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Sample records for acid glycoprotein agp

  1. Increased α1-3 fucosylation of α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Balmaña, Meritxell; Giménez, Estela; Puerta, Angel; Llop, Esther; Figueras, Joan; Fort, Esther; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria; de Bolós, Carme; Rizzi, Andreas; Barrabés, Sílvia; de Frutos, Mercedes; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-30

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) lacks reliable diagnostic biomarkers and the search for new biomarkers represents an important challenge. Previous results looking at a small cohort of patients showed an increase in α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) fucosylation in advanced PDAC using N-glycan sequencing. Here, we have analysed AGP glycoforms in a larger cohort using several analytical techniques including mass spectrometry (MS), capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and enzyme-linked lectin assays (ELLAs) for determining AGP glycoforms which could be PDAC associated. AGP from 31 serum samples, including healthy controls (HC), chronic pancreatitis (ChrP) and PDAC patients, was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. Stable isotope labelling of AGP released N-glycans and their analysis by zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction capillary liquid chromatography electrospray MS (μZIC-HILIC-ESI-MS) showed an increase in AGP fucosylated glycoforms in PDAC compared to ChrP and HC. By CZE-UV analysis, relative concentrations of some of the AGP isoforms were found significantly different compared to those in PDAC and HC. Finally, ELLAs using Aleuria aurantia lectin displayed a significant increase in AGP fucosylation, before and after AGP neuraminidase treatment, in advanced PDAC compared to ChrP and HC, respectively. Altogether, these results indicate that α1-3 fucosylated glycoforms of AGP are increased in PDAC and could be potentially regarded as a PDAC biomarker. PMID:26563517

  2. Identification of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) as a potential marker of impaired growth in the newborn piglet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between the circulating levels of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin (HP) and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) and growth potential in neonatal pigs. In runts, the circulating level of AGP, but not HP in serum of newborn piglets was higher...

  3. Transcriptional induction of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene by synergistic interaction of two alternative activator forms of AGP/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP beta) and NF-kappaB or Nopp140.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y M; Miau, L H; Chang, C J; Lee, S C

    1996-01-01

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein/enhancer-binding protein (AGP/EBP) (C/EBPbeta), a member of the C/EBP family, is one of the key transcription factors responsible for the induction of a wide array of genes, some of which are expressed during the acute-phase response. Both activator and repressor were shown to be encoded by the intronless agp/ebp or its rat and human homologs, which contain a common bZIP domain at their C-terminal regions. Expression of the AGP gene (agp) is regulated by AGP/EBP in liver during the acute-phase response. However, the molecular mechanism for this regulation is poorly understood. The experiments reported here demonstrate that two activator forms of AGP/EBP, one of which has an additional 21 amino acids at its N-terminal region, are expressed in liver as well as in a number of cell lines. We have also demonstrated that NF-kappaB and a phosphoprotein of 140 kDa, Nopp140, interact with different AGP/EBP activators synergistically, which results in induction of the agp gene in an AGP/EBP-binding-motif-dependent manner. Furthermore, extracellular stimuli that are known to be NF-kappaB inducers can selectively activate the agp gene by cooperating with one of the two activator forms of AGP/EBP. The physiological significance of differential regulation for the function of two activator forms of AGP/EBP through selective interaction with different transcription factors is discussed. PMID:8754826

  4. Transcriptional induction of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene by synergistic interaction of two alternative activator forms of AGP/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP beta) and NF-kappaB or Nopp140.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y M; Miau, L H; Chang, C J; Lee, S C

    1996-08-01

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein/enhancer-binding protein (AGP/EBP) (C/EBPbeta), a member of the C/EBP family, is one of the key transcription factors responsible for the induction of a wide array of genes, some of which are expressed during the acute-phase response. Both activator and repressor were shown to be encoded by the intronless agp/ebp or its rat and human homologs, which contain a common bZIP domain at their C-terminal regions. Expression of the AGP gene (agp) is regulated by AGP/EBP in liver during the acute-phase response. However, the molecular mechanism for this regulation is poorly understood. The experiments reported here demonstrate that two activator forms of AGP/EBP, one of which has an additional 21 amino acids at its N-terminal region, are expressed in liver as well as in a number of cell lines. We have also demonstrated that NF-kappaB and a phosphoprotein of 140 kDa, Nopp140, interact with different AGP/EBP activators synergistically, which results in induction of the agp gene in an AGP/EBP-binding-motif-dependent manner. Furthermore, extracellular stimuli that are known to be NF-kappaB inducers can selectively activate the agp gene by cooperating with one of the two activator forms of AGP/EBP. The physiological significance of differential regulation for the function of two activator forms of AGP/EBP through selective interaction with different transcription factors is discussed.

  5. Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein has immunomodulatory effects in neonatal swine adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) is the most abundant protein in serum of neonatal swine. This protein functions as an immunomodulator in the pig. Recent work has demonstrated that adipose tissue can express AGP mRNA, as well as numerous cytokine mRNA. The present study was designed to determine i...

  6. Regulation of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein synthesis by porcine hepatocytes in monolayer culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, ORM-1) is a highly glycosylated mammalian acute phase protein, which is synthesized primarily in the liver and represents the major serum protein in newborn pigs. Recent data have suggested that the pig is unique in that AGP is a negative acute phase protein in this ...

  7. The immune system modulator a1-acid glycoprotein inhibits insulin and IGF1 induced protein synthesis in C2C12 myotubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) has previously been demonstrated by our laboratory to be negatively correlated with growth rate in newborn piglets. However, a mechanism of action for AGP in growth has not been identified. Previous research has demonstrated that AGP can modify adipose tissue metabo...

  8. O-Glycosylation of α-1-Acid Glycoprotein of Human Milk Is Lactation Stage Related

    PubMed Central

    Berghausen-Mazur, Marta; Hirnle, Lidia; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human milk provides a multitude of glycoproteins, including highly glycosylated α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), which elicits anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. The milk AGP glycoforms may provide the breastfed infant with a wide range of biological benefits. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of O-linked sugar-specific lectins with human milk AGP over the process of lactation and compared the results with those of the lactating mother's plasma. Materials and Methods: Relative amounts of human skim milk AGP O-glycans were analyzed in early colostrum, colostrum, and transitional and mature milk samples of 127 healthy mothers by lectin–AGP enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using sialyl T (sialyl-α2,3/α2,6 Galβ1,3GalNAc-), asialyl T (Galβ1,3GalNAc-), and Tn (GalNAc-) antigen-specific biotinylated Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Vicia villosa (VVA) lectins, respectively. Results: Milk AGP elicited high expression of Jacalin- and PNA-reactive glycotopes and low expression of VVA-reactive glycotopes, which were absent on plasma AGP of lactating mothers and healthy individuals. The expression of sialyl, asialyl T, and Tn glycotopes of human milk AGP was lactation stage related. The relative amount of Jacalin-reactive AGP glycotope was highest in the colostrum samples and then decreased starting from Day 8 of lactation. In contrast, an increase of the relative amount of PNA-reactive glycotope with milk maturation was observed. The relative amount of VVA-reactive glycotope remained almost constant over the development of lactation. Conclusions: Milk AGP differs from mother's plasma AGP by the presence of O-linked sialylated and asialylated T as well as Tn antigens. The variation of the expression of sialylated and asialylated T and Tn antigens on AGP is associated with milk maturation. PMID:26057552

  9. Α₁-acid glycoprotein modulates phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli by bovine polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Scarafoni, Alessio; Bronzo, Valerio; Martino, Piera Anna; Cavallini, Alice; Sartorelli, Paola; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    α1-Acid glycoprotein (AGP) is an acute phase protein that modulates innate immunity and increases in response to infection or injury. The effects of native (phosphorylated) and partially dephosphorylated AGP on the antimicrobial activities of bovine polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and monocytes were evaluated. Native AGP inhibited phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli by PMNs and monocytes. Engulfment and killing of E. coli were reduced at the acute phase concentration of AGP (0.9 mg/mL) compared with a physiological concentration (0.3mg/mL). The ability of AGP to inhibit phagocytosis by monocytes and the killing of E. coli by PMNs was reduced following dephosphorylation. The findings indicate that the functions of PMNs and monocytes are differentially regulated by varying concentrations of AGP and its phosphorylation state.

  10. Lactation Stage-Related Expression of Sialylated and Fucosylated Glycotopes of Human Milk α-1-Acid Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hirnle, Lidia; Berghausen-Mazur, Marta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Because terminal sugars of α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) are reported to be involved in anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory processes, their expressions might have an influence on the proper function of immune system of newborns. Here, relative amounts of sialylated and fucosylated glycotopes on human milk AGP over normal lactation were investigated. Materials and Methods: AGP concentration and relative amounts of its sialylated and fucosylated glycovariants were analyzed in early colostrum, colostrum, and transitional and mature milk samples of 127 healthy mothers by lectin–AGP enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using α2,3- and α2,6-sialic acid and α1,2-, α1,3-, and α1,6-fucose specific biotinylated Maackia amurensis, Sambucus nigra, Ulex europaeus, Tetragonolobus purpureus, and Lens culinaris lectins, respectively. Results: AGP concentration in human milk was about 30 times lower than in plasma of lactating mothers and decreased gradually over lactation. Milk AGP showed significantly higher expression of sialylated and fucosylated glycotopes in comparison with those of plasma AGP. Milk AGP glycovariants containing α2,6-sialylated and α1,6- and α1,2-fucosylated glycotopes showed the highest relative amounts in early colostrums. With progression of lactation, the expressions of glycotopes α1,2-fucosylated decreased starting from Day 4 and those of α2,6-sialylated and α1,6-fucosylated from Day 8 of lactation, whereas the level of α2,3-sialyl-glycotope was almost constant over 45 days of lactation. In contrast, the expression of α1,3-linked fucose on AGP was low in colostrums and significantly higher in transitional and mature milk. Conclusions: The relative amounts of sialylated and fucosylated glycovariants of human hindmilk AGP significantly varied between Days 2 and 45 of normal lactation. PMID:24892765

  11. Bovine α₁-acid glycoprotein, a thermostable version of its human counterpart: insights from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and in silico modelling.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Galeazzi, Roberta; Maggiore, Beatrice; Tanfani, Fabio; Scirè, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    α1-Acid glycoprotein (AGP) is a plasma protein and a member of the acute phase response. AGP is known to bind and carry several biologically active compounds, as well as to down-modulate the immune system activities. In this work, the structure of bovine AGP has been investigated by Fourier-Transform infrared spectroscopy. A model structure has been obtained on the basis of human AGP and refined by molecular dynamics. In spite of the similar structure, bovine AGP shows an unexpectedly higher (∼20 °C) thermostability than its human counterpart. Inspection of the model structure has pointed out the presence of 12 ionic bridges and 2 sulphur-aromatic interactions, whereas only 6 ionic bridges were detected in human AGP. The high number (9) of glutamic acid residues involved in the ionic interactions might explain the significantly decreased thermostability measured at pH 5.5 (Tm ∼ 71 °C) with respect to pH 7.4 (Tm ∼ 81 °C), whereas thermostability of human AGP was only slightly affected by lowering the pH. As in human AGP and several other lipocalins, a temperature-induced molten globule state has been observed in the denaturation pathway of bovine AGP. PMID:24530968

  12. Studying the Impact of Presence of Alpha Acid Glycoprotein and Protein Glycoprotein in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib Mesylate in the State of Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dewik, Nader I.; Jewell, Andrew P.; Yassin, Mohammed A.; Morsi, Hisham M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of imatinib mesylate (IM) in treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there is a high degree of resistance. Alpha- 1-acid glycoprotein may reduce drug efficacy through its ability to interact with IM and blocks it from reaching its target, while protein glycoprotein (PGP) may reduce the intracellular concentration of the drug via an active pump mechanism. We thus investigated the correlation between AGP and PGP levels and the resistance/response to treatment. A total of 26 CML patients were investigated for AGP and PGP levels at diagnosis and during treatment. There was no significant difference or correlation between AGP levels and the different groups of patients. There was also no significant difference in the fluorescence intensities of PGP levels among the different patient groups. The resistance observed in our CML patient population could not be correlated with AGP and PGP levels. There was no significant pattern of AGP and PGP expression, irrespective of the response or resistance to treatment. PMID:26640393

  13. Activated human PMN synthesize and release a strongly fucosylated glycoform of alpha1-acid glycoprotein, which is transiently deposited in human myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Poland, Dennis C W; García Vallejo, Juan-Jesús; Niessen, Hans W M; Nijmeyer, Remco; Calafat, Jero; Hack, C Erik; Van het Hof, Bert; Van Dijk, Willem

    2005-08-01

    Alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) is a major acute-phase protein present in human plasma as well as in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In this report, we show that PMN synthesize a specific glycoform of AGP, which is stored in the specific and azurophilic granules. Activation of PMN results in the rapid release of soluble AGP. PMN AGP exhibits a substantially higher apparent molecular weight than plasma AGP (50-60 kD vs. 40-43 kD), owing to the presence of strongly fucosylated and sialylated polylactosamine units on its five N-linked glycans. PMN AGP is also released in vivo from activated PMN, as appeared from studies using well-characterized myocard slices of patients that had died within 2 weeks after an acute myocardial infarction. AGP was found deposited transiently on damaged cardiomyocytes in areas with infiltrating PMN only. It is interesting that this was inversely related to the deposition of activated complement C3. Strongly fucosylated and sialylated AGP glycoforms have the ability to bind to E-selectin and to inhibit complement activation. We suggest that AGP glycoforms in PMN provide an endogenous feedback-inhibitory response to excessive inflammation.

  14. The glycosylation of AGP and its associations with the binding to methadone.

    PubMed

    Behan, Jennifer L; Cruickshank, Yvonne E; Matthews-Smith, Gerri; Bruce, Malcolm; Smith, Kevin D

    2013-01-01

    Methadone remains the most common form of pharmacological therapy for opioid dependence; however, there is a lack of explanation for the reports of its relatively low success rate in achieving complete abstinence. One hypothesis is that in vivo binding of methadone to the plasma glycoprotein alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), to a degree dependent on the molecular structure, may render the drug inactive. This study sought to determine whether alterations present in the glycosylation pattern of AGP in patients undergoing various stages of methadone therapy (titration < two weeks, harm reduction < one year, long-term > one and a half years) could affect the affinity of the glycoprotein to bind methadone. The composition of AGP glycosylation was determined using high pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and intrinsic fluorescence analysed to determine the extent of binding to methadone. The monosaccharides galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine were elevated in all methadone treatment groups indicating alterations in AGP glycosylation. AGP from all patients receiving methadone therapy exhibited a greater degree of binding than the normal population. This suggests that analysing the glycosylation of AGP in patients receiving methadone may aid in determining whether the therapy is likely to be effective.

  15. Drug-binding energetics of human α-1-acid glycoprotein assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking simulations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Cooper, Matthew A.; Baker, Mark A.; Azad, Mohammad A.K.; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This study utilizes sensitive, modern isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) methods to characterize the microscopic thermodynamic parameters that drive the binding of basic drugs to α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and thereby rationalize the thermodynamic data in relation to docking models and crystallographic structures of the drug-AGP complexes. The binding of basic compounds from the tricyclic antidepressant series, together with miaserine, chlorpromazine, disopyramide and cimetidine all displayed an exothermically driven binding interaction with AGP. The impact of protonation/deprotonation events, ionic strength, temperature and the individual selectivity of the A and F1*S AGP variants on drug-binding thermodynamics were characterized. A correlation plot of the thermodynamic parameters for all of the test compounds revealed enthalpy-entropy compensation is in effect. The exothermic binding energetics of the test compounds were driven by a combination of favorable (negative) enthalpic (ΔH°) and favorable (positive) entropic (ΔS°) contributions to the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°). Collectively, the data imply that the free energies that drive drug binding to AGP and its relationship to drug-serum residency evolve from the complex interplay of enthalpic and entropic forces from interactions with explicit combinations of hydrophobic and polar side-chain sub-domains within the multi-lobed AGP ligand binding cavity. PMID:23192962

  16. Expression of α1-acid glycoprotein and lipopolysaccharide binding protein in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mizanur M; Lecchi, Cristina; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred; Häußler, Susanne; Restelli, Laura; Giudice, Chiara; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine compartment that plays an important role in immune defence by producing and releasing a wide range of proteins, including acute phase proteins (APPs). The liver is the main organ of APP synthesis, although extrahepatic production has also been reported. In the present study, expression of two APPs in dairy cattle, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), was determined in four visceral (pericardial, mesenteric, omental and retroperitoneal) and three subcutaneous (withers, tail head and sternum) adipose tissue depots. mRNA expression was evaluated using qualitative and quantitative PCR, protein profiles were assessed by Western blot analysis and cellular localisation was determined by immunohistochemistry. The presence of LBP and AGP was demonstrated at mRNA and protein levels in all seven adipose tissue depots. Expression of AGP and LBP suggests that they may have roles as local and systemic inflammatory adipokines. PMID:25542063

  17. Serum α-1 acid glycoprotein and serum amyloid A concentrations in cats receiving antineoplastic treatment for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Valter M; Pavan, Tatiana L R; Wirthl, Vera A B F; Alves, Ana L N; Lucas, Silvia R R

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize serum α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations at diagnosis and during treatment in cats with lymphoma. ANIMALS 16 cats with various anatomic forms of lymphoma and 25 healthy cats. PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from healthy cats once and from cats with lymphoma at diagnosis and 2-week intervals until the 12th week of antineoplastic treatment. Serum harvested from blood samples was assessed for AGP and SAA concentrations. Differences in serum AGP and SAA values were investigated between healthy cats and cats with lymphoma (at diagnosis) and, for cats with lymphoma, between diagnosis and various points during treatment. RESULTS Serum AGP and SAA concentrations were higher in cats with lymphoma at diagnosis (median, 832.60 and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively), compared with those in healthy cats (median, 269.85 and 0.10 μg/mL). Treatment resulted in a gradual decrease in serum AGP concentration after 4 weeks and in SAA concentration after 8 weeks of treatment, and these concentrations returned to values comparable with those of healthy cats by 12 weeks of treatment, by which point all cats had achieved complete remission of the disease. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Serum AGP and SAA concentrations in cats with lymphoma were higher at diagnosis than after antineoplastic treatment. Decreases to values established for healthy cats corresponded with achievement of complete disease remission. Serum AGP and SAA may be useful protein markers for monitoring of antineoplastic treatment in cats with lymphoma.

  18. Analysis of free drug fractions in serum by ultrafast affinity extraction and two-dimensional affinity chromatography using α1-acid glycoprotein microcolumns.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2016-02-01

    In the circulatory system, many drugs are reversibly bound to serum proteins such as human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), resulting in both free and protein-bound fractions for these drugs. This report examined the use of microcolumns containing immobilized AGP for the measurement of free drug fractions by ultrafast affinity extraction and a two-dimensional affinity system. Several drugs known to bind AGP were used as models to develop and evaluate this approach. Factors considered during the creation of this method included the retention of the drugs on the microcolumns, the injection flow rate, the microcolumn size, and the times at which a second AGP column was placed on-line with the microcolumn. The final system had residence times of only 110-830ms during sample passage through the AGP microcolumns and allowed free drug fractions to be determined within 10-20min when using only 3-10μL of sample per injection. This method was used to measure the free fractions of the model drugs at typical therapeutic levels in serum, giving good agreement with the results obtained by ultrafiltration. This approach was also used to estimate the binding constants for each drug with AGP in serum, even for drugs that had significant interactions with both AGP and HSA in such samples. These results indicated that AGP microcolumns could be used with ultrafast affinity extraction to measure free drug fractions in a label-free manner and to study the binding of drugs with AGP in complex samples such as serum. PMID:26797422

  19. Entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein in high-performance affinity columns for drug-protein binding studies.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Jackson, Abby; Vargas-Badilla, John; Li, Rong; Rada, Giana; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    A slurry-based method was developed for the entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) for use in high-performance affinity chromatography to study drug interactions with this serum protein. Entrapment was achieved based on the physical containment of AGP in hydrazide-activated porous silica supports and by using mildly oxidized glycogen as a capping agent. The conditions needed for this process were examined and optimized. When this type of AGP column was used in binding studies, the association equilibrium constant (Ka) measured by frontal analysis at pH 7.4 and 37°C for carbamazepine with AGP was found to be 1.0 (±0.5)×10(5)M(-1), which agreed with a previously reported value of 1.0 (±0.1)×10(5)M(-1). Binding studies based on zonal elution were conducted for several other drugs with such columns, giving equilibrium constants that were consistent with literature values. An entrapped AGP column was also used in combination with a column containing entrapped HSA in a screening assay format to compare the binding of various drugs to AGP and HSA. These results also agreed with previous data that have been reported in literature for both of these proteins. The same entrapment method could be extended to other proteins and to the investigation of additional types of drug-protein interactions. Potential applications include the rapid quantitative analysis of biological interactions and the high-throughput screening of drug candidates for their binding to a given protein.

  20. Serum albumin and α-1 acid glycoprotein impede the killing of Schistosoma mansoni by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Svenja; Long, Thavy; Scheld, Christina; Geyer, Rudolf; Caffrey, Conor R.; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2014-01-01

    In the search for new drugs and drug targets to treat the flatworm disease schistosomiasis, protein kinases (PKs) have come under particular scrutiny because of their essential roles in developmental and physiological processes in schistosome parasites. In this context the application of the anti-cancer Abl tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor Imatinib (Gleevec/Glivec; STI-571) to adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro has indicated negative effects on diverse physiological processes including survival. Motivated by these in vitro findings, we performed in vivo experiments in rodent models of S. mansoni infection. Unexpectedly, Imatinib had no effect on worm burden or egg-production. We found that the blood components serum albumin (SA) and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP or orosomucoid) negated Imatinib’s deleterious effects on adult S. mansoni and schistosomula (post-infective larvae) in vitro. This negative effect was partially reversed by erythromycin. AGP synthesis can increase as a consequence of inflammatory processes or infection; in addition upon infection AGP levels are 6–8 times higher in mice compared to humans. Therefore, mice and probably other rodents are poor infection models for measuring the effects of Imatinib in vivo. Accordingly, we suggest the routine evaluation of the ability of AGP and SA to block in vitro anti-schistosomal effects of small molecules like Imatinib prior to laborious and expensive animal experiments. PMID:25516839

  1. Fucosylated Glycans in α1-Acid Glycoprotein for Monitoring Treatment Outcomes and Prognosis of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Shin; Takahashi, Ryo; Yokobori, Takehiko; Sano, Rie; Mogi, Akira; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Asao, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    One standard treatment option for advanced-stage cancer is surgical resection of malignant tumors following by adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Additionally, neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be applied if required. During the time course of treatments, patients are generally followed by computed tomography (CT) surveillance, and by tumor marker diagnosis. However, currently, early evidence of recurrence and/or metastasis of tumors with a clinically relevant biomarker remains a major therapeutic challenge. In particular, there has been no validated biomarker for predicting treatment outcomes in therapeutic settings. Recently, we have looked at glycoforms of serum α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) by using a crossed affinoimmunoelectrophoresis with two lectins and an anti-AGP antibody. The primary glycan structures of AGP were also analyzed by a mass spectrometer and a novel software in a large number of patients with various cancers. Accordingly, the relative abundance of α1,3fucosylated glycans in AGP (FUCAGP) was found to be significantly high in cancer patients as compared with the healthy controls. Further, strikingly elevated levels of FUCAGP were found in patients with poor prognosis but not in patients with good prognosis. In the current study, levels of FUCAGP in serum samples from various cancer patients were analyzed and 17 patients including 13 who had undergone chemotherapy were followed for several years post operation. FUCAGP level determined diligently by using a mass spectrometer was found to change along with disease prognosis as well as with responses to treatments, in particular, to various chemotherapies. Therefore, FUCAGP levels measured during following-up of the patients after operation appeared to be clinically relevant biomarker of treatment intervention. PMID:27295180

  2. On-column entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein for studies of drug-protein binding by high-performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Bi, Cong; Koke, Michelle; Jackson, Abby; Hage, David S

    2016-08-01

    An on-column approach for protein entrapment was developed to immobilize alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) for drug-protein binding studies based on high-performance affinity chromatography. Soluble AGP was physically entrapped by using microcolumns that contained hydrazide-activated porous silica and by employing mildly oxidized glycogen as a capping agent. Three on-column entrapment methods were evaluated and compared to a previous slurry-based entrapment method. The final selected method was used to prepare 1.0 cm × 2.1 mm I.D. affinity microcolumns that contained up to 21 (±4) μg AGP and that could be used over the course of more than 150 sample applications. Frontal analysis and zonal elution studies were performed on these affinity microcolumns to examine the binding of various drugs with the entrapped AGP. Site-selective competition studies were also conducted for these drugs. The results showed good agreement with previous observations for these drug-protein systems and with binding constants that have been reported in the literature. The entrapment method developed in this study should be useful for future work in the area of personalized medicine and in the high-throughput screening of drug interactions with AGP or other proteins. Graphical abstract On-column protein entrapment using a hydrazide-activated support and oxidized glycogen as a capping agent.

