathway of conjugated BAs both in day-1 and day-3 SCRH, while canalicular BA efflux showed substantial interbatch variability. After 4h exposure to (C)DCA, intracellular glycine conjugate levels were at least 10-fold higher than taurine conjugate levels. Taken together, reduced BA conjugate formation in day-3 SCRH results in lower intracellular glycine conjugate concentrations, explaining decreased toxicity of (C)DCA in day-3 versus day-1 SCRH. Our data provide for the first time a direct link between BA toxicity and glycine conjugate exposure in SCRH. PMID:24211540

  10. Chemical fragmentation by o-iodosobenzoic acid of. cap alpha. -chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n. at tryptophan residues

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, E.A.; Grebenshchikova, O.G.; Prozorovskii, V.N.

    1987-02-10

    The carboxymethylated ..cap alpha..-chain of histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n., which contains four tryptophan residues, was cleaved by o-iodosobenzoic acid. Five fragments were isolated in homogeneous form by means of gel filtration on Sephadex, rechromatography, and high-voltage paper electrophoresis. The molecular weight, amino acid composition, and N-terminal amino acid sequence were determined for all the peptides isolated.

  11. Chemical vectors for gene delivery: a current review on polymers, peptides and lipids containing histidine or imidazole as nucleic acids carriers

    PubMed Central

    Midoux, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Yaouanc, Jean-Jacques; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2009-01-01

    DNA/cationic lipid (lipoplexes), DNA/cationic polymer (polyplexes) and DNA/cationic polymer/cationic lipid (lipopolyplexes) electrostatic complexes are proposed as non-viral nucleic acids delivery systems. These DNA-nanoparticles are taken up by the cells through endocytosis processes, but the low capacity of DNA to escape from endosomes is regarded as the major limitations of their transfection efficiency. Here, we present a current report on a particular class of carriers including the polymers, peptides and lipids, which is based on the exploitation of the imidazole ring as an endosome destabilization device to favour the nucleic acids delivery in the cytosol. The imidazole ring of histidine is a weak base that has the ability to acquire a cationic charge when the pH of the environment drops bellow 6. As it has been demonstrated for poly(histidine), this phenomena can induce membrane fusion and/or membrane permeation in an acidic medium. Moreover, the accumulation of histidine residues inside acidic vesicles can induce a proton sponge effect, which increases their osmolarity and their swelling. The proof of concept has been shown with polylysine partially substituted with histidine residues that has caused a dramatic increase by 3–4.5 orders of magnitude of the transfection efficiency of DNA/polylysine polyplexes. Then, several histidine-rich polymers and peptides as well as lipids with imidazole, imidazolinium or imidazolium polar head have been reported to be efficient carriers to deliver nucleic acids including genes, mRNA or SiRNA in vitro and in vivo. More remarkable, histidylated carriers are often weakly cytotoxic, making them promising chemical vectors for nucleic acids delivery. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19459843

  12. Members of a unique histidine acid phosphatase family are conserved amongst a group of primitive eukaryotic human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shakarian, Alison M; Joshi, Manju B; Yamage, Mat; Ellis, Stephanie L; Debrabant, Alain; Dwyer, Dennis M

    2003-03-01

    Recently, we identified and characterized the genes encoding several distinct members of the histidine-acid phosphatase enzyme family from Leishmania donovani, a primitive protozoan pathogen of humans. These included genes encoding the heavily phosphorylated/glycosylated, tartrate-sensitive, secretory acid phosphatases (Ld SAcP-1 and Ld SAcP-2) and the unique, tartrate-resistant, externally-oriented, surface membrane-bound acid phosphatase (Ld MAcP) of this parasite. It had been previously suggested that these enzymes may play essential roles in the growth, development and survival of this organism. In this report, to further examine this hypothesis, we assessed whether members of the L. donovani histidine-acid phosphatase enzyme family were conserved amongst other pathogenic Leishmania and related trypanosomatid parasites. Such phylogenetic conservation would clearly indicate an evolutionary selection for this family of enzymes and strongly suggest and support an important functional role for acid phosphatases to the survival of these parasites. Results of pulsed field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting showed that homologs of both the Ld SAcPs and Ld MAcP were present in each of the visceral and cutaneous Leishmania species examined (i.e. isolates of L. donovani, L. infantum, L. tropica, L. major and L. mexicana, respectively). Further, results of enzyme assays showed that all of these organisms expressed both tartrate-sensitive and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities. In addition, homologs of both the Ld SAcPs and Ld MAcP genes and their corresponding enzyme activities were also identified in two Crithidia species (C. fasciculata and C. luciliae) and in Leptomonas seymouri. In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Phytomonas serpens had only very-low levels of such enzyme activities. Cumulatively, results of this study showed that homologs of the Ld SAcPs and Ld MAcP are conserved amongst all pathogenic Leishmania sps. suggesting

  13. Diamond nanowires modified with poly[3-(pyrrolyl)carboxylic acid] for the immobilization of histidine-tagged peptides.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Palaniappan; Mazurenko, Ievgen; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2014-09-01

    Coating boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs) with a conducting polymer, poly[3-(pyrrolyl)carboxylic acid], has been reported. Polymer coating was achieved through electropolymerization of 3-(pyrrolyl)carboxylic acid at the electrode interface by amperometrically biasing the BDD NWs interface until a predefined charge has passed. The poly[3-(pyrrolyl)carboxylic acid] modified BDD NWs (PPA-BDD NWs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Using a deposition charge of 11 mC cm(-2) resulted in a thin polymer film deposition. The availability of the carboxylic groups of the polymer coated BDD NWs electrode was demonstrated through copper ion (Cu(2+)) chelation. The resulting complex was successfully used for the site-specific immobilization of histidine-tagged peptides. The binding process was followed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The Cu(2+)-chelated PPA-BDD NWs interface showed peptide loading capability comparable to those of commercially available interfaces and can be easily regenerated several times using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). PMID:25009833

  14. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  15. DL-β-Aminobutyric Acid-Induced Resistance in Soybean against Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yunpeng; Wang, Biao; Yan, Junhui; Cheng, Linjing; Yao, Luming; Xiao, Liang; Wu, Tianlong

    2014-01-01

    Priming can improve plant innate capability to deal with the stresses caused by both biotic and abiotic factors. In this study, the effect of DL-β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA) against Aphis glycines Matsumura, the soybean aphid (SA) was evaluated. We found that 25 mM BABA as a root drench had minimal adverse impact on plant growth and also efficiently protected soybean from SA infestation. In both choice and non-choice tests, SA number was significantly decreased to a low level in soybean seedlings drenched with 25 mM BABA compared to the control counterparts. BABA treatment resulted in a significant increase in the activities of several defense enzymes, such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), peroxidase (POX), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), chitinase (CHI), and β-1, 3-glucanase (GLU) in soybean seedlings attacked by aphid. Meanwhile, the induction of 15 defense-related genes by aphid, such as AOS, CHS, MMP2, NPR1-1, NPR1-2, and PR genes, were significantly augmented in BABA-treated soybean seedlings. Our study suggest that BABA application is a promising way to enhance soybean resistance against SA. PMID:24454805

  16. Extracellular matrix-like surfactant polymers containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eric H; Ruegsegger, Mark A; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Marchant, Roger E

    2004-08-01

    We report on a novel series of biomimetic polymers exhibiting interfacial properties similar to the extracellular matrix. A series of well-defined surfactant polymers were synthesized by simultaneously incorporating arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, dextran oligosaccharide, and hexyl ligands with controlled feed ratios onto a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone. The peptide sequence was H-GSSSGRGDSPA-NH(2) (Pep) having a hydrophilic extender at the amino terminus and capped carboxy terminus. The peptide-to-dextran (Pep:Dex) ratios were varied to create surfactants having 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mol-% peptide relative to dextran. The surfactants were characterized by IR, NMR and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for composition and surface active properties. AFM confirmed full surface coverage of PVAm(Pep)(100%) on graphite, and supported the mechanism of interdigitation of hexyl ligands between surfactant molecules within a specified range of hexyl chain densities. the attachment and growth of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells on the PVAm(Pep)(100%) surface was identical to the fibronectin positive control. Cell adhesion decreased dramatically with decreasing peptide density on the surfactant polymers. Molecular model of a peptide surfactant polymer, consisting of poly(vinyl amine) backbone with peptide, dextran oligosaccharide and hexyl branches coupled to the polymer chain. PMID:15468270

  17. The Leishmania donovani histidine acid ecto-phosphatase LdMAcP: insight into its structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Papadaki, Amalia; Politou, Anastasia S.; Smirlis, Despina; Kotini, Maria P.; Kourou, Konstadina; Papamarcaki, Thomais; Boleti, Haralabia

    2015-01-01

    Acid ecto-phosphatase activity has been implicated in Leishmania donovani promastigote virulence. In the present study, we report data contributing to the molecular/structural and functional characterization of the L. donovani LdMAcP (L. donovani membrane acid phosphatase), member of the histidine acid phosphatase (HAcP) family. LdMAcP is membrane-anchored and shares high sequence identity with the major secreted L. donovani acid phosphatases (LdSAcPs). Sequence comparison of the LdMAcP orthologues in Leishmania sp. revealed strain polymorphism and species specificity for the L. donovani complex, responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (Khala azar), proposing thus a potential value of LdMAcP as an epidemiological or diagnostic tool. The extracellular orientation of the LdMAcP catalytic domain was confirmed in L. donovani promastigotes, wild-type (wt) and transgenic overexpressing a recombinant LdMAcP–mRFP1 (monomeric RFP1) chimera, as well as in transiently transfected mammalian cells expressing rLdMAcP–His. For the first time it is demonstrated in the present study that LdMAcP confers tartrate resistant acid ecto-phosphatase activity in live L. donovani promastigotes. The latter confirmed the long sought molecular identity of at least one enzyme contributing to this activity. Interestingly, the L. donovani rLdMAcP–mRFP1 promastigotes generated in this study, showed significantly higher infectivity and virulence indexes than control parasites in the infection of J774 mouse macrophages highlighting thereby a role for LdMAcP in the parasite's virulence. PMID:25695743

  18. The Leishmania donovani histidine acid ecto-phosphatase LdMAcP: insight into its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, Amalia; Politou, Anastasia S; Smirlis, Despina; Kotini, Maria P; Kourou, Konstadina; Papamarcaki, Thomais; Boleti, Haralabia

    2015-05-01

    Acid ecto-phosphatase activity has been implicated in Leishmania donovani promastigote virulence. In the present study, we report data contributing to the molecular/structural and functional characterization of the L. donovani LdMAcP (L. donovani membrane acid phosphatase), member of the histidine acid phosphatase (HAcP) family. LdMAcP is membrane-anchored and shares high sequence identity with the major secreted L. donovani acid phosphatases (LdSAcPs). Sequence comparison of the LdMAcP orthologues in Leishmania sp. revealed strain polymorphism and species specificity for the L. donovani complex, responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (Khala azar), proposing thus a potential value of LdMAcP as an epidemiological or diagnostic tool. The extracellular orientation of the LdMAcP catalytic domain was confirmed in L. donovani promastigotes, wild-type (wt) and transgenic overexpressing a recombinant LdMAcP-mRFP1 (monomeric RFP1) chimera, as well as in transiently transfected mammalian cells expressing rLdMAcP-His. For the first time it is demonstrated in the present study that LdMAcP confers tartrate resistant acid ecto-phosphatase activity in live L. donovani promastigotes. The latter confirmed the long sought molecular identity of at least one enzyme contributing to this activity. Interestingly, the L. donovani rLdMAcP-mRFP1 promastigotes generated in this study, showed significantly higher infectivity and virulence indexes than control parasites in the infection of J774 mouse macrophages highlighting thereby a role for LdMAcP in the parasite's virulence. PMID:25695743

  19. Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons by zinc, thiol containing redox agents and carnosine.

    PubMed

    Thio, L L; Zhang, H X

    2006-01-01

    Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors by zinc (Zn(2+)) and endogenous redox agents such as glutathione may alter inhibition in the mammalian brain. Despite the abundance of Zn(2+) in the hippocampus and its ability to modulate glycine receptors, few studies have examined Zn(2+) modulation of hippocampal glycine receptors. Whether redox agents modulate hippocampal glycine receptors also remains unknown. This study examined Zn(2+) and redox modulation of glycine receptor-mediated currents in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons using whole-cell recordings. Zn(2+) concentrations below 10 microM potentiated currents elicited by low glycine, beta-alanine, and taurine concentrations by 300-400%. Zn(2+) concentrations above 300 microM produced nearly complete inhibition. Potentiating Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for the three agonists to the left and decreased the Hill coefficient for glycine and beta-alanine but not taurine. Inhibiting Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for glycine and beta-alanine to the right but reduced the maximum taurine response. Histidine residues may participate in potentiation because diethyl pyrocarbonate and pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) enhancement of glycine currents. pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) block of glycine currents, but diethyl pyrocarbonate did not. These findings indicate that separate sites mediate Zn(2+) potentiation and inhibition. The redox agents glutathione, dithiothreitol, tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) did not alter glycine currents by a redox mechanism. However, glutathione and dithiothreitol interfered with the effects of Zn(2+) on glycine currents by chelating it. Carnosine had similar effects. Thus, Zn(2+) and thiol containing redox agents that chelate Zn(2+) modulate hippocampal glycine receptors with the mechanism of Zn(2+) modulation being agonist dependent. PMID:16515845

  20. Vanadate inhibition of fungal phyA and bacterial appA2 histidine acid phosphatases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal PhyA protein, which was first identified as an acid optimum phosphomonoesterase (EC 3.1.3.8), could also serve as a vanadate haloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.10) provided the acid phosphatase activity is shutdown by vanadate. To understand how vanadate inhibits both phytate and pNPP degrading ac...

  1. Variable clinical manifestations of a glycine to glutamic acid substitution of the COL3A1 gene at residue 736

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, F.M.; Narcisi, P.; Richards, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Glycine substitutions at the 3{prime} end of the COL3A1 gene generally produce a characteristic clinical phenotype including acrogeria and severe vascular fragility. Here we report a three generation British family in which the propositus presented with aneurysms of the groins. He, his mother, sister and elder daughter all had the external clinical phenotype of vascular EDS IV whilst another daughter and nephew were clinically normal. Cultured skin fibroblasts from the propositus and his clinically affected relatives poorly secreted normal and overmodified collagen III species. Normal components of secreted proteins predominated whilst overmodified molecules were prominent in intracellular material. Surprisingly the normal children also secreted less collagen type III than expected (though more than their clinically abnormal relatives). cDNA from bases 2671 to 3714 were amplified as four overlapping PCR fragments and analysed by DGGE. The region between 2671 and 3015 was heterozygous. Sequencing showed a mutation of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 736. This mutation created an extra Apa 1 restriction site which was suitable for family studies. These showed inheritance of the mutant gene by both vascular and non-vascular clinical phenotypes. This family therefore illustrates that replacement of glycine to glutamic acid at position 736 produces variable clinical and biochemical phenotypes ranging from easily recognizable vascular EDS IV with very poor collagen secretion to an EDS III-like picture and with less severe protein disturbance. The reasons for these differences are at present unexplained.

  2. (3H) 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid, a high affinity ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine regulatory site

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, S.D.; Baron, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors is allosterically linked to a strychnine-insensitive glycine regulatory site. Kynurenic acid and its halogenated derivatives are non-competitive NMDA antagonists acting at the glycine site. The authors have prepared (3H) 5,7-dichlorokyrurenic acid (DCKA) as an antagonist radioligand and have characterized its binding. 3-Bromo-5,7-DCKA was catalytically dehalogenated in the presence of tritium gas and HPLC purified to yield (3H) 5,7-DCKA with a specific activity of 17.6 Ci/mmol. (3H) 5,7-DCKA bound to rat brain synaptosomes with a Kd of 69 {plus minus} 23 nM and Bmax = 14.5 {plus minus} 3.2 pmoles/mg protein. Binding was 65-70% specific at 10 nM (3H) 5,7-DCKA. This ligand is thus more selective and has higher affinity than (3H) glycine, in addition to being an antagonist.

  3. Genetic Evolution of a Helicobacter pylori Acid-Sensing Histidine Kinase and Gastric Disease.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Uma; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Suarez, Giovanni; Azah, Ayeetin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Varga, Matthew G; Forsyth, Mark H; Peek, Richard M

    2016-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, which develops within a hypochlorhydric environment. We sequentially isolated H. pylori (strain J99) from a patient who developed corpus-predominant gastritis and hypochlorhydia over a 6-year interval. Archival J99 survived significantly better under acidic conditions than recent J99 strains. H. pylori arsRS encodes a 2-component system critical for stress responses; recent J99 isolates harbored 2 nonsynonymous arsS mutations, and arsS inactivation abolished acid survival. In vivo, acid-resistant archival, but not recent J99, successfully colonized high-acid-secreting rodents. Thus, genetic evolution of arsS may influence progression to hypochlorhydia and gastric cancer. PMID:27190191

  4. Nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles as affinity probes for enrichment of histidine-tagged proteins and phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Ya-Shiuan; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chen, Cheng-Tai; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-10-01

    We herein demonstrate superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with nitrilotriacetic acid derivative (NTA) that can bind with different immobilized metal ions are capable of probing diverse target species. Immobilized Ni(II) on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles have the capability of selectively trapping histidine (His)-tagged proteins such as a mutated streptopain tagged with 6x His, i.e., C192S (MW approximately 42 kDa), from cell lysates. Enrichment was achieved by vigorously mixing the sample solution and the nanoparticles by pipetting in and out of a sample vial for only 30 s. After enrichment, the probe-target species could be readily isolated by magnetic separation. We also characterized the proteins enriched on the affinity probes using on-probe tryptic digestion under microwave irradiation for only 2 min, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Using this enrichment and tryptic digestion, the target species can be rapidly enriched and characterized, reducing the time required for carrying out the complete analysis to less than 10 min. Furthermore, when either Zr(IV) or Ga (III) ions are immobilized on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles, the nanoparticles have the capability of selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides from tryptic digests of alpha-, beta-caseins, and diluted milk. The detection limit for the tryptic digests of alpha- and beta-caseins is approximately 50 fmol. PMID:17784733

  5. Association of amino acids embedded in helium droplets detected by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalanne, Matthieu R.; Achazi, Georg; Reichwald, Sebastian; Lindinger, Albrecht

    2015-12-01

    Amino acids were embedded in helium droplets. The electron impact ionization allows for detecting positively charged glycine, valine, histidine, tryptophan and their principal fragments. Monomers and polymers with up to four amino acids are reported. Heterodimers of tryptophan and valine or histidine are observed as well as heterodimers of included fragments. The ability of these associations of molecules to form complexes with water is examined.

  6. Is the reaction between formic acid and protonated aminomethanol a possible source of glycine precursors in the interstellar medium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Antonio; Barrientos, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Context. One of the most interesting questions in interstellar chemistry concerns whether we can detect the basic building blocks of proteins in astronomical sources. In ascertaining whether amino acids could be possible interstellar molecules, a crucial point is how they could be synthesized in the interstellar medium. Aims: We do a theoretical study of the ion-molecule reaction involving protonated aminomethanol and formic acid to establish its viability in space. This ion-molecule reaction has been proposed by other authors as a possible way to produce glycine in the interstellar medium. Methods: The relevant stationary points on the potential energy surface of the reaction between protonated aminomethanol and formic acid have been theoretically studied by using ab initio methods. The second-order Moller-Plesset level was employed, in conjunction with the correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta (cc-pVTZ) basis set. In addition, the electronic energies were refined by means of single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level (coupled cluster single and double excitation model augmented with a non-iterative treatment of triple excitations) on the MP2/cc-pVTZ geometries with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. Results: Formation of protonated glycine is an exothermic process; however, the process presents a net activation barrier that makes this reaction unfeasible under interstellar conditions. Conclusions: The reaction of protonated aminomethanol with formic acid does not seem to be a plausible source of interstellar glycine. This particular case is a clear example that a detailed study of the potential energy surface is needed to establish the relevance of a process in the interstellar medium.

  7. Regulation of SulA cleavage by Lon protease by the C-terminal amino acid of SulA, histidine.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Y; Amano, F

    2001-09-01

    SulA protein, a cell division inhibitor in Escherichia coli, is degraded by Lon protease. The C-terminal eight residues of SulA have been shown to be recognized by Lon; however, it remains to be elucidated which amino acid in the C-terminus of SulA is critical for the recognition of SulA by Lon. To clarify this point, we constructed mutants of SulA with changes in the C-terminal residues, and examined the accumulation and stability of the resulting mutant SulA proteins in vivo. Substitution of the extreme C-terminal histidine residue with another amino acid led to marked accumulation and high stability of SulA in lon(+) cells. A SulA mutant in which the C-terminal eight residues were deleted (SulAC161) showed high accumulation and stability, but the addition of histidine to the C-terminus of SulAC161 (SulAC161+H) made it labile. Similarly, SulAC161+H fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP-SulAC161+H) formed a tight complex with and was degraded rapidly by Lon in vitro. Histidine competitively inhibited the degradation of MBP-SulA by Lon, while other amino acids did not. These results suggest that the histidine residue at the extreme C-terminus of SulA is recognized specifically by Lon, leading to a high-affinity interaction between SulA and Lon. PMID:11513747

  8. Experimental and theoretical enthalpies of formation of glycine-based sulfate/bisulfate amino acid ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Fang; He, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Ming; Tao, Guo-Hong

    2012-01-12

    The experimental and theoretical enthalpies of formation of several structural-similar glycine-based sulfate/bisulfate amino acid ionic liquids including glycine sulfate (Gly(2)SO(4), 1), glycine bisulfate (GlyHSO(4), 2), N,N-dimethylglycine sulfate ([DMGly](2)SO(4), 3), N,N-dimethylglycine bisulfate ([DMGly]HSO(4), 4), N,N-dimethylglycine methyl ester sulfate ([DMGlyC(1)](2)SO(4), 5), N,N-dimethylglycine methyl ester bisulfate ([DMGlyC(1)]HSO(4), 6), N,N,N-trimethylglycine methyl ester sulfate ([TMGlyC(1)](2)SO(4), 7), and N,N,N-trimethylglycine methyl ester bisulfate ([TMGlyC(1)]HSO(4), 8) were studied. Their experimental enthalpies of formation were obtained from the corresponding energies of combustion determined by the bomb calorimetry method. The enthalpies of formation of these amino acid ionic liquids are in the range from -1406 kJ mol(-1) to -1128 kJ mol(-1). Systematic theoretical study on these amino acid ionic liquids were performed by quantum chemistry calculation using the Gaussian03 suite of programs. The geometric optimization and the frequency analyses are carried out using the B3LYP method with the 6-31+G** basis set. Their calculated enthalpies of formation were derived from the single point energies carried out with the HF/6-31+G**, B3LYP/6-31+G**, B3LYP/6-311++G**, and MP2/6-311++G** level of theory, respectively. The relevance of experimental and calculated enthalpies of formation was studied. The calculated enthalpies of formation are in good agreement with their experimental data in less than 3% error. PMID:22148242

  9. Prebiotic synthesis of histidyl-histidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C.; Mills, T.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    Histidyl-histidine (His-His) has been synthesized in a yield of up to 14.4% under plausible prebiotic conditions using histidine (His), cyanamide, and 4-amino-5-imidazole carboxamide. A trace amount of His trimer was also detected. Because the imidazole group of His is involved in a number of important enzymatic reactions, and His-His has been shown to catalyze the prebiotic synthesis of glycyl-glycine, we expect this work will stimulate further studies on the catalytic activities of simple His-containing peptides in prebiotic reactions.

  10. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  11. Effects of inhibitory amino acids on expression of GABAA Rα and glycine Rα1 in hypoxic rat cortical neurons during development

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H; Feng, Y; He, XZ; Yang, YL; Sung, JH; Xia, Y

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that GABA and glycine are protective to mature but toxic to immature cortical neurons during prolonged hypoxia. Since the action of these inhibitory amino acids is mediated by GABA and glycine receptors, the expression of these receptors is a critical factor in determining neuronal response to GABAA and glycine in hypoxia. Therefore, we asked whether in rat cortical neurons, 1) hypoxia alters the expression of the GABA and glycine receptors; 2) inhibitory amino acids change the course of GABA and glycine receptor expression; and 3) there are any differences between the immature and mature neurons. In cultured rat cortical neurons from day 4 (4 Days in Vitro or DIV 4) to day 20 (DIV 20), we observed that 1) GABAARα and GlyRα1 underwent differential changes in expression during the development in-vitro; 2) hypoxia for 3 days decreased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in the neurons in-between DIV 4 and DIV 20, but did not induce a major change in immature (DIV 4) and mature (DIV 20) neurons; 3) during normoxia GABA, glycine and taurine decreased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in the immature neurons, but had a tendency to increase the density in the mature neurons, except for taurine; 4) under hypoxia, all these amino acids decreased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in most groups of the immature neurons with a slight effect on the mature neurons; and 5) δ-opioid receptor activation with DADLE increased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in both the immature and mature neurons under normoxia and in the mature neurons under hypoxic condition. These data suggest that inhibitory amino acids differentially regulate the expression of GABAA and glycine receptors in rat cortical neurons in normoxic and hypoxic conditions with major differences between the immature and mature neurons. PMID:22018691

  12. The importance of glutamate, glycine, and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transport and regulation in manganese, mercury and lead neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A.; Aschner, Michael . E-mail: michael.aschner@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-05-01

    Historically, amino acids were studied in the context of their importance in protein synthesis. In the 1950s, the focus of research shifted as amino acids were recognized as putative neurotransmitters. Today, many amino acids are considered important neurochemicals. Although many amino acids play a role in neurotransmission, glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly), and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are among the more prevalent and better understood. Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, and Gly and GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the central nervous system, are known to be tightly regulated. Prolonged exposure to environmental toxicants, such as manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), or lead (Pb), however, can lead to dysregulation of these neurochemicals and subsequent neurotoxicity. While the ability of these metals to disrupt the regulation of Glu, Gly and GABA have been studied, few articles have examined the collective role of these amino acids in the respective metal's mechanism of toxicity. For each of the neurotransmitters above, we will provide a brief synopsis of their regulatory function, including the importance of transport and re-uptake in maintaining their optimal function. Additionally, the review will address the hypothesis that aberrant homeostasis of any of these amino acids, or a combination of the three, plays a role in the neurotoxicity of Mn, Hg, or Pb.

  13. Glassin, a histidine-rich protein from the siliceous skeletal system of the marine sponge Euplectella, directs silica polycondensation

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Amano, Taro; Bari, Md. Rezaul; Weaver, James C.; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The hexactinellids are a diverse group of predominantly deep sea sponges that synthesize elaborate fibrous skeletal systems of amorphous hydrated silica. As a representative example, members of the genus Euplectella have proved to be useful model systems for investigating structure–function relationships in these hierarchically ordered siliceous network-like composites. Despite recent advances in understanding the mechanistic origins of damage tolerance in these complex skeletal systems, the details of their synthesis have remained largely unexplored. Here, we describe a previously unidentified protein, named “glassin,” the main constituent in the water-soluble fraction of the demineralized skeletal elements of Euplectella. When combined with silicic acid solutions, glassin rapidly accelerates silica polycondensation over a pH range of 6–8. Glassin is characterized by high histidine content, and cDNA sequence analysis reveals that glassin shares no significant similarity with any other known proteins. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals that glassin consists of two similar histidine-rich domains and a connecting domain. Each of the histidine-rich domains is composed of three segments: an amino-terminal histidine and aspartic acid-rich sequence, a proline-rich sequence in the middle, and a histidine and threonine-rich sequence at the carboxyl terminus. Histidine always forms HX or HHX repeats, in which most of X positions are occupied by glycine, aspartic acid, or threonine. Recombinant glassin reproduces the silica precipitation activity observed in the native proteins. The highly modular composition of glassin, composed of imidazole, acidic, and hydroxyl residues, favors silica polycondensation and provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of skeletal formation in hexactinellid sponges. PMID:26261346

  14. Glassin, a histidine-rich protein from the siliceous skeletal system of the marine sponge Euplectella, directs silica polycondensation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Amano, Taro; Bari, Md Rezaul; Weaver, James C; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2015-09-15

    The hexactinellids are a diverse group of predominantly deep sea sponges that synthesize elaborate fibrous skeletal systems of amorphous hydrated silica. As a representative example, members of the genus Euplectella have proved to be useful model systems for investigating structure-function relationships in these hierarchically ordered siliceous network-like composites. Despite recent advances in understanding the mechanistic origins of damage tolerance in these complex skeletal systems, the details of their synthesis have remained largely unexplored. Here, we describe a previously unidentified protein, named "glassin," the main constituent in the water-soluble fraction of the demineralized skeletal elements of Euplectella. When combined with silicic acid solutions, glassin rapidly accelerates silica polycondensation over a pH range of 6-8. Glassin is characterized by high histidine content, and cDNA sequence analysis reveals that glassin shares no significant similarity with any other known proteins. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals that glassin consists of two similar histidine-rich domains and a connecting domain. Each of the histidine-rich domains is composed of three segments: an amino-terminal histidine and aspartic acid-rich sequence, a proline-rich sequence in the middle, and a histidine and threonine-rich sequence at the carboxyl terminus. Histidine always forms HX or HHX repeats, in which most of X positions are occupied by glycine, aspartic acid, or threonine. Recombinant glassin reproduces the silica precipitation activity observed in the native proteins. The highly modular composition of glassin, composed of imidazole, acidic, and hydroxyl residues, favors silica polycondensation and provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of skeletal formation in hexactinellid sponges. PMID:26261346

  15. Histidine residues in the Na+-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) are central regulators of SVCT2 function, modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na+ cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Ormazabal, Valeska; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escobar, Elizabeth; Aylwin, Carlos; Salas-Burgos, Alexis; Godoy, Alejandro; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2010-11-19

    Na(+)-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) activity is impaired at acid pH, but little is known about the molecular determinants that define the transporter pH sensitivity. SVCT2 contains six histidine residues in its primary sequence, three of which are exofacial in the transporter secondary structure model. We used site-directed mutagenesis and treatment with diethylpyrocarbonate to identify histidine residues responsible for SVCT2 pH sensitivity. We conclude that five histidine residues, His(109), His(203), His(206), His(269), and His(413), are central regulators of SVCT2 function, participating to different degrees in modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na(+) cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization. Our results are compatible with a model in which (i) a single exofacial histidine residue, His(413), localized in the exofacial loop IV that connects transmembrane helices VII-VIII defines the pH sensitivity of SVCT2 through a mechanism involving a marked attenuation of the activation by Na(+) and loss of Na(+) cooperativity, which leads to a decreased V(max) without altering the transport K(m); (ii) exofacial histidine residues His(203), His(206), and His(413) may be involved in maintaining a functional interaction between exofacial loops II and IV and influence the general folding of the transporter; (iii) histidines 203, 206, 269, and 413 affect the transporter kinetics by modulating the apparent transport K(m); and (iv) histidine 109, localized at the center of transmembrane helix I, might be fundamental for the interaction of SVCT2 with the transported substrate ascorbic acid. Thus, histidine residues are central regulators of SVCT2 function. PMID:20843809

  16. Identification of essential residues for the catalytic function of 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2. Probing the role of histidine, aspartic acid, cysteine, and arginine.

    PubMed

    Pickard, R T; Chiou, X G; Strifler, B A; DeFelippis, M R; Hyslop, P A; Tebbe, A L; Yee, Y K; Reynolds, L J; Dennis, E A; Kramer, R M; Sharp, J D

    1996-08-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) hydrolyzes the sn-2-acyl ester bond of phospholipids and shows a preference for arachidonic acid-containing substrates. We found previously that Ser-228 is essential for enzyme activity and is likely to function as a nucleophile in the catalytic center of the enzyme (Sharp, J. D., White, D. L., Chiou, X. G., Goodson, T., Gamboa, G. C., McClure, D., Burgett, S., Hoskins, J., Skatrud, P. L., Sportsman, J. R., Becker, G. W., Kang, L. H., Roberts, E. F., and Kramer, R. M.(1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 14850-14853). cPLA2 contains a catalytic aspartic acid motif common to the subtilisin family of serine proteases. Substitution within this motif of Ala for Asp-549 completely inactivated the enzyme, and substitutions with either glutamic acid or asparagine reduced activity 2000- and 300-fold, respectively. Additionally, using mutants with cysteine replaced by alanine, we found that Cys-331 is responsible for the enzyme's sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide. Surprisingly, substituting alanine for any of the 19 histidines did not produce inactive enzyme, demonstrating that a classical serine-histidine-aspartate mechanism does not operate in this hydrolase. We found that substituting alanine or histidine for Arg-200 did produce inactive enzyme, while substituting lysine reduced activity 200-fold. Results obtained with the lysine mutant (R200K) and a coumarin ester substrate suggest no specific interaction between Arg-200 and the phosphoryl group of the phospholipid substrate. Arg-200, Ser-228, and Asp-549 are conserved in cPLA2 from six species and also in four nonmammalian phospholipase B enzymes. Our results, supported by circular dichroism, provide evidence that Asp-549 and Arg-200 are critical to the enzyme's function and suggest that the cPLA2 catalytic center is novel. PMID:8702602

  17. Conformational characterization of peptides rich in the cycloaliphatic C alpha,alpha-disubstituted glycine 1-aminocyclononane-1-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Gatos, M; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Valle, G; Toniolo, C; Bonora, G M; Saviano, M; Iacovino, R; Menchise, V; Galdiero, S; Pedone, C; Benedetti, E

    1997-01-01

    A series of N- and C-protected, monodispersed homo-oligopeptides (to the pentamer level) from the cycloaliphatic C alpha,alpha-dialkylated glycine 1-aminocyclononane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac9c) and two Ala/Ac9c tripeptides have been synthesized by solution methods and fully characterized. The conformational preferences of all the model peptides were determined in deuterochloroform solution by FT-IR absorption and 1H-NMR. The molecular structures of the amino acid derivatives mCIAc-Ac9c-OH and Z-Ac9c-OtBu, the dipeptide pBrBz-(Ac9c)2-OtBu, the tetrapeptide Z-(Ac9c)4-OtBu, and the pentapeptide Z-(Ac9c)5-OtBu were determined in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. Based on this information, the average geometry and the preferred conformation for the cyclononyl moiety of the Ac9c residue have been assessed. The backbone conformational data are strongly in favour of the conclusion that the Ac9c residue is a strong beta-turn and helix former. A comparison with the structural propensity of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, the prototype of C alpha,alpha-dialkylated glycines, and the other extensively investigated members of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc, with n = 3-8) is made and the implications for the use of the Ac9c residue in conformationally constrained analogues of bioactive peptides are briefly examined. PMID:9391912

  18. Effect of acidity on the glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of nanocrystalline alumina powder

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Tianyou . E-mail: typeng@whu.edu.cn; Liu Xun; Dai Ke; Xiao Jiangrong; Song Haibo

    2006-09-14

    Nanocrystalline alumina powders were prepared by combustion synthesis using glycine as fuel and nitrate as an oxidizer. The effect of the pH values in the precursor solutions on crystallite sizes, surface areas and morphologies of the synthesized alumina powder has been investigated by X-ray diffractometry, thermal analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and transmission electron microscopy. With decreasing the pH values in the precursor solutions, the obtained materials could be modified from segregated nanoparticles (pH 10.5) to aggregates of nanoparticles (pH 6.0), and finally to a flaky morphology (pH 2.5). The rates of decomposition, the interaction of coordination as well as the hydrogen bonding of the glycine and the Al-hydroxides species at different pH values were found to be responsible for the generation of flake and/or segregated nanoparticles during auto-ignition reactions. The as-prepared combustion ashes were converted into pure nanocrystalline alumina after calcination at elevated temperatures. The specific surface areas of the products calcined at 800 deg. C ranged from 96 to 39 m{sup 2}/g with the pH decreased from 10.5 to 2.5.

  19. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  20. Primary structure of a histidine-rich proteolytic fragment of human ceruloplasmin. I. Amino acid sequence of the cyanogen bromide peptides.

    PubMed

    Kingston, I B; Kingston, B L; Putnam, F W

    1980-04-10

    A histidine-rich fragment, Cp F5, with a molecular weight of 18,650 was isolated from human ceruloplasmin. It consists of 159 amino acids and contains a possible copper-binding site. The sequence of the first 18 NH2-terminal residues of Cp F5 was determined by automated Edman degradation. Cp F5 was cleaved by cyanogen bromide to produce nine fragments of from 2 to 63 residues. The amino acid sequence of all of the cyanogen bromide fragments was investigated using automated and manual Edman degradation, the fragments being digested with trypsin, chymotrypsin, thermolysin, staphylococcal protease, and pepsin as appropriate. The results, in conjunction with the data on the tryptic peptides reported in the accompanying paper (Kingston, I.B., Kingston, B.L., and Putnam, F.L. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2886-2896), establish the complete amino acid sequence of Cp F5. PMID:6987229

  1. Growth, Optical, Dielectric and Ferroelectric Properties of Non-Linear Optical Single Crystal: Glycine-Phthalic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Sagadevan

    2016-07-01

    Single crystals of glycine-phthalic acid (GPA) were grown by slow evaporation process using aqueous solution. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to examine its cell structure and it was found that the GPA crystal corresponded to the orthorhombic system. To identify absorption range and cut-off wavelength for the GPA crystal, UV-visible spectrum was recorded. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to study the optical constants such as the refractive index, the extinction coefficient, electrical susceptibility, and optical conductivity. As a function of different frequencies and temperatures, the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss were examined. The electrical properties like plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy, and polarizability were determined for the analysis of the second harmonic generation (SHG). Using the Kurtz powder technique, the SHG of the GPA crystal was studied. Investigations relating to hysteresis were carried out to ascertain the ferroelectric nature of the material.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new set of pyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolines as glycine/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Varano, Flavia; Catarzi, Daniela; Colotta, Vittoria; Poli, Daniela; Filacchioni, Guido; Galli, Alessandro; Costagli, Chiara

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that 8-chloro-5,6-dihydro-5-oxo-pyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-2-carboxylates (PQZ series) represent a family of glycine/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and/or (R,S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) and/or kainic acid (KA) receptor antagonists. Moreover, some groups have been identified that introduced in suitable positions of the PQZ 2-carboxylate framework shift affinity and selectivity toward glycine/NMDA receptor. These substituents are a carboxylate function at position-1 and/or a chlorine atom at position-9. In this paper we report a study on some new 5,6-dihydro-5-oxo-pyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-1-carboxylates bearing at position-2 a lipophilic amide group or lacking substituent at this same position. All the newly synthesised compounds were evaluated for their binding at glycine/NMDA, AMPA and KA receptors. These studies led to the identification of some new PQZ derivatives endowed with good glycine/NMDA receptor affinity and selectivity and to better definition of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this class of compounds. PMID:19652407

  3. LeProT1, a transporter for proline, glycine betaine, and gamma-amino butyric acid in tomato pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, R; Grallath, S; Breitkreuz, K E; Stransky, E; Stransky, H; Frommer, W B; Rentsch, D

    1999-01-01

    During maturation, pollen undergoes a period of dehydration accompanied by the accumulation of compatible solutes. Solute import across the pollen plasma membrane, which occurs via proteinaceous transporters, is required to support pollen development and also for subsequent germination and pollen tube growth. Analysis of the free amino acid composition of various tissues in tomato revealed that the proline content in flowers was 60 times higher than in any other organ analyzed. Within the floral organs, proline was confined predominantly to pollen, where it represented >70% of total free amino acids. Uptake experiments demonstrated that mature as well as germinated pollen rapidly take up proline. To identify proline transporters in tomato pollen, we isolated genes homologous to Arabidopsis proline transporters. LeProT1 was specifically expressed both in mature and germinating pollen, as demonstrated by RNA in situ hybridization. Expression in a yeast mutant demonstrated that LeProT1 transports proline and gamma-amino butyric acid with low affinity and glycine betaine with high affinity. Direct uptake and competition studies demonstrate that LeProT1 constitutes a general transporter for compatible solutes. PMID:10072398

  4. Inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum enhances the organic and fatty acids content of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís R; Pereira, Maria J; Azevedo, Jessica; Mulas, Rebeca; Velazquez, Encarna; González-Andrés, Fernando; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2013-12-15

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is one of the most important food crops for human and animal consumption, providing oil and protein at relatively low cost. The least expensive source of nitrogen for soybean is the biological fixation of atmospheric nitrogen by the symbiotic association with soil bacteria, belonging mainly to the genus Bradyrhizobium. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the inoculation of G. max with Bradyrhizobium japonicum on the metabolite profile and antioxidant potential of its seeds. Phenolic compounds, sterols, triterpenes, organic acids, fatty acids and volatiles profiles were characterised by different chromatographic techniques. The antioxidant activity was evaluated against DPPH, superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Inoculation with B. japonicum induced changes in the profiles of primary and secondary metabolites of G. max seeds, without affecting their antioxidant capacity. The increase of organic and fatty acids and volatiles suggest a positive effect of the inoculation process. These findings indicate that the inoculation with nodulating B. japonicum is a beneficial agricultural practice, increasing the content of bioactive metabolites in G. max seeds owing to the establishment of symbiosis between plant and microorganism, with direct effects on seed quality. PMID:23993531

  5. Water deficit-induced changes in abscisic acid, growth polysomes, and translatable RNA in soybean hypocotyls. [Glycine max L

    SciTech Connect

    Bensen, R.J.; Boyer, J.S.; Mullet, J.E. )

    1988-01-01

    Soybean seedlings (Glycine max L.) were germinated and dark-grown in water-saturated vermiculite for 48 hours, then transferred either to water-saturated vermiculite or to low water potential vermiculite. A decrease in growth rate was detectable within 0.8 hour post-transfer to low water potential vermiculite. A fourfold increase in the abscisic acid content of the elongating region was observed within 0.5 hour. At 24 hours post-transfer, hypocotyl elongation was severely arrested and abscisic acid reached its highest measured level. A comparison of the polyA{sup +} RNA populations isolated at 24 hours post-transfer from the elongating region of water-saturated and low water potential vermiculite-grown seedlings was made by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analysis of in vitro translation products. It revealed both increases and decreases in the relative amounts of a number of translation products. Rewatering seedlings grown in low water potential vermiculite at 24 hours post-transfer led to a total recovery in growth rate within 0.5 hour, while abscisic acid in the elongating hypocotyl region required 1 to 2 hours to return to uninduced levels. Application of 1.0 millimolar {+-} abscisic acid to well-watered seedlings resulted in a 48% reduction in hypocotyl growth rate during the first 2 hours after treatment. Plants treated with abscisic acid for 24 hours had a lower polysome content than control plants. However, hypocotyl growth inhibition in abscisic acid-treated seedlings preceded the decline in polysome content.

  6. A Non-Invasive NMR Method Based on Histidine Imidazoles to Analyze the pH-Modulation of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Del Conte, Rebecca; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; García-Mauriño, Sofía M; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2015-05-11

    A useful (2) J(N-H) coupling-based NMR spectroscopic approach is proposed to unveil, at the molecular level, the contribution of the imidazole groups of histidines from RNA/DNA-binding proteins on the modulation of binding to nucleic acids by pH. Such protonation/deprotonation events have been monitored on the single His96 located at the second RNA/DNA recognition motif (RRM2) of T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) protein. The pKa values of the His96 ionizable groups were substantially higher in the complexes with short U-rich RNA and T-rich DNA oligonucleotides than those of the isolated TIA-1 RRM2. Herein, the methodology applied to determine changes in pKa of histidine side chains upon DNA/RNA binding, gives valuable information to understand the pH effect on multidomain DNA/RNA-binding proteins that shuttle among different cellular compartments. PMID:25846236

  7. Supramolecular polymer hydrogels from bolaamphiphilic L-histidine and benzene dicarboxylic acids: thixotropy and significant enhancement of Eu(III) fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Minghua

    2012-11-12

    Supramolecular polymers from the bolaamphiphilic L-histidine (BolaHis) and benzene dicarboxylic acids (o-phthalic acid, OPA; isophthalic acid, IPA and terephthalic acid, TPA) were found to form hydrogels although neither of the single components could gel water. It was suggested that the hydrogen bond and ionic interactions among different imidazole and carboxylic acid groups are responsible for the formation of the supramolecular polymer as well as the hydrogel formation. Depending on the structures of the dicarboxylic acids, different behaviors of the gels were observed. The hydrogels from OPA/BolaHis and IPA/BolaHis showed thixotropic properties, that is, the hydrogel was destroyed by hand shaking and then slowly gelated again at room temperature. However, the hydrogels of TPA/BolaHis could not. Interestingly, when Eu(III) was doped into IPA/BolaHis supramolecular polymers, very strong luminescence enhancement was observed. FT-IR spectroscopies and XRD analysis revealed that the strong luminescence enhancement could be attributed to the matched supramolecular nanostructures, which render the correct binding and a good dispersion of Eu(III) ions. The work offers a new approach for fabricating functional hydrogels through the supramolecular polymers. PMID:23097314

  8. Prebiotic synthesis of histidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C.; Yang, L.; Miller, S. L.; Oro, J.

    1990-01-01

    The prebiotic formation of histidine (His) has been accomplished experimentally by the reaction of erythrose with formamidine followed by a Strecker synthesis. In the first step of this reaction sequence, the formation of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde took place by the condensation of erythrose and formamidine, two compounds that are known to be formed under prebiotic conditions. In a second step, the imidazole-4-acetaldehyde was converted to His, without isolation of the reaction products by adding HCN and ammonia to the reaction mixture. LC, HPLC, thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify the product, which was obtained in a yield of 3.5% based on the ratio of His/erythrose. This is a new chemical synthesis of one of the basic amino acids which had not been synthesized prebiotically until now.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops. PMID:27148336

  10. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops. PMID:27148336

  11. Biological evaluation of halogenated thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-3-one carboxylic acid derivatives targeting the YycG histidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Chen, Chen; Liu, Huayong; Zheng, Likang; Tong, Yao; Qu, Di; Han, Shiqing

    2014-11-24

    With an intention to potent inhibitors of YycG histidine kinase, a series of halogenated thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-3-one carboxylic acid derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial, antibiofilm and hemolytic activities. The majority of the compounds showed good activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, with MIC values of 1.56-6.25 μM, simultaneously presented promising antiobifilm activity against S. epidermidis ATCC35984 at 50 μM. The test of inhibitory activity on YycG kinase suggested the antibacterial activities of these derivatives are based on inhibiting the enzyme activity of the YycG HK domain. The hemolytic activity test suggested these compounds exhibited in vitro antibacterial activity at non-hemolytic concentrations. PMID:25282671

  12. Dual Mode Fluorophore-Doped Nickel Nitrilotriacetic Acid-Modified Silica Nanoparticles Combine Histidine-Tagged Protein Purification with Site-Specific Fluorophore Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Jeyakumar, M.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first example of a fluorophore-doped nickel chelate surface- modified silica nanoparticle that functions in a dual mode, combining histidine-tagged protein purification with site-specific fluorophore labeling. Tetramethylrhodamine (TMR)-doped silica nanoparticles, estimated to contain 700–900 TMRs per ca. 23-nm particle, were surface modified with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), producing TMR-SiO2-NTA-Ni+2. Silica-embedded TMR retains very high quantum yield, is resistant to quenching by buffer components and is modestly quenched and only to a certain depth (ca. 2 nm) by surface-attached Ni+2. When exposed to a bacterial lysate containing estrogen receptor α ligand binding domain (ERα) as a minor component, these beads showed very high specificity binding, enabling protein purification in one step. The capacity and specificity of these beads for binding a his-tagged protein were characterized by electrophoresis, radiometric counting, and MALDI-TOF MS. ERα, bound to TMR-SiO2-NTA-Ni++ beads in a site-specific manner, exhibited good activity for ligand binding and for ligand-induced binding to coactivators in solution FRET experiments and protein microarray fluorometric and FRET assays. This dual-mode type TMR-SiO2-NTA-Ni++ system represents a powerful combination of one-step histidine-tagged protein purification and site-specific labeling with multiple fluorophore species. BRIEFS Tetramethylrhodamine-doped silica nanoparticles surface modified with nitrilotriacetic acid are dual-mode agents that can be used to purify and site-specifically fluorophore label his-tagged proteins in one step for fluorometric and FRET experiments. PMID:17910454

  13. The glycine deportation system and its pharmacological consequences.

    PubMed

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Idle, Jeffrey R

    2012-08-01

    The glycine deportation system is an essential component of glycine catabolism in man whereby 400 to 800mg glycine per day are deported into urine as hippuric acid. The molecular escort for this deportation is benzoic acid, which derives from the diet and from gut microbiota metabolism of dietary precursors. Three components of this system, involving hepatic and renal metabolism, and renal active tubular secretion help regulate systemic and central nervous system levels of glycine. When glycine levels are pathologically high, as in congenital nonketotic hyperglycinemia, the glycine deportation system can be upregulated with pharmacological doses of benzoic acid to assist in normalization of glycine homeostasis. In congenital urea cycle enzymopathies, similar activation of the glycine deportation system with benzoic acid is useful for the excretion of excess nitrogen in the form of glycine. Drugs which can substitute for benzoic acid as substrates for the glycine deportation system have adverse reactions that may involve perturbations of glycine homeostasis. The cancer chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide has an unacceptably high incidence of encephalopathy. This would appear to arise as a result of the production of toxic aldehyde metabolites which deplete ATP production and sequester NADH in the mitochondrial matrix, thereby inhibiting the glycine deportation system and causing de novo glycine synthesis by the glycine cleavage system. We hypothesize that this would result in hyperglycinemia and encephalopathy. This understanding may lead to novel prophylactic strategies for ifosfamide encephalopathy. Thus, the glycine deportation system plays multiple key roles in physiological and neurotoxicological processes involving glycine. PMID:22584143

  14. The glycine deportation system and its pharmacological consequences☆

    PubMed Central

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    The glycine deportation system is an essential component of glycine catabolism in man whereby 400 to 800 mg glycine per day are deported into urine as hippuric acid. The molecular escort for this deportation is benzoic acid, which derives from the diet and from gut microbiota metabolism of dietary precursors. Three components of this system, involving hepatic and renal metabolism, and renal active tubular secretion help regulate systemic and central nervous system levels of glycine. When glycine levels are pathologically high, as in congenital nonketotic hyperglycinemia, the glycine deportation system can be upregulated with pharmacological doses of benzoic acid to assist in normalization of glycine homeostasis. In congenital urea cycle enzymopathies, similar activation of the glycine deportation system with benzoic acid is useful for the excretion of excess nitrogen in the form of glycine. Drugs which can substitute for benzoic acid as substrates for the glycine deportation system have adverse reactions that may involve perturbations of glycine homeostasis. The cancer chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide has an unacceptably high incidence of encephalopathy. This would appear to arise as a result of the production of toxic aldehyde metabolites which deplete ATP production and sequester NADH in the mitochondrial matrix, thereby inhibiting the glycine deportation system and causing de novo glycine synthesis by the glycine cleavage system. We hypothesize that this would result in hyperglycinemia and encephalopathy. This understanding may lead to novel prophylactic strategies for ifosfamide encephalopathy. Thus, the glycine deportation system plays multiple key roles in physiological and neurotoxicological processes involving glycine. PMID:22584143

  15. Comparison of oleic acid metabolism in the soybean (Glycine max (L. ) Merr. ) genotypes Williams and A5, a mutant with decreased linoleic acid in the seed

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.A.; Rinne, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The metabolism of oleoyl coenzyme A (CoA) was examined in developing seed from two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) genotypes: Williams, a standard cultivar and A5, a mutant containing nearly twice the oleic acid (18:1) content of Williams. The in vitro rates of esterification of oleoyl-CoA to lysophosphatides by acyl-CoA: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase was similar in both genotypes and lysophosphatidyl-ethanolamine was a poor substrate. Crude extracts desaturated exogenous (1-/sup 14/C)dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine at 14% of the rate achieved with (1-/sup 14/C)oleoyl-CoA, and 50 micromolar lysophosphaatidylcholine. The desaturase enzyme also required NADH for full activity. Extracts from Williams contained 1.5-fold more oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase activity, on a fresh weight basis, than did A5 and appeared to have a similar affinity for oleoyl-CoA. There was 1.2- to 1.9-fold more linoleic acid (18:2) in phosphatidylcholine from Williams than from A5, measured at two stages of development, but both genotypes had a similar distribution of fatty acids in the one and two positions. Phosphatidylethanolamine in A5 contained relatively more linoleic acid (18:2) in the one position than did Williams. The increased oleic acid (18:1) content in A5 appeared to be a result of decreased rates of 18:1 desaturation of oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine in this genotype.

  16. Propofol differentially inhibits the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine in the spinal dorsal horn of rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yong, Zheng; Mi, Weidong; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol) is an intravenous anesthetic that is commonly used for the general anesthesia. It is well known that the spinal cord is one of the working targets of general anesthesia including propofol. However, there is a lack of investigation of the effects of propofol on spinal dorsal horn which is important for the sensory transmission of nociceptive signals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing dosage of propofol on the release of glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in the spinal dorsal horn. Materials and Methods: The efflux of Glu, GABA or Gly in the spinal dorsal horn of rats was detected using transverse spinal microdialysis under an awake condition and various depths of propofol anesthesia. The infusion rates of propofol were, in order, 400 µg/(kg·min), 600 µg/(kg·min) and 800 µg/(kg·min), with a 20 min infusion period being maintained at each infusion rate. Results: Propofol decreased the glutamate efflux within spinal dorsal horn in a dose-dependent manner, and the maximum decrease was 56.8 ± 6.0% at high-dose propofol infusion producing immobility. The inhibitory GABA and Gly efflux was also decreased about 15–20% at low-dose propofol infusion only producing sedation, but did not continue to drop with higher doses of propofol. Conclusion: Propofol decreased both excitatory and inhibitory amino acids efflux in spinal dorsal horn, and the preferential suppression of the excitatory amino acid might be associated with the analgesic effect of propofol. PMID:26557972

  17. Structure and synthesis of histopine, a histidine derivative produced by crown gall tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, H.A.; Kaushal, A.; Deng, P.N.; Sciaky, D.

    1984-07-03

    Histopine, an unusual amino acid derivative of histidine isolated from crown gall tumors of sunflowers (Helianthus annus) inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain B/sub 6/, was previously assigned the gross structure N-(1-carboxyethyl)histidine. A diastereomeric mixture containing histopine was readily prepared by reductive alkylation of (S)-histidine with pyruvic acid and sodium cyanoborohydride. The individual diastereomers were prepared by reaction of (S)-histidine with (R)- and (S)-2-bromopropionic acid. (R)-N-(1-Carboxyethyl)-(S)-histidine supports the growth of A. tumefaciens whereas (S)-N-(1-carboxyethyl)-(S)-histidine is inactive.

  18. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-conjugated dendrimer-modified quantum dots for targeting and imaging melanoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Huang, Peng; Lin, Jing; He, Rong; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yang, Sen; Xi, Peng; Zhang, Xuejun; Ren, Qiushi; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-08-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for the development of malignant tumors and provides important targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy. Quantum dots have been broadly investigated for their potential application in cancer molecular imaging. In present work, CdSe quantum dots were synthesized, polyamidoamine dendrimers were used to modify surface of quantum dots and improve their solubility in water solution. Then, dendrimer-modified CdSe quantum dots were conjugated with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides. These prepared nanoprobes were injected into nude mice loaded with melanoma (A375) tumor xenografts via tail vessels, IVIS imaging system was used to image the targeting and bio-distribution of as-prepared nanoprobes. The dendrimer-modified quantum dots exhibit water-soluble, high quantum yield, and good biocompatibility. RGD-conjugated quantum dots can specifically target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and A375 melanoma cells, as well as nude mice loaded with A735 melanoma cells. High-performance RGD-conjugated dendrimers modified quantum dot-based nanoprobes have great potential in application such as tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:21125820

  19. Characterization of an acidic chitinase from seeds of black soybean (Glycine max (L) Merr Tainan No. 3).

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Min; Chen, Li-Chun; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Chiang, Chui-Liang; Chang, Chen-Tien; Chung, Yun-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Using 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N,N',N″-triacetylchitotrioside (4-MU-GlcNAc3) as a substrate, an acidic chitinase was purified from seeds of black soybean (Glycine max Tainan no. 3) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and three successive steps of column chromatography. The purified chitinase was a monomeric enzyme with molecular mass of 20.1 kDa and isoelectric point of 4.34. The enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of synthetic substrates p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl chitooligosaccharides with chain length from 3 to 5 (GlcNAcn, n = 3-5), and pNp-GlcNAc4 was the most degradable substrate. Using pNp-GlcNAc4 as a substrate, the optimal pH for the enzyme reaction was 4.0; kinetic parameters Km and kcat were 245 µM and 10.31 min-1, respectively. This enzyme also showed activity toward CM-chitin-RBV, a polymer form of chitin, and N-acetyl chitooligosaccharides, an oligomer form of chitin. The smallest oligomer substrate was an N-acetylglucosamine tetramer. These results suggested that this enzyme was an endo-splitting chitinase with short substrate cleavage activity and useful for biotechnological applications, in particular for the production of N-acetyl chitooligosaccharides. PMID:25437446

  20. Covariation Analysis of Serumal and Urinary Metabolites Suggests Aberrant Glycine and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue; Kong, Xiangliang; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yongyu; Hu, Yiyang; Tang, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis b (CHB) is one of the most serious viral diseases threatening human health by putting patients at lifelong risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although some proofs of altered metabolites in CHB were accumulated, its metabolic mechanism remains poorly understood. Analyzing covariations between metabolites may provide new hints toward underlying metabolic pathogenesis in CHB patients. Methods The present study collected paired urine and serum samples from the same subjects including 145 CHB and 23 healthy controls. A large-scale analysis of metabolites’ covariation within and across biofluids was systematically done to explore the underlying biological evidences for reprogrammed metabolism in CHB. Randomization and relative ranking difference were introduced to reduce bias caused by different sample size. More importantly, functional indication was interpreted by mapping differentially changed covariations to known metabolic pathways. Results Our results suggested reprogrammed pathways related to glycine metabolism, fatty acids metabolism and TCA cycle in CHB patients. With further improvement, the covariation analysis combined with network association study would pave new alternative way to interpret functional clues in clinical multi-omics data. PMID:27228119

  1. Incorporation of glycine-2-C-14 in acid-insoluble proteins of rat bones and teeth during hypokinesia and administration of thyrocalcitonine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Stekolnikov, L. I.; Uglova, N. N.; Potkin, V. Y.

    1979-01-01

    A forced limitation of the motor activity in rats (from 5 to 60 days) results in reduced incorporation of glycine 2-C14 in the total acid insoluble proteins of limb bones and its increase in the teeth and mandibular-maxillary bones. Daily administration of five micrograms of thyrocalcitonine together with polyvinylpyrrolidone normalizes the protein metabolism in the bone tissues during the 40 days of experimentation.

  2. Combination of cathodic reduction with adsorption for accelerated removal of Cr(VI) through reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes modified with sulfuric acid-glycine co-doped polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xi; Yang, Zhao-hui; Xu, Hai-yin; Zeng, Guang-ming; Huang, Jing; Yang, Xia; Song, Pei-pei; Wang, Li-ke

    2015-04-01

    Improving the reduction kinetics is crucial in the electroreduction process of Cr(VI). In this study, we developed a novel adsorption-electroreduction system for accelerated removal of Cr(VI) by employing reticulated vitreous carbon electrode modified with sulfuric acid-glycine co-doped polyaniline (RVC/PANI-SA-GLY). Firstly, response surface methodology confirmed the optimum polymerization condition of co-doped polyaniline for modifying electrodes (Aniline, sulfuric acid and glycine, respectively, of 0.2 mol/L, 0.85 mol/L, 0.93 mol/L) when untraditional dopant glycine was added. Subsequently, RVC/PANI-SA-GLY showed higher Cr(VI) removal percentages in electroreduction experiments over RVC electrode modified with sulfuric acid doped polyaniline (RVC/PANI-SA) and bare RVC electrode. In contrast to RVC/PANI-SA, the improvement by RVC/PANI-SA-GLY was more significant and especially obvious at more negative potential, lower initial Cr(VI) concentration, relatively less acidic solution and higher current densities, best achieving 7.84% higher removal efficiency with entire Cr(VI) eliminated after 900 s. Current efficiencies were likewise enhanced by RVC/PANI-SA-GLY under quite negative potentials. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism of RVC/PANI-SA-GLY, which greatly contributed to the faster reduction kinetics and was probably relative to the absorption between protonated amine groups of glycine and HCrO4(-). Eventually, the stability of RVC/PANI-SA-GLY was proven relatively satisfactory. PMID:25603298

  3. Effect of glycine supplementation in low protein diets with amino acids from soy protein isolate or free amino acids on broiler growth and nitrogen utilisation.

    PubMed

    Siegert, W; Wild, K J; Schollenberger, M; Helmbrecht, A; Rodehutscord, M

    2016-06-01

    Here, it was investigated whether substitution of amino acids (AA) from soy protein isolate with free AA in low crude protein diets influences the growth performance and N utilisation in broilers, and whether interactions with dietary glycine equivalent (Glyequi) concentration exist. Birds were distributed in two 2 × 2 factorial arrangements of 48 floor pens containing 10 birds each, plus 48 metabolism cages containing two birds each. Experimental feed was provided for ad libitum consumption from d 7 to 22. Diets contained either a soy protein isolate at 79 g/kg or a mix of free AA, which supplied the same amount of 18 proteinogenic AA. A mix of free glycine and l-serine was used to obtain low and high (12.0 and 20.5 g/kg dry matter) levels of dietary Glyequi. Substitution of soy protein isolate with free AA reduced the average daily gain and feed efficiency, mainly due to reduced feed intake. Efficiency of N accretion was not influenced by the AA source or Glyequi concentration on d 21, possibly due to the lower AA digestibility of soy protein isolate and higher urinary excretion of nitrogenous substances in the treatments with the AA mix. The average daily weight gain of the treatments with high Glyequi concentration was higher for both AA sources. This increase was due to higher average daily feed intake by broilers in the treatments with soy protein isolate and due to the increased feed efficiency in the treatments with the AA mix. Broilers exhibited different growth responses to dietary Glyequi between the AA sources; however, these responses could not be attributed to the different utilisation of Glyequi for uric acid synthesis. PMID:26955743

  4. A new locus (leuK) affecting the regulation of branched-chain amino acid, histidine, and tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C S; West, R; Hilderman, R H; Bayliss, F T; Klines, E L

    1978-01-01

    A locus (leuK) affecting regulation of the leucine operon was selected by isolating a spontaneous Ara+ derivative of an Escherichia coli B/r strain carrying an ara-leu fusion in which the arabinose operon is under leucine control. Genetic analyses by P1 transduction demonstrated that the lesion is located to the right of the galactose operon. Regulation of the biosynthetic enzymes for leucine, isoleucine-valine, histidine, and tryptophan was altered in a strain carrying leuK16. High-level gene expression in the heterozygous merodiploid strain F' leuK+/leuK16) demonstrated the dominance of the mutant allele to the wild-type allele. No apparent effect was observed in the mutant on N-acetylornithinase, a biosynthetic enzyme in the arginine pathway, nor on any of the 18 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases examined. However, compared with that of the parent strain, the extent of the charging of leucyl-, isoleucyl-, valyl-, histidyl-, and arginyl-tRNA was decreased in the mutant. PMID:355232

  5. PREPARATIVE ISOLATION AND PURIFICATION OF THREE GLYCINE-CONJUGATED CHOLIC ACIDS FROM PULVIS FELLIS SUIS BY HIGH-SPEED COUNTERCURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH ELSD DETECTION

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiao; Li, Jing; Sun, Wenji; Zhang, Tianyou; Ito, Yoichiro

    2011-01-01

    Coupled with evaporative light scattering detection, a high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) method was developed for preparative isolation and purification of three glycine-conjugated cholic acids, glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA), glycohyodeoxycholic acid (GHDCA) and glycohyocholic acid (GHCA) from Pulvis Fellis Suis (Pig gallbladder bile) for the first time. The separation was performed with a two-phase solvent system consisted of chloroform-methanol-water-acetic acid (65:30:10:1.5, v/v/v/v) by eluting the lower phase in the head-to-tail elution mode. The revolution speed of the separation column, flow rate of the mobile phase and separation temperature were 800 rpm, 2 ml/min and 25 °C, respectively. In a single operation, 33 mg of GCDCA, 38 mg of GHDCA and 23 mg of GHCA were obtained from 200 mg of crude extract with the purity of 95.65%, 96.72% and 96.63%, respectively, in one step separation. The HSCCC fractions were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the structures of the three glycine-conjugated cholic acids were identified by ESI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. PMID:23008527

  6. Modification of photosynthetic electron transport and amino acid levels by overexpression of a circadian-related histidine kinase hik8 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Ayuko; Arisaka, Satomi; Takeya, Masahiro; Iijima, Hiroko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis, and the maintenance of photosynthetic electron transport chains is indispensable to their survival in various environmental conditions. Photosynthetic electron transport in cyanobacteria can be studied through genetic analysis because of the natural competence of cyanobacteria. We here show that a strain overexpressing hik8, a histidine kinase gene related to the circadian clock, exhibits an altered photosynthetic electron transport chain in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Respiratory activity was down-regulated under nitrogen-replete conditions. Photosynthetic activity was slightly lower in the hik8-overexpressing strain than in the wild-type after nitrogen depletion, and the values of photosynthetic parameters were altered by hik8 overexpression under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Transcripts of genes encoding Photosystem I and II were increased by hik8 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Nitrogen starvation triggers increase in amino acids but the magnitude of the increase in several amino acids was diminished by hik8 overexpression. These genetic data indicate that Hik8 regulates the photosynthetic electron transport, which in turn alters primary metabolism during nitrogen starvation in this cyanobacterium. PMID:26539179

  7. N-Acetylglucosaminidases from CAZy Family GH3 Are Really Glycoside Phosphorylases, Thereby Explaining Their Use of Histidine as an Acid/Base Catalyst in Place of Glutamic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Spencer S.; Blaukopf, Markus; Withers, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH3 consists primarily of stereochemistry-retaining β-glucosidases but also contains a subfamily of β-N-acetylglucosaminidases. Enzymes from this subfamily were recently shown to use a histidine residue within a His-Asp dyad contained in a signature sequence as their catalytic acid/base residue. Reasons for their use of His rather than the Glu or Asp found in other glycosidases were not apparent. Through studies on a representative member, the Nag3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Cellulomonas fimi, we now show that these enzymes act preferentially as glycoside phosphorylases. Their need to accommodate an anionic nucleophile within the enzyme active site explains why histidine is used as an acid/base catalyst in place of the anionic glutamate seen in other GH3 family members. Kinetic and mechanistic studies reveal that these enzymes also employ a double-displacement mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, which was directly detected by mass spectrometry. Phosphate has no effect on the rates of formation of the glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, but it accelerates turnover of the N-acetylglucosaminyl-enzyme intermediate ∼3-fold, while accelerating turnover of the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate several hundredfold. These represent the first reported examples of retaining β-glycoside phosphorylases, and the first instance of free β-GlcNAc-1-phosphate in a biological context. PMID:25533455

  8. 11B NMR spectroscopy of peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes of alpha-lytic protease. Direct evidence for tetrahedral boron in both boron-histidine and boron-serine adduct complexes.

    PubMed

    Tsilikounas, E; Kettner, C A; Bachovchin, W W

    1993-11-30

    We have previously shown, using 15N and 1H NMR spectroscopy, that MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-boroPhe and certain other boronic acid inhibitors form boron-histidine adducts with alpha-lytic protease instead of transition-state-like tetrahedral boron-serine adducts as is generally supposed [Bachovchin, W. W., Wong, W. Y. L., Farr-Jones, S., Shenvi, A. B., & Kettner, C. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7689-7697]. An X-ray crystallographic study of the MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-boroPhe complex with alpha-lytic protease [Bone, R., Frank, D., Kettner, C. A., & Agard, D. A. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 7600-7609] has confirmed the existence of the boron-histidine bond but has concluded that the boron atom is trigonal rather than tetrahedral. Here we report a 11B NMR study at 160.46 MHz of this histidine adduct complex and of two other complexes known to be serine adducts: alpha-lytic protease with MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-boroVal and chymotrypsin with MeOSucAla-Ala-Pro-boroPhe. The 11B NMR chemical shifts demonstrate that the boron atom is tetrahedral in both the histidine and serine adduct complexes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8251483

  9. Mechanism of anion permeation through channels gated by glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in mouse cultured spinal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Bormann, J; Hamill, O P; Sakmann, B

    1987-01-01

    1. The ion-selective and ion transport properties of glycine receptor (GlyR) and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) channels in the soma membrane of mouse spinal cord neurones were investigated using the whole-cell, cell-attached and outside-out patch versions of the patch-clamp technique. 2. Current-voltage (I-V) relations of transmitter-activated currents obtained from whole-cell measurements with 145 mM-Cl- intracellularly and extracellularly, showed outward rectification. In voltage-jump experiments, the instantaneous I-V relations were linear, and the steady-state I-V relations were rectifying outwardly indicating that the gating of GlyR and GABAR channels is voltage sensitive. 3. The reversal potential of whole-cell currents shifted 56 mV per tenfold change in internal Cl- activity indicating activation of Cl(-)-selective channels. The permeability ratio of K+ to Cl- (PK/PCl) was smaller than 0.05 for both channels. 4. The permeability sequence for large polyatomic anions was formate greater than bicarbonate greater than acetate greater than phosphate greater than propionate for GABAR channels; phosphate and propionate were not measurably permeant in GlyR channels. This indicates that open GlyR and GABAR channels have effective pore diameters of 5.2 and 5.6 A, respectively. The sequence of relative permeabilities for small anions was SCN- greater than I- greater than Br- greater than Cl- greater than F- for both channels. 5. GlyR and GABAR channels are multi-conductance-state channels. In cell-attached patches the single-channel slope conductances close to 0 mV membrane potential were 29, 18 and 10 pS for glycine, and 28, 17 and 10 pS for GABA-activated channels. The most frequently observed (main) conductance states were 29 and 17 pS for the GlyR and GABAR channel, respectively. 6. In outside-out patches with equal extracellular and intracellular concentrations of 145 mM-Cl-, the conductance states were 46, 30, 20 and 12 pS for GlyR channels and 44, 30

  10. Asparagine and glycine metabolism in rat liver mitochondria and in mouse L5178Y lymphoma cells resistant or sensitive to the anticancer drug L-asparaginase

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, J.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver mitochondrial asparagine was found to be degraded via an aminotransferase and omega-amidase. Evidence includes oxaloacetate production from asparagine only when glyoxylate was added and production of radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-ketosuccinamate via metabolism of (U-/sup 14/C)asparagine. In the cytosol, asparagine is degraded primarily via asparaginase and subsequent transamination. A new HPLC technique for separation of citric acid cycle intermediates was developed using: ion pairing with 20 mM each to tetrabutylammonium hydroxide and Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/; pH 7.0; isocratic elution; and detection at 210 nm. Amino acid content of mouse lymphoma cells either sensitive (L5178Y) or resistant (L5178Y/L-ASE) to the anticancer drug L-asparaginase was studied. The concentration of asparagine was 1.5 times higher and the concentrations of the essential amino acids histidine, methionine, valine and phenylalanine were two times higher in asparaginase-resistant than sensitive cells. In vivo but not in vitro studies indicated that glucine decreases in sensitive but not resistant cells upon asparaginase treatment. Asparagine and glycine metabolism was further studied using /sup 14/C radiolabel conversion of asparagine, glyoxylate, glycine and serine. Glycine metabolism is especially important in lymphomas and leukemias because these cells contain higher concentrations of glycine that other cancer and normal cells. Therefore, glycine levels were studied and were found to decrease in sensitive but not resistant cells upon asparaginase administration.

  11. Study of Glycine and Folic Acid Supplementation to Ameliorate Transfusion Dependence in Congenital SLC25A38 Mutated Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Marissa A; Bettle, Amanda; Berman, Jason N; Price, Victoria E; Pambrun, Chantale; Yu, Zhijie; Tiller, Marilyn; McMaster, Christopher R; Fernandez, Conrad V

    2016-07-01

    Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hematological disorder characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in bone marrow erythroid precursors. Mutations in the erythroid-specific glycine mitochondrial transporter gene SLC25A38 have been found in a subset of patients with transfusion-dependent congenital CSA. Further studies in a zebrafish model identified a promising ameliorative strategy with combined supplementation with glycine and folate. We tested this combination in three individuals with SLC25A38 CSA, with a primary objective to decrease red blood cell transfusion requirements. No significant impact was observed on transfusion requirements or any hematologic parameters. PMID:27038157

  12. Impact of combined resistance and aerobic exercise training on branched-chain amino acid turnover, glycine metabolism and insulin sensitivity in overweight humans

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Erin L.; Piner, Lucy W.; Huffman, Kim M.; Slentz, Cris A.; Elliot-Penry, Lorraine; AbouAssi, Hiba; White, Phillip J.; Bain, James R.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Stevens, Robert D.; Porter Starr, Kathryn N.; Bales, Connie W.; Volpi, Elena; Brosnan, M. Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K.; Rolph, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypotheses Obesity is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity (IS) and elevated plasma branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between BCAA metabolism and IS in overweight (OW) individuals during exercise intervention. Methods Whole-body leucine turnover, IS by hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp, and circulating and skeletal muscle amino acids, branched-chain α-keto acids and acylcarnitines were measured in ten healthy controls (Control) and nine OW, untrained, insulin-resistant individuals (OW-Untrained). OW-Untrained then underwent a 6 month aerobic and resistance exercise programme and repeated testing (OW-Trained). Results IS was higher in Control vs OW-Untrained and increased significantly following exercise. IS was lower in OW-Trained vs Control expressed relative to body mass, but was not different from Control when normalised to fat-free mass (FFM). Plasma BCAAs and leucine turnover (relative to FFM) were higher in OW-Untrained vs Control, but did not change on average with exercise. Despite this, within individuals, the decrease in molar sum of circulating BCAAs was the best metabolic predictor of improvement in IS. Circulating glycine levels were higher in Control and OW-Trained vs OW-Untrained, and urinary metabolic profiling suggests that exercise induces more efficient elimination of excess acyl groups derived from BCAA and aromatic amino acid (AA) metabolism via formation of urinary glycine adducts. Conclusions/interpretation A mechanism involving more efficient elimination of excess acyl groups derived from BCAA and aromatic AA metabolism via glycine conjugation in the liver, rather than increased BCAA disposal through oxidation and turnover, may mediate interactions between exercise, BCAA metabolism and IS. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01786941 PMID:26254576

  13. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  14. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  15. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  16. Catalysis of peptide bond formation by histidyl-histidine in a fluctuating clay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Erickson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The condensation of glycine to form oligoglycines during wet-dry fluctuations on clay surfaces was enhanced up to threefold or greater by small amounts of histidyl-histidine. In addition, higher relative yields of the longer oligomers were produced. Other specific dipeptides tested gave no enhancement, and imidazole, histidine, and N-acetylhistidine gave only slight enhancements. Histidyl-histidine apparently acts as a true catalyst (in the sense of repeatedly catalyzing the reaction), since up to 52 nmol of additional glycine were incorporated into oligoglycine for each nmol of catalyst added. This is the first known instance of a peptide or similar molecule demonstrating a catalytic turnover number greater than unity in a prebiotic oligomer synthesis reaction, and suggests that histidyl-histidine is a model for a primitive prebiotic proto-enzyme. Catalysis of peptide bond synthesis by a molecule which is itself a peptide implies that related systems may be capable of exhibiting autocatalytic growth.

  17. Cyanobacteria Produce N-(2-Aminoethyl)Glycine, a Backbone for Peptide Nucleic Acids Which May Have Been the First Genetic Molecules for Life on Earth

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Metcalf, James S.; Jiang, Liying; Craighead, Derek; Ilag, Leopold L.; Cox, Paul Alan

    2012-01-01

    Prior to the evolution of DNA-based organisms on earth over 3.5 billion years ago it is hypothesized that RNA was the primary genetic molecule. Before RNA-based organisms arose, peptide nucleic acids may have been used to transmit genetic information by the earliest forms of life on earth. We discovered that cyanobacteria produce N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), a backbone for peptide nucleic acids. We detected AEG in axenic strains of cyanobacteria with an average concentration of 1 µg/g. We also detected AEG in environmental samples of cyanobacteria as both a free or weakly bound molecule and a tightly bound form released by acid hydrolysis, at concentrations ranging from not detected to 34 µg/g. The production of AEG by diverse taxa of cyanobacteria suggests that AEG may be a primitive feature which arose early in the evolution of life on earth. PMID:23145061

  18. Biochemical effect of a histidine phosphatase acid (phytase) of Aspergillus japonicus var. Saito on performance and bony characteristics of broiler.

    PubMed

    Maller, Alexandre; de Quadros, Thays Cristina Oliveira; Junqueira, Otto M; Graña, Alfredo Lora; de Lima Montaldi, Ana Paula; Alarcon, Ricardo Fernandes; Jorge, João Atílio; de Lourdes T M Polizeli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Phytases are enzymes that hydrolyze the ester linkage of phytic acid, releasing inositol and inorganic phosphate. The phytic acid (phytate) is a major form of phosphorus in plant foods. Knowing that diet for animal of production has the cereal base (corn and soybean), primarily, broilers need for an alternative to use of the phosphate present in these ingredients, since it does not naturally produce the enzyme phytase, which makes it available. The aims of this work was studding the safe supplementation of Aspergillus japonicus var. Saito crude phytase in feeding broilers and check the biochemical effect on performance and bones of these animals. The enzymatic extract did not have aflatoxins B1, B2, G2 and G1 and zearalenone and ochratoxin, and low concentrations of this extract did not have cytotoxic effects on cells derived from lung tissue. The in vivo experiments showed that the phytase supplied the available phosphate reduction in the broiler feed formulation, with a live weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion, viability, productive efficiency index and carcass yield similar to the control test. Furthermore, the phytase supplementation favored the formation of bone structure and performance of the broilers. The results show the high biotechnological potential of A. japonicus phytase on broiler food supplementation to reduce phosphorus addition in the food formulation. So, this enzyme could be used as a commercial alternative to animal diet supplementation. PMID:27625972

  19. Synthetic Cyclolipopeptides Selective against Microbial, Plant and Animal Cell Targets by Incorporation of D-Amino Acids or Histidine

    PubMed Central

    Vilà, Sílvia; Badosa, Esther; Montesinos, Emilio; Planas, Marta; Feliu, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Cyclolipopeptides derived from the antimicrobial peptide c(Lys-Lys-Leu-Lys-Lys-Phe-Lys-Lys-Leu-Gln) (BPC194) were prepared on solid-phase and screened against four plant pathogens. The incorporation at Lys5 of fatty acids of 4 to 9 carbon atoms led to active cyclolipopeptides. The influence on the antimicrobial activity of the Lys residue that is derivatized was also evaluated. In general, acylation of Lys1, Lys2 or Lys5 rendered the sequences with the highest activity. Incorporation of a D-amino acid maintained the antimicrobial activity while significantly reduced the hemolysis. Replacement of Phe with a His also yielded cyclolipopeptides with low hemolytic activity. Derivatives exhibiting low phytotoxicity in tobacco leaves were also found. Interestingly, sequences with or without significant activity against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi, but with differential hemolysis and phytotoxicity were identified. Therefore, this study represents an approach to the development of bioactive peptides with selective activity against microbial, plant and animal cell targets. These selective cyclolipopeptides are candidates useful not only to combat plant pathogens but also to be applied in other fields. PMID:27008420

  20. Radiolysis of amino acids by heavy and energetic cosmic ray analogues in simulated space environments: α-glycine zwitterion form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portugal, Williamary; Pilling, Sergio; Boduch, Philippe; Rothard, Hermann; Andrade, Diana P. P.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we studied the stability of the glycine molecule in the crystalline zwitterion form, known as α-glycine (+NH3CH2COO-), under the action of heavy cosmic ray analogues. The experiments were conducted in a high vacuum chamber at the heavy-ion accelerator Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), in Caen, France. The samples were bombarded at two temperatures (14 and 300 K) by 58Ni11+ ions of 46 MeV, up to a final fluence of 1013 ion cm-2. The chemical evolution of the sample was evaluated in situ using a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR). The bombardment at 14 K produced several daughter species, such as OCN-, CO, CO2 and CN-. The results also suggest the appearance of peptide bonds during irradiation, but this must be confirmed by further experiments. The half-life of glycine in the interstellar medium was estimated to be 7.8 × 103 yr (300 K) and 2.8 × 103 yr (14 K). In the Solar system, the values were 8.4 × 102 yr (300 K) and 3.6 × 103 yr (14 K). It is believed that glycine could be present in space environments that suffered aqueous changes, such as the interiors of comets, meteorites and planetesimals. This molecule is present in the proteins of all living beings. Therefore, studying its stability in these environments will provide further understanding of the role of this species in prebiotic chemistry on Earth.

  1. Mutations that render the promoter of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium insensitive to nutrient-rich medium repression and amino acid downshift.

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, X J; Artz, S W

    1997-01-01

    The effects of mutations in the promoter of the histidine operon of Salmonella typhimurium were examined in vivo. The wild-type chromosomal copy of the his promoter was replaced with mutations in the -10 hexamer sequence and in the region between the -10 hexamer and the transcriptional start point-termed the discriminator sequence. The substitutions were performed with a phage M13 allele replacement system. Expression of the his operon is known to correlate with levels of guanosine 5',3'-bispyrophosphate (ppGpp) in vivo. Strains containing either the wild-type his promoter or his promoter mutations were grown in both nutrient-rich and minimal media under steady-state conditions known to alter intracellular levels of ppGpp in a predictable way. The effect of the presence or absence of the his attenuator was assessed under these conditions as well. Expression of the his operon was studied by measuring the differential rate of beta-galactosidase synthesis with a his-lac transcriptional fusion. Regulation of the his operon in the promoter mutants was also studied under conditions of a transient amino acid downshift induced by the addition of serine hydroxamate to cultures growing in nutrient-rich medium. These growth conditions cause elevated levels of ppGpp. The results provide physiological confirmation of previous evidence obtained with a coupled transcription-translation system in vitro which indicated that ppGpp regulates interaction of RNA polymerase at the his promoter. More specifically, the in vivo evidence shows that the region of the his promoter that includes the -10 hexamer and discriminator sequences is the target at which ppGpp stimulates transcription. PMID:9260966

  2. Serine and glycine metabolism in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Amelio, Ivano; Cutruzzolá, Francesca; Antonov, Alexey; Agostini, Massimiliano; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    Serine and glycine are biosynthetically linked, and together provide the essential precursors for the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids that are crucial to cancer cell growth. Moreover, serine/glycine biosynthesis also affects cellular antioxidative capacity, thus supporting tumour homeostasis. A crucial contribution of serine/glycine to cellular metabolism is through the glycine cleavage system, which refuels one-carbon metabolism; a complex cyclic metabolic network based on chemical reactions of folate compounds. The importance of serine/glycine metabolism is further highlighted by genetic and functional evidence indicating that hyperactivation of the serine/glycine biosynthetic pathway drives oncogenesis. Recent developments in our understanding of these pathways provide novel translational opportunities for drug development, dietary intervention, and biomarker identification of human cancers. PMID:24657017

  3. Conformational Structure of Tyrosine, Tyrosyl-Glycine, and Tyrosyl-Glycyl-Glycine by Double Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Crews, Bridgit; Callahan, Michael P,; van Mourik, Tanja; de Vries, Mattanjah S,

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation in conformation for the amino acid tyrosine (Y), alone and in the small peptides tyrosine-glycine (YC) and tyrosine-glycine-glycine (YGG), in the gas phase by using UV-UV and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. For tyrosine we found seven different conformations, for YG we found four different conformations, and for YGG we found three different conformations. As the peptides get larger, we observe fewer stable conformers, despite the increasing complexity and number of degrees of freedom. We find structural trends similar to those in phenylalanine-glycine glycine (FGG) and tryptophan-glycine-glycine (WGG)j however) the effect of dispersive forces in FGG for stabilizing a folded structure is replaced by that of hydrogen bonding in YGG.

  4. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  5. Isovaleric, methylmalonic, and propionic acid decrease anesthetic EC50 in tadpoles, modulate glycine receptor function, and interact with the lipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Yun; Hsu, Tienyi Theresa; Zhao, Jing; Nishimura, Stefanie; Fuller, Gerald G.; Sonner, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Elevated concentrations of isovaleric, methylmalonic, and propionic acid are associated with impaired consciousness in genetic diseases (organic acidemias). We conjectured that part of the central nervous system depression observed in these disorders was due to anesthetic effects of these metabolites. We tested three hypotheses. First, that these metabolites would have anesthetic-sparing effects, possibly being anesthetics by themselves. Second, that these compounds would modulate glycine and GABAA receptor function, increasing chloride currents through these channels as potent clinical inhaled anesthetics do. Third, that these compounds would affect physical properties of lipids. Methods Anesthetic EC50’s were measured in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Glycine and GABAA receptors were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and studied using two-electrode voltage clamping. Pressure-area isotherms of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayers were measured with and without added organic acids. Results Isovaleric acid was an anesthetic in tadpoles, while methylmalonic and propionic acid decreased isoflurane’s EC50 by half. All three organic acids concentration-dependently increased current through α1 glycine receptors. There were minimal effects on α1β2γ2s GABAA receptors. The organic acids increased total lateral pressure (surface pressure) of DPPC monolayers, including at mean molecular areas typical of bilayers. Conclusion Isovaleric, methylmalonic, and propionic acid have anesthetic affects in tadpoles, positively modulate glycine receptor fuction, and affect physical properties of DPPC monolayers. PMID:19372333

  6. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine..., potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  7. High-performance liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric method for the determination of ursodeoxycholic acid and its glycine and taurine conjugates in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Tessier, E; Neirinck, L; Zhu, Z

    2003-12-25

    A novel sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its glycine and taurine conjugates, glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). The procedure involved a solid phase extraction of UDCA, GDCA, TDCA and the internal standard, 23-nordeoxycholic acid from human plasma on a C18 Bond Elut cartridge. Chromatography was performed by isocratic reverse phase separation with methanol/25 mM ammonium acetate (40/60, v/v) containing 0.05% acetic acid on a C18 column with embedded polar functional group. Detection was achieved using an LC-MS/MS system. The standard curve was linear over a working range of 10-3000 ng/ml for all analytes and gave an average correlation coefficient of 0.9992 or better during validation. The absolute recovery for UDCA, GDCA, TDCA and the internal standard was 87.3, 83.7, 79.5 and 95.8%, respectively. This method is simple, sensitive and suitable for pharmacokinetics, bioequivalence or clinical studies. PMID:14643509

  8. GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS OF PRECURSORS OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE: A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE REACTIONS OF ACETIC ACID WITH HYDROXYLAMINE AND ITS IONIZED AND PROTONATED DERIVATIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Barrientos, Carmen; Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Laura; Rayon, Victor M.; Largo, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    A computational study of the reactions of hydroxylamine and its ionized and protonated derivatives with acetic acid is provided. The reaction of neutral hydroxylamine with acetic acid, despite being clearly exothermic, involves a very large energy barrier. The reaction of ionized hydroxylamine with acetic acid is also clearly exothermic, but again a significant energy barrier is found (around 24 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). The reaction of the most stable protonated isomer of hydroxylamine, NH{sub 3}OH{sup +}, with acetic acid also involves a high barrier (more than 27 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Only the higher energy isomer, NH{sub 2}OH{sup +}{sub 2}, leads to a sensibly lower energy barrier (about 2.3 kcal mol{sup -1} at the CCSD(T) level). Nevertheless, an estimate of the reaction coefficient at low temperatures such as those reigning in the interstellar medium gives very low values. Therefore, it seems that precursors of interstellar glycine could not be efficiently produced from the reactions of hydroxylamine-derived ions with acetic acid.

  9. Host-pathogen interactions. XXIX. Oligogalacturonides released from sodium polypectate by endopolygalacturonic acid lyase are elicitors of phytoalexins in soybean. [Glycine max L

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K.R.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.; Dell, A.

    1986-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that an apparently homogeneous preparation of an ..cap alpha..-1,4-D-endopolygalacturonic acid lyase (EC 4.2,2.2) isolated from the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia carotovora induced phytoalexin accumulation in cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Wayne) and that this pectin-degrading enzyme released heat-stable elicitors of phytoalexins from soybean cell walls, citrus pectin, and sodium polypectate. The present paper reports the purification, by anion-exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex columns followed by gel-permeation chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-6 column, of the two fractions with highest specific elicitor activity present in a crude elicitor-preparation obtained by lyase treatment of sodium polypectate. Structural analysis of the fraction with highest specific elicitor activity indicated that the major, if not only, component was a decasaccharide of ..cap alpha..-1,4-D-galactosyluronic acid that contained the expected product of lyase cleavage, 4-deoxy-..beta..-L-5-threo-hexopyranos-4-enyluronic acid (4,5-unsaturated galactosyluronic acid), at the nonreducing terminus. This modified decagalacturonide fraction exhibited half-maximum and maximum elicitor activity at 1 microgram/cotyledon (6 micromolar) and 5 micrograms/cotyledon (32 micromolar) galactosyluronic acid equivalents, respectively. Reducing 90 to 95% of the carboxyl groups of the galactosyluronic acid residues abolished the elicitor activity of the decagalacturonide fraction. The second most elicitor-active fraction contained mostly undeca-..cap alpha..-1,4-D-galactosyluronic acid that contained 4,5-unsaturated galactosyluronic acid at the nonreducing termini. This fraction exhibited half-maximum and maximum elicitor activity at approximately 3 micrograms/cotyledon (17 micromolar) and 6 micrograms/cotyledon (34 micromolar) galactosyluronic acid equivalents, respectively.

  10. Further characterization of the interaction of histidine-rich glycoprotein with heparin: evidence for the binding of two molecules of histidine-rich glycoprotein by high molecular weight heparin and for the involvement of histidine residues in heparin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, M.K.; Blackburn, M.N.; Morgan, W.T.

    1987-11-17

    Rabbit histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG, 94 kDa) binds heparin with high affinity (apparent K/sub d/ 60-110 nM). Eosin Y (1 equiv) bound to HRG was used as a reporter group to monitor associations of HRG with heparins of molecular mass 10, 17.5, and 30 kDa. The stoichiometries of the heparin- (/sup 125/I) HRG complexes were determined by fluorescence and absorbance measurements as well as by analytical ultracentrifugation. Two types of complex form: complexes of 1 heparin: 1 HRG and of 1 heparin:2 HRG. The 1:2 complex formation requires a minimum heparin chain length since 17.5-kDa but not 10-kDa heparin binds two HRG molecules. The formation of the 1:2 complexes of the larger heparin fractions is enhanced by divalent copper or zinc (1-10 equiv) bound to HRG. However, metal is not required for complex formation since all sizes of heparin examined interact tightly with HRG in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Between 0.1 and 0.3 M ionic strength, both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of heparin with HRG are progressively destabilized. No heparin-HRG complex is found at ionic strengths of 0.5 M. Between pH 8.5 and pH 6.5 both 1:2 and 1:1 complexes are found with 17.5-kDa heparin, but at pH 5.5 only 1:1 complexes are formed. The heparin-HRG interaction is progressively decreased by modification of the histidine residues of HRG, whereas modification of 22 of the 33 lysine residues of HRG has little effect. Supporting the role of histidine in heparin binding, a histidine-proline-glycine-rich peptide (molecular mass 28 kDa) derived from HRG and intact HRG binds to heparin-Sepharose at pH 6.8, but only HRG binds to the affinity medium at pH 7.4.

  11. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  12. Protective effect of Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B upon oxidative stress caused by ozone and acid rain in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba".

    PubMed

    Esposito, Jéssica Bordotti Nobre; Esposito, Breno Pannia; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Cruz, Luciano Soares; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the Mn complex (Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B (MnDFB)) on oxidative stress in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba" following exposure to ozone and acid rain. We determined the suitable dose of MnDFB to apply to G. max seedlings using a dose-response curve. The highest superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and Mn content in leaves were found upon the application of 8 μM MnDFB. Thus, G. max seedlings pretreated with 8 μM MnDFB were individually exposed to ozone and acid rain simulated. Pretreatment with MnDFB reduced lipid peroxidation upon ozone exposure and increased SOD activity in leaves; it did not alter the metal content in any part of the plant. Conversely, following acid rain exposure, neither the metal content in leaves nor SOD enzyme activity were directly affected by MnDFB, unlike pH. Our findings demonstrated that exogenous MnDFB application before ozone exposure may modulate the MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD, and FeSOD activities to combat the ROS excess in the cell. Here, we demonstrated that the applied dose of MnDFB enhances antioxidative defenses in soybean following exposure to acid rain and especially to ozone. PMID:25510614

  13. Detoxications in peripatus. Sulphate, phosphate and histidine conjugations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T W; McNaught, R W; Smith, J N

    1970-06-01

    Phenols were detoxified in the Onycophoran Peripatoides novaezealandiae by conjugation with sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid, but no evidence for a glycoside detoxication could be found. [(14)C]Benzoic acid was metabolized in 24h to N(2)-benzoyl-l-histidine, which was identified by electrophoresis, chromatography and dilution analysis. Similar conjugates were formed with p-aminobenzoic acid and p-nitrobenzoic acid. In longer-duration experiments further unidentified metabolites were formed, two of which appeared to result from the further metabolism of the histidine conjugate. PMID:5472152

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization, in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer activity studies of ternary metal complexes containing glycine amino acid and the anti-inflammatory drug lornoxicam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Dessouky, Maher M. I.

    2015-02-01

    Mixed ligand complexes were synthesized using lornoxicam (LOR) as the primary ligand and glycine amino acid (HGly) as the secondary ligand. They were characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, mass, 1H NMR, ESR spectral studies, TG-DTG, X-ray powder diffraction and physical analytical studies. From the molar conductance, magnetic moment and electronic spectral data of the synthesized complexes, general formulae of [M(LOR)2(Gly)]·Xn·yH2O where M = Cr(III) (X = Cl, n = 2, y = 3), Mn(II) (X = Cl, n = 1, y = 1), Co(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 0), Ni(II) (X = Cl, n = 1, y = 0), Cu(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 2) and Zn(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 2) and (M = Fe(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 1) and Fe(III) (X = Cl, n = 2, y = 1) with an octahedral structure were proposed. Thermal analyses show that the complexes lose water molecules of hydration initially and subsequently expel anionic parts and organic ligands in continuous steps. The kinetic parameters namely E, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ illustrate the spontaneous association of the metal and ligands in the formation of the complexes. The antimicrobial efficiency of the LOR and HGly ligands and the ternary complexes were examined by in vitro method against various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes were found to possess efficient antimicrobial properties compared to lornoxicam and most of these complexes could turn out to be excellent models for the design of effective antibiotic drug substances. Also, the two ligands, in comparison to ternary metal complexes are screened for their anticancer activity against breastic cancer cell line. The results showed that the metal complexes be more active than the parent LOR and glycine free ligands except Cr(III) ternary complex which was found to be inactive.

  15. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  16. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed. PMID:26637601

  17. Histidine biosynthesis, its regulation and biotechnological application in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Kulis-Horn, Robert K; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    l-Histidine biosynthesis is an ancient metabolic pathway present in bacteria, archaea, lower eukaryotes, and plants. For decades l-histidine biosynthesis has been studied mainly in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, revealing fundamental regulatory processes in bacteria. Furthermore, in the last 15 years this pathway has been also investigated intensively in the industrial amino acid-producing bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, revealing similarities to E. coli and S. typhimurium, as well as differences. This review summarizes the current knowledge of l-histidine biosynthesis in C. glutamicum. The genes involved and corresponding enzymes are described, in particular focusing on the imidazoleglycerol-phosphate synthase (HisFH) and the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase (HisN). The transcriptional organization of his genes in C. glutamicum is also reported, including the four histidine operons and their promoters. Knowledge of transcriptional regulation during stringent response and by histidine itself is summarized and a translational regulation mechanism is discussed, as well as clues about a histidine transport system. Finally, we discuss the potential of using this knowledge to create or improve C. glutamicum strains for the industrial l-histidine production. PMID:23617600

  18. Spectroscopic investigations of humic-like acids formed via polycondensation reactions between glycine, catechol and glucose in the presence of natural zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Shigeki; Miura, Akitaka; Okabe, Ryo; Fukushima, Masami; Sasaki, Masahide; Sato, Tsutomu

    2010-10-01

    Polycondensation reactions between low-molecular-weight compounds, such as amino acids, sugars and phenols, are crucially important processes in the formation of humic substances, and clay minerals have the ability to catalyze these reactions. In the present study, catechol (CT), glycine (Gly) and glucose (Gl) were used as representative phenols, amino acids and sugars, respectively, and the effects of the catalytic activities of natural zeolites on polycondensation reactions between these compounds were investigated. The extent of polycondensation was evaluated by measuring the specific absorbance at 600 nm ( E600) as an index of the degree of darkening. After a 3-week incubation period, the E600 values for solutions that contained zeolite samples were 4-10 times greater than those measured in the absence of zeolite, suggesting that the zeolite had, in fact, catalyzed the polycondensation reaction. The humic-like acids (HLAs) produced in the reactions were isolated, and their elemental composition and molecular weights determined. When formed in the presence of a zeolite, the nitrogen contents and molecular weights for the HLAs were significantly higher, compared to the HLA sample formed in the absence of zeolite. In addition, solid-state CP-MAS 13C NMR spectra and carboxylic group analyses of the HLA samples indicated that the concentration of carbonyl carbon species for quinones and ketones produced in the presence of zeolite were higher than the corresponding values for samples produced in the absence of a zeolite. Carbonyl carbons in quinones and ketones indicate the nucleophilic characteristics of the samples. Therefore, a nitrogen atom in Gly, which serves as nucleophile, is incorporated into quinones and ketones in CT and Gl. The differences in the catalytic activities of the zeolite samples can be attributed to differences in their transition metal content (Fe, Mn and Ti), which function as Lewis acids.

  19. Effect of Cooking on Isoflavones, Phenolic Acids, and Antioxidant Activity in Sprouts of Prosoy Soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Shweta; Chang, Sam K C

    2016-07-01

    Soy sprouts possess health benefits and is required to be cooked before consumption. The effects of cooking on the phenolic components and antioxidant properties of soy sprouts with different germination days were investigated. A food-grade cultivar Prosoy with a high protein content was germinated for 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 d and cooked till palatable for 20, 20, 5, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoids content (TFC), condensed tannins content (CTC), individual phenolic acids, isoflavones, DPPH, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of raw and cooked sprouts were measured. Cooking caused significant losses in phenolic content and antioxidant activities, and maximum loss was on day 3 > 5 > 7, including TPC (32%, 23%, and 15%), TFC (50%, 44%, and 20%), CTC (73%, 47%, and 12%), DPPH (31%, 15%, and 5%), FRAP (34%, 25%, and 1%), and ORAC (34%, 22%, 32%), respectively. Cooking caused significant losses in most individual phenolic acid, benzoic group, cinnamic group, total phenolic composition, individual isoflavones, and total isoflavones. The losses of phenolic acids such as gallic, protocatechuic, hydroxybenzoic, syringic, chlorogenic, or sinapic acids during cooking were not compensated by the increases in trihydroxybenzoic, vanillic or coumaric acids on certain days of germination. Cooking caused minimal changes in phenolic acid composition of day 1 and 2 sprouts compared to 3, 5, and 7 d sprouts. PMID:27258930

  20. Organic Reference Materials for Hydrogen, Carbon, and Nitrogen Stable Isotope-Ratio Measurements: Caffeines, n-Alkanes, Fatty Acid Methyl Esters, Glycines, L-Valines, Polyethylenes, and Oils.

    PubMed

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Brand, Willi A; Fong, Jon; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Kemp, Helen F; Toman, Blaza; Ackermann, Annika; Assonov, Sergey; Aerts-Bijma, Anita T; Brejcha, Ramona; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Darwish, Tamim; Elsner, Martin; Gehre, Matthias; Geilmann, Heike; Gröning, Manfred; Hélie, Jean-François; Herrero-Martín, Sara; Meijer, Harro A J; Sauer, Peter E; Sessions, Alex L; Werner, Roland A

    2016-04-19

    An international project developed, quality-tested, and determined isotope-δ values of 19 new organic reference materials (RMs) for hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen stable isotope-ratio measurements, in addition to analyzing pre-existing RMs NBS 22 (oil), IAEA-CH-7 (polyethylene foil), and IAEA-600 (caffeine). These new RMs enable users to normalize measurements of samples to isotope-δ scales. The RMs span a range of δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) values from -210.8 to +397.0 mUr or ‰, for δ(13)C(VPDB-LSVEC) from -40.81 to +0.49 mUr and for δ(15)N(Air) from -5.21 to +61.53 mUr. Many of the new RMs are amenable to gas and liquid chromatography. The RMs include triads of isotopically contrasting caffeines, C16 n-alkanes, n-C20-fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), glycines, and l-valines, together with polyethylene powder and string, one n-C17-FAME, a vacuum oil (NBS 22a) to replace NBS 22 oil, and a (2)H-enriched vacuum oil. A total of 11 laboratories from 7 countries used multiple analytical approaches and instrumentation for 2-point isotopic normalization against international primary measurement standards. The use of reference waters in silver tubes allowed direct normalization of δ(2)H values of organic materials against isotopic reference waters following the principle of identical treatment. Bayesian statistical analysis yielded the mean values reported here. New RMs are numbered from USGS61 through USGS78, in addition to NBS 22a. Because of exchangeable hydrogen, amino acid RMs currently are recommended only for carbon- and nitrogen-isotope measurements. Some amino acids contain (13)C and carbon-bound organic (2)H-enrichments at different molecular sites to provide RMs for potential site-specific isotopic analysis in future studies. PMID:26974360

  1. Analysis of cyclic pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Seen; Ko, Ji-Eun

    2011-11-18

    Amino acid was mixed with silica and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to favor pyrolysis of amino acid monomer. The pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer were using GC/MS and GC. 20 amino acids of alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine were analyzed. The pyrolysis products were divided into cyclic and non-cyclic products. Among the 20 amino acids, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, and phenylalanine generated cyclic pyrolysis products of the monomer. New cyclic pyrolysis products were formed by isolation of amino acid monomers. They commonly had polar side functional groups to 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring structure. Arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, and phenylalanine generated only 5- or 6-membered ring products. However, lysine generated both 6- and 7-membered ring compounds. Variations of the relative intensities of the cyclic pyrolysis products with the pyrolysis temperature and amino acid concentration were also investigated. PMID:21993510

  2. Characterization of mycosporine-serine-glycine methyl ester, a major mycosporine-like amino acid from dinoflagellates: a mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Carignan, Mario O; Carreto, José I

    2013-08-01

    Several unknown mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) have been previously isolated from some cultured species of toxic dinoflagellates of the Alexandrium genus (Dinophyceae). One of them, originally called M-333, was tentatively identified as a shinorine methyl ester, but the precise nature of this compound is still unknown. Using a high-resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses (HPLC/MS), we found that natural populations of the red tide dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans Ehrenberg showed a net dominance of M-333 together with lesser amounts of other MAAs. We also documented the isolation and characterization of this MAA from natural dinoflagellate populations and from Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech cultures. Using a comparative fragmentation study in electrospray mass spectrometry between deuterated and non-deuterated M-333 compounds and synthesized mono and dimethyl esters of shinorine, this novel compound was characterized as mycosporine-serine-glycine methyl ester, a structure confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance. These isobaric compounds can be differentiated by their fragmentation patterns in MS(3) experiments because the extension and the specific site of the methylation changed the fragmentation pathway. PMID:27007200

  3. Facilitation of cell adhesion by immobilized dengue viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1): arginine-glycine-aspartic acid structural mimicry within the dengue viral NS1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Shyu, Huey-Fen; Wang, Yo-Ming; Sun, Der-Shan; Shyu, Rong-Hwa; Tang, Shiao-Shek; Huang, Yao-Shine

    2002-09-15

    Dengue virus infection causes life-threatening hemorrhagic fever. Increasing evidence implies that dengue viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) exhibits a tendency to elicit potentially hazardous autoantibodies, which show a wide spectrum of specificity against extracellular matrix and platelet antigens. How NS1 elicits autoantibodies remains unclear. To address the hypothesis that NS1 and matrix proteins may have structural and functional similarity, cell-matrix and cell-NS1 interactions were evaluated using a cell-adhesion assay. The present study showed that dengue NS1 immobilized on coverslips resulted in more cell adhesion than did the control proteins. This cell adhesion was inhibited by peptides containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), a motif important for integrin-mediated cell adhesion. In addition, anti-NS1 antibodies blocked RGD-mediated cell adhesion. Although there is no RGD motif in the NS1 protein sequence, these data indicate that RGD structural mimicry exists within the NS1 antigen. PMID:12198607

  4. Glycine max cultivar Dare chloroplast fatty acid desaturase 7 (FAD7) gene, complete cds; nuclear gene for chloroplast product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomic sequence of soybean GmFAD7 (2455 nucleotides) was determined and reported to GenBank and assigned the accession number HM769340. The structure and deduced amino acid sequence of soybean FAD7 is similar to other higher plant plastidal omega-3 desaturases: 8 exons and 7 introns, predicted...

  5. Glycine max cultivar Dare chloroplast fatty acid desaturase 8 (FAD8) gene, complete cds; nuclear gene for chloroplast product

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomic sequence of soybean GmFAD8 (2480 nucleotides) was determined and reported to GenBank and assigned the accession number HM769341. The structure and deduced amino acid sequence of soybean FAD8 is similar to other higher plant plastidal omega-3 desaturases: 8 exons and 7 introns, predicted...

  6. Nicotianamine and histidine/proline are, respectively, the most important copper chelators in xylem sap of Brassica carinata under conditions of copper deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Irtelli, B; Petrucci, W A; Navari-Izzo, F

    2009-01-01

    The effect of two different copper conditions (deficiency and excess) on the amino acid composition in B. carinata xylem sap was analysed. When the Cu in the nutrient solution was increased from 0.12 to 2.5 or 5 microM, the concentrations of histidine, threonine, glutamine, proline, methionine, and glycine were much increased in the xylem sap. When Cu was made deficient in the nutrient solution by decreasing its concentration from 0.12 microM to 0 microM, nicotianamine, glutamine, and threonine were significantly increased in the xylem sap. Aqueous solutions containing different Cu-amino acid complexes (simulated saps) responded in a specific way to the changes in pH, providing a signature that was used to evaluate, by comparison with the real xylem sap, the importance of each amino acid in the xylem transport of Cu. For a single amino acid, the free solution Cu(2+) concentration versus pH titration curves for histidine and proline were the most similar to that for xylem under Cu excess. Under Cu deficiency, this Cu concentration versus pH titration curve appeared to be very similar to that for nicotianamine. It is concluded that increased Cu concentrations induced the selective synthesis of certain amino acids in the sap, of which histidine and proline are the most important. Under Cu deficiency, the concentration of nicotianamine was induced the most. The fact that nicotianamine is induced under Cu starvation and not under Cu excess, is in contrast to similar studies indicating species-specific reactions. However, the induction of nicotianamine under Cu starvation is in line with recent molecular data of the role of nicotianamine in intracellular Cu delivery. PMID:19033552

  7. Advanced asymmetric synthesis of (1R,2S)-1-amino-2-vinylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid by alkylation/cyclization of newly designed axially chiral Ni(II) complex of glycine Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Aki; Shu, Shuangjie; Takeda, Ryosuke; Kawamura, Akie; Sato, Tatsunori; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Wang, Jiang; Izawa, Kunisuke; Aceña, José Luis; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Liu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Asymmetric synthesis of (1R,2S)-1-amino-2-vinylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid (vinyl-ACCA) is in extremely high demand due to the pharmaceutical importance of this tailor-made, sterically constrained α-amino acid. Here we report the development of an advanced procedure for preparation of the target amino acid via two-step SN2 and SN2' alkylation of novel axially chiral nucleophilic glycine equivalent. Excellent yields and diastereoselectivity coupled with reliable and easy scalability render this method of immediate use for practical synthesis of (1R,2S)-vinyl-ACCA. PMID:26661034

  8. Cytoplasmic histidine kinase (HP0244)-regulated assembly of urease with UreI, a channel for urea and its metabolites, CO2, NH3, and NH4(+), is necessary for acid survival of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Scott, David R; Marcus, Elizabeth A; Wen, Yi; Singh, Siddarth; Feng, Jing; Sachs, George

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the normal human stomach by maintaining both periplasmic and cytoplasmic pH close to neutral in the presence of gastric acidity. Urease activity, urea flux through the pH-gated urea channel, UreI, and periplasmic alpha-carbonic anhydrase are essential for colonization. Exposure to pH 4.5 for up to 180 min activates total bacterial urease threefold. Within 30 min at pH 4.5, the urease structural subunits, UreA and UreB, and the Ni(2+) insertion protein, UreE, are recruited to UreI at the inner membrane. Formation of this complex and urease activation depend on expression of the cytoplasmic sensor histidine kinase, HP0244. Its deletion abolishes urease activation and assembly, impairs cytoplasmic and periplasmic pH homeostasis, and depolarizes the cells, with an approximately 7-log loss of survival at pH 2.5, even in 10 mM urea. Associated with this assembly, UreI is able to transport NH(3), NH(4)(+), and CO(2), as shown by changes in cytoplasmic pH following exposure to NH(4)Cl or CO(2). To be able to colonize cells in the presence of the highly variable pH of the stomach, the organism expresses two pH-sensor histidine kinases, one, HP0165, responding to a moderate fall in periplasmic pH and the other, HP0244, responding to cytoplasmic acidification at a more acidic medium pH. Assembly of a pH-regulatory complex of active urease with UreI provides an advantage for periplasmic buffering. PMID:19854893

  9. Regulation of Serine, Glycine, and One-Carbon Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, George V

    2004-12-01

    The biosynthesis of serine, glycine, and one-carbon (C1) units constitutes a major metabolic pathway in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. C1 units derived from serine and glycine are used in the synthesis of purines, histidine, thymine, pantothenate, and methionine and in the formylation of the aminoacylated initiator fMet-TRNAfMet used to start translation in E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. The need for serine, glycine, and C1 units in many cellular functions makes it necessary for the genes encoding enzymes for their synthesis to be carefully regulated to meet the changing demands of the cell for these intermediates. This review discusses the regulation of the following genes: serA, serB, and serC; gly gene; gcvTHP operon; lpdA; gcvA and gcvR; and gcvB genes. Threonine utilization (the Tut cycle) constitutes a secondary pathway for serine and glycine biosynthesis. L-Serine inhibits the growth of E. coli cells in GM medium, and isoleucine releases this growth inhibition. The E. coli glycine transport system (Cyc) has been shown to transport glycine, D-alanine, D-serine, and the antibiotic D-cycloserine. Transport systems often play roles in the regulation of gene expression, by transporting effector molecules into the cell, where they are sensed by soluble or membrane-bound regulatory proteins. PMID:26443363

  10. Improving impurities clearance by amino acids addition to buffer solutions for chromatographic purifications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takashi; Hosono, Mareto

    2015-07-15

    The performance of amino acids in Protein A affinity chromatography, anion exchange chromatography and cation exchange chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification was investigated. Glycine, threonine, arginine, glutamate, and histidine were used as buffer components in the equilibration, washing, and elution steps of these chromatographies. Improved clearance of impurity, high molecular weight species (HMW) and host cell proteins (HCP) was observed in the purification processes when using the amino acids as base-buffer constituents, additives or eluents compared with that of buffers without these amino acids. In addition, we designed a buffer system in which the mobile phases were composed of only a single amino acid, histidine, and applied it to the above three chromatographies. Effective HMW and HCP clearance was also obtained in this manner. These results suggest that amino acids may enhance impurity clearance during the purification of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26057847

  11. Glycine production in severe childhood undernutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Although nutritionally dispensable amino acids are not essential in the diet, from a biochemical standpoint, dispensable amino acids such as glycine are essential for life. This is especially true under unique circumstances, such as when the availability of labile nitrogen for dispensabl...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of pH-sensitive poly(itaconic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate-poly(l-histidine) micelles for enhancing tumor therapy and tunable drug release.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Yapeng; Nan, Shuli; Zhang, Liangzi; Huang, Hailong; Wang, Jingyuan

    2015-11-15

    pH responsive intracellular tumor targeting is increasingly investigated as a pathway to trigger the release of anti-tumor drugs once the drug carrier reached the unique acidic environment of the solid tumors or after the drug carrier has been taken up by cells, resulting in the localization of the micelles in the acidic endosomes and lysosomes. Poly(itaconic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate-poly(l-histidine) (PIA-PEG-FA-PHIS) was synthesized as a carrier for tumor-targeted drug delivery. The micelles were internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, and the combination of active targeting and triggered release resulted in apparent cytotoxicity and antitumor activity. The MTT assay showed DOX-loaded micelles had higher and obvious cytotoxicity against Hela cells at pH 5.0 than that at pH 7.4. Cellular uptake experiments revealed that these pH-responsive PIA-PEG-FA-PHIS micelles were taken up in great amounts by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes, triggering release of DOX into the cytoplasm. These indicated that the PIA-PEG-FA-PHIS micelles could be a promising drug delivery system with preeminent stability for targeting the hydrophobic drugs to cancer cells and releasing DOX in to the cells by sensing the acidic environment of the endosomes for cancer therapy. PMID:26210102

  13. Evidence of histidine phosphorylation in isocitrate lyase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Roberston, E.F.; Hoyt, J.C.; Reeves, H.C.