  3. On-column entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein for studies of drug-protein binding by high-performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Bi, Cong; Koke, Michelle; Jackson, Abby; Hage, David S

    2016-08-01

    An on-column approach for protein entrapment was developed to immobilize alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) for drug-protein binding studies based on high-performance affinity chromatography. Soluble AGP was physically entrapped by using microcolumns that contained hydrazide-activated porous silica and by employing mildly oxidized glycogen as a capping agent. Three on-column entrapment methods were evaluated and compared to a previous slurry-based entrapment method. The final selected method was used to prepare 1.0 cm × 2.1 mm I.D. affinity microcolumns that contained up to 21 (±4) μg AGP and that could be used over the course of more than 150 sample applications. Frontal analysis and zonal elution studies were performed on these affinity microcolumns to examine the binding of various drugs with the entrapped AGP. Site-selective competition studies were also conducted for these drugs. The results showed good agreement with previous observations for these drug-protein systems and with binding constants that have been reported in the literature. The entrapment method developed in this study should be useful for future work in the area of personalized medicine and in the high-throughput screening of drug interactions with AGP or other proteins. Graphical abstract On-column protein entrapment using a hydrazide-activated support and oxidized glycogen as a capping agent. PMID:27289464

  4. Identification and characterization of isomeric N-glycans of human alfa-acid-glycoprotein by stable isotope labelling and ZIC-HILIC-MS in combination with exoglycosidase digestion.

    PubMed

    Mancera-Arteu, Montserrat; Giménez, Estela; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victòria

    2016-10-12

    In this study, a ZIC-HILIC-MS methodology for the analysis of N-glycan isomers was optimized to obtain greater detection sensitivity and thus identify more glycan structures in hAGP. In a second step, this method was combined with glycan reductive isotope labelling (GRIL) through [(12)C6]/[(13)C6]-aniline and exoglycosidase digestion to characterize the different glycan isomers. The GRIL method allows the peak areas resulting from two different labelled samples to be compared, since neither retention time shifts nor variations in the ionization of glycans between these samples are obtained. First, sialic acid linkage assignations were performed for most hAGP glycan isomers with α2-3 sialidase digestion. Bi-, tri- and tetraantennary glycan isomers with different terminal sialic acid linkages to galactose (α2-3 or α2-6) were assigned, and the potential of this technique for the structural characterization of isobaric isomers was therefore demonstrated. Furthermore, fucose linkage isomers of hAGP glycans were also characterized using this isotope-labelling approach in combination with α1-3,4 fucosidase and β1-4 galactosidase digestion. α1-3 antennary fucoses and α1-6 core fucosylation were detected in hAGP fucosylated glycans. These established methodologies can be extremely useful for patho-glycomic studies to characterize glycoproteins of biomedical interest and find novel glycan isomers that could be used as biomarkers in cancer research. PMID:27662763

  5. Amyloid fibril formation by bovine α1-acid glycoprotein in a reducing environment: The role of disulfide bridges on the observed aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Maggiore, Beatrice; Scirè, Andrea; Tanfani, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Bovine α1-acid glycoprotein (bAGP), a thermostable counterpart of its human homologue, is a positive acute phase protein involved in binding and transportation of a large number of bio-active molecules and drugs across the body. We have investigated the effect of low pH and reducing conditions on the structure of the protein and found that it aggregates at high temperatures. The aggregates show a fibrillar structure when observed with electron microscopy. Aggregation assays using the amyloid-specific dye Thioflavin T show the presence of a lag phase which was neither abolished nor shortened when seeds were added. A priori reduction of the two disulfide bridges of bAGP, on the other hand, abolished the lag phase and reveals a connection between the kinetics of reduction and aggregation. We provide a kinetic interpretation and the corresponding rate laws allowing to model the process of fibril formation by bAGP under reducing conditions. Our interpretation allows to assess the role of disulfide bridges on the fibrillation kinetics of bAGP and can provide a more accurate interpretation of the fibrillation kinetics of other amyloidogenic proteins containing disulfide bridges.

  6. AtAGP18 is localized at the plasma membrane and functions in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yizhu; Yang, Jie; Showalter, Allan M

    2011-04-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are a family of highly glycosylated hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs). AtAGP17, 18 and 19 comprise the lysine-rich classical AGP subfamily in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of GFP-AtAGP17/18/19 fusion proteins in Arabidopsis revealed localization of the fusion proteins on the plant cell surface of different organs. Subcellular localization of the fusion proteins at the plasma membrane was further determined by plasmolysis of leaf trichome cells. To elucidate AtAGP17/18/19 function(s), these AGPs were expressed without the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag under the control of 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. In contrast to AtAGP17/AtAGP19 overexpressors which showed phenotypes identical to wild-type plants, AtAGP18 overexpressors displayed several phenotypes distinct from wild-type plants. Specifically, these overexpressors had smaller rosettes and shorter stems and roots, produced more branches and had less viable seeds. Moreover, these AtAGP18 overexpressors exhibited similar phenotypes to tomato LeAGP-1 overexpressors, suggesting these two AGP genes may have similar function(s) in Arabidopsis and tomato. PMID:21165646

  7. Coactivator TIF1β Interacts with Transcription Factor C/EBPβ and Glucocorticoid Receptor To Induce α1-Acid Glycoprotein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Jin; Chen, Ya-Ling; Lee, Sheng-Chung

    1998-01-01

    The transcription of the α1-acid glycoprotein gene is induced by inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids. C/EBPβ is a major transcription factor involved in the induction of the agp gene by some cytokines. In this report, we have identified a novel transcriptional intermediary factor, TIF1β, which could enhance the transcription of the agp gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and C/EBPβ. TIF1β belongs to a subgroup of RING (really interesting new gene) finger proteins that contain a RING finger preceding two B box-type fingers and a putative coiled-coil domain (RBCC domain). Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the interaction between GR and TIF1β is ligand independent. The overexpression of the TIF1β gene enhances GR-regulated expression in a ligand- and glucocorticoid-responsive element (GRE)-dependent manner. TIF1β can also augment C/EBPβ-mediated activity on wild-type and GRE-mutated agp genes, but this augmentation is diminished when all three C/EBPβ-binding elements are mutated. Functional and biochemical characterizations indicated that the bZIP domain of C/EBPβ and the RBCC domain, plant homeodomain finger, and bromodomain of TIF1β are crucial for the interactions of these proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that TIF1β serves as a converging mediator of signal transduction pathways of glucocorticoids and some inflammatory cytokines. PMID:9742105

  8. The effect of age and teat order on alpha1-acid glycoprotein, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, cortisol, and average daily gain in commercial growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Stull, C L; Kachulis, C J; Farley, J L; Koenig, G J

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate age and teat order on a performance trait, average daily gain, and on physiological stress indicators, alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (N:L), and cortisol in commercial growing pigs from weaning to market age. Pigs (n = 129) from five commercial California farms were weighed and blood-sampled at 28-d intervals from 28 to 168 d of age. Laboratory assays were performed from blood samples to quantify cortisol, AGP, and N:L. Age and facility effects (P<.001), but not teat order effects (P>.05), were found for all three physiological traits and ADG. Pigs that routinely suckled from teats 1, 4, or 6 (numbered from anterior to posterior on the upper teat bank) had similar (P>.05) ADG and BW throughout the production cycle. No correlation (P> .05) was found between cortisol, AGP, and N:L. The use of these physiological and production traits as stress and health indices of growing pigs in commercial facilities has limitations in comparing data between facilities or different ages of pigs. PMID:10064029

  9. Urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and alpha 1 acid glycoprotein as biomarkers of renal disease activity in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Watson, L; Midgley, A; Pilkington, C; Tullus, K; Marks, Sd; Holt, Rcl; Jones, Ca; Beresford, Mw

    2012-04-01

    A higher proportion of patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) will have renal involvement compared with adult-onset disease, some progressing to renal failure in adulthood. Histological examination is the gold standard for diagnosing lupus nephritis (LN), but its invasive nature limits routine use. Using cross-sectional cohort analysis, we aimed to determine whether urinary concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP10) are biomarkers of active LN. Sixty JSLE patients recruited to the UK JSLE Cohort Study were categorized according to the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) activity index. Patients with active renal JSLE (n = 8; renal BILAG score A, B) had significantly higher urinary MCP1 concentrations than patients with inactive renal disease (n = 52; renal BILAG score C, D, E; 582 pg/mg creatinine [Cr], 207 pg/mg Cr; p = 0.018) or healthy controls (n = 23; 117 pg/mg Cr; p = 0.005). Urinary AGP concentration was significantly elevated in patients with active renal disease compared with inactive renal disease (1517 ng/mg Cr, 485 ng/mg Cr; p = 0.027) or healthy controls (313 ng/mg Cr; p = 0.013). Urinary IP10 concentration was not significantly different between groups, but did strongly correlate with uMCP and uAGP levels (rho = 0.38, p = 0.009; rho = 0.33, p = 0.021). Urinary MCP1 and AGP are biomarkers of LN, providing insight into its pathophysiology. Longitudinal studies are warranted.

  10. Arabinogalactan protein 31 (AGP31), a putative network-forming protein in Arabidopsis thaliana cell walls?

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Roujol, David; Nguyen-Kim, Huan; del Rocio Cisneros Castillo, Liliana; Saland, Estelle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Arabinogalactan protein 31 (AGP31) is a remarkable plant cell-wall protein displaying a multi-domain organization unique in Arabidopsis thaliana: it comprises a predicted signal peptide (SP), a short AGP domain of seven amino acids, a His-stretch, a Pro-rich domain and a PAC (PRP-AGP containing Cys) domain. AGP31 displays different O-glycosylation patterns with arabinogalactans on the AGP domain and Hyp-O-Gal/Ara-rich motifs on the Pro-rich domain. AGP31 has been identified as an abundant protein in cell walls of etiolated hypocotyls, but its function has not been investigated thus far. Literature data suggest that AGP31 may interact with cell-wall components. The purpose of the present study was to identify AGP31 partners to gain new insight into its function in cell walls. Methods Nitrocellulose membranes were prepared by spotting different polysaccharides, which were either obtained commercially or extracted from cell walls of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brachypodium distachyon. After validation of the arrays, in vitro interaction assays were carried out by probing the membranes with purified native AGP31 or recombinant PAC-V5-6xHis. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analyses were carried out on an AGP31 purified fraction. Key Results It was demonstrated that AGP31 interacts through its PAC domain with galactans that are branches of rhamnogalacturonan I. This is the first experimental evidence that a PAC domain, also found as an entire protein or a domain of AGP31 homologues, can bind carbohydrates. AGP31 was also found to bind methylesterified polygalacturonic acid, possibly through its His-stretch. Finally, AGP31 was able to interact with itself in vitro through its PAC domain. DLS data showed that AGP31 forms aggregates in solution, corroborating the hypothesis of an auto-assembly. Conclusions These results allow the proposal of a model of interactions of AGP31 with different cell-wall components, in which AGP31 participates in

  11. CsAGP1, a Gibberellin-Responsive Gene from Cucumber Hypocotyls, Encodes a Classical Arabinogalactan Protein and Is Involved in Stem Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Me Hea; Suzuki, Yoshihito; Chono, Makiko; Knox, J. Paul; Yamaguchi, Isomaro

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence differential display was used to isolate the gibberellin (GA)-responsive gene, CsAGP1, from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hypocotyls. A sequence analysis of CsAGP1 indicated that the gene putatively encodes a “classical” arabinogalactan protein (AGP) in cucumber. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing CsAGP1 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter produced a Y(βGlc)3-reactive proteoglycan in addition to AGPs present in wild-type tobacco plants. Immuno-dot blotting of the product, using anti-AGP antibodies, showed that the CsAGP1 protein had the AGP epitopes common to AGP families. The transcription level of CsAGP1 in cucumber hypocotyls increased in response not only to GA but also to indole-3-acetic acid. Although CsAGP1 is expressed in most vegetative tissues of cucumber, including the shoot apices and roots, the GA treatment resulted in an increase in the mRNA level of CsAGP1 only in the upper part of the hypocotyls. Y(βGlc)3, which selectively binds AGPs, inhibited the hormone-promoted elongation of cucumber seedling hypocotyls. Transgenic plants ectopically expressing CsAGP1 showed a taller stature and earlier flowering than the wild-type plants. These observations suggest that CsAGP1 is involved in stem elongation. PMID:12644694

  12. CsAGP1, a gibberellin-responsive gene from cucumber hypocotyls, encodes a classical arabinogalactan protein and is involved in stem elongation.

    PubMed

    Park, Me Hea; Suzuki, Yoshihito; Chono, Makiko; Knox, J Paul; Yamaguchi, Isomaro

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence differential display was used to isolate the gibberellin (GA)-responsive gene, CsAGP1, from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hypocotyls. A sequence analysis of CsAGP1 indicated that the gene putatively encodes a "classical" arabinogalactan protein (AGP) in cucumber. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing CsAGP1 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter produced a Y(betaGlc)(3)-reactive proteoglycan in addition to AGPs present in wild-type tobacco plants. Immuno-dot blotting of the product, using anti-AGP antibodies, showed that the CsAGP1 protein had the AGP epitopes common to AGP families. The transcription level of CsAGP1 in cucumber hypocotyls increased in response not only to GA but also to indole-3-acetic acid. Although CsAGP1 is expressed in most vegetative tissues of cucumber, including the shoot apices and roots, the GA treatment resulted in an increase in the mRNA level of CsAGP1 only in the upper part of the hypocotyls. Y(betaGlc)(3), which selectively binds AGPs, inhibited the hormone-promoted elongation of cucumber seedling hypocotyls. Transgenic plants ectopically expressing CsAGP1 showed a taller stature and earlier flowering than the wild-type plants. These observations suggest that CsAGP1 is involved in stem elongation.

  13. Strategy Approach for Direct Enantioseparation of Hyoscyamine Sulfate and Zopiclone on a Chiral αl-Acid Glycoprotein Column and Determination of Their Eutomers: Thermodynamic Study of Complexation.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Salama, Nahla N; Abd El Halim, Lobna M; Salem, Maissa Y; Abd El Fattah, Laila E

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and simple isocratic high-performance liquid chromatographic methods with UV detection were developed and validated for the direct resolution of racemic mixtures of hyoscyamine sulfate and zopiclone. The method involved the use of αl -acid glycoprotein (AGP) as chiral stationary phase. The stereochemical separation factor (ά) and the stereochemical resolution factor (Rs ) obtained were 1.29 and 1.60 for hyoscyamine sulfate and 1.47 and 2.45 for zopiclone, respectively. The method was used for determination of chiral switching (eutomer) isomers: S-hyoscyamine sulfate and eszopiclone. Several mobile phase parameters were investigated for controlling enantioselective retention and resolution on the chiral AGP column. The influence of mobile phase, concentration and type of uncharged organic modifier, ionic strength, and column temperature on enantioselectivity were studied. Calibration curves were linear in the ranges of 1-10 µg mL(-1) and 0.5-5 µg mL(-1) for S-hyoscyamine sulfate and eszopiclone, respectively. The method is specific and sensitive, with lower limits of detection and quantifications of 0.156, 0.515 and 0.106, 0.349 for S-hyoscyamine sulfate and eszopiclone, respectively. The method was used to identify quantitatively the enantiomers profile of the racemic mixtures of the studied drugs in their pharmaceutical preparations. Thermodynamic studies were performed to calculate the enthalpic ΔH and entropic ΔS terms. The results showed that enantiomer separation of the studied drugs were an enthalpic process.

  14. Different effects of the glucosidase inhibitors 1-deoxynojirimycin, N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine on the glycosylation of rat alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Gross, V; Tran-Thi, T A; Schwarz, R T; Elbein, A D; Decker, K; Heinrich, P C

    1986-06-15

    The glucosidase inhibitors 1-deoxynojirimycin, N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine were used to inhibit oligosaccharide processing in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Their effect on the glycosylation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (alpha 1AGP) was studied. Of the three glucosidase inhibitors examined, 1-deoxynojirimycin inhibited not only oligosaccharide trimming but also glycosylation de novo of newly synthesized proteins, resulting in the formation of alpha 1PI with two and three (normally carrying three) and alpha 1AGP with two to five (normally carrying six) oligosaccharide side chains. In the presence of the glucosidase inhibitors, glucosylated high-mannose-type oligosaccharides accumulated. Whereas most of the endoglucosaminidase-H-sensitive oligosaccharides formed in the presence of 1-deoxynojirimycin contained only one glucose residue, N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine led mainly to the formation of oligosaccharides with three glucose residues. None of the three glucosidase inhibitors completely prevented the formation of complex-type oligosaccharides. Thus, in their presence, alpha 1PI and alpha 1AGP with a mixture of both high-mannose and complex-type oligosaccharides were secreted. PMID:2947571

  15. Different effects of the glucosidase inhibitors 1-deoxynojirimycin, N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine on the glycosylation of rat alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, V; Tran-Thi, T A; Schwarz, R T; Elbein, A D; Decker, K; Heinrich, P C

    1986-01-01

    The glucosidase inhibitors 1-deoxynojirimycin, N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine were used to inhibit oligosaccharide processing in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Their effect on the glycosylation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (alpha 1AGP) was studied. Of the three glucosidase inhibitors examined, 1-deoxynojirimycin inhibited not only oligosaccharide trimming but also glycosylation de novo of newly synthesized proteins, resulting in the formation of alpha 1PI with two and three (normally carrying three) and alpha 1AGP with two to five (normally carrying six) oligosaccharide side chains. In the presence of the glucosidase inhibitors, glucosylated high-mannose-type oligosaccharides accumulated. Whereas most of the endoglucosaminidase-H-sensitive oligosaccharides formed in the presence of 1-deoxynojirimycin contained only one glucose residue, N-methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine led mainly to the formation of oligosaccharides with three glucose residues. None of the three glucosidase inhibitors completely prevented the formation of complex-type oligosaccharides. Thus, in their presence, alpha 1PI and alpha 1AGP with a mixture of both high-mannose and complex-type oligosaccharides were secreted. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:2947571

  16. Effect of inositol and phytases on hematological indices and α-1 acid glycoprotein levels in laying hens fed phosphorus-deficient corn-soybean meal-based diets.

    PubMed

    Zyła, K; Grabacka, M; Pierzchalska, M; Duliński, R; Starzyńska-Janiszewska, A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of feeding low nonphytate phosphorus (NPP) corn-soybean meal-based diets supplemented with myo-inositol at 0.1%, or with phytase B at 1,300 acid phosphatase units/kg, or with phytase B enriched in 6-phytase A at 300 phytase units/kg on the hematological indices and the α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations in the blood of Bovans Brown laying hens were investigated. The experimental design comprised also a negative control diet and an internal control diet that had the NPP content adjusted by the addition of 0.304 g of monocalcium phosphate per kg to reach the NPP level similar to that resulting from the combined action of both phytases. A total of sixty 50-wk-old hens were randomly assigned to the dietary treatments with 12 cage replicates of 1 hen, and fed the experimental diets until wk 62, when the blood samples were taken and analyzed for basic hematological indices and for AGP concentrations in sera. The hematological indices from all the experimental groups remained in a normal range; nevertheless, the statistically significant effects of diet on hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.003), erythrocyte counts (P = 0.035), the percentage of lymphocytes (P = 0.020), heterophils (P = 0.002), eosinophils (P = 0.023), and basophils (P = 0.001) in the leucocyte population, as well as on the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.003), were observed. The highest erythrocyte counts were characteristic for hens fed the diet supplemented with both phytase A and phytase B. The highest heterophil to lymphocyte ratios were found in blood of hens fed the diet supplemented with phytase B, whereas the highest basophil percentages and the highest AGP concentrations occurred in birds fed the negative control diet. A highly significant correlation was observed between AGP concentrations in sera and BW losses determined previously. The results indicate that the low-NPP corn soybean meal-based diets increased acute phase protein level in laying hens. Phytase B alone

  17. Distribution of primaquine in human blood: Drug-binding to alpha 1-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.; Frischer, H. )

    1990-12-01

    To clarify the distribution of the antimalarial primaquine in human blood, we measured the drug separately in the liquid, cellular, and ultrafiltrate phases. Washed red cells resuspended at a hematocrit of 0.4 were exposed to a submaximal therapeutic level of 250 ng/ml of carbon 14-labeled primaquine. The tracer was recovered quantitatively in separated plasma and red cells. Over 75% of the total labeled drug was found in red cells suspended in saline solution, but only 10% to 30% in red cells suspended in plasma. The plasma effect was not mediated by albumin. Studies with alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, an agent that displaces AGP-bound drugs, and cord blood known to have decreased AGP established that primaquine binds to physiologic amounts of the glycoprotein in plasma. Red cell primaquine concentration increased linearly as AGP level fell and as the free drug fraction rose. We suggest that clinical blood levels of primaquine include the red cell fraction or whole blood level because (1) erythrocytic primaquine is a sizable and highly variable component of the total drug in blood; (2) this component reflects directly the free drug in plasma, and inversely the extent of binding to AGP; (3) the amount of free primaquine may influence drug transport into specific tissues in vivo; and (4) fluctuations of AGP, an acute-phase reactant that increases greatly in patients with malaria and other infections, markedly affect the partition of primaquine in blood. Because AGP binds many basic drugs, unrecognized primaquine-drug interactions may exist.

  18. Discovery of Inhibitors for the Ether Lipid-Generating Enzyme AGPS as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Valentina; Benjamin, Daniel I; Valente, Sergio; Nenci, Simone; Mai, Antonello; Aliverti, Alessandro; Nomura, Daniel K; Mattevi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated ether lipid metabolism is an important hallmark of cancer cells. Previous studies have reported that lowering ether lipid levels by genetic ablation of the ether lipid-generating enzyme alkyl-glycerone phosphate synthase (AGPS) lowers key structural and oncogenic ether lipid levels and alters fatty acid, glycerophospholipid, and eicosanoid metabolism to impair cancer pathogenicity, indicating that AGPS may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer. In this study, we have performed a small-molecule screen to identify candidate AGPS inhibitors. We have identified several lead AGPS inhibitors and have structurally characterized their interactions with the enzyme and show that these inhibitors bind to distinct portions of the active site. We further show that the lead AGPS inhibitor 1a selectively lowers ether lipid levels in several types of human cancer cells and impairs their cellular survival and migration. We provide here the first report of in situ-effective pharmacological tools for inhibiting AGPS, which may provide chemical scaffolds for future AGPS inhibitor development for cancer therapy. PMID:26322624

  19. Discovery of Inhibitors for the Ether Lipid-Generating Enzyme AGPS as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Piano, Valentina; Benjamin, Daniel I; Valente, Sergio; Nenci, Simone; Marrocco, Biagina; Mai, Antonello; Aliverti, Alessandro; Nomura, Daniel K; Mattevi, Andrea

    2015-11-20

    Dysregulated ether lipid metabolism is an important hallmark of cancer cells. Previous studies have reported that lowering ether lipid levels by genetic ablation of the ether lipid-generating enzyme alkyl-glycerone phosphate synthase (AGPS) lowers key structural and oncogenic ether lipid levels and alters fatty acid, glycerophospholipid, and eicosanoid metabolism to impair cancer pathogenicity, indicating that AGPS may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer. In this study, we have performed a small-molecule screen to identify candidate AGPS inhibitors. We have identified several lead AGPS inhibitors and have structurally characterized their interactions with the enzyme and show that these inhibitors bind to distinct portions of the active site. We further show that the lead AGPS inhibitor 1a selectively lowers ether lipid levels in several types of human cancer cells and impairs their cellular survival and migration. We provide here the first report of in situ-active pharmacological tools for inhibiting AGPS, which may provide chemical scaffolds for future AGPS inhibitor development for cancer therapy.