    1987-05-01

    Escherichia coli isocitrate lyase can be phosphorylated in vitro in an ATP-dependent reaction. Partially purified extracts were incubated with ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by a Western blot and autoradiography. Radioactivity was associated with the lyase only when blotting was performed under alkaline conditions. This suggests that phosphate groups are attached to the lyase via an acid-labile P-N bond rather than a more stable P-O bond. Treatment of the lyase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, a histidine modifying agent, blocks incorporation of /sup 32/P-phosphate. Treatment with phosphoramidate, a histidine phosphorylating agent, alters the isoelectric point of the lyase suggesting that the enzyme can be phosphorylated at histidine residues. Loss of catalytic activity after treatment with potato acid phosphatase indicates that isocitrate lyase activity may be modulated by phosphorylation.

  14. Influence of amino acid specificities on the molecular and supramolecular organization of glycine-rich elastin-like polypeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Anna M; Moscarelli, Pasquale; Satriano, Giuseppina; Bochicchio, Brigida; Castle, James E

    2011-10-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides adopt complex supramolecular structures, showing either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic surface, depending on their surrounding environment and the supporting substrate. The preferred organization is important in many situations ranging from biocompatibility to bio-function. Here we compare the n-repeat pentamer LeuGlyGlyValGly (n = 7) with the analogue ValGlyGlyValGly (n = 5), as water suspensions and as deposits on silicon substrates. These sequences contain the repeat XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu) motif belonging to the hydrophobic glycine-rich domain of elastin and represent a simplified model from which to obtain information on molecular interactions functional to elastin itself. The compounds studied differ only by the presence of the -CH(2)- spacer in the Leu moiety and thus the work was aimed at revealing the influence of this spacer element on self assembly. Both polypeptides were studied under identical conditions, using combined techniques, to identify differences in their conformational states both at molecular (CD, FTIR) and supramolecular (XPS, AFM) levels. By these means, together with a Congo Red spectroscopic assay of β-sheet formation in water, a clear correlation between amino acid sequences (sequence specificity) and their kinetics and ordering of aggregation has emerged. The novel outcomes of this work are from the supplementary measurements, made to augment the AFM and XPS studies, showing that the significant step in the self assembly of both polypeptides takes place in the liquid phase and from the finding that the substitution of Val by Leu in the first position of the pentapeptide effectively inhibits the formation of amyloidal fibers. PMID:21509743

  15. Optical imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in vivo using arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide conjugated near-infrared quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Bai, Yun-Long; Yang, Kai; Tang, Hong; Wang, You-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging plays a key role in personalized medicine and tumor diagnosis. Quantum dots with near-infrared emission spectra demonstrate excellent tissue penetration and photostability, and have recently emerged as important tools for in vivo tumor imaging. Integrin αvβ3 has been shown to be highly and specifically expressed in endothelial cells of tumor angiogenic vessels in almost all types of tumors, and specifically binds to the peptide containing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD). In this study, we conjugated RGD with quantum dots with emission wavelength of 800 nm (QD800) to generate QD800-RGD, and used it via intravenous injection as a probe to image tumors in nude mice bearing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Twelve hours after the injection, the mice were still alive and were sacrificed to isolate tumors and ten major organs for ex vivo analysis to localize the probe in these tissues. The results showed that QD800-RGD was specifically targeted to integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo, producing clear tumor fluorescence images after the intravenous injection. The tumor-to-background ratio and size of tumor image were highest within 6 hours of the injection and declined significantly at 9 hours after the injection, but there was still a clearly visible tumor image at 12 hours. The greatest amount of QD800-RGD was found in liver and spleen, followed by tumor and lung, and a weak fluorescence signal was seen in tibia. No detectable signal of QD800-RGD was found in brain, heart, kidney, testis, stomach, or intestine. Our study demonstrated that using integrin αvβ3 as target, it is possible to use intravenously injected QD800-RGD to generate high quality images of HNSCC, and the technique offers great potential in the diagnosis and personalized therapy for HNSCC. PMID:24324343

  16. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  17. Amino Acid and Vitamin Requirements of Several Bacteroides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Grace

    1966-01-01

    Nutritional studies were performed on nine Bacteroides strains, by use of the methodology and media of anaerobic rumen microbiology. Ristella perfoetens CCI required l-arginine hydrochloride, l-tryptophan, l-leucine, l-histidine hydrochloride, l-cysteine hydrochloride, dl-valine, dl-tyrosine, and the vitamin calcium-d-pantothenate, since scant turbidity developed in media without these nutrients. R. perfoetens was stimulated by glycine, dl-lysine hydrochloride, dl-isoleucine, l-proline, l-glutamic acid, dl-alanine, dl-phenylalanine, dl-methionine, and the vitamins nicotinamide and p-aminobenzoic acid, since maximal turbidity developed more slowly in media without these nutrients than in complete medium. Medium A-23, which was devised for R. perfoetens, contained salts, 0.0002% nicotinamide and calcium d-pantothenate, 0.00001% p-aminobenzoic acid, 0.044% l-tryptophan, 0.09% l-glutamic acid, and 0.1% of the other 13 amino acids listed above. Zuberella clostridiformis and seven strains of R. pseudoinsolita did not require vitamins, and showed no absolute requirement for any one amino acid. Various strains produced maximal turbidity more slowly in media deficient in l-proline, glycine, l-glutamic acid, dl-serine, l-histidine hydrochloride, dl-alanine, or l-cysteine hydrochloride, than in complete medium. These eight strains grew optimally in medium A-23 plus 0.1% dl-serine but without vitamins. PMID:16349673

  18. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis genes encoding salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-related proteins confers partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) in transgenic soybean roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) an...

  19. Ultrasonic absorption in aqueous solutions of amino acids at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, S.; Ohno, T.; Huang, H.; Yoshizuka, K.; Jordan, F.

    2003-05-01

    Ultrasonic absorption coefficients in aqueous solutions of glycine, L-alanine, imidazole, L-phenylalanine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan at neutral pH were measured in the range from 0.8 to 220 MHz at 25 °C. A characteristic ultrasonic relaxation phenomenon was observed only in the solution of L-histidine with a relaxation frequency at around 2 MHz at neutral pH. It was proposed from the concentration independent relaxation frequency and the linear concentration dependence of the maximum absorption per wavelength that the relaxation mechanism was associated with a perturbation of the rotational isomeric equilibrium of the L-histidine molecule. The existence of two rotational isomeric forms of L-histidine in water was examined by semiempirical quantum chemical methods, in order to determine the free energy difference between the two states. The forward and backward rate constants were determined from the relaxation frequency and the energy change. Also, the standard volume change of the reaction was estimated from the concentration dependence of the maximum absorption per wavelength. It was speculated that L-histidine fulfills a specific function among amino acids because of the rotational motion in the molecule, in addition to its well-established acid-base properties.

  20. Safety, absorption, and antioxidant effects of chromium histidine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplemental chromium has been shown to be involved in the alleviation of the metabolic syndrome, glucose intolerance, polycystic ovary syndrome, depression, excess body fat, and gestational, steroid-induced, and type 2 diabetes. Chromium amino acid complexes that contained histidine displayed cons...

  1. Association of purified skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase with a histidine-proline-rich-glycoprotein-like molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri-Raggi, M; Montali, U; Ronca, F; Sabbatini, A; Brown, P E; Moir, A J; Raggi, A

    1997-01-01

    Denaturation of rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase in acidic medium followed by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose in 8 M urea atpH 8.0 allows separation of two main peptide components of similar apparent molecular mass (75-80 kDa) that we tentatively assume correspond to two different enzyme subunits. Whereas the amino acid composition of one of the two peptides is in good agreement with that derived from the nucleotide sequence of the known rat and human AMPD1 cDNAs, the second component shows much higher contents of proline, glycine and histidine. N-Terminal sequence analysis of the fragments liberated by limited proteolysis with trypsin of the novel peptide reveals a striking similarity to the fragments produced by plasmin cleavage of the rabbit plasma protein called histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein (HPRG). However, some divergence is observed between the sequence of one of the fragments liberated from AMP deaminase by a more extensive trypsinization and rabbit plasma HPRG in the region containing residues 472-477. A fragment with a blocked N-terminus, which was found among those liberated by proteolysis with pepsin of either whole AMP deaminase or the novel component of the enzyme, shows an amino acid composition quite different from that of the N-terminus of the known subunit of AMP deaminase. By coupling this observation with the detection in freshly prepared AMP deaminase of a low yield of the sequence (LTPTDX) corresponding to that of HPRG N-terminus, it can be deduced that in comparison with HPRG, the putative HPRG-like component of AMP deaminase contains an additional fragment with a blocked N-terminus, which is liberated by a proteolytic process during purification of the enzyme. The implications of the association to rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase of a HPRG-like protein species are discussed. PMID:9307011

  2. Spectroscopic studies on covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with glycine.

    PubMed

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Kumara Dhas, M; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2014-10-22

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have a great potential in a wide range of applications, but faces limitation in terms of dispersion feasibility. The functionalization process of SWCNTs with the amino acid, glycine involves oxidation reaction using a mild aqueous acid mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonication technique and the resulted oxidized SWCNTs were again treated with the amino acid glycine suspension. The resulted glycine functionalized carbon nanotubes have been characterized by XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for glycine functionalized SWCNTs compared with oxidized SWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. The red shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectra of glycine functionalized SWCNTs, which reveals that the covalent bond formation between glycine molecule and SWCNTs. The functional groups of oxidized SWCNTs and glycine functionalized SWCNTs were identified and assigned. EPR results indicate that the unpaired electron undergoes reduction process in glycine functionalized SWCNTs. SEM images show that the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs was observed for glycine functionalized SWCNTs, which indicates that the adsorption of glycine molecule on the sidewalls of oxidized SWCNTs. EDX elemental micro analysis confirms that the nitrogen element exists in glycine functionalized SWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen due to CONH bioactive sites in glycine functionalized SWCNTs for future applications. PMID:25448929

  3. Histidine-rich glycoprotein inhibits contact activation of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, A B; Andersen, H F; Magnusson, S; Halkier, T

    1990-12-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein has been purified from bovine plasma employing two different purification procedures. The first procedure was one-step ion-exchange chromatography using phosphocellulose, while the second procedure involved fractionation using polyethyleneglycol 6000 followed by column chromatography employing CM-Sepharose and heparin-Sepharose. The effect of purified bovine histidine-rich glycoprotein on the contact activation of blood coagulation was studied in human plasma by using as activating surface either an ellagic acid-phospholipid suspension (Cephotest) or sulfatide. Contact activation was monitored by the generation of amidolytic activity towards a synthetic chromogenic substrate (S-2302) for factor XIIa and plasma kallikrein. Bovine histidine-rich glycoprotein inhibits the contact activation induced by both of these activating surfaces. PMID:2084959

  4. Solution interactions between the uranyl cation [UO2(2+)] and histidine, N-acetyl-histidine, tyrosine, and N-acetyl-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Badawi, Ahmed; Huang, Huan; Van Horn, J David

    2009-01-01

    Complexes of the uranyl cation [UO(2)(2+)] with histidine (His), N-acetyl-histidine (NAH), tyrosine (Tyr), and N-acetyl-tyrosine (NAT) were studied by UV-visible and NMR spectroscopy, and by potentiometric titration. Protonation constants for each ligand are reported, as are cumulative formation constants for uranyl-amino acid complexes. Coupling constant data (J(CH)) for uranyl-histidine complexes indicate that inner-sphere solution interactions between histidine and uranyl cation are solely at the carboxylate site. At 25 degrees C the major uranyl-histidine complex has a cumulative formation constant of logbeta(110)=8.53, and a proposed formula of [UO(2)HisH(2)(OH)(2)](+); the stepwise formation constant, logK(UL), is estimated to be 5.6 ( approximately 8.53-(-6.1)-(-6.1)-15.15). Outer-sphere interactions, H-bonding or electrostatic interactions, are proposed as contributing a significant portion of the stability to the ternary uranyl-hydroxo-amino acid complexes. The temperature dependent protonation constants of histidine and formation constants between uranyl cation and histidine are reported from 10 to 35 degrees C; at 25 degrees C, DeltaG=-43.3 kJ/mol. PMID:18947879

  5. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  6. Identification and characterization of heptapeptide modulators of the glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Garrett L; Pflanz, Natasha C; Tipps, Megan E; Mihic, S John

    2016-06-01

    The glycine receptor is a member of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels and is implicated as a possible therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases such as alcoholism and inflammatory pain. In humans, four glycine receptor subtypes (α1, α2, α3, and β) co-assemble to form pentameric channel proteins as either α homomers or αβ heteromers. To date, few agents have been identified that can selectively modulate the glycine receptor, especially those possessing subtype specificity. We used a cell-based method of phage display panning, coupled with two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes, to identify novel heptapeptide modulators of the α1β glycine receptor. This involved a panning procedure in which the phage library initially underwent subtractive panning against Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing alternative glycine receptor subtypes before panning the remaining library over HEK 293 cells expressing the target, the α1β glycine receptor. Peptides were identified that act with selectivity on α1β and α3β, compared to α2β, glycine receptors. In addition, peptide activity at the glycine receptor decreased when zinc was chelated by tricine, similar to previous observations of a decrease in ethanol's enhancing actions at the receptor in the absence of zinc. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of heptapeptides capable of potentiating glycine receptor function revealed several consensus sequences that may be predictive of a peptide's enhancing ability. PMID:27038522

  7. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5361 Histidine. (a) Product. Histidine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5361 Histidine. (a) Product. Histidine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5361 Histidine. (a) Product. Histidine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5361 Histidine. (a) Product. Histidine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5361 - Histidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Histidine. 582.5361 Section 582.5361 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5361 Histidine. (a) Product. Histidine (L- and DL-forms). (b) Conditions of use....

  12. Synthesis of a novel zwitterionic biodegradable poly (α,β-L-aspartic acid) derivative with some L-histidine side-residues and its resistance to non-specific protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Wu, Guolin; Lu, Caicai; Wang, Yinong; Fan, Yunge; Gao, Hui; Ma, Jianbiao

    2011-08-01

    A novel zwitterionic polypeptide derivative, denoted as His-PAsp/PAsp, was successfully synthesized by amidation of Poly (α,β-L-aspartic acid) with L-histidine methyl ester. Turbidity, zeta potential and ¹H NMR measurements were used to study the aggregation behaviors of His-PAsp/PAsp under different pH values. The modified polypeptide derivative composed of electro-negatively carboxylic and electro-positively imidazole residues randomly so as to bear opposite charges at pH values above or below the isoelectric point. When the zwitterionic polypeptide was coated on silicon wafer as a model substrate material, the absorption resistance of fibrinogen, a blood protein resulting in the blood coagulation cascade, on the coated surface was measured. It was found that the adsorption amount of fibrinogen on the polypeptide-coated surface depended on the dose of the polypeptide on silicon wafer. Obvious resistance of the fibrinogen adsorption on the polypeptide-coated surface was observed. Since its good biodegradability and superior anti-protein-fouling property, this pH-responsive zwitterionic polypeptide is a promising candidate for surface modification in many biomedical applications, including medical implants, drug delivery carriers, and biosensors. PMID:21536417

  13. Nitrogen metabolism, tissue carnosine concentration and blood chemistry of gravid swine fed graded levels of histidine.

    PubMed

    Easter, R A; Baker, D H

    1977-01-01

    Three nitrogen metabolism experiments were conducted to determine the qualitative and quantitative histidine need of first-litter gilts during the last third of pregnancy. A completely purified, crystalline 8amino acid diet was formulated to meet all nutrient needs of the gravid gilt when 2 kg/day was fed. Experiments 1 and 2 were 9-day nitrogen balance studies, each consisting of three littermate gilts subjected to three levels of dietary L-histidine in a Latin square arrangement of treatments. Nitrogen retention was depresed, but not significantly, when less than 0.12% histidine was fed. Complete deletion of histidine, however, did not depress retention below that observed when 0.06% was fed. This suggested that either histidine biosynthesis or its release from endogenous reserves was confounding retention data. Therefore in a third experiment, two gilts were fed a histidine-free diet for 24 days in an attempt to deplete endogenous reserves. For comparison, two siblings were fed 0.12% histidine during this same period. Nitrogen retention tended to be lower for gilts fed the histidine-free diet during each of three consecutive collection periods. Blood hemoglobin, muscle and olfactory bulb carnosine concentration, plasma protein and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase activity, and blood urea nitrogen were all unaffected by treatment. Offspring from gilts fed the histidine-free diet had lower blood hemoglobin concentrations than their counterparts from gilts receiving histidine. A tentative recommendation of 0.12% dietary L-histidine would seem justified for gravid swine. PMID:833672

  14. New crystals of L-histidine maleates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, M.; Ghazaryan, V. V.; Bezhanova, L. S.; Atanesyan, A. K.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Two new crystals were obtained in the system L-histidine (L-His) + maleic acid + H2O: L-His+·maleate-·H2O (I) and L-His2+·2maleate- (II) in addition to two previously known species: L-His+·maleate- (III) and 2L-His+·2maleate-·3H2O (IV). Crystal structures and vibrational spectra of (I) and (II) are determined and compared with structures of (III) and (IV). L-His+·maleate-·H2O is monoclinic (space group P21, Z = 2), L-His2+·2maleate- is triclinic (space group P1, Z = 2). The conformation of the histidine molecules in (I) is closed - as it was found in (III) - whereas in (II) all molecules are in open conformation. Moreover, it is shown that in the structure published for (IV), extremely short Csbnd H⋯O type hydrogen bonds are included, which along with several other data indicate that in this structure N and C atoms in imidazole group of one L-His+ cation have been confused.

  15. Agglutination of human erythrocytes by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine-651 on the extracellular domain of band 3.

    PubMed

    Kiyotake, Kento; Ochiai, Hideharu; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Clustering of band 3, chloride/bicarbonate exchanger, has been reported in Zn(2+)-treated human erythrocytes. However, the agglutination of human erythrocytes is also induced by the interaction of Zn(2+)ion with histidine on band 3. Identification of histidine that interacts with Zn(2+)ion remains to be determined. The Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes was unaffected by chymotrypsin cleavage of the small loop region containing His-547 in the extracellular domain of band 3. On the other hand, papain digestion of the large loop region containing His-651 in band 3 inhibited such Zn(2+)-induced agglutination. Moreover, Zn(2+)-induced erythrocyte agglutination was inhibited by the peptide (ARGWVIHPLG) containing His-651, but not by the peptide such as ARGWVIRPLG, which His-651 was substituted by arginine. Among 10 kinds of animal erythrocytes tested, interestingly, no agglutination by Zn(2+)ions was observed in cow cells only that the forth amino acid in the upstream from His-669 on the large loop of cow band 3 is aspartate (Asp-665) instead of glycine. As expected, the agglutination of human erythrocytes by Zn(2+) ions was inhibited in the presence of aspartate. These data indicate that the interaction of Zn(2+) ion with His-651 residue of band 3 plays an important role in the Zn(2+)-induced agglutination of human erythrocytes. PMID:26859120

  16. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  17. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  18. Zinc Modulation of Glycine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Paul Q.; Blakemore, Laura J.; Hill, Brook J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycine receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system, and previous studies have demonstrated that glycine receptors are modulated by endogenous zinc. Zinc is concentrated in synaptic vesicles in several brain regions but is particularly abundant in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. In the present study, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology of rat hippocampal and olfactory bulb neurons in primary culture to examine the effects of zinc on glycine receptors. Although glycine has been reported to reach millimolar concentrations during synaptic transmission, most previous studies on the effects of zinc on glycine receptors have used relatively low concentrations of glycine. High concentrations of glycine cause receptor desensitization. Our current results extend our previous demonstration that the modulatory actions of zinc are largely prevented when co-applied with desensitizing concentrations of glycine (300 μM), suggesting that the effects of zinc are dependent on the state of the receptor. In contrast, pre-application of 300 μM zinc, prior to glycine (300 μM) application, causes a slowly developing inhibition with a slow rate of recovery, suggesting that the timing of zinc and glycine release also influences the effects of zinc. Furthermore, previous evidence suggests that synaptically released zinc can gain intracellular access, and we provide the first demonstration that low concentrations of intracellular zinc can potentiate glycine receptors. These results support the notion that zinc has complex effects on glycine receptors and multiple factors may interact to influence the efficacy of glycinergic transmission. PMID:21530619

  19. The pH sensitivity of histidine-containing lytic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhigang; Young, Albert; Murphy, Christopher; Liang, Jun F.

    2010-01-01

    Many bioactive peptides are featured by their unique amino acid compositions such as argine/lysine-rich peptides. However, histidine-rich bioactive peptides are hardly found. In this study, histidine-containing peptides were constructed by selectively replacing the corresponded lysine residues in a lytic peptide LL-1 with histidines. Interestingly, all resulting peptides demonstrated pH-dependent activities. The cell lysis activities of these peptides could be increased up to four times as the solution pHs dropped from pH=7.4 to pH=5.5. The pH sensitivity of a histidine-containing peptide was determined by histidine substitution numbers. Peptide derivatives with more histidines were associated with increased pH sensitivity. Results showed that not the secondary structures but pH-affected cell affinity changes were responsible for the pH-dependent activities of histidine-containing peptides. The histidine substitution approach demonstrated here may present a general strategy to construct bioactive peptides with desired pH sensitivity for various applications. PMID:19787821

  20. Histidine-imbalanced diets stimulate hepatic histidase gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Torres, N; Beristain, L; Bourges, H; Tovar, A R

    1999-11-01

    A high protein concentration in the diet induces the gene expression of several amino acid degrading enzymes such as histidase (Hal) in rats. It is important to understand whether the amino acid pattern of the dietary protein affects the gene expression of these enzymes. The purpose of the present work was to study the effect of a histidine-imbalanced diet on the activity and mRNA concentration of rat hepatic histidase. Seven groups of six rats were fed one of the following diets: 1) 6% casein (basal), 2) 20% casein, 3) 35% casein, 4) an imbalance diet containing 6% casein plus a mixture of indispensable amino acids (IAA) equivalent to a 20% casein diet without histidine (I-20), 5) 6% casein plus a mixture of IAA equivalent to a 35% casein diet without histidine (I-35), 6) a corrected diet containing 6% casein plus IAA including histidine equivalent to a 20% casein diet, 7) a corrected diet containing 6% casein plus IAA including histidine equivalent to a 35% casein diet. Serum histidine concentration was inversely proportional to the protein content of the diet, and it was significantly higher in rats fed the corrected diets compared to their respective imbalanced diet groups. Hal activity increased as the protein content of the diet increased. Greater histidine imbalance resulted in lower food intake and higher Hal activity. Rats fed histidine-corrected diets had lower activity than their respective imbalanced groups. Differences in Hal activity were associated with differences in the concentration of Hal mRNA. These results indicate that rats fed a histidine-imbalanced diet exhibit reduced food intake and weight gain and increased Hal gene expression as a consequence of an increased amino acid catabolism. PMID:10539772

  1. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds Formed Between Amino Acid Molecules in Aqueous Solution Investigated by Temperature-jump Nanosecond Time-resolved Transient Mid-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Man-ping; Li, Heng; Zhang, Qing-li; Weng, Yu-xiang; Qiu, Xiang-gang

    2007-08-01

    Carboxyl (COO-) vibrational modes of two amino acids histidine and glycine in D2O solution were investigated by temperature-dependent FTIR spectroscopy and temperature-jump nanosecond time-resolved IR difference absorbance spectroscopy. The results show that hydrogen bonds are formed between amino acid molecules as well as between the amino acid molecule and the solvent molecules. The asymmetric vibrational frequency of COO- around 1600-1610 cm-1 is blue shifted when raising temperature, indicating that the strength of the hydrogen bonds becomes weaker at higher temperature. Two bleaching peaks at 1604 and 1612 cm-1 were observed for histidine in response to a temperature jump from 10 °C to 20 °C. The lower vibrational frequency at 1604 cm-1 is assigned to the chain COO- group which forms the intermolecular hydrogen bond with NH3+ group, while the higher frequency at 1612 cm-1 is assigned to the end COO- group forming hydrogen bonds with the solvent molecules. This is because that the hydrogen bonds in the former are expected to be stronger than the latter. In addition the intensities of these two bleaching peaks are almost the same. In contrast, only the lower frequency at 1604 cm-1 bleaching peak has been observed for glycine. The fact indicates that histidine molecules form a dimer-like intermolecular chain while glycine forms a relatively longer chain in the solution. The rising phase of the IR absorption kinetics in response to the temperature-jump detected at 1604 cm-1 for histidine is about 30+/-10 ns, within the resolution limit of our instrument, indicating that breaking or weakening the hydrogen bond is a very fast process.

  2. Synthesis of 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxylic acid 1,1-dioxides and their evaluation as ligands for NMDA receptor glycine binding site.

    PubMed

    Bluke, Zanda; Paass, Einars; Sladek, Meik; Abel, Ulrich; Kauss, Valerjans

    2016-08-01

    A series of 2-substituted 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxylic acid 1,1-dioxides were synthesized and evaluated for their affinity to the glycine binding site of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The binding affinity was determined by the displacement of radioligand [(3)H]MDL-105,519 from rat cortical membrane preparations. The most attractive structures in the search for prospective NMDA receptor ligands were identified to be 2-arylcarbonylmethyl substituted 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxylic acid 1,1-dioxides. It has been demonstrated for the first time that the replacement of NH group in the ligand by sp(3) CH2 is tolerated. This finding may pave the way for previously unexplored approaches for designing new ligands of the NMDA receptor. PMID:26114309

  3. The dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-Diaminopimelic Acid Desuccinylase from Haemophilus influenzae Contains two Active Site Histidine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Gillner, Danuta M.; Bienvenue, David L.; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Zachary, Vincentos; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic and structural properties of the H67A and H349A altered dapE-encoded N-succinyl-l,l-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (DapE) from H. influenzae were investigated. Based on sequence alignment with CPG2 both H67 and H349 were predicted to be Zn(II) ligands. Catalytic activity was observed for the H67A altered DapE enzyme which exhibited kcat = 1.5 ± 0.5 sec−1 and Km = 1.4 ± 0.3 mM. No catalytic activity was observed for H349A under the experimental conditions used. The EPR and electronic absorption data indicate that the Co(II) ion bound to H349A-DapE is analogous to WT DapE after the addition of a single Co(II) ion. The addition of one equivalent of Co(II) to H67A altered DapE provides spectra that are very different from the first Co(II) binding site of the WT enzyme, but similar to the second binding site. The EPR and electronic absorption data, in conjunction with the kinetic data, are consistent with the assignment of H67 and H349 as active site metal ligands for the DapE from H. influenzae. Furthermore, the data suggest that H67 is a ligand in the first metal binding site while H349 resides in the second metal binding site. A three-dimensional homology structure of the DapE from H. influenzae was generated using the X-ray crystal structure of the DapE from N. meningitidis as a template and superimposed on the structure of AAP. This homology structure confirms the assignment of H67 and H349 as active site ligands. The superimposition of the homology model of DapE with the dizinc(II) structure of AAP indicates that within 4.0 Å of the Zn(II) binding sites of AAP, all of the amino acid residues of DapE are nearly identical. PMID:18712420

  4. BSA-conjugated zinc oxide nanoparticles as luminescent probes for the determination of histidine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dudu; Liang, Qiaowen; Chen, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles doped with bovine serum albumin were used to determine histidine in aqueous solutions using a fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The results showed that histidine effectively quenched the fluorescence of the modified ZnO nanoparticles, whereas other amino acids did not significantly affect the light emission, thereby allowing selective and sensitive histidine detection in amino acid mixtures. Under optimal conditions (pH 7.0, 25 °C, 10 min preincubation), the detection limit for histidine was ~ 9.87 × 10(-7) mol/L. The high value of the determined quenching rate constant Kq (3.30 × 10(13)  L/mol/s) was consistent with a static quenching mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26577609

  5. Reversible Major Histocompatibility Complex I-Peptide Multimers Containing Ni2+-Nitrilotriacetic Acid Peptides and Histidine Tags Improve Analysis and Sorting of CD8+ T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julien; Guillaume, Philippe; Irving, Melita; Baumgaertner, Petra; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel F.

    2011-01-01

    MHC-peptide multimers containing biotinylated MHC-peptide complexes bound to phycoerythrin (PE) streptavidin (SA) are widely used for analyzing and sorting antigen-specific T cells. Here we describe alternative T cell-staining reagents that are superior to conventional reagents. They are built on reversible chelate complexes of Ni2+-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) with oligohistidines. We synthesized biotinylated linear mono-, di-, and tetra-NTA compounds using conventional solid phase peptide chemistry and studied their interaction with HLA-A*0201-peptide complexes containing a His6, His12, or 2×His6 tag by surface plasmon resonance on SA-coated sensor chips and equilibrium dialysis. The binding avidity increased in the order His6 < His12 < 2×His6 and NTA1 < NTA2 < NTA4, respectively, depending on the configuration of the NTA moieties and increased to picomolar KD for the combination of a 2×His6 tag and a 2×Ni2+-NTA2. We demonstrate that HLA-A2–2×His6-peptide multimers containing either Ni2+-NTA4-biotin and PE-SA- or PE-NTA4-stained influenza and Melan A-specific CD8+ T cells equal or better than conventional multimers. Although these complexes were highly stable, they very rapidly dissociated in the presence of imidazole, which allowed sorting of bona fide antigen-specific CD8+ T cells without inducing T cell death as well as assessment of HLA-A2-peptide monomer dissociation kinetics on CD8+ T cells. PMID:21990358

  6. Aza-Glycine Induces Collagen Hyperstability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yitao; Malamakal, Roy M; Chenoweth, David M

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding is fundamental to life on our planet, and nature utilizes H-bonding in nearly all biomolecular interactions. Often, H-bonding is already maximized in natural biopolymer systems such as nucleic acids, where Watson-Crick H-bonds are fully paired in double-helical structures. Synthetic chemistry allows molecular editing of biopolymers beyond nature's capability. Here we demonstrate that substitution of glycine (Gly) with aza-glycine in collagen may increase the number of interfacial cross-strand H-bonds, leading to hyperstability in the triple-helical form. Gly is the only amino acid that has remained intolerant to substitution in collagen. Our results highlight the vital importance of maximizing H-bonding in higher order biopolymer systems using minimally perturbing alternatives to nature's building blocks. PMID:26368649

  7. Glycine enhanced separation of Co(II) and Ni(II) with bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid (Cyanex 272) by liquid-liquid extraction and supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Reichley-Yinger, L.; Danesi, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The extraction behavior of Co and Ni ions from aqueous nitrate solution containing glycine, and their separation by liquid-liquid extraction and supported liquid membranes (SLMs) has been studied. The separation factor between the two metals is greatly enhanced by the presence of glycine. The enhancement is due to the preferential complexation of the Ni ions by glycine. The conditional equilibrium constants of the extraction reactions and the SLM permeability coefficients have been measured. The results indicate that metal glycinate complexes are not extracted and that in presence of glycine very clean Co-Ni separation can be obtained in a single SLM pass.

  8. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-01

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N-H ṡ ṡ ṡ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  9. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  10. L-Histidine Inhibits Biofilm Formation and FLO11-Associated Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Flor Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of FLO11 which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling FLO11 alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce FLO11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to FLO11 expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air–liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the FLO11 gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts. PMID:25369456

  11. Identification of combined conjugation of nabumetone phase I metabolites with glucuronic acid and glycine in minipig biotransformation using coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Česlová, Lenka; Holčapek, Michal; Nobilis, Milan

    2014-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was applied for the analysis of nabumetone metabolites during the biotransformation in minipigs. In addition to known phase I metabolites, the identification of phase II metabolites was achieved on the basis of their full-scan mass spectra and subsequent MS(n) analysis using both positive-ion and negative-ion ESI mode. Some phase I metabolites are conjugated with both glucuronide acid and glycine, which is quite unusual type of phase II metabolite not presented so far for nabumetone. These metabolites were found in small intestine content, but they were absent in minipigs urine. PMID:24083957

  12. Histidine Degradation via an Aminotransferase Increases the Nutritional Flexibility of Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Seider, Katja; Richter, Martin Ernst; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Ramachandra, Shruthi; Kiehntopf, Michael; Brock, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The ability to acquire nutrients during infections is an important attribute in microbial pathogenesis. Amino acids are a valuable source of nitrogen if they can be degraded by the infecting organism. In this work, we analyzed histidine utilization in the fungal pathogen of humans Candida glabrata. Hemiascomycete fungi, like C. glabrata or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possess no gene coding for a histidine ammonia-lyase, which catalyzes the first step of a major histidine degradation pathway in most other organisms. We show that C. glabrata instead initializes histidine degradation via the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8. Although ARO8 is also present in S. cerevisiae and is induced by extracellular histidine, the yeast cannot use histidine as its sole nitrogen source, possibly due to growth inhibition by a downstream degradation product. Furthermore, C. glabrata relies only on Aro8 for phenylalanine and tryptophan utilization, since ARO8, but not its homologue ARO9, was transcriptionally activated in the presence of these amino acids. Accordingly, an ARO9 deletion had no effect on growth with aromatic amino acids. In contrast, in S. cerevisiae, ARO9 is strongly induced by tryptophan and is known to support growth on aromatic amino acids. Differences in the genomic structure of the ARO9 gene between C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae indicate a possible disruption in the regulatory upstream region. Thus, we show that, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata has adapted to use histidine as a sole source of nitrogen and that the aromatic amino acid aminotransferase Aro8, but not Aro9, is the enzyme required for this process. PMID:24728193

  13. Endogenous flow of amino acids in the avian ileum as influenced by increasing dietary peptide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Velmurugu; Morel, Patrick C H; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Thomas, Donald V

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether feeding broiler chickens with diets containing increasing dietary peptide concentrations would cause increases in ileal endogenous amino acid flow. The flow of N and most amino acids increased quadratically (P < 0.05 to 0.001) with increasing dietary concentrations of peptides. The exceptions were the flow of threonine, serine, glycine, tyrosine and cystine, which increased linearly (P < 0.001) with dietary peptide levels. Another notable exception to the general trend was the flow of proline, which was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in birds fed the protein-free diet. The amino acid profile of endogenous protein, expressed as proportion of crude protein, indicated that the ratios of threonine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, leucine, histidine, arginine and cystine were influenced (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. In general, compared with the protein-free diet, the ratios of threonine and arginine in endogenous protein were lower (P < 0.05) and those of glutamic acid, glycine and histidine were greater (P < 0.05) in diets with high concentrations of peptides. The ratio of proline was found to decrease (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. These changes in the amino acid profile of endogenous protein are probably reflective of changes in the output of one or more of the components of endogenous protein. Overall, the present results demonstrated that increasing dietary peptide concentrations increased the flow of endogenous amino acid flow at the terminal ileum of broiler chickens in a dose-dependent manner and also caused changes in the composition of endogenous protein. The observed changes in endogenous amino flow will influence the maintenance requirements for amino acids and also have implications for the calculation of true digestibility coefficient of feedstuffs. PMID:18662428

  14. Cometary Glycine Detected in Samples Returned by Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    Our previous analysis of cometary samples returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft showed several amines and amino acids, but the or igin of these compounds could not be firmly established. Here, we pre sent the stable carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-amino-n-caproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids identified in Stardu st-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrom etry coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The Delta C-13 value for glycine of +29 +/- ? 6%: strongly suggests an extraterrestrial origin For glycine, while the Delta C-13 value for EACA of -25 +/-2 % indicates terrestrial contamination by Nylon-6 during curation. This represents the first detection of a cometary amino acid.

  15. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  16. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  17. DETECTABILITY OF GLYCINE IN SOLAR-TYPE SYSTEM PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Testi, Leonardo; Caselli, Paola; Viti, Serena E-mail: ltesti@eso.org E-mail: sv@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the simplest amino acid relevant to life. Its detection in the interstellar medium is key to understanding the formation mechanisms of pre-biotic molecules and their subsequent delivery onto planetary systems. Glycine has been extensively searched for toward hot molecular cores, although these studies did not yield any firm detection. In contrast to hot cores, low-mass star forming regions, in particular their earliest stages represented by cold pre-stellar cores, may be better suited for the detection of glycine as well as more relevant to the study of pre-biotic chemistry in young solar system analogs. We present one-dimensional spherically symmetric radiative transfer calculations of the glycine emission expected to arise from the low-mass pre-stellar core L1544. Water vapor has recently been reported toward this core, indicating that a small fraction of the grain mantles in L1544 (∼0.5%) has been injected into the gas phase. Assuming that glycine is photo-desorbed together with water in L1544, and considering a solid abundance of glycine on ices of ∼10{sup –4} with respect to water, our calculations reveal that several glycine lines between 67 GHz and 80 GHz have peak intensities larger than 10 mK. These results show for the first time that glycine could reach detectable levels in cold objects such as L1544. This opens up the possibility of detecting glycine, and other pre-biotic species, at the coldest and earliest stages in the formation of solar-type systems with near-future instrumentation such as the Band 2 receivers of ALMA.

  18. Detection of histidine oxidation in a monoclonal immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masato; Kobayashi, Naoki; Yabuta, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2014-08-01

    Although oxidation of methionine and tryptophan are known as popular chemical modifications that occur in monoclonal antibody (mAb) molecules, oxidation of other amino acids in mAbs has not been reported to date. In this study, oxidation of the histidine residue in a human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) 1 molecule was discovered for the first time by mass spectrometry. The oxidation of a specific histidine located at the CH2 domain of IgG1 occurred under light stress, but it was not observed under heat stress. With the forced degradation study using several reactive oxygen species, the singlet oxygen was attributed to a reactive source of the histidine oxidation. The reaction mechanism of the histidine oxidation was proposed on the basis of the mass spectrometric analysis of IgG1 oxidized in deuterium oxide and hydrogen heavy oxide. PMID:24940720

  19. Compositions containing poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1992-02-18

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and the apparatus used in effecting the removal are described. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 figs.

  20. Compositions containing poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  1. Influence of the morphology and impurities of Ni(OH) 2 on the synthesis of neutral Ni(II)-amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, Vicente; Marceau, Eric; Che, Michel; Pepe, Claude

    2007-12-01

    Synthesis of neutral complexes of Ni 2+ with amino acids has often been reported on a qualitative basis, with a lack of information on the parameters involved in the dissolution of the nickel-containing solid precursor. This paper reports on a systematic study of the reactivity of Ni(OH) 2 toward glycine in aqueous solution. The crystallinity and size of hydroxide particles are found to be key parameters in the rapid glycine-promoted dissolution of the hydroxide and synthesis of [Ni(glycinate) 2(H 2O) 2]. These parameters derive from the nature of the salt used to prepare the hydroxide. Ni(II) chloride leads to the most reactive solid precursor, because of the presence of defects in the Ni(OH) 2 sheets arrangements, assigned to the substitution of Cl - ions to OH - ions at the edges of the particles. The reaction between this hydroxide and glycine at 80 °C is quantitative after 7 min and similar rates of dissolution are obtained with other amino acids, alanine or histidine, the reaction with serine being slower. When the hydroxide contains nitrate or carbonate ions, a glycinato complex with composition similar to [Ni(glycinate) 2(H 2O) 2], but with a different crystal structure, is also formed. Spectroscopic results may suggest a structure involving bridging ligands.

  2. Baicalin Activates Glycine and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptors on Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons of the Trigeminal Subsnucleus Caudalis in Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hua; Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Oh, Sun Mi; Park, Soo Joung; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) receives nociceptive afferent inputs from thin-myelinated A[Formula: see text] fibers and unmyelinated C fibers and has been shown to be involved in the processing of orofacial nociceptive information. Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (Huang-Qin, SbG), one of the 50 fundamental herbs of Chinese herbology, has been used historically as anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic medicine. Baicalin, one of the major compounds of SbG, has been reported to have neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. However, the receptor type activated by baicalin and its precise action mechanism on the SG neurons of Vc have not yet been studied. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was performed to examine the ion channels activated by baicalin on the SG neurons of Vc. In high Cl[Formula: see text] pipette solution, the baicalin (300[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M) induced repeatable inward currents ([Formula: see text][Formula: see text]pA, [Formula: see text]) without desensitization on all the SG neurons tested. Further, the inward currents showed a concentration (0.1-3[Formula: see text]mM) dependent pattern. The inward current was sustained in the presence of tetrodotoxin (0.5[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a voltage sensitive Na[Formula: see text] channel blocker. In addition, baicalin-induced inward currents were reduced in the presence of picrotoxin (50[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a GABAA receptor antagonist, flumazenil (100[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor antagonist, and strychnine (2[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M), a glycine receptor antagonist, respectively. These results indicate that baicalin has inhibitory effects on the SG neurons of the Vc, which are due to the activation of GABAA and/or the glycine receptor. Our results suggest that baicalin may be a potential target for orofacial pain modulation

  3. Some Operational Characteristics of Glycine Release in Rat Retina: The Role of Reverse Mode Operation of Glycine Transporter Type-1 (GlyT-1) in Ischemic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hanuska, Adrienn; Szénási, Gábor; Albert, Mihaly; Koles, Laszlo; Varga, Agoston; Szabo, Andras; Matyus, Peter; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2016-02-01

    Rat posterior eyecups containing the retina were prepared, loaded with [(3)H]glycine and superfused in order to determine its release originated from glycinergic amacrine cells and/or glial cells. Deprivation of oxygen and glucose from the Krebs-bicarbonate buffer used for superfusion evoked a marked increase of [(3)H]glycine release, an effect that was found to be external Ca(2+)-independent. Whereas oxygen and glucose deprivation increased [(3)H]glycine release, its uptake was reduced suggesting that energy deficiency shifts glycine transporter type-1 operation from normal to reverse mode. The increased release of [(3)H]glycine evoked by oxygen and glucose deprivation was suspended by addition of the non-competitive glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor NFPS and the competitive inhibitor ACPPB further suggesting the involvement of this transporter in the mediation of [(3)H]glycine release. Oxygen and glucose deprivation also evoked [(3)H]glutamate release from rat retina and the concomitantly occurring release of the NMDA receptor agonist glutamate and the coagonist glycine makes NMDA receptor pathological overstimulation possible in hypoxic conditions. [(3)H]Glutamate release was suspended by addition of the excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor TBOA. Sarcosine, a substrate inhibitor of glycine transporter type-1, also increased [(3)H]glycine release probably by heteroexchange shifting transporter operation into reverse mode. This effect of sarcosine was also external Ca(2+)-independent and could be suspended by NFPS. Energy deficiency in retina induced by ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na(+)-K(+)-dependent ATPase, and by rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor added with the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose, led to increase of retinal [(3)H]glycine efflux. These effects of ouabain and rotenone/2-deoxy-D-glucose could also be blocked by NFPS pointed to the preferential reverse mode operation of glycine transporter type-1 as a consequence of

  4. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  5. Ionization constants of aqueous amino acids at temperatures up to 250°C using hydrothermal pH indicators and UV-visible spectroscopy: Glycine, α-alanine, and proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Rodney G. F.; Collins, Christopher M.; Roberts, Jenene C.; Trevani, Liliana N.; Bartholomew, Richard J.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2005-06-01

    Ionization constants for several simple amino acids have been measured for the first time under hydrothermal conditions, using visible spectroscopy with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow cell and thermally stable colorimetric pH indicators. This method minimizes amino acid decomposition at high temperatures because the data can be collected rapidly with short equilibration times. The first ionization constant for proline and α-alanine, K a,COOH, and the first and second ionization constants for glycine, K a,COOH and K a,NH4+, have been determined at temperatures as high as 250°C. Values for the standard partial molar heat capacity of ionization, Δ rC po, COOH and Δ rC po, NH4+, have been determined from the temperature dependence of ln (K a,COOH) and ln (K a,NH4+). The methodology has been validated by measuring the ionization constant of acetic acid up to 250°C, with results that agree with literature values obtained by potentiometric measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainty. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Dr. Donald Irish (1932-2002) of the University of Waterloo—friend and former supervisor of two of the authors (R.J.B. and P.R.T.).

  6. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ingredients: Sodium chloride 8.82 grams, potassium phosphate 4.20 grams, citric acid anhydrous 0.5 gram, potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  7. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ingredients: Sodium chloride 8.82 grams, potassium phosphate 4.20 grams, citric acid anhydrous 0.5 gram, potassium citrate 0.12 gram, aminoacetic acid (glycine) 6.36 grams, and glucose 44.0 grams. (b) Sponsor....

  8. l-Histidyl-glycyl-glycyl-l-histidine. Amino-acid structuring of the bleomycin-type pentadentate metal-binding environment capable of efficient double-strand cleavage of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Ida, Satomi; Iwamaru, Kana; Fujita, Mikako; Okamoto, Yoshinari; Kudo, Yuri; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Otsuka, Masami

    2015-10-01

    A tetrapeptide, l-histidyl-glycyl-glycyl-l-histidine (HGGH), was synthesized and the pUC19 plasmid DNA cleaving activity by copper(II) complex of HGGH (Cu(II)-HGGH) was investigated. Cu(II)-HGGH showed bleomycin-like DNA cleaving activity and, at 50nM, converted a supercoiled DNA efficiently to a linear DNA in the presence of 500μM H2O2/sodium ascorbate through an oxidative pathway. PMID:26159895

  9. Estrogen-like osteoprotective effects of glycine in in vitro and in vivo models of menopause.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the placenta mesotherapy has been widely used to treat menopause. Placenta contains amino acids, peptides, minerals, and estrogen. Here, we investigated the estrogen-like osteoprotective effects of glycine (a main ingredient of placenta) in in vitro and in vivo models of menopause. We assessed the effect of glycine on MG-63 osteoblast cell line, MCF-7 estrogen-dependent cell line, and ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Glycine significantly increased the MG-63 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase were increased by glycine in MG-63 cells. Glycine also increased the BrdU-incorporation and Ki-67 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells. Glycine induced the up-regulation of estrogen receptor-β mRNA expression and estrogen-response element-luciferase activity in MG-63 and MCF-7 cells. In OVX mice, glycine was administered orally at a daily dose of 10 mg/kg per day for 8 weeks. Glycine resulted in the greatest decrease in weight gain caused by ovariectomy. Meanwhile, vaginal weight reduced by ovariectomy was increased by glycine. Glycine significantly increased the ALP activity in OVX mice. MicroCT-analysis showed that glycine significantly enhanced bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density in OVX mice. Moreover, glycine significantly increased the serum 17β-estradiol levels reduced by ovariectomy. Glycine has an estrogen-like osteoprotective effect in menopause models. Therefore, we suggest that glycine may be useful for the treatment of menopause. PMID:26563333

  10. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar. PMID:24446756

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Metal & Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interfaced With Ligand Complexes Of 8-Hydroxyquinoline And α-Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanjana, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sandeep

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial nanotechnology is a recent addition to the fight against disease causing organisms, replacing heavy metals and toxins. In the present work, mixed ligand complexes of metals like zinc, silver etc. and metal oxide have been synthesized using 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) as a primary ligand and N-and/O-donor amino acids such as L-serine, L-alanine, glycine, cysteine and histidine as secondary ligands. These complexes were characterized using different spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity by using agar well diffusion bioassay.

  12. Human milk nonprotein nitrogen components: changing patterns of free amino acids and urea in the course of early lactation.

    PubMed

    Harzer, G; Franzke, V; Bindels, J G

    1984-08-01

    Free amino acids and urea were analyzed in 78 human milk samples obtained during the first 5 wk of lactation from 10 mothers delivering at term. Significant differences (p less than 0.05) in the concentrations between colostral and mature milk were found for glutamic acid, glutamine, alanine, glycine, cystine, and phosphoethanolamine which increased, and with serine, phosphoserine, aspartic acid + asparagine, arginine, lysine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, proline, methionine, tryptophan, and beta-alanine which decreased. Some of these changes occurred within the first 5 days of lactation, so that differences between transitional and mature milk became negligible (glutamic acid, alanine, and serine, aspartic acid + asparagine, lysine, isoleucine, methionine, tryptophan, respectively). No significant differences between any of the three stages of lactation were found regarding the concentrations of total free amino acids, urea, taurine, threonine, valine, leucine, histidine, and tyrosine. Possible relevances for free amino acids, including nonprotein ones, in human milk are discussed. PMID:6147084

  13. Highly Conserved Histidine Plays a Dual Catalytic Role in Protein Splicing: a pKa Shift Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhenming; Shemella, Philip T.; Liu, Yangzhong; McCallum, Scott A.; Pereira, Brian; Nayak, Saroj K.; Belfort, Georges; Belfort, Marlene; Wang, Chunyu

    2009-01-01

    Protein splicing is a precise auto-catalytic process in which an intein excises itself from a precursor with the concomitant ligation of the flanking sequences. Protein splicing occurs through acid-base catalysis in which the ionization states of active site residues are crucial to the reaction mechanism. In inteins, several conserved histidines have been shown to play important roles in protein splicing, including the most conserved “B-block” histidine. In this study, we have combined NMR pKa determination with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) modeling to study engineered inteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu) RecA intein. We demonstrate a dramatic pKa shift for the invariant B-block histidine, the most conserved residue among inteins. The B-block histidine has a pKa of 7.3 ± 0.6 in a precursor and a pKa of < 3.5 in a spliced intein. The pKa values and QM/MM data suggest that the B-block histidine has a dual role in the acid-base catalysis of protein splicing. This histidine likely acts as a general base to initiate splicing with an acyl shift and then as a general acid to cause the breakdown of the scissile bond. The proposed pKa shift mechanism accounts for the biochemical data supporting the essential role for the B-block histidine and for the absolute sequence conservation of this residue. PMID:19630416

  14. The effect of histidine on mental fatigue and cognitive performance in subjects with high fatigue and sleep disruption scores.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ikuko; Fujimura, Naoko; Nozawa, Yoshizu; Furuhata, Yasufumi; Sato, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Our previous study reported that a dried bonito broth known in Japan as 'dashi' improved or ameliorated mood states, including fatigue, during the daily lives of human subjects. Histidine is an amino acid that is present in dried bonito broth, and we sought to evaluate whether histidine would affect feelings of fatigue in humans. We investigated the effects of histidine intake on the feeling of fatigue, mood states and mental task performance by performing a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial. Twenty subjects with high fatigue and sleep disruption scores were asked to ingest histidine or a placebo every day for two weeks. The subjects' mood states were evaluated using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) scale and a visual analog scale (VAS) for eight feelings (fatigue, depression, carelessness, drowsiness, clear thinking, motivation, attentiveness and concentration). We also measured subjects' cognitive performance using the CogHealth test battery. The fatigue T-scores on the POMS test decreased significantly following histidine ingestion compared to placebo ingestion (p<0.05). After two weeks of histidine ingestion, the reaction time for the working memory task in the CogHealth test battery was significantly shorten compared to placebo ingestion. The VAS scores for clear thinking and for attentiveness were increased significantly following histidine ingestion compared to placebo ingestion (p<0.05). These results suggest that daily ingestion of histidine may ameliorate feelings of fatigue, increase performance during working memory tasks, and improve the clear thinking and attentiveness. PMID:25921948

  15. Alpha-amylase from germinating soybean (Glycine max) seeds--purification, characterization and sequential similarity of conserved and catalytic amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Arpana; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Fitter, Jörg; Polen, Tino; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2010-10-01

    Starch hydrolyzing amylase from germinated soybeans seeds (Glycine max) has been purified 400-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity with a final specific activity of 384 units/mg. SDS-PAGE of the final preparation revealed a single protein band of 100 kDa, whereas molecular mass was determined to be 84 kDa by MALDI-TOF and gel filtration on Superdex-200 (FPLC). The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at pH 5.5 and a pI value of 4.85. The energy of activation was determined to be 6.09 kcal/mol in the temperature range 25-85 degrees C. Apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)((app))) for starch was 0.71 mg/mL and turnover number (k(cat)) was 280 s(-1) in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer, pH 5.5. Thermal inactivation studies at 85 degrees C showed first-order kinetics with rate constant (k) equal to 0.0063 min(-1). Soybean alpha-amylase showed high specificity for its primary substrate starch. High similarity of soybean alpha-amylase with known amylases suggests that this alpha-amylase belongs to glycosyl hydrolase family 13. Cereal alpha-amylases have gained importance due to their compatibility for biotechnological applications. Wide availability and easy purification protocol make soybean as an attractive alternative for plant alpha-amylase. Soybean can be used as commercially viable source of alpha-amylase for various industrial applications. PMID:20655076

  16. Effect of Growth Rate on Histidine Catabolism and Histidase Synthesis in Aerobacter aerogenes1

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Donald E.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1969-01-01

    A study was made of how the catabolism of a carbon and energy source is affected by the biosynthetic demands of growing bacterial cells. Cultures of Aerobacter aerogenes in l-histidine medium were grown in a chemostat at rates determined by the supply of either sulfate or a required amino acid, l-arginine. It was discovered that the rate at which these cells grow under a biosynthetic restriction determines both the rate and the pattern of histidine degradation. (i) Histidine catabolism is partially coupled to the growth rate. This coupling is achieved by catabolite repression of histidase (histidine ammonia lyase; EC 4.3.1.3.), and also by a slightly decreased in vivo function of this enzyme at low growth rates. (ii) The looseness of the coupling results in a direct relationship between growth rate and growth yield, and possibly is correlated with an altered pattern of carbon flow from histidine. (iii) Sudden decreases in growth rate cause total repression of histidase synthesis for substantial periods of time. (iv) Sudden release of biosynthetic restriction leads rapidly to an increase in the functioning of the cells' complement of histidase, an increase in the rate of synthesis of this enzyme, and an increase in the growth yield from histidine. PMID:5781570

  17. Neuroprotective actions of a histidine analogue in models of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sung-Chun; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Cutler, Roy G; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Mughal, Mohamed R; Telljohann, Richard S; Nassar, Matthew; Ouyang, Xin; Calderan, Andrea; Ruzza, Paolo; Guiotto, Andrea; Mattson, Mark P

    2007-05-01

    Histidine is a naturally occurring amino acid with antioxidant properties, which is present in low amounts in tissues throughout the body. We recently synthesized and characterized histidine analogues related to the natural dipeptide carnosine, which selectively scavenge the toxic lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). We now report that the histidine analogue histidyl hydrazide is effective in reducing brain damage and improving functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke when administered intravenously at a dose of 20 mg/kg, either 30 min before or 60 min and 3 h after the onset of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The histidine analogue also protected cultured rat primary neurons against death induced by HNE, chemical hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and combined oxygen and glucose deprivation. The histidine analogue prevented neuronal apoptosis as indicated by decreased production of cleaved caspase-3 protein. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential for HNE-scavenging histidine analogues in the treatment of stroke and related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:17254011

  18. Modulation of heparin cofactor II activity by histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Tollefsen, D M; Pestka, C A

    1985-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II is a plasma protein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate. We have determined the effects of two glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins, i.e., histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4, on these reactions. Inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and heparin was completely prevented by purified histidine-rich glycoprotein at the ratio of 13 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram heparin. In contrast, histidine-rich glycoprotein had no effect on inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II and dermatan sulfate at ratios of less than or equal to 128 micrograms histidine-rich glycoprotein/microgram dermatan sulfate. Removal of 85-90% of the histidine-rich glycoprotein from plasma resulted in a fourfold reduction in the amount of heparin required to prolong the thrombin clotting time from 14 s to greater than 180 s but had no effect on the amount of dermatan sulfate required for similar anti-coagulant activity. In contrast to histidine-rich glycoprotein, purified platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of either heparin or dermatan sulfate at the ratio of 2 micrograms platelet factor 4/micrograms glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, the supernatant medium from platelets treated with arachidonic acid to cause secretion of platelet factor 4 prevented inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in the presence of heparin or dermatan sulfate. We conclude that histidine-rich glycoprotein and platelet factor 4 can regulate the antithrombin activity of heparin cofactor II. Images PMID:3838317

  19. Modification of histidine residues in proteins by reaction with 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, K; Stadtman, E R

    1992-01-01

    We find that histidine residues in proteins are major targets for reaction with the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynon-2-enal (HNE). Reaction of insulin (which contains no sulfhydryl groups) with HNE leads to the generation of HNE-protein adducts, which are converted to radioactive derivatives upon subsequent treatment with NaB[3H]H4. Amino acid analysis of the modified protein showed that the HNE treatment leads to the selective loss of histidine residues and the stiochiometric formation of 3H-labeled amino acid derivatives. The same labeled products were detected in acid hydrolysates of polyhistidine and N-acetylhistidine after their reactions with HNE and NaB[3H]H4. The reaction of N-acetylhistidine with HNE led to the production of two compounds. Upon acid hydrolysis, both derivatives yielded stoichiometric amounts of histidine. However, after reduction with NaBH4, acid hydrolysis led to a mixture of amino acid derivatives [presumably, isomeric forms of N pi (N tau)-1,4-dihydroxynonanylhistidine] that were indistinguishable from those obtained from insulin and polyhistidine after similar treatment. Although other possibilities are not excluded, it is suggested that the modification of histidine residues in proteins by HNE involves a Michael-type addition of the imidazole nitrogen atom of histidine to the alpha, beta-unsaturated bond of HNE, followed by secondary reaction involving the aldehyde group with the C-4 hydroxyl group of HNE. The reaction of histidine residues with HNE provides the basis for methods by which the contributions of HNE in the modification of proteins can be determined. PMID:1584790

  20. Determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine, and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in Food Products Containing Cyanobacteria by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Baker, Teesha C; Murch, Susan J; Brown, Paula N

    2015-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was completed for the determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in bulk natural health product supplements purchased from a health food store in Canada. BMAA and its isomers were extracted with acid hydrolysis to free analytes from protein association. Acid was removed with the residue evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with derivatization using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Fluor). Chromatographic separation and detection were achieved using RP ultra-performance LC coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Data from biological samples were evaluated for precision and accuracy across different days to ensure repeatability. Accuracy was assessed by spike recovery of biological samples using varying amino acid concentrations, with an average recovery across all samples of 108.6%. The analytical range was found to be 764-0.746 ng/mL prior to derivatization, thereby providing a linear range compatible with potentially widely varying analyte concentrations in commercial health food products. Both the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U. S. Pharmacopeia definitions were evaluated for determining method limits, with the FDA approach found to be most suitable having an LOD of 0.187 ng/mL and LLOQ of 0.746 ng/mL. BMAA in the collected specimens was detected at concentrations lower than 1 μg/g, while AEG and DAB were found at concentrations as high as 100 μg/g. Finding these analytes, even at low concentrations, has potential public health significance and suggests a need to screen such products prior to distribution. The method described provides a rapid, accurate, and precise method to facilitate that screening process. PMID:26651568

  1. Preferential Pathway for Glycine Formation in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilling, S.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Baptista, L.; Santos A. C., F.

    Interstellar clouds, similar to that from which the solar system was formed, contain many organic molecules including aldehydes, acids, ketones, and sugars Ehrenfreund & Charnley (2000). Those organic compounds have important functions in terrestrial biochemistry and could also have been important in prebiotic synthesis. The simplest amino acid, glycine (NH2CH2COOH), was recently detected in the hot molecular cores Sgr B2(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2 Kuan et al. (2003). The formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid(CH3COOH) have also been detected in those regions Liu et al. (2002), Remijan et al. (2004). The goal of this work is to study experimentally photoionization and photodissociation processes of glycine precursor molecules, acetic acid and formic acid to elucidate a possible preferentially in the glycine synthesis between ice and gas phase. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator TGM) beamline (100 - 310 eV). The experimental set up consists of a high vacuum chamber with a Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOF-MS). Mass spectra were obtained using PhotoElectron PhotoIon Coincidence (PEPICO) technique. Kinetic energy distributions and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Dissociative and non-dissociative photoionization cross sections for both molecules were also determined Boechat-Roberty, Pilling & Santos (2005). Due to the high photodissociation cross section of formic acid it is possible that in PDRs regions, just after molecules evaporation from the grains surface, it is almost destructed by soft X-rays, justifying the observed low abundance of HCOOH in gaseous phase Ehrenfreund et al. (2001). Acetic acid have shown to be more stable to the ionizing field, and its main outcomes from dissociation process were the reactive ionic fragments COOH+ and CH3CO+. To

  2. Mode of Action of Glycine on the Biosynthesis of Peptidoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Kandler, O.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of glycine action in growth inhibition was studied on eight different species of bacteria of various genera representing the four most common peptidoglycan types. To inhibit the growth of the different organisms to 80%, glycine concentrations from 0.05 to 1.33 M had to be applied. The inhibited cells showed morphological aberrations. It has been demonstrated that glycine is incorporated into the nucleotide-activated peptidoglycan precursors. The amount of incorporated glycine was equivalent to the decrease in the amount of alanine. With one exception glycine is also incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Studies on the primary structure of both the peptidoglycan precursors and the corresponding peptidoglycan have revealed that glycine can replace l-alanine in position 1 and d-alanine residues in positions 4 and 5 of the peptide subunit. Replacement of l-alanine in position 1 of the peptide subunit together with an accumulation of uridine diphosphate-muramic acid (UDP-MurNAc), indicating an inhibition of the UDP-MurNAc:l-Ala ligase, has been found in three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and L. plantarum). However, discrimination against precursors with glycine in position 1 in peptidoglycan synthesis has been observed only in S. aureus. Replacement of d-alanine residues was most common. It occurred in the peptidoglycan with one exception in all strains studied. In Corynebacterium sp., C. callunae, L. plantarum, and L. cellobiosus most of the d-alanine replacing glycine occurs C-terminal in position 4, and in C. insidiosum and S. aureus glycine is found C-terminal in position 5. It is suggested that the modified peptidoglycan precursors are accumulated by being poor substrates for some of the enzymes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Two mechanisms leading to a more loosely cross-linked peptidoglycan and to morphological changes of the cells are considered. First, the accumulation of glycine-containing precursors may lead to

  3. Kinetics of histidine sorption and desorption on Fumasep® FTCM cation-exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maigurova, N. I.; Eliseeva, T. V.; Lantsuzskaya, E. V.; Sholokhova, A. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The sorption of the basic amino acid histidine by Fumasep® FTCM membranes in different ionic forms is investigated over a wide range of solution concentrations. It is established that sorption limited by the stage of external diffusion. The time required for equilibrium to be established in the membrane-amino acid solution system is found to grow from 4 to 9 h when the initial concentration of the solution is reduced. The reversibility of histidine sorption is demonstrated, and the conditions of effective desorption are determined.

  4. Glycine metabolism in rat kidney cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Rowsell, E V; Al-Naama, M M; Rowsell, K V

    1982-04-15

    When rat kidney cortex slices were incubated with glycine or [1-14C]glycine, after correcting for metabolite changes with control slices, product formation and glycine utilization fitted the requirements of the equation: 2 Glycine leads to ammonia + CO2 + serine. Evidence is presented that degradation via glyoxylate, by oxidation or transamination, is unlikely to have any significant role in kidney glycine catabolism. It is concluded that glycine metabolism in rat kidney is largely via glycine cleavage closely coupled with serine formation. 1-C decarboxylation and urea formation with glycine in rat hepatocyte suspensions were somewhat greater than decarboxylation or ammonia formation in kidney slices, showing that in the rat, potentially, the liver is quantitatively the more important organ in glycine catabolism. There was no evidence of ammonia formation from glycine with rat brain cortex, heart, spleen or diaphragm and 1-C decarboxylation was very weak. PMID:6810880

  5. Ileal digestibility of nutrients and amino acids in low quality soybean meal sources treated with β-mannanase for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, S D; Park, J W; Lee, J H; Kim, I H

    2016-07-01

    Apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of energy, dry matter (DM), nitrogen (N) and amino acids and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids in low quality soybean meals with different CP concentration (SBM 44% CP and SBM 48% CP) with or without 400 U β-mannanase/kg supplementation were evaluated in 20 cannulated barrows ((Landrace×Yorkshire)×Duroc) with an average BW of 25.08±3.42 kg. A N-free diet was used to determine basal endogenous losses of amino acids. The supplementation of β-mannanase improved (P0.05) AID of N and energy. The type of SBM (SBM 44% CP v. SBM 48% CP) had no effect on AID of DM, N and energy. β-mannanase improved (P<0.05) AID of sum of essential amino acids, arginine, histidine, lysine, valine and glycine. The SID of lysine was higher (P<0.05) in enzyme supplemented than in non-supplemented diets. Larger AID and SID of threonine and proline (P<0.05) were observed in SBM 48% CP than in SBM 44% CP. In conclusion, the supplementation of enzyme improved AID of arginine, histidine, lysine, valine and glycine, but it did not cause marked difference in SID of these amino acids except for lysine. The low nutrient digestibility of the SBM sources used in the present experiment might have favoured the positive effect of β-mannanase supplementation. PMID:26857033

  6. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  7. Synthesis of water soluble glycine capped silver nanoparticles and their surface selective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agasti, Nityananda; Singh, Vinay K.; Kaushik, N.K.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles at ambient reaction conditions. • Glycine as stabilizing agent for silver nanoparticles. • Surface selective interaction of glycine with silver nanoparticles. • Glycine concentration influences crystalinity and optical property of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles has been an area of significant interest because of their wide range of applications. In the present study, we have successfully synthesized water soluble silver nanoparticles assisted by small amino acid glycine. The method is primarily based on reduction of AgNO{sub 3} with NaBH{sub 4} in aqueous solution under atmospheric air in the presence of glycine. UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X–ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques used for characterization of resulting silver nanoparticles demonstrated that, glycine is an effective capping agent to stabilize silver nanoparticles. Surface selective interaction of glycine on (1 1 1) face of silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The optical property and crystalline behavior of silver nanoparticles were found to be sensitive to concentration of glycine. X–ray diffraction studies ascertained the phase specific interaction of glycine on silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were of diameter 60 nm. We thus demonstrated an efficient synthetic method for synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles capped by amino acid under mild reaction conditions with excellent reproducibility.

  8. Determination of amino acids in Chinese rice wine by fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Niu, Xiaoying; Yang, Danting; Ying, Yibin; Li, Bobin; Zhu, Geqing; Wu, Jian

    2010-09-01

    Chinese rice wine is abundant in amino acids. The possibility of quantitative detection of 16 free amino acids (aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, and arginine) in Chinese rice wine by Fourier transform near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was investigated for the first time in this study. A total of 98 samples from vintage 2007 rice wines with different aging times were analyzed by NIR spectroscopy in transmission mode. Calibration models were developed using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by postcolumn derivatization and diode array detection as a reference method. To validate the calibration models, full cross (leave-one-out) validation was employed. The results showed that the calibration statistics were good (rcal>0.94) for all amino acids except proline, histidine, and arginine. The correlation coefficient in cross validation (rcv) was >0.81 for 12 amino acids. The residual predictive deviation (RPD) value obtained was >1.5 in all amino acids except proline and arginine, and it was >2.0 in 6 amino acids. The results obtained in this study indicated that NIR spectroscopy could be used as an easy, rapid, and novel tool to quantitatively predict free amino acids in Chinese rice wine without sophisticated methods. PMID:20707307

  9. Assessment of Fatty Acid Profile and Seed Mineral Nutrients of Two Soybean (Glycine max L.) Cultivars Under Elevated Ultraviolet-B: Role of ROS, Pigments and Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Krishna Kumar; Agrawal, Shashi Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Current scenarios under global climate change envisage a considerable increase in ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation in near future which may affect the productivity and yield quality of major agricultural crops. Present investigation was conducted to examine various defense strategies adopted against elevated UV-B (ambient + 7.2 kJ m-(2) day-(1) ) and their impact on seed nutrients, content and quality of oil including fatty acid profile of two soybean cultivars (JS-335 and PS-1042). Elevated UV-B (eUV-B) exposure leads toward higher unsaturation of fatty acids and changes in other oil quality parameters (acid, iodine and saponification value) indicated that eUV-B favored the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids with fewer carboxylic acid groups, making the oil rancid, with undesirable flavor and low nutritional value. The effect was more severe in JS-335 as compared to PS-1042. Negative effects were also seen on nutrients of soybean seeds. Adverse effects resulted due to insufficient quenching of ROS (superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide) by the defense system and thus unable to overcome the imposed oxidative stress. Credit of better performance by PS-1042 against eUV-B may be given to the adoption of efficient defense strategies like higher wax deposition, increase in lignin and flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol) contents. PMID:26489397

  10. Conformationally Constrained Histidines in the Design of Peptidomimetics: Strategies for the χ-Space Control

    PubMed Central

    Stefanucci, Azzurra; Pinnen, Francesco; Feliciani, Federica; Cacciatore, Ivana; Lucente, Gino; Mollica, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    A successful design of peptidomimetics must come to terms with χ-space control. The incorporation of χ-space constrained amino acids into bioactive peptides renders the χ1 and χ2 torsional angles of pharmacophore amino acids critical for activity and selectivity as with other relevant structural features of the template. This review describes histidine analogues characterized by replacement of native α and/or β-hydrogen atoms with alkyl substituents as well as analogues with α, β-didehydro unsaturation or Cα-Cβ cyclopropane insertion (ACC derivatives). Attention is also dedicated to the relevant field of β-aminoacid chemistry by describing the synthesis of β2- and β3-models (β-hHis). Structural modifications leading to cyclic imino derivatives such as spinacine, aza-histidine and analogues with shortening or elongation of the native side chain (nor-histidine and homo-histidine, respectively) are also described. Examples of the use of the described analogues to replace native histidine in bioactive peptides are also given. PMID:21686155

  11. Stabilisation of proteins via mixtures of amino acids during spray drying.

    PubMed

    Ajmera, Ankur; Scherließ, Regina

    2014-03-10

    Biologicals are often formulated as solids in an effort to preserve stability which generally requires stabilising excipients for proper drying. The purpose of this study was to screen amino acids and their combinations for their stabilising effect on proteins during spray drying. Catalase, as model protein, was spray dried in 1+1 or 1+2 ratios with amino acids. Some amino acids namely arginine, glycine and histidine showed good retention of catalase functionality after spray drying and subsequent storage stress. A 1+1 combination of arginine and glycine in a 1+2 ratio with catalase resulted in a tremendously good stabilising effect. Storage at high temperature/humidity also showed beneficial effects of this combination. To evaluate whether this was a general principle, these findings were transferred to an antigenic protein of comparable size and supramolecular structure (haemagglutinin) as well as to a smaller enzyme (lysozyme). Upon spray drying with the combination of amino acids it could be shown that both proteins remain more stable especially after storage compared to the unprotected protein. The combination of arginine and glycine is tailored to the needs of protein stabilisation during spray drying and may hence be utilised in dry powder formulation of biomolecules with superior stability characteristics. PMID:24412336

  12. Integrin αvβ3 as a Promising Target to Image Neoangiogenesis Using In-House Generator-Produced Positron Emitter (68)Ga-Labeled DOTA-Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD) Ligand.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Rakhee; Bhusari, Priya; Kumar, Sunil; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh; Singh, Gurpreet; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Shukla, Jaya; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-06-01

    For the growth and spread of a tumor beyond 2 mm, angiogenesis plays a crucial role, and association of various integrins with angiogenesis is evidential. The aim of the study was radiolabeling of DOTA-chelated RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) peptide with (68)Ga for PET imaging in locally advanced breast carcinoma. DOTA-RGD was incubated with (68)GaCl3, eluted in 0.05 m HCl. Elution volume, peptide amount, and reaction pH were studied. Radio-ITLC, gas chromatography, endotoxin, and sterility testing were performed. Serial (n=3) and whole-body (n=2) PET/CT imaging was done on patients post i.v. injection of 111-185 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD. Maximum radiolabeling yield was achieved with 3 mL elution volume of 15-20 μg peptide at pH 3.5-4.0 with 10 minutes of incubation at 95°C. Product samples were sterile having 99.5% radiochemical purity with residual ethanol content and endotoxins in injectable limits. Intense radiotracer uptake was noticed in the tumor with SUVmax 15.3 at 45 minutes in serial images. Physiological radiotracer uptake was seen in the liver, spleen, ventricles, and thyroid with excretion through the kidneys. The authors concluded that (68)Ga-DOTA-RGD has the potential for imaging α,vβ3 integrin-expressing tumors. PMID:26083951

  13. Growth enhancing effect of exogenous glycine and characterization of its uptake in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2015-02-01

    Alkaliphilic halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica showed optimal growth in the medium containing 0.5 M NaCl. The increase of exogenously added glycine to the medium up to 10 mM significantly promoted cell growth under both normal (0.5 M NaCl) and salt stress (2.0 M NaCl) conditions. Salt stress imposed by either 2.0 or 3.0 M NaCl retarded cell growth; however, exogenously added glycine at 10 mM concentration to salt-stress medium resulted in the reduction of growth inhibition particularly under 3.0 M NaCl condition. The uptake of glycine by intact A. halophytica was shown to exhibit saturation kinetics with an apparent K s of 160 μM and V max of 3.9 nmol/min/mg protein. The optimal pH for glycine uptake was at pH 8.0. The uptake activity was decreased in the presence of high concentration of NaCl. Both metabolic inhibitors and ionophores decreased glycine uptake in A. halophytica suggesting an energy-dependent glycine uptake. Several neutral amino acids showed considerable inhibition of glycine uptake with higher than 50 % inhibition observed with serine, cysteine and alanine whereas acidic, basic and aromatic amino acids showed only slight inhibition of glycine uptake. PMID:25536900

  14. Neutral amino acid transport in bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Barker, G A; Wilkins, R J; Golding, S; Ellory, J C

    1999-02-01

    1. The sodium-dependent amino acid transport systems responsible for proline, glycine and glutamine transport, together with the sodium-independent systems for leucine and tryptophan, have been investigated in isolated bovine chondrocytes by inhibition studies and ion replacement. Each system was characterized kinetically. 2. Transport via system A was identified using the system-specific analogue alpha-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) as an inhibitor of proline, glycine and glutamine transport. 3. Uptake of proline, glycine and glutamine via system ASC was identified by inhibition with alanine or serine. 4. System Gly was identified by the inhibition of glycine transport with excess sarcosine (a substrate for system Gly) whilst systems A and ASC were inhibited. This system, having a very limited substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was also shown to be Na+ and Cl- dependent. Evidence for expression of the system Gly component GLYT-1 was obtained using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). 5. System N, also of narrow substrate specificity and tissue distribution, was shown to be present in chondrocytes. Na+-dependent glutamine uptake was inhibited by high concentrations of histidine (a substrate of system N) in the presence of excess MeAIB and serine. 6. System L was identified using the system specific analogue 2-aminobicyclo(2,2, 1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) and D-leucine as inhibitors of leucine and tryptophan transport. 7. The presence of system T was tested by using leucine, tryptophan and tyrosine inhibition. It was concluded that this system was absent in the chondrocyte. 8. Kinetic analysis showed the Na+-independent chondrocyte L system to have apparent affinities for leucine and tryptophan of 125 +/- 27 and 36 +/- 11 microM, respectively. 9. Transport of the essential amino acids leucine and tryptophan into bovine chondrocytes occurs only by the Na+-independent system L, but with a higher affinity than the

  15. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  16. Influence of high glycine diets on the activity of glycine-catabolizing enzymes and on glycine catabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Petzke, K.J.; Albrecht, V.; Przybilski, H.

    1986-05-01

    Male albino rats were adapted to isocaloric purified diets that differed mainly in their glycine and casein contents. Controls received a 30% casein diet. In experimental diets gelatin or gelatin hydrolysate was substituted for half of the 30% casein. An additional group was fed a glycine-supplemented diet, which corresponded in glycine level to the gelatin diet but in which the protein level was nearly the same as that of the casein control diet. Another group received a 15% casein diet. Rat liver glycine cleavage system, serine hydroxymethyltransferase and serine dehydratase activities were measured. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from the catabolism of /sup 14/C-labeled glycine was measured in vivo and in vitro (from isolated hepatocytes). Serine dehydratase and glycine cleavage system activities were higher in animals fed 30% casein diets than in those fed 15% casein diets. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity of the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions was highest when a high glycine diet (glycine administered as pure, protein bound in gelatin or peptide bound in gelatin hydrolysate) was fed. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ formation from (1-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)glycine both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes was higher when a high glycine diet was fed than when a casein diet was fed. These results suggest that glycine catabolism is dependent on and adaptable to the glycine content of the diet. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase appears to play a major role in the regulation of glycine degradation via serine and pyruvate.

  17. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  18. Felbamate increases [3H]glycine binding in rat brain and sections of human postmortem brain.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R T; Sofia, R D; Layer, R T; Leiner, K A; Faull, R L; Narang, N; Wamsley, J K

    1998-08-01

    The anticonvulsant compound felbamate (2-phenyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; FBM) appears to inhibit the function of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex through an interaction with the strychnine-insensitive glycine recognition site. Since we have demonstrated previously that FBM inhibits the binding of [3H]5, 7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), a competitive antagonist at the glycine site, we assessed the ability of FBM to modulate the binding of an agonist, [3H]glycine, to rat forebrain membranes and human brain sections. In contrast to its ability to inhibit [3H]5,7-DCKA binding, FBM increased [3H]glycine binding (20 nM; EC50 = 485 microM; Emax = 211% of control; nH = 1.8). FBM, but not carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid or phenobarbital, also increased [3H]glycine binding (50 nM; EC50 = 142 microM; Emax = 157% of control; nH = 1.6) in human cortex sections. Autoradiographic analysis of human brain slices demonstrated that FBM produced the largest increases in [3H]glycine binding in the cortex, hippocampus and the parahippocampal gyrus. Because various ions can influence the binding of glycine-site ligands, we assessed their effects on FBM-modulation of [3H]glycine binding. FBM-enhanced [3H]glycine binding was attenuated by Zn++ and not inhibited by Mg++ in human brain. These results suggest that FBM increases [3H]glycine binding in a manner sensitive to ions which modulate the NMDA receptor. These data support the hypothesis that FBM produces anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects by inhibiting NMDA receptor function, likely through an allosteric modulation of the glycine site. PMID:9694960

  19. Compartmentalization of amino acids in surfactant aggregates - Partitioning between water and aqueous micellar sodium dodecanoate and between hexane and dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendler, J. H.; Nome, F.; Nagyvary, J.

    1975-01-01

    The partitioning of amino acids (glycine, alanine, leucine, phenylalanine, histidine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, isoleucine, threonine, serine, valine, proline, arginine) in aqueous and nonaqueous micellar systems was studied experimentally. Partitioning from neat hexane into dodecylammonium propionate trapped water in hexane was found to be dependent on both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which implies that the interior of dodecylammonium propionate aggregates is negatively charged and is capable of hydrogen bonding in addition to providing a hydrophobic environment. Unitary free energies of transfer of amino acid side chains from hexane to water were determined and solubilities of amino acids in neat hexane substantiated the amino acid hydrophobicity scale. The relevance of the experiments to prebiotic chemistry was examined.

  20. Profiling histidine dipeptides in plasma and urine after ingesting beef, chicken or chicken broth in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS), oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids, protein & sugars, play a role in the etiology of certain chronic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that histidine-dipeptides such as carnosine and anserine detoxify cytotoxic carbonyls such as 4-hydroxy-trans-...

  1. Neighbor-directed histidine N(τ) alkylation. A route to imidazolium-containing phosphopeptide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Wen-Jian; Park, Jung-Eun; Grant, Robert; Lai, Christopher C.; Kelley, James A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Lee, Kyung S.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2015-07-07

    Our recently discovered, selective, on-resin route to N(τ)-alkylated imidazolium-containing histidine residues affords new strategies for peptide mimetic design. In this, we demonstrate the use of this chemistry to prepare a series of macrocyclic phosphopeptides, in which imidazolium groups serve as ring-forming junctions. These cationic moieties subsequently serve to charge-mask the phosphoamino acid group that directed their formation. Furthermore, neighbor-directed histidine N(τ)-alkylation opens the door to new families of phosphopeptidomimetics for use in a range of chemical biology contexts.

  2. Quest for Cells Responsible for Age-related Increase of Salivary Glycine and Proline.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shunsuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Matsuta, Tomohiko; Horie, Norio; Shimoyama, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shoji; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that salivary glycine and proline levels are increased to nearly butanoate level in elderly people. In order to identify the source of glycine and proline, we performed high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of amino acid production to a total of seven oral cells before and after stimulation with inflammation inducers. We found that production of amino acids (per a given number of cells) by normal oral mesenchymal cells (gingival fibroblast, pulp cell, periodontal ligament fibroblast) was approximately three-fold that of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, HSC-4, Ca9-22), and that production of glycine and especially proline by all these seven cells was much lower than that of glutamine and glutamic acid. Treatment of three oral mesenchymal cells with interleukin (IL)-1β or lipopoly-saccharide (LPS) reproducibly increased the production of glutamic acid and glutamine, but not that of glycine and proline. Glycine and proline only marginally stimulated the IL-8 production by IL-1β-stimulated gingival fibroblast, whereas glycine dose-dependently inhibited the nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. These data demonstrated that normal oral mesenchymal cells are not the major source of glycine and proline that accumulates in the saliva of aged people, suggesting the involvement of the deregulation of collagen metabolism during aging. PMID:26912818

  3. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate. PMID:26928127

  4. Unbinding Force Measurement of a Histidine--Nickel Complex. The His-Tag Immobilization Force.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey G.; Yim, Peter

    1998-03-01

    A sequence of six or more histidines will bind tightly to a nickel complex. The compound typically used to immobilized the nickel is N-(5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)iminodiacetic acid (NTA). Most proteins will not bind to the complex unless there is a sequence of histidines, which is readily added using recombinant DNA techniques. The histidine tag may be removed from the nickel complex with a high concentration of imidazole or by protonating the histidines at a pH below 6. We have studied the the unbinding strength of this interaction with the atomic force microscope (AFM). To perform this measurement, we have functionalized silicon nitride AFM tips with Ni--NTA. A glass slide was coated with recombinant DNAse I with a his-tag on the C-terminus. Unbinding force measurements were made in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) to reduce electrostatic interactions. We find that the unbinding force for the NTA-Ni/His-tag interaction to be ca. 50 pN. Interestingly, 0.5 M imidazole does not remove the interaction, but only changes the distribution of the measured forces. This is a result of the non-equilibrium condition of the tip being forced into the protein coated surface. The interaction is completely removed by lowering the pH to 5.0 where the histidines are protonated and can no longer coordinate with the nickel.

  5. NMR contour maps as a new parameter of carboxyl's OH groups in amino acids recognition: A reason of tRNA-amino acid conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajjemi, Majid; Wayne, Robert; Boggs, James E.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we have applied a statistical method by computing statistical nucleus-independent chemical shifts (SNICS) in point of probes motions within a spatial shielding and de-shielding spaces around the OH groups of some amino acids. NMR contour maps as a new parameter have been created for amino-acyl-tRNA conjugation, by using a computational method to identify this model theoretically, it is critical to understand the reasons for tRNA-amino acid conjugation. DFT, NMR, 3D Gaussian distribution and Monte Carlo methods have been applied for Methionine, Serine, Histidine, Glycine and Glutamine to investigate the structural stability in the active parts of the amino acid-tRNA linkage by chemical shielding effects.

  6. Association study of polymorphisms in the neutral amino acid transporter genes SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and the glycine transporter genes SLC6A5, SLC6A9 with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiangdong; Sagata, Noriaki; Takeuchi, Naoko; Tanaka, Masami; Ninomiya, Hideaki; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Background Based on the glutamatergic dysfunction hypothesis for schizophrenia pathogenesis, we have been performing systematic association studies of schizophrenia with the genes involved in glutametergic transmission. We report here association studies of schizophrenia with SLC1A4, SLC1A5 encoding neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1, ASCT2, and SLC6A5, SLC6A9 encoding glycine transporters GLYT2, GLYT1, respectively. Methods We initially tested the association of 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed in the four gene regions with schizophrenia using 100 Japanese cases-control pairs and examined allele, genotype and haplotype association with schizophrenia. The observed nominal significance were examined in the full-size samples (400 cases and 420 controls). Results We observed nominally significant single-marker associations with schizophrenia in SNP2 (P = 0.021) and SNP3 (P = 0.029) of SLC1A4, SNP1 (P = 0.009) and SNP2 (P = 0.022) of SLC6A5. We also observed nominally significant haplotype associations with schizophrenia in the combinations of SNP2-SNP7 (P = 0.037) of SLC1A4 and SNP1-SNP4 (P = 0.043) of SLC6A5. We examined all of the nominal significance in the Full-size Sample Set, except one haplotype with insufficient LD. The significant association of SNP1 of SLC6A5 with schizophrenia was confirmed in the Full-size Sample Set (P = 0.018). Conclusion We concluded that at least one susceptibility locus for schizophrenia may be located within or nearby SLC6A5, whereas SLC1A4, SLC1A5 and SLC6A9 are unlikely to be major susceptibility genes for schizophrenia in the Japanese population. PMID:18638388

  7. Evaluation of interaction between histidine binding Cu2+ ion and histidine by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Haeng-Ja; Kim, Woo-Sik; Sano, Masato; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Chang, Sang-Mok

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a direct interaction force measurement between histidine molecules using AFM force-distance curve measurement. AFM force-distance curves between the histidine-modified cantilever and substrate in the different conditions with or without intercalating Cu2+ ion were measured and interpreted via Gaussian curve fitting analyses. The adhesion force between histidine molecules was shown to be 110 pN under the presence of Cu2+. The result was compareable to the measured adhesion force about 0 pN, which was measured by the removal of Cu2+ ion with the addition of EDTA. The result indicated the direct histidine-histidie interaction was difficult without the role of the bridigible ionic component. From the results, the possibility of direct measurement on chemical affinities between biomolecules was suggested by using AFM force-distance curve analyses. Especially, the current approach showed the possible affinity measurement techniques that elucidate the role of bridge ions. PMID:22966539

  8. Targeting the histidine pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Juleane; Nunes, José Eduardo S; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The increasing prevalence of this disease, the emergence of multi-, extensively, and totally drug-resistant strains, complicated by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, and the length of tuberculosis chemotherapy have led to an urgent and continued need for the development of new and more effective antitubercular drugs. Within this context, the L-histidine biosynthetic pathway, which converts 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate to L-histidine in ten enzymatic steps, has been reported as a promising target of antimicrobial agents. This pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants but is absent in mammals, making these enzymes highly attractive targets for the drug design of new antimycobacterial compounds with selective toxicity. Moreover, the biosynthesis of L-histidine has been described as essential for Mtb growth in vitro. Accordingly, a comprehensive overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine pathway enzymes as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents is provided, mainly summarizing the previously reported inhibition data for Mtb or orthologous proteins. PMID:24111909

  9. Urinary amino acid alterations in 3-year-old children with neurodevelopmental effects due to perinatal dioxin exposure in Vietnam: a nested case-control study for neurobiomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Nishijo, Muneko; Tai, Pham The; Anh, Nguyen Thi Nguyet; Nghi, Tran Ngoc; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Van Luong, Hoang; Anh, Tran Hai; Morikawa, Yuko; Waseda, Tomoo; Kido, Teruhiko; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study of 3-year-old children in a dioxin contamination hot spot in Vietnam, the high total dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ-PCDDs/Fs)-exposed group during the perinatal period displayed lower Bayley III neurodevelopmental scores, whereas the high 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-exposed group displayed increased autistic traits. In autistic children, urinary amino acid profiles have revealed metabolic alterations in the amino acids that serve as neurotransmitters in the developing brain. Therefore, our present study aimed to investigate the use of alterations in urinary amino acid excretion as biomarkers of dioxin exposure-induced neurodevelopmental deficits in highly exposed 3-year-old children in Vietnam. A nested case-control study of urinary analyses was performed for 26 children who were selected from 111 3-year-old children whose perinatal dioxin exposure levels and neurodevelopmental status were examined in follow-up surveys conducted in a dioxin contaminated hot spot. We compared urinary amino acid levels between the following 4 groups: (1) a high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and high TCDD-exposed group; (2) a high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs but low TCDD-exposed group; (3) a low TEQ-PCDDs/Fs exposed and poorly developed group; and (4) a low TEQ-PCDDs/Fs exposed and well-developed group. Urinary levels of histidine and tryptophan were significantly decreased in the high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and high TCDD group, as well as in the high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs but low TCDD group, compared with the low TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and well-developed group. However, the ratio of histidine to glycine was significantly lower only in the high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and high TCDD group. Furthermore, urinary histidine levels and the ratio of histidine to glycine were significantly correlated with neurodevelopmental scores, particularly for language and fine motor skills. These results indicate that urinary histidine is specifically associated with dioxin exposure-induced neurodevelopmental deficits, suggesting that

  10. Urinary Amino Acid Alterations in 3-Year-Old Children with Neurodevelopmental Effects due to Perinatal Dioxin Exposure in Vietnam: A Nested Case-Control Study for Neurobiomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Nishijo, Muneko; Tai, Pham The; Anh, Nguyen Thi Nguyet; Nghi, Tran Ngoc; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Van Luong, Hoang; Anh, Tran Hai; Morikawa, Yuko; Waseda, Tomoo; Kido, Teruhiko; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study of 3-year-old children in a dioxin contamination hot spot in Vietnam, the high total dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ-PCDDs/Fs)-exposed group during the perinatal period displayed lower Bayley III neurodevelopmental scores, whereas the high 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-exposed group displayed increased autistic traits. In autistic children, urinary amino acid profiles have revealed metabolic alterations in the amino acids that serve as neurotransmitters in the developing brain. Therefore, our present study aimed to investigate the use of alterations in urinary amino acid excretion as biomarkers of dioxin exposure-induced neurodevelopmental deficits in highly exposed 3-year-old children in Vietnam. A nested case-control study of urinary analyses was performed for 26 children who were selected from 111 3-year-old children whose perinatal dioxin exposure levels and neurodevelopmental status were examined in follow-up surveys conducted in a dioxin contaminated hot spot. We compared urinary amino acid levels between the following 4 groups: (1) a high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and high TCDD-exposed group; (2) a high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs but low TCDD-exposed group; (3) a low TEQ-PCDDs/Fs exposed and poorly developed group; and (4) a low TEQ-PCDDs/Fs exposed and well-developed group. Urinary levels of histidine and tryptophan were significantly decreased in the high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and high TCDD group, as well as in the high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs but low TCDD group, compared with the low TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and well-developed group. However, the ratio of histidine to glycine was significantly lower only in the high TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and high TCDD group. Furthermore, urinary histidine levels and the ratio of histidine to glycine were significantly correlated with neurodevelopmental scores, particularly for language and fine motor skills. These results indicate that urinary histidine is specifically associated with dioxin exposure-induced neurodevelopmental deficits, suggesting that

  11. Glycine modulates membrane potential, cell volume, and phagocytosis in murine microglia.

    PubMed

    Komm, Barbara; Beyreis, Marlena; Kittl, Michael; Jakab, Martin; Ritter, Markus; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2014-08-01

    Phagocytes form engulfment pseudopodia at the contact area with their target particle by a process resembling cell volume (CV) regulatory mechanisms. We evaluated whether the osmoregulatory active neutral amino acid glycine, which contributes to CV regulation via activation of sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs) improves phagocytosis in isotonic and hypertonic conditions in the murine microglial cell line BV-2 and primary microglial cells (pMG). In BV-2 cells and pMG, RT-PCR analysis revealed expression of SNATs (Slc38a1, Slc38a2), but not of GlyRs (Glra1-4). In BV-2 cells, glycine (5 mM) led to a rapid Na(+)-dependent depolarization of membrane potential (V mem). Furthermore, glycine increased CV by about 9%. Visualizing of phagocytosis of polystyrene microspheres by scanning electron microscopy revealed that glycine (1 mM) increased the number of BV-2 cells containing at least one microsphere by about 13%. Glycine-dependent increase in phagocytosis was suppressed by the SNAT inhibitor α-(methylamino)isobutyric acid (MeAIB), by replacing extracellular Na(+) with choline, and under hypertonic conditions, but not by the GlyR antagonist strychnine or the GlyR agonist taurine. Interestingly, hypertonicity-induced suppression of phagocytosis was rescued by glycine. These findings demonstrate that glycine increases phagocytosis in iso- and hypertonic conditions by activation of SNATs. PMID:24760586

  12. The development and amino acid binding ability of nano-materials based on azo derivatives: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefang; Du, Jinge; Yang, Wancai; Liu, Yun; Fu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Xiaofang; Yan, Ruifang; Yao, Ningcong; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jinlian; Xu, Xiufang

    2014-05-01

    Two nano-material-containing azo groups have been designed and developed, and the binding ability of nano-materials with various amino acids has been characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence titrations. Results indicated that two nano-materials showed the strongest binding ability for homocysteine among twenty normal kinds of amino acids (alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, glycine, serine, threonine, asparagine, phenylalanine, histidine, tryptophan, proline, lysine, glutamine, tyrosine and homocysteine). The reason for the high sensitivity for homocysteine was that two nano-materials containing an aldehyde group reacted with SH in homocysteine and afforded very stable thiazolidine derivatives. Theoretical investigation further illustrated the possible binding mode in host-guest interaction and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay. Thus, the two nano-materials can be used as optical sensors for the detection of homocysteine. PMID:24656358

  13. Amino acids interference on the quantification of reducing sugars by the 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid assay mislead carbohydrase activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; da Silva, Ayla Sant'Ana; Ferreira-Leitão, Viridiana Santana; da Silva Bon, Elba Pinto

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the interference of the amino acids tryptophan, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, hydroxyproline, leucine, proline, serine, glycine, valine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and methionine on the measurement of reducing sugars using a phenol-free 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) reagent. It was found that in reaction mixtures containing 20mM of either tryptophan, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, or hydroxyproline the measurement of 3.7 mM glucose was overestimated by 76%, 50%, 35%, 18%, and 10%, respectively. The amino acids valine, glutamic acid, and phenylalanine did not affect the DNS reaction, while methionine decreased the color development by 5%. The measurement of glucose, xylose, arabinose, and cellobiose at the 3.7-12.4 mM range in the presence of 20 mM cysteine resulted in an overestimated concentration of 34.8-50%. Enzymatic assays for measuring xylanolytic and filter paper activity (FPAse) were conducted in the presence of 20-60 mM cysteine, and compared to cysteine-free assays. In the presence of cysteine, the measured xylanase activity increased threefold and the FPAse activity increased twofold due to the overestimation of the reducing sugar concentrations in the assays. The interference from cysteine was reduced to a maximum of 8.6% when a DNS reagent containing phenol was used. PMID:23103512

  14. A THREE-PHASE CHEMICAL MODEL OF HOT CORES: THE FORMATION OF GLYCINE

    SciTech Connect

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures {approx}40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, occurring at {approx}200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH{sub 2}, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  15. A Three-phase Chemical Model of Hot Cores: The Formation of Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH2CH2COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures ~40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 × 10-11-8 × 10-9, occurring at ~200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH2, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  16. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-05-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  17. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  18. Formation of RNA phosphodiester bond by histidine-containing dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Rafał; Dörr, Mark; Chotera, Agata; Luisi, Pier Luigi; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2013-01-21

    A new scenario for prebiotic formation of nucleic acid oligomers is presented. Peptide catalysis is applied to achieve condensation of activated RNA monomers into short RNA chains. As catalysts, L-dipeptides containing a histidine residue, primarily Ser-His, were used. Reactions were carried out in self-organised environment, a water-ice eutectic phase, with low concentrations of reactants. Incubation periods up to 30 days resulted in the formation of short oligomers of RNA. During the oligomerisation, an active intermediate (dipeptide-mononucleotide) is produced, which is the reactive species. Details of the mechanism and kinetics, which were elucidated with a set of control experiments, further establish that the imidazole side chain of a histidine at the carboxyl end of the dipeptide plays a crucial role in the catalysis. These results suggest that this oligomerisation catalysis occurs by a transamination mechanism. Because peptides are much more likely products of spontaneous condensation than nucleotide chains, their potential as catalysts for the formation of RNA is interesting from the origin-of-life perspective. Finally, the formation of the dipeptide-mononucleotide intermediate and its significance for catalysis might also be viewed as the tell-tale signs of a new example of organocatalysis. PMID:23255284

  19. Role of Polymeric Endosomolytic Agents in Gene Transfection: A Comparative Study of Poly(l-lysine) Grafted with Monomeric l-Histidine Analogue and Poly(l-histidine)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Endosomal entrapment is one of the main barriers that must be overcome for efficient gene expression along with cell internalization, DNA release, and nuclear import. Introducing pH-sensitive ionizable groups into the polycationic polymers to increase gene transfer efficiency has proven to be a useful method; however, a comparative study of introducing equal numbers of ionizable groups in both polymer and monomer forms, has not been reported. In this study, we prepared two types of histidine-grafted poly(l-lysine) (PLL), a stacking form of poly(l-histidine) (PLL-g-PHis) and a mono- l-histidine (PLL-g-mHis) with the same number of imidazole groups. These two types of histidine-grafted PLL, PLL-g-PHis and PLL-g-mHis, showed profound differences in hemolytic activity, cellular uptake, internalization, and transfection efficiency. Cy3-labeled PLL-g-PHis showed strong fluorescence in the nucleus after internalization, and high hemolytic activity upon pH changes was also observed from PLL-g-PHis. The arrangement of imidazole groups from PHis also provided higher gene expression than mHis due to its ability to escape the endosome. mHis or PHis grafting reduced the cytotoxicity of PLL and changed the rate of cellular uptake by changing the quantity of free ε-amines available for gene condensation. The subcellular localization of PLL-g-PHis/pDNA measured by YOYO1-pDNA intensity was highest inside the nucleus, while the lysotracker, which stains the acidic compartments was lowest among these polymers. Thus, the polymeric histidine arrangement demonstrate the ability to escape the endosome and trigger rapid release of polyplexes into the cytosol, resulting in a greater amount of pDNA available for translocation to the nucleus and enhanced gene expression. PMID:25144273

  20. N-H···N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Histidine Imidazole Nitrogen Atoms: A New Structural Role for Histidine Residues in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishna Deepak, R N V; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-07-12

    The amino acid histidine can play a significant role in the structure and function of proteins. Its various functions include enzyme catalysis, metal binding activity, and involvement in cation-π, π-π, salt-bridge, and other types of noncovalent interactions. Although histidine's imidazole nitrogens (Nδ and Nε) are known to participate in hydrogen bond (HB) interactions as an acceptor or a donor, a systematic study of N-H···N HBs with the Nδ/Nε atom as the acceptor has not been conducted. In this study, we have examined two data sets of ultra-high-resolution (data set I) and very high-resolution (data set II) protein structures and identified 28 and 4017 examples of HBs of the N-H···Nδ/Nε type from both data sets involving histidine imidazole nitrogen as the acceptor. In nearly 70% of them, the main-chain N-H bond is the HB donor, and a majority of the examples are from the N-H group separated by two residues (Ni+2-Hi+2) from histidine. Quantum chemical calculations using model compounds were performed with imidazole and N-methylacetamide, and they assumed conformations from 19 examples from data set I with N-H···Nδ/Nε HBs. Basis set superposition error-corrected interaction energies varied from -5.0 to -6.78 kcal/mol. We also found that the imidazole nitrogen of 9% of histidine residues forming N-H···Nδ/Nε interactions in data set II participate in bifurcated HBs. Natural bond orbital analyses of model compounds indicate that the strength of each HB is mutually influenced by the other. Histidine residues involved in Ni+2-Hi+2···Nδi/Nεi HBs are frequently observed in a specific N-terminal capping position giving rise to a novel helix-capping motif. Along with their predominant occurrence in loop segments, we propose a new structural role for histidines in protein structures. PMID:27305350

  1. Toxicity of Copper, Cobalt, and Nickel Salts Is Dependent on Histidine Metabolism in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, David A.; Sherman, Fred

    1999-01-01

    The pH-dependent inhibition of 22 metal salts have been systematically investigated for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have established that the inhibition of growth by Cu, Co, or Ni salts is markedly enhanced by histidine auxotrophy and by increasing the pH of the medium. Each of the his1-his7 mutant strains were unable to grow in the presence of elevated levels of Cu, Co, or Ni at nearly neutral pHs, in contrast to His+ strains, which grew under these conditions. The Cu, Co, or Ni inhibition was reversed by the addition of histidine to the medium. Deletion of the high-affinity histidine permease Hip1p in His− strains resulted in even greater sensitivity to Cu, Co, and Ni and the requirement of an even higher level of histidine to reverse the inhibition. These results suggest that intracellular histidine, most likely in the vacuole, diminishes the pH-dependent toxicity of Cu, Co, and Ni. Furthermore, the toxicity of many salts is exacerbated in strains with a defective vacuolar H+-ATPase, which abolishes the ability of yeast to maintain an acidic vacuole, a compartment known to sequester metal compounds. We suggest that the accumulation of histidine in the vacuole is a normal process used to detoxify Cu, Co, and Ni. PMID:10438744

  2. Raman Spectroscopic Studies on L-histidine, aniline Doped Triglycine Sulphate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Ramakrishnan, V.; Parameswari, A.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystals of triglycine sulphate (TGS) doped with L-histidine and aniline were studied by Raman Spectroscopy. The structure and symmetry of molecules, the nature of bonding and the effect of crystalline field on molecular vibrations were studied for pure and doped TGS. The characteristic group frequencies were identified and analysed for H2SO4 and glycine. The skeletal motion, lattice vibrational peaks were observed in the low wavenumber region. The site symmetry effect and the correlation field effect were studied from the splitting of vibrational bands. The observed Raman shift towards higher wave number region reveals that the symmetry reduction in doped TGS crystals. The broadening of Raman spectral line showed that a decrease in the hardness value for the doped crystals. Comparative studies of the Raman Spectra of pure TGS and doped TGS were also carried out.

  3. Enhanced chemiluminescence CdSe quantum dots by histidine and tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Morteza; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Jarrahi, Afsaneh; Vaezi, Zahra; Mizani, Farhang; Faridbod, Farnoush

    2014-11-01

    The enhancing effect of histidine and tryptophan on chemiluminescence (CL) of CdSe quantum dots (QDs)-H2O2 system was studied. This reaction is based on the catalytic effect of amino acids, causing a significant increase in the light emission, as a result of the reaction of quantum dots (QDs) with hydrogen peroxide. In the optimum conditions, this method was satisfactorily described by linear calibration curve in the range of 0.66-35.5 μM and 0.83-35.1 μM for histidine and tryptophan, respectively. The effect of various parameters such as concentration of CdSe QDs, concentration of H2O2 and concentration of imidazole on the intensity of CL system were studied. The main experimental advantage of the proposed method is it's selective to two amino acids compared with other amino acids.

  4. The tautomeric state of histidines in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, S; Sukits, S F; MacLaughlin, K L; Lecomte, J T

    1997-01-01

    1H-15N HMQC spectra were collected on 15N-labeled sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) to determine the tautomeric state of its histidines in the neutral form. By analyzing metaquoMb and metcyanoMb data sets collected at various pH values, cross-peaks were assigned to the imidazole rings and their patterns interpreted. Of the nine histidines not interacting with the heme in sperm whale myoglobin, it was found that seven (His-12, His-48, His-81, His-82, His-113, His-116, and His-119) are predominantly in the N epsilon2H form with varying degrees of contribution from the Ndelta1 H form. The eighth, His-24, is in the Ndelta1H state as expected from the solid state structure. 13C correlation spectra were collected to probe the state of the ninth residue (His-36). Tentative interpretation of the data through comparison with horse Mb suggested that this ring is predominantly in the Ndelta1H state. In addition, signals were observed from the histidines associated with the heme (His-64, His-93, and His-97) in the 1H-15N HMQC spectra of the metcyano form. In several cases, the tautomeric state of the imidazole ring could not be derived from inspection of the solid state structure. It was noted that hydrogen bonding of the ring was not unambiguously reflected in the nitrogen chemical shift. With the experimentally determined tautomeric state composition in solution, it will be possible to broaden the scope of other studies focused on the electrostatic contribution of histidines to the thermodynamic properties of myoglobin. PMID:9414234

  5. Electrophysiological Signature of Homomeric and Heteromeric Glycine Receptor Channels.

    PubMed

    Raltschev, Constanze; Hetsch, Florian; Winkelmann, Aline; Meier, Jochen C; Semtner, Marcus

    2016-08-19

    Glycine receptors are chloride-permeable, ligand-gated ion channels and contribute to the inhibition of neuronal firing in the central nervous system or to facilitation of neurotransmitter release if expressed at presynaptic sites. Recent structure-function studies have provided detailed insights into the mechanisms of channel gating, desensitization, and ion permeation. However, most of the work has focused only on comparing a few isoforms, and among studies, different cellular expression systems were used. Here, we performed a series of experiments using recombinantly expressed homomeric and heteromeric glycine receptor channels, including their splice variants, in the same cellular expression system to investigate and compare their electrophysiological properties. Our data show that the current-voltage relationships of homomeric channels formed by the α2 or α3 subunits change upon receptor desensitization from a linear to an inwardly rectifying shape, in contrast to their heteromeric counterparts. The results demonstrate that inward rectification depends on a single amino acid (Ala(254)) at the inner pore mouth of the channels and is closely linked to chloride permeation. We also show that the current-voltage relationships of glycine-evoked currents in primary hippocampal neurons are inwardly rectifying upon desensitization. Thus, the alanine residue Ala(254) determines voltage-dependent rectification upon receptor desensitization and reveals a physio-molecular signature of homomeric glycine receptor channels, which provides unprecedented opportunities for the identification of these channels at the single cell level. PMID:27382060

  6. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Itälä, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-21

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C–C{sub α} bond and the presence of the CNH{sub 2}{sup +} fragment.

  7. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itälä, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-01

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C-Cα bond and the presence of the CNH_2^+ fragment.

  8. Ultraviolet-induced effects on chloramine and cyanogen chloride formation from chlorination of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Weng, ShihChi; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2013-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-based treatment is commonly used to augment chlorination in swimming pools. However, the effects of combined application of UV254/chlorine on disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation are incompletely defined. To examine this issue, experiments were conducted with amino acids (l-arginine, l-histidine, and glycine) that are representative of those introduced to swimming pools via human body fluids. For each precursor, stepwise experiments were conducted with chlorination and UV254 exposure, with/without post-chlorination. Net formation and decomposition of chloramines and cyanogen chloride (CNCl) were measured for a range of chlorine/precursor (Cl/P) molar ratios and UV254 doses. Substantial production of NH2Cl from l-arginine and l-histidine was observed at Cl/P = 1.0 and 2.0 when post-chlorination was applied to UV254-irradiated samples. These results suggested a mechanism of rapid N-chlorination, followed by cleavage of NH3 by UV254 irradiation. CNCl formation was observed from UV254-irradiated samples of l-arginine and l-histidine when Cl/P = 2.0 and 3.0, as well as from glycine for Cl/P ≤ 1. Structurally related precursor compounds were examined for CNCl formation potential in chlorination/UV experiments. CNCl formation was promoted by UV254 exposure of chlorinated imidazole and guanidine compounds, which suggested that these groups contributed to CNCl formation. The results have implications with respect to the application of chlorine and UV for water treatment in swimming pools and other settings, such as water reuse and advanced oxidation processes. PMID:23560482

  9. Antioxidant status of turkey breast meat and blood after feeding a diet enriched with histidine.

    PubMed

    Kopec, W; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Jamroz, D; Biazik, E; Pudlo, A; Hikawczuk, T; Skiba, T; Korzeniowska, M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 1) spray dried blood cells rich in histidine and 2) pure histidine added to feed on the antioxidant status and concentration of carnosine related components in the blood and breast meat of female turkeys. The experiment was performed on 168 Big7 turkey females randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments: control; control with the addition of 0.18% L-histidine (His); and control with the addition of spray dried blood cells (SDBC). Birds were raised for 103 d on a floor with sawdust litter, with drinking water and feed ad libitum. The antioxidant status of blood plasma and breast muscle was analyzed by ferric reducing ability (FRAP) and by 2,2-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging ability. The activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was analyzed in the blood and breast meat, with the content of carnosine and anserine quantified by HPLC. Proximate analysis as well as amino acid profiling were carried out for the feed and breast muscles. Growth performance parameters also were calculated. Histidine supplementation of the turkey diet resulted in increased DPPH radical scavenging capacity in the breast muscles and blood, but did not result in higher histidine dipeptide concentrations. The enzymatic antioxidant system of turkey blood was affected by the diet with SDBC. In the plasma, the SDBC addition increased both SOD and GPx activity, and decreased GPx activity in the erythrocytes. Feeding turkeys with an SDBC containing diet increased BW and the content of isoleucine and valine in breast muscles. PMID:26574038

  10. Corynebacterium glutamicum ATP-phosphoribosyl transferases suitable for L-histidine production--Strategies for the elimination of feedback inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kulis-Horn, Robert K; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-07-20

    L-Histidine biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum is mainly regulated by L-histidine feedback inhibition of the ATP-phosphoribosyltransferase HisG that catalyzes the first step of the pathway. The elimination of this feedback inhibition is the first and most important step in the development of an L-histidine production strain. For this purpose, a combined approach of random mutagenesis and rational enzyme redesign was performed. Mutants spontaneously resistant to the toxic L-histidine analog β-(2-thiazolyl)-DL-alanine (2-TA) revealed novel and unpredicted mutations in the C-terminal regulatory domain of HisG resulting in increased feedback resistance. Moreover, deletion of the entire C-terminal regulatory domain in combination with the gain of function mutation S143F in the catalytic domain resulted in a HisG variant that is still highly active even at L-histidine concentrations close to the solubility limit. Notably, the S143F mutation on its own provokes feedback deregulation, revealing for the first time an amino acid residue in the catalytic domain of HisG that is involved in the feedback regulatory mechanism. In addition, we investigated the effect of hisG mutations for L-histidine production on different levels. This comprised the analysis of different expression systems, including plasmid- and chromosome-based overexpression, as well as the importance of codon choice for HisG mutations. The combination of domain deletions, single amino acid exchanges, codon choice, and chromosome-based overexpression resulted in production strains accumulating around 0.5 g l(-1) L-histidine, demonstrating the added value of the different approaches. PMID:25892668

  11. Electric field directed nucleic acid hybridization on microchips.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, C F; Raymond, D E; Wu, D J; Tu, E; Sosnowski, R G; Butler, W F; Nerenberg, M; Heller, M J

    1997-01-01

    Selection and adjustment of proper physical parameters enables rapid DNA transport, site selective concentration, and accelerated hybridization reactions to be carried out on active microelectronic arrays. These physical parameters include DC current, voltage, solution conductivity and buffer species. Generally, at any given current and voltage level, the transport or mobility of DNA is inversely proportional to electrolyte or buffer conductivity. However, only a subset of buffer species produce both rapid transport, site specific concentration and accelerated hybridization. These buffers include zwitterionic and low conductivity species such as: d- and l-histidine; 1- and 3-methylhistidines; carnosine; imidazole; pyridine; and collidine. In contrast, buffers such as glycine, beta-alanine and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) produce rapid transport and site selective concentration but do not facilitate hybridization. Our results suggest that the ability of these buffers (histidine, etc.) to facilitate hybridization appears linked to their ability to provide electric field concentration of DNA; to buffer acidic conditions present at the anode; and in this process acquire a net positive charge which then shields or diminishes repulsion between the DNA strands, thus promoting hybridization. PMID:9396795

  12. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.; Katz, Leonard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-likemore » subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.« less

  13. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.; Katz, Leonard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-like subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.