  20. Temperature Effects on Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1

    PubMed Central

    Njimona, Ibrahim; Lamparter, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors with a conserved N-terminal chromophore-binding domain. Most phytochromes bear a light-regulated C-terminal His kinase or His kinase-like region. We investigated the effects of light and temperature on the His kinase activity of the phytochrome Agp1 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. As in earlier studies, the phosphorylation activity of the holoprotein after far-red irradiation (where the red-light absorbing Pr form dominates) was stronger than that of the holoprotein after red irradiation (where the far red-absorbing Pfr form dominates). Phosphorylation activities of the apoprotein, far red-irradiated holoprotein, and red-irradiated holoprotein decreased when the temperature increased from 25°C to 35°C; at 40°C, almost no kinase activity was detected. The activity of a holoprotein sample incubated at 40°C was nearly completely restored when the temperature returned to 25°C. UV/visible spectroscopy indicated that the protein was not denatured up to 45°C. At 50°C, however, Pfr denatured faster than the dark-adapted sample containing the Pr form of Agp1. The Pr visible spectrum was unaffected by temperatures of 20–45°C, whereas irradiated samples exhibited a clear temperature effect in the 30–40°C range in which prolonged irradiation resulted in the photoconversion of Pfr into a new spectral species termed Prx. Pfr to Prx photoconversion was dependent on the His-kinase module of Agp1; normal photoconversion occurred at 40°C in the mutant Agp1-M15, which lacks the C-terminal His-kinase module, and in a domain-swap mutant in which the His-kinase module of Agp1 is replaced by the His-kinase/response regulator module of the other A. tumefaciens phytochrome, Agp2. The temperature-dependent kinase activity and spectral properties in the physiological temperature range suggest that Agp1 serves as an integrated light and temperature sensor in A. tumefaciens. PMID:22043299

  1. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  2. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewisa substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  3. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review.

  4. Sialic acid glycoproteins inhibit in vitro and in vivo replication of rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, R H; Willoughby, R; Wee, S B; Miskuff, R; Vonderfecht, S

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the interactions of rotaviruses with glycoproteins and cells that support rotaviral replication. We found that a wide range of naturally occurring glycoproteins, including ovalbumins and ovomucoids from chicken and turkey eggs, and mucin derived from bovine submaxillary glands, inhibit the replication of rotaviruses in MA-104 cells. Our studies further indicated that the glycoproteins bind directly to rotaviruses and that virus-glycoprotein binding is dependent largely upon interactions with sialic acid oligosaccharides. We found that accessible sialic acid oligosaccharides are required for efficient rotavirus infection of MA-104 cells, thus demonstrating that sialic acid oligosaccharides play an important role in the interactions of rotaviruses with both glycoproteins and cells that support rotaviral replication. Bovine submaxillary mucin and chicken ovoinhibitor can also prevent the shedding of rotavirus antigen and the development of rotavirus gastroenteritis in a mouse model of rotavirus infection. Our findings document that a range of glycoproteins inhibit the in vivo and in vitro replication of rotaviruses and suggest that the alteration in the quantity or chemical composition of intestinal glycoproteins is a potential means for the modulation of enteric infections. Images PMID:3025257

  5. Boronic Acid-Based Approach for Separation and Immobilization of Glycoproteins and Its Application in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojin; Xia, Ning; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Glycoproteins influence a broad spectrum of biological processes including cell-cell interaction, host-pathogen interaction, or protection of proteins against proteolytic degradation. The analysis of their glyco-structures and concentration levels are increasingly important in diagnosis and proteomics. Boronic acids can covalently react with cis-diols in the oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins to form five- or six-membered cyclic esters. Based on this interaction, boronic acid-based ligands and materials have attracted much attention in both chemistry and biology as the recognition motif for enrichment and chemo/biosensing of glycoproteins in recent years. In this work, we reviewed the progress in the separation, immobilization and detection of glycoproteins with boronic acid-functionalized materials and addressed its application in sensing. PMID:24141187

  6. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression. PMID:17222216

  7. [Acid and basic glycoproteins of human saliva. 2. Investigation of glycoprotein of parotid saliva].

    PubMed

    Mirković, S

    1991-01-01

    We applied the standard diagnostic electrophoretic method on lyophilized human parotid saliva under the appropriate conditions (pH = 8.6 voltage 90 V and time of 30 seconds). The variation of the essential electrophoretic parameters (volume, time, voltage and pH) gave the best protein separation results in the natural range (pH = 7). Also in all cases, except pH = 11, the catodic side was richer in fractions than the anodic one; this was the qualitative characteristic of the protein component of the parotid saliva. Consequently, the protein content of the parotid saliva was rich in basic elements with the typical electrophoregram and densitogram for human serum and mixed saliva. The Pol-E agarose film method is appropriate for investigation and detection of the protein content in human, especially parotid saliva. It also enables differentiation of samples of mixed and parotid saliva on the basis of appropriate densitograms which are the consequence of different protein and especially glycoprotein components of the content.

  8. Method of using alpha-1 acid glycoprotein on T-cells as a marker for alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fudenberg, H.H.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described of diagnosing a dementia of the Alzheimer's type characterized by a change in the percentage of T-cells bearing surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein which comprises providing T-cells from a subject, determining the percentage of those T cells which bear surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, and comparing that percentage of the percentage of T cells which bear the glycoprotein in a control, whereby the dementia is diagnosed.

  9. Weak anion exchange chromatographic profiling of glycoprotein isoforms on a polymer monolithic capillary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Lianbing; Liu, Yunchun; Li, Hengye; Liu, Zhen

    2012-03-01

    High resolution separation of intact glycoproteins, which is essential for many aspects such as finger-print profiling, represents a great challenge because one glycoprotein can exhibit many isoforms with close physicochemical properties. Monolithic columns are important separation media for the separation of intact proteins due to its significant advantages such as easy preparation, high column efficiency and high permeability. However, there are few reports on high resolution profiling of intact glycoproteins. Herein, we presented a polymeric weak anion exchange (WAX) monolithic capillary for high resolution separation of glycoprotein isoforms. A base monolith was first prepared through ring-opening polymerization between tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate and tri(2-aminoethyl), and then modified through reacting with ammonia aqueous solution to convert the unreacted epoxide moieties into primary amino groups. The prepared monolithic capillary was characterized in terms of morphology, pore size, hydrophilicity and reproducibility. The obtained WAX monolithic capillary exhibited desired through-pores and mesopore size, stable skeleton and hydrophilic nature. The performance of the capillary was evaluated using several typical glycoproteins such as α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as mode analytes. Effects of the experimental parameters on the glycoform resolution were investigated. Under the optimized separation conditions, the tested glycoproteins were all resolved into distinct glycoforms. A comparative investigation with capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) revealed that this WAX column provided better selectivity as more isoforms were observed, although the resolution of some glycoprotein isoforms decreased.

  10. Ether lipid generating enzyme AGPS alters the balance of structural and signaling lipids to fuel cancer pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Daniel I; Cozzo, Alyssa; Ji, Xiaodan; Roberts, Lindsay S; Louie, Sharon M; Mulvihill, Melinda M; Luo, Kunxin; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-09-10

    Aberrant lipid metabolism is an established hallmark of cancer cells. In particular, ether lipid levels have been shown to be elevated in tumors, but their specific function in cancer remains elusive. We show here that the metabolic enzyme alkylglyceronephosphate synthase (AGPS), a critical step in the synthesis of ether lipids, is up-regulated across multiple types of aggressive human cancer cells and primary tumors. We demonstrate that ablation of AGPS in cancer cells results in reduced cell survival, cancer aggressiveness, and tumor growth through altering the balance of ether lipid, fatty acid, eicosanoid, and fatty acid-derived glycerophospholipid metabolism, resulting in an overall reduction in the levels of several oncogenic signaling lipids. Taken together, our results reveal that AGPS, in addition to maintaining ether lipids, also controls cellular utilization of fatty acids, favoring the generation of signaling lipids necessary for promoting the aggressive features of cancer. PMID:23980144

  11. Malonic acid suppresses mucin-type O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Goso, Yukinobu

    2016-03-01

    Hydrazine treatment is frequently used for releasing mucin-type O-glycans (O-glycans) from glycoproteins because the method provides O-glycans that retain a reducible GalNAc at their reducing end, which is available for fluorescent labeling. However, many O-glycans are degraded by "peeling" during this treatment. In the current study, it was found that malonic acid suppressed O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of bovine fetuin or porcine gastric mucin in both the gas and liquid phases. This is paradoxical because the release of O-glycans from glycoproteins occurs under alkaline conditions. However, malonic acid seems to prevent the degradation through its acidic property given that other weak acids also prevented the degradation. Accordingly, disodium malonate did not suppress O-glycan degradation. Application of this method to rat gastric mucin demonstrated that the majority of the major O-glycans obtained in the presence of malonic acid were intact, whereas those obtained in the absence of malonic acid were degraded. These results suggest that hydrazine treatment in the presence of malonic acid would allow glycomic analysis of native mucin glycoproteins.

  12. Boronic acid functionalized peptidyl synthetic lectins: Combinatorial library design, peptide sequencing, and selective glycoprotein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bicker, Kevin L.; Sun, Jing; Lavigne, John J.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of cell membrane and secreted glycoproteins is a hallmark of various disease states, including cancer. The natural lectins currently used in the recognition of these glycoproteins are costly, difficult to produce, and unstable towards rigorous use. Herein we describe the design and synthesis of several boronic acid functionalized peptide-based synthetic lectin (SL) libraries, as well as the optimized methodology for obtaining peptide sequences of these SLs. SL libraries were subsequently used to identify SLs with as high as 5-fold selectivity for various glycoproteins. SLs will inevitably find a role in cancer diagnositics, given that they do not suffer from the drawbacks of natural lectins and that the combinatorial nature of these libraries allows for the identification of an SL for nearly any glycosylated biomolecule. PMID:21405093

  13. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  14. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  15. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  16. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  17. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  18. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  19. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Simple boric acid-based fluorescent focusing for sensing of glucose and glycoprotein via multipath moving supramolecular boundary electrophoresis chip.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingyu; Li, Si; Wang, Houyu; Meng, Qinghua; Fan, Liuyin; Xie, Haiyang; Cao, Chengxi; Zhang, Weibing

    2013-06-18

    Boric acid-based fluorescent complex probe of BBV-HPTS (boronic acid-based benzyl viologen (BBV) and hydroxypyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS)) was rarely used for sensitive sensing of saccharide (especially glycoprotein) via electrophoresis. We proposed a novel model of moving supramolecular boundary (MSB) formed with monosaccharide or glycoprotein in microcolumn and the complex probe of BBV-HPTS in the cathodic injection tube, developed a method of MSB fluorescent focusing for sensitive recognition of monosaccharide and glycoprotein, and designed a special multipath capillary electrophoresis (CE) chip for relative experiments. As a proof of concept, glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were respectively used as the mode saccharide and glycoprotein for the relevant demonstration. The experiments revealed that (i) the complex of BBV-HPTS could interact with free glucose or bound one in glycoprotein; (ii) the fluorescent signal was a function of glucose or glycoprotein content approximately; and (iii) interestingly the fluorescent band motion was dependent on glucose content. The developed method had the following merits: (i) low cost; (ii) low limit of detection (down to 1.39 pg/mL for glucose and 2.0 pg per capillary HbA1c); and (iii) high throughput (up to 12 runs or more per patch) and speed (less than 5 min). The developed method has potential use for sensitive monitoring of monosaccharide and glycoprotein in biomedical samples.

  4. The adsorption and lubrication behavior of synovial fluid proteins and glycoproteins on the bearing-surface materials of hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Roba, Marcella; Naka, Marco; Gautier, Emanuel; Spencer, Nicholas D; Crockett, Rowena

    2009-04-01

    The selectivity of synovial fluid protein adsorption onto ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and alumina (Al(2)O(3)), and in particular the ability of glycoproteins to adsorb in the presence of all the other synovial fluid proteins, was investigated by means of fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The non-specific nature of protein adsorption from synovial fluid indicated that the lubrication of artificial hip-joint materials may not be attributable to a single protein as has been frequently suggested. The friction behavior of polyethylene (PE) sliding against Al(2)O(3) in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) was investigated by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. BSA was shown to be a poorer boundary lubricant than the phosphate buffered saline used as a control. This was attributed to denaturation of the BSA upon adsorption, which provided a high-shear-strength layer at the interface, impairing the lubrication. Interestingly, both the glycoproteins AGP and A1AT, despite their low concentrations, improved lubrication. The lubricating properties of AGP and A1AT were attributed to adsorption via the hydrophobic backbone, allowing the hydrophilic carbohydrate moieties to be exposed to the aqueous solution, thus providing a low-shear-strength fluid film that lubricated the system. The amount of glycoprotein adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces was determined by means of optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), allowing conclusions to be drawn about the conformation of the glycan residues following adsorption.

  5. Impact of a human CMP-sialic acid transporter on recombinant glycoprotein sialylation in glycoengineered insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mabashi-Asazuma, Hideaki; Shi, Xianzong; Geisler, Christoph; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Jarvis, Donald L

    2013-02-01

    Insect cells are widely used for recombinant glycoprotein production, but they cannot provide the glycosylation patterns required for some biotechnological applications. This problem has been addressed by genetically engineering insect cells to express mammalian genes encoding various glycoprotein glycan processing functions. However, for various reasons, the impact of a mammalian cytosine-5'-monophospho (CMP)-sialic acid transporter has not yet been examined. Thus, we transformed Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells with six mammalian genes to generate a new cell line, SfSWT-4, that can produce sialylated glycoproteins when cultured with the sialic acid precursor, N-acetylmannosamine. We then super-transformed SfSWT-4 with a human CMP-sialic acid transporter (hCSAT) gene to isolate a daughter cell line, SfSWT-6, which expressed the hCSAT gene in addition to the other mammalian glycogenes. SfSWT-6 cells had higher levels of cell surface sialylation and also supported higher levels of recombinant glycoprotein sialylation, particularly when cultured with low concentrations of N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, hCSAT expression has an impact on glycoprotein sialylation, can reduce the cost of recombinant glycoprotein production and therefore should be included in ongoing efforts to glycoengineer the baculovirus-insect cell system. The results of this study also contributed new insights into the endogenous mechanism and potential mechanisms of CMP-sialic acid accumulation in the Golgi apparatus of lepidopteran insect cells.

  6. G glycoprotein amino acid residues required for human monoclonal antibody RAB1 neutralization are conserved in rabies virus street isolates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Rowley, Kirk J; Booth, Brian J; Sloan, Susan E; Ambrosino, Donna M; Babcock, Gregory J

    2011-08-01

    Replacement of polyclonal anti-rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) used in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with a monoclonal antibody will eliminate cost and availability constraints that currently exist using RIG in the developing world. The human monoclonal antibody RAB1 has been shown to neutralize all rabies street isolates tested; however for the laboratory-adapted fixed strain, CVS-11, mutation in the G glycoprotein of amino acid 336 from asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) resulted in resistance to neutralization. Interestingly, this same mutation in the G glycoprotein of a second laboratory-adapted fixed strain (ERA) did not confer resistance to RAB1 neutralization. Using cell surface staining and lentivirus pseudotyped with rabies virus G glycoprotein (RABVpp), we identified an amino acid alteration in CVS-11 (K346), not present in ERA (R346), which was required in combination with D336 to confer resistance to RAB1. A complete analysis of G glycoprotein sequences from GenBank demonstrated that no identified rabies isolates contain the necessary combination of G glycoprotein mutations for resistance to RAB1 neutralization, consistent with the broad neutralization of RAB1 observed in direct viral neutralization experiments with street isolates. All combinations of amino acids 336 and 346 reported in the sequence database were engineered into the ERA G glycoprotein and RAB1 was able to neutralize RABVpp bearing ERA G glycoprotein containing all known combinations at these critical residues. These data demonstrate that RAB1 has the capacity to neutralize all identified rabies isolates and a minimum of two distinct mutations in the G glycoprotein are required for abrogation of RAB1 neutralization.

  7. Fluorescent staining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by 4H-[1]-benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Yang; Chi, Lisha; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Cong, Weitao; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A fluorescent detection method for glycoproteins in SDS-PAGE by using 4H-[1]-benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (BH) was developed in this study. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be specifically detected by the BH staining method, which is twofold more sensitive than that of the most commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 488 glycoprotein stain. Furthermore, the specificity of the newly developed stain for glycoproteins was demonstrated by 1-D and 2-D SDS-PAGE, deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity enrichment and LC-MS/MS, respectively. According to the results, it is concluded that BH stain may provide new choices for convenient, sensitive, specific and economic visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins. PMID:24712021

  8. Fluorescent staining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by 4H-[1]-benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Yang; Chi, Lisha; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Cong, Weitao; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A fluorescent detection method for glycoproteins in SDS-PAGE by using 4H-[1]-benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (BH) was developed in this study. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be specifically detected by the BH staining method, which is twofold more sensitive than that of the most commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 488 glycoprotein stain. Furthermore, the specificity of the newly developed stain for glycoproteins was demonstrated by 1-D and 2-D SDS-PAGE, deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity enrichment and LC-MS/MS, respectively. According to the results, it is concluded that BH stain may provide new choices for convenient, sensitive, specific and economic visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins.

  9. Studies on the site of biosynthesis of acidic glycoproteins of guinea-pig serum

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, J. L.; Jamieson, J. C.

    1967-01-01

    1. Studies were carried out to determine the cellular and subcellular site of biosynthesis of components of fraction I, an α-globulin fraction containing acidic glycoproteins isolated from guinea-pig serum. l-[U-14C]Leucine or -valine and d-[1-14C]glucosamine were used as precursors. 2. A lag of about 10min. occurred before appreciable label appeared in fraction I of serum after injection of leucine or glucosamine. Label in fraction I after 60min. labelling with glucosamine was present almost entirely in hexosamine and sialic acid. 3. Site of synthesis was investigated by studies in vivo up to 17min. after injection of precursor. Particulate subcellular fractions isolated from liver, spleen and kidney or homogenates of the latter two tissues were extracted with Lubrol. Extracts were allowed to react by double diffusion with antisera to fraction I or to subfractions isolated from it, and gels were subsequently subjected to radioautography. With either amino acid or glucosamine as precursor, only extracts of the microsome fraction of liver formed precipitin lines that were appreciably radioactive. 4. The role of the microsome fraction of liver in the synthesis of these glycoproteins was confirmed by immunological studies after incubation of liver slices with leucine or glucosamine. Incorporation of leucine was also investigated in a cell-free microsome system. 5. Material was also precipitated from certain Lubrol extracts of liver microsomes by direct addition of antiserum and its radioactivity measured. Degradation of material thus precipitated and use of heterologous immune systems showed that labelling of precipitin lines represented biosynthesis. 6. A study of extraction procedures suggested that the substances present in the microsome fraction of liver that react with specific antisera are associated with membranous structures. 7. Most or all precipitin lines formed by Lubrol extracts of liver microsomes interacted with precipitin lines given by guinea

  10. Amino acid sequence and location of the disulfide bonds in bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I: the presence of five Sushi domains.

    PubMed

    Kato, H; Enjyoji, K

    1991-12-17

    beta 2 glycoprotein I is a plasma protein with the ability to bind with various kinds of negatively charged substances. The complete amino acid sequence and the location of all the disulfide bonds of bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I were determined. Bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I consists of 326 amino acid residues with five asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains. Homology with the human protein was calculated to be 83%. Eleven disulfide bonds in bovine beta 2 glycoprotein I constitute four characteristic domains, Sushi domains, and one modified form of a Sushi domain.

  11. Avian serum. cap alpha. /sub 1/-glycoprotein, hemopexin, differing significantly in both amino acid and carbohydrate composition from mammalian (. beta. -glycoprotein) counter parts

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, V.; Trimble, R.B.; Falco, M.D.; Liem, H.H.; Metcalfe, S.A.; Wellner, D.; Muller-Eberhard, U.

    1986-10-21

    The physicochemical characteristics of chicken hemopexin, which can be isolated by heme-agarose affinity chromatography, is compared with representative mammalian hemopexins of rat, rabbit, and human. The avian polypeptide chain appears to be slightly longer (52 kDa) than the human, rat, or rabbit forms (49 kDa), and also the glycoprotein differs from the mammalian hemopexins in being an ..cap alpha../sub 1/-glycoprotein instead of a ..beta../sub 1/-glycoprotein. The distinct electrophoretic mobility probably arises from significant differences in the amino acid composition of the chicken form, which, although lower in serine and particularly in lysine, has a much higher glutamine/glutamate and agrinine content, and also a higher proline, glycine, and histidine content, than the mammalian hemopexins. Compositional analyses and /sup 125/I concanavalin A and /sup 125/I wheat germ agglutinin binding suggest that chicken hemopexin has a mixture of three fucose-free N-linked bi- and triantennary oligosaccharides. In contrast, human hemopexin has give N-linked oligosaccharides and an additional O-linked glycan blocking the N-terminal threonine residue, while the rabbit form has four N-linked oligosaccharides. In keeping with the finding of a simpler carbohydrate structure, the avian hemopexin shows only a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under both nondenaturing and denaturing conditions, whereas the hemopexins of the three mammalian species tested show several bands. In contrast, the isoelectric focusing pattern of chicken hemopexin is very complex, revealing at least nine bands between pH 4.0 and pH band 5.0, while the other hemopexins show a broad smear of multiple ill-defined bands in the same region.Results indicate the hemopexin of avians differs substantially from the hemopexins of mammals, which show a notable similarity with regard to carbohydrate structure and amino acid composition.