  14. Cometary Glycine Detected in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 to Earth. The Stardust cometary collector consisted of aerogel cells lined with aluminum foils designed to capture impacting particles and facilitate removal of the aerogel. Preliminary examinations of these comet-exposed materials revealed a suite of organic compounds, including several amines and amino acids which were later examined in more detail. Methylamine (NH2CH3) and ethylamine (NH2C2H5) were detected in the exposed aerogel at concentrations greatly exceeding those found in control samples, while the amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) was detected in several foil samples as well as in the comet-exposed aerogel. None of these three compounds had been previously detected in comets, although methylamine had been observed in the interstellar medium. Although comparison with control samples suggested that the detected glycine was cometary. the previous work was not able to conclusively identify its origin. Here, we present the results of compound-specific carbon isotopic analysis of glycine in Stardust cometary collector foils. Several foils from the interstellar side of the Stardust collector were also analyzed for amino acid abundance, but concentrations were too low to perform isotopic ana!ysis.

  15. Promoter- and attenuator-related metabolic regulation of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine operon.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, M E; Roth, D J; Hartman, P E

    1978-01-01

    Expression of the histidine (his) operon in Salmonella typhimurium was found to be positively correlated with the intracellular level of guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp). Limitation for amino acids other than histidine elicited a histidine-independent metabolic regulation of the operon. In bacteria grown at decreased growth rates, his operon expression was metabolically regulated up to a point, after which further decreases in growth rate no longer resulted in further enhancement of operon expression. Studies using strains carrying various regulatory and deletion mutations indicated that metabolic regulation is achieved predominantly by increased RNA chain initiations at the primary (P1) and internal (P2) promoters. Metabolic regulation ordinarly did not involve changes in RNA chain terminations at the attenuator site of the his operon. A model is proposed that involves ppGpp-induced changes in RNA polymerase initiation specificity at particular promoters. A second, special form of metabolic regulation may operate which also is histidine independent, but does involve relief of attenuation. PMID:342509

  16. Substrate specificity of duckling hepatic and renal D-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkin, R G; Lyons, M L

    1988-05-01

    The substrate specificity of duckling hepatic and renal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO; D-amino acid: O2 oxidoreductase [deaminating], E.C. 1.4.3.3) was determined using a method based on the combination of coupled enzyme reactions and a colorimetric procedure. When activities were averaged across tissues, D-proline was the most reactive substrate, followed by (in order) D-phenylalanine, D-alanine, D-methionine, D-leucine, D-isoleucine, D-valine, D-tryptophan, D-arginine, and D-lysine. Compared with D-alanine, duckling DAAO had minimal or no reactivity with D-asparagine, D-glutamine, D-histidine, D-threonine, D-cysteine, glycine, or D-serine. These results were in general agreement with data from other vertebrate species. PMID:2900508

  17. About the detectability of glycine in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Pauzat, F.; Pilmé, J.; Ellinger, Y.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Glycine, the simplest of aminoacids, has been found in several carbonaceous meteorites. It remains unclear, however, wether glycine is formed in the interstellar medium (ISM) and therefore available everywhere in the Universe. For this reason, radioastronomers have searched for many years unsuccessfully to detect glycine in the ISM. Aims: We provide possible guidelines to optimize the return of these searches. Since, for most of the species observed so far in the ISM, the most abundant isomer of a given generic chemical formula is the most stable one (minimum energy principle (MEP)), we assess whether neutral glycine is the best molecule to search for or whether one of its isomers/conformers or ionic, protonated, or zwitterionic derivatives would have a higher probability of being detected. Methods: The question of the relative stability of these different species is addressed by means of quantum density functional theory (DFT) simulations within the hybrid B3LYP formalism. Each fully optimized structure is verified as a stationary point by means of a vibrational analysis. A comprehensive screening of 32 isomers/conformers of the C2H5O2N chemical formula (neutral, negative, and positive ions together with the corresponding protonated species and the possible zwitterionic structures) is carried out. In the sensitive case of the neutral compounds, more accurate relative energies were obtained by means of high level post Hartree-Fock coupled cluster calculations with large basis sets (CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ). Results: We find that neutral glycine is not the most stable isomer and, therefore, probably not the most abundant one, which might explain why it has escaped detection so far. We find instead that N-methyl carbamic acid and methyl carbamate are the two most stable isomers and, therefore, probably the two most abundant ones. Among the non-neutral forms, we found that glycine is the most stable isomer only if protonated or zwitterionic if present in interstellar

  18. Activation-induced structural change in the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; Takahashi, Hirohide; Srivats, Shyam; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We studied the response of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor to activation. • GluN1 and GluN3A subunits interacted within transfected cells. • The GluN1/GluN3A receptor was functionally active. • Glycine or D-serine caused a ∼1 nm height reduction in bilayer-integrated receptors. • This height reduction was abolished by the glycine antagonist DCKA. - Abstract: Unlike GluN2-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which require both glycine and glutamate for activation, receptors composed of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits are activated by glycine alone. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging to examine the response to activation of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor. GluN1 and GluN3A subunits were shown to interact intimately within transfected tsA 201 cells. Isolated GluN1/GluN3A receptors integrated into lipid bilayers responded to addition of either glycine or D-serine, but not glutamate, with a ∼1 nm reduction in height of the extracellular domain. The height reduction in response to glycine was abolished by the glycine antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid. Our results represent the first demonstration of the effect of activation on the conformation of this receptor.

  19. A Sensitive VLA Search for Small-Scale Glycine Emission Toward OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J. A.; Snyder, L. E.; Jewell, P. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Palmer, Patrick; Liu, S.-Y.

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted a deep Q-band (lambda-7 mm) search with the Very Large Array (VLA) toward OMC-1 for the lowest energy conformation (conformer I) of glycine (NH2CH2COOH) in four rotational transitions: the 6(sub 15)- 5(sub 14), 6(sub 24)-5(sub 23), 7(sub 17- 6(sub 16), and 7(sub 07)-6(sub 06). Our VLA observations sample the smallest-scale structures to date in the search for glycine toward OMC-1. No glycine emission features were detected. Thus if glycine exists in OMC-1, either it is below our detection limit, or it is more spatially extended than other large molecules in this source, or it is primarily in its high energy form (conformer II). Our VLA glycine fractional abundance limits in OMC-1 are comparable to those determined from previous IRAM 30m measurements -- somewhat better or worse depending on the specific source model -- and the entire approximately 1 foot primary beam of the VLA was searched while sensitive to an areal spatial scale approximately 150 times smaller than the 24 inch beam of the IRAM single-element telescope. In the course of this work, we detected and imaged the 4(sub 14)-3(sub 13) A and E transitions of methyl formate (HCOOCH3) and also the 2(sub 02) - 1(sub 01) transition of formic acid (HCOOH). Since formic acid is a possible precursor to glycine, our glycine limits and formic acid results provide a constraint on this potential formation chemistry route for glycine in OMC-1.

  20. Autophosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphate kinase on non-histidine residues.

    PubMed

    Bominaar, A A; Tepper, A D; Véron, M

    1994-10-10

    Recently, several reports appeared which described auto-phosphorylation of NDP kinase on residues different from the active-site histidine. Based on these findings conclusions were drawn with respect to a regulation of enzyme activity and to a possible role as a metastasis suppressor. In this paper we show that although non-histidine autophosphorylation occurs on NDP kinases from mammals, lower eukaryotes and bacteria, less than 0.2% of the subunits are phosphorylated. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the active site histidine is essential for non-histidine autophosphorylation. The low stoichiometry of phosphate incorporation excludes a role of autophosphorylation in regulating overall enzyme activity. PMID:7926021

  1. Determination of glycine in biofluid by hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry and its application to the quantification of glycine released by embryonal carcinoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ya-Bin; Teng, Lin; Sun, Fan; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Peng, Liang; Cui, Yong-Yao; Hu, Jin-Jia; Luan, Xin; Zhu, Liang; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2012-09-15

    Because glycine plays a prominent role in living creatures, an accurate and precise quantitative analysis method for the compound is needed. Herein, a new approach to analyze glycine by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) was developed. This method avoids the use of derivatization and/or ion-pairing reagents. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) is used as the internal standard (IS). The mobile phase for the isocratic elution consisted of 10 mM ammonium formate in acetonitrile-water (70:30, v/v, adjusted to pH 2.8 with formic acid), and a flow rate of 250 μL/min was used. Two microliters of sample was injected for analysis. The signal was monitored in the positive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The total run time was 5 min. The dynamic range was 40-2000 ng/mL for glycine in the biological matrix. The LLOQ (lower limit of quantification) of this method was 40 ng/mL (80 pg on column). The validated method was applied to determine the dynamic release of glycine from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells (ECSCs). Glycine spontaneously released from the ECSCs into the intercellular space gradually increased from 331.02±60.36 ng/mL at 2 min in the beginning to 963.52±283.80 ng/mL at 60 min and 948.27±235.09 ng/mL at 120 min, finally reaching a plateau, indicating that ECSCs consecutively release glycine until achieving equilibration between the release and the reuptake of the compound; on the contrary, the negative control NIH/3T3 embryonic fibroblast cells did not release glycine. This finding will help to improve our understanding of the novel effects of neurotransmitters, including glycine, on non-neural systems. PMID:22906796

  2. Ionic conductivity, sintering and thermal expansion behaviors of mixed ion conductor BaZr 0.1Ce 0.7Y 0.1Yb 0.1O 3- δ prepared by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid assisted glycine nitrate process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoliang; Liu, Limin; Zhen, Jiangman; Zhu, Shengcai; Li, Baowen; Sun, Kening; Wang, Peng

    BaZr 0.1Ce 0.7Y 0.1Yb 0.1O 3- δ as a candidate electrolyte material is prepared by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid assisted glycine-nitrate process. After calcining at 900 °C, the single-phase perovskite is obtained due to the better distribution of starting materials and the more feasible reaction kinetic conditions than solid state reaction method. The relative densities reach 96.8 and 98.4% respectively after sintering the pressed pellets at 1280 and 1400 °C for 10 h. In humidified oxygen the ionic conductivities are 0.015, 0.045, 0.101 and 0.207 S cm -1 at 500, 600, 700 and 800 °C, respectively. In air and humidified oxygen the activation energies for ionic conductivity are 66.1 and 68.9 kJ mol -1. In humidified hydrogen, however, different activation energies occur in low and high temperature ranges. The thermal expansion curve inflections at 500-800 °C with respect to possible phase changes are found. Zirconia aggregation possibly results in the higher activation energy and peculiar thermal expansion behavior. The results indicate the ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid assisted glycine-nitrate process is a very promising preparation method for solid oxide fuel cell practical application.

  3. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors.

  4. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/ graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors. PMID:26568200

  5. Graphdiyne as a promising material for detecting amino acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Gao, Pengfei; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of glycine, glutamic acid, histidine and phenylalanine on single-layer graphdiyne/graphene is investigated by ab initio calculations. The results show that for each amino acid molecule, the adsorption energy on graphdiyne is larger than the adsorption energy on graphene and dispersion interactions predominate in the adsorption. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that at room temperature the amino acid molecules keep migrating and rotating on graphdiyne surface and induce fluctuation in graphdiyne bandgap. Additionally, the photon absorption spectra of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are investigated. We uncover that the presence of amino acid molecules makes the photon absorption peaks of graphdiyne significantly depressed and shifted. Finally, quantum electronic transport properties of graphdiyne-amino-acid systems are compared with the transport properties of pure graphdiyne. We reveal that the amino acid molecules induce distinct changes in the electronic conductivity of graphdiyne. The results in this paper reveal that graphdiyne is a promising two-dimensional material for sensitively detecting amino acids and may potentially be used in biosensors. PMID:26568200

  6. Glycine transporter 1 is a target for the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Ying; van Vliet, Erwin A; Bright, Kerry-Ann; Hanthorn, Marissa; Lytle, Nikki K; Gorter, Jan; Aronica, Eleonora; Boison, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    Glycine is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in brainstem and spinal cord, whereas in hippocampus glycine exerts dual modulatory roles on strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and on the strychnine-insensitive glycineB site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). In hippocampus, the synaptic availability of glycine is largely under control of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1). Since epilepsy is a disorder of disrupted network homeostasis affecting the equilibrium of various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, we hypothesized that changes in hippocampal GlyT1 expression and resulting disruption of glycine homeostasis might be implicated in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Using two different rodent models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE)--the intrahippocampal kainic acid model of TLE in mice, and the rat model of tetanic stimulation-induced TLE--we first demonstrated robust overexpression of GlyT1 in the hippocampal formation, suggesting dysfunctional glycine signaling in epilepsy. Overexpression of GlyT1 in the hippocampal formation was corroborated in human TLE samples by quantitative real time PCR. In support of a role of dysfunctional glycine signaling in the pathophysiology of epilepsy, both the genetic deletion of GlyT1 in hippocampus and the GlyT1 inhibitor LY2365109 increased seizure thresholds in mice. Importantly, chronic seizures in the mouse model of TLE were robustly suppressed by systemic administration of the GlyT1 inhibitor LY2365109. We conclude that GlyT1 overexpression in the epileptic brain constitutes a new target for therapeutic intervention, and that GlyT1 inhibitors constitute a new class of antiictogenic drugs. These findings are of translational value since GlyT1 inhibitors are already in clinical development to treat cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:26302655

  7. Theoretical model of the interaction of glycine with hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC).

    PubMed

    Timón, Vicente; Gálvez, Óscar; Maté, Belén; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J; Escribano, Rafael

    2015-11-21

    A theoretical model of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) is developed and applied to study the interaction of glycine with HAC surfaces at astronomical temperatures. Two models with different H content are tried for the HAC surface. The theory is applied at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) level, including a semiempirical dispersion correlation potential, d-DFT or Grimme DFT-D2. The level of theory is tested on glycine adsorption on a Si(001) surface. Crystalline glycine is also studied in its two stable phases, α and β, and the metastable γ phase. For the adsorption on Si or HAC surfaces, molecular glycine is introduced in the neutral and zwitterionic forms, and the most stable configurations are searched. All theoretical predictions are checked against experimental observations. HAC films are prepared by plasma enhanced vapor deposition at room temperature. Glycine is deposited at 20 K into a high vacuum, cold temperature chamber, to simulate astronomical conditions. Adsorption takes place through the acidic group COO(-) and when several glycine molecules are present, they form H-bond chains among them. Comparison between experiments and predictions suggests that a possible way to improve the theoretical model would require the introduction of aliphatic chains or a polycyclic aromatic core. The lack of previous models to study the interaction of amino-acids with HAC surfaces provides a motivation for this work. PMID:26456640

  8. 75 FR 62141 - Glycine From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... glycine from China (60 FR 16116). Following first five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission... from China (65 FR 45752). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission, effective... glycine from China (70 FR 69316). The Commission is now conducting a third review to determine...

  9. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  10. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  11. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  12. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glycine. 172.812 Section 172.812 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.812 Glycine. The...

  13. Dissociation of gaseous zwitterion glycine-betaine by slow electrons.

    PubMed

    Kopyra, J; Abdoul-Carime, H

    2010-05-28

    In this work, we investigate dissociation processes induced by low-energy electrons to gas phase N,N,N-trimethylglycine [glycine-betaine, (CH(3))(3)N(+)CH(2)COO(-)] molecules. Glycine-betaine represents a model system for zwitterions. All negative fragments are observed to be produced only at subelectronic excitation energies (<4 eV). With the exception of the loss of a neutral H atom that could arise from any C[Single Bond]H bond breaking, we tentatively suggest that the zwitterion dissociates exclusively from the fragmentation of the cation site of the molecule, subsequent to the attachment of the excess electron. Within the context of radiation induced damage to biological systems, the present findings contribute to a more complete description of the fragmentation mechanism occurring to amino acids, peptides, and proteins since they adopt usually a zwitterion structure. PMID:20515090

  14. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. 13C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using 3H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  15. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. (13)C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using (3)H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  16. Solubility calculations of branched and linear amino acids using lattice cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischlschweiger, Michael; Enders, Sabine; Zeiner, Tim

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the activity coefficients and the solubility of amino acids in water were calculated using the lattice cluster theory (LCT) combined with the extended chemical association lattice model allowing self-association as well as cross-association. This permits the study of the influence of the amino acids structure on the thermodynamic properties for the first time. By the used model, the activity coefficient and solubilities of the investigated fourteen amino acids (glycine, alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid, dl-valine, dl-threonine, dl-methionine, l-leucine, l-glutamic acid, l-proline, hydroxyproline, histidine, l-arginine, α-amino valeric acid) could be described in good accordance with experimental data. In the case of different α-amino acids, but different hydrocarbon chains, the same interaction energy parameter can be used within the LCT. All studied amino acids could be modelled using the same parameter for the description of the amino acid association properties. The formed cross-associates contain more amino acids than expressed by the overall mole fraction of the solution. Moreover, the composition of the cross-associates depends on temperature, where the amount of amino acids increases with increasing temperature.

  17. Histidines, histamines and imidazoles as glycosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Field, R A; Haines, A H; Chrystal, E J; Luszniak, M C

    1991-01-01

    This present study reports the ability of a range of derivatives of L-histidine, histamine and imidazole to act as inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase, yeast alpha-glucosidase and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The addition of a hydrophobic group to the basic imidazole nucleus greatly enhances binding to both the alpha- and beta-glucosidases. L-Histidine (beta-naphthylamide (Ki 17 microM) is a potent competitive inhibitor of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase as is omega-N-acetylhistamine (K1 35 microM), which inhibits the sweet-almond beta-glucosidase at least 700 times more strongly than either yeast alpha-glucosidase or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, and suggests potential for the development of selective reversible beta-glucosidase inhibitors. A range of hydrophobic omega-N-acylhistamines were synthesized and shown to be among the most potent inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase reported to date. PMID:2012615

  18. Mechanism of regulation of receptor histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Hornig, Nora; Hulko, Michael; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2012-01-11

    Bacterial transmembrane receptors regulate an intracellular catalytic output in response to extracellular sensory input. To investigate the conformational changes that relay the regulatory signal, we have studied the HAMP domain, a ubiquitous intracellular module connecting input to output domains. HAMP forms a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil, and rational substitutions in our model domain (Af1503 HAMP) induce a transition in its interhelical packing, characterized by axial rotation of all four helices (the gearbox signaling model). We now illustrate how these conformational changes are propagated to a downstream domain by fusing Af1503 HAMP variants to the DHp domain of EnvZ, a bacterial histidine kinase. Structures of wild-type and mutant constructs are correlated with ligand response in vivo, clearly associating them with distinct signaling states. We propose that altered recognition of the catalytic domain by DHp, rather than a shift in position of the phospho-accepting histidine, forms the basis for regulation of kinase activity. PMID:22244755

  19. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1375 Histidine test system. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1375 Histidine test system. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1375 Histidine test system. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1375 Histidine test system. (a) Identification....

  3. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  4. High-performance liquid chromatographic method for rapid and highly sensitive determination of histidine using postcolumn fluorescence detection with o-phthaldialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Tateda, N; Matsuhisa, K; Hasebe, K; Kitajima, N; Miura, T

    1998-11-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the rapid and sensitive determination of histidine. The method is based on separation by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography followed by highly selective fluorescence derivatization of histidine with o-phthaldialdehyde. A linear calibration curve was obtained over the range of 0.25-200 pmol per injection (10 microl) with the coefficient of variation of 0.9% at 2 pmol (n=10) and with the detection limit (SIN=8) of 25 fmol. The method was applicable to the assay of histidine in human serum. Serum histidine values obtained by the present method were in good agreement with values obtained with an amino acid analyzer. PMID:9840433

  5. Phytoremediation of mixed-contaminated soil using the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum: evidence of histidine as a measure of phytoextractable nickel.

    PubMed

    Singer, Andrew C; Bell, Thomas; Heywood, Chloe A; Smith, J A C; Thompson, Ian P

    2007-05-01

    In this study we examine the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the ability of the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum to phytoextract nickel from co-contaminated soil. Planted and unplanted mesocosms containing the contaminated soils were repeatedly amended with sorbitan trioleate, salicylic acid and histidine in various combinations to enhance the degradation of two PAHs (phenanthrene and chrysene) and increase nickel phytoextraction. Plant growth was negatively affected by PAHs; however, there was no significant effect on the phytoextraction of Ni per unit biomass of shoot. Exogenous histidine did not increase nickel phytoextraction, but the histidine-extractable fraction of soil nickel showed a high correlation with phytoextractable nickel. These results indicate that Alyssum lesbiacum might be effective in phytoextracting nickel from marginally PAH-contaminated soils. In addition, we provide evidence for the broader applicability of histidine for quantifying and predicting Ni phytoavailability in soils. PMID:17084494

  6. Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired Redox Mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Gary F.; Hambourger, Michael; Kodis, Gerdenis; Michl, Weston; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.

    2010-11-18

    The conversion of tyrosine to the corresponding tyrosyl radical in photosytem II (PSII) is an example of proton-coupled electron transfer. Although the tyrosine moiety (TyrZ) is known to function as a redox mediator between the photo-oxidized primary donor (P680 •+) and the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex, the protonation states involved in the course of the reaction remain an active area of investigation. Herein, we report on the optical, structural, and electrochemical properties of tyrosine-histidine constructs, which model the function of their naturally occurring counterparts in PSII. Electrochemical studies show that the phenoxyl/phenol couple of the model is chemically reversible and thermodynamically capable of water oxidation. Studies under acidic and basic conditions provide clear evidence that an ionizable proton controls the electrochemical potential of the tyrosine-histidine mimic and that an exogenous base or acid can be used to generate a low-potential or high-potential mediator, respectively. The phenoxyl/phenoxide couple associated with the low-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of water oxidation, whereas the relay associated with the high-potential mediator is thermodynamically incapable of reducing an attached photoexcited porphyrin. These studies provide insight regarding the mechanistic role of the tyrosine-histidine complex in water oxidation and strategies for making use of hydrogen bonds to affect the coupling between proton and electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  7. The pathways for the removal of acrylamide in model systems using glycine based on the identification of reaction products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Chen, Fang; Man, Yong; Dong, Jing; Hu, Xiaosong

    2011-09-15

    The reaction between acrylamide and glycine was studied in the aqueous model system heated at 150°C. The main reaction products were identified as C5H10N2O3, C8H15N3O4, C7H12N2O5 and C10H17N3O6 using HPLC-MS/MS, IT-TOF and NMR. Both of the critical intermediates were identified as glyoxylic acid and iminodiacetic acid. The pathways for the removal of acrylamide by glycine were proposed as the Michael addition between acrylamide and glycine with or without the initial oxidation of glycine. The changes in the contents of reactants and products provided quantitative evidence for the above pathways. The addition products between acrylamide and other 14 amino acids were identified by HPLC-MS/MS also. PMID:25212154

  8. Implication of citrate, malate and histidine in the accumulation and transport of nickel in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Amari, Taoufik; Lutts, Stanley; Taamali, Manel; Lucchini, Giorgio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2016-04-01

    Citrate, malate and histidine have been involved in many processes including metal tolerance and accumulation in plants. These molecules have been frequently reported to be the potential nickel chelators, which most likely facilitate metal transport through xylem. In this context, we assess here, the relationship between organics acids and histidine content and nickel accumulation in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea grown in hydroponic media added with 25, 50 and 100 µM NiCl2. Results showed that M. crystallinum is relatively more tolerant to Ni toxicity than B. juncea. For both species, xylem transport rate of Ni increased with increasing Ni supply. A positive correlation was established between nickel and citrate concentrations in the xylem sap. In the shoot of B. juncea, citric and malic acids concentrations were significantly higher than in the shoot of M. crystallinum. Also, the shoots and roots of B. juncea accumulated much more histidine. In contrast, a higher root citrate concentration was observed in M. crystallinum. These findings suggest a specific involvement of malic and citric acid in Ni translocation and accumulation in M. crystallinum and B. juncea. The high citrate and histidine accumulation especially at 100µM NiCl2, in the roots of M. crystallinum might be among the important factors associated with the tolerance of this halophyte to toxic Ni levels. PMID:26745003

  9. pH-Sensitive Poly(histidine methacrylamide).

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifeng; Wu, Haiyan; Lee, Chen-Jung; Lei, Xia; Zhe, Jiang; Xu, Fujian; Cheng, Fang; Cheng, Gang

    2016-06-28

    This research reports a synthetic amino acid based zwitterionic poly(histidine methacrylamide) (PHisMA), which possesses switchability among zwitterionic, anionic, and cationic states, pH-dependent antifouling properties, and chelation capability to multivalent metal ions. The PHisMA polymer brush surface shows good antifouling properties to resist protein adsorption and bacterial attachment in its zwitterionic state at pH 5. This study also demonstrates that the solution acidity significantly affects the mechanical properties of PHisMA hydrogels. PHisMA hydrogels show higher viscoelastic properties and lower swelling ratios in the zwitterionic state at pH 4 and pH 5, compared to higher or lower pH conditions. It was discovered that PHisMA can chelate multivalent metal ions, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Fe(3+). This study provides us a better understanding of structure-property relationships of switchable zwitterionic polymers. PHisMA can potentially be adapted for a broad range of applications including wound care, water treatment, bioseparation, coating, drug and gene delivery carriers, etc. PMID:27310924

  10. Histidine kinase activity in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, H.R.; Pesis, K. Wei, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Nuclei of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, contain a kinase that specifically phosphorylates the 1-nitrogen of histidine-75 of histone H4, in vitro. Phosphohistidine is alkali stable and acid labile. Similar alkali stable phosphorylation has been observed with beef heart extracts and S-100 extracts from S. cerevisiae. The activity may be similar to that previously reported by R.A. Smith and his colleagues in several mammalian tissues. They have begun a search for nuclear proteins that contain phosphohistidine. Cultures of Physarum were grown in the presence of /sup 32/P-phosphate using several different labeling protocols. Labeled nuclear proteins were fractionated on a Superose-12 column. Alkali stable phosphate label eluted close to the position of histone H1, although it was not on H1 itself. No alkali stable phosphate eluted at the position of histone H4, which was obtained in high yield by this procedure. The absence of alkali-stable phosphorylation of histone H4 was confirmed by gel electrophoresis of the crude nuclear proteins. The fraction containing alkali-stable phosphate was shown to contain phosphohistidine by amino acid analysis of a total alkaline hydrolysate. They conclude that Physarum nuclei possess at least one protein that contains phosphohistidine in vivo and that histone H4 does not contain phosphohistidine in this system.

  11. Modulation of brain opioid receptors by zinc and histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hanissian, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of zinc and several trace elements was studied on the binding of the opioid receptor antagonist ({sup 3}H)-naloxone and the agonists ({sup 3}H)-DAGO, ({sup 3}H)-DSTLE, and ({sup 3}H)-EKC, specific for the mu, delta and kappa receptors, respectively, in several areas of the rat brain. Physiological concentrations of zinc were inhibitory to the binding of naloxone, DAGO, and EKC, whereas delta receptors were insensitive to this inhibition. Copper, cadmium, and mercury also inhibited the binding of all the ligands studied to their receptors. Histidine was most effective in preventing the inhibitory effects of zinc and copper, whereas it was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibit was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibition caused by mercury. Its metabolites histamine and imidazoleacetic acid, and also citrate were ineffective. Magnesium and manganese were stimulatory to opioid receptor binding, whereas cobalt and nickel had dual effects. Concentrations of zinc less that its IC{sub 50} totally prevented the stimulatory effects of magnesium and manganese on the mu and delta receptors on which zinc alone had no effects. The reducing reagents dithiothreitol and B-mercaptoethanol partially protected against zinc inhibition, and the oxidizing reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid even potentiated the inhibitory effects of zinc on DSTLE and DAGO binding, although to different extents.

  12. Insufficient intake of L-histidine reduces brain histamine and causes anxiety-like behaviors in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Sugita, Mayu; Naganuma, Fumito; Iida, Tomomitsu; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb; Harada, Ryuichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    L-histidine is one of the essential amino acids for humans, and it plays a critical role as a component of proteins. L-histidine is also important as a precursor of histamine. Brain histamine is synthesized from L-histidine in the presence of histidine decarboxylase, which is expressed in histamine neurons. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the importance of dietary L-histidine as a precursor of brain histamine and the histaminergic nervous system. C57BL/6J male mice at 8 wk of age were assigned to 2 different diets for at least 2 wk: the control (Con) diet (5.08 g L-histidine/kg diet) or the low L-histidine diet (LHD) (1.28 g L-histidine/kg diet). We measured the histamine concentration in the brain areas of Con diet-fed mice (Con group) and LHD-fed mice (LHD group). The histamine concentration was significantly lower in the LHD group [Con group vs. LHD group: histamine in cortex (means ± SEs): 13.9 ± 1.25 vs. 9.36 ± 0.549 ng/g tissue; P = 0.002]. Our in vivo microdialysis assays revealed that histamine release stimulated by high K(+) from the hypothalamus in the LHD group was 60% of that in the Con group (P = 0.012). However, the concentrations of other monoamines and their metabolites were not changed by the LHD. The open-field tests showed that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the central zone (87.6 ± 14.1 vs. 50.0 ± 6.03 s/10 min; P = 0.019), and the light/dark box tests demonstrated that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the light box (198 ± 8.19 vs. 162 ± 14.1 s/10 min; P = 0.048), suggesting that the LHD induced anxiety-like behaviors. However, locomotor activity, memory functions, and social interaction did not differ between the 2 groups. The results of the present study demonstrated that insufficient intake of histidine reduced the brain histamine content, leading to anxiety-like behaviors in the mice. PMID:25056690

  13. Effects of pH and surface pressure on morphology of glycine crystals formed beneath the phospholipid Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ying-Di; Xiao, Fei; Zhang, Ren-Jie; Li, Hong-Ying; Huang, Wei; Feng, Xu-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2005-11-01

    Ordered molecular monolayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were used as templates to induce the nucleation and growth of glycine crystals. It was found that α-glycine crystals were formed under the DPPC monolayers regardless of pH values of the aqueous supersaturated glycine solutions. The morphologies and orientations of the glycine crystals varied with pH of the solutions and surface pressures of the monolayers. When acidic and neutral aqueous supersaturated glycine solutions were used as subphases, the glycine crystals are plate-like habit with an elongated (0 1 0) crystal face preferentially oriented parallel to the plane of the monolayers; when basic solutions were used, the crystals are pyramidal habit. At surface pressures below 25 mN/m at the beginning of crystallization, plate-like α-glycine crystals were formed from the neutral solution; while at higher surface pressures, such as 35 and 40 mN/m, prismatic crystals were formed. The morphology of the glycine crystals can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions.

  14. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of lipoxygenase 2 (lox-2) isozyme from Indian soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] cv. Pusa 16.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Somnath; Sahana, Nandita; Rajarani, A P; Santha, I M

    2013-02-01

    The consumption of soybean is limited worldwide, despite being highly nutritious and having versatile uses due to the presence of grassy, beany and rancid off-flavour. The lipoxygenase-2 (LOX-2) is the key enzyme responsible for the production of volatiles released from the beans, which cause off-flavour in soy products. In this study, a 2.6-kb full-length lox2 gene (NCBI accession No. JQ929619.1) was isolated and cloned from soybean (Glycine max L. Merril) cv. Pusa 16. The cloned cDNA sequence of lox2 gene showed the complete open reading frame (ORF) of a putative protein, having 866 amino acids with start codon present at the foremost position and stop codon at the end. The theoretical pI of predicted protein was 6.22. A hydropathy profile calculated from the amino acid sequence resembled those of dicot LOXs, suggesting conservation of the secondary structure of these enzymes. The LOX-2 showed conserved six Histidine residues within a span of 520 to 590 amino acid position, a signature element for the enzyme activity. The lox2 gene was expressed using pET vector in prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant LOX-2 protein was purified after induction with IPTG (isopentyl thiogalactoside). A prominent band of 97 kDa was observed, when affinity purified fractions were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The purified protein was characterized for the enzyme activity, substrate preference and K(m). Inhibitor studies with natural antioxidant molecules present in soybean revealed alpha-tocopherol to be the most effective inhibitor of LOX-2. PMID:23617075

  15. Linear short histidine and cysteine modified arginine peptides constitute a potential class of DNA delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Mann, Anita; Shukla, Vasundhara; Khanduri, Richa; Dabral, Spoorti; Singh, Harpal; Ganguli, Munia

    2014-03-01

    The success of gene therapy relies on the development of safe and efficient multifunctional carriers of nucleic acids that can overcome extra- and intracellular barriers, protect the nucleic acid and mediate its release at the desired site allowing gene expression. Peptides bear unique properties that are indispensable for any carrier, e.g., they can mediate DNA condensation, cellular targeting, membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear localization. In an effort to design a multifunctional peptide, we have modified an arginine homopeptide R16 by replacement of seven arginines with histidines and addition of one cysteine at each end respectively to impart endosomal escape property while maintaining the DNA condensation and release balance. Addition of histidines imparts endosomal escape property to arginine homopeptide, but their arrangement with respect to arginines is more critical in controlling DNA condensation, release and transfection efficiency. Intriguingly, R5H7R4 peptide where charge/arginine is distributed in blocks is preferred for strong condensation while more efficient transfection is seen in the variants R9H7 and H4R9H3, which exhibit weak condensation and strong release. Addition of cysteine to each of these peptides further fine-tuned the condensation-release balance without application of any oxidative procedure unlike other similar systems reported in the literature. This resulted in a large increase in the transfection efficiency in all of the histidine modified peptides irrespective of the arginine and histidine positions. This series of multifunctional peptides shows comparable transfection efficiency to commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine 2000 at low charge ratios, with simple preparative procedure and exhibits much less toxicity. PMID:24476132

  16. Microbial Community Responses to Glycine Addition in Kansas Prairie Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottos, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; White, R. A., III; Brislawn, C.; Fansler, S.; Kim, Y. M.; Metz, T. O.; McCue, L. A.; Jansson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are rapidly expanding our abilities to unravel aspects of microbial community structure and function in complex systems like soil; however, characterizing the highly diverse communities is problematic, due primarily to challenges in data analysis. To tackle this problem, we aimed to constrain the microbial diversity in a soil by enriching for particular functional groups within a community through addition of "trigger substrates". Such trigger substrates, characterized by low molecular weight, readily soluble and diffusible in soil solution, representative of soil organic matter derivatives, would also be rapidly degradable. A relatively small energy investment to maintain the cell in a state of metabolic alertness for such substrates would be a better evolutionary strategy and presumably select for a cohort of microorganisms with the energetics and cellular machinery for utilization and growth. We chose glycine, a free amino acid (AA) known to have short turnover times (in the range of hours) in soil. As such, AAs are a good source of nitrogen and easily degradable, and can serve as building blocks for microbial proteins and other biomass components. We hypothesized that the addition of glycine as a trigger substrate will decrease microbial diversity and evenness, as taxa capable of metabolizing it are enriched in relation to those that are not. We tested this hypothesis by incubating three Kansas native prairie soils with glycine for 24 hours at 21 degree Celsius, and measured community level responses by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics. Preliminary evaluation of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed minor changes in bacterial community composition in response to glycine addition. We will also present data on functional gene abundance and expression. The results of these analyses will be useful in designing sequencing strategies aimed at dissecting and deciphering complex microbial communities.

  17. Glycine improves biochemical and biomechanical properties following inflammation of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; De Oliveira, Letícia Prado; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; Dos Santos De Almeida, Marcos; Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra Gomes; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2015-03-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon is a clinical problem that motivates the scientific community to search for treatments that assist in restoring its functional properties. Glycine has broad biological effects, acting as a modulator of the inflammatory cascade, and is the predominant amino acid in collagen. A 5% glycine diet provided beneficial effects against toxicity and inflammation since glycine may restructure the collagen molecules faster due to its broad anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose was analyze the effects of a 5% glycine diet in rats as a treatment for the inflammatory process. The experimental groups were as follows: C (control group), G1 and G3 (inflammatory group), and G2 and G4 (glycine+inflammatory group). G1 and G2 were euthanized 8 days following injury, and G3 and G4 were euthanized 22 days following injury. The concentrations of hydroxyproline, non-collagenous proteins, and glycosaminoglycans, as well as the activity of MMP-2 and -9 were analyzed. Biomechanical and morphological tests were employed. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycans were found in G4 and an increased activity of MMP-2 was found in G2. Higher birefringence was noted in group G2. The biomechanical results indicated that the tendon was more resistant to loading to rupture upon treatment with a glycine diet in group G4. Glycine induced the synthesis of important components of the tendon. A rapid remodeling was noted when compared with the inflamed-only groups. These data suggest that glycine may be a beneficial supplement for individuals with inflammation of the Achilles tendon. PMID:25156668

  18. Child Stunting is Associated with Low Circulating Essential Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Shardell, Michelle; Sakr Ashour, Fayrouz A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Trehan, Indi; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stunting affects about one-quarter of children under five worldwide. The pathogenesis of stunting is poorly understood. Nutritional interventions have had only modest effects in reducing stunting. We hypothesized that insufficiency in essential amino acids may be limiting the linear growth of children. Methods We used a targeted metabolomics approach to measure serum amino acids, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and other metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 313 children, aged 12–59 months, from rural Malawi. Children underwent anthropometry. Findings Sixty-two percent of the children were stunted. Children with stunting had lower serum concentrations of all nine essential amino acids (tryptophan, isoleucine, leucine, valine, methionine, threonine, histidine, phenylalanine, lysine) compared with nonstunted children (p < 0.01). In addition, stunted children had significantly lower serum concentrations of conditionally essential amino acids (arginine, glycine, glutamine), non-essential amino acids (asparagine, glutamate, serine), and six different sphingolipids compared with nonstunted children. Stunting was also associated with alterations in serum glycerophospholipid concentrations. Interpretation Our findings support the idea that children with a high risk of stunting may not be receiving an adequate dietary intake of essential amino acids and choline, an essential nutrient for the synthesis of sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids. PMID:27211567

  19. Essential histidine pairs indicate conserved haem binding in epsilonproteobacterial cytochrome c haem lyases

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Melanie; Scheithauer, Juliane; Kranz, Robert G.; Simon, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial cytochrome c maturation occurs at the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane, requires transport of haem b across the membrane, and depends on membrane-bound cytochrome c haem lyase (CCHL), an enzyme that catalyses covalent attachment of haem b to apocytochrome c. Epsilonproteobacteria such as Wolinella succinogenes use the cytochrome c biogenesis system II and contain unusually large CCHL proteins of about 900 amino acid residues that appear to be fusions of the CcsB and CcsA proteins found in other bacteria. CcsBA-type CCHLs have been proposed to act as haem transporters that contain two haem b coordination sites located at different sides of the membrane and formed by histidine pairs. W. succinogenes cells contain three CcsBA-type CCHL isoenzymes (NrfI, CcsA1 and CcsA2) that are known to differ in their specificity for apocytochromes and apparently recognize different haem c binding motifs such as CX2CH (by CcsA2), CX2CK (by NrfI) and CX15CH (by CcsA1). In this study, conserved histidine residues were individually replaced by alanine in each of the W. succinogenes CCHLs. Characterization of NrfI and CcsA1 variants in W. succinogenes demonstrated that a set of four histidines is essential for maturing the dedicated multihaem cytochromes c NrfA and MccA, respectively. The function of W. succinogenes CcsA2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was also found to depend on each of these four conserved histidine residues. The presence of imidazole in the growth medium of both W. succinogenes and E. coli rescued the cytochrome c biogenesis activity of most histidine variants, albeit to different extents, thereby implying the presence of two functionally distinct histidine pairs in each CCHL. The data support a model in which two conserved haem b binding sites are involved in haem transport catalysed by CcsBA-type CCHLs. PMID:20705660

  20. GABA and glycine in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    GABA and glycine are major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the CNS and act on receptors coupled to chloride channels. During early developmental periods, both GABA and glycine depolarize membrane potentials due to the relatively high intracellular Cl(-) concentration. Therefore, they can act as excitatory neurotransmitters. GABA and glycine are involved in spontaneous neural network activities in the immature CNS such as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in neonatal hippocampal neurons, which are generated by the synchronous activity of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal neurons. GDPs and GDP-like activities in the developing brains are thought to be important for the activity-dependent functiogenesis through Ca(2+) influx and/or other intracellular signaling pathways activated by depolarization or stimulation of metabotropic receptors. However, if GABA and glycine do not shift from excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmitters at the birth and in maturation, it may result in neural disorders including autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26951057

  1. A Didactic Experience of Statistical Analysis for the Determination of Glycine in a Nonaqueous Medium Using ANOVA and a Computer Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Delgado, M. J.; Larrea-Tarruella, L.

    2004-01-01

    The back-titration methods are compared statistically to establish glycine in a nonaqueous medium of acetic acid. Important variations in the mean values of glycine are observed due to the interaction effects between the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique and a statistical study through a computer software.

  2. Standard thermodynamic functions of complex formation between Cu2+ and glycine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Metlin, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    Heat effects of the interaction of copper(II) solutions with aminoacetic acid (glycine) are measured by the direct calorimetry at 298.15 K and ionic strengths of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 against a background of potassium nitrate. Standard enthalpy values for reactions of the formation of aminoacetic acid copper complexes in aqueous solutions are obtained using an equation with a single individual parameter by extrapolating it to zero ionic strength. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of complex formation in the Cu2+-glycine system are calculated. It is shown that glycine-like coordination is most likely in Cu(II) complexes with L-asparagine, L-glutamine, and L-valine.

  3. N-[[(Mercaptoacetyl)amino]benzoyl]glycines as mucolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Martin, T A; Comer, W T

    1985-07-01

    m- and p-aminobenzoic acids were converted to the title compounds by sequential use of ClCH2COCl, SOCl2, glycine methyl or ethyl ester, AcSK, and hydrolysis. The title compounds and a number of salts were compared for mucolytic activity, toxicity, stability, and hygroscopicity. When compared to N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), the compounds exhibit several times the in vitro mucolytic activity of NAC on a molar basis. The most promising candidate appears to be the sodium salt 3.5H2O 2 of the meta series. PMID:4009614

  4. Survivability and reactivity of glycine and alanine in early oceans: effects of meteorite impacts.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Yuhei; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oceans might have contained abundant amino acids, and were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. It is so far unknown how meteorite impacts affected amino acids in the early oceans. Impact experiments were performed under the conditions where glycine was synthesized from carbon, ammonia, and water, using aqueous solutions containing (13)C-labeled glycine and alanine. Selected amino acids and amines in samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In particular, the (13)C-labeled reaction products were analyzed to distinguish between run products and contaminants. The results revealed that both amino acids survived partially in the early ocean through meteorite impacts, that part of glycine changed into alanine, and that large amounts of methylamine and ethylamine were formed. Fast decarboxylation was confirmed to occur during such impact processes. Furthermore, the formation of n-butylamine, detected only in the samples recovered from the solutions with additional nitrogen and carbon sources of ammonia and benzene, suggests that chemical reactions to form new biomolecules can proceed through marine impacts. Methylamine and ethylamine from glycine and alanine increased considerably in the presence of hematite rather than olivine under similar impact conditions. These results also suggest that amino acids present in early oceans can contribute further to impact-induced reactions, implying that impact energy plays a potential role in the prebiotic formation of various biomolecules, although the reactions are complicated and depend upon the chemical environments as well. PMID:26369758

  5. A rapid and ultrasensitive SERRS assay for histidine and tyrosine based on azo coupling.

    PubMed

    Sui, Huimin; Wang, Yue; Yu, Zhi; Cong, Qian; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A simple and highly sensitive surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS)-based approach coupled with azo coupling reaction has been put forward for quantitative analysis of histidine and tyrosine. The SERRS-based assay is simple and rapid by mixing the azo reaction products with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for measurements within 2min. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method are as low as 4.33×10(-11) and 8.80×10(-11)M for histidine and tyrosine, respectively. Moreover, the SERRS fingerprint information specific to corresponding amino acids guarantees the selective detection for the target histidine and tyrosine. The results from serum indicated the potential application of the proposed approach into biological samples. Compared with the methods ever reported, the main advantages of this methodology are simpleness, rapidity without time-consuming separation or pretreatment steps, high sensitivity, selectivity and the potential for determination of other molecules containing imidazole or phenol groups. PMID:27474300

  6. Tagging the expressed protein with 6 histidines: rapid cloning of an amplicon with three options.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manika Indrajit; Jain, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    We report the designing of three expression vectors that can be used for rapid cloning of any blunt-end DNA segment. Only a single set of oligonucleotides are required to perform the amplification of the target DNA and its cloning in all three vectors simultaneously. The DNA thus cloned can express a protein either with or without a hexa-histidine tag depending upon the vector used. The expression occurs from T7 promoter when transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Two of the three plasmids have been designed to provide the expressed protein with either N- or C-terminus 6 histidine amino acids in tandem. The third plasmid, however, does not add any tag to the expressed protein. The cloning is achieved quickly with the requirement of phosphorylation of PCR product without any restriction digestion. Additionally, the generated clones can be confirmed with a single step PCR reaction carried out from bacterial colonies (generally termed as "colony PCR"). We show the cloning, expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as proof-of-concept. Additionally, we also show the cloning and expression of four sigma factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis further demonstrating the utility of the designed plasmids. We strongly believe that the vectors and the strategy that we have developed will facilitate the rapid cloning and expression of any gene in E. coli BL21(DE3) with or without a hexa-histidine tag. PMID:23691118

  7. Folate mediated histidine derivative of quaternised chitosan as a gene delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Morris, Viola B; Sharma, Chandra P

    2010-04-15

    Folate targeted gene delivery vectors showed enhanced accumulation in folate receptor expressing tumor model. In the present work, the water solubility and transfection efficiency of chitosans were improved by modifying the depolymerised trimethylated chitosans with histidine moiety. Folate mediated targeting was induced by conjugating poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PEG-FA) on histidine modified chitosan polymer having low molecular weight of 15 kDa and high degree of quaternisation (HTFP15-H). The zeta potential and size of the HTFP15-H/pDNA nanoparticles were determined using dynamic light scattering technique and the results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The morphology of the nanoparticles was found spherical in shape having core-shell nanostructure. The HTFP15-H derivative found to buffer in the pH range from 10 to 4. The blood compatibility in terms of percentage hemolysis, erythrocyte aggregation and also by platelet activation was found to be significantly improved compared to the control vector PEI. At a concentration of 10 microg the derivative promote the cell growth up to 139% compared to control at normal cell growing conditions. The transfection efficiency in KB cell line, which over expresses the folate receptor (FR) in presence of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) was also found to be comparable to the control. Moreover the enhanced cellular and nuclear uptake due to the conjugation of both folic acid and histidine makes it a potential vector for gene delivery applications. PMID:20117198

  8. Cu(2+) modulated silver nanoclusters as an on-off-on fluorescence probe for the selective detection of L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuyue; Yao, Tianming; Zhu, Ying; Shi, Shuo

    2015-04-15

    In the present study, a new strategy based on Cu(2+) mediated DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-Ag NCs) was developed, as a label-free, on-off-on fluorescent probe for the detection of l-histidine. Eight synthesized DNA oligonucleotides (D1-D8) were experimentally tested, and D5-Ag NCs was finally selected for l-histidine detection due to its best fluorescent properties. The fluorescence emission of D5-Ag NCs could be quenched by Cu(2+) via electron or energy transfer. Upon addition of l-histidine, the chelation between Cu(2+) and the imidazole group of l-histidine leads to Cu(2+) liberation from D5-Ag NCs, and subsequently results in a dramatic fluorescence enhancement of the probe. The method displayed a good selectivity toward l-histidine over all the other amino acids, with a linear relationship in the range of 0.20-80μM, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.3nM. The strategy was also successfully applied to detect l-histidine in diluted human urine, exhibiting great opportunities for practical application in biological system. PMID:25460889

  9. Recyclable decoration of amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with Ni(2+) for determination of histidine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Chengbin; Wu, Li; Hou, Xiandeng; Lv, Yi

    2014-01-01

    It is critically important to accurately determine histidine since it is an indicator for many diseases when at an abnormal level. Here, an inexpensive and simple method using an amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle-based Ni(2+)-histidine affinity pair system was developed for highly sensitive and selective detection of histidine in human urine by photochemical vapor generation atomic spectrometry. Ni(2+) was first bound to the amine groups of the amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and then liberated to solution via the highly specific interaction between the histidine and Ni(2+) in the presence of histidine. The liberated histidine-Ni(2+) complex was exposed to UV irradiation in the presence of formic acid to form gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl, which was separated from the sample matrix and determined by atomic absorption/fluorescence spectrometry. Compared to other methods, this approach promises high sensitivity, simplicity in design, and convenient operation. The need for organic solvents, enzymatic reactions, separation processes, chemical modification, expensive instrumentations, and sophisticated and complicated pretreatment is minimized with this strategy. A limit of detection of 1 nM was obtained and provided tens-to-hundreds of fold improvements over that achieved with conventional methods. The protocol was evaluated by analysis of several urine samples with good recoveries and showed great potential for practical application. PMID:24286112

  10. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan. PMID:16415214

  11. Silver adducts of four-branched histidine rich peptides exhibit synergistic antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Woodle, Martin C; Liu, Yijia; Mixson, A James

    2016-09-01

    Previously, a four branched histidine-lysine rich peptide, H3K4b, was shown to demonstrate selective antifungal activity with minimal antibacterial activity. Due to the potential breakdown from proteases, H3K4b was further evaluated in the current study by varying the D- and l-amino acid content in its branches. Whereas analogues of H3K4b that selectively replaced l-amino acids (H3k4b, h3K4b) had improved antifungal activity, the all d-amino acid analogue, h3k4b, had reduced activity, suggesting that partial breakdown of the peptide may be necessary. Moreover, because histidines form coordination bonds with the silver ion, we examined whether silver adducts can be formed with these branched histidine-lysine peptides, which may improve antifungal activity. For Candida albicans, the silver adduct of h3K4b or H3k4b reduced the MIC compared to peptide and silver ions alone by 4- and 5-fold, respectively. For Aspergillus fumigatus, the silver adducts showed even greater enhancement of activity. Although the silver adducts of H3k4b or h3K4b showed synergistic activity, the silver adduct with the all l-amino acid H3K4b surprisingly showed the greatest synergistic and growth inhibition of A. fumigatus: the silver adduct of H3K4b reduced the MIC compared to the peptide and silver ions alone by 30- and 26-fold, respectively. Consistent with these antifungal efficacy results, marked increases in free oxygen radicals were produced with the H3K4b and silver combination. These studies suggest that there is a balance between stability and breakdown for optimal antifungal activity of the peptide alone and for the peptide-silver adduct. PMID:27387239

  12. protonation behavior of histidine during HSF1 activation by physiological acidification.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Park, Jang-Su

    2015-06-01

    The expression of eukaryotic molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins, HSPs) is triggered in response to a wide range of environmental stresses, including: heat shock, hydrogen peroxide, heavy metal, low-pH, or virus infection. Biochemical and genetic studies have clearly shown the fundamental roles of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in stress-inducible HSP gene expression, resistance to stress-induced cell death, carcinogenesis, and other biological phenomena. Previous studies show that acidic pH changes within the physiological range directly activate the HSF1 function in vitro. However, the detailed mechanism is unclear. Though computational pKa-predications of the amino acid side-chain, acidic-pH induced protonation of a histidine residue was found to be most-likely involved in this process. The histidine 83 (His83) residue, which could be protonated by mild decrease in pH, causes mild acidic-induced HSF1 activation (including in-vitro trimerization, DNA binding, in-vivo nuclear accumulation, and HSPs expression). His83, which is located in the loop region of the HSF1 DNA binding domain, was suggested to enhance the intermolecular force with Arginine 79, which helps HSF1 form a DNA-binding competent. Therefore, low-pH-induced activation of HSF1 by the protonation of histidine can help us better to understand the HSF1 mechanism and develop more therapeutic applications (particularly in cancer therapy). J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 977-984, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25560907

  13. Utilization of glycine and serine as nitrogen sources in the roots of Zea mays and Chamaegigas intrepidus.

    PubMed

    Hartung, W; Ratcliffe, R G

    2002-12-01

    Glycine and serine are potential sources of nitrogen for the aquatic resurrection plant Chamaegigas intrepidus Dinter in the rock pools that provide its natural habitat. The pathways by which these amino acids might be utilized were investigated by incubating C. intrepidus roots and maize (Zea mays) root tips with [(15)N]glycine, [(15)N]serine and [2-(13)C]glycine. The metabolic fate of the label was followed using in vivo NMR spectroscopy, and the results were consistent with the involvement of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) in the utilization of glycine. In contrast, the labelling patterns provided no evidence for the involvement of serine:glyoxylate aminotransferase in the metabolism of glycine by the root tissues. The key observations were: (i) the release of [(15)N]ammonium during [(15)N]-labelling experiments; and (ii) the detection of a characteristic set of serine isotopomers in the [2-(13)C]glycine experiments. The effects of aminoacetonitrile, amino-oxyacetate, and isonicotinic acid hydrazide, all of which inhibit GDC and SHMT to some extent, and of methionine sulphoximine, which inhibited the reassimilation of the ammonium, supported the conclusion that GDC and SHMT were essential for the metabolism of glycine. C. intrepidus was observed to metabolize serine more readily than the maize root tips and this may be an adaptation to its nitrogen-deficient habitat. Overall, the results support the emerging view that GDC is an essential component of glycine catabolism in non-photosynthetic tissues. PMID:12432023

  14. Amino Acid Compositions of 27 Food Fishes and Their Importance in Clinical Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mahanty, Arabinda; Sankar, T. V.; Chakraborty, Kajal; Rangasamy, Anandan; Paul, Baidyanath; Sarma, Debajit; Mathew, Suseela; Asha, Kurukkan Kunnath; Behera, Bijay; Aftabuddin, Md.; Debnath, Dipesh; Vijayagopal, P.; Sridhar, N.; Akhtar, M. S.; Sahi, Neetu; Mitra, Tandrima; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Das, Debajeet; Das, Pushpita; Vijayan, K. K.; Laxmanan, P. T.; Sharma, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and amino acids are important biomolecules which regulate key metabolic pathways and serve as precursors for synthesis of biologically important substances; moreover, amino acids are building blocks of proteins. Fish is an important dietary source of quality animal proteins and amino acids and play important role in human nutrition. In the present investigation, crude protein content and amino acid compositions of important food fishes from different habitats have been studied. Crude protein content was determined by Kjeldahl method and amino acid composition was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and information on 27 food fishes was generated. The analysis showed that the cold water species are rich in lysine and aspartic acid, marine fishes in leucine, small indigenous fishes in histidine, and the carps and catfishes in glutamic acid and glycine. The enriched nutrition knowledge base would enhance the utility of fish as a source of quality animal proteins and amino acids and aid in their inclusion in dietary counseling and patient guidance for specific nutritional needs. PMID:25379285

  15. Organic foliar Milstop shows efficacy against soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) on soybean (Glycine max)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) has been produced in the United States since 1765. Soybean aphids (Aphis glycines Matsumura) were first detected on soybean in the United States in 2000 and now cause an estimated yield loss of up to US$4.9 billion annually. Organic soybean producers have few insecti...

  16. Conserved Glycine Residues in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Play Essential Roles in Kinase Coupling and On–Off Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Matthew D.; Bass, Randal B.; Mehan, Ryan S.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The aspartate receptor of the bacterial chemotaxis pathway serves as a scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein signaling complex containing the receptor and the cytoplasmic pathway components. Within this complex, the receptor regulates the autophosphorylation activity of histidine kinase CheA, thereby controlling the signals sent to the flagellar motor and the receptor adaptation system. The receptor cytoplasmic domain, which controls the on–off switching of CheA, possesses 14 glycine residues that are highly conserved in related receptors. In principle, these conserved glycines could be required for static turns, bends, or close packing in the cytoplasmic domain, or they could be required for conformational dynamics during receptor on–off switching. To determine which glycines are essential and to probe their functional roles, we have substituted each conserved glycine with both alanine and cysteine, and then measured the effects on receptor function in vivo and in vitro. The results reveal a subset of six glycines which are required for receptor function during cellular chemotaxis. Two of these essential glycines (G388 and G391) are located at a hairpin turn at the distal end of the folded cytoplasmic domain, where they are required for the tertiary fold of the signaling subdomain and for CheA kinase activation. Three other essential glycines (G338, G339, and G437) are located at the border between the adaptation and signaling subdomains, where they play key roles in CheA kinase activation and on–off switching. These three glycines form a ring around the four-helix bundle that comprises the receptor cytoplasmic domain, yielding a novel architectural feature termed a bundle hinge. The final essential glycine (G455) is located in the adaptation subdomain where it is required for on–off switching. Overall, the findings confirm that six of the 14 conserved cytoplasmic glycines are essential for receptor function because they enable helix turns and bends

  17. Isolation, Purification and Characterization of Histidino-Threosidine, a Novel Maillard Reaction Protein Crosslink from Threose, Lysine and Histidine

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhenyu; Nemet, Ina; Shen, Wei; Monnier., Vincent M.

    2007-01-01

    We isolated a novel acid-labile yellow chromophore from the incubation of lysine, histidine and D-threose and identified its chemical structure by one and two-dimensional 1H and DEPT NMR spectroscopy combined with LC-tandem mass spectrometry. This new cross-link exhibits a UV absorbance maximum at 305 nm and a molecular mass of 451 Da. The proposed structure is 2-amino-5-(3-((4-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)-4-(1,2-dihydroxyethyl)-2-formyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)pentatonic acid, a cross-link between lysine and histidine with addition of two threose molecules. It was in part deduced and confirmed through synthesis of the analogous compound from n-butylamine, imidazole and D-threose. We assigned the compound the trivial name histidino-threosidine. Systemic incubation revealed that histidino-threosidine can be formed in low amounts from fructose, glyceraldehyde, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, ascorbic acid, and dehydroascorbic acid, but at a much higher yield with degradation products of ascorbic acid, i.e. threose, erythrose, and erythrulose. Bovine lens protein incubated with 10 and 50 mM threose for two weeks yielded 560 and 2840 pmol/mg histidino-threosidine. Histidino-threosidine is to our knowledge the first Maillard reaction product known to involve histidine in a crosslink. PMID:17466255

  18. Salt effects on ionization equilibria of histidines in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y H; Fitch, C A; Bhattacharya, S; Sarkisian, C J; Lecomte, J T; García-Moreno E, B

    2000-01-01

    The salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in sperm whale and horse myoglobin and in histidine-containing peptides was measured by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Structure-based pK(a) calculations were performed with continuum methods to test their ability to capture the effects of solution conditions on pK(a) values. The measured pK(a) of most histidines, whether in the protein or in model compounds, increased by 0.3 pH units or more between 0.02 M and 1.5 M NaCl. In myoglobin two histidines (His(48) and His(36)) exhibited a shallower dependence than the average, and one (His(113)) showed a steeper dependence. The (1)H-NMR data suggested that the salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in the protein was determined primarily by the preferential stabilization of the charged form of histidine with increasing salt concentrations rather than by screening of electrostatic interactions. The magnitude and salt dependence of interactions between ionizable groups were exaggerated in pK(a) calculations with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method applied to a static structure, even when the protein interior was treated with arbitrarily high dielectric constants. Improvements in continuum methods for calculating salt effects on pK(a) values will require explicit consideration of the salt dependence of model compound pK(a) values used for reference in the calculations. PMID:10969024

  19. Hybrid histidine kinases in pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Defosse, Tatiana A; Sharma, Anupam; Mondal, Alok K; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Calderone, Richard; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Histidine kinases (HK) sense and transduce via phosphorylation events many intra- and extracellular signals in bacteria, archaea, slime moulds and plants. HK are also widespread in the fungal kingdom, but their precise roles in the regulation of physiological processes remain largely obscure. Expanding genomic resources have recently given the opportunity to identify uncharacterised HK family members in yeasts and moulds and now allow proposing a complex classification of Basidiomycota, Ascomycota and lower fungi HK. A growing number of genetic approaches have progressively provided new insight into the role of several groups of HK in prominent fungal pathogens. In particular, a series of studies have revealed that members of group III HK, which occur in the highest number of fungal species and contain a unique N-terminus region consisting of multiple HAMP domain repeats, regulate morphogenesis and virulence in various human, plant and insect pathogenic fungi. This research field is further supported by recent shape-function studies providing clear correlation between structural properties and signalling states in group III HK. Since HK are absent in mammals, these represent interesting fungal target for the discovery of new antifungal drugs. PMID:25560420

  20. Division of labour: how does folate metabolism partition between one-carbon metabolism and amino acid oxidation?

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Margaret E; MacMillan, Luke; Stevens, Jennifer R; Brosnan, John T

    2015-12-01

    One-carbon metabolism is usually represented as having three canonical functions: purine synthesis, thymidylate synthesis and methylation reactions. There is however a fourth major function: the metabolism of some amino acids (serine, glycine, tryptophan and histidine), as well as choline. These substrates can provide cells with more one-carbon groups than they need for these three canonical functions. Therefore, there must be mechanisms for the disposal of these one-carbon groups (when in excess) which maintain the complement of these groups required for the canonical functions. The key enzyme for these mechanisms is 10-formyl-THF (tetrahydrofolate) dehydrogenase (both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic isoforms) which oxidizes the formyl group to CO2 with the attendant reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH and release of THF. In addition to oxidizing the excess of these compounds, this process can reduce substantial quantities of NADP(+) to NADPH. PMID:26567272

  1. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The clinical associations of glycine receptor antibodies have not yet been described fully. We identified prospectively 52 antibody-positive patients and collated their clinical features, investigations and immunotherapy responses. Serum glycine receptor antibody endpoint titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:60 000. In 11 paired samples, serum levels were higher than (n = 10) or equal to (n = 1) cerebrospinal fluid levels; there was intrathecal synthesis of glycine receptor antibodies in each of the six pairs available for detailed study. Four patients also had high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (>1000 U/ml), and one had high voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody (2442 pM). Seven patients with very low titres (<1:50) and unknown or alternative diagnoses were excluded from further study. Three of the remaining 45 patients had newly-identified thymomas and one had a lymphoma. Thirty-three patients were classified as progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus, and two as stiff person syndrome; five had a limbic encephalitis or epileptic encephalopathy, two had brainstem features mainly, two had demyelinating optic neuropathies and one had an unclear diagnosis. Four patients (9%) died during the acute disease, but most showed marked improvement with immunotherapies. At most recent follow-up, (2–7 years, median 3 years, since first antibody detection), the median modified Rankin scale scores (excluding the four deaths) decreased from 5 at maximal severity to 1 (P < 0.0001), but relapses have occurred in five patients and a proportion are on reducing steroids or other maintenance immunotherapies as well as symptomatic treatments. The glycine receptor antibodies activated complement on glycine receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney cells at room temperature, and caused internalization and lysosomal degradation of the glycine receptors at 37°C. Immunoglobulin G antibodies bound to rodent spinal cord and brainstem co-localizing with

  2. Amino Acid Synthesis in Photosynthesizing Spinach Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Peder Olesen; Cornwell, Karen L.; Gee, Sherry L.; Bassham, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated cells from leaves of Spinacia oleracea have been maintained in a state capable of high rates of photosynthetic CO2 fixation for more than 60 hours. The incorporation of 14CO2 under saturating CO2 conditions into carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids, and the effect of ammonia on this incorporation have been studied. Total incorporation, specific radioactivity, and pool size have been determined as a function of time for most of the protein amino acids and for γ-aminobutyric acid. The measurements of specific radio-activities and of the approaches to 14C “saturation” of some amino acids indicate the presence and relative sizes of metabolically active and passive pools of these amino acids. Added ammonia decreased carbon fixation into carbohydrates and increased fixation into carboxylic acids and amino acids. Different amino acids were, however, affected in different and highly specific ways. Ammonia caused large stimulatory effects in incorporation of 14C into glutamine (a factor of 21), aspartate, asparagine, valine, alanine, arginine, and histidine. No effect or slight decreases were seen in glycine, serine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine labeling. In the case of glutamate, 14C labeling decreased, but specific radioactivity increased. The production of labeled γ-aminobutyric acid was virtually stopped by ammonia. The results indicate that added ammonia stimulates the reactions mediated by pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, as seen with other plant systems. The data on the effects of added ammonia on total labeling, pool sizes, and specific radioactivities of several amino acids provides a number of indications about the intracellular sites of principal synthesis from carbon skeletons of these amino acids and the selective nature of effects of increased intracellular ammonia concentration on such synthesis. PMID:16661904

  3. Mutagenesis and heterologous expression in yeast of a plant Delta6-fatty acid desaturase.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, O; Beaudoin, F; Libisch, B; Castel, A; Shewry, P R; Napier, J A

    2001-07-01

    Membrane-bound microsomal fatty acid desaturases are known to have three conserved histidine boxes, comprising a total of up to eight histidine residues. Recently, a number of deviations from this consensus have been reported, with the substitution of a glutamine for the first histidine residue of the third histidine box being present in the so called 'front end' desaturases. These enzymes are also characterized by the presence of a cytochrome b5 domain at the protein N-terminus. Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to probe the functional importance of a number of amino acid residues which comprise the third histidine box of a 'front end' desaturase, the borage Delta6-fatty acid desaturase. This showed that the variant glutamine in the third histidine box is essential for enzyme activity and that histidine is not able to substitute for this residue. PMID:11457919

  4. Kinetic determinants of agonist action at the recombinant human glycine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Trevor M; Schofield, Peter R; McClellan, Annette M L

    2003-01-01

    The amino acids glycine, β-alanine and taurine are all endogenous agonists of the glycine receptor. In this study, a combination of rapid agonist application onto macropatches and steady-state single-channel recordings was used to compare the actions of glycine, β-alanine and taurine upon homomeric α1 human glycine receptors transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. The 10–90 % rise times determined from rapid application of 100 μm of each agonist were indistinguishable, indicating each agonist has a similar association rate. At saturating concentrations (30 mm) the rise time for glycine (0.26 ms) was 1.8-fold faster than that for β-alanine (0.47 ms) and 3.9-fold faster than that for taurine (1.01 ms), indicating clear differences in the maximum opening rate between agonists. The relaxation following rapid removal of agonist was fitted with a single exponential for β-alanine (3.0 ms) and taurine (2.2 ms), and two exponential components for glycine with a weighted mean time constant of 27.1 ms. This was consistent with differences in dissociation rates estimated from analysis of bursts, with taurine > β-alanine > glycine. Exponential fits to the open period distributions gave time constants that did not differ between agonists and the geometric distribution for the number of openings per burst indicated that all three agonists had a significant component of single-opening bursts. Based upon these data, we propose a kinetic scheme with three independent open states, where the opening rates are dependent upon the activating agonist, while the closing rates are an intrinsic characteristic of the receptor. PMID:12679369

  5. Methylammonium methylcarbamate thermal formation in interstellar ice analogs: a glycine salt precursor in protostellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossa, J.-B.; Duvernay, F.; Theulé, P.; Borget, F.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Chiavassa, T.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Analyses of dust cometary grains collected by the Stardust spacecraft have shown the presence of amines and amino acids molecules, and among them glycine (NH{2}CH{2}COOH). We show how the glycine molecule could be produced in the protostellar environments before its introduction into comets. Aims: We study the evolution of the interstellar ice analogues affected by both thermal heating and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons, in addition to the nature of the formed molecules and the confrontation of our experimental results with astronomical observations. Methods: Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are used to monitor the evolution of the H{2}O:CO{2}:CH{3}NH{2} and CO{2}:CH{3}NH{2} ice mixtures during both warming processes and VUV photolysis. Results: We first show how carbon dioxide (CO{2}) and methylamine (CH{3}NH{2}) thermally react in water-dominated ice to form methylammonium methylcarbamate [ CH{3}NH{3}+] [ CH{3}NHCOO-] noted C. We then determine the reaction rate and activation energy. We show that C thermal formation can occurs in the 50-70 K temperature range of a protostellar environment. Secondly, we report that a VUV photolysis of a pure C sample produces a glycine salt, methylammonium glycinate [ CH{3}NH{3}+] [ NH{2}CH{2}COO-] noted G. We propose a scenario explaining how C and subsequently G can be synthesized in interstellar ices and precometary grains. Conclusions: [ CH{3}NH{3}+] [ CH{3}NHCOO-] could be readily formed and would act as a glycine salt precursor in protostellar environments dominated by thermal and UV processing. We propose a new pathway leading to a glycine salt, which is consistent with the detection of glycine and methylamine within the returned samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 from the Stardust mission.

  6. Ir-Spectroscopy of Glycine and its Complexes with Water in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letzner, M.; Grün, S. A.; Schwaab, G.; Havenith, M.

    2011-06-01

    Glycine is the smallest amino acid, and therefore it is of special interest as a model and starting point for theoretical and experimental studies. Whereas the crystalline form of glycine consists of zwitterions NH_3+-CH_2-COO-, gas phase glycine is known to exist in the nonionized form NH_2-CH_2-COOH. The interaction between glycine and water has been widely studied using a large variety of theoretical methods. Depending on the theoretical level used, a stabilisation of the zwitterionic form is predicted for complexes containing from 2 to 7 water molecules. In low-temperature Ar matrices a set of characteristic IR absorption bands for the zwitterionic form has been observed. The higher stoichiometry complexes (glycine)\\cdots(H_2O)_n with n larger than 3 are demonstrated to be zwitterionic H-bonded complexes. The multitude of conformations expected for these glycine-water complexes makes a combination of low temperature and high resolution spectroscopy essential. We want to use the advantages of our experiment to investigate glycine and its complexes with water in helium-nanodroplets at ultracold temperatures in the range from 3000-3800 Cm-1. Our measurements were carried out using a high power IR-OPO (cw: 2.7 W) as radiation source and a helium nanodroplet spectrometer. Helium-nanodroplets are formed by expansion of helium at 55 bar through a 5 μm nozzle which is kept at a temperature of 16 K. The status of the project is presented. P.-G. Jönsson et al., Acta Crystallogr., Sect. B: Struct. Crystallogr. Cryst. Chem. 28, 1827 (1972) G. Junk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 85, 839 (1963) R. Ramaekers et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004)

  7. Kinetic study of carbon dioxide absorption into glycine promoted diethanolamine (DEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudjiastuti, Lily; Susianto, Altway, Ali; IC, Maria Hestia; Arsi, Kartika

    2015-12-01

    In industry, especially petrochemical, oil and natural gas industry, required separation process of CO2 gas which is a corrosive gas (acid gas). This characteristic can damage the plant utility and piping systems as well as reducing the caloric value of natural gas. Corrosive characteristic of CO2 will appear in areas where there is a decrease in temperature and pressure, such as at the elbow pipe, tubing, cooler and injector turbine. From disadvantages as described above, then it is important to do separation process in the CO2 gas stream, one of the method for remove CO2 from the gas stream is reactive absorption using alkanolamine based solution with promotor. Therefore, this study is done to determine the kinetics constant of CO2 absorption in diethanolamine (DEA) solution using a glycine promoter. Glycine is chosen as a promoter because glycine is a primary amine compound which is reactive, moreover, glycine has resistance to high temperatures so it will not easy to degradable and suitable for application in industry. The method used in this study is absorption using laboratory scale wetted wall column equipment at atmospheric of pressure. This study will to provide the reaction kinetics data information in order to optimize the separation process of CO2 in the industrialized world. The experimental results show that rising temperatures from 303,15 - 328,15 K and the increase of concentration of glycine from 1% - 3% weight will increase the absorption rate of carbon dioxide in DEA promoted with glycine by 24,2% and 59,764% respectively, also the reaction kinetic constant is 1.419 × 1012 exp (-3634/T) (m3/kmol.s). This result show that the addition of glycine as a promoter can increase absorption rate of carbon dioxide in diethanolamine solution and cover the weaknesses of diethanolamine solution.

  8. A Rigorous Attempt to Verify Interstellar Glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Hollis, J. M.; Friedel, D. N.; Jewell, P. R.; Remijan, A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, Kuan, Charnley, and co-workers reported the detection of interstellar glycine (NH2CH2COOH) based on observations of 27 lines in 19 different spectral bands in one or more of the sources Sgr BP(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2. They supported their detection report with rotational temperature diagrams for all three sources. In this paper, we present essential criteria which can be used in a straightforward analysis technique to confirm the identity of an interstellar asymmetric rotor such as glycine. We use new laboratory measurements of glycine as a basis for applying this analysis technique, both to our previously unpublished 12 m telescope data and to the previously published SEST data of Nummelin and colleagues. We conclude that key lines necessary for an interstellar glycine identification have not yet been found. We identify several common molecular candidates that should be examined further as more likely carriers of the lines reported as glycine. Finally, we illustrate that rotational temperature diagrams used without the support of correct spectroscopic assignments are not a reliable tool for the identification of interstellar molecules. Subject headings: ISM: abundances - ISM: clouds - ISM: individual (Sagittarius B2[N-

  9. Identification of essential histidine residues involved in heme binding and Hemozoin formation in heme detoxification protein from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Haruto; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites digest hemoglobin within a food vacuole to supply amino acids, releasing the toxic product heme. During the detoxification, toxic free heme is converted into an insoluble crystalline form called hemozoin (Hz). Heme detoxification protein (HDP) in Plasmodium falciparum is one of the most potent of the hemozoin-producing enzymes. However, the reaction mechanisms of HDP are poorly understood. We identified the active site residues in HDP using a combination of Hz formation assay and spectroscopic characterization of mutant proteins. Replacement of the critical histidine residues His122, His172, His175, and His197 resulted in a reduction in the Hz formation activity to approximately 50% of the wild-type protein. Spectroscopic characterization of histidine-substituted mutants revealed that His122 binds heme and that His172 and His175 form a part of another heme-binding site. Our results show that the histidine residues could be present in the individual active sites and could be ligated to each heme. The interaction between heme and the histidine residues would serve as a molecular tether, allowing the proper positioning of two hemes to enable heme dimer formation. The heme dimer would act as a seed for the crystal growth of Hz in P. falciparum. PMID:25138161

  10. The effects of short intensive exercise on plasma free amino acids in standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Hackl, S; van den Hoven, R; Zickl, M; Spona, J; Zentek, J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of short intense exercise on plasma amino acid concentrations in trotters and to test the repeatability of plasma amino acids concentration in samples obtained on two independent days under field conditions. Plasma amino acid concentrations were analysed in blood samples of 36 standardbred trotters before and after intense exercise over a distance of 2000 m. Sampling was repeated in 20 horses after 35 days. Exercise intensity was estimated from post-exercise lactate levels. Horses were divided in two groups according to a cut-off lactate concentration at 15 mmol/l. The plasma concentrations of alanine, aspartate, glutamate, isoleucine, leucine, lysine and taurine increased and arginine, asparagine, citrulline, glutamine, glycine, histidine, methionine, serine, tryptophan and 3-methylhistidine decreased after exercise. Ornithine, threonine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and valine concentrations remained constant. Higher intensity of exercise significantly decreased tryptophan and increased taurine concentrations. Sampling day had a significant effect on the absolute pre- and post-exercise amino acid concentrations. Exercise had a significant influence on the concentrations of most plasma amino acids in trotters. These changes could reflect shifts between the free amino acid compartments, but there were also some indications for muscle catabolism. The amino acid supply of sporting horses could be of specific significance for maintaining muscle integrity and for the improvement of post-exercise recovery of competition horses. PMID:19320929

  11. Effect of spermine on the uptake of amino acids in Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    PubMed

    Ariel, M; Grossowicz, N

    1972-08-01

    Spermine inhibited the transport of neutral aliphatic amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine, alanine, and glycine) into cells of Micrococcus lysodeikticus. On the other hand, spermine did not affect the uptake of basic (arginine and histidine), acidic (glutamic acid), or aromatic (phenylalanine and tyrosine) amino acids. Inhibition of uptake of the neutral amino acids by spermine is apparently of a noncompetitive nature; the V(max) decreased, whereas the apparent K(m) remained unaltered. The inhibition is most likely due to a specific binding of spermine to the carrier(s) of these amino acids. Related polyamines, spermidine and cadaverine, also caused inhibition of valine uptake, though to a lesser extent; spermidine was less active than spermine, and cadaverine showed the weakest effect of all. Valine, leucine, and isoleucine were transported into M. lysodeikticus cells by a common carrier as evidenced from competition experiments. The uptake of these amino acids is an active process; it was temperature-dependent and inhibited by azide (10(-1)m to 2.5 x 10(-2)m) and dinitrophenol (10(-3)m). The intracellular concentration of valine was 100-fold higher than in the medium. PMID:5053465

  12. Extraterrestrial material analysis: loss of amino acids during liquid-phase acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Brault, Amaury; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Searching for building blocks of life in extraterrestrial material is a way to learn more about how life could have appeared on Earth. With this aim, liquid-phase acid hydrolysis has been used, since at least 1970 , in order to extract amino acids and other organic molecules from extraterrestrial materials (e.g. meteorites, lunar fines) or Earth analogues (e.g. Atacama desert soil). This procedure involves drastic conditions such as heating samples in 6N HCl for 24 h, either under inert atmosphere/vacuum, or air. Analysis of the hydrolyzed part of the sample should give its total (free plus bound) amino acid content. The present work deals with the influence of the 6N HCl hydrolysis on amino acid degradation. Our experiments have been performed on a standard solution of 17 amino acids. After liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl) under argon atmosphere (24 h at 100°C), the liquid phase was evaporated and the dry residue was derivatized with N-Methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. After comparison with derivatized amino acids from the standard solution, a significant reduction of the chromatographic peak areas was observed for most of the amino acids after liquid-phase acid hydrolysis. Furthermore, the same loss pattern was observed when the amino acids were exposed to cold 6N HCl for a short amount of time. The least affected amino acid, i.e. glycine, was found to be 73,93% percent less abundant compared to the non-hydrolyzed standard, while the most affected, i.e. histidine, was not found in the chromatograms after hydrolysis. Our experiments thereby indicate that liquid-phase acid hydrolysis, even under inert atmosphere, leads to a partial or total loss of all of the 17 amino acids present in the standard solution, and that a quick cold contact with 6N HCl is sufficient to lead to a loss of amino acids. Therefore, in the literature, the reported increase

  13. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  14. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  15. Chemical basis of glycine riboswitch cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Miyun; Strobel, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The glycine binding riboswitch forms a unique tandem aptamer structure that binds glycine cooperatively. We employed nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) and mutagenesis to explore the chemical basis of glycine riboswitch cooperativity. Based on the interference pattern, at least two sites appear to facilitate cooperative tertiary interactions, namely, the minor groove of the P1 helix from aptamer 1 and the major groove of the P3a helix from both aptamers. Mutation of these residues altered both the cooperativity and binding affinity of the riboswitch. The data support a model in which the P1 helix of the first aptamer participates in a tertiary interaction important for cooperativity, while nucleotides in the P1 helix of the second aptamer interface with the expression platform. These data have direct analogy to well-characterized mutations in hemoglobin, which provides a framework for considering cooperativity in this RNA-based system. PMID:18042658

  16. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Mouse Glycine N-acyltransferase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Daniel R.; Bond, Jason D.; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Ospina, Santiago Rodriguez; Merkler, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Glycine N-acyltransferase (GLYAT) is a phase II metabolic detoxification enzyme for exogenous (xenobiotic) and endogenous carboxylic acids; consisting of fatty acids, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid. GLYAT catalyzes the formation of hippurate (N-benzoylglycine) from the corresponding glycine and benzoyl-CoA. Herein, we report the successful expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant mouse GLYAT (mGLYAT). A 34 kDa mGLYAT protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity by nickel affinity chromatography to a final yield of 2.5 mg/L culture. Characterization for both amino donors and amino acceptors were completed, with glycine serving as the best amino donor substrate, (kcat/Km)app = (5.2 ± 0.20) × 102M−1s−1, and benzoyl-CoA serving as the best the amino acceptor substrate, (kcat/Km)app = (4.5 ± 0.27) × 105M−1s−1. Our data demonstrate that mGLYAT will catalyzed the chain length specific (C2-C6) formation of N-acylglycines. The steady-state kinetic constants determined for recombinant mGLYAT for the substrates benzoyl-CoA and glycine, were shown to be consistent with other reported species (rat, human, bovine, ovine, and rhesus monkey). The successful recombinant expression and purification of mGLYAT can lead to solve unanswered questions associated with this enzyme, consisting of what is the chemical mechanism and what catalytic residues are essential for the how this phase II metabolic detoxification enzyme conjugates glycine to xenobiotic and endogenous carboxylic acids. PMID:24576660

  17. Expression of heteromeric glycine receptor-channels in rat spinal cultures and inhibition by neuroactive steroids.

    PubMed

    Fodor, László; Boros, András; Dezso, Péter; Maksay, Gábor

    2006-11-01

    Ionotropic glycine receptors were studied in cultured spinal cord neurons prepared from 17-day-old rat embryos, using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Glycine receptors of 3-17 days in vitro were characterized via subtype-specific channel blockade by micromolar picrotoxin and cyanotriphenylborate, as well as nanomolar strychnine. Potentiation by nanomolar tropisetron indicated coexpression of beta with alpha subunits. The neuroactive steroids pregnenolone sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, as well as alphaxalone and its 3beta epimer betaxalone inhibited the chloride current with IC(50) values of 19, 46, 16 and 208 microM, respectively, with no potentiation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry demonstrated mRNAs and proteins of alpha1, alpha2, alpha3 and beta subunits in rat spinal cord cultures. In conclusion, neuroactive steroids, both positive and negative modulators of gamma-aminobutyric-acid(A) receptors, inhibited heteromeric glycine receptors at micromolar concentrations. PMID:16784797

  18. Aqueous microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis using Fmoc strategy. III: racemization studies and water-based synthesis of histidine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Keiko; Shinozaki, Natsuki; Hidaka, Koushi; Tsuda, Yuko; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Ichikawa, Hideki; Wade, John D

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we describe the first aqueous microwave-assisted synthesis of histidine-containing peptides in high purity and with low racemization. We have previously shown the effectiveness of our synthesis methodology for peptides including difficult sequences using water-dispersible 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-amino acid nanoparticles. It is an organic solvent-free, environmentally friendly method for chemical peptide synthesis. Here, we studied the racemization of histidine during an aqueous-based coupling reaction with microwave irradiation. Under our microwave-assisted protocol using 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride, the coupling reaction can be efficiently performed with low levels of racemization of histidine. Application of this water-based microwave-assisted protocol with water-dispersible 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-amino acid nanoparticles led to the successful synthesis of the histidine-containing hexapeptide neuropeptide W-30 (10-15), Tyr-His-Thr-Val-Gly-Arg-NH₂, in high yield and with greatly reduced histidine racemization. PMID:24965528

  19. Regulation of skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase: involvement of histidine residues in the pH-dependent inhibition of the rabbit enzyme by ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri-Raggi, M; Ronca, F; Sabbatini, A; Raggi, A

    1995-01-01

    Reaction of rabbit skeletal-muscle AMP deaminase with a low molar excess of diethyl pyrocarbonate results in conversion of the enzyme into a species with one or two carbethoxylated histidine residues per subunit that retains sensitivity to ATP at pH 7.1 but, unlike the native enzyme, it is not sensitive to regulation by ATP at pH 6.5. This effect mimics that exerted on the enzyme by limited proteolysis with trypsin, which removes the 95-residue N-terminal region from the 80 kDa enzyme subunit. These observations suggest involvement of some histidine residues localized in the region HHEMQAHILH (residues 51-60) in the regulatory mechanism which stabilizes the binding of ATP to its inhibitory site at acidic pH. Carbethoxylation of two histidine residues per subunit abolishes the inhibition by ATP of the proteolysed enzyme at pH 7.1, suggesting the obligatory participation of a second class of histidine residues, localized in the 70 kDa subunit core, in the mechanism of the pH-dependent inhibition of the enzyme by ATP. At a slightly acidic pH, these histidine residues would be positively charged, resulting in a desensitized form of the enzyme similar to that obtained with the carbethoxylation reaction. PMID:7639701

  20. Glycine as a regulator of tryptophan-dependent pigment synthesis in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Barchmann, Thorsten; Hort, Wiebke; Krämer, Hans-Joachim; Mayser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the addition of different amino nitrogens on growth, morphology and secondary metabolism of Malassezia furfur were investigated. After primary culture on Dixon agar, M. furfur CBS 1878 was transferred into a fluid medium together with the nitrogen sources, glycine (Gly) or tryptophan (Trp), or a combination of both. Growth was measured by means of a direct cell counting method and pigment synthesis was photometrically assessed. Addition of glycine resulted in an exponential increase in biomass, but not in pigment production. Tryptophan as the sole nitrogen source caused distinct brown staining of the medium, without increasing biomass. Simultaneous equimolar addition of both amino acids resulted in an initial increase in biomass as a sign of preferential metabolism of glycine, followed by a growth plateau and pigment production which, caused by higher biomass, occurred more rapidly than after addition of tryptophan alone. The yeast-cell morphology changed from round to oval. Addition of glycine to the tryptophan-containing liquid culture stopped pigment formation with simultaneous growth induction. These in vitro on-off phenomena depending on the nitrogen source might be significant in the pathogenesis of pityriasis versicolor: hyperhidrosis followed by preferential consumption of individual nitrogen sources such as glycine with exponential growth and thereafter transamination of tryptophan and TRP-dependent pigment synthesis. PMID:19702622

  1. Glycine regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lean and monosodium glutamate-obese mice.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Almanza-Perez, Julio; Blancas, Gerardo; Angeles, Selene; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Roman, Ruben; Cruz, Miguel

    2008-12-01

    Fat tissue plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Increased visceral fat has been associated with a higher production of cytokines that triggers a low-grade inflammatory response, which eventually may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether glycine, an amino acid that represses the expression in vitro of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Kupffer and 3T3-L1 cells, can affect in vivo cytokine production in lean and monosodium glutamate-induced obese mice (MSG/Ob mice). Our data demonstrate that glycine treatment in lean mice suppressed TNF-alpha transcriptional expression in fat tissue, and serum protein levels of IL-6 were suppressed, while adiponectin levels were increased. In MSG/Ob mice, glycine suppressed TNF-alpha and IL-6 gene expression in fat tissue and significantly reduced protein levels of IL-6, resistin and leptin. To determine the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) in the modulation of this inflammatory response evoked by glycine, we examined its expression levels in fat tissue. Glycine clearly increased PPAR-gamma expression in lean mice but not in MSG/Ob mice. Finally, to identify alterations in glucose metabolism by glycine, we also examined insulin levels and other biochemical parameters during an oral glucose tolerance test. Glycine significantly reduced glucose tolerance and raised insulin levels in lean but not in obese mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that glycine suppresses the pro-inflammatory cytokines production and increases adiponectin secretion in vivo through the activation of PPAR-gamma. Glycine might prevent insulin resistance and associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:18930730

  2. Poly(L-histidine) based copolymers: Effect of the chemically substituted L-histidine on the physio-chemical properties of the micelles and in vivo biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Dawei; Ba, Shuang; Chang, Jing; Zhou, Jiaying; Zhao, Haixia; Zhu, Jia; Zhao, Xiuli; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, Mingxi

    2016-04-01

    Even though the Poly(l-histidine) (PHis) based copolymers have been well studied, the effect of the chemically substituted l-histidine on the physio-chemical and biological properties of the micelles has never been elucidated to date. To address this issue, triblock copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide)-poly(2,4-dinitrophenol-L-histidine)(mPEG-b-PLA-b-DNP-PHis) with DNP group substituted to the saturated nitrogen of l-histidine were synthesized. The pH sensitive properties of the copolymer micelles were characterized using an acid-base titration method, fluorescene probe technique, DLS observation, in vitro drug release and cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells under different pH conditions, respectively. The results suggest that mPEG-b-PLA-b-DNP-PHis copolymers showed similar micellar stability for DOX loaded micelles, increased particle size, and similar pH responsive properties with mPEG-b-PLA-b-PHis copolymers. The subcellular distribution observation demonstrated that mPEG-b-PLA-b-DNP-PHis micelles showed a slightly compromised endo-lysosmal escape of doxorubicin as compared to mPEG-b-PLA-b-PHis micelles. The mPEG-b-PLA-b-DNP-PHis micelles showed higher cellular uptake by MCF-7 cells than mPEG-b-PLA-b-PHis micelles due to the different uptake pathways. Effect of DNP substitution on the in vivo distribution of the copolymer micelles was studied using non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging with mPEG-b-PLA-b-PHis micelles as control. The results indicate that the mPEG-b-PLA-b-DNP-PHis micelles showed a reduced passive targeting to the tumor due to the larger particle size. These results suggest that saturated nitrogen of PHis may serve as a valuable site for chemical modification of the PHis based copolymers because of the little effect on the pH responsive properties. However, selection of the substitution group needs to be considered due to the possible increase of micellar particle size of the micelles, leading to compromised passive

  3. Biomimetic synthesis of highly biocompatible gold nanoparticles with amino acid-dithiocarbamate as a precursor for SERS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Huang, Jin; He, Dinggeng; Guo, Xi; Wan, Lan; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2016-03-01

    Amino acid-dithiocarbamate (amino acid-DTC) was developed as both the reductant and ligand stabilizer for biomimetic synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which served as an excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) contrast nanoprobe for cell imaging. Glycine (Gly), glutamic acid (Glu), and histidine (His) with different isoelectric points were chosen as representative amino acid candidates to synthesize corresponding amino acid-DTC compounds through mixing with carbon disulfide (CS2), respectively. The pyrogenic decomposition of amino acid-DTC initiated the reduction synthesis of AuNPs, and the strong coordinating dithiocarbamate group of amino acid-DTC served as a stabilizer that grafted onto the surface of the AuNPs, which rendered the as-prepared nanoparticles a negative surface charge and high colloidal stability. MTT cell viability assay demonstrated that the biomimetic AuNPs possessed neglectful toxicity to the human hepatoma cell, which guaranteed them good biocompatibility for biomedical application. Meanwhile, the biomimetic AuNPs showed a strong SERS effect with an enhancement factor of 9.8 × 105 for the sensing of Rhodamine 6G, and two distinct Raman peaks located at 1363 and 1509 cm-1 could be clearly observed in the cell-imaging experiments. Therefore, biomimetic AuNPs can be explored as an excellent SERS contrast nanoprobe for biomedical imaging, and the amino acid-DTC mediated synthesis of the AuNPs has a great potential in bio-engineering and biomedical imaging applications.

  4. Comparison of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in myocytes from rats treated with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan cetoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solutions that cause elective cardiac arrest are constantly evolving, but the ideal compound has not yet been found. The authors compare a new cardioplegic solution with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (Group 2) and other one with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate (Group 1) in a model of isolated rat heart. Objective To quantify the fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in rat myocytes subjected to cardioplegia solution using histidine-tryptophan with glutamate in an experimental model, considering the caspase markers, IL-8 and KI-67. Methods Twenty male Wistar rats were anesthetized and heparinized. The chest was opened, the heart was withdrawn and 40 ml/kg of cardioplegia (with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate or histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution) was infused. The hearts were kept for 2 hours at 4ºC in the same solution, and thereafter placed in the Langendorff apparatus for 30 min with Ringer-Locke solution. Analyzes were performed for immunohistochemical caspase, IL-8 and KI-67. Results The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy were not different between groups histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate. Conclusion The amount of information measured by Shannon entropy and the distribution thereof (given by fractal dimension) of the slices treated with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate and histidine-tryptophan-glutamate were not different, showing that the histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution is as good as histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate to preserve myocytes in isolated rat heart. PMID:25140464

  5. Synchrotron x-ray photoemission study of soft x-ray processed ultrathin glycine-water ice films

    SciTech Connect

    Tzvetkov, George; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-05-28

    Ultrathin glycine-water ice films have been prepared in ultrahigh vacuum by condensation of H{sub 2}O and glycine at 90 K on single crystalline alumina surfaces and processed by soft x-ray (610 eV) exposure for up to 60 min. The physicochemical changes in the films were monitored using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Two films with different amounts of H{sub 2}O have been considered in order to evaluate the influence of the water ice content on the radiation-induced effects. The analysis of C1s, N1s, and O1s spectral regions together with the changes in the valence band spectra indicates that amino acid degradation occurs fast mainly via decarboxylation and deamination of pristine molecules. Enrichment of the x-ray exposed surfaces with fragments with carbon atoms without strong electronegative substituents (C-C and C-H) is documented as well. In the thinner glycine-water ice film (six layers of glycine + six layers of water) the 3D ice suffers strongly from the x-rays and is largely removed from the sample. The rate of photodecomposition of glycine in this film is about 30% higher than for glycine in the thicker film (6 layers of glycine + 60 layers of water). The photoemission results suggest that the destruction of amino acid molecules is caused by the direct interaction with the radiation and that no chemical attack of glycine by the species released by water radiolysis is detected.

  6. Glycine restores the anabolic response to leucine in a mouse model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Chhen, Victoria; Chee, Annabel; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine, potently stimulate protein synthesis and reduce protein breakdown in healthy skeletal muscle and as a result have received considerable attention as potential treatments for muscle wasting. However, the normal anabolic response to amino acids is impaired during muscle-wasting conditions. Although the exact mechanisms of this anabolic resistance are unclear, inflammation and ROS are believed to play a central role. The nonessential amino acid glycine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and preserves muscle mass in calorie-restricted and tumor-bearing mice. We hypothesized that glycine would restore the normal muscle anabolic response to amino acids under inflammatory conditions. Relative rates of basal and leucine-stimulated protein synthesis were measured using SUnSET methodology 4 h after an injection of 1 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas leucine failed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in LPS-treated mice pretreated with l-alanine (isonitrogenous control), leucine robustly stimulated protein synthesis (+51%) in mice pretreated with 1 g/kg glycine. The improvement in leucine-stimulated protein synthesis was accompanied by a higher phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6, and 4E-BP1 compared with l-alanine-treated controls. Despite its known anti-inflammatory action in inflammatory cells, glycine did not alter the skeletal muscle inflammatory response to LPS in vivo or in vitro but markedly reduced DHE staining intensity, a marker of oxidative stress, in muscle cross-sections and attenuated LPS-induced wasting in C2C12 myotubes. Our observations in male C57BL/6 mice suggest that glycine may represent a promising nutritional intervention for the attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting. PMID:27094036

  7. Changes in urinary amino acids excretion in relationship with muscle activity markers over a professional cycling stage race: in search of fatigue markers.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Roberto; Barassi, Alessandra; Perego, Silvia; Sansoni, Veronica; Rossi, Alessandra; Damele, Clara Anna Linda; Melzi D'Eril, Gianlodovico; Banfi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between metabolic effort, muscular damage/activity indices, and urinary amino acids profile over the course of a strenuous prolonged endurance activity, as a cycling stage race is, in order to identify possible fatigue markers. Nine professional cyclists belonging to a single team, competing in the Giro d'Italia cycling stage race, were anthropometrically characterized and sampled for blood and urine the day before the race started, and on days 12 and 23 of the race. Diet was kept the same over the race, and power output and energy expenditure were recorded. Sera were assayed for muscle markers (lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase activities, and blood urea nitrogen), and creatinine, all corrected for plasma volume changes. Urines were profiled for amino acid concentrations, normalized on creatinine excretion. Renal function, in terms of glomerular filtration rate, was monitored by MDRD equation corrected on body surface area. Creatine kinase activity and blood urea were increased during the race as did serum creatinine while kidney function remained stable. Among the amino acids, taurine, glycine, cysteine, leucine, carnosine, 1-methyl histidine, and 3-methyl histidine showed a net decreased, while homocysteine was increased. Taurine and the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) were significantly correlated with the muscle activity markers and the indices of effort. In conclusion, the metabolic profile is modified strikingly due to the effort. Urinary taurine and carnosine seem useful tools to evaluate the muscle damage and possibly the fatigue status on a long-term basis. PMID:26306846

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrogen-Bonded Clusters of Protonated Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Makoto; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Ishikawa, Haruki

    2015-06-01

    Histidine(His), one of the essential amino acids, is involved in active sites in many enzyme proteins, and known to play fundamental roles in human body. Thus, to gain detailed information about intermolecular interactions of His as well as its structure is very important. In the present study, we have recorded IR spectra of hydrogen-bonded clusters of protonated His (HisH^+) in the gas phase to discuss the relation between the molecular structure and intermolecular interaction of HisH^+. Clusters of HisH^+-(MeOH)_n (n = 1, 2) were generated by an electrospray ionization of the MeOH solution of L-His hydrochloride monohydrate. IR photodissociation spectra of HisH^+-(MeOH)1,2 were recorded. By comparing with the results of the DFT calculations, we determined the structures of these clusters. In the case of n = 1 cluster, MeOH is bonded to the imidazole ring as a proton acceptor. The most of vibrational bands observed were well explained by this isomer. However, a free NH stretch band of the imidazole ring was also observed in the spectrum. This indicates an existence of an isomer in which MeOH is bounded to the carboxyl group of HisH^+. Furthermore, it is found that a protonated position of His is influenced by a hydrogen bonding position of MeOH. In the case of n = 2 cluster, one MeOH molecule is bonded to the amino group, while the other MeOH molecule is separately bonded to the carboxyl group in the most stable isomer. However, there is a possibility that other conformers also exist in our experimental condition. The details of the experimental and theoretical results will be presented in the paper.

  9. Stress physiology functions of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase cytokinin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Nagaraj; Verslues, Paul E

    2015-07-01

    Cytokinin signaling has complex effects on abiotic stress responses that remain to be fully elucidated. The Arabidopsis histidine kinases (AHKs), AHK2, AHK3 and CRE1 (cytokinin response1/AHK4) are the principle cytokinin receptors of Arabidopsis. Using a set of ahk mutants, we found dramatic differences in response to low water potential and salt stress among the AHKs. ahk3-3 mutants had increased root elongation after transfer to low water potential media. Conversely ahk2-2 was hypersensitive to salt stress in terms of root growth and fresh weight and accumulated higher than wild-type levels of proline specifically under salt stress. Strongly reduced proline accumulation in ahk double mutants after low water potential treatment indicated a more general role of cytokinin signaling in proline metabolism. Reduced P5CS1 (Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase1) gene expression may have contributed to this reduced proline accumulation. Low water potential phenotypes of ahk mutants were not caused by altered abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation as all ahk mutants had wild-type ABA levels, despite the observation that ahk double mutants had reduced NCED3 (9-cis-epoxycartenoid dioxygenase3) expression when exposed to low water potential. No difference in osmoregulatory solute accumulation was detected in any of the ahk mutants indicating that they do not affect drought responsive osmotic adjustment. Overall, our examination of ahk mutants found specific phenotypes associated with AHK2 and AHK3 as well as a general function of cytokinin signaling in proline accumulation and low water potential induction of P5CS1 and NCED3 expression. These results show the stress physiology function of AHKs at a new level of detail. PMID:25263537

  10. Effects of glycine and proline on the calcium activation properties of skinned muscle fibre segments from crayfish and rat.

    PubMed

    Powney, E L; West, J M; Stephenson, D G; Dooley, P C

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the polar amino acid glycine (20 mmol l(-1)) and the non-polar amino acid proline (20 mmol l(-1)) on Ca(2+)-activated contraction have been examined in four types of striated muscle fibres. Single fibres dissected from the claw muscle of a crustacean (long- and short-sarcomere) and the hindlimb muscles of the rat (slow-twitch from soleus and fast-twitch from extensor digitorum longus) were activated in matched solutions that either contained the amino acid ('test') or not ('control'). The steady-state force produced in these solutions was used to determine the relation between force production and pCa (-log10[Ca2+]). The results show that in the concentrations used, glycine and proline had only small effects on the maximum Ca(2+)-activated force, pCa corresponding to 10, 50 and 90% maximum force (pCa10, pCa50, pCa90, respectively) or on the slope of the force-pCa curves in the four different fibre types. The relative lack of effects of glycine and proline on contractile activation would confer a distinct physiological advantage to force production of muscle of Cherax, where the concentrations of glycine and proline vary considerably. Finally, the results show that glycine and proline may be useful to balance control solutions when the effects of other amino acids or zwitterions on contractile activation are examined. PMID:14677649

  11. GcsR, a TyrR-Like Enhancer-Binding Protein, Regulates Expression of the Glycine Cleavage System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Zaara; Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Grassa, Michael T.; Wang, Michael X.; Gribble, Megan; Moffat, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycine serves as a major source of single carbon units for biochemical reactions within bacterial cells. Utilization of glycine is tightly regulated and revolves around a key group of proteins known as the glycine cleavage system (GCS). Our lab previously identified the transcriptional regulator GcsR (PA2449) as being required for catabolism of glycine in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. In an effort to clarify and have an overall better understanding of the role of GcsR in glycine metabolism, a combination of transcriptome sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays was used to identify target genes of this transcriptional regulator. It was found that GcsR binds to an 18-bp consensus sequence (TGTAACG-N4-CGTTCCG) upstream of the gcs2 operon, consisting of the gcvH2, gcvP2, glyA2, sdaA, and gcvT2 genes. The proteins encoded by these genes, namely, the GCS (GcvH2-GcvP2-GcvT2), serine hydroxymethyltransferase (GlyA2), and serine dehydratase (SdaA), form a metabolic pathway for the conversion of glycine into pyruvate, which can enter the central metabolism. GcsR activates transcription of the gcs2 operon in response to glycine. Interestingly, GcsR belongs to a family of transcriptional regulators known as TyrR-like enhancer-binding proteins (EBPs). Until this study, TyrR-like EBPs were only known to function in regulating aromatic amino acid metabolism. GcsR is the founding member of a new class of TyrR-like EBPs that function in the regulation of glycine metabolism. Indeed, homologs of GcsR and its target genes are present in almost all sequenced genomes of the Pseudomonadales order, suggesting that this genetic regulatory mechanism is a common theme for pseudomonads. IMPORTANCE Glycine is required for various cellular functions, including cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis, and the biosynthesis of several important metabolites. Regulating levels of glycine metabolism allows P. aeruginosa to maintain the metabolic flux

  12. Interactions of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine with selected amino acids and with albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliber, Marta; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Nackiewicz, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Effect of selected amino acids (glycine, L-histidine, L-cysteine, L-serine, L-tryptophan) and albumin on the spectroscopic properties and photostability of zinc octacarboxyphthalocyanine (ZnPcOC) was explored in the phosphate buffer at a pH of 7.0. The photodegradation of ZnPcOC alone and in the presence of amino acids or albumin has been investigated in aqueous phase using UV-366 nm and daylight irradiation. Kinetic analysis showed that the interaction with amino acids or albumin enhances the photostability of ZnPcOC. To answer the question of how zinc phthalocyanine interacts with amino acids extensive DFT calculations were performed. Analysis of the optimized geometry features of ZnPcOC: amino acids complexes in the gas phase and in water environment as well as the BSSE corrected interaction energies indicates that the more likely is the formation of equatorial complexes in which H-bonds are formed between the COOH groups of the phthalocyanine and carboxyl or amino groups of amino acids. UV-Vis spectra calculated by employing time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) are also consistent with this conclusion.

  13. A rare case of glycine encephalopathy unveiled by valproate therapy.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Velusamy; Kadiyala, Pramila; Hariharan, Praveen; Neeraj, E

    2015-01-01

    Glycine encephalopathy (GE) or nonketotic hyperglycinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder due to a primary defect in glycine cleavage enzyme system. It is characterized by elevated levels of glycine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid usually presenting with seizures, hypotonia, and developmental delay. In our case, paradoxical increase in seizure frequency on starting sodium valproate led us to diagnose GE. PMID:26167219

  14. Identification of Rotylenchulus reniformis resistant Glycine lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of resistance to reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) is the first step in developing resistant soybean (Glycine max) cultivars that will benefit growers in the Mid South. This study was conducted to identify soybean (G. max and G. soja) lines with resistance to this pathogen....

  15. 21 CFR 172.812 - Glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES... food additive glycine may be safely used for technological purposes in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex,...