  12. Resveratrol and P-glycoprotein Inhibitors Enhance the Anti-skin Cancer Effects of Ursolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Junco, Jacob J.; Mancha, Anna; Malik, Gunjan; Wei, Sung-Jen; Kim, Dae Joon; Liang, Huiyun; Slaga, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), present in apples, rosemary, and other sources, is known to inhibit tumor formation and tumor cell viability in multiple systems, including skin. However, various cancers are resistant to UA treatment. Herein, skin carcinoma cells (Ca3/7) as compared to skin papilloma cells (MT1/2) displayed more resistance to UA-induced cytotoxicity. Interestingly, Ca3/7 cells had elevated levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump that mediates resistance to chemotherapy in pre-clinical and clinical settings, and not only accumulated less but also more rapidly expelled the P-gp substrate Rhodamine 123 (Rh123) indicating UA is transported by P-gp. To determine if P-gp inhibition can enhance UA-mediated cytotoxicity, cells were challenged with P-gp inhibitors verapamil (VRP) or cyclosporin A (CsA). Alternatively, cells were pre-treated with the natural compound resveratrol (RES), a known chemotherapy sensitizer. VRP and RES enhanced the effects of UA in both cell lines, while CsA only did so in Ca3/7 cells. Similarly, VRP inhibited Rh123 efflux in both lines, while CsA only inhibited Rh123 efflux in Ca3/7 cells. RES did not inhibit Rh123 efflux in either line, indicating the synergistic effects of RES and UA are not manifest by inhibition of P-gp-mediated efflux of UA. These results indicate that the anti-skin cancer effects of UA are enhanced with P-gp inhibitors. In addition, RES and UA interact synergistically, but not through inhibition of P-gp. Implications Resveratrol and/or p-glycoprotein inhibitors in combination with ursolic acid are an effective anti-skin cancer regimen. PMID:24072817

  13. Prestaining of glycoproteins in SDS-PAGE via 4H-[1]-Benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide with weak influence on protein mobility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Yang; Yu, Qing; Zhu, Xinliang; Niu, Chao; Cong, Weitao; Jin, Litai

    2014-12-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using 4H-[1]-Benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (BH). The prestained gels were readily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststain. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to the most commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 488 glycoprotein stain. In addition, subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity chromatography, and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method. As a result, BH prestain provides a new choice for quick, sensitive, specific, economical, and MS compatible visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins. PMID:25229714

  14. Prestaining of glycoproteins in SDS-PAGE via 4H-[1]-Benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide with weak influence on protein mobility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongxin; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Yang; Yu, Qing; Zhu, Xinliang; Niu, Chao; Cong, Weitao; Jin, Litai

    2014-12-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using 4H-[1]-Benzopyrano[4,3-b]thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (BH). The prestained gels were readily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststain. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to the most commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 488 glycoprotein stain. In addition, subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity chromatography, and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method. As a result, BH prestain provides a new choice for quick, sensitive, specific, economical, and MS compatible visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins.

  15. Mass spectrometry signal amplification for ultrasensitive glycoprotein detection using gold nanoparticle as mass tag combined with boronic acid based isolation strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minbo; Zhang, Lijuan; Xu, Yawei; Yang, Pengyuan; Lu, Haojie

    2013-07-25

    We describe a novel method for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of intact glycoproteins without enzymatic pretreatment which was commonly used in proteomic research. This method is based on using gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as signal tag in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis combined with boronic acid assisted isolation strategy. Briefly speaking, target glycoproteins were firstly isolated from sample solution with boronic acid functionalized magnetic microparticles, and then the surface modified gold nanoparticles were added to covalently bind to the glycoproteins. After that, these AuNP tagged glycoproteins were eluted from magnetic microparticles and applied to LDI-MS analysis. The mass signal of AuNP rather than that of glycoprotein was detected and recorded in this strategy. Through data processing of different standard glycoproteins, we have demonstrated that the signal of AuNP could be used to quantitatively represent glycoprotein. This method allows femtomolar detection of intact glycoproteins. We believe that the successful validation of this method on three different kinds of glycoproteins suggests the potential use for tracking trace amount of target glycoproteins in real biological samples in the near future.

  16. A glycoprotein binding retinoids and fatty acids is present in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Duncan, T; Kutty, G; Chader, G J; Wiggert, B

    1994-07-01

    In the search for a possible Drosophila melanogaster homolog of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP), a approximately 140-kDa retinoid- and fatty acid-binding glycoprotein found in vertebrates, the 110,000 g supernatant fraction prepared from homogenates of fly heads was analyzed for the presence of proteins capable of binding radiolabeled retinol and palmitic acid. A soluble protein, which binds concanavalin A and has a retention time on size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography identical to that of purified bovine IRBP, was identified as binding both ligands. As assessed by fluorescence titration, the protein fraction obtained by concanavalin A-Sepharose affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography of fly head supernatant had apparent dissociation constants of 2.9 x 10(-7) +/- 0.6 M for all-trans retinol, with the number (n) of independent ligand binding sites per protein molecule = 2, and 3.5 x 10(-7) +/- 0.1 M for 16-[9-anthroyloxy] palmitic acid with n = 7. High-performance liquid chromatography of hexane extracts of this protein fraction resolved several peaks with polarity and relative retention times similar, but not identical to all-trans retinol and retinal and their 9-, 11-, and 13-cis isomers. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid methyl esters prepared following lipid extraction of the protein identified lauric, myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, and oleic acids as being covalently bound. Laurate, myristate, palmitate, and stearate were noncovalently bound. The apparent molecular mass of the Drosophila protein as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining of the retinoid- and fatty acid-binding peak obtained by hydrophobic interaction chromatography of the size-exclusion fraction was approximately 70 kDa. PMID:8031123

  17. Boronic acid-functionalized core-shell-shell magnetic composite microspheres for the selective enrichment of glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Miaorong; Sun, Yangfei; Zheng, Jin; Yang, Wuli

    2013-09-11

    In this work, core-shell-shell-structured boronic acid-functionalized magnetic composite microspheres Fe3O4@SiO2@poly (methyl methacrylate-co-4-vinylphenylbornoic acid) (Fe3O4@SiO2@P(MMA-co-VPBA)) with a uniform size and fine morphology were synthesized. Here, Fe3O4 magnetic particles were prepared by a solvothermal reaction, whereas the Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres with a core-shell structure were obtained by a sol-gel process. 3-(Trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS)-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 was used as the seed in the emulsion polymerization of MMA and VPBA to form the core-shell-shell-structured magnetic composite microspheres. As the boronic acid groups on the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2@P(MMA-co-VPBA) could form tight yet reversible covalent bonds with the cis-1,2-diols groups of glycoproteins, the magnetic composite microspheres were applied to enrich a standard glycoprotein, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and the results demonstrated that the composite microspheres have a higher affinity for the glycoproteins in the presence of the nonglycoprotein bovine serum albumin (BSA) over HRP. Additionally, different monomer mole ratios of MMA/VPBA were studied, and the results implied that using MMA as the major monomer could reduce the amount of VPBA with a similar glycoprotein enrichment efficiency but a lower cost. PMID:23924282

  18. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  19. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  20. Contribution of mdr1b-type P-glycoprotein to okadaic acid resistance in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ritz, V; Marwitz, J; Sieder, S; Ziemann, C; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Quentin, I; Steinfelder, H J

    1999-08-01

    Okadaic acid as well as other, structurally different, inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A induce apoptosis in pituitary GH3 cells. Incubation with stepwise raised concentrations of okadaic acid resulted in the isolation of cells that were increasingly less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of this agent. After about 18 months cells were selected that survived at 300 nM okadaic acid, which is about 30 times the initially lethal concentration. This study revealed that a major pharmacokinetic mechanism underlying cell survival was the development of a P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The increase in mRNA levels of the mdr1b P-glycoprotein isoform correlated with the extent of drug resistance. Functional assays revealed that increasing drug resistance was paralleled by a decreased accumulation of rhodamine 123, a fluorescent dye which is a substrate of mdr1-mediated efflux activity. Resistance could be abolished by structurally different chemosensitizers of P-glycoprotein function like verapamil and reserpine but not by the leukotriene receptor antagonist MK571 which is a modulator of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). Okadaic acid resistance included cross-resistance to other cytotoxic agents that are substrates of mdr1-type P-glycoproteins, like doxorubicin and actinomycin D, but not to non-substrates of mdr1, e.g. cytosine arabinoside. Thus, functional as well as biochemical features support the conclusion that okadaic acid is a substrate of the mdr1-mediated efflux activity in rat pituitary GH3 cells. Maintenance of resistance after withdrawal of okadaic acid as well as metaphase spreads of 100 nM okadaic acid-resistant cells suggested a stable MDR genotype without indications for the occurrence of extrachromosomal amplifications, e.g. double minute chromosomes.

  1. In silico Analysis for Predicting Fatty Acids of Black Cumin Oil as Inhibitors of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Babar; Jamal, Qazi Mohd. Sajid; Mir, Showkat R.; Shams, Saiba; Al-Wabel, Naser A.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Black cumin oil is obtained from the seeds of Nigella sativa L. which belongs to family Ranunculaceae. The seed oil has been reported to possess antitumor, antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, central nervous system depressant, antioxidant, and immunostimulatory activities. These bioactivities have been attributed to the fixed oil, volatile oil, or their components. Seed oil consisted of 15 saturated fatty acids (17%) and 17 unsaturated fatty acids (82.9%). Long chain fatty acids and medium chain fatty acids have been reported to increase oral bioavailability of peptides, antibiotics, and other important therapeutic agents. In earlier studies, permeation enhancement and bioenhancement of drugs has been done with black cumin oil. Objective: In order to recognize the mechanism of binding of fatty acids to P-glycoprotein (P-gp), linoleic acid, oleic acid, margaric acid, cis-11, 14-eicosadienoic acid, and stearic acid were selected for in silico studies, which were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. Materials and Methods: Template search with BLAST and HHblits has been performed against the SWISS-MODEL template library. The target sequence was searched with BLAST against the primary amino acid sequence of P-gp from Rattus norvegicus. Results: The amount of energy needed by linoleic acid, oleic acid, eicosadienoic acid, margaric acid, and stearic acid to bind with P-gp were found to be − 10.60, −10.48, −9.95, −11.92, and − 10.37 kcal/mol, respectively. The obtained data support that all the selected fatty acids have contributed to inhibit P-gp activity thereby enhances the bioavailability of drugs. Conclusion: This study plays a significant role in finding hot spots in P-gp and may offer the further scope of designing potent and specific inhibitors of P-gp. SUMMARY Generation of 3D structure of fatty acid compounds from Black cumin oil and 3D homology modeling of Rat P

  2. Facile synthesis of red emitting 3-aminophenylboronic acid functionalized copper nanoclusters for rapid, selective and highly sensitive detection of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Ge; Zhang, Fei; Gao, Ya; Zhou, Qing-Meng; Zhao, Ye; Li, Yan; Huo, Jian-Zhong; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2016-12-15

    As an emerging class of fluorescent probes, copper nanoclusters (Cu NCs) have been considered as an intriguing candidate for detecting biomoleculars due to their outstanding fluorescent properties, excellent biocompatibility and low cost. Herein, we fabricated bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected Cu NCs (BSA-Cu NCs) and further functionalized them with 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) for selectively discerning glycoproteins. In aqueous solution, Cu(2+) ions were directly reduced into BSA-Cu NCs by hydrazine hydrate (N2H4·H2O) at room-temperature using BSA as the capping agent. The synthetic process was very rapid, simple and easy for controlling due to the lack of any other complicated procedure such as heating and adjusting the pH value of the reactive mixture. The APBA-Cu NCs showed strong fluorescent emission at 630nm in the red range. So it can effectively avoid the disturbance of auto-fluorescence in biosamples. The fluorescence of the APBA-Cu NCs was obviously quenched by glycoprotein samples. Then, the APBA-Cu NCs were employed as a probe for selective capture and sensitive detection of glycoproteins with a wide linear range of 5-220nM and a low detection limit of 2.60nM owing to the covalent reaction between the boric acid group of APBA and the cis-glycol groups of the glycoproteins. The developed method was also successfully applied to determine glycoproteins in egg white of chickens and human urine samples with quantitative spike recoveries from 95% to 104%. PMID:27376198

  3. Transmembrane aromatic amino acid distribution in P-glycoprotein. A functional role in broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Pawagi, A B; Wang, J; Silverman, M; Reithmeier, R A; Deber, C M

    1994-01-14

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a membrane protein which interacts with structurally diverse hydrophobic molecules of high membrane affinity. In an analysis of the molecular basis for this broad range of substrate specificity, we found that the transmembrane (TM) regions of Pgp are rich in highly conserved aromatic amino acid residues. Computer-generated three-dimensional model structures showed that a typical substrate, rhodamine 123, can intercalate between three to four phenylalanine side-chains in any of several Pgp TM helices with minimal protrusion of the drug into bulk lipid, and that five to six (of the 12 Pgp putative TM segments) helices can facilitate transport through creation of a sterically compatible pore. In contrast to the case for proteins involved in the transport of membrane-impermeable, relatively polar substrates, the "transport path" for Pgp substrates need not be polar, and may involve either an internal channel occupied largely by aromatic side-chains, or external gaps along TM helix-lipid interfaces. Weakly polar interactions between drug cationic sites and Pgp aromatic residues contribute additionally to overall protein/drug binding. The ability of Pgp to recognize and efflux structurally diverse molecules suggests that rather than a unique structure, the Pgp channel may maintain the intrinsic capacity to undergo wide-ranging drug-dependent dynamic reorganization. PMID:7904655

  4. Binding of oxprenolol and propranolol to serum, albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein in man and other species.

    PubMed

    Belpaire, F M; Braeckman, R A; Bogaert, M G

    1984-07-01

    Species differences in binding of basic drugs have only occasionally been studied and we have therefore measured the binding of the beta-adrenergic blockers oxprenolol and propranolol in (1) serum of healthy humans, dogs, rats and rabbits and of rabbits with experimental arthritis, (2) a solution of albumin of these species and (3) a solution of human alpha 1-AGP. In humans, dogs, rats and arthritic rabbits, binding of oxprenolol and propranolol was much higher in serum than in albumin solution; in healthy rabbits serum binding was very low and not different from albumin binding. For both drugs, concentration-dependency was seen in serum of dogs, humans and rats and of arthritic rabbits; a similar concentration-dependency was found for human alpha 1-AGP solution, but not for human albumin and for serum of healthy rabbits. Tris (2-butoxyethyl)-phosphate (TBEP), a known displacer of drugs from alpha 1-AGP in humans, decreased binding in serum of all species except the rabbit. For both beta-blockers, species differences in capacity constants were found; species differences in affinity constants were present only for propranolol. These results suggest that in humans, dog and rat, but much less in rabbits, oxprenolol and propranolol bind mainly to alpha 1-AGP and that binding to alpha 1-AGP is more important for oxprenolol than for propranolol. PMID:6743355

  5. Transcriptional induction of the agp/ebp (c/ebp beta) gene by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Shen, B J; Chang, C J; Lee, H S; Tsai, W H; Miau, L H; Lee, S C

    1997-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic factor with mitogenic, morphogenic, motogenic, cytotoxic, or growth inhibitory activity. Although the signaling of HGF is mediated through the cell membrane receptor c-Met, the molecular mechanism of downstream signal transduction remains obscure. In this report, we present evidence that shows HGF can stimulate the expression of AGP/EBP (C/EBP beta) and NF-kappaB, which are both key transcription factors responsible for the regulation of many genes under stress conditions or during the acute-phase response. Biochemical and functional analysis indicates that the HGF-responsive element is located in the region -376 to -352 (URE1) of the 5'-upstream regulatory sequence of agp/ebp. Activation of NF-kappaB by HGF was observed to precede the induction of agp/ebp. Further studies indicate that NF-kappaB can cooperate with AGP/EBP or other members of the C/EBP family to activate the agp/ebp gene in both URE1 and URE2-dependent manner. These results suggest that the induction of the agp/ebp gene by HGF is mediated at least in part by its activation of NF-kappaB. The activated NF-kappaB then interacts with AGP/EBP, resulting in the induction of agp/ebp.

  6. AGP: a multimethods web server for alignment-free genome phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinkui; Cao, Fuliang; Liu, Zhihua

    2013-05-01

    Phylogenetic analysis based on alignment method meets huge challenges when dealing with whole-genome sequences, for example, recombination, shuffling, and rearrangement of sequences. Thus, various alignment-free methods for phylogeny construction have been proposed. However, most of these methods have not been implemented as tools or web servers. Researchers cannot use these methods easily with their data sets. To facilitate the usage of various alignment-free methods, we implemented most of the popular alignment-free methods and constructed a user-friendly web server for alignment-free genome phylogeny (AGP). AGP integrated the phylogenetic tree construction, visualization, and comparison functions together. Both AGP and all source code of the methods are available at http://www.herbbol.org:8000/agp (last accessed February 26, 2013). AGP will facilitate research in the field of whole-genome phylogeny and comparison.

  7. A Single-Amino-Acid Polymorphism in Chikungunya Virus E2 Glycoprotein Influences Glycosaminoglycan Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Laurie A.; Khomandiak, Solomiia; Ashbrook, Alison W.; Weller, Romy; Heise, Mark T.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging arbovirus responsible for outbreaks of infection throughout Asia and Africa, causing an acute illness characterized by fever, rash, and polyarthralgia. Although CHIKV infects a broad range of host cells, little is known about how CHIKV binds and gains access to the target cell interior. In this study, we tested whether glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding is required for efficient CHIKV replication using CHIKV vaccine strain 181/25 and clinical isolate SL15649. Preincubation of strain 181/25, but not SL15649, with soluble GAGs resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of infection. While parental Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are permissive for both strains, neither strain efficiently bound to or infected mutant CHO cells devoid of GAG expression. Although GAGs appear to be required for efficient binding of both strains, they exhibit differential requirements for GAGs, as SL15649 readily infected cells that express excess chondroitin sulfate but that are devoid of heparan sulfate, whereas 181/25 did not. We generated a panel of 181/25 and SL15649 variants containing reciprocal amino acid substitutions at positions 82 and 318 in the E2 glycoprotein. Reciprocal exchange at residue 82 resulted in a phenotype switch; Gly82 results in efficient infection of mutant CHO cells but a decrease in heparin binding, whereas Arg82 results in reduced infectivity of mutant cells and an increase in heparin binding. These results suggest that E2 residue 82 is a primary determinant of GAG utilization, which likely mediates attenuation of vaccine strain 181/25. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection causes a debilitating rheumatic disease that can persist for months to years, and yet there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies. Like other alphaviruses, CHIKV displays broad tissue tropism, which is thought to be influenced by virus-receptor interactions. In this study, we determined that cell-surface glycosaminoglycans are

  8. Effects of Eimeria acervulina infection severity on growth performance, apparent ileal amino acid digestibility, and plasma concentrations of amino acids, carotenoids, and α1-acid glycoprotein in broilers.

    PubMed

    Rochell, S J; Parsons, C M; Dilger, R N

    2016-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate growth performance, apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of amino acids, and plasma concentrations of amino acids, carotenoids, and α1-acid glycoprotein, an acute-phase protein, in broilers inoculated with graded doses of E. acervulina oocysts. Ross 308 male broilers (400 total) were housed in battery cages from 1 to 21 d post-hatch and received common corn-soybean meal-based diets throughout the experiment. At 9 d post-hatch, birds were individually weighed and allotted to 4 treatment groups with 10 replicate cages of 10 birds per cage. At 15 d post-hatch, all birds were inoculated with 1 mL of distilled water that contained 0, 2.5 × 10(5), 5.0 × 10(5), or 1.0 × 10(6) sporulated E. acervulina oocysts. At 21 d, birds were euthanized for collection of blood and ileal digesta. Body weight gain and feed efficiency decreased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing E. acervulina dose. With the exception of Trp and Gly, AID values decreased (P < 0.05) linearly or quadratically for all amino acids by an average of 2.6 percentage units for birds inoculated with 1.0 × 10(6) oocysts compared with uninfected birds. Infection with E. acervulina caused a quadratic decrease (P < 0.05) in plasma carotenoid concentrations. Plasma concentrations of Arg and Tyr decreased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing E. acervulina inoculation dose and plasma Gln and Asn decreased quadratically (P < 0.01). Linear increases (P < 0.05) were observed for plasma Lys, Leu, Ile, Val, Pro, and Orn as E. acervulina inoculation dose increased. Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein of broilers was not influenced (P > 0.05) by E. acervulina infection. In conclusion, E. acervulina challenge adversely impacted growth performance, plasma carotenoids, and AID of amino acids in a dose-dependent manner. However, plasma amino acid responses to graded E. acervulina inoculation doses varied considerably among amino acids. Thus, these results indicated that alterations

  9. Effects of Eimeria acervulina infection severity on growth performance, apparent ileal amino acid digestibility, and plasma concentrations of amino acids, carotenoids, and α1-acid glycoprotein in broilers.

    PubMed

    Rochell, S J; Parsons, C M; Dilger, R N

    2016-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate growth performance, apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of amino acids, and plasma concentrations of amino acids, carotenoids, and α1-acid glycoprotein, an acute-phase protein, in broilers inoculated with graded doses of E. acervulina oocysts. Ross 308 male broilers (400 total) were housed in battery cages from 1 to 21 d post-hatch and received common corn-soybean meal-based diets throughout the experiment. At 9 d post-hatch, birds were individually weighed and allotted to 4 treatment groups with 10 replicate cages of 10 birds per cage. At 15 d post-hatch, all birds were inoculated with 1 mL of distilled water that contained 0, 2.5 × 10(5), 5.0 × 10(5), or 1.0 × 10(6) sporulated E. acervulina oocysts. At 21 d, birds were euthanized for collection of blood and ileal digesta. Body weight gain and feed efficiency decreased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing E. acervulina dose. With the exception of Trp and Gly, AID values decreased (P < 0.05) linearly or quadratically for all amino acids by an average of 2.6 percentage units for birds inoculated with 1.0 × 10(6) oocysts compared with uninfected birds. Infection with E. acervulina caused a quadratic decrease (P < 0.05) in plasma carotenoid concentrations. Plasma concentrations of Arg and Tyr decreased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing E. acervulina inoculation dose and plasma Gln and Asn decreased quadratically (P < 0.01). Linear increases (P < 0.05) were observed for plasma Lys, Leu, Ile, Val, Pro, and Orn as E. acervulina inoculation dose increased. Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein of broilers was not influenced (P > 0.05) by E. acervulina infection. In conclusion, E. acervulina challenge adversely impacted growth performance, plasma carotenoids, and AID of amino acids in a dose-dependent manner. However, plasma amino acid responses to graded E. acervulina inoculation doses varied considerably among amino acids. Thus, these results indicated that alterations

  10. Rat epididymal luminal fluid acid beta-D-galactosidase optimally hydrolyses glycoprotein substrate at neutral pH.

    PubMed Central

    Skudlarek, M D; Tulsiani, D R; Orgebin-Crist, M C

    1992-01-01

    Several glycosidases, purified and characterized from mammalian tissues, have been shown to be optimally active under acidic conditions when p-nitrophenyl (PNP) or 4-methylumbelliferyl glycosides are used as substrates. Although high levels of the glycosidases are present in the epididymal lumen, their physiological role remains uncertain. To be functional, the glycosidases are expected to be enzymatically active at or near the physiological pH of luminal fluid. In this report, we demonstrate that the rat epididymal luminal fluid beta-D-galactosidase, optimally active toward PNP beta-D-galactoside at pH 3.5, shows maximum activity towards a glycoprotein substrate ([Gal-3H]fetuin) at neutral pH. Several lines of evidence, including immunoprecipitation studies using antibody to the acid beta-D-galactosidase, and substrate competition studies, indicate that PNP galactosidase and [3H]Gal galactosidase activities are caused by a single enzyme, and that the two substrates are probably cleaved by the same catalytic site(s). Competition studies with various disaccharides indicate that this enzyme is capable of cleaving a variety of galactose linkages found in both O- and N-linked oligosaccharides. Molecular-sieve column chromatography of the beta-D-galactosidase of luminal fluid under several conditions of buffer and pH show that, whereas the enzyme eluted as a tetramer (apparent M(r) 320,000) under acidic conditions (pH 3.5-4.3), only dimers and monomers (apparent M(r) 180,000 and 92,000 respectively) were observed in neutral conditions (pH 6.8). This aggregation/dissociation phenomenon is reversible. These studies indicate that beta-D-galactosidase is present in the luminal fluid in dissociated forms, and is therefore optimally active towards glycoprotein substrates at physiological pH. The potential role of the enzyme in modification of sperm surface glycoproteins is discussed. PMID:1417750

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-. cap alpha. /sub 2/-glycoprotein and its homology to histocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Gejyo, F.; Takagaki, K.; Haupt, H.; Schwick, H.G.; Buergi, W.; Marti, T.; Schaller, J.; Rickli, E.; Brossmer, R.