  16. Engineering and characterization of fluorogenic glycine riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Simon; Gladis, Lukas; Kozica, Adnan; Meier, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    A set of 12 fluorogenic glycine riboswitches with different thermodynamic and kinetic response properties was engineered. For the design of functional riboswitches, a three-part RNA approach was applied based on the idea of linking a RNA sensor, transmitter and actuator part together. For the RNA sensor and actuator part, we used the tandem glycine aptamer structure from Bacillus subtillis, and fluorogenic aptamer Spinach, respectively. To achieve optimal signal transduction from the sensor to the actuator, a riboswitch library with variable transmitter was screened with a microfluidic large-scale integration chip. This allowed us to establish the complete thermodynamic binding profiles of the riboswitch library. Glycine dissociation constants of the 12 strong fluorescence response riboswitches varied between 99.7 and 570 μM. Furthermore, the kinetic glycine binding (kon), and dissociation (koff) rates, and corresponding energy barriers of the 10 strongest fluorescence response riboswitches were determined with the same chip platform. kon and koff were in the order of 10−3s−1 and 10−2s−1, respectively. Conclusively, we demonstrate that systematic screening of synthetic and natural linked RNA parts with microfluidic chip technology is an effective approach to rapidly generate fluorogenic metabolite riboswitches with a broad range of biophysical response properties. PMID:27220466

  17. Engineering and characterization of fluorogenic glycine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Simon; Gladis, Lukas; Kozica, Adnan; Meier, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    A set of 12 fluorogenic glycine riboswitches with different thermodynamic and kinetic response properties was engineered. For the design of functional riboswitches, a three-part RNA approach was applied based on the idea of linking a RNA sensor, transmitter and actuator part together. For the RNA sensor and actuator part, we used the tandem glycine aptamer structure from Bacillus subtillis, and fluorogenic aptamer Spinach, respectively. To achieve optimal signal transduction from the sensor to the actuator, a riboswitch library with variable transmitter was screened with a microfluidic large-scale integration chip. This allowed us to establish the complete thermodynamic binding profiles of the riboswitch library. Glycine dissociation constants of the 12 strong fluorescence response riboswitches varied between 99.7 and 570 μM. Furthermore, the kinetic glycine binding (k(on)), and dissociation (k(off)) rates, and corresponding energy barriers of the 10 strongest fluorescence response riboswitches were determined with the same chip platform. k(on) and k(off) were in the order of 10(-3)s(-1) and 10(-2)s(-1), respectively. Conclusively, we demonstrate that systematic screening of synthetic and natural linked RNA parts with microfluidic chip technology is an effective approach to rapidly generate fluorogenic metabolite riboswitches with a broad range of biophysical response properties. PMID:27220466

  18. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jamie; Ananthapadmanabhan, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Design: Biochemical and clinical assays. Setting: Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Participants: Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Measurements: Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. Results: The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores <3 and erythema scores <2 (both on a 0-6 scale) indicated an initial reduction in visual dryness. In subjects with eczema, normal use resulted in significant improvements (p<0.05) at Week 4 compared with baseline in skin dryness (change from baseline = −0.73), rash (−0.56), itch (−0.927), tightness (−0.585), and all eczema (−0.756). The glycinate-based body wash removed 56 percent of a long-lasting cosmetic foundation from skin compared with less than 30 percent removed by two competitive products tested. The glycinate-based body wash was preferred over a competitive mild cleansing product overall. Conclusion: The patented glycinate-containing body wash demonstrated better product mildness and patient-preferred attributes and clinical benefits. PMID:23882306

  19. Β-alanine and l-histidine transport across the inner blood-retinal barrier: potential involvement in L-carnosine supply.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takuya; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The supply of L-carnosine, a bioactive dipeptide of β-alanine and l-histidine, to the retina across the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) was studied. The in vivo and in vitro studies revealed low uptake activities for [(3)H]Gly-Sar, a representative dipeptide, suggesting that l-carnosine transport plays only a minor role at the BRB. The in vivo study using rats showed approximately 18- and 23-fold greater retinal uptake indexes (RUI) for [(3)H]β-alanine and [(3)H]l-histidine compared with that of a paracellular marker, respectively. The RUI of [(3)H]β-alanine was taurine- and γ-aminobutyric acid-sensitive, and the in vitro uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells showed time- concentration- and temperature-dependent [(3)H]β-alanine uptake, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved in β-alanine transport across the inner BRB. [(3)H]β-Alanine uptake was inhibited by taurine and β-guanidinopropionic acid, suggesting that taurine transporter (TAUT/SLC6A6) is responsible for the influx transport of β-alanine across the inner BRB. Regarding l-histidine, the l-leucine-sensitive RUI of [(3)H]l-histidine was identified, and the in vitro [(3)H]l-histidine uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells suggested that a carrier-mediated process was involved in l-histidine transport across the inner BRB. The inhibition profile suggested that L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1/SLC7A5) is responsible for the influx transport of l-histidine across the inner BRB. These results show that the influx transports of β-alanine and l-histidine across the inner BRB is carried out by TAUT and LAT1, respectively, suggesting that the retinal l-carnosine is supplied by enzymatic synthesis from two kinds of amino acids transported across the inner BRB. PMID:23773890

  20. Glycine Betaine Biosynthesized from Glycine Provides an Osmolyte for Cell Growth and Spore Germination during Osmotic Stress in Myxococcus xanthus▿

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshio; Kawasaki, Shinji; Yoshimoto, Hinae; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Glycine sarcosine methyltransferase (Gsm) and sarcosine dimethylglycine methyltransferase (Sdm) catalyze glycine betaine synthesis from glycine. Disruption of the M. xanthus gsmA (MXAN 7068) or sdmA (MXAN 3190) gene, encoding Gsm or Sdm homologue proteins, respectively, generated mutants that exhibited a longer lag period of growth and delayed spore germination under osmostress. PMID:20023011

  1. Sorption of Cu(II) complexes with ligands tartrate, glycine and quadrol by chitosan.

    PubMed

    Gyliene, Ona; Binkiene, Rima; Butkiene, Rita

    2009-11-15

    The sorption by chitosan in Cu(II) solutions containing tartrate, glycine (amino acetic acid) and quadrol (N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine) as ligands has been investigated. The degree of sorbate removal strongly depends on pH. In solutions containing tartrate almost complete sorption of both Cu(II) and tartrate proceeds in mildly acidic and neutral solutions. The sorption of Cu(II) is also complete in alkaline solutions containing glycine; meanwhile a substantial sorption of glycine proceeds at pH approximately 6. The Cu(II) sorption in solutions containing quadrol is insignificant. Any sorption of quadrol does not proceed in the whole range of pH investigated. The investigations under equilibrium conditions showed that the Cu(II) sorption from tartrate containing solutions obeys Freundlich equation and in solutions containing glycine and quadrol it fits Langmuir equation. Supposedly, Cu(II) sorption onto chitosan proceeds with formation of amino complexes onto the surface of chitosan; the sorption of tartrate proceeds as electrostatic as well as with formation of amide bonds. Applying of electrolysis enables a complete removal of sorbed Cu(II) and ligands without changes in physical and chemical properties of chitosan. This is confirmed by sorption ability of regenerated chitosan, measurements of its molecular weight, the deacetylation degree and FT-IR spectra. PMID:19540041

  2. Bioinformatics analysis of the serine and glycine pathway in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Maria; Minieri, Marilena; Melino, Gerry; Amelio, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    Serine and glycine are amino acids that provide the essential precursors for the synthesis of proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Employing 3 subsequent enzymes, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH), phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), 3-phosphoglycerate from glycolysis can be converted in serine, which in turn can by converted in glycine by serine methyl transferase (SHMT). Besides proving precursors for macromolecules, serine/glycine biosynthesis is also required for the maintenance of cellular redox state. Therefore, this metabolic pathway has a pivotal role in proliferating cells, including cancer cells. In the last few years an emerging literature provides genetic and functional evidences that hyperactivation of serine/glycine biosynthetic pathway drives tumorigenesis. Here, we extend these observations performing a bioinformatics analysis using public cancer datasets. Our analysis highlighted the relevance of PHGDH and SHMT2 expression as prognostic factor for breast cancer, revealing a substantial ability of these enzymes to predict patient survival outcome. However analyzing patient datasets of lung cancer our analysis reveled that some other enzymes of the pathways, rather than PHGDH, might be associated to prognosis. Although these observations require further investigations they might suggest a selective requirement of some enzymes in specific cancer types, recommending more cautions in the development of novel translational opportunities and biomarker identification of human cancers. PMID:25436979

  3. NMR Structures of the Histidine-Rich Peptide LAH4 in Micellar Environments: Membrane Insertion, pH-Dependent Mode of Antimicrobial Action, and DNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Julia; Munhoz, Victor H.O.; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    The LAH4 family of histidine-rich peptides exhibits potent antimicrobial and DNA transfection activities, both of which require interactions with cellular membranes. The bilayer association of the peptides has been shown to be strongly pH-dependent, with in-planar alignments under acidic conditions and transmembrane orientations when the histidines are discharged. Therefore, we investigated the pH- and temperature-dependent conformations of LAH4 in DPC micellar solutions and in a TFE/PBS solvent mixture. In the presence of detergent and at pH 4.1, LAH4 adopts helical conformations between residues 9 and 24 concomitantly with a high hydrophobic moment. At pH 6.1, a helix-loop-helix structure forms with a hinge encompassing residues His10–Ala13. The data suggest that the high density of histidine residues and the resulting electrostatic repulsion lead to both a decrease in the pK values of the histidines and a less stable α-helical conformation of this region. The hinged structure at pH 6.1 facilitates membrane anchoring and insertion. At pH 7.8, the histidines are uncharged and an extended helical conformation including residues 4–21 is again obtained. LAH4 thus exhibits a high degree of conformational plasticity. The structures provide a stroboscopic view of the conformational changes that occur during membrane insertion, and are discussed in the context of antimicrobial activity and DNA transfection. PMID:20959091

  4. Thermal formation of methylammonium methylcarbamate in interstellar ice analogs: a glycine salt precursor under VUV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvernay, Fabrice; Borget, Fabien; Bossa, Jean-Baptiste; Theule, Patrice; Dhendecourt, Louis; Chiavassa, Thierry

    Dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) play an important role in dense molecular clouds chemistry of providing a surface (catalyst) upon which atoms and molecules can freeze out, forming icy mantles. Dense molecular clouds are characterized by low temperature (10 -50 K) and represent the birth sites of stars. After a gravitationnal breakdown, a part of the dense molecular cloud collapses toward the formation of star and subsequently a protoplanetary disk from which planets, asteroids and comets will appear. During this evolution, interstellar or-ganic material inside ices undergoes different range of chemical alterations (thermal cycling process, ultraviolet photons, electron scattering and cosmic rays irradiation) hence increasing the molecular complexity before their incorporation inside precometary ices. To date, it is supposed that comets could have delivered to the early Earth the organic materials essential to a prebiotic chemistry, one of the prerequisites toward the origin of living systems. The for-mation of prebiotical molecules such as the simplest amino acids (glycine) is proposed in this current study mainly based on laboratory experiments simulating the chemistry occuring on ices within protostellar environments. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are used to monitor the thermal formation of glycine isomer form: the methylammonium methylcarbamate [CH3NH3+][CH3NHCOO-] in interstellar ice analogs made up of two astrophysical relevant molecules: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methylamine (CH3NH2). Using infrared spectroscopy, we study the photochemical behaviour of a pure sample of methylammonium methylcarbamate under vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) field. We show that a glycine isomer salt could readily enter into the composition of ices in colder region of protostellar environments. Upon ultraviolet irra-diation, this latter can undergo an isomerization process induced by photons yielding a glycine salt: the methylammonium glycinate [CH3NH3+][NH2CH2

  5. Unique amino acid signatures that are evolutionarily conserved distinguish simple-type, epidermal and hair keratins

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Pavel; Usachov, Valentyn; Debes, Cedric; Gräter, Frauke; Parry, David A. D.; Omary, M. Bishr

    2011-01-01

    Keratins (Ks) consist of central α-helical rod domains that are flanked by non-α-helical head and tail domains. The cellular abundance of keratins, coupled with their selective cell expression patterns, suggests that they diversified to fulfill tissue-specific functions although the primary structure differences between them have not been comprehensively compared. We analyzed keratin sequences from many species: K1, K2, K5, K9, K10, K14 were studied as representatives of epidermal keratins, and compared with K7, K8, K18, K19, K20 and K31, K35, K81, K85, K86, which represent simple-type (single-layered or glandular) epithelial and hair keratins, respectively. We show that keratin domains have striking differences in their amino acids. There are many cysteines in hair keratins but only a small number in epidermal keratins and rare or none in simple-type keratins. The heads and/or tails of epidermal keratins are glycine and phenylalanine rich but alanine poor, whereas parallel domains of hair keratins are abundant in prolines, and those of simple-type epithelial keratins are enriched in acidic and/or basic residues. The observed differences between simple-type, epidermal and hair keratins are highly conserved throughout evolution. Cysteines and histidines, which are infrequent keratin amino acids, are involved in de novo mutations that are markedly overrepresented in keratins. Hence, keratins have evolutionarily conserved and domain-selectively enriched amino acids including glycine and phenylalanine (epidermal), cysteine and proline (hair), and basic and acidic (simple-type epithelial), which reflect unique functions related to structural flexibility, rigidity and solubility, respectively. Our findings also support the importance of human keratin ‘mutation hotspot’ residues and their wild-type counterparts. PMID:22215855

  6. Activation of glycine receptor phase-shifts the circadian rhythm in neuronal activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Mordel, Jérôme; Karnas, Diana; Inyushkin, Alexey; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is composed of numerous synchronized oscillating cells that drive daily behavioural and physiological processes. Several entrainment pathways, afferent inputs to the SCN with their neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, can reset the circadian system regularly and also modulate neuronal activity within the SCN. In the present study, we investigated the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine on neuronal activity in the mouse SCN and on resetting of the circadian clock. The effects of glycine on the electrical activity of SCN cells from C57Bl/6 mice were studied either by patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices or by long-term recordings from organotypic brain slices using multi-microelectrode arrays (MEA). Voltage-clamp recordings confirmed the existence of glycine-induced, chloride-selective currents in SCN neurons. These currents were reversibly suppressed by strychnine, phenylbenzene ω-phosphono-α-amino acid (PMBA) or ginkgolide B, selective blockers of glycine receptors (GlyRs). Long-term recordings of the spontaneous activity of SCN neurons revealed that glycine application induces a phase advance during the subjective day and a phase delay during the early subjective night. Both effects were suppressed by strychnine or by PMBA. These results suggest that glycine is able to modulate circadian activity by acting directly on its specific receptors in SCN neurons. PMID:21486797

  7. Activation of glycine receptor phase-shifts the circadian rhythm in neuronal activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Mordel, Jérôme; Karnas, Diana; Inyushkin, Alexey; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2011-05-01

    In mammals, the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is composed of numerous synchronized oscillating cells that drive daily behavioural and physiological processes. Several entrainment pathways, afferent inputs to the SCN with their neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, can reset the circadian system regularly and also modulate neuronal activity within the SCN. In the present study, we investigated the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine on neuronal activity in the mouse SCN and on resetting of the circadian clock. The effects of glycine on the electrical activity of SCN cells from C57Bl/6 mice were studied either by patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices or by long-term recordings from organotypic brain slices using multi-microelectrode arrays(MEA). Voltage-clamp recordings confirmed the existence of glycine-induced, chloride-selective currents in SCN neurons. These currents were reversibly suppressed by strychnine, phenylbenzeneω-phosphono-α-amino acid (PMBA) or ginkgolide B, selective blockers of glycine receptors(GlyRs). Long-term recordings of the spontaneous activity of SCN neurons revealed that glycine application induces a phase advance during the subjective day and a phase delay during the early subjective night. Both effects were suppressed by strychnine or by PMBA. These results suggest that glycine is able to modulate circadian activity by acting directly on its specific receptors in SCN neurons. PMID:21486797

  8. Influence of different histidine sources and zinc supplementation of broiler diets on dipeptide content and antioxidant status of blood and meat.

    PubMed

    Kopeć, W; Jamroz, D; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Biazik, E; Pudlo, A; Hikawczuk, T; Skiba, T; Korzeniowska, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to investigate how a diet containing spray-dried blood cells (SDBC) (4%) with or without zinc (Zn) would affect the concentration of two histidine heterodipeptides and the antioxidant status of broiler blood and breast muscles. 2. The study was carried out on 920 male Flex chickens randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments: I - control, II - diet I with SDBC, III - diet I with SDBC and supplemented with Zn and IV - diet I supplemented with L-histidine. Birds were raised on floor littered with wood shavings, given free access to water and fed ad libitum. Performance indices were measured on d 1, 21 and 42. 3. The activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was analysed in plasma, erythrocytes and muscle tissue. The total antioxidant capacity of plasma and breast muscles was measured by 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging ability, as well as by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Carnosine/anserine content of meat and plasma were determined using HPLC. Diets and breast muscles were analysed for amino acid profile and selected microelement content. 4. Histidine supplementation of the diet increased glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma and superoxide dismutase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, the addition of SDBC or pure histidine in the diet increased histidine dipeptide content and activated enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems in chicken blood and muscles. However, it led to lower growth performance indices. 5. The enrichment of broiler diets with Zn increased the antioxidant potential and the activity of superoxide dismutase in plasma, which was independent of the histidine dipeptide concentration. Zn supplementation combined with SDBC in a broiler diet led to the increase of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity, but it did not affect the radical

  9. STRUCTURES AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF STARCH FROM IMMATURE SEEDS OF SOYBEAN VARIETIES (GLYCINE MAX (L.) MERR.) EXHIBITING NORMAL, LOW-LINOLENIC OR LOW-SATURATED FATTY ACID OIL PROFILES AT MATURITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean variety exhibiting at maturity, normal (NM), low-linolenic (LL) or low-saturate (LS) fatty acid seed oil composition had starch structure and functional properties studied from seeds collected 20 days prior to harvest. Soybean starch had small granules (0.4-4.5 micrometers diameter), and CB...

  10. THE AMPHOTERIC PROPERTIES OF SOME AMINO-ACIDS AND PEPTIDES.

    PubMed

    Eckweiler, H; Noyes, H M; Falk, K G

    1921-01-20

    The titration curves of solutions of glycine, alanine, alpha-ammo-butyric acid, leucine, glycyl-glycine, alanyl-glycine, alanyl-alanine, acetone, acetamide, urea, acetic acid, and aceturic acid were determined and some of the relations as dependent upon the chemical structures discussed. The isoelectric points of some of the amphoteric electrolytes were found experimentally. The definition of isoelectric point, its theoretical significance, and method of calculation were considered in some detail. PMID:19871865

  11. 21 CFR 862.1375 - Histidine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Histidine test system. 862.1375 Section 862.1375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. Structure and reaction mechanism of L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase.

    PubMed

    Humm, A; Fritsche, E; Steinbacher, S

    1997-01-01

    L-Arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AT) catalyzes the committed step in creatine biosynthesis by formation of guanidinoacetic acid, the direct precursor of creatine. The X-ray structure of the human enzyme shows a novel fold with fivefold pseudosymmetry of beta beta alphabeta-modules. These modules enclose the active site compartment of the basket-like structure. The active site of AT lies at the bottom of a very narrow channel and contains a catalytic triad with the residues Cys-His-Asp. The transamidination reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism and is accompanied by large conformational changes. During catalysis the amidino group is covalently attached to the active site cysteine to give an amidino-cysteine intermediate. PMID:9165070

  13. Degradation of Glycine and Alanine on Irradiated Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlikowski, Maciej; Benko, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Tomasz P.

    2013-04-01

    Recent researches suggest participation of minerals in the formation of life under primordial conditions. Among all of the minerals, quartz seems to be one of the most probable to take part in such processes. However, an external source of energy is needed, e.g. electric discharge. A device simulating the proposed conditions was designed and was used to simulate prebiotic conditions. Investigation of processes occurring during the stimulation of quartz with electric discharge was studied by means of Ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, in order to monitor the generation kinetics of free radicals. Additionally, infrared spectroscopy was applied to identify chemical reaction products created in a solution of alanine or glycine, in the presence of quartz treated with electric discharge. Formation of increased amounts of free radicals, compared to experiments performed without quartz and/or amino acid, is reported, along with identification of possible degradation products of alanine. No synthetic reactions were observed.

  14. Purification and characterization of two forms of cytochrome b5 from an arachidonic acid-producing fungus, Mortierella hygrophila.

    PubMed

    Kouzaki, N; Kawashima, H; Chung, M C; Shimizu, S

    1995-06-01

    Two forms of cytochrome b5 have been purified from the microsomes of an arachidonic acid-producing fungus, Mortierella hygrophila IFO 5941, after detergent solubilization. They have monomeric molecular masses of about 16 kDa and 19 kDa. Their absorption spectra are similar to those of mammalian cytochrome b5s. Their amino acid compositions show some similarity to those of mammalian cytochrome b5s, but the contents of some amino acids (glycine, alanine, aspartic acid + asparagine, glutamic acid + glutamine, arginine, proline, histidine, leucine and lysine) are unique to the cytochrome b5s of M. hygrophila. Some of their internal peptide sequences also show close homology with those of some mammals (approx. 65 to 67%), while some others show no or little homology. The addition of various acyl-CoAs to NADH-reduced microsomes caused an abrupt shiftdown of the steady state reduction level of cytochrome b5. This indicates the increased utilization of electrons for the desaturation process and may suggest that the cytochrome b5s of this fungus actually take part in its microsomal desaturation system for polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis as electron carriers. PMID:7786894

  15. Studies on Dyeing Process Variables for Salt Free Reactive Dyeing of Glycine Modified Cationized Cotton Muslin Fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Kar, Tapas Ranjan; Mukhopadhyay, Asis; Shome, Debashis; Konar, Adwaita

    2015-04-01

    Bleached cotton muslin fabric with or without pre-oxidized with NaIO4 (oxy-cotton) was chemically modified with glycine (amino acid) by pad dry calendar process to investigate the changes in textile properties and its dyeability with reactive dye. This glycine modified cotton incorporates new functional groups producing -NH3 + or -C=NH+ -ion (cationic groups) in acid bath to obtain cationized cotton making it amenable to a newer route of salt free reactive dyeing in acid bath. In the present work the process variables of reactive dyeing in the salt free acid bath for dyeing of amine (glycine) modified cationized cotton were studied and optimized. The present study also includes thorough investigation of changes in important textile related properties and dyeability with reactive dye after such chemical modifications. Between oxidized and unoxidized cotton muslin fabric, unoxidized cotton fabric shows better reactive dye uptake in both conventional alkaline bath dyeing and nonconventional salt free acid bath dyeing particularly for high exhaustion class of reactive dye with acceptable level of colour fastness and overall balance of other textile related properties. Moreover, application of dye fixing agent further improves surface colour depth (K/S) of the glycine treated cotton fabric for HE brand of reactive dyes. Corresponding reaction mechanisms for such modifications were supported by FTIR spectroscopy. Finally unoxidized cotton and pre-oxidized cotton further treated with glycine (amino acid) provide a new route of acid bath salt free reactive dyeing showing much higher dye uptake and higher degree of surface cover with amino acid residue anchored to modified cotton.

  16. Further Characterization of Glycine-Containing Microcystins from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Puddick, Jonathan; Prinsep, Michèle R.; Wood, Susanna A.; Cary, Stephen Craig; Hamilton, David P.; Holland, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Microcystins are hepatotoxic cyclic peptides produced by several cyanobacterial genera worldwide. In 2008, our research group identified eight new glycine-containing microcystin congeners in two hydro-terrestrial mat samples from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Eastern Antarctica. During the present study, high-resolution mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis and micro-scale thiol derivatization were used to further elucidate their structures. The Antarctic microcystin congeners contained the rare substitution of the position-1 d-alanine for glycine, as well as the acetyl desmethyl modification of the position-5 Adda moiety (3S-amino-9S-methoxy-2S,6,8S-trimethyl-10-phenyldeca-4E,6E-dienoic acid). Amino acid analysis was used to determine the stereochemistry of several of the amino acids and conclusively demonstrated the presence of glycine in the microcystins. A recently developed thiol derivatization technique showed that each microcystin contained dehydrobutyrine in position-7 instead of the commonly observed N-methyl dehydroalanine. PMID:25675414

  17. Iminoglycinuria and hyperglycinuria are discrete human phenotypes resulting from complex mutations in proline and glycine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, Stefan; Bailey, Charles G.; Kowalczuk, Sonja; Ng, Cynthia; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M.; Rodgers, Helen; Auray-Blais, Christiane; Cavanaugh, Juleen A.; Bröer, Angelika; Rasko, John E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Iminoglycinuria (IG) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of renal transport of glycine and the imino acids proline and hydroxyproline, but the specific genetic defect(s) have not been determined. Similarly, although the related disorder hyperglycinuria (HG) without iminoaciduria has been attributed to heterozygosity of a putative defective glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline transporter, confirming the underlying genetic defect(s) has been difficult. Here we applied a candidate gene sequencing approach in 7 families first identified through newborn IG screening programs. Both inheritance and functional studies identified the gene encoding the proton amino acid transporter SLC36A2 (PAT2) as the major gene responsible for IG in these families, and its inheritance was consistent with a classical semidominant pattern in which 2 inherited nonfunctional alleles conferred the IG phenotype, while 1 nonfunctional allele was sufficient to confer the HG phenotype. Mutations in SLC36A2 that retained residual transport activity resulted in the IG phenotype when combined with mutations in the gene encoding the imino acid transporter SLC6A20 (IMINO). Additional mutations were identified in the genes encoding the putative glycine transporter SLC6A18 (XT2) and the neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A19 (B0AT1) in families with either IG or HG, suggesting that mutations in the genes encoding these transporters may also contribute to these phenotypes. In summary, although recognized as apparently simple Mendelian disorders, IG and HG exhibit complex molecular explanations depending on a major gene and accompanying modifier genes. PMID:19033659

  18. Histidine maintenance requirement and efficiency of its utilization in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Heger, Jaroslav; Patrás, Peter; Nitrayová, Sona; Dolesová, Patricia; Sommer, Alexander

    2007-06-01

    An experiment was conducted in young pigs (initial BW 10.1 kg) to estimate the maintenance requirement for histidine and its efficiency of utilization for protein accretion using a comparative slaughter technique. Three groups of six pigs each were fed a purified diet supplying 0, 14 or 56 mg histidine per kg BW0.75. Following 21 d of feeding, pigs were killed for whole body compositional analysis. A representative group of six pigs was killed at the beginning of the experiment. Retention of histidine and total N were the main criteria of response. Histidine retention (R2 = 0.73) and N retention (R2 = 0.78) were linear functions of histidine intake (p < 0.001). Histidine requirement for zero histidine retention was 15.5 mg/kg BW0.7, whereas histidine required for zero N retention was 4.1 mg/kg BW0.75. At zero histidine retention, the pigs retained daily 82 mg N/kg BW0.75, presumably due to the degradation of histidine-rich compounds such as haemoglobin and/or carnosine. The slope of the regression line relating histidine retention to N retention indicated that 105 mg of histidine was deposited per gram of total N which was considerably less than the estimated histidine concentration in body protein (179 mg/g N). Based on the slopes of regression equations for histidine and N retention, marginal efficiency of histidine utilization was calculated to be 0.94 and 1.34, respectively. PMID:17578260

  19. Dicationic Surfactants with Glycine Counter Ions for Oligonucleotide Transportation.

    PubMed

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    Gemini surfactants are good candidates to bind, protect, and deliver nucleic acids. Herein, the concept of amino acids (namely glycine) as counter ions of gemini surfactants for gene therapy application was explored. This study was conducted on DNA and RNA oligomers and two quaternary bis-imidazolium salts, having 2,5-dioxahexane and 2,8-dioxanonane spacer groups. The toxicity level of surfactants was assessed by an MTT assay, and their ability to bind nucleic acids was tested through electrophoresis. The nucleic acid conformation was established based on circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopic analyses. The structures of the formed complexes were characterized by small-angle scattering of synchrotron radiation. Both studied surfactants appear to be suitable for gene therapy; however, although they vary by only three methylene groups in the spacer, they differ in binding ability and toxicity. The tested oligonucleotides maintained their native conformations upon surfactant addition and the studied lipoplexes formed a variety of structures. In systems based on a 2,5-dioxahexane spacer, a hexagonal phase was observed for DNA-surfactant complexes and a micellar phase was dominant with RNA. For the surfactant with a 2,8-dioxanonane spacer group, the primitive cubic phase prevailed. PMID:27214208

  20. Recombinant expression and isolation of human L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and identification of its active-site cysteine residue.

    PubMed Central

    Humm, A; Fritsche, E; Mann, K; Göhl, M; Huber, R

    1997-01-01

    Creatine and its phosphorylated form play a central role in the energy metabolism of muscle and nerve tissues. l-Arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AT) catalyses the committed step in the formation of creatine. The mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the enzyme are believed to derive from the same gene by alternative splicing. We have expressed recombinant human AT in Escherichia coli with two different N-termini, resembling the longest two forms of the enzyme that we had isolated recently from porcine kidney mitochondria as a mixture. The enzymes were expressed with N-terminal histidine tags followed by factor Xa-cleavage sites. We established a new method for the removal of N-terminal fusion peptides by means of an immobilized snake venom prothrombin activator. We identified cysteine-407 as the active-site residue of AT by radioactive labelling and isolation of labelled peptides, and by site-directed mutagenesis of the protein. PMID:9148748

  1. The influence of crystallinity degree on the glycine decomposition induced by 1 MeV proton bombardment in space analog conditions.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Sergio; Mendes, Luiz A V; Bordalo, Vinicius; Guaman, Christian F M; Ponciano, Cássia R; da Silveira, Enio F

    2013-01-01

    Glycine is the simplest proteinaceous amino acid and is present in all life-forms on Earth. In aqueous solutions, it appears mainly as zwitterion glycine (+NH3CH2COO-); however, in solid phase, it may be found in amorphous or crystalline (α, β, and γ) forms. The crystalline forms differ from each other by the packing of zwitterions in the unitary cells and by the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. This molecular species has been extensively detected in carbonaceous meteorites and was recently observed in the cometary samples returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. In space, glycine is exposed to several radiation fields at different temperatures. We present an experimental study on the destruction of zwitterionic glycine crystals at room temperature by 1 MeV protons, in which the dependence of the destruction rates of the α-glycine and β-glycine crystals on bombardment fluence is investigated. The samples were analyzed in situ by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry at different proton fluences. The experiments occurred under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at the Van de Graaff accelerator lab at the Pontifical Catholic University at Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Brazil. For low fluences, the dissociation cross section of α-glycine was observed to be 2.5×10(-14) cm2, a value roughly 5 times higher than the dissociation cross section found for β-glycine. The estimated half-lives of α-glycine and β-glycine zwitterionic forms extrapolated to the Earth orbit environment are 9×10(5) and 4×10(6) years, respectively. In the diffuse interstellar medium the estimated values are 1 order of magnitude lower. These results suggest that pristine interstellar β-glycine is the one most likely to survive the hostile environments of space radiation. A small feature around 1650-1700 cm(-1), tentatively attributed to an amide functional group, was observed in the IR spectra of irradiated samples, suggesting that cosmic rays may induce peptide bond synthesis in

  2. Crystal Structure of a Histidine Kinase Sensor Domain with Similarity to Periplasmic Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J.; Le-Khac, M; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Histidine kinase receptors are elements of the two-component signal transduction systems commonly found in bacteria and lower eukaryotes, where they are crucial for environmental adaption through the coupling of extracellular changes to intracellular responses. The typical two-component system consists of a membrane-spanning histidine kinase sensor and a cytoplasmic response regulator. In the calssic system, extracellular signals such as small molecule ligands and ions are detected by the periplasmic sensor domain of the histidine kinase receptor, which modulates the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain and promotes ATP-dependent autophosphorylation of a conserved histidine residue. G. sulfurreducens genomic DNA was used.

  3. Molecular insight in the purification of immunoglobulin by pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine and histidyl moieties in histidine ligand affinity chromatography (HLAC) by molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Savane, Tushar S; Kumar, Sanjit; Janakiraman, Vignesh Narasimhan; Kamalanathan, Agamudi S; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A

    2016-05-15

    Pseudobiospecific ligand l-histidine is an inexpensive, highly stable, non-toxic ligand explored successfully over the last twenty years for the purification of immunoglobulins in immobilised histidine ligand affinity chromatography. It is of great interest to know the molecular recognition sites of IgG to immobilized l-histidine. Here, we have used an in silico approach to explore the molecular recognition of l-histidine by IgG. We have assessed the feasible binding modes of histidine and its moieties at different sites of IgG and considered only those binding conformations which are exhibited via the imidazole ring NH group or any other OH donating group apart from the ones which are terminally conjugated with the support matrix. We categorised binding site into two categories; category I: inner binding groove and category II: surface binding groove and observed that the hinge region of IgG has most favourable binding pocket for l-histidine and histidyl moieties. Ser and Tyr residues on the hinge region make several significant interactions with l-histidine and histidyl moieties. In case of Fc region of IgG, l-histidine and histidyl moieties closely resemble the binding modes of Protein A, biomimetic ligand 22/8 and B domain of SpA to IgG. In addition to these we have also observed a significant binding site for l-histidine and histidyl moieties at Fab region of IgG. PMID:26476866

  4. Preparation of silica coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygar, Gülfem; Kaya, Murat; Özkan, Necati; Kocabıyık, Semra; Volkan, Mürvet

    2015-12-01

    Surface modified cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles containing Ni-NTA affinity group were synthesized and used for the separation of histidine tag proteins from the complex matrices through the use of imidazole side chains of histidine molecules. Firstly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared in an aqueous solution using the controlled co-precipitation method. In order to obtain small CoFe2O4 agglomerates, oleic acid and sodium chloride were used as dispersants. The CoFe2O4 particles were coated with silica and subsequently the surface of these silica coated particles (SiO2-CoFe2O4) was modified by amine (NH2) groups in order to add further functional groups on the silica shell. Then, carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups were added to the SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles through the NH2 groups. After that Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate (NTA) was attached to carboxyl ends of the structure. Finally, the surface modified nanoparticles were labeled with nickel (Ni) (II) ions. Furthermore, the modified SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as a new system that allows purification of the N-terminal His-tagged recombinant small heat shock protein, Tpv-sHSP 14.3.

  5. Structural Adaptability Facilitates Histidine Heme Ligation in a Cytochrome P450

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Almost all known members of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily conserve a key cysteine residue that coordinates the heme iron. Although mutation of this residue abolishes monooxygenase activity, recent work has shown that mutation to either serine or histidine unlocks non-natural carbene- and nitrene-transfer activities. Here we present the first crystal structure of a histidine-ligated P450. The T213A/C317H variant of the thermostable CYP119 from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius maintains heme iron coordination through the introduced ligand, an interaction that is accompanied by large changes in the overall protein structure. We also find that the axial cysteine C317 may be substituted with any other amino acid without abrogating folding and heme cofactor incorporation. Several of the axial mutants display unusual spectral features, suggesting that they have active sites with unique steric and electronic properties. These novel, highly stable enzyme active sites will be fruitful starting points for investigations of non-natural P450 catalysis and mechanisms. PMID:26299431

  6. Signal transduction in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitor histidine-rich glycoprotein targets focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chunsik; Dixelius, Johan; Thulin, Asa; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Claesson-Welsh, Lena; Olsson, Anna-Karin . E-mail: Anna-Karin.Olsson@genpat.uu.se

    2006-08-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) is an abundant heparin-binding plasma protein. We have shown that a fragment released from the central histidine/proline-rich (His/Pro-rich) domain of HRGP blocks endothelial cell migration in vitro and vascularization and growth of murine fibrosarcoma in vivo. The minimal active HRGP domain exerting the anti-angiogenic effect was recently narrowed down to a 35 amino acid peptide, HRGP330, derived from the His/Pro-rich domain of HRGP. By use of a signal transduction antibody array representing 400 different signal transduction molecules, we now show that HRGP and the synthetic peptide HRGP330 specifically induce tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and its downstream substrate paxillin in endothelial cells. HRGP/HRGP330 treatment of endothelial cells induced disruption of actin stress fibers, a process reversed by treatment of cells with the FAK inhibitor geldanamycin. In addition, VEGF-mediated endothelial cell tubular morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was inhibited by HRGP and HRGP330. In contrast, VEGF-induced proliferation was not affected by HRGP or HRGP330, demonstrating the central role of cell migration during tube formation. In conclusion, our data show that HRGP targets focal adhesions in endothelial cells, thereby disrupting the cytoskeletal organization and the ability of endothelial cells to assemble into vessel structures.

  7. Polyamine synthesis in plants. Purification and properties of amidinotransferase from soybean (Glycine max) axes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geun Taek; Kim, Woo Jeung; Cho, Young Dong

    2002-12-01

    Three-day-old soybean (Glycine max) seedlings were exposed to 0.4 M sorbitol solution for 4 h to induce amidinotransferase activity, with the corresponding enzyme being purified to homogeneity by chromatographic separation on DEAE-Sephacel, Sephacryl S-300 and L-arginine Sepharose 4B. The purified enzyme used L-arginine and L-glycine as the major donor/acceptor of the amidino group, respectively, with formation of guanidinoacetic acid and ornithine products being confirmed by ESI-MS. The enzyme is a tetrameric protein having a molecular mass of 240,000 Da, whose thiol group is needed for enzymatic activity. The K(M)s for arginine and glycine were 3.8 and 0.89 mM, respectively, with optimal temperature and pH being 37 degrees C and 9.5, respectively. The soybean amidinotransferase could be indirectly involved in nitrogen metabolism, as suggested by the observation that arginine:glycine amidinotransferase in soybean axes is indirectly involved in putrescine biosynthesis and displays feedback control at high levels of an endogenous regulator, putrescine. PMID:12453570

  8. Effect of Liquid Swine Manure on Hatch and Viability of Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianli; Chen, Senyu; Zhu, Jun; Ruan, Weibin

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse to determine the effect of raw and anaerobically digested liquid swine manures on the hatch and viability of Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode. Anaerobic digestion was performed for 15 and 35 days to enrich volatile fatty acids (VFA) and ammonium (NH4 +), respectively. All filtrates of the raw, VFA-enriched, and NH4 +-enriched manures at 10−1 to 250−1 dilutions inhibited H. glycines hatch, and the reduction of hatch was increased with increasing concentration of the manure. Cumulative hatch at day 21 was only 2.1% to 3.7% in the 10−1 dilution manures, while the hatch in water was 21% to 27.3%. The high concentrations appeared to be lethal to some eggs. Most second-stage juveniles (J2) of H. glycines were killed when incubated for 8 hours in the manure filtrate at the original concentration (>90% mortality) or for 48 hours at the 64−1 dilution (> 82% mortality). When J2 were treated with the manures at 10−1 to 250−1 dilutions for 4 hours, only the 10−1 dilution of VFA-enriched and raw manures resulted in a lower number of J2 that penetrated soybean roots as compared with lower concentrations. The VFA-enriched manure was the best, raw manure intermediate, and NH4 +-enriched manure the least effective in inhibiting H. glycines hatch and killing eggs and J2. PMID:19259532

  9. Exposure to the Proton Scavenger Glycine under Alkaline Conditions Induces Escherichia coli Viability Loss

    PubMed Central

    Vanhauteghem, Donna; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Lauwaerts, Angelo; Sys, Stanislas; Boyen, Filip; Cox, Eric; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work described a clear loss of Escherichia coli (E. coli) membrane integrity after incubation with glycine or its N-methylated derivatives N-methylglycine (sarcosine) and N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), but not N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine), under alkaline stress conditions. The current study offers a thorough viability analysis, based on a combination of real-time physiological techniques, of E. coli exposed to glycine and its N-methylated derivatives at alkaline pH. Flow cytometry was applied to assess various physiological parameters such as membrane permeability, esterase activity, respiratory activity and membrane potential. ATP and inorganic phosphate concentrations were also determined. Membrane damage was confirmed through the measurement of nucleic acid leakage. Results further showed no loss of esterase or respiratory activity, while an instant and significant decrease in the ATP concentration occurred upon exposure to either glycine, sarcosine or DMG, but not betaine. There was a clear membrane hyperpolarization as well as a significant increase in cellular inorganic phosphate concentration. Based on these results, we suggest that the inability to sustain an adequate level of ATP combined with a decrease in membrane functionality leads to the loss of bacterial viability when exposed to the proton scavengers glycine, sarcosine and DMG at alkaline pH. PMID:23544135

  10. Exposure to the proton scavenger glycine under alkaline conditions induces Escherichia coli viability loss.

    PubMed

    Vanhauteghem, Donna; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Lauwaerts, Angelo; Sys, Stanislas; Boyen, Filip; Cox, Eric; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work described a clear loss of Escherichia coli (E. coli) membrane integrity after incubation with glycine or its N-methylated derivatives N-methylglycine (sarcosine) and N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), but not N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine), under alkaline stress conditions. The current study offers a thorough viability analysis, based on a combination of real-time physiological techniques, of E. coli exposed to glycine and its N-methylated derivatives at alkaline pH. Flow cytometry was applied to assess various physiological parameters such as membrane permeability, esterase activity, respiratory activity and membrane potential. ATP and inorganic phosphate concentrations were also determined. Membrane damage was confirmed through the measurement of nucleic acid leakage. Results further showed no loss of esterase or respiratory activity, while an instant and significant decrease in the ATP concentration occurred upon exposure to either glycine, sarcosine or DMG, but not betaine. There was a clear membrane hyperpolarization as well as a significant increase in cellular inorganic phosphate concentration. Based on these results, we suggest that the inability to sustain an adequate level of ATP combined with a decrease in membrane functionality leads to the loss of bacterial viability when exposed to the proton scavengers glycine, sarcosine and DMG at alkaline pH. PMID:23544135

  11. Glycine: an alternative transmitter candidate of the pallidosubthalamic projection neurons in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, M.; Hattori, T.

    1987-08-22

    Autoradiographic retrograde tracing techniques with radioactive transmitters were used to analyse the identity of a putative transmitter in the rat pallidosubthalamic (GP-STN) pathway. One to 2 hours after the stereotaxic injection of /sup 3/H-glycine restricted to the STN, a large number of neuronal somata were radiolabeled in the GP. No comparable labeling was observed following the injection of /sup 3/H-gamma-aminobutyric acid (/sup 3/H-GABA) into the same nucleus even with survival times as long as 6 hours. Specifically, no significant somatic labeling was detected either in the GP or in the caudoputamen (CPU). Only when /sup 3/H-GABA was injected into the substantia nigra did CPU and GP neurons become labeled. On the contrary, STN neuronal somata were invariably labeled 6 hours after the intrapallidal injection of /sup 3/H-GABA, whereas no perikaryal labeling was observed in the STN after /sup 3/H-glycine injection into the GP. The perikaryal labeling was prevented in all cases by intraventricular administration of colchicine 1 day before the isotope injections. The observations suggest that /sup 3/H-glycine was preferentially transported retrogradely through the GP-STN pathway, and /sup 3/H-GABA through the STN-GP projection. In view of the recent controversy on the role of GABA as a putative transmitter of the GP-STN projection, we now propose glycine as an alternative transmitter candidate of these critically situated neurons in the basal ganglia.

  12. Formation and Operation of the Histidine-degrading Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lessie, Thomas G.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1967-01-01

    Histidine ammonia lyase (histidase), urocanase, and the capacity to degrade formiminoglutamate, which are respectively involved in steps I, II, and IV in the catabolism of histidine, were induced during growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on histidine or urocanate, and were formed gratuitously in the presence of dihydro-urocanate. Urocanase-deficient bacteria formed enzymes I and IV constitutively; presumably they accumulate enough urocanate from the breakdown of endogenous histidine to induce formation of the pathway. Urocanate did not satisfy the histidine requirement of a histidine auxotroph, indicating that it probably acted as an inducer without being converted to histidine. The results imply that urocanate is the physiological inducer of the histidine-degrading enzymes in P. aeruginosa. Enzymes of the pathway were extremely sensitive to catabolite repression; enzymes I and II, but not IV, were coordinately repressed. Our results suggest a specific involvement of nitrogenous metabolites in the repression. Mutant bacteria with altered sensitivity to repression were obtained. The molecular weight of partially purified histidase was estimated at 210,000 by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Its Km for histidine was 2 × 10−3 m in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane chloride buffer. Sigmoid saturation curves were obtained in pyrophosphate buffer, indicating that the enzyme might have multiple binding sites for histidine. Under certain conditions, histidase appeared to be partially inactive in vivo. These findings suggest that some sort of allosteric interaction involving histidase may play a role in governing the operation of the pathway of histidine catabolism. PMID:4290562

  13. Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron(III)-Glycine Formation Constant in Aqueous Medium Using Competitive Ligand Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, Rajendra; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-01-01

    The formation constant of iron(III) complex with glycine (Gly) ligand in aqueous acidic medium (0.2 M HNO[subscript 3], I = 0.2 M at 28 plus or minus 1 degree C) was determined spectrophotometrically in which a competing color reaction between Fe(III) and SCN[superscript -] was used as an indicator reaction. Under the specified conditions Fe(III)…

  14. Bis-Histidine-Coordinated Hemes in Four-Helix Bundles: How the Geometry of the Bundle Controls the Axial Imidazole Plane Orientations in Transmembrane Cytochromes of Mitochondrial Complexes II and III and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Edward A.; Walker, F. Ann

    2009-01-01

    Early investigation of the EPR spectra of bis-histidine-coordinated membrane-bound ferriheme proteins led to the description of a spectral signal that had only one resolved feature. These became known as “highly anisotropic low-spin” (HALS) or “large gmax” ferriheme centers. Extensive work with small-molecule model heme complexes showed that this spectroscopic signature occurs in bis-imidazole ferrihemes in which the planes of the imidazole ligands are nearly perpendicular, Δϕ = 57–90°. In the last decade protein crystallographic studies have revealed the atomic structures of a number of examples of bis-histidine heme proteins. A frequent characteristic of these large gmax ferrihemes in membrane-bound proteins is the occurrence of the heme within a four-helix bundle with a left-handed twist. The histidine ligands occur at the same level on two diametrically opposed helices of the bundle. These ligands have the same side chain conformation and ligate heme iron on the bundle axis, resulting in a quasi-2-fold symmetric structure. The two non-ligand-bearing helices also obey this symmetry, and have a conserved small residue, usually glycine, where the edge of the heme ring makes contact with the helix backbones. In many cases this small residue is preceded by a threonine or serine residue whose side chain hydroxyl oxygen acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor from the Nδ1 atom of the heme-ligating histidine. The Δϕ angle is thus determined by the common histidine side-chain conformation and the crossing angle of the ligand-bearing helices, in some cases constrained by H-bonds to the Ser/Thr residues on the non-ligand-bearing helices. PMID:18418633

  15. Functional analyses of carnivorous plant-specific amino acid residues in S-like ribonucleases.

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoki; Nishimura, Emi; Kikuchi, Yo; Ohyama, Takashi

    2015-09-11

    Unlike plants with no carnivory, carnivorous plants seem to use S-like ribonucleases (RNases) as an enzyme for carnivory. Carnivorous plant-specific conserved amino acid residues are present at four positions around the conserved active site (CAS). The roles of these conserved amino acid residues in the enzymatic function were explored in the current study by preparing five recombinant variants of DA-I, the S-like RNase of Drosera adelae. The kcat and kcat/Km values of the enzymes revealed that among the four variants with a single mutation, the serine to glycine mutation at position 111 most negatively influenced the enzymatic activity. The change in the bulkiness of the amino acid residue side-chain seemed to be the major cause of the above effect. Modeling of the three dimensional (3D) structures strongly suggested that the S to G mutation at 111 greatly altered the overall enzyme conformation. The conserved four amino acid residues are likely to function in keeping the two histidine residues, which are essential for the cleavage of RNA strands, and the CAS in the most functional enzymatic conformation. PMID:26235877

  16. Alterations in the levels of plasma amino acids in polycystic ovary syndrome- A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Unni, C. Sumithra N.; Lakshman, Lakshmi R.; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Subhakumari, K.N.; Menon, N. Leela

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Plasma amino acid levels are known to be altered in conditions like sepsis and burns which are situations of metabolic stress. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition which affects a woman throughout her life, is said to be associated with metabolic stress. This study was undertaken to assess if there were significant alterations in the levels of plasma amino acids in women with PCOS. Methods: Sixty five women with PCOS along with the similar number of age matched normal controls were included in this study. Levels of 14 amino acids were determined using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Results: The levels of methionine, cystine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, valine, tyrosine, proline, glycine, lysine and histidine were found to be significantly (P<0.001) lower in cases than in controls. Arginine and alanine levels were found to be significantly (P<0.001) higher in cases compared with controls. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed significant derangement in the levels of plasma amino acids in women with PCOS which might be due to the oxidative and metabolic stress associated with it. Further studies need to be done to confirm the findings. PMID:26658589

  17. Histidine Methylation of Yeast Ribosomal Protein Rpl3p Is Required for Proper 60S Subunit Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadid, Qais; Roy, Kevin; Munroe, William; Dzialo, Maria C.; Chanfreau, Guillaume F.

    2014-01-01

    Histidine protein methylation is an unusual posttranslational modification. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the large ribosomal subunit protein Rpl3p is methylated at histidine 243, a residue that contacts the 25S rRNA near the P site. Rpl3p methylation is dependent upon the presence of Hpm1p, a candidate seven-beta-strand methyltransferase. In this study, we elucidated the biological activities of Hpm1p in vitro and in vivo. Amino acid analyses reveal that Hpm1p is responsible for all of the detectable protein histidine methylation in yeast. The modification is found on a polypeptide corresponding to the size of Rpl3p in ribosomes and in a nucleus-containing organelle fraction but was not detected in proteins of the ribosome-free cytosol fraction. In vitro assays demonstrate that Hpm1p has methyltransferase activity on ribosome-associated but not free Rpl3p, suggesting that its activity depends on interactions with ribosomal components. hpm1 null cells are defective in early rRNA processing, resulting in a deficiency of 60S subunits and translation initiation defects that are exacerbated in minimal medium. Cells lacking Hpm1p are resistant to cycloheximide and verrucarin A and have decreased translational fidelity. We propose that Hpm1p plays a role in the orchestration of the early assembly of the large ribosomal subunit and in faithful protein production. PMID:24865971

  18. Histidines, heart of the hydrogen ion channel from influenza A virus: Toward an understanding of conductance and proton selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Fu, Riqiang; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Busath, David D.; Vijayvergiya, Viksita; Cross, Timothy A.

    2006-05-01

    The heart of the H+ conductance mechanism in the homotetrameric M2 H+ channel from influenza A is a set of four histidine side chains. Here, we show that protonation of the third of these imidazoles coincides with acid activation of this transmembrane channel and that, at physiological pH, the channel is closed by two imidazole-imidazolium dimers, each sharing a low-barrier hydrogen bond. This unique construct succeeds in distributing a pair of charges over four rings and many atoms in a low dielectric environment to minimize charge repulsion. These dimers form with identical pKas of 8.2 ± 0.2, suggesting cooperative H+ binding and clearly illustrating high H+ affinity for this channel. The protonation behavior of the histidine side chains has been characterized by using solid-state NMR spectroscopy on the M2 transmembrane domain in fully hydrated lipid bilayers where the tetrameric backbone structure is known. Furthermore, electrophysiological measurements of multichannel and single-channel experiments confirm that these protein constructs are functional. M2 channel | proton channel | solid-state NMR | low-barrier hydrogen bond | histidine ionization constants

  19. Secretion of a malarial histidine-rich protein (Pf HRP II) from Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Uni, S.; Aikawa, M.; Aley, S.B.; Leech, J.H.; Lew, A.M.; Wellems, T.E.; Rener, J.; Taylor, D.W.

    1986-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IRBCs) synthesis several histidine-rich proteins (HRPs) that accumulate high levels of (/sup 3/H)histidine but very low levels of amino acids such as (/sup 3/H)isoleucine or (/sup 35/S)methionine. The authors prepared a monoclonal antibody which reacts specifically with one of these HRPs (Pf HRP II) and studied the location and synthesis of this protein during the parasite's intracellular growth. With the knob-positive Malayan Camp strain of P. falciparum, the monoclonal antibody identified a multiplet of protein of protein bands with major species at M/sub r/ 72,000 and 69,000. Pf HRP II synthesis began with immature parasites (rings) and continued through the trophozoite stage. The M/sub r/ 72,000 band of Pf HRP II, but not the faster moving bands of the multiplet, was recovered as a water-soluble protein from the culture supernatant of intact IRBCs. Approximately 50% of the total (/sup 3/H)histidine radioactivity incorporated into the M/sub r/ 72,000 band was extracellular between 2 and 24 h of culture. Immunofluorescence and cryothin-section immunoelectron microscopy localized Pf HRP II to several cell compartments including the parasite cytoplasm, as concentrated packets in the host erythrocyte cytoplasm and at the IRBC membrane. The results provide evidence for an intracellular route of transport for a secreted malarial protein from the parasite through several membranes and the host cell cytoplasm.

  20. Affinity labeling and characterization of the active site histidine of glucosephosphate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.R.; Gracy, R.W.; Hartman, F.C.

    1980-10-10

    N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was found to act as a specific affinity label for the active center of glucosephosphate isomerase. The inactivation process followed pseudo-first order kinetics, was irreversible, and exhibited rate saturation kinetics with minimal half-lives of inactivation of 4.5 and 6.3 min for the enzyme isolated from human placenta and rabbit muscle, respectively. The pH dependence of the inactivation process closely paralleled the pH dependence of the overall catalytic process with pK/sub a/ values at pH 6.4 and 9.0. The stoichiometry of labeling of either enzyme, as determined with N-bromo(/sup 14/C/sub 2/)acetylethanolamine phosphate, was 1 eq of the affinity label/subunit of enzyme. After acid hydrolysis and amino acid analysis of the radioactive affinity-labeled human enzyme, only radioactive 3-carboxymethyl histidine was found. In the case of the rabbit enzyme, the only radioactive derivative obtained was 1-carboxymethyl histidine. Active site tryptic peptides were isolated by solvent extraction, thin layer peptide fingerprinting, and ion exchange chromatography before and after removal of the phosphate from the active site peptide. Amino acid analysis of the labeled peptides from the two species were very similar. Using high sensitivity methods for sequence analysis, the primary structure of the active site was established as Val-Leu-His-Ala-Glu-Asn-Val-Asp (Gly,Thr,Ser) Glu-Ile (Thr-Gly-His-Lys-Glx)-Tyr-Phe. Apparent sequence homology between the catalytic center of glucosephosphate isomerase and triosephosphate isomerase suggest that the two enzymes may have evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  1. Helix-Capping Histidines: Diversity of N-H···N Hydrogen Bond Strength Revealed by (2h)JNN Scalar Couplings.

    PubMed

    Preimesberger, Matthew R; Majumdar, Ananya; Rice, Selena L; Que, Lauren; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2015-11-24

    In addition to its well-known roles as an electrophile and general acid, the side chain of histidine often serves as a hydrogen bond (H-bond) acceptor. These H-bonds provide a convenient pH-dependent switch for local structure and functional motifs. In hundreds of instances, a histidine caps the N-terminus of α- and 310-helices by forming a backbone NH···Nδ1 H-bond. To characterize the resilience and dynamics of the histidine cap, we measured the trans H-bond scalar coupling constant, (2h)JNN, in several forms of Group 1 truncated hemoglobins and cytochrome b5. The set of 19 measured (2h)JNN values were between 4.0 and 5.4 Hz, generally smaller than in nucleic acids (~6-10 Hz) and indicative of longer, weaker bonds in the studied proteins. A positive linear correlation between (2h)JNN and the difference in imidazole ring (15)N chemical shift (Δ(15)N = |δ(15)Nδ1 - δ(15)Nε2|) was found to be consistent with variable H-bond length and variable cap population related to the ionization of histidine in the capping and noncapping states. The relative ease of (2h)JNN detection suggests that this parameter can become part of the standard arsenal for describing histidines in helix caps and other key structural and catalytic elements involving NH···N H-bonds. The combined nucleic acid and protein data extend the utility of (2h)JNN as a sensitive marker of local structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties in biomolecules. PMID:26523621

  2. Evaluation of mechanical properties of some glycine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraju, D.; Raja Shekar, P. V.; Chandra, Ch. Sateesh; Rao, K. Kishan; Krishna, N. Gopi

    2014-04-01

    The variation of Vickers hardness with load for (101) glycine zinc chloride (GZC), (001) glycine lithium sulphate (GLS), (001) triglycine sulphate (TGS) and (010) glycine phosphite (GPI) crystals was studied. From the cracks initiated along the corners of the indentation impression, crack lengths were measured and the fracture toughness value and brittle index number were determined. The hardness related parameters viz. yield strength and Young's modulus were also estimated. The anisotropic nature of the crystals was studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  3. Evaluation of mechanical properties of some glycine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju, D.; Raja Shekar, P. V.; Chandra, Ch. Sateesh; Rao, K. Kishan; Krishna, N. Gopi

    2014-04-24

    The variation of Vickers hardness with load for (101) glycine zinc chloride (GZC), (001) glycine lithium sulphate (GLS), (001) triglycine sulphate (TGS) and (010) glycine phosphite (GPI) crystals was studied. From the cracks initiated along the corners of the indentation impression, crack lengths were measured and the fracture toughness value and brittle index number were determined. The hardness related parameters viz. yield strength and Young’s modulus were also estimated. The anisotropic nature of the crystals was studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  4. Effects of grain, fructose, and histidine on ruminal pH and fermentation products during an induced subacute acidosis protocol.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Celi, P; Rabiee, A R; Heuer, C; Bramley, E; Miller, D W; King, R; Lean, I J

    2012-04-01

    The effects of grain, fructose, and histidine on ruminal pH and fermentation products were studied in dairy cattle during an induced subacute acidosis protocol. Thirty Holstein heifers were randomly allocated to 5 treatment groups: (1) control (no grain); (2) grain [fed at a crushed triticale dry matter intake (DMI) of 1.2% of body weight (BW)]; (3) grain (0.8% of BW DMI)+fructose (0.4% of BW DMI); (4) grain (1.2% of BW DMI)+histidine (6 g/head); and (5) grain (0.8% of BW DMI)+fructose (0.4% of BW DMI)+histidine (6 g/head) in a partial factorial arrangement. Heifers were fed 1 kg of grain daily with ad libitum access to ryegrass silage and alfalfa hay for 10 d. Feed was withheld for 14 h before challenge day, on which heifers were fed 200 g of alfalfa hay and then the treatment diets immediately thereafter. Rumen samples were collected 5 min after diet ingestion, 60 min later, and at 3 subsequent 50-min intervals. Grain decreased ruminal pH and increased ammonia, total volatile fatty acid (VFA), acetate, butyrate, propionate, and valerate concentrations compared with controls. The addition of grain had no effect on ruminal D- and L-lactate concentrations. Fructose markedly decreased ruminal pH and markedly increased D- and L-lactate concentrations. Fructose increased total VFA and butyrate and decreased valerate concentrations. Although histidine did not have a marked effect on ruminal fermentation, increased concentrations of histamine were observed following feeding. This study demonstrates that the substitution of some grain for fructose can lower ruminal pH and increase VFA and lactate concentrations, warranting further investigation into the role of sugars on the risk of acidosis in dairy cattle. PMID:22459843

  5. Iridium(III) Luminescent Probe for Detection of the Malarial Protein Biomarker Histidine Rich Protein-II.

    PubMed

    Davis, Keersten M; Bitting, Anna L; Markwalter, Christine F; Bauer, Westley S; Wright, David W

    2015-01-01

    This work outlines the synthesis of a non-emissive, cyclometalated Ir(III) complex, Ir(ppy)2(H2O)2(+) (Ir1), which elicits a rapid, long-lived phosphorescent signal when coordinated to a histidine-containing protein immobilized on the surface of a magnetic particle. Synthesis of Ir1, in high yields,is complete O/N and involves splitting of the parent cyclometalated Ir(III) chloro-bridged dimer into two equivalents of the solvated complex. To confirm specificity, several amino acids were probed for coordination activity when added to the synthesized probe, and only histidine elicited a signal response. Using BNT-II, a branched peptide mimic of the malarial biomarker Histidine Rich Protein II (pfHRP-II), the iridium probe was validated as a tool for HRP-II detection. Quenching effects were noted in the BNT-II/Ir1 titration when compared to L-Histidine/Ir1, but these were attributed to steric hindrance and triplet state quenching. Biolayer interferometry was used to determine real-time kinetics of interaction of Ir1 with BNT-II. Once the system was optimized, the limit of detection of rcHRP-II using the probe was found to be 12.8 nM in solution. When this protein was immobilized on the surface of a 50 µm magnetic agarose particle, the limit of detection was 14.5 nM. The robust signal response of this inorganic probe, as well as its flexibility of use in solution or immobilized on a surface, can lend itself toward a variety of applications, from diagnostic use to imaging. PMID:26273845

  6. 21 CFR 176.160 - Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N-heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonyl glycine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N... § 176.160 Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N-heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonyl glycine. The chromium... by weight of the chromium (Cr III) complex of heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonic acid may be...