    1988-02-01

    In the present study the complete amino acid sequence of human plasma Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein was determined. This protein whose biological function is unknown consists of a single polypeptide chain of 276 amino acid residues including 8 tryptophan residues and has a pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus. The location of the two disulfide bonds in the polypeptide chain was also established. The three glycans, whose structure was elucidated with the aid of 500 MHz /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy, were sialylated N-biantennas. The molecular weight calculated from the polypeptide and carbohydrate structure is 38,478, which is close to the reported value of approx. = 41,000 based on physicochemical measurements. The predicted secondary structure appeared to comprised of 23% ..cap alpha..-helix, 27% ..beta..-sheet, and 22% ..beta..-turns. The three N-glycans were found to be located in ..beta..-turn regions. An unexpected finding was made by computer analysis of the sequence data; this revealed that Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein is closely related to antigens of the major histocompatibility complex in amino acid sequence and in domain structure. There was an unusually high degree of sequence homology with the ..cap alpha.. chains of class I histocompatibility antigens. Moreover, this plasma protein was shown to be a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Zn-..cap alpha../sub 2/-glycoprotein appears to be truncated secretory major histocompatibility complex-related molecule, and it may have a role in the expression of the immune response.

  12. A Fully Attenuated Recombinant Salmonid Alphavirus Becomes Pathogenic through a Single Amino Acid Change in the E2 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Mérour, Emilie; Lamoureux, Annie; Bernard, Julie; Biacchesi, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant sleeping disease virus (rSDV) was previously shown to be totally attenuated and provide long-term protection in trout (C. Moriette, M. Leberre, A. Lamoureux, T. L. Lai, M. Brémont, J. Virol. 80:4088–4098, 2006). Sequence comparison of the rSDV to wild-type genomes exhibited a number of nucleotide changes. In the current study, we demonstrate that the virulent phenotype of SDV was essentially associated with two amino acid changes, V8A and M136T, in the E2 glycoprotein, with the V8A change mostly being involved in the acquisition of the virulent phenotype. PMID:23449806

  13. Flagellasialin: a novel sulfated alpha2,9-linked polysialic acid glycoprotein of sea urchin sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shinji; Sato, Chihiro; Kumita, Hironobu; Toriyama, Masaru; Vacquier, Victor D; Kitajima, Ken

    2006-12-01

    A novel alpha2,9-linked polysialic acid (polySia)-containing glycoprotein of sea urchin sperm flagella was identified and named "flagellasialin." Flagellasialin from Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus shows a diverse relative molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of 40-80 kDa. Flagellasialin is a 96-amino acid, threonine-rich, heavily O-glycosylated (80-90% by weight) glycoprotein with a single transmembrane segment at its C-terminus and no apparent cytosolic domain. Of 12 extracellular Thr residues, eight are O-glycosylated and three are nonglycosylated. Flagellasialin is highly expressed in the testis but cannot be detected in the ovary. The amino acid sequences of flagellasialin from three sea urchin species (H. pulcherrimus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) are identical, but some species differences exist in the three core glycan structures to which the sulfated alpha2,9-linked polyNeu5Ac chain is linked. Finally, the treatment of sperm with a specific antibody against the alpha2,9-linked polyNeu5Ac structure results in the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and inhibition of sperm motility and fertilization, implicating flagellasialin as a regulator of these critical processes.

  14. Protective effects of alpha1-acid glycoprotein and serum amyloid A on concanavalin A-induced liver failure via interleukin-6 induction by ME3738.

    PubMed

    Kuzuhara, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamashita, Nobuyuki; Imai, Masako; Kawamura, Yuji; Kurosawa, Tohru; Nishiyama, Shoji

    2006-07-17

    We examined whether the 22beta-methoxyolean-12-ene-3beta,24(4beta)-diol (ME3738)-mediated selective induction of interleukin-6 increased alpha1-acid glycoprotein and serum amyloid A expression, and whether these proteins protected against liver injury in vitro and in vivo. ME3738 treatment in male mice increased gene expression of alpha1-acid glycoprotein subtypes and serum amyloid A 2 genes, and plasma concentration of serum amyloid A. Treatment with alpha1-acid glycoprotein at 5 mg/animal or serum amyloid A at 0.03 and 0.1 mg/animal prior to concanavalin A administration reduced multifocal necrosis in the liver. Treatment with alpha1-acid glycoprotein and serum amyloid A, but not alpha1-antitrypsin, protected Hep G2 cells against cell injury. These results suggest that alpha1-acid glycoprotein and serum amyloid A, increased by ME3738-induced interleukin-6, might protect against concanavalin A-induced liver injury. PMID:16765939

  15. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  16. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen. PMID:27239860

  17. Human Adenovirus 52 Uses Sialic Acid-containing Glycoproteins and the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor for Binding to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A. Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S.; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25674795

  18. Identification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of the conjugation-inducing glycoprotein (blepharmone) in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Mayumi; Harumoto, Terue

    2001-01-01

    Conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum is induced by interaction between complementary mating-types I and II, which excrete blepharmone (gamone 1) and blepharismone (gamone 2), respectively. Gamone 1 transforms type II cells such that they can unite, and gamone 2 similarly transforms type I cells. Moreover, each gamone promotes the production of the other gamone. Gamone 2 has been identified as calcium-3-(2′-formylamino-5′-hydroxy-benzoyl) lactate and has been synthesized chemically. Gamone 1 was isolated and characterized as a glycoprotein of 20–30 kDa containing 175 amino acids and 6 sugars. However, the amino acid sequence and arrangement of sugars in this gamone are still unknown. To determine partial amino acid sequences of gamone 1, we established a method of isolation based on the finding that this glycoprotein can be concentrated by a Con A affinity column. Gamone 1 is extremely unstable and loses its biological activity once adsorbed to any of the columns that we tested. By using a Con A affinity column and native PAGE, we detected a 30-kDa protein corresponding to gamone 1 activity and determined the partial amino acid sequences of the four peptides. To isolate gamone 1 cDNA, we isolated mRNA from mating-type I cells stimulated by synthetic gamone 2 and then performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures by using gene-specific primers and cloned cDNA of gamone 1. The cDNA sequence contains an ORF of 305 amino acids and codes a possibly novel protein. We also estimated the arrangement of sugars by comparing the affinity to various lectin columns. PMID:11724922

  19. Identification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of the conjugation-inducing glycoprotein (blepharmone) in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, M; Harumoto, T

    2001-12-01

    Conjugation in Blepharisma japonicum is induced by interaction between complementary mating-types I and II, which excrete blepharmone (gamone 1) and blepharismone (gamone 2), respectively. Gamone 1 transforms type II cells such that they can unite, and gamone 2 similarly transforms type I cells. Moreover, each gamone promotes the production of the other gamone. Gamone 2 has been identified as calcium-3-(2'-formylamino-5'-hydroxy-benzoyl) lactate and has been synthesized chemically. Gamone 1 was isolated and characterized as a glycoprotein of 20-30 kDa containing 175 amino acids and 6 sugars. However, the amino acid sequence and arrangement of sugars in this gamone are still unknown. To determine partial amino acid sequences of gamone 1, we established a method of isolation based on the finding that this glycoprotein can be concentrated by a Con A affinity column. Gamone 1 is extremely unstable and loses its biological activity once adsorbed to any of the columns that we tested. By using a Con A affinity column and native PAGE, we detected a 30-kDa protein corresponding to gamone 1 activity and determined the partial amino acid sequences of the four peptides. To isolate gamone 1 cDNA, we isolated mRNA from mating-type I cells stimulated by synthetic gamone 2 and then performed rapid amplification of cDNA ends procedures by using gene-specific primers and cloned cDNA of gamone 1. The cDNA sequence contains an ORF of 305 amino acids and codes a possibly novel protein. We also estimated the arrangement of sugars by comparing the affinity to various lectin columns.

  20. Identifying the differences in mechanisms of mycophenolic acid controlling fucose content of glycoproteins expressed in different CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, An; Tsang, Valerie Liu; Markely, Lam R; Kurt, Lutfiye; Huang, Yao-Ming; Prajapati, Shashi; Kshirsagar, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, glycosylation is a critical quality attribute that can modulate the efficacy of a therapeutic glycoprotein. Obtaining a consistent glycoform profile is desired because molecular function can be defined by its carbohydrate structures. Specifically, the fucose content of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins is one of the most important attributes that can significantly affect antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. It is therefore important to understand the fucosylation pathway and be able to control fucosylation at the desired level to match predecessor materials in late stage and biosimilar programs. Several strategies were explored in this study and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was able to finely modulate the fucose content with the least undesired side effects. However, the response was significantly different between CHO cell lines of different lineages. Further experiments were then performed for a deeper understanding of the mechanism of fucosylation in different CHO cell lines. Results indicated that changes in the intracellular nucleotide involved in fucosylation pathway after MPA treatment are the main cause of the differences in fucosylation level response in different CHO cell lines. Differences in MPA metabolism in the various CHO cell lines directly resulted in different levels of afucosylation measured in antibodies produced by the CHO cell lines. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2367-2376. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K.; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C. Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A.; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits. PMID:26849049

  2. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2016-02-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  3. The SAGA histone acetyltransferase complex regulates leucine uptake through the Agp3 permease in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sun, Xiaoying; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yashiroda, Yoko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic responses of unicellular organisms are mostly acute, transient, and cell-autonomous. Regulation of nutrient uptake in yeast is one such rapid response. High quality nitrogen sources such as NH(4)(+) inhibit uptake of poor nitrogen sources, such as amino acids. Both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms operate in nutrient uptake regulation; however, many components of this system remain uncharacterized in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we demonstrate that the Spt-Ada-Gcn acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex modulates leucine uptake. Initially, we noticed that a branched-chain amino acid auxotroph exhibits a peculiar adaptive growth phenotype on solid minimal media containing certain nitrogen sources. In fact, the growth of many auxotrophic strains is inhibited by excess NH(4)Cl, possibly through nitrogen-mediated uptake inhibition of the corresponding nutrients. Surprisingly, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional reprogramming during the adaptation of the branched-chain amino acid auxotroph was highly correlated with reprogramming observed in deletions of the SAGA histone acetyltransferase module genes. Deletion of gcn5(+) increased leucine uptake in the prototrophic background and rendered the leucine auxotroph resistant to NH(4)Cl. Deletion of tra1(+) caused the opposite phenotypes. The increase in leucine uptake in the gcn5Δ mutant was dependent on an amino acid permease gene, SPCC965.11c(+). The closest budding yeast homolog of this permease is a relatively nonspecific amino acid permease AGP3, which functions in poor nutrient conditions. Our analysis identified the regulation of nutrient uptake as a physiological function for the SAGA complex, providing a potential link between cellular metabolism and chromatin regulation.

  4. The Functional Property Changes of Muscular Na(v)1.4 and Cardiac Na(v)1.5 Induced by Scorpion Toxin BmK AGP-SYPU1 Mutants Y42F and Y5F.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangxue; Xu, Yijia; Zhao, Mingyi; Wang, Fangyang; Ma, Yuanyuan; Jin, Yao; Liu, Yanfeng; Song, Yongbo; Zhang, Jinghai

    2015-05-19

    Scorpion toxins are invaluable therapeutic leads and pharmacological tools which influence the voltage-gated sodium channels. However, the details were still unclear about the structure-function relationship of scorpion toxins on VGSC subtypes. In the previous study, we reported one α-type scorpion toxin Bmk AGP-SYPU1 and its two mutants (Y5F and Y42F) which had been demonstrated to ease pain in mice acetic acid writhing test. However, the function of Bmk AGP-SYPU1 on VGSCs is still unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of BmK AGP-SYPU1 and its two mutants (Y5F and Y42F) on hNa(v)1.4 and hNa(v)1.5 heterologously expressed CHO cell lines by using Na⁺-specialized fluorescent dye and whole-cell patch clamp. The data showed that BmK AGP-SYPU1 displayed as an activator of hNa(v)1.4 and hNa(v)1.5, which might indeed contribute to its biotoxicity to muscular and cardiac system and exhibited the functional properties of both the α-type and β-type scorpion toxin. Notably, Y5F mutant exhibited lower activatory effects on hNa(v)1.4 and hNa(v)1.5 compared with BmK AGP-SYPU1. Y42F was an enhanced activator and confirmed that the conserved Tyr42 was the key amino acid involved in bioactivity or biotoxicity. These data provided a deep insight into the structure-function relationship of BmK AGP-SYPU1, which may be the guidance for engineering α-toxin with high selectivity on VGSC subtypes. PMID:25919575

  5. Amino acid mutations in Ebola virus glycoprotein of the 2014 epidemic.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, Marta; Grifoni, Alba; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Montesano, Carla; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Colizzi, Vittorio; Amicosante, Massimo; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Zaire Ebola virus (EBOV) is an enveloped non-segmented negative strand RNA virus of 19 kb in length belonging to the family Filoviridae. The virus was isolated and identified in 1976 during the epidemic of hemorrhagic fever in Zaire. The most recent outbreak of EBOV among humans, was that occurred in the forested areas of south eastern Guinea, that began in February 2014 and is still ongoing. The recent Ebola outbreak, is affecting other countries in West Africa, in addiction to Guinea: Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. In this article, a selective pressure analysis and homology modeling based on the G Glycoprotein (GP) sequences retrieved from public databases were used to investigate the genetic diversity and modification of antibody response in the recent outbreak of Ebola Virus. Structural and the evolutionary analysis underline the 2014 epidemic virus being under negative selective pressure does not change with respect to the old epidemic in terms of genome adaptation.

  6. The shell matrix of the freshwater mussel Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Involvement of acidic polysaccharides from glycoproteins in nacre mineralization.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Luquet, Gilles; Pais De Barros, Jean-Paul; Guichard, Nathalie; Morel, Sylvain; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bollache, Loïc; Marin, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Among molluscs, the shell biomineralization process is controlled by a set of extracellular macromolecular components secreted by the calcifying mantle. In spite of several studies, these components are mainly known in bivalves from only few members of pteriomorph groups. In the present case, we investigated the biochemical properties of the aragonitic shell of the freshwater bivalve Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Analysis of the amino acid composition reveals a high amount of glycine, aspartate and alanine in the acid-soluble extract, whereas the acid-insoluble one is rich in alanine and glycine. Monosaccharidic analysis indicates that the insoluble matrix comprises a high amount of glucosamine. Furthermore, a high ratio of the carbohydrates of the soluble matrix is sulfated. Electrophoretic analysis of the acid-soluble matrix revealed discrete bands. Stains-All, Alcian Blue, periodic acid/Schiff and autoradiography with (45)Ca after electrophoretic separation revealed three major polyanionic calcium-binding glycoproteins, which exhibit an apparent molecular mass of 95, 50 and 29 kDa, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis shows that these bands, provisionally named P95, P50 and P29, are composed of numerous isoforms, the majority of which have acidic isoelectric points. Chemical deglycosylation of the matrix with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid induces a drastic shift of both the apparent molecular mass and the isoelectric point of these matrix components. This treatment induces also a modification of the shape of CaCO(3) crystals grown in vitro and a loss of the calcium-binding ability of two of the main matrix proteins (P95 and P50). Our findings strongly suggest that post-translational modifications display important functions in mollusc shell calcification. PMID:17488282

  7. The shell matrix of the freshwater mussel Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Involvement of acidic polysaccharides from glycoproteins in nacre mineralization.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Luquet, Gilles; Pais De Barros, Jean-Paul; Guichard, Nathalie; Morel, Sylvain; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bollache, Loïc; Marin, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Among molluscs, the shell biomineralization process is controlled by a set of extracellular macromolecular components secreted by the calcifying mantle. In spite of several studies, these components are mainly known in bivalves from only few members of pteriomorph groups. In the present case, we investigated the biochemical properties of the aragonitic shell of the freshwater bivalve Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Analysis of the amino acid composition reveals a high amount of glycine, aspartate and alanine in the acid-soluble extract, whereas the acid-insoluble one is rich in alanine and glycine. Monosaccharidic analysis indicates that the insoluble matrix comprises a high amount of glucosamine. Furthermore, a high ratio of the carbohydrates of the soluble matrix is sulfated. Electrophoretic analysis of the acid-soluble matrix revealed discrete bands. Stains-All, Alcian Blue, periodic acid/Schiff and autoradiography with (45)Ca after electrophoretic separation revealed three major polyanionic calcium-binding glycoproteins, which exhibit an apparent molecular mass of 95, 50 and 29 kDa, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis shows that these bands, provisionally named P95, P50 and P29, are composed of numerous isoforms, the majority of which have acidic isoelectric points. Chemical deglycosylation of the matrix with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid induces a drastic shift of both the apparent molecular mass and the isoelectric point of these matrix components. This treatment induces also a modification of the shape of CaCO(3) crystals grown in vitro and a loss of the calcium-binding ability of two of the main matrix proteins (P95 and P50). Our findings strongly suggest that post-translational modifications display important functions in mollusc shell calcification.

  8. Tailor-Made Boronic Acid Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles with a Tunable Polymer Shell-Assisted for the Selective Enrichment of Glycoproteins/Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xihao; Wang, Jiewen; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-11-11

    Biomedical sciences, and in particular biomarker research, demand efficient glycoproteins enrichment platforms. In this work, we present a facile and time-saving method to synthesize phenylboronic acid and copolymer multifunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) using a distillation-precipitation polymerization (DPP) technique. The polymer shell is obtained through copolymerization of two monomers-affinity ligand 3-acrylaminophenylboronic acid (AAPBA) and a hydrophilic functional monomer. The resulting hydrophilic Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) NPs exhibit an enhanced binding capacity toward glycoproteins by an additional functional monomer complementary to the surface presentation of the target protein. The effects of monomer ratio of AAPBA to hydrophilic comonomers on the binding of glycoproteins are systematically investigated. The morphology, structure, and composition of all the synthesized microspheres are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The hydrophilic Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) microspheres show an excellent performance in the separation of glycoproteins with high binding capacity; And strong magnetic response allows them to be easily separated from solution in the presence of an external magnetic field. Moreover, both synthetic Fe3O4@P(AAPBA) and copolymeric NPs show good adsorption to glycoproteins in physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) NPs are successfully utilized to selectively capture and identify the low-abundance glycopeptides from the tryptic digest of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In addition, the selective isolation and enrichment of glycoproteins from the egg white samples at physiological condition is obtained by Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) NPs as adsorbents.

  9. Tailor-Made Boronic Acid Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles with a Tunable Polymer Shell-Assisted for the Selective Enrichment of Glycoproteins/Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xihao; Wang, Jiewen; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-11-11

    Biomedical sciences, and in particular biomarker research, demand efficient glycoproteins enrichment platforms. In this work, we present a facile and time-saving method to synthesize phenylboronic acid and copolymer multifunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) using a distillation-precipitation polymerization (DPP) technique. The polymer shell is obtained through copolymerization of two monomers-affinity ligand 3-acrylaminophenylboronic acid (AAPBA) and a hydrophilic functional monomer. The resulting hydrophilic Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) NPs exhibit an enhanced binding capacity toward glycoproteins by an additional functional monomer complementary to the surface presentation of the target protein. The effects of monomer ratio of AAPBA to hydrophilic comonomers on the binding of glycoproteins are systematically investigated. The morphology, structure, and composition of all the synthesized microspheres are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The hydrophilic Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) microspheres show an excellent performance in the separation of glycoproteins with high binding capacity; And strong magnetic response allows them to be easily separated from solution in the presence of an external magnetic field. Moreover, both synthetic Fe3O4@P(AAPBA) and copolymeric NPs show good adsorption to glycoproteins in physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) NPs are successfully utilized to selectively capture and identify the low-abundance glycopeptides from the tryptic digest of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In addition, the selective isolation and enrichment of glycoproteins from the egg white samples at physiological condition is obtained by Fe3O4@P(AAPBA-co-monomer) NPs as adsorbents. PMID:26479332

  10. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  11. Affinity ligands for glycoprotein purification based on the multi-component Ugi reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Khoury, Graziella El; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-10-15

    One challenge facing the purification of therapeutic glycoproteins by affinity chromatography is creating ligands specific for the glycan moiety. Affinity chromatography of glycoproteins is currently conducted with immobilized lectins or boronates, although biomimetic ligands could present a more desirable option. This work describes the rational design and combinatorial synthesis of carbohydrate-binding ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction. An aldehyde-functionalized Sepharose™ solid support constitutes one component (aldehyde) in the four-component reaction, while the other three components (a primary/secondary amine, a carboxylic acid and an isocyanide) are varied in a combinatorial fashion to generate a tri-substituted Ugi scaffold which provides a degree of rigidity and is functionally suitable for interacting with the glycan moiety of glycoproteins. An Ugi library containing 48 ligands was initially screened against glucose oxidase (GOx) as the model glycoprotein to identify a candidate ligand, A13C24I8, which showed affinity to GOx through its carbohydrate moiety. Immobilized ligand A13C24I8 demonstrated a static binding capacity of 16.7mg GOx/ml resin and an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.45×10(-6)M at pH 7.4. The adsorbent can also bind 8.1mg AGP/ml resin and displays an apparent affinity constant Kd=1.44×10(-5)M. The ligand has a sugar specificity in the following sequence: sorbitol>fructose>mannitol>ribose>arabinose>xylose>galactose>mannose>glucose>fructose; however, it did not display any specificity for sialic acid or methyl α-D-glycosides. A control ligand, generated by substitution of C24 (3-carboxyphenylboronic acid) with C7 (4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid), failed to show affinity to the carbohydrate moiety, supporting the importance of the role that boronic acid group plays in sugar binding. GOx spiked E. coli samples were loaded onto immobilized ligand A13C24I8, 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) and

  12. Indole-3-acetic acid UDP-glucosyltransferase from immature seeds of pea is involved in modification of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Hetmann, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The glycosylation of auxin is one of mechanisms contributing to hormonal homeostasis. The enzyme UDPG: indole-3-ylacetyl-β-D-glucosyltransferase (IAA glucosyltransferase, IAGlc synthase) catalyzes the reversible reaction: IAA+UDPG↔1-O-IA-glucose+UDP, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of IAA-ester conjugates in monocotyledonous plants. In this study, we report IAA-glucosyltransferase isolated using a biochemical approach from immature seed of pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme was purified by PEG fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography and preparative PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of the enzyme revealed the high identity with maize IAGlc synthase, but lack of homology with other IAA-glucosyltransferases from dicots. Biochemical characterization showed that of several acyl acceptors tested, the enzyme had the highest activity on IAA as the glucosyl acceptor (Km=0.52 mM, Vmax=161 nmol min(-1), kcat/Km=4.36 mM s(-1)) and lower activity on indole-3-propionic acid and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Whereas indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-propionic acid were competitive inhibitors of IAGlc synthase, D-gluconic acid lactone, an inhibitor of β-glucosidase activity, potentiated the enzyme activity at the optimal concentration of 0.3mM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the 1-O-IA-glucose synthesized by IAGlc synthase is the substrate for IAA labeling of glycoproteins from pea seeds indicating a possible role of this enzyme in the covalent modification of a class of proteins by a plant hormone.

  13. Ursodeoxycholic acid inhibits overexpression of P-glycoprotein induced by doxorubicin in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Komori, Yuki; Arisawa, Sakiko; Takai, Miho; Yokoyama, Kunihiro; Honda, Minako; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Katano, Yoshiaki; Goto, Hidemi; Ueyama, Jun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Wakusawa, Shinya

    2014-02-01

    The hepatoprotective action of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was previously suggested to be partially dependent on its antioxidative effect. Doxorubicin (DOX) and reactive oxygen species have also been implicated in the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is encoded by the MDR1 gene and causes antitumor multidrug resistance. In the present study, we assessed the effects of UDCA on the expression of MDR1 mRNA, P-gp, and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in DOX-treated HepG2 cells and compared them to those of other bile acids. DOX-induced increases in reactive oxygen species levels and the expression of MDR1 mRNA were inhibited by N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, and the DOX-induced increase in reactive oxygen species levels and DOX-induced overexpression of MDR1 mRNA and P-gp were inhibited by UDCA. Cells treated with UDCA showed improved rhodamine 123 uptake, which was decreased in cells treated with DOX alone. Moreover, cells exposed to DOX for 24h combined with UDCA accumulated more DOX than that of cells treated with DOX alone. Thus, UDCA may have inhibited the overexpression of P-gp by suppressing DOX-induced reactive oxygen species production. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) also exhibited these effects, whereas deoxycholic acid and litocholic acid were ineffective. In conclusion, UDCA and CDCA had an inhibitory effect on the induction of P-gp expression and reactive oxygen species by DOX in HepG2 cells. The administration of UDCA may be beneficial due to its ability to prevent the overexpression of reactive oxygen species and acquisition of multidrug resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  14. Indole-3-acetic acid UDP-glucosyltransferase from immature seeds of pea is involved in modification of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Hetmann, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The glycosylation of auxin is one of mechanisms contributing to hormonal homeostasis. The enzyme UDPG: indole-3-ylacetyl-β-D-glucosyltransferase (IAA glucosyltransferase, IAGlc synthase) catalyzes the reversible reaction: IAA+UDPG↔1-O-IA-glucose+UDP, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of IAA-ester conjugates in monocotyledonous plants. In this study, we report IAA-glucosyltransferase isolated using a biochemical approach from immature seed of pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme was purified by PEG fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel anion-exchange chromatography and preparative PAGE. LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of the enzyme revealed the high identity with maize IAGlc synthase, but lack of homology with other IAA-glucosyltransferases from dicots. Biochemical characterization showed that of several acyl acceptors tested, the enzyme had the highest activity on IAA as the glucosyl acceptor (Km=0.52 mM, Vmax=161 nmol min(-1), kcat/Km=4.36 mM s(-1)) and lower activity on indole-3-propionic acid and 1-naphthalene acetic acid. Whereas indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-propionic acid were competitive inhibitors of IAGlc synthase, D-gluconic acid lactone, an inhibitor of β-glucosidase activity, potentiated the enzyme activity at the optimal concentration of 0.3mM. Moreover, we demonstrated that the 1-O-IA-glucose synthesized by IAGlc synthase is the substrate for IAA labeling of glycoproteins from pea seeds indicating a possible role of this enzyme in the covalent modification of a class of proteins by a plant hormone. PMID:26057226

  15. Characteristics of Mammalian Rh Glycoproteins (SLC42 transporters) and Their Role in Acid-Base Transport

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih L.; Hamm, L. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian Rh glycoproteins belong to the solute transporter family SLC42 and include RhAG, present in red blood cells, and two non-erythroid members RhBG and RhCG that are expressed in various tissues, including kidney, liver, skin and the GI tract. The Rh proteins in the red blood cell form an “Rh complex” made up of one D-subunit, one CE-subunit and two RhAG subunits. The Rh complex has a well-known antigenic effect but also contributes to the stability of the red cell membrane. RhBG and RhCG are related to the NH4+ transporters of the yeast and bacteria but their exact function is yet to be determined. This review describes the expression and molecular properties of these membrane proteins and their potential role as NH3/NH4+ and CO2 transporters. The likelihood that these proteins transport gases such as CO2 or NH3 is novel and significant. The review also describes the physiological importance of these proteins and their relevance to human disease. PMID:23506896

  16. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides with collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mechref, Y; Baker, A G; Novotny, M V

    1998-12-15

    Using ribonuclease B and human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as model glycoproteins, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation (CID) is validated here as an effective tool for oligosaccharide sequencing. The spectra acquired for high-mannose and complex oligosaccharide structures show characteristic fragments resulting from cleavages of the glycosidic bonds and a few cross-ring cleavages. Esterification of the sialic acid residues is essential in stabilizing the acidic N-linked oligosaccharides. An important analytical feature observed in all acquired spectra is the occurrence of cleavages on the same antenna up to the branching point, as deduced from the absence of fragmentation due to the simultaneous cleavages on two or more antennas.

  17. Secretion of high-mannose-type alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes in the presence of the mannosidase I inhibitor 1-deoxymannojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Gross, V; Steube, K; Tran-Thi, T A; McDowell, W; Schwarz, R T; Decker, K; Gerok, W; Heinrich, P C

    1985-07-01

    Two different forms of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein were found in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. After a 2.5-h labeling period with [35S]methionine the high-mannose-type precursor of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (Mr 49000) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (Mr 39 000) and the mature-complex-type alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (Mr 54 000) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (Mr 43 000-60 000) could be immunoprecipitated from the cells, but only the complex-type forms of the two glycoproteins were secreted into the hepatocyte media. When hepatocytes were incubated with the mannosidase I inhibitor 1-deoxymannojirimycin at a concentration of 4 mM, the 49 000-Mr form of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and the 39 000-Mr form of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein could be detected in the cells as well as in their media. Neither the secretion of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor nor that of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was impaired by 1-deoxymannojirimycin. While alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, secreted by control cells, were resistant to endoglucosaminidase H, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, secreted by hepatocytes treated with 4 mM 1-deoxymannojirimycin, could be deglycosylated by endoglucosaminidase H. When the [3H]mannose-labeled oligosaccharides of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, secreted by 1-deoxymannojirimycin-treated hepatocytes, were cleaved off by endoglucosaminidase H and analyzed by Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography, they eluted at the position of Man9GlcNAc, indicating that mannosidase I had been efficiently inhibited. 1-Deoxymannojirimycin did not inhibit the synthesis or the cotranslational N-glycosylation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor or alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. PMID:3160588

  18. Molecular determinants of macrophage tropism and viral persistence: importance of single amino acid changes in the polymerase and glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Matloubian, M; Kolhekar, S R; Somasundaram, T; Ahmed, R

    1993-01-01

    This study documents that the immunosuppressive lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) variant, clone 13, shows a specific predilection for enhanced infection of macrophages both in vitro and in vivo and that single amino acid changes in the viral polymerase and glycoprotein are responsible for macrophage tropism. The growth difference seen between variant clone 13 and the parental Armstrong strain was specific for macrophages, since both clone 13 and Armstrong grew equally well in fibroblasts and neither isolate infected lymphocytes efficiently. Complete sequencing of the clone 13 genome, along with genetic analysis, showed that a single amino acid change in the polymerase (K-->Q at position 1079) was the major determinant of virus yield in macrophages. This was proven unequivocally by comparing the sequences of parental and reassortant viruses, which were identical at all loci except for the single mutation in the polymerase gene. This finding was further strengthened by showing that reversion at this site back to lysine (Q-->K) resulted in loss of macrophage tropism. In addition, an independently derived macrophage-tropic variant of LCMV, clone 28b, had a K-->N mutation at the same position. Thus, these results show that substitution of the positively charged amino acid K with a neutral amino acid (either Q or N) at residue 1079 of the polymerase resulted in enhanced viral replication in macrophages. In addition to the polymerase change, a mutation in the glycoprotein was also associated with macrophage tropism. This single amino acid change in the glycoprotein (F-->L at position 260) did not affect virus yield per macrophage but was critical in determining the number of macrophages infected. Our previous studies have shown that the same two mutations in the polymerase and glycoprotein are essential for establishing a chronic infection in adult mice. Since the same mutations confer macrophage tropism and ability to persist in vivo, these studies provide

  19. Protein binding of fentanyl and its metabolite nor-fentanyl in human plasma, albumin and α-1 acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bista, Sudeep Raj; Haywood, Alison; Hardy, Janet; Lobb, Michael; Tapuni, Angela; Norris, Ross

    2015-03-01

    1.Fentanyl is a highly lipophilic opioid commonly used to treat cancer pain. Plasma protein binding (PPB) of fentanyl in human plasma is reported as 80-85%, however it is unclear whether fentanyl binds primarily to albumin (ALB) or α-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) and no studies have been conducted on the metabolite, nor-fentanyl. Fentanyl is also known to bind to plasticware and ultrafiltration (UF) devices which impacts adversely on binding experiments. 2.PPB of fentanyl and nor-fentanyl to ALB and AAG in isotonic phosphate buffer solution and seeded human plasma was quantified. PPB was also performed in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients receiving transdermal fentanyl. The adsorption of fentanyl and nor-fentanyl to UF devices and plasticware commonly used in PPB studies was also assessed. 3.Fentanyl was shown to bind primarily to ALB as opposed to AAG, with nor-fentanyl exhibiting negligible binding to plasma proteins. Total PPB of fentanyl was 86-89% in seeded human plasma. PPB in 56 cancer patient samples was 95.1 ± 3.52% for fentanyl and 32.4 ± 21.9% for nor-fentanyl. 4.UF was shown to be a reliable and convenient method for PPB studies, thereby removing the need for complex testing for adsorption of the drug to plasticware during UF.

  20. Determination of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein and albumin binding of various marketed and preclinical kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bencze, Gyula; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2009-01-01

    There are about 380 protein kinase inhibitors in drug development as of today and 15 drugs have been marketed already for the treatment of cancer. This time 139 validated kinase targets are in the focus of drug research of pharmaceutical companies and big efforts are made for the development of new, druglike kinase inhibitors. Plasma protein binding is an important factor of the ADME profiling of a drug compound. Human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) are the most relevant drug carriers in blood plasma. Since previous literature data indicated that AAG is the principal plasma binding component of some kinase inhibitors the present work focuses on the comprehensive evaluation of AAG binding of a series of marketed and experimental kinase inhibitors by using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approach. HSA binding was also evaluated by affinity chromatography. Protein binding interactions of twenty-six kinase inhibitors are characterized. The contribution of AAG and HSA binding data to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the investigated therapeutic agents is discussed. Structural, biological and drug binding properties of AAG as well as the applicability of the CD method in studying drug-protein binding interactions are also briefly reviewed.

  1. Gambogic acid sensitizes resistant breast cancer cells to doxorubicin through inhibiting P-glycoprotein and suppressing survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengpeng; Wang, Lu; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2015-06-25

    The development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents remains a major challenge to breast cancer chemotherapy. Overexpression of drug efflux transporters like P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and resistance to apoptosis are the two key factors that confer cancer drug resistance. Gambogic acid (GA), a major component of Gamboge resin, has potent anticancer effects and can inhibit the growth of several types of human cancers. However, the potential and underlying mechanisms of GA in reversing cancer resistance remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that GA can markedly sensitize doxorubicin (DOX)-resistant breast cancer cells to DOX-mediated cell death. GA increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX by inhibiting both P-gp expression and activity. Meanwhile, the combination effect was associated with the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the suppression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin. Scavenging intracellular ROS or overexpression of survivin blocked the sensitizing effects of GA in DOX-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, ROS-mediated activation of p38 MAPK was revealed in GA-mediated suppression of survivin expression. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying GA as an anticancer agent for the purpose of combating DOX-resistant breast cancer.

  2. Occurrence of poly(alpha2,8-deaminoneuraminic acid) in mammalian tissues: widespread and developmentally regulated but highly selective expression on glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ziak, M; Qu, B; Zuo, X; Zuber, C; Kanamori, A; Kitajima, K; Inoue, S; Inoue, Y; Roth, J

    1996-01-01

    In tissues of higher organisms homopolymers of alpha2,8-linked N-acetylneuraminic acid can be found as a posttranslational modification on selected proteins. We report here the discovery of homopolymers of alpha2,8-linked deaminoneuraminic acid [poly(alpha2,8-KDN)] in various tissues derived from all three germ layers in vertebrates including mammals. The monoclonal antibody kdn8kdn in conjunction with a bacterial KDNase permitted the detection of poly(alpha2,8-KDN) by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Further evidence for the existence of poly(alpha2,8-KDN) was obtained by gas/liquid chromatography. The poly(alpha2,8-KDN) glycan was detectable in all tissues studied with the exception of mucus-producing cells present in various organs, the extracellular matrix, and basement membranes. However, in certain organs such as muscle, kidney, lung, and brain its expression was developmentally regulated. Despite its widespread tissue distribution, the poly(alpha2,8-KDN) glycan was detected on a single 150-kDa glycoprotein except for a single >350-kDa glycoprotein in kidney, which makes it most distinctive among polysialic acids. The ubiquitous yet selective expression may be indicative of a general function of the poly(alpha2,8-KDN)-bearing glycoproteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8610115

  3. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  4. Interaction of the recently approved anticancer drug nintedanib with human acute phase reactant α 1-acid glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Ponnusamy, Kalaiarasan; Subbarao, Naidu; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the interaction of the newly approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Nintedanib (NTB) and Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein (AAG) has been carried out by utilizing UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking techniques. The obtained results showed enhancement of the UV-Vis peak of the protein upon binding to NTB with the fluorescence intensity of AAG is being quenched by NTB via the formation of ground state complex (i.e. Static quenching). Forster distance (Ro) obtained from fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is found to be 2.3 nm. The calculated binding parameters from the modified Stern-Volmer equation showed that NTB binds to AAG with a binding constant in the order of 103. Conformational alteration of the protein upon its binding to NTB was confirmed by the circular dichroism. Dynamic light scattering results showed that the binding interaction of NTB leads to the reduction in hydrodynamic radii of AAG. Dynamic molecular docking results showed that the NTB fits into the central binding cavity in AAG and hydrophobic interaction played the key role in the binding process also the docking studies were performed with methotrexate and clofarabine drugs to look into the common binding regions of these drugs on AAG molecule, it was found that five amino acid residues namely Phe 113, Arg 89, Tyr 126, Phe 48 and Glu 63 were common among the binding regions of three studied drugs this phenomenon of overlapping binding regions may influence the drug transport by the carrier molecule in turn affecting the metabolism of the drug and treatment outcome.

  5. Glycosylation of alpha1-acid glycoprotein in inflammatory disease: analysis by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography and concanavalin A crossed affinity immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rydén, I; Skude, G; Lundblad, A; Påhlsson, P

    1997-06-01

    High-pH anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection is a highly sensitive technique that can be used for detecting changes in sialylation and fucosylation, as well as different branching patterns of N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins. We examined the N-glycans of alpha1-acid glycoprotein obtained from twelve patients with various inflammatory conditions with this technique, as well as traditional concanavalin A crossed affinity immunoelectrophoresis. We found the chromatographic profiles of N-glycans in all patients with rheumatoid arthritis to be very similar, but significantly different from normal controls. N-glycans from patients with ulcerative colitis also showed specific alterations in their chromatographic profiles. However, some heterogeneity was found between these patients, perhaps reflecting changes in glycosylation secondary to certain states of the disease, or to medical treatment. We conclude that this technique is useful for detailed mapping of glycosylation changes in alpha1-acid glycoprotein in clinical samples, and that it may be used to further increase our knowledge about glycosylation changes in response to inflammatory disease.

  6. Trametenolic acid B reverses multidrug resistance in breast cancer cells through regulating the expression level of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoyin; Wang, Junzhi; He, Haibo; Liu, Hongbing; Yan, Ximing; Zou, Kun

    2014-07-01

    Trametenolic acid B (TAB) is the main active composition of Trametes lactinea (Berk.) Pat which possesses antitumor activities. There was no report its antitumor effect through regulating P-glycoprotein (P-gp) so far, due toP-gp over expression is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to the multiple drug resistance phenotype. The present aim was to investigate the effects of TAB on P-gp in multidrug-resistant cells;Paclitaxel-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231/Taxol was established by stepwise exposure for 10 months.MDA-MB-231 cells and MDA-MB-231/Taxol cells were treated with TAB, and their growth was evaluated using MTT assays. Paclitaxel accumulation in the cells was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatogram(HPLC). The activity of P-gp was detected by intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rho123), and the protein expression of P-gp was evaluated using western blot. Results indicated that the IC50 of MDA-MB-231/Taxol to paclitaxel (Taxol) was 33 times higher than that of nature MDA-MB-231. TAB increased the intracellular concentration of Taxol and inhibited the activity of P-gp and suppressed the expression of P-gp in MDA-MB-231/Taxol cells. Our present results showed that TAB could reverse Taxol resistance in MDA-MB-231/Taxol cells,mainly inhibiting the activity of P-gp and down-regulating the expression level of P-gp, and then enhancing the accumulation of chemotherapy agents.

  7. A single amino acid change in the cytoplasmic domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane molecule increases envelope glycoprotein expression on infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    LaBranche, C C; Sauter, M M; Haggarty, B S; Vance, P J; Romano, J; Hart, T K; Bugelski, P J; Marsh, M; Hoxie, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have described a virus termed CP-MAC, derived from the BK28 molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus, that was remarkable for its ability to infect Sup-T1 cells with rapid kinetics, cell fusion, and CD4 down-modulation (C. C. LaBranche, M. M. Sauter, B. S. Haggarty, P. J. Vance, J. Romano, T. K. Hart, P. J. Bugelski, and J. A. Hoxie, J. Virol. 68:5509-5522, 1994 [Erratum 68:7665-7667]). Compared with BK28, CP-MAC exhibited a number of changes in its envelope glycoproteins, including a highly stable association between the external (SU) and transmembrane (TM) molecules, a more rapid electrophoretic mobility of TM, and, of particular interest, a marked increase in the level of envelope protein expression on the surface of infected cells. These changes were shown to be associated with 11 coding mutations in the env gene (5 in SU and 6 in TM). In this report, we demonstrate that a single amino acid mutation of a Tyr to a Cys at position 723 (Y723C) in the TM cytoplasmic domain of CP-MAC is the principal determinant for the increased expression of envelope glycoproteins on the cell surface. When introduced into the env gene of BK28, the Y723C mutation produced up to a 25-fold increase in the levels of SU and TM on chronically infected cells, as determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. A similar effect was observed when a Tyr-to-Cys change was introduced at the analogous position (amino acid 721) in the SIVmac239 molecular clone, which, unlike BK28 does not contain a premature stop codon in its TM cytoplasmic tail. Substituting other amino acids, including Ala, Ile, and Ser, at this position produced increases in surface envelope glycoproteins that were similar to that observed for the Cys substitution, while a Tyr-to-Phe mutation produced a smaller increase. These results could not be accounted for by differences in the kinetics or efficiency of envelope glycoprotein processing or by shedding of SU

  8. The M/GP5 Glycoprotein Complex of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Binds the Sialoadhesin Receptor in a Sialic Acid-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Van Breedam, Wander; Van Gorp, Hanne; Zhang, Jiquan Q.; Crocker, Paul R.; Delputte, Peter L.; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to swine health worldwide and is considered the most significant viral disease in the swine industry today. In past years, studies on the entry of the virus into its host cell have led to the identification of a number of essential virus receptors and entry mediators. However, viral counterparts for these molecules have remained elusive and this has made rational development of new generation vaccines impossible. The main objective of this study was to identify the viral counterparts for sialoadhesin, a crucial PRRSV receptor on macrophages. For this purpose, a soluble form of sialoadhesin was constructed and validated. The soluble sialoadhesin could bind PRRSV in a sialic acid-dependent manner and could neutralize PRRSV infection of macrophages, thereby confirming the role of sialoadhesin as an essential PRRSV receptor on macrophages. Although sialic acids are present on the GP3, GP4 and GP5 envelope glycoproteins, only the M/GP5 glycoprotein complex of PRRSV was identified as a ligand for sialoadhesin. The interaction was found to be dependent on the sialic acid binding capacity of sialoadhesin and on the presence of sialic acids on GP5. These findings not only contribute to a better understanding of PRRSV biology, but the knowledge and tools generated in this study also hold the key to the development of a new generation of PRRSV vaccines. PMID:20084110

  9. Redox regulation of glycogen biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: analysis of the AGP and glycogen synthases.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Troya, Sandra; López-Maury, Luis; Sánchez-Riego, Ana María; Roldán, Miguel; Florencio, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen constitutes the major carbon storage source in cyanobacteria, as starch in algae and higher plants. Glycogen and starch synthesis is linked to active photosynthesis and both of them are degraded to glucose in the dark to maintain cell metabolism. Control of glycogen biosynthesis in cyanobacteria could be mediated by the regulation of the enzymes involved in this process, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and glycogen synthase, which were identified as putative thioredoxin targets. We have analyzed whether both enzymes were subjected to redox modification using purified recombinant enzymes or cell extracts in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our results indicate that both AGP and glycogen synthases are sensitive to copper oxidation. However, only AGP exhibits a decrease in its enzymatic activity, which is recovered after reduction by DTT or reduced thioredoxin (TrxA), suggesting a redox control of AGP. In order to elucidate the role in redox control of the cysteine residues present on the AGP sequence (C45, C185, C320, and C337), they were replaced with serine. All AGP mutant proteins remained active when expressed in Synechocystis, although they showed different electrophoretic mobility profiles after copper oxidation, reflecting a complex pattern of cysteines interaction.

  10. [Platelet aggregation upon acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel treatment and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa content in patients with acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Khaspekova, S G; Ziuriaev, I T; Iakushkin, V V; Golubeva, N V; Ruda, M Ia; Mazurov, A V

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between aggregating activity of platelets and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (fibrinogen receptor) content on their surface was investigated in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Eighty nine ACS patients were included into the study - 69 with and 20 without elevation of ST segment. Blood was collected within the first hour of admission to the clinic (1 day), and then at 3-5 and 8-12 days. All patients received standard antiaggregant therapy - acetylsalicylic acid - ASA (thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor) and clopidogrel (ADP receptor antagonist). Platelet aggregation was analyzed at the first time point when patients had already taken ASA but not clopidogrel, and then (3-5 and 8- 12 days) upon combined therapy with both preparations. Aggregation was induced by 5 and 20 uM ADP and measured by turbidimetric method. In comparison with the initial level (1 day, ASA) at days 3-5, i.e. after development of clopidogrel effect, platelet aggregation was decreased by 54 and 40% upon its stimulation with 5 and 20 uM ADP, and was not further changed at days 8-12. GP IIb/IIIa content on platelet surface was determined by binding of 125I-labelled monoclonal antibody CRC64. GP IIb/IIIa number varied from 31100 to 73000 per platelet with the mean level of 48500 +/- 8400 (mean +/- standard deviation). No differences were detected between mean GP IIb/IIIa number at 1, 3-5 and 8-12 days after ACS onset. Upon repeat GP IIb/IIIa measurement coefficient of variation was 6.1% demonstrating the stability of this parameter in each patient. Positive correlation between platelet aggregation and GP IIb/IIIa content was detected at the first day - correlation coefficients (r) 0.425 and 0.470 for 5 and 20 uM ADP (n=57, p<0.001). However positive association between these parameters was not revealed at 3-5 and 8-12 days, when patients received not only ASA but clopidogrel as well (r from -0.054 to -0.237, p>0.05). These results indicates that variations of GP IIb/IIIa content

  11. Naphthalenedisulfonic acid derivatives inhibit HIV-1-induced cytopathogenesis, syncytia formation and virus-cell binding by interaction with the viral envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, P.; Schols, D.; De Clercq, E.; Shigeta, S.; Baba, M.

    1993-12-31

    Bis naphthalenedisulfonic acid analogs with biphenyl spacers have exhibited potent and selective inhibition of HIV-1 replication and giant cell formation. FACS analysis has revealed that these agents also inhibit viral binding to the target cell. Further mechanism of action studies by the FACA method demonstrate that the sulfonic acid analogs inhibit binding of anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody to the viral envelope of glycoprotein, gp120. Binding of OKT4A/Leu3a monoclonal antibody to the target cell CD4 receptor is not affected by these compounds. This investigation suggests that these naphthalenedisulfonic acid derivatives exert their anti-HIV-1 activity by inhibiting the gp120-CD4 interaction through binding of these agents to the viral gp120 antigen.