  7. Glyphosate resistant and susceptible soybean (Glycine max) and canola (Brassica napus) dose response and metabolism relationships with glyphosate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine 1) dose response of glyphosate-resistant (GR) and –susceptible (non-GR) soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and canola (Brassica napus L.) to glyphosate, 2) if differential metabolism of glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is the underlying mechanism ...

  8. Effect of amino acids on the formation of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in creatinine/phenylalanine and creatinine/phenylalanine/4-oxo-2-nonenal reaction mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Alcón, Esmeralda; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2013-12-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) formation in mixtures of creatinine, phenylalanine, amino acids and 4-oxo-2-nonenal was studied, to analyse the role of amino acids on the generation of this heterocyclic aromatic amine. When oxidised lipid was absent, cysteine, serine, aspartic acid, threonine, asparagine, tryptophan, tyrosine, proline, and methionine increased significantly (p < 0.05) the amount of PhIP formed in comparison to the control. When lipid was present, only the addition of methionine, glycine, and serine increased significantly (p < 0.05) the amount of PhIP produced, while histidine, cysteine, lysine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and alanine reduced significantly (p < 0.05) PhIP. These results may be a consequence of the different competitive reactions that occur. Thus, in the absence of lipids, thermal decomposition of the amino acids produced reactive carbonyls that converted phenylalanine into phenylacetaldehyde as a key step in the formation of PhIP. When oxidised lipid was present, amino acids competed with phenylalanine for the lipid, and amino acid degradation products were formed, among which alpha-keto acids seemed to play a role in these reactions. These results suggest that PhIP can be produced by several alternative reaction pathways from all major food components, including amino acids and lipids, in addition to carbohydrates. PMID:23993611

  9. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  10. Electrophysiological evidence for acidic, basic, and neutral amino acid olfactory receptor sites in the catfish.

    PubMed

    Caprio, J; Byrd, R P

    1984-09-01

    Electrophysiological experiments indicate that olfactory receptors of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, contain different receptor sites for the acidic (A), basic (B), and neutral amino acids; further, at least two partially interacting neutral sites exist, one for the hydrophilic neutral amino acids containing short side chains (SCN), and the second for the hydrophobic amino acids containing long side chains (LCN). The extent of cross-adaptation was determined by comparing the electro-olfactogram (EOG) responses to 20 "test" amino acids during continuous bathing of the olfactory mucosa with water only (control) to those during each of the eight "adapting" amino acid regimes. Both the adapting and test amino acids were adjusted in concentrations to provide approximately equal response magnitudes in the unadapted state. Under all eight adapting regimes, the test EOG responses were reduced from those obtained in the unadapted state, but substantial quantitative differences resulted, depending upon the molecular structure of the adapting stimulus. Analyses of the patterns of EOG responses to the test stimuli identified and characterized the respective "transduction processes," a term used to describe membrane events initiated by a particular subset of amino acid stimuli that are intricately linked to the origin of the olfactory receptor potential. Only when the stimulus compounds interact with different transduction processes are the stimuli assumed to bind to different membrane "sites." Four relatively independent L-alpha-amino acid transduction processes (and thus at least four binding sites) identified in this report include: (a) the A process for aspartic and glutamic acids; (b) the B process for arginine and lysine; (c) the SCN process for glycine, alanine, serine, glutamine, and possibly cysteine; (d) the LCN process for methionine, ethionine, valine, norvaline, leucine, norleucine, glutamic acid-gamma-methyl ester, histidine, phenylalanine, and also

  11. Novel Pectate Lyase Genes of Heterodera glycines Play Key Roles in the Early Stage of Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan; Cui, Jiangkuan; Long, Haibo; Huang, Wenkun; Kong, Lingan; Liu, Shiming; He, Wenting; Hu, Xianqi; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Pectate lyases are known to play a key role in pectin degradation by catalyzing the random cleavage of internal polymer linkages (endo-pectinases). In this paper, four novel cDNAs, designated Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7, that encode pectate lyases were cloned and characterized from the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The predicted protein sequences of HG-PEL-3, HG-PEL-4 and HG-PEL-6 differed significantly in both their amino acid sequences and their genomic structures from other pectate lyases of H. glycines (HG-PEL-1, HG-PEL-2 and HG-PEL-7). A phylogenetic study revealed that the pectate lyase proteins of H. glycines are clustered into distinct clades and have distinct numbers and positioning of introns, which suggests that the pectate lyase genes of H. glycines may have evolved from at least two ancestral genes. A Southern blot analysis revealed that multiple Hg-pel-6-like genes were present in the H. glycines genome. In situ hybridization showed that four novel pectate lyases (Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7) were actively transcribed in the subventral esophageal gland cells. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay supported the finding that the expression of these genes was strong in the egg, pre-parasitic second-stage juvenile (J2) and early parasitic J2 stages and that it declined in further developmental stages of the nematode. This expression pattern suggests that these proteins play a role in the migratory phase of the nematode life cycle. Knocking down Hg-pel-6 using in vitro RNA interference resulted in a 46.9% reduction of the number of nematodes that invaded the plants and a 61.5% suppression of the development of H. glycines females within roots compared to the GFP-dsRNA control. Plant host-derived RNAi induced the silencing of the Hg-pel-6gene, which significantly reduced the nematode infection levels at 7 Days post inoculation (dpi). Similarly, this procedure reduced the number of female adults at 40 dpi, which suggests

  12. Novel Pectate Lyase Genes of Heterodera glycines Play Key Roles in the Early Stage of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan; Cui, Jiangkuan; Long, Haibo; Huang, Wenkun; Kong, Lingan; Liu, Shiming; He, Wenting; Hu, Xianqi; Peng, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Pectate lyases are known to play a key role in pectin degradation by catalyzing the random cleavage of internal polymer linkages (endo-pectinases). In this paper, four novel cDNAs, designated Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7, that encode pectate lyases were cloned and characterized from the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. The predicted protein sequences of HG-PEL-3, HG-PEL-4 and HG-PEL-6 differed significantly in both their amino acid sequences and their genomic structures from other pectate lyases of H. glycines (HG-PEL-1, HG-PEL-2 and HG-PEL-7). A phylogenetic study revealed that the pectate lyase proteins of H. glycines are clustered into distinct clades and have distinct numbers and positioning of introns, which suggests that the pectate lyase genes of H. glycines may have evolved from at least two ancestral genes. A Southern blot analysis revealed that multiple Hg-pel-6-like genes were present in the H. glycines genome. In situ hybridization showed that four novel pectate lyases (Hg-pel-3, Hg-pel-4, Hg-pel-6 and Hg-pel-7) were actively transcribed in the subventral esophageal gland cells. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay supported the finding that the expression of these genes was strong in the egg, pre-parasitic second-stage juvenile (J2) and early parasitic J2 stages and that it declined in further developmental stages of the nematode. This expression pattern suggests that these proteins play a role in the migratory phase of the nematode life cycle. Knocking down Hg-pel-6 using in vitro RNA interference resulted in a 46.9% reduction of the number of nematodes that invaded the plants and a 61.5% suppression of the development of H. glycines females within roots compared to the GFP-dsRNA control. Plant host-derived RNAi induced the silencing of the Hg-pel-6gene, which significantly reduced the nematode infection levels at 7 Days post inoculation (dpi). Similarly, this procedure reduced the number of female adults at 40 dpi, which suggests

  13. Linear free energy relationship rate constants and basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in positronium-glycine complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongti; Liang, Jiachang; Du, Youming; Cao, Chun; Yin, Dinzhen; Wang, Shuying; Zhang, Tianbao

    1987-06-01

    Complex formation between positronium and glycine derivatives in solution is discussed and the complex reaction rate constants obtained by means of a positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer with BaF 2 detectors. Rate constants mainly depend on the conjugation effect at the benzene ring and the induction effect of the substituents at the phenyl. There is a linear free energy relationship between rate constants and basicities of N-substituted phenyl glycines in orthopositronium-glycine complex formation.

  14. Structural, vibrational and theoretical studies of L-histidine bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. Ben; Feki, H.; Abid, Y.; Boughzala, H.; Mlayah, A.

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the results of our calculations of the geometric parameters, vibrational spectra and hyperpolarizability of a non linear optical material, L-histidine bromide. Due to the lack of sufficiently precise information on the geometric structure available in literature, theoretical calculations were preceded by re-determination of the crystal X-ray structure. Single crystals of L-histidine bromide have been grown by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in the non-Centro symmetric space group P2 12 12 1 of the orthorhombic system. Raman spectra have been recorded in the range [200-3500 cm -1]. All observed vibrational bands have been discussed and assigned to normal mode or to combinations and overtones on the basis of our calculations. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using HF and DFT (B3LYP and BLYP) show good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison between the measured and the calculated vibrational frequencies indicate that B3LYP is superior to the scaled HF approach for molecular vibrational problems. To investigate microscopic second order non linear optical properties of L-histidine bromide, the electric dipole μ, the polarizability α and the hyperpolarizability β were computed using DFT//B3LYP/6-31G(d) method. According to our calculations, the title compound exhibits non-zero β value revealing microscopic second order NLO behaviour.

  15. Temperature dependence of histidine ionization constants in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, S; Lecomte, J T

    1997-01-01

    The standard enthalpy of ionization of six titratable histidines in horse metaquomyoglobin was determined by repeating proton NMR titrations as a function of temperature and using the van't Hoff relationship. It was found that deltaH degrees varies between 16 and 37 kJ mol(-1) in the protein, compared with a value of 29 kJ mol(-1) in free histidine. The standard entropy change was evaluated by combining the enthalpy and free energy changes derived from the pKa values. Although the entropy change could not be precisely and accurately obtained by this method, it could be established that it spans a wide range, from -60 to 0 J K(-1) mol(-1), about the value of -23 J K(-1) mol(-1) for the free histidine. The entropy change was used within the framework of enthalpy-entropy compensation to partition the solvation component from the standard thermodynamic quantities for each of the titrating residues. It was shown that the partitioning of the values in the protein is not readily understood in terms of solvent accessibility or electrostatic interactions. The contribution of solvation effects to the temperature response appeared to be significant only in the case of His-119 and His-48. The standard quantities were also used to explore the energetics of proton binding in the native state at temperatures below the onset of thermal denaturation. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9414235

  16. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy; Stock, Ann M.

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  17. Cell Fate Regulation Governed by a Repurposed Bacterial Histidine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Thomas H.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK∼P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation. PMID:25349992

  18. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy; Stock, Ann M.

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interactionmore » between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.« less

  19. Activity-Based Probe for Histidine Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Kaelyn E.; Francis, Samson; Carlson, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are signaling pathways composed of two proteins, a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). Upon stimulation, the HK autophosphorylates at a conserved histidine. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to an aspartate on a RR, eliciting an adaptive response, often up- or downregulation of gene expression. TCS signaling controls many functions in bacteria including development, virulence and antibiotic resistance, making the proteins involved in these systems potential therapeutic targets. Efficient methods for the profiling of HKs are currently lacking. For direct readout of HK activity, we sought to design a probe that enables detection of the phosphotransfer event; however, analysis of the phosphohistidine species is made difficult by the instability of the P-N bond. We anticipated that use of a γ-thiophosphorylated ATP analog, which would yield a thiophosphorylated histidine intermediate, could overcome this challenge. We determined that the fluorophore-conjugated probe, ATPγS-BODIPY, labels active HK proteins and is competitive for the ATP-binding site. This activity-based probe provides a new strategy for analysis of TCSs and other HK-mediated processes and will facilitate both functional studies and inhibitor identification. PMID:22606938

  20. Estimation of endogenous protein and amino acid ileal losses in weaned piglets by regression analysis using diets with graded levels of casein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated endogenous loss of proteins and amino acids (AAs) at the ileal level in growing pigs. However, only a few studies have researched this subject in piglets. Knowledge regarding AA ileal digestibility in piglets would be helpful during the formulation of diets for weaning piglets, rather than just using coefficients obtained in growing pigs. Therefore, in this study, we sought to estimate endogenous protein and AA ileal losses in piglets. Furthermore, apparent and true ileal digestibility (AID and TID) of protein and AAs from casein were measured. Results The average flow of protein was 20.8 g/kg of dry matter intake (DMI). Basal protein loss, as estimated by regression, was 16.9 g/kg DMI. Glutamic acid, arginine, and aspartic acid (2.2, 1.4, and 1.2 g/kg DMI, respectively) were the AAs for which greater losses were seen. The AID of protein and AAs increased as the protein level in the diet increased. A higher increment in AID was observed between diets with 80 and160 g CP/kg of feed; this finding was mainly attributable to increases in glycine and arginine (46.1% and 18%, respectively). The TID of protein was 97.8, and the TID of AAs varied from 93.9 for histidine to 100.2 for phenylalanine. Conclusions The basal endogenous protein loss in piglets was 16.9 g/kg DMI. Endogenous protein was rich in glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and arginine, which represented 32.7% of endogenous protein loss in weaning piglets. The TID of casein was high and varied from 93.0 for histidine to 100.2 for phenylalanine. PMID:24053636

  1. Simultaneous analysis of the non-canonical amino acids norleucine and norvaline in biopharmaceutical-related fermentation processes by a new ultra-high performance liquid chromatography approach.

    PubMed

    Biermann, Michael; Bardl, Bettina; Vollstädt, Sebastian; Linnemann, Julia; Knüpfer, Uwe; Seidel, Guido; Horn, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a precise and reliable ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method for the simultaneous determination of non-canonical (norvaline and norleucine) and standard amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, histidine, glycine, threonine, arginine, tyrosine, methionine, valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine) in biopharmaceutical-related fermentation processes was established. After pre-column derivatization with ortho-phthaldialdehyde and 2-mercaptoethanol, the derivatives were separated on a sub-2 μm particle C18 reverse-phase column. Identification and quantification of amino acids were carried out by fluorescence detection. To test method feasibility on standard HPLC instruments, the assay was properly transferred to a core-shell particle C18 reverse-phase column. The limits of detection showed excellent sensitivity by values from 0.06 to 0.17 pmol per injection and limits of quantification between 0.19 and 0.89 pmol. In the present study, the newly established UHPLC method was applied to a recombinant antibody Escherichia coli fermentation process for the analysis of total free amino acids. We were able to specifically detect and quantify the unfavorable amino acids in such complex samples. Since we observed trace amounts of norvaline and norleucine during all fermentation phases, an obligatory process monitoring should be considered to improve quality of recombinant protein drugs in future. PMID:23306451

  2. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  3. Effect of bromide ion on the reaction pathway between hydroxyl radical and glycine.

    PubMed

    Ying, Liwen; Dong, Wenbo; Yuan, Haixia; Liu, Yan; Ma, Luming

    2015-06-01

    Br(-) and nitrogen-containing organic pollutants, such as amino acids, protein, etc., were often detected in water and wastewater treatment plants using advanced oxidation technologies. All these technologies have one common characteristic, that is, the removal processes involve ·OH. Therefore, it is necessary to study the different reaction pathways among ·OH, Br(-), and amino acids. In this research, glycine was chosen as the representative of amino acids and H2O2 was selected as ·OH precursor. Results showed that Br(-) had a shielding effect on [Formula: see text] of α-carbon in glycine, when it was abstracted by ·OH. The main reaction pathway in the system containing Br(-) was the abstraction of H from amino group in glycine by ·OH, contributing 85 % of total abstracted H. This system had a prominent phenomenon of decarboxylation and performed as alkali production dominating. However, in the system not containing Br(-), the main reaction pathway was the abstraction of H from α-carbon in glycine by ·OH, contributing 97 % of total abstracted H. This system performed as acid production dominating. By laser flash photolysis, the second-order rate constants of abstraction of H from both α-carbon and amino group in glycine by ·OH were obtained as (3.3 ± 0.5) × 10(7) M(-1)·s(-1) and (8.2 ± 0.8) × 10(8) M(-1)·s(-1), respectively. The second-order rate constants of the reaction between [Formula: see text], HṄCH2COO(-) and H2O2 were (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10(7) M(-1)·s(-1) and (4.4 ± 0.3) × 10(7) M(-1)·s(-1), respectively. In addition, Br(-) was found to play a catalytic role in the decomposition of H2O2 under UV radiation. The results mentioned above were significant for the application of advanced oxidation technologies for water containing both amino acids and Br(-) in water and wastewater treatment plants. PMID:25548016

  4. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor requires two distinct agonists to operate. Glycine is assumed to be the endogenous ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine site, but this notion has been challenged by the discovery of high levels of endogenous d-serine in the mammalian forebrain. I have outlined an evolutionary framework for the appearance of a glycine site in animals and the metabolic events leading to high levels of D-serine in brain. Sequence alignments of the glycine-binding regions, along with the scant experimental data available, suggest that the properties of invertebrate NMDA receptor glycine sites are probably different from those in vertebrates. The synthesis of D-serine in brain is due to a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (B(6))-requiring serine racemase in glia. Although it remains unknown when serine racemase first evolved, data concerning the evolution of B(6) enzymes, along with the known occurrences of serine racemases in animals, point to D-serine synthesis arising around the divergence time of arthropods. D-Serine catabolism occurs via the ancient peroxisomal enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO), whose ontogenetic expression in the hindbrain of mammals is delayed until the postnatal period and absent from the forebrain. The phylogeny of D-serine metabolism has relevance to our understanding of brain ontogeny, schizophrenia and neurotransmitter dynamics. PMID:15306409

  5. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    PubMed

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear. PMID:27064126

  6. Replacement of the proximal heme thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase with a histidine residue

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xianwen; Mroczko, Mark; Manoj, Kelath M.; Wang, Xiaotang; Hager, Lowell P.

    1999-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase is a versatile heme enzyme which can cross over the catalytic boundaries of other oxidative hemoproteins and perform multiple functions. Chloroperoxidase, in addition to catalyzing classical peroxidative reactions, also acts as a P450 cytochrome and a potent catalase. The multiple functions of chloroperoxidase must be derived from its unique active site structure. Chloroperoxidase possesses a proximal cysteine thiolate heme iron ligand analogous to the P450 cytochromes; however, unlike the P450 enzymes, chloroperoxidase possesses a very polar environment distal to its heme prosthetic group and contains a glutamic acid residue in close proximity to the heme iron. The presence of a thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase has long been thought to play an essential role in its chlorination and epoxidation activities; however, the research reported in this paper proves that hypothesis to be invalid. To explore the role of Cys-29, the amino acid residue supplying the thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase, Cys-29 has been replaced with a histidine residue. Mutant clones of the chloroperoxidase genome have been expressed in a Caldariomyces fumago expression system by using gene replacement rather than gene insertion technology. C. fumago produces wild-type chloroperoxidase, thus requiring gene replacement of the wild type by the mutant gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that gene replacement has been reported for this type of fungus. The recombinant histidine mutants retain most of their chlorination, peroxidation, epoxidation, and catalase activities. These results downplay the importance of a thiolate ligand in chloroperoxidase and suggest that the distal environment of the heme active site plays the major role in maintaining the diverse activities of this enzyme. PMID:10535936

  7. Primary structure of histidine-tRNA synthetase and characterization of hisS transcripts.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Gibson, B; Donovan, D; Biemann, K; Eisenbeis, S; Parker, J; Schimmel, P

    1985-08-25

    Histidine-tRNA synthetase is one of the smallest bacterial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. It is less than one-half the size of the largest aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The entire nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli hisS locus was determined. The coding region is comprised of 424 codons, and the sequence was determined for 200 nucleotides on the 5'- and 3'-sides of the coding region. The translated nucleotide sequence was confirmed extensively by independent amino acid sequence information obtained by Edman degradations of purified peptides and by measurements of peptide masses by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. A significant sequence alignment of four bacterial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was reported recently (Webster, T., Tsai, H., Kula, M., Mackie, G., and Schimmel, P. (1984) Science 226, 1315-1317). Although the four enzymes vary considerably in length, this match occurs within the first 100 amino acids of each of the four enzymes and is in the segment believed to be part of the catalytic core. But no strong alignment could be found of the histidine sequence with these four tRNA synthetase sequences. This enzyme may be derived, therefore, from a different progenitor. Previous work suggested that three places in the hisS 5'-noncoding sequence could be promoter sites for RNA polymerase (Eisenbeis, S. J., and Parker, J. (1982) Gene 18, 107-114). We detected a 1400-nucleotide RNA species by RNA blot analysis with a hisS-specific probe. S1 nuclease mapping demonstrated a 5'-end to the RNA species occurs at -67 +/- 1, relative to the first nucleotide of the coding region. This position coincides with the predicted start site for transcription from one of the previously proposed promoter sites. PMID:2991272

  8. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERSTELLAR GLYCINE FORMATION OCCURRING AT RADICAL SURFACES OF WATER-ICE DUST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2012-07-20

    Glycine is the simplest amino acid, and due to the significant astrobiological implications that suppose its detection, the search for it in the interstellar medium (ISM), meteorites, and comets is intensively investigated. In the present work, quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory have been used to model the glycine formation on water-ice clusters present in the ISM. The removal of either one H atom or one electron from the water-ice cluster has been considered to simulate the effect of photolytic radiation and of ionizing particles, respectively, which lead to the formation of OH{sup .} radical and H{sub 3}O{sup +} surface defects. The coupling of incoming CO molecules with the surface OH{sup .} radicals on the ice clusters yields the formation of the COOH{sup .} radicals via ZPE-corrected energy barriers and reaction energies of about 4-5 kcal mol{sup -1} and -22 kcal mol{sup -1}, respectively. The COOH{sup .} radicals couple with incoming NH=CH{sub 2} molecules (experimentally detected in the ISM) to form the NHCH{sub 2}COOH{sup .} radical glycine through energy barriers of 12 kcal mol{sup -1}, exceedingly high at ISM cryogenic temperatures. Nonetheless, when H{sub 3}O{sup +} is present, one proton may be barrierless transferred to NH=CH{sub 2} to give NH{sub 2}=CH{sub 2}{sup +}. This latter may react with the COOH{sup .} radical to give the NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH{sup +.} glycine radical cation which can then be transformed into the NH{sub 2}CHC(OH){sub 2}{sup +.} species (the most stable form of glycine in its radical cation state) or into the NH{sub 2}CHCOOH{sup .} neutral radical glycine. Estimated rate constants of these events suggest that they are kinetically feasible at temperatures of 100-200 K, which indicate that their occurrence may take place in hot molecular cores or in comets exposed to warmer regions of solar systems. Present results provide quantum chemical evidence that defects formed on water ices due to the harsh

  9. Regulation of Glucagon Secretion in Normal and Diabetic Human Islets by γ-Hydroxybutyrate and Glycine*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Naji, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-13C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels. PMID:23266825

  10. Regulation of glucagon secretion in normal and diabetic human islets by γ-hydroxybutyrate and glycine.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Matschinsky, Franz M; Naji, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-(13)C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels. PMID:23266825

  11. Protein synthesis in cancer patients with inflammatory response: investigations with [15N]glycine.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D C; Preston, T; Fearon, K C; Burns, H J; Slater, C; Shenkin, A

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that the increase in amino acid flux and derived protein synthesis rates observed in weight-losing cancer patients may contribute to an ongoing negative energy balance. The mediators and tissues responsible for such apparent increased protein synthesis have not been clearly identified. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between protein synthetic rates in whole-body, skeletal muscle, and circulating cortisol concentrations in healthy subjects (n = 6) and cancer patients with evidence of an inflammatory response (n = 6). Protein synthetic rates were measured with a primed continuous 20-h infusion of [15N]glycine. Skeletal muscle was biopsied at laparotomy. Serum cortisol, resting energy expenditure, plasma proteins, nitrogen metabolites in urine, and skeletal muscle free amino acids were also measured. Derived whole-body and skeletal muscle protein synthetic rates in the cancer group were increased significantly (by 70 and 93%, respectively, p < 0.05). Circulating concentrations of cortisol, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein were also significantly increased in the cancer group and indicated the presence of an inflammatory response. However, there was no significant increase in resting energy expenditure. Mechanisms by which apparent increases in whole-body and skeletal protein synthesis do not result in an increase in resting energy expenditure are discussed. We conclude that glycine utilization is increased in cancer patients but that rates of protein synthesis derived from [15N]glycine kinetics may not be valid in such patients. PMID:7919675

  12. The effect of hyperphenylalaninaemia on glycine metabolism in developing rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, C E; Greengard, O

    1980-01-01

    The brains of 3--16-day-old rats that were rendered hyperphenylalaninaemic by daily injections of alpha-methylphenylalanine plus phenylalanine were subjected to biochemical analysis. Fluctuations throughout the treatment period in the concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine and serotonin were in agreement with the known interference of excess plasma phenylalanine with transport. The glycine content, however, became abnormal only by day 5, remained so through the treatment, and the elevation was equally apparent at 4, 8 or 24 h after the last daily injections. On the last day of treatment there were small increases in the taurine, glutamate, aspartate and 4-aminobutyrate concentrations, attributable mainly to the diencephalon or brain stem. After day 3 of treatment there were persistent elevations in the specific activity of phosphoserine phosphatase and glycine synthase (but not serine hydroxymethyltransferase) of the brain in each of the regions analysed. The observations indicate that chronic hyperphenylalaninaemia interferes with the normal regulation of intracerebral glycine metabolism during a critical period of early postnatal development, and suggest that the resulting excess in this amino acid (particularly marked in the cortex) contributes to the behavioural abnormalities that these animals exhibit in later life. PMID:6112983

  13. Functional characterization of a member of alanine or glycine: cation symporter family in halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Bualuang, Aporn; Kageyama, Hakuto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins of amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily transport amino acids and amines across membranes and play important roles in the regulation of cellular processes. The alanine or glycine: cation symporter (AGCS) family belongs to APC superfamily and is found in prokaryotes, but its substrate specificity remains to be clarified. In this study, we found that a halotolerant cyanobacterium, Aphanothece halophytica has two putative ApagcS genes. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of genes, ApagcS1, exhibited high homology to Pseudomonas AgcS. The ApagcS1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli JW4166 which is deficient in glycine uptake. Kinetics studies in JW4166 revealed that ApAgcS1 is a sodium-dependent glycine transporter. Competition experiments showed the significant inhibition by glutamine, asparagine, and glycine. The level of mRNA for ApagcS1 was induced by NaCl and nitrogen-deficient stresses. Uptake of glutamine by ApAgcS1 was also observed. Based on these data, the physiological role of ApAgcS1 was discussed. PMID:25421789

  14. Activation of presynaptic glycine receptors facilitates glycine release from presynaptic terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Jang, Il-Sung; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Akaike, Norio

    2003-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Here we report the novel finding that presynaptic glycine autoreceptors modulate release from terminals synapsing onto rat spinal sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) neurons. In mechanically dissociated SDCN neurons, in which functional presynaptic nerve terminals remain adherent to the isolated neurons, exogenously applied glycine (3 μM) increased the frequency of glycinergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) without affecting their amplitudes or decay times. This suggests that glycine acts presynaptically to increase glycine release probability. Picrotoxin, at a concentration that had little direct effect on sIPSC frequency and amplitude (30 μM), significantly attenuated glycine-induced presynaptic sIPSC facilitation. The glycine-induced sIPSC frequency facilitation was completely abolished either in a Ca2+-free external solution or in the presence of 100 μM Cd2+, suggesting the involvement of extracellular Ca2+ influx into the nerve terminals. The glycine action was also completely occluded in the presence of 300 nM tetrodotoxin. In recordings from SDCN neurons in spinal cord slices, glycine (10 μM) increased evoked IPSC (eIPSC) amplitude and decreased the extent of paired-pulse facilitation. In response to brief high frequency stimulus trains the eIPSCs displayed a profound frequency-dependent facilitation that was greatly reduced by picrotoxin (30 μM). These results indicate that glycine acts at presynaptic autoreceptors, causing depolarization of the glycinergic nerve terminals, the subsequent activation of voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels, and facilitation of glycine release. Furthermore, this presynaptic facilitation was observed under more physiological conditions, suggesting that these glycinergic autoreceptors may contribute to the integration of local inhibitory inputs to SDCN neurons. PMID:12754315

  15. New soybean accessions identified with resistance to Heterodera glycines populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious root-parasite of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], in USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in USA are estimated to be nearly $1 billion. These losses have remained stable at current levels with the use of resistant cultivars bu...

  16. New soybean accessions evaluated for reaction to Heterodera glycines populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe) is a serious pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in the USA and worldwide. Annual yield losses in the USA are estimated to be over $1 billion. These losses have remained stable with the use of resistant cultivars but over time nematode...

  17. Glycine betaine as a direct substrate for methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.).

    PubMed

    Watkins, Andrew J; Roussel, Erwan G; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners. PMID:24162571

  18. Glycine receptor mechanism elucidated by electron cryo-microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Lü, Wei; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR) mediates inhibitory synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and brainstem and is linked to neurological disorders, including autism and hyperekplexia. Understanding of molecular mechanisms and pharmacology of glycine receptors has been hindered by a lack of high-resolution structures. Here we report electron cryo-microscopy structures of the zebrafish α1 GlyR with strychnine, glycine, or glycine and ivermectin (glycine/ivermectin). Strychnine arrests the receptor in an antagonist-bound closed ion channel state, glycine stabilizes the receptor in an agonist-bound open channel state, and the glycine/ivermectin complex adopts a potentially desensitized or partially open state. Relative to the glycine-bound state, strychnine expands the agonist-binding pocket via outward movement of the C loop, promotes rearrangement of the extracellular and transmembrane domain 'wrist' interface, and leads to rotation of the transmembrane domain towards the pore axis, occluding the ion conduction pathway. These structures illuminate the GlyR mechanism and define a rubric to interpret structures of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:26344198

  19. 21 CFR 520.550 - Glucose/glycine/electrolyte.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. 520.550 Section 520.550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.550 Glucose/glycine/electrolyte. (a) Specifications. The product...

  20. Glycine transporter2 inhibitors: Getting the balance right.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Robert J; Mostyn, Shannon N; Carland, Jane E; Ryan, Renae M

    2016-09-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are targets for a wide range of therapeutically useful drugs. This is because they have the capacity to selectively manipulate the dynamics of neurotransmitter concentrations and thereby enhance or diminish signalling through particular brain pathways. High affinity glycine transporters (GlyTs) regulate extracellular concentrations of glycine and provide novel therapeutic targets for neurological disorders. PMID:26723543

  1. NECTAR COMPOSITION OF WILD PERENNIAL GLYCINE (SOYBEAN) SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Glycine contains the cultivated annual soybean G. max, the wild annual, G. soja, and about 21 wild perennial Glycine species. The perennials are largely indigenous to Australia, but are found in Papua New Guinea, Timor, Philippines, Japan and Taiwan. Outcrossing rates in the cultivated s...

  2. Population genetic structure of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is an invasive pest of cultivated soybean [Glycine max (L.)] in North America. After the initial invasion in 2000, the aphid has quickly spread across most of the U.S. and Canada, suggesting large scale dispersals and rapid adaptations to new environment...

  3. Glycine Betaine as a Direct Substrate for Methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Andrew J.; Roussel, Erwan G.; Parkes, R. John

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners. PMID:24162571

  4. An experimental and theoretical study of the amino acid side chain Raman bands in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Cardey, Bruno; Enescu, Mironel

    2014-07-01

    The Raman spectra of a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine, glycine, methionine, histidine, lysine and leucine were measured in H2O. The theoretical Raman spectra obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) level of theory allows a precise attribution of the vibrational bands. The experimental results show that there is a blue shift in the frequencies of several bands of the amino acid side chains in tripeptides compared to free amino acids, especially in the case of AAs containing aromatic rings. On the other hand, a very good agreement was found between the Raman bands of AA residues in tripeptides and those measured on three model proteins: bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The present analysis contributes to an unambiguous interpretation of the protein Raman spectra that is useful in monitoring the biological reactions involving AA side chains alteration.

  5. The interaction of triethyltin with a component of guinea-pig liver supernatant. Evidence for histidine in the binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M. S.; Lock, E. A.

    1970-01-01

    A protein fraction was isolated from guinea-pig liver that binds triethyltin with an affinity of approx. 2×106m−1 at pH8.0. It was shown that the protein responsible for binding 70% of the triethyltin found in guinea-pig liver after injection of radioactively labelled triethyltin is at most a few per cent of the total liver protein. Evidence is presented from the kinetics of loss of binding and loss of certain amino acids on photo-oxidation with either Methylene Blue or Rose Bengal that each binding site consists of two histidine residues. PMID:5494221

  6. The Quorum-Sensing Hybrid Histidine Kinase LuxN of Vibrio harveyi Contains a Periplasmically Located N Terminus▿

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kirsten; Odenbach, Tina; Timmen, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Hydropathy profile analyses of the amino acid sequence of the quorum-sensing hybrid histidine kinase LuxN of Vibrio harveyi predict a periplasmic location of the N terminus. To test this, two-hybrid proteins consisting of LuxN and an N-terminally fused maltose-binding protein with or without a leader sequence were analyzed with regard to the enzymatic activities of LuxN, protease accessibility, and complementation of an Escherichia coli malE mutant. The results strongly support a periplasmic location of the N terminus, implying that LuxN is anchored with nine transmembrane domains in the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:17259316

  7. Application of self-organising maps towards segmentation of soybean samples by determination of amino acids concentration.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia Ramazzoti Chanan; Angilelli, Karina Gomes; Cremasco, Hágata; Romagnoli, Érica Signori; Galão, Olívio Fernandes; Borsato, Dionisio; Moraes, Larissa Alexandra Cardoso; Mandarino, José Marcos Gontijo

    2016-09-01

    Soybeans are widely used both for human nutrition and animal feed, since they are an important source of protein, and they also provide components such as phytosterols, isoflavones, and amino acids. In this study, were determined the concentrations of the amino acids lysine, histidine, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine present in 14 samples of conventional soybeans and 6 transgenic, cultivated in two cities of the state of Paraná, Londrina and Ponta Grossa. The results were tabulated and presented to a self-organising map for segmentation according planting regions and conventional or transgenic varieties. A network with 7000 training epochs and a 10 × 10 topology was used, and it proved appropriate in the segmentation of the samples using the data analysed. The weight maps provided by the network, showed that all the amino acids were important in targeting the samples, especially isoleucine. Three clusters were formed, one with only Ponta Grossa samples (including transgenic (PGT) and common (PGC)), a second group with Londrina transgenic (LT) samples and the third with Londrina common (LC) samples. PMID:27213953

  8. Cytochrome c catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl glycine

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, Jeffrey M.; Driscoll, William J.; Mueller, Gregory P.

    2008-01-11

    Long chain fatty acyl glycines are an emerging class of biologically active molecules that occur naturally and produce a wide array of physiological effects. Their biosynthetic pathway, however, remains unknown. Here we report that cytochrome c catalyzes the synthesis of N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) from arachidonoyl coenzyme A and glycine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The identity of the NAGly product was verified by isotope labeling and mass analysis. Other heme-containing proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, were considerably less effective in generating arachidonoyl glycine as compared to cytochrome c. The reaction catalyzed by cytochrome c in vitro points to its potential role in the formation of NAGly and other long chain fatty acyl glycines in vivo.

  9. Identification of essential residues in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. Chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of cysteine and histidine residues in enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Gravel, M; Gao, E; O'Neill, R C; Braun, P E

    2001-05-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP; EC ) catalyzes in vitro hydrolysis of 3'-phosphodiester bonds in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides to produce 2'-nucleotides exclusively. N-terminal deletion mapping of the C-terminal two-thirds of recombinant rat CNP1 identified a region that possesses the catalytic domain, with further truncations abolishing activity. Proteolysis and kinetic analysis indicated that this domain forms a compact globular structure and contains all of the catalytically essential features. Subsequently, this catalytic fragment of CNP1 (CNP-CF) was used for chemical modification studies to identify amino acid residues essential for activity. 5,5'-Dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification studies and kinetic analysis of cysteine CNP-CF mutants revealed the nonessential role of cysteines for enzymatic activity. On the other hand, modification studies with diethyl pyrocarbonate indicated that two histidines are essential for CNPase activity. Consequently, the only two conserved histidines, His-230 and His-309, were mutated to phenylalanine and leucine. All four histidine mutants had k(cat) values 1000-fold lower than wild-type CNP-CF, but K(m) values were similar. Circular dichroism studies demonstrated that the low catalytic activities of the histidine mutants were not due to gross changes in secondary structure. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both histidines assume critical roles for catalysis. PMID:11278504

  10. Gastric protection by meciadanol. A new synthetic flavonoid inhibiting histidine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kitler, M E; Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T

    1986-08-01

    Flavonoids reportedly inhibit histidine decarboxylase and reduce gastric mucosal histamine content. We studied the effects of acute and chronic intragastric administration to rats of meciadanol, a new synthetic flavonoid (Zyma S.A., Nyon, Switzerland). The action of meciadanol was compared to that of 16,16-dimethyl PGE2. Meciadanol did not affect acid or pepsin output at any dose used. High doses of 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 reduced both acid and pepsin output. Meciadanol partially prevented aspirin-induced lesions but the prevention required chronic administration of meciadanol. In contrast, a single dose of meciadanol completely prevented ethanol-induced lesions. Chronic administration of meciadanol also completely prevented ethanol-induced lesions. 16,16-Dimethyl PGE2 prevented both aspirin-induced and ethanol-induced lesions in doses that did not affect acid or pepsin output. Meciadanol did not influence the effect that either aspirin or ethanol had on endogenous mucosal PGI2. Thus, the dose range of meciadanol that protected against ulcerogens did not affect either gastric acid secretion or pepsin output. Therefore, we conclude that meciadanol's action represents true cytoprotection, which was previously attributed only to prostaglandins. PMID:3525045

  11. Transgenic soybean overexpressing GmSamT1 exhibits resistance to multiple-HG types of soybean cysts nematode heterodera glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) salicylic acid methyl transferase (GmSAMT1) catalyzes the conversion of salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Prior results showed that when GmSAMT1 was overexpressed in transgenic soybean hairy roots, resistance is conferred against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heter...

  12. Absorption of Amino Acids and Peptides in a Child with a Variant of Hartnup Disease and Coexistent Coeliac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, M. J.; Seakins, J. W. T.; Lloyd, June K.; Matthews, D. M.; Cheng, B.; Thomas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    A child with a variant of Hartnup disease and co-existent coeliac disease is described. Oral tolerance tests with L-histidine, L-tyrosine, and glycyl-L-tyrosine, and in vitro uptake studies on a small intestinal biopsy with L-histidine and glycyl-L-histidine, showed impaired absorption of the free amino acids, and showed that absorption of tyrosine and mucosal uptake of histidine was better from the dipeptides than from the free amino acids. This supports the hypothesis that the intestinal mucosa can take up small peptides intact, and that the peptide uptake mechanism is not involved in the intestinal defect of Hartnup disease. PMID:5086513

  13. Positive Modulation of the Glycine Receptor by Means of Glycine Receptor–Binding Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Blank, Michael; Mueller, Johan; Nyman, Eva; Blind, Michael; Dabrowski, Michael A.; Andersson, Christin V.; Sandberg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    According to the gate control theory of pain, the glycine receptors (GlyRs) are putative targets for development of therapeutic analgesics. A possible approach for novel analgesics is to develop a positive modulator of the glycine-activated Cl− channels. Unfortunately, there has been limited success in developing drug-like small molecules to study the impact of agonists or positive modulators on GlyRs. Eight RNA aptamers with low nanomolar affinity to GlyRα1 were generated, and their pharmacological properties analyzed. Cytochemistry using fluorescein-labeled aptamers demonstrated GlyRα1-dependent binding to the plasma membrane but also intracellular binding. Using a fluorescent membrane potential assay, we could identify five aptamers to be positive modulators. The positive modulation of one of the aptamers was confirmed by patch-clamp electrophysiology on L(tk) cells expressing GlyRα1 and/or GlyRα1β. This aptamer potentiated whole-cell Cl− currents in the presence of low concentrations of glycine. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration ever of RNA aptamers acting as positive modulators for an ion channel. We believe that these aptamers are unique and valuable tools for further studies of GlyR biology and possibly also as tools for assay development in identifying small-molecule agonists and positive modulators. PMID:26071243

  14. Prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and histidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Chun; Oro, J.; Yang, Lily; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose and formamidine has been demonstrated as well as the prebiotic synthesis of imidazole-4-ethanol and imidazole-4-glycol from erythrose, formaldehyde, and ammonia. The maximum yields of imidazole-4-acetaldehyde, imidazole-4-ethanol, and imidazole-4-glycol obtained in these reactions are 1.6, 5.4, and 6.8 percent respectively, based on the erythrose. Imidazole-4-acetaldehyde would have been converted to histidine on the primitive earth by a Strecker synthesis, and several prebiotic reactions would convert imidazole-4-glycol and imidazole-4-ethanol to imidazole-4-acetaldehyde.

  15. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Background Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. Results While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The β-amino acid taurine possessed 30–50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for β-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In

  16. Design and Evaluation by Nitrogen Balance and Blood Aminograms of an Amino Acid Mixture for Total Parenteral Nutrition of Adults with Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. H.; Patel, D. G.; Jeejeebhoy, K. N.

    1974-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of an amino acid mixture formulated for intravenous use from estimates of requirements for essential amino acids of human adults, and from data previously derived from a study using casein hydrolysate as the amino acid source. This mixture contained 39.4% essential amino acids, with glycine, alanine, arginine, histidine, and proline selected to supply the nonessential nitrogen. Nitrogen balance and blood aminograms were measured in six adult patients with gastrointestinal disease, fed intravenously for 1 wk at each of three levels of amino acid intake, while all other nutrients were constant and adequate in relation to body weight. Four of the patients were then fed 1.0 g/kg of egg or meat protein orally for 1 wk at the end of the 3 wk study, while all nutrients other than the amino acids were fed intravenously. Average nitrogen balances of −0.8, 0.5, and 2.2 g/day were observed when the amounts of amino acids infused were 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 g/kg, respectively. Fasting levels of threonine, glycine, cystine, methionine, isoleucine, tryptophan, and arginine, but not of the other amino acids, increased with the increment in input, although the levels were generally lower than normal. The increase in blood concentration observed during infusion was similar for each of the essential amino acids, indicating that the supply of each of the amino acids was much better balanced for utilization than casein hydrolysate. However the blood aminograms did suggest that some changes in composition of the mixture for the malnourished adult were desirable, such that the amino acid mixture resembled that needed by the normal growing child. Nitrogen balance in the four patients fed orally with high-quality protein averaged 2.0 g/day, showing that an amino acid mixture given intravenously, provided it is well-balanced, can be utilized as efficiently as protein given orally. It is concluded that the prediction of oral requirements for

  17. Structure-function relationships in histidine-rich antimicrobial peptides from Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Mark; Mannion, Michael; Pike, Damien; Lewis, Krystina; Flynn, Andrew; Brannan, Alex M; Browne, Mitchell J; Jackman, Donna; Madera, Laurence; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Hoskin, David W; Rise, Matthew L; Booth, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    Gad-1 and Gad-2 are antimicrobial peptide (AMP) sequences encoded by paralogous genes. They are rich in histidine, which suggests that their activity might be pH-dependent. We examined their structure-function relationships with a view to learning how to improve AMP therapeutic ratios. Activity assays with Gram-negative bacteria and cancer cell lines demonstrate that Gad-2 is substantially more active at slightly acidic pH than it is at neutral pH. By contrast, the activity of Gad-1 at lower pH is similar to its activity at pH7. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that the greater functional plasticity of Gad-2 correlates with a greater structural plasticity; Gad-2's percent helicity varies dramatically with altered pH and lipid environment. Interestingly, Gad-2's highest levels of helicity do not correspond to the conditions where it is most active. High resolution solution NMR structures were determined in SDS micelles at pH5, conditions that induce an intermediate level of helicity in the peptides. Gad-1 is more helical than Gad-2, with both peptides exhibiting the greatest helical tendencies in their central region and lowest helicity in their N-termini. The high resolution structures suggest that maximum activity relies on the appropriate balance between an N-terminal region with mixed hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure features and an amphipathic central and C-terminal region. Taken together with previous studies, our results suggest that to improve the therapeutic ratio of AMPs, consideration should be given to including sequential histidine-pairs, keeping the overall charge of the peptide modest, and retaining a degree of structural plasticity and imperfect amphipathicity. PMID:25839356

  18. Carbonic anhydrase activators: gold nanoparticles coated with derivatized histamine, histidine, and carnosine show enhanced activatory effects on several mammalian isoforms.

    PubMed

    Saada, Mohamed-Chiheb; Montero, Jean-Louis; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-03-10

    Lipoic acid moieties were attached to amine or amino acids showing activating properties against the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The obtained lipoic acid conjugates of histamine, L-histidine methyl ester, and L-carnosine methyl ester were attached to gold nanoparticles (NPs) by reaction with Au(III) salts in reducing conditions. The CA activators (CAAs)-coated NPs showed low nanomolar activation (K(A)s of 1-9 nM) of relevant cytosolic, membrane-bound, mitochondrial, and transmembrane CA isoforms, such as CA I, II, IV, VA, VII, and XIV. These NPs also effectively activated CAs ex vivo, in whole blood experiments, with an increase of 200-280% of the CA activity. This is the first example of enzyme activation with nanoparticles and may lead to biomedical applications for conditions in which the CA activity is diminished, such as aging, Alzheimer's disease, or CA deficiency syndrome. PMID:21291238

  19. Multivalent dendritic polyglycerolamine with arginine and histidine end groups for efficient siRNA transfection

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi Mehrabadi, Fatemeh; Zeng, Hanxiang; Johnson, Mark; Schlesener, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The success of siRNA-based therapeutics highly depends on a safe and efficient delivery of siRNA into the cytosol. In this study, we post-modified the primary amines on dendritic polyglycerolamine (dPG-NH2) with different ratios of two relevant amino acids, namely, arginine (Arg) and histidine (His). To investigate the effects from introducing Arg and His to dPG, the resulting polyplexes of amino acid functionalized dPG-NH2s (AAdPGs)/siRNA were evaluated regarding cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, and cellular uptake. Among AAdPGs, an optimal vector with (1:3) Arg to His ratio, showed efficient siRNA transfection with minimal cytotoxicity (cell viability ≥ 90%) in NIH 3T3 cells line. We also demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of dPG-NH2 decreased as a result of amino acid functionalization. While the incorporation of both cationic (Arg) and pH-responsive residues (His) are important for safe and efficient siRNA transfection, this study indicates that AAdPGs containing higher degrees of His display lower cytotoxicity and more efficient endosomal escape. PMID:26124878

  20. Glycine uptake in heath plants and soil microbes responds to elevated temperature, CO 2 and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven; Beier, Claus; Ambus, Per

    2009-11-01

    Temperate terrestrial ecosystems are currently exposed to climatic and air quality changes with increased atmospheric CO 2, increased temperature and prolonged droughts. The responses of natural ecosystems to these changes are focus for research, due to the potential feedbacks to the climate. We here present results from a field experiment in which the effects of these three climate change factors are investigated solely and in all combinations at a temperate heath dominated by heather ( Calluna vulgaris) and wavy hair-grass ( Deschampsia flexuosa). Climate induced increases in plant production may increase plant root exudation of dissolved organic compounds such as amino acids, and the release of amino acids during decomposition of organic matter. Such free amino acids in soil serve as substrates for soil microorganisms and are also acquired as nutrients directly by plants. We investigated the magnitude of the response to the potential climate change treatments on uptake of organic nitrogen in an in situ pulse labelling experiment with 15N 13C 2-labelled glycine (amino acid) injected into the soil. In situ root nitrogen acquisition by grasses responded significantly to the climate change treatments, with larger 15N uptake in response to warming and elevated CO 2 but not additively when the treatments were combined. Also, a larger grass leaf biomass in the combined T and CO 2 treatment than in individual treatments suggest that responses to combined climate change factors cannot be predicted from the responses to single factors treatments. The soil microbes were superior to plants in the short-term competition for the added glycine, as indicated by an 18 times larger 15N recovery in the microbial biomass compared to the plant biomass. The soil microbes acquired glycine largely as an intact compound (87%), with no effects of the multi factorial climate change treatment through one year.

  1. Evolution of threonine aldolases, a diverse family involved in the second pathway of glycine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangxiu; Zhang, Manxiao; Chen, Ximing; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2015-02-01

    Threonine aldolases (TAs) catalyze the interconversion of threonine and glycine plus acetaldehyde in a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent manner. This class of enzymes complements the primary glycine biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), and was shown to be necessary for yeast glycine auxotrophy. Because the reverse reaction of TA involves carbon-carbon bond formation, resulting in a β-hydroxyl-α-amino acid with two adjacent chiral centers, TAs are of high interests in synthetic chemistry and bioengineering studies. Here, we report systematic phylogenetic analysis of TAs. Our results demonstrated that L-TAs and D-TAs that are specific for L- and D-threonine, respectively, are two phylogenetically unique families, and both enzymes are different from their closely related enzymes SHMTs and bacterial alanine racemases (ARs). Interestingly, L-TAs can be further grouped into two evolutionarily distinct families, which share low sequence similarity with each other but likely possess the same structural fold, suggesting a convergent evolution of these enzymes. The first L-TA family contains enzymes of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origins, and is related to fungal ARs, whereas the second contains only prokaryotic L-TAs. Furthermore, we show that horizontal gene transfer may occur frequently during the evolution of both L-TA families. Our results indicate the complex, dynamic, and convergent evolution process of TAs and suggest an updated classification scheme for L-TAs. PMID:25644973

  2. Poly(gamma-glutamylcysteinyl)glycine: its role in cadmium resistance in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Doolen, J.A.; Watt, K.; Robinson, N.J.

    1987-10-01

    Angiosperms can be selected for the ability to grow in the presence of normally toxic concentrations of certain trace metal ions. Addition of Cd and Cu to Cd-resistant Datura innoxia cell cultures results in the rapid synthesis and accumulation of sulfur-rich, metal-binding polypeptides. The structure of these compounds was determined using amino acid analysis, /sup 13/C NMR, and site-specific enzymic digestion. These compounds are poly(gamma-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines. Greater than 80% of the cellular Cd is bound to the bis and tris forms in Cd-resistant cells. There is a direct correlation between the maximum accumulation of the metal-binding polypeptides and the concentration of toxic ions to which the cells are resistant. In the presence of metal ions, the polypeptides form multimeric aggregates that can be resolved by gel chromatography. Cd binds to both the high and low molecular weight aggregates, whereas Cu preferentially binds to the higher molecular weight forms. The presence of gamma-carboxamide linkages between glutamyl and adjacent cysteinyl residues indicates that these polypeptides are products of biosynthetic pathways. Poly(gamma-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines bind metals and, in this respect, appear to be functional analogs of the protein metallothionein. However, in the absence of supraoptimal concentrations of trace metal ions, the functions of metallothionein in animals and microorganisms and poly(gamma-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines in plants may differ.

  3. Surface modification of ultrafiltration membranes by grafting glycine-functionalized PVA based on polydopamine coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Ye, Jianfeng; Yang, Linming; Deng, Chunhua; Tian, Qing; Yang, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Due to the ease of processing and stability during filtration, polydopamine (PD) coatings with grafted hydrophilic polymers have recently received significant attention. In this study, glycine-functionalized PVA was synthesized and grafted to a PD-coated ultrafiltration (UF) membrane to improve its performance during wastewater filtration. The membranes were modified by grafting PD with glycine-functionalized PVA (PD-g-PVA), and the resultant materials were characterized using surface morphology analyses, contact angle measurements, flux, oil/water emulsion separation tests, and grafted layer stability tests. The performance of the PD-g-PVA membrane was compared to that of the membrane modified with PD-g-polyethylene glycol (PEG). After grafting the PD-g-PVA, the surface roughness of the membranes decreased significantly. The grafted PVA layer, which was stable under acidic and alkaline conditions, protected the PD layer. The filtration experiments with an oil/water emulsion indicated that modifying the glycine-functionalized PVA by grafting can significantly improve the antifouling ability of membranes.

  4. Oligo(N-aryl glycines): a new twist on structured peptoids.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel H; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Nguyen, Khanh; Yoo, Barney; Bonneau, Richard; Rabenstein, Dallas L; Kirshenbaum, Kent

    2008-12-10

    We explore strategies to enhance conformational ordering of N-substituted glycine peptoid oligomers. Peptoids bearing bulky N-alkyl side chains have previously been studied as important examples of biomimetic "foldamer" compounds, as they exhibit a capacity to populate helical structures featuring repeating cis-amide bonds. Substantial cis/trans amide bond isomerization, however, gives rise to conformational heterogeneity. Here, we report the use of N-aryl side chains as a tool to enforce the presence of trans-amide bonds, thereby engendering structural stability. Aniline derivatives and bromoacetic acid are used in the facile solid-phase synthesis of a diverse family of sequence-specific N-aryl glycine oligomers. Quantum mechanics calculations yield a detailed energy profile of the folding landscape and substantiate the hypothesis that the presence of anilide groups establishes a strong energetic preference for trans-amide bonds. X-ray crystallographic analysis and solution NMR studies verify this preference. Molecular modeling indicates that the linear oligomers can adopt helical structures resembling a polyproline type II helix. High resolution structures of macrocyclic oligomers incorporating both N-alkyl and N-aryl glycine units confirm the ability to direct the presence of trans-amide bonds specifically at N-aryl positions. These results are an important step in developing strategies for the rational de novo design of new structural motifs in biomimetic oligopeptoid systems. PMID:19049458

  5. Mutations within the agonist-binding site convert the homomeric alpha1 glycine receptor into a Zn2+-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Grudzinska, Joanna; Schumann, Tanja; Schemm, Rudolf; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    The divalent cation Zn2+ has been shown to regulate inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS by affecting the activation of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor (GlyR). In spinal neurons and cells expressing recombinant GlyRs, low micromolar (<10 microM) concentrations of Zn2+ enhance glycine currents, whereas higher concentrations (>10 microM) have an inhibitory effect. Mutational studies have localized the Zn2+ binding sites mediating allosteric potentiation and inhibition of GlyRs in distinct regions of the N-terminal extracellular domain of the GlyR alpha-subunits. Here, we examined the Zn2+ sensitivity of different mutations within the agonist binding site of the homomeric alpha(1)-subunit GlyR upon heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. This revealed that six substitutions within the ligand-binding pocket result in a total loss of Zn2+ inhibition. Furthermore, substitution of the positively charged residues arginine 65 and arginine 131 by alanine (alpha(1)(R65A), alpha(1)(R131A), or of the aromatic residue phenylalanine 207 by histidine (alpha(1)(F207H)), converted the alpha(1) GlyR into a chloride channel that was activated by Zn2+ alone. Dose-response analysis of the alpha(1)(F207H) GlyR disclosed an EC(50) value of 1.2 microM for Zn2+ activation; concomitantly the apparent glycine affinity was 1000-fold reduced. Thus, single point mutations within the agonist-binding site of the alpha(1) subunit convert the inhibitory GlyR from a glycine-gated into a selectively Zn2+-activated chloride channel. This might be exploited for the design of metal-specific biosensors by modeling-assisted mutagenesis. PMID:18690053

  6. Identification and disruption of BetL, a secondary glycine betaine transport system linked to the salt tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes LO28.

    PubMed

    Sleator, R D; Gahan, C G; Abee, T; Hill, C

    1999-05-01

    The trimethylammonium compound glycine betaine (N,N, N-trimethylglycine) can be accumulated to high intracellular concentrations, conferring enhanced osmo- and cryotolerance upon Listeria monocytogenes. We report the identification of betL, a gene encoding a glycine betaine uptake system in L. monocytogenes, isolated by functional complementation of the betaine uptake mutant Escherichia coli MKH13. The betL gene is preceded by a consensus sigmaB-dependent promoter and is predicted to encode a 55-kDa protein (507 amino acid residues) with 12 transmembrane regions. BetL exhibits significant sequence homologies to other glycine betaine t