  12. Identification of amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from alpaca that may be involved in host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Dubovi, Edward J; Ridpath, Julia F

    2015-09-30

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are most commonly associated with infections of cattle. However, BVDV are often isolated from closely related ruminants with a number of BVDV-1b viruses being isolated from alpacas that were both acutely and persistently infected. The complete nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame of eleven alpaca-adapted BVDV isolates and the region encoding the envelope glycoproteins of an additional three isolates were determined. With the exception of one, all alpaca isolates were >99.2% similar at the nucleotide level. The Hercules isolate was more divergent, with 95.7% sequence identity to the other viruses. Sequence similarity of the 14 viruses indicated they were isolates of a single BVDV strain that had adapted to and were circulating through alpaca herds. Hercules was a more distantly related strain that has been isolated only once in Canada and represented a separate adaptation event that possessed the same adaptive changes. Comparison of amino acid sequences of alpaca and bovine-derived BVDV strains revealed three regions with amino acid sequences unique to all alpaca isolates. The first contained two small in-frame deletions near the N-terminus of the E2 glycoprotein. The second was found near the C-terminus of the E2 protein where four altered amino acids were located within a 30 amino acid domain that participates in E2 homodimerization. The third region contained three variable amino acids in the C-terminus of the E(rns) within the amphipathic helix membrane anchor. These changes were found in the polar side of the amphipathic helix and resulted in an increased charge within the polar face. Titration of bovine and alpaca viruses in both bovine and alpaca cells indicated that with increased charge in the amphipathic helix, the ability to infect alpaca cells also increased.

  13. A single amino acid change in the E2 glycoprotein of Sindbis virus confers neurovirulence by altering an early step of virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Dropulic, L K; Hardwick, J M; Griffin, D E

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins of Sindbis virus have been linked to neurovirulence; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these amino acid changes alter neurovirulence are not known. Recombinant-virus studies have mapped an important determinant of neurovirulence in adult mice to a single amino acid change, glutamine to histidine, at position 55 of the E2 glycoprotein (P. C. Tucker, E. G. Strauss, R. J. Kuhn, J. H. Strauss, and D. E. Griffin, J. Virol. 67:4605-4610, 1993). To investigate how histidine confers neurovirulence, we examined the various stages of the virus life cycle in neural (N18) and nonneural (BHK) cells. In BHK cells, recombinant viruses 633 (E255Q) and TE (E255H) replicated similarly. In contrast, in N18 neuroblastoma cells, TE established infection more efficiently, replicated faster, and achieved higher rates of virus release than did 633. Viral structural protein synthesis was similar in 633- and TE-infected BHK cells, while in N18 cells, structural protein synthesis was detected only in TE-infected cells at 6 h and remained higher for at least 16 h postinfection. Viral RNA synthesis was initiated more rapidly and was up to fivefold greater in TE- versus 633-infected N18 cells. Taken together with other data demonstrating minimal effects on virus binding and entry (P. C. Tucker, S. H. Lee, N. Bui, D. Martinie, and D. E. Griffin, J. Virol. 71:6106-6112, 1997), these data suggest that E2 position 55 plays an important role at early stages of infection of neural cells, thereby facilitating neurovirulence. PMID:9223504

  14. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  15. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and P-glycoprotein function by gambogic acid synergistically potentiates adriamycin -induced apoptosis in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hui; Yang, Jing-Yu; Yang, Sheng-Nan; Li, Yi; Ping, Guan-Fang; Hou, Yue; Cui, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of lung cancer in clinical trials. However, whether GA has chemosensitizing properties when combined with other chemotherapy agents in the treatment of lung cancer is not known. Here we investigated the effects of GA combined with adriamycin (ADM), a common chemotherapy agent, in regard to their activities and the possible mechanisms against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cell viability results showed that sequential GA-ADM treatment was synergistic, while the reverse sequence and simultaneous treatments were antagonistic or additive, in lung cancer cells and ADM resistant cells, but not in normal cells. The combined use of GA and ADM synergistically displayed apoptosis-inducing activities in lung cancer cells. Moreover, GA in combination with ADM could promote PARP cleavage, enhance caspases activation and decrease the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in lung cancer cells. The combined use of GA and ADM decreased the expression of P-glycoprotein and increased the accumulation of ADM in lung cancer cells. Furthermore, it was found that, prior to ADM treatment, GA could inhibit NF-κB signaling pathways, which have been validated to confer ADM resistance. The critical role of NF-κB was further confirmed by using PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor, which significantly increased apoptosis induction by the combination of GA and ADM and inhibited ADM-induced ABCB1 upregulation. Importantly, our results indicated that the combination of GA and ADM exerted enhanced anti-tumor effects on A549 xenograft models through inhibiting NF-κB and P-glycoprotein, and attenuated ADM-induced cardiotoxicity. Collectively, these findings indicate that GA sensitizes lung cancer cells to ADM in vitro and in vivo, providing a rationale for the combined use of GA and ADM in lung cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies in a variant of equine infectious anemia virus is linked to amino acid substitutions in the surface unit envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R F; Berger, S L; Rushlow, K E; McManus, J M; Cook, S J; Harrold, S; Raabe, M L; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C J

    1995-01-01

    Serial passage of the prototype (PR) cell-adapted Wyoming strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in fetal donkey dermal (FDD) rather than fetal horse (designated fetal equine kidney [FEK]) cell cultures resulted in the generation of a variant virus strain which produced accelerated cytopathic effects in FDD cells and was 100- to 1,000-fold more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies than its parent. This neutralization-sensitive variant was designated the FDD strain. Although there were differences in glycosylation between the PR and FDD strains, passage of the FDD virus in FEK cells did not reduce its sensitivity to neutralizing antibody. Nucleotide sequencing of the region encoding the surface unit (SU) protein from the FDD strain revealed nine amino acid substitutions compared with the PR strain. Two of these substitutions resulted in changes in the polarity of charge, four caused the introduction of a charged residue, and three had no net change in charge. Nucleotide sequence analysis was extended to the region of the FDD virus genome encoding the extracellular domain of the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (TM). Unlike the situation with the FDD virus coding region, there were minor variations in nucleotide sequence between individual molecular clones containing this region of the TM gene. Although each clone contained three nucleotide substitutions compared with the PR strain, only one of these was common to all, and this did not affect the amino acid content. Of the remaining two nucleotide substitutions, only one resulted in an amino acid change, and in each case, this change appeared to be conservative. To determine if amino acid substitutions in the SU protein of FDD cell-grown viruses were responsible for the enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies, chimeric viruses were constructed by using an infectious molecular clone of EIAV. These chimeric viruses contained all of the amino acid substitutions found in the FDD virus strain and were

  17. [Biological role of heterogeneous glycoprotein structures].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate molecules connected mostly with covalent junctions to protein chains are called glycoproteins. These carbohydrate molecules are attached to the protein core in different qualities and order. When the protein core is connected with acidic components such as uronic acid or SO4 radicals, they are called proteoglycans. The currently used name "glycosaminoglycan" in this case is not entirely correct. In the living world polymannane structures occur, too. Glycoproteins do not only exceptionally hold acidic groups but they have neuraminic acid derivatives. Tissue, cellular and matrix structures, and mostly all serum "proteins" are mainly glycoproteins. In the everyday clinical practice glycoproteins are mentioned as proteins. Nevertheless, the inadequate use of the concept may cause errors in the attitudes, too. This paper aims to correct this notion, because the term of "glycobiology" has already been expanded to be an independent scientific field. The practical clinical consequences of recent knowledge in this field are also summarized including novel findings on glycoprotein structures and functions. The importance of the quantity of carbohydrates, and their structural arrangements are also presented. In short, significance of glycoprotein-carbohydrate structures, as well as their physiological and pathological roles are reviewed in order to introduce the field of "glycobiology". Orosomucoid and immunoglobulins are discussed separately. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1185-1192.

  18. Novel mutations in Marburg virus glycoprotein associated with viral evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Masahiro; Nakayama, Eri; Marzi, Andrea; Igarashi, Manabu; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus, members of the family Filoviridae, cause lethal haemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. Although the outbreaks are concentrated mainly in Central Africa, these viruses are potential agents of imported infectious diseases and bioterrorism in non-African countries. Recent studies demonstrated that non-human primates passively immunized with virus-specific antibodies were successfully protected against fatal filovirus infection, highlighting the important role of antibodies in protective immunity for this disease. However, the mechanisms underlying potential evasion from antibody mediated immune pressure are not well understood. To analyse possible mutations involved in immune evasion in the MARV envelope glycoprotein (GP) which is the major target of protective antibodies, we selected escape mutants of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) expressing MARV GP (rVSVΔG/MARVGP) by using two GP-specific mAbs, AGP127-8 and MGP72-17, which have been previously shown to inhibit MARV budding. Interestingly, several rVSVΔG/MARVGP variants escaping from the mAb pressure-acquired amino acid substitutions in the furin-cleavage site rather than in the mAb-specific epitopes, suggesting that these epitopes are recessed, not exposed on the uncleaved GP molecule, and therefore inaccessible to the mAbs. More surprisingly, some variants escaping mAb MGP72-17 lacked a large proportion of the mucin-like region of GP, indicating that these mutants efficiently escaped the selective pressure by deleting the mucin-like region including the mAb-specific epitope. Our data demonstrate that MARV GP possesses the potential to evade antibody mediated immune pressure due to extraordinary structural flexibility and variability.

  19. Effect of HEPES buffer on the uptake and transport of P-glycoprotein substrates and large neutral amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuanghui; Pal, Dhananjay; Shah, Sujay J.; Kwatra, Deep; Paturi, Kalyani D.; Mitra, Ashim. K.

    2010-01-01

    HEPES has been widely employed as an organic buffer agent in cell culture medium as well as uptake and transport experiments in vitro. However, concentrations of HEPES used in such studies vary from one laboratory to another. In this study, we investigated the effect of HEPES on the uptake and bidirectional transport of P-gp substrates employing both Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1 cells. ATP-dependent uptake of glutamic acid was also examined. ATP production was further quantified applying ATP Determination Kit. An addition of HEPES to the cellular washing and incubation media significantly altered the uptake and transport of P-gp substrates in both Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1 cells. Uptake of P-gp substrates substantially diminished as the HEPES concentration was raised to 25 mM. Bidirectional (A-B and B-A) transport studies revealed that permeability ratio of PappB-A to PappA-B in the presence of 25 mM HEPES was significantly higher than control. The uptake of phenylalanine is an ATP-independent process, whereas the accumulation of glutamic acid is ATP-dependent. While phenylalanine uptake remained unchanged glutamic acid uptake was elevated with the addition of HEPES. Verapamil is an inhibitor of P-gp mediated uptake, elevation of cyclosporine uptake in the presence of 5 μM verapamil was compromised by the presence of 25 mM HEPES. The results of ATP assay indicated that HEPES stimulated the production of ATP. This study suggests that the addition of HEPES in the medium modulated the energy dependent efflux and uptake processes. The effect of HEPES on P-gp mediated drug efflux and transport may provide some mechanistic insight into possible reasons for inconsistencies in the results reported from various laboratories. PMID:20163160

  20. Recombinant sialidase NanA (rNanA) cleaves α2-3 linked sialic acid of host cell surface N-linked glycoprotein to promote Edwardsiella tarda infection.

    PubMed

    Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Tabata, Mutsumi; Shinyoshi, Sayaka; Oishi, Kazuki; Araki, Kyosuke; Komatsu, Masaharu; Itakura, Takao; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is one of the major pathogenic bacteria affecting both marine and freshwater fish species. Sialidase NanA expressed endogenously in E. tarda is glycosidase removing sialic acids from glycoconjugates. Recently, the relationship of NanA sialidase activity to E. tarda infection has been reported, however, the mechanism with which sialidase NanA aids the pathogenicity of E. tarda remained unclear. Here, we comprehensively determined the biochemical properties of NanA towards various substrates in vitro to provide novel insights on the potential NanA target molecule at the host cell. GAKS cell pretreated with recombinant NanA showed increased susceptibility to E. tarda infection. Moreover, sialidase inhibitor treated E. tarda showed a significantly reduced ability to infect GAKS cells. These results indicate that NanA-induced desialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates is essential for the initial step of E. tarda infection. Among the natural substrates, NanA exhibited the highest activity towards 3-sialyllactose, α2-3 linked sialic acid carrying sialoglycoconjugates. Supporting this finding, intact GAKS cell membrane exposed to recombinant NanA showed changes of glycoconjugates only in α2-3 sialo-linked glycoproteins, but not in glycolipids and α2-6 sialo-linked glycoproteins. Lectin staining of cell surface glycoprotein provided further evidence that α2-3 sialo-linkage of the N-linked glycoproteins was the most plausible target of NanA sialidase. To confirm the significance of α2-3 sialo-linkage desialylation for E. tarda infection, HeLa cells which possessed lower amount of α2-3 sialo-linkage glycoprotein were used for infection experiment along with GAKS cells. As a result, infection of HeLa cells by E. tarda was significantly reduced when compared to GAKS cells. Furthermore, E. tarda infection was significantly inhibited by mannose pretreatment suggesting that the bacterium potentially recognizes and binds to mannose or mannose containing

  1. Interaction of new kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and tofacitinib with human serum alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. A comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular Docking approach.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-04-15

    In the current study we have investigated the interaction of newly approved kinase inhibitors namely Cabozantinib (CBZ) and Tofacitinib (TFB) with human Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) under simulated physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching measurements, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking methods. CBZ and TFB binds to AAG with significant affinity and the calculated binding constant for the drugs lie in the order of 10(4). With the increase in temperature the binding constant values decreased for both CBZ and TFB. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from AAG to CBZ and TFB suggested the fluorescence intensity of AAG was quenched by the two studied drugs via the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the static manner. The molecular distance r value calculated from FRET is around 2 nm for both drugs, fluorescence spectroscopy data was employed for the study of thermodynamic parameters, standard Gibbs free energy change at 300 K was calculated as -5.234 kcal mol(-1) for CBZ-AAG interaction and -6.237 kcal mol(-1) for TFB-AAG interaction, standard enthalpy change and standard entropy change for CBZ-AAG interaction are -9.553 kcal mol(-1) and -14.618 cal mol(-1) K(-1) respectively while for AAG-TFB interaction, standard enthalpy and standard entropy change was calculated as 4.019 kcal mol(-1) and 7.206 cal mol(-1) K(-1) respectively. Protein binding of the two drugs caused the tertiary structure alterations. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated the reduction in the hydrodynamic radii of the protein. Furthermore molecular docking results suggested the Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding were the interactive forces in the binding process of CBZ to AAG while in case of TFB only hydrophobic interactions were found to be involved, overlap of the binding site for two studied drugs on the AAG molecule was revealed by docking results.

  2. Single Amino Acid Substitution N659D in HIV-2 Envelope Glycoprotein (Env) Impairs Viral Release and Hampers BST-2 Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Dufrasne, François E.; Lombard, Catherine; Goubau, Patrick; Ruelle, Jean

    2016-01-01

    BST-2 or tetherin is a host cell restriction factor that prevents the budding of enveloped viruses at the cell surface, thus impairing the viral spread. Several countermeasures to evade this antiviral factor have been positively selected in retroviruses: the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) relies on the envelope glycoprotein (Env) to overcome BST-2 restriction. The Env gp36 ectodomain seems involved in this anti-tetherin activity, however residues and regions interacting with BST-2 are not clearly defined. Among 32 HIV-2 ROD Env mutants tested, we demonstrated that the asparagine residue at position 659 located in the gp36 ectodomain is mandatory to exert the anti-tetherin function. Viral release assays in cell lines expressing BST-2 showed a loss of viral release ability for the HIV-2 N659D mutant virus compared to the HIV-2 wild type virus. In bst-2 inactivated H9 cells, those differences were lost. Subtilisin treatment of infected cells demonstrated that the N659D mutant was more tethered at the cell surface. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments confirmed a direct molecular link between Env and BST-2 and highlighted an inability of the mutant to bind BST-2. We also tested a virus presenting a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminal part of Env, a cytoplasmic tail partial deletion that is spontaneously selected in vitro. Interestingly, viral release assays and FRET experiments indicated that a full Env cytoplasmic tail was essential in BST-2 antagonism. In HIV-2 infected cells, an efficient Env-mediated antagonism of BST-2 is operated through an intermolecular link involving the asparagine 659 residue as well as the C-terminal part of the cytoplasmic tail. PMID:27754450

  3. Interaction of new kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and tofacitinib with human serum alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. A comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular Docking approach.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-04-15

    In the current study we have investigated the interaction of newly approved kinase inhibitors namely Cabozantinib (CBZ) and Tofacitinib (TFB) with human Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) under simulated physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching measurements, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking methods. CBZ and TFB binds to AAG with significant affinity and the calculated binding constant for the drugs lie in the order of 10(4). With the increase in temperature the binding constant values decreased for both CBZ and TFB. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from AAG to CBZ and TFB suggested the fluorescence intensity of AAG was quenched by the two studied drugs via the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the static manner. The molecular distance r value calculated from FRET is around 2 nm for both drugs, fluorescence spectroscopy data was employed for the study of thermodynamic parameters, standard Gibbs free energy change at 300 K was calculated as -5.234 kcal mol(-1) for CBZ-AAG interaction and -6.237 kcal mol(-1) for TFB-AAG interaction, standard enthalpy change and standard entropy change for CBZ-AAG interaction are -9.553 kcal mol(-1) and -14.618 cal mol(-1) K(-1) respectively while for AAG-TFB interaction, standard enthalpy and standard entropy change was calculated as 4.019 kcal mol(-1) and 7.206 cal mol(-1) K(-1) respectively. Protein binding of the two drugs caused the tertiary structure alterations. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated the reduction in the hydrodynamic radii of the protein. Furthermore molecular docking results suggested the Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding were the interactive forces in the binding process of CBZ to AAG while in case of TFB only hydrophobic interactions were found to be involved, overlap of the binding site for two studied drugs on the AAG molecule was revealed by docking results. PMID:26851488

  4. St. John's wort may ameliorate 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid colitis off rats through the induction of pregnane X receptors and/or P-glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sehirli, A O; Cetinel, S; Ozkan, N; Selman, S; Tetik, S; Yuksel, M; Dulger, F G A

    2015-04-01

    It is reported that deficiencies of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the latter of which is encoded by the MDR1 gene, are important factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is also known that the activation of PXR is protective of IBD due to the mutual repression between PXR and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression and because NF-κB was reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. The goal of this study was to investigate whether St. John's wort (SJW) and spironolactone (SPL), both known to have strong inducing effects on cytochrome P 450 (CYP) enzymes as well as PXR and P-gp, have ameliorating effects on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis of rats through induction of PXR and/or P-gp. Wistar albino rats (250 - 300 g) were divided into control and TNBS-colitis groups. Each group was then divided into a) control (saline), b) SJW (300 mg/kg p.o. bid), and c) SPL (80 mg/kg p.o.) groups. Drugs were given for 7 days. Both treatments ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis, as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, colon length, and bowel histology. Plasma levels of NF-κB, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the oxidative stress markers that increased during colitis, decreased significantly after both treatments. The PXR and P-gp expression in the intestinal tissues was diminished in the colitis group but increased after drug treatments. Both drugs appeared to have significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorated the TNBS colitis of the rats, most likely through their PXR- and P-gp-inducing properties.

  5. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  6. Interaction of new kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and tofacitinib with human serum alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. A comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular Docking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-04-01

    In the current study we have investigated the interaction of newly approved kinase inhibitors namely Cabozantinib (CBZ) and Tofacitinib (TFB) with human Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) under simulated physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching measurements, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking methods. CBZ and TFB binds to AAG with significant affinity and the calculated binding constant for the drugs lie in the order of 104. With the increase in temperature the binding constant values decreased for both CBZ and TFB. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from AAG to CBZ and TFB suggested the fluorescence intensity of AAG was quenched by the two studied drugs via the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the static manner. The molecular distance r value calculated from FRET is around 2 nm for both drugs, fluorescence spectroscopy data was employed for the study of thermodynamic parameters, standard Gibbs free energy change at 300K was calculated as - 5.234 kcal mol- 1 for CBZ-AAG interaction and - 6.237 kcal mol- 1 for TFB-AAG interaction, standard enthalpy change and standard entropy change for CBZ-AAG interaction are - 9.553 kcal mol- 1 and - 14.618 cal mol- 1K- 1 respectively while for AAG-TFB interaction, standard enthalpy and standard entropy change was calculated as 4.019 kcal mol- 1 and 7.206 cal mol- 1K- 1 respectively. Protein binding of the two drugs caused the tertiary structure alterations. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated the reduction in the hydrodynamic radii of the protein. Furthermore molecular docking results suggested the Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding were the interactive forces in the binding process of CBZ to AAG while in case of TFB only hydrophobic interactions were found to be involved, overlap of the binding site for two studied drugs on the AAG molecule was revealed by docking results.

  7. The sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter confers high-level expression of the GUS reporter gene in the potato tuber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Goo, Young-Min; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Jung-Myung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2009-10-01

    Molecular farming refers to the process of creating bioengineered plants with the capability of producing potentially valuable products, such as drugs, vaccines, and chemicals. We have investigated the potential of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter and its transit peptide (TP) as an expression system for the mass production of foreign proteins in potato. The ibAGP1 promoter and its TP sequence were transformed into potato along with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, and GUS activity was subsequently analyzed in the transgenic potato plants. In tuber tissues, GUS activity in transgenic plants carrying only the ibAGP1 promoter (ibAGP1::GUS) increased up to 15.6-fold compared with that of transgenic plants carrying only the CaMV35S promoter (CaMV35S::GUS). GUS activity in transgenic plants was further enhanced by the addition of the sweetpotato TP to the recombinant vector (ibAGP1::TP::GUS), with tuber tissues showing a 26-fold increase in activity compared with that in the CaMV35S::GUS-transgenic lines. In leaf tissues, the levels of GUS activity found in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic lines were similar to those in CaMV35S::GUS-lines, but they were significantly enhanced in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-lines. GUS activity gradually increased with increasing tuber diameter in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic plants, reaching a maximum level when the tuber was 35 mm in diameter. In contrast, extremely elevated levels of GUS activity - up to about 10-fold higher than that found in CaMV35S::GUS-lines - were found in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-transgenic lines at a much earlier stage of tuber development (diameter 4 mm), and these higher levels were maintained throughout the entire tuber developmental stage. These results suggest that the sweetpotato ibAGP1 promoter and its TP are a potentially strong foreign gene expression system that can be used for molecular farming in potato plants.

  8. The sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter confers high-level expression of the GUS reporter gene in the potato tuber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Goo, Young-Min; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Jung-Myung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2009-10-01

    Molecular farming refers to the process of creating bioengineered plants with the capability of producing potentially valuable products, such as drugs, vaccines, and chemicals. We have investigated the potential of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter and its transit peptide (TP) as an expression system for the mass production of foreign proteins in potato. The ibAGP1 promoter and its TP sequence were transformed into potato along with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, and GUS activity was subsequently analyzed in the transgenic potato plants. In tuber tissues, GUS activity in transgenic plants carrying only the ibAGP1 promoter (ibAGP1::GUS) increased up to 15.6-fold compared with that of transgenic plants carrying only the CaMV35S promoter (CaMV35S::GUS). GUS activity in transgenic plants was further enhanced by the addition of the sweetpotato TP to the recombinant vector (ibAGP1::TP::GUS), with tuber tissues showing a 26-fold increase in activity compared with that in the CaMV35S::GUS-transgenic lines. In leaf tissues, the levels of GUS activity found in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic lines were similar to those in CaMV35S::GUS-lines, but they were significantly enhanced in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-lines. GUS activity gradually increased with increasing tuber diameter in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic plants, reaching a maximum level when the tuber was 35 mm in diameter. In contrast, extremely elevated levels of GUS activity - up to about 10-fold higher than that found in CaMV35S::GUS-lines - were found in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-transgenic lines at a much earlier stage of tuber development (diameter 4 mm), and these higher levels were maintained throughout the entire tuber developmental stage. These results suggest that the sweetpotato ibAGP1 promoter and its TP are a potentially strong foreign gene expression system that can be used for molecular farming in potato plants. PMID:19819408

  9. Paromomycin Derived from Streptomyces sp. AG-P 1441 Induces Resistance against Two Major Pathogens of Chili Pepper.

    PubMed

    Balaraju, Kotnala; Kim, Chang-Jin; Park, Dong-Jin; Nam, Ki-Woong; Zhang, Kecheng; Sang, Mee Kyung; Park, Kyungseok

    2016-09-28

    This is the first report that paromomycin, an antibiotic derived from Streptomyces sp. AG-P 1441 (AG-P 1441), controlled Phytophthora blight and soft rot diseases caused by Phytophthora capsici and Pectobacterium carotovorum, respectively, in chili pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Chili pepper plants treated with paromomycin by foliar spray or soil drenching 7 days prior to inoculation with P. capsici zoospores showed significant (p < 0.05) reduction in disease severity (%) when compared with untreated control plants. The disease severity of Phytophthora blight was recorded as 8% and 50% for foliar spray and soil drench, respectively, at 1.0 ppm of paromomycin, compared with untreated control, where disease severity was 83% and 100% by foliar spray and soil drench, respectively. A greater reduction of soft rot lesion areas per leaf disk was observed in treated plants using paromomycin (1.0 μg/ml) by infiltration or soil drench in comparison with untreated control plants. Paromomycin treatment did not negatively affect the growth of chili pepper. Furthermore, the treatment slightly promoted growth; this growth was supported by increased chlorophyll content in paromomycin-treated chili pepper plants. Additionally, paromomycin likely induced resistance as confirmed by the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes: PR-1, β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, PR-4, peroxidase, and PR-10, which enhanced plant defense against P. capsici in chili pepper. This finding indicates that AG-P 1441 plays a role in pathogen resistance upon the activation of defense genes, by secretion of the plant resistance elicitor, paromomycin. PMID:27291677

  10. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, along with E^rns and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with E1, media...

  11. Traceless labeling of glycoproteins and its application to the study of glycoprotein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Lin; Lee, Yen-Pin; Yang, Yen-Ling; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2014-02-21

    A new chemical method for the traceless labeling of glycoproteins with synthetic boronic acid (BA)-tosyl probes was successfully developed. The BA moiety acts as an affinity head to direct the formation of a cyclic boronate diester with the diol groups of glycans. Following this step, the electrophilic tosyl group is displaced by an SN2 reaction with a nucleophilic residue of the boronated glycoprotein, and finally, a reporter group is tagged onto the glycoprotein via an ether linkage. In the presence of polyols, a competition reaction recovers the native glycan of the tagged glycoprotein, conserving its biological significance. The BA-tosyl probes were used successfully for the specific labeling of glycosylated fetuins in a mixed protein pool and from crude Escherichia coli (E. coli) lysate. Further, a BA-tosyl-functionalized glass slide was used to fabricate glycoprotein microarrays with highly conserved glycans. By interacting with various lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins), such as Concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), the types of carbohydrates and specific linkages of glycoproteins (α or β) could be systematically monitored. It is believed that the newly developed method will greatly accelerate the understanding of glycoproteins.

  12. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  13. Specific restrictions in the progression of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-induced disease resulting from single amino acid changes in the glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Grieder, F B; Davis, N L; Aronson, J F; Charles, P C; Sellon, D C; Suzuki, K; Johnston, R E

    1995-02-01

    The pathogenesis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) was examined in the mouse model using V3000, a virus derived from a molecular clone of the Trinidad donkey strain of VEE. These results were compared in parallel experiments with avirulent mutants of VEE derived by site-directed mutagenesis of the clone. Adult mice, inoculated subcutaneously in their left rear footpad with V3000, were followed in a time course study for 6 days in which 15 organs were tested for histopathological changes, for the presence of viral antigen by immunohistochemical staining, for the presence of viral nucleic acid by in situ hybridization analysis, and for content of viable virus. Virus was detected in the footpad inoculation site, but until 12 hr postinoculation (pi), the level of virus did not suggest early viral replication. By 4 hr pi, however, replication of V3000 was evident in the draining popliteal lymph node. At this early time point, no virus could be isolated from any other organ examined. At 12 hr, a significant serum viremia was observed, and virus was detected at a low level in a number of well vascularized organs, including spleen, heart, lung, liver, kidney, and adrenal gland. By 18 hr, high virus titers were present in serum and all the lymphoid organs examined, and these tissues appeared to be the major peripheral sites of V3000 replication. Virus in serum and peripheral organs was cleared by 3-4 days pi. In a second phase of the infection, V3000 invaded the central nervous system (CNS), replicated predominantly in neurons, and persisted in the brain until death by encephalitis. Pathologic findings as well as the results of immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization examination were generally coordinate with virus titration. A site-directed mutant of V3000, V3010, contained a mutation in the gene for the E2 glycoprotein at codon 76 (Glu to Lys) which rendered it avirulent after footpad inoculation. Detection of V3010 replication in the draining lymph node

  14. dbAARD & AGP: A computational pipeline for the prediction of genes associated with age related disorders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Isha; Gahlot, Lokesh Kumar; Khurana, Pooja; Hasija, Yasha

    2016-04-01

    The atrocious behavioral and physiological shift with aging accelerate occurrence of deleterious disorders. Contemporary research is focused at uncovering the role of genetic associations in age-related disorders (ARDs). While the completion of the Human Genome Project and the HapMap project has generated huge amount of data on genetic variations; Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variations, essentially SNPs associated with several disorders including ARDs. However, a repository that houses all such ARD associations is lacking. The present work is aimed at filling this void. A database, dbAARD (database of Aging and Age Related Disorders) has been developed which hosts information on more than 3000 genetic variations significantly (p-value <0.05) associated with 51 ARDs. Furthermore, a machine learning based gene prediction tool AGP (Age Related Disorders Gene Prediction) has been constructed by employing rotation forest algorithm, to prioritize genes associated with ARDs. The tool achieved an overall accuracy in terms of precision 75%, recall 76%, F-measure 76% and AUC 0.85. Both the web resources have been made available online at http://genomeinformatics.dce.edu/dbAARD/ and http://genomeinformatics.dce.edu/AGP/ respectively for easy retrieval and usage by the scientific community. We believe that this work may facilitate the analysis of plethora of variants associated with ARDs and provide cues for deciphering the biology of aging. PMID:26836976

  15. Facile fabrication of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables based on the mixed mode of soft/hard templates

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Mimi; Zhao, Wenbo; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Ping; Mao, Chun; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A new kind of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be facilely synthesized by using soft/hard templates method. In order to effectively introduce Ag sources into porous polystyrene (PS) nanotubes which were trapped in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) hard template, Pluronic F127 (F127) was used as guiding agent, soft template and reductant. Meanwhile, ethylene glycol solution was also used as solvent and co-reducing agent to assist in the formation of silver nanowires. The influences of concentration of F127 and reducing reaction time on the formation of Ag/PS coaxial nanocables were discussed. Results indicated that the high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be obtained by the mixed mode of soft/hard templates under optimized conditions. This strategy is expected to be extended to design more metal/polymer coaxial nanocables for the benefit of creation of complex and functional nanoarchitectures and components. PMID:27477888

  16. Facile fabrication of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables based on the mixed mode of soft/hard templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mimi; Zhao, Wenbo; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Xu, Ping; Mao, Chun; Shen, Jian

    2016-08-01

    A new kind of high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be facilely synthesized by using soft/hard templates method. In order to effectively introduce Ag sources into porous polystyrene (PS) nanotubes which were trapped in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) hard template, Pluronic F127 (F127) was used as guiding agent, soft template and reductant. Meanwhile, ethylene glycol solution was also used as solvent and co-reducing agent to assist in the formation of silver nanowires. The influences of concentration of F127 and reducing reaction time on the formation of Ag/PS coaxial nanocables were discussed. Results indicated that the high-quality Ag/PS coaxial nanocables can be obtained by the mixed mode of soft/hard templates under optimized conditions. This strategy is expected to be extended to design more metal/polymer coaxial nanocables for the benefit of creation of complex and functional nanoarchitectures and components.

  17. The effect of ginger extract on glycoproteins of Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Nassir-Ud-Din; Kohan, Haleemeh Kabini; Kadivar, Mehdi; Kalyee, Zahra; Rad, Behzad Laame; Iravani, Ayda; Rahimi, Nourooz Ali; Wahabi, Farideh; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Pourfallah, Fatemeh; Arjmand, Mohammad

    2014-01-15

    Protein glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of specific diseases, including cancers. The ginger rhizome is known to have anti-cancer and anti-fungal properties. This investigation was carried out to study the effect of ginger on glycoproteins of Raji cells. A 10% yield of ginger extract was mixed with 0.01% DMSO and added to 6 x 10(4) Raji cells at different concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 degrees C. Their half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined and analyzed statistically using Graphpad prism software. Cell extracts were prepared and their glycoproteins purified using lectin-affinity chromatography (Q proteome total glycoprotein and O glycoprotein kits) and SDS PAGE was carried out. IC50 of ginger extract on Raji cells was 20 microg mL(-1) at 72 h with < 0.01 significance. Silver staining of purified glycoprotiens in Raji cells indicated the presence of O-glycans and N-glycans. N-linked mannose and N-linked sialic acids were detected with the total glycoprotein kit. O-linked galactose and O-linked sialic acids were identified with the O-glycoprotein. Ginger reduced the expression of O-linked sialic acid and also N-linked mannose on Raji cells but had no effect on other glycoproteins. Sialic acid is now well known as a cancer marker and investigations are on to use it as a drug-target in cancerous tissues.

  18. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.

    2014-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4+ with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4+ across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. PMID:24647713

  19. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2014-05-15

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4(+) with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4(+) across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport.

  20. The turnover rate of rabbit urinary Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Anne M. S.; Neuberger, Albert

    1973-01-01

    1. The turnover rate of urinary Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein in rabbits was determined by two different methods. The first involved measurement of the pool size of the glycoprotein in rabbit kidney and the daily urinary excretion rate by a radioimmunoassay from which the turnover rate was calculated. 2. The second method made use of the incorporation in vivo of Na214CO3 and sodium [14C]acetate. After a single intramuscular injection of one of these compounds, urine collections were made every 24h and the glycoprotein was isolated and its specific radioactivity was determined. 3. Incorporation of the label into urinary HCO3−, urea and plasma fibrinogen was also examined. The specific radio-activities of the O-acetyl, sialic acid, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues isolated from the Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein were compared and their half-lives were compared with that of the intact glycoprotein. The two methods gave results in quite close agreement and indicated a half-life for the glycoprotein of approx. 9h. 4. An attempt was made to localize the glycoprotein within the kidney and within the cell. It is present throughout the kidney, but was not detected in the brush-border fraction isolated from the proximal tubules. From differential cell-centrifugation studies, the glycoprotein seemed to be predominantly present in the soluble fraction (100000g supernatant). This suggests that it is either largely a soluble cytoplasmic component or is very loosely bound to a membrane, being readily released under the gentlest homogenization procedure. 5. The half-life of Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein in human kidney was found by the radioimmunoassay method to be approx. 16h. The similarity between the composition of Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and human erythropoietin is discussed. PMID:4780692

  1. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP).

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardization of analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from CGM systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP), and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This paper provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients.

  2. Prestaining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by dansylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Qing; Duan, Yuanmeng; Huang, Binbin; Hong, Guoying; Zhou, Ayi; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using dansylhydrazine in this study. The prestained gels could be easily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststains. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, one of the most commonly used glycoprotein stain. In addition, a subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity isolation, and LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method. PMID:24668852

  3. Prestaining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by dansylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Qing; Duan, Yuanmeng; Huang, Binbin; Hong, Guoying; Zhou, Ayi; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using dansylhydrazine in this study. The prestained gels could be easily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststains. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, one of the most commonly used glycoprotein stain. In addition, a subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity isolation, and LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method.

  4. Involvement of the alpha2,8-polysialyltransferases II/STX and IV/PST in the biosynthesis of polysialic acid chains on the O-linked glycoproteins in rainbow trout ovary.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Shinji; Sato, Chihiro; Matsuno, Midori; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Colley, Karen; Kitajima, Ken

    2006-11-01

    Polysialoglycoprotein (PSGP) in salmonid fish egg is a unique glycoprotein bearing alpha2,8-linked polysialic acid (polySia) on its O-linked glycans. Biosynthesis of the polySia chains is developmentally regulated and only occurs at later stage of oogenesis. Two alpha2,8-polysialyltransferases (alpha2,8-polySTs), PST (ST8Sia IV) and STX (ST8Sia II), responsible for the biosynthesis of polySia on N-glycans of glycoproteins, are known in mammals. However, nothing has been known about which alpha2,8-polySTs are involved in the biosynthesis of polySia on O-linked glycans in any glycoproteins. We thus sought to identify cDNA encoding the alpha2,8-polyST involved in polysialylation of PSGP. A clone for PST orthologue, rtPST, and two clones for the STX orthologue, rtSTX-ov and rtSTX-em, were identified in rainbow trout. The deduced amino acid sequence of rtPST shows a high identity (72-77%) to other vertebrate PSTs, while that of rtSTX-ov shows 92% identity with rtSTX-em and a significant identity (63-76%) to other vertebrate STXs. The rtPST exhibited the in vivo alpha2,8-polyST activity, although its in vitro activity was low. However, the rtSTXs showed no in vivo and very low in vitro activities. Interestingly, co-existence of rtPST and rSTX-ov in the reaction mixture synergistically enhanced the alpha2,8-polyST activity. During oogenesis, rtPST was constantly expressed, while the expression of rtSTX-ov was not increased until polySia chain is abundantly biosynthesized in the later stage. rtSTX-em was not expressed in ovary. These results suggest that the enhanced expression of rtSTX-ov under the co-expression with rtPST may be important for the biosynthesis of polySia on O-linked glycans of PSGP.

  5. Glycoproteins from the cell wall of Phaseolus coccineus.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, M A; Selvendran, R R

    1980-04-01

    1. The use of a modified sodium chlorite/acetic acid delignification procedure for the solubilization of a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein fraction from the depectinated cell walls of Phaseolus coccineus is described. 2. The crude glycoprotein was associated with some pectic material; hydroxyproline and serine were the most abundant amino acids, and arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid the predominant monosaccharides. 3. The bulk of the hydroxyproline is O-glycosidically substituted with tetra- and tri-arabinofuranosides. From methylation analysis the linkages in these arabinosides could be inferred. 4. Ion-exchange chromatography of the crude glycoprotein gave one major and two minor hydroxyproline-rich fractions, with similar amino acid but different monosaccharide composition. 5. In the major fraction, serine appears to be O-glycosidically substituted with a single galactopyranoside residue that can be removed by the action of alpha-galactosidase but not beta-galactosidase. Removal of arabinofuranoside residues by partial acid hydrolysis greatly enhanced the action of alpha-galactosidase. 6. Methylation followed by carboxy reduction with LiAl2H4 has shown the presence of (1 leads to 4)-linked galacturonic acid in the crude glycoprotein fraction but not in the major fraction from the ion-exchange column. Hence the bulk of the pectic material is not associated with the major glycoprotein component. It is suggested that the glycoprotein is held in the wall by phenolic cross-links. 7. Similarities with the glycopeptide moiety of potato lectin provides further evidence for a class of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins with common features.

  6. Characterization of TRIF Selectivity in the AGP Class of Lipid A Mimetics: Role of Secondary Lipid Chains

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Juhienah K.; Bowen, William S.; Bazin, Hélène G.; Ryter, Kendal T.; Livesay, Mark T.; Ward, Jon R.; Evans, Jay T.; Johnson, David A.

    2014-01-01

    TLR4 agonists that favor TRIF-dependent signaling and the induction of type 1 interferons may have potential as vaccine adjuvants with reduced toxicity. CRX-547 (4), a member of the aminoalkyl glucosaminide 4-phosphate (AGP) class of lipid A mimetics possessing three (R)-3-decanoyloxytetradecanoyl groups and D-relative configuration in the aglycon, selectively reduces MyD88-dependent signaling resulting in TRIF-selective signaling, whereas the corresponding secondary ether lipid 6a containing (R)-3-decyloxytetradecanoyl groups does not. In order to determine which secondary acyl groups are important for the reduction in MyD88-dependent signaling activity of 4, the six possible ester/ether hybrid derivatives of 4 and 6a were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to induce NF-κB in a HEK293 cell reporter assay. An (R)-3-decanoyloxytetradecanoyl group on the 3-position of the D-glucosamine unit was found to be indispensable for maintaining low NF-κB activity irrespective of the substitutions (decyl or decanoyl) on the other two secondary positions. These results suggest that the carbonyl group of the 3-secondary lipid chain may impede homodimerization and/or conformational changes in the TLR4–MD2 complex necessary for MyD88 binding and pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. PMID:25553892

  7. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. PMID:24889823

  8. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies.

  9. Oxygen radicals stimulate guinea pig gallbladder glycoprotein secretion in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, W.B.; Turner, B.; LaMont, J.T. )

    1987-11-01

    In several animal models of cholelithiasis, and in humans with gallstones, hypersecretion of gallbladder mucin is observed. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of oxygen radicals on guinea pig gallbladder glycoprotein secretion in organ culture. Mucosal explants were incubated with ({sup 3}H)glucosamine hydrochloride to label glycoproteins, then exposed to oxygen radicals generated by chelated ferric iron and ascorbic acid. Marked stimulation of glycoprotein release was observed after a 30-min exposure to the oxygen radical-generating system, and the effect was inhibited by mannitol. The stimulatory effect of hydroxyl radical was not accompanied by leakage of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase. Parallel experiments with human granulocytes activated with f-Met-Leu-Phe and coincubated with gallbladder explants revealed similar results. These results indicate that oxygen radicals, especially the hydroxyl radical (OH), are capable of stimulating rapid release of mucous-type glycoproteins from gallbladder epithelium.

  10. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc. PMID:14533798

  11. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  12. Nucleotide and Predicted Amino Acid Sequence-Based Analysis of the Avian Metapneumovirus Type C Cell Attachment Glycoprotein Gene: Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Epidemiology of U.S. Pneumoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rene; Lwamba, Humphrey M.; Kapczynski, Darrell R.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Seal, Bruce S.

    2003-01-01

    A serologically distinct avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) was isolated in the United States after an outbreak of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT) in February 1997. The newly recognized U.S. virus was subsequently demonstrated to be genetically distinct from European subtypes and was designated aMPV serotype C (aMPV/C). We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the cell attachment glycoprotein (G) of aMPV/C (Colorado strain and three Minnesota isolates) and predicted amino acid sequence by sequencing cloned cDNAs synthesized from intracellular RNA of aMPV/C-infected cells. The nucleotide sequence comprised 1,321 nucleotides with only one predicted open reading frame encoding a protein of 435 amino acids, with a predicted Mr of 48,840. The structural characteristics of the predicted G protein of aMPV/C were similar to those of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) attachment G protein, including two mucin-like regions (heparin-binding domains) flanking both sides of a CX3C chemokine motif present in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. Comparison of the deduced G-protein amino acid sequence of aMPV/C with those of aMPV serotypes A, B, and D, as well as hRSV revealed overall predicted amino acid sequence identities ranging from 4 to 16.5%, suggesting a distant relationship. However, G-protein sequence identities ranged from 72 to 97% when aMPV/C was compared to other members within the aMPV/C subtype or 21% for the recently identified human MPV (hMPV) G protein. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes were greater than one in the G gene when comparing the more recent Minnesota isolates to the original Colorado isolate. Epidemiologically, this indicates positive selection among U.S. isolates since the first outbreak of TRT in the United States. PMID:12682171

  13. Secondary cell-wall-specific glycoprotein(s) from French bean hypocotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, P; Bolwell, G P

    1995-01-01

    Specific labeling of secondary cell walls of tracheary elements and of xylary and phloem fibers has been observed when wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and anti-WGA antibodies were used during ultrastructural studies of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) hypocotyls. In this report we demonstrate that at least part of this labeling is due to the presence of secondary cell-wall-specific glycoproteins. Three major novel glycoproteins with relative molecular weights of 55,000, 86,000, and 90,000, purified by means of WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatography, have been characterized. Their amino acid composition indicates that they are not the members of known classes of structural cell-wall proteins, since they contain no hydroxyproline, a lower level of glycine than seen in glycine-rich proteins, and very little proline. N-terminal sequences of all three proteins show no significant homology with other proteins. Antibodies were raised against electrophoretically pure 90-kD glycoprotein. These were used to localize this protein in secondary cell walls of xylem tracheary elements and in xylary and phloem fibers, i.e. in the same compartments where labeling with WGA has been observed. To our knowledge this is one of the first biochemical and ultrastructural demonstrations of secondary cell-wall-specific glycoproteins. PMID:7630932

  14. Identification and characterization of a nucleolar phosphoprotein, Nopp140, as a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Miau, L H; Chang, C J; Tsai, W H; Lee, S C

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene (agp) is activated by a key transcription factor, AGP/enhancer-binding protein (AGP/EBP, commonly called C/EBP beta), in the liver during the acute-phase response. In addition to this positive regulation, agp is negatively regulated by nucleolin (T. H. Yang et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:6068-6074, 1994). Other factors involve in positive regulation of the agp gene are poorly characterized. In a systematic search for factors that may interact with AGP/EBP, we have identified Nopp 140, a phosphoprotein of 140 kDa, by immunoaffinity chromatography. Nopp 140 not only functions as a transcriptional activator per se but also interacts with AGP/EBP to synergistically activate the agp gene in an AGP/EBP-binding motif-dependent manner. In addition to interacting with AGP/EBP, Nopp140 interacts specifically with TFIIB. Distinct regions of Nopp140 that interact with AGP/EBP and TFIIB have been characterized. The sequence of Nopp140 contains several stretches of serine- and acidic amino acid-rich sequences which are also found in ICP4 of herpes simplex virus type 1, a known transcription factor that interacts with TFIIB. The physical interaction between TFIIB and wild-type Nopp140 or several deletion mutants of Nopp140 correlates with the ability of Nopp140 to activate the agp gene synergistically with AGP/EBP. Thus, the molecular mechanism for agp gene activation may involve the interaction of AGP/EBP and TFIIB mediated by coactivator Nopp140.

  15. Identification and characterization of a nucleolar phosphoprotein, Nopp140, as a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Miau, L H; Chang, C J; Tsai, W H; Lee, S C

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) gene (agp) is activated by a key transcription factor, AGP/enhancer-binding protein (AGP/EBP, commonly called C/EBP beta), in the liver during the acute-phase response. In addition to this positive regulation, agp is negatively regulated by nucleolin (T. H. Yang et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:6068-6074, 1994). Other factors involve in positive regulation of the agp gene are poorly characterized. In a systematic search for factors that may interact with AGP/EBP, we have identified Nopp 140, a phosphoprotein of 140 kDa, by immunoaffinity chromatography. Nopp 140 not only functions as a transcriptional activator per se but also interacts with AGP/EBP to synergistically activate the agp gene in an AGP/EBP-binding motif-dependent manner. In addition to interacting with AGP/EBP, Nopp140 interacts specifically with TFIIB. Distinct regions of Nopp140 that interact with AGP/EBP and TFIIB have been characterized. The sequence of Nopp140 contains several stretches of serine- and acidic amino acid-rich sequences which are also found in ICP4 of herpes simplex virus type 1, a known transcription factor that interacts with TFIIB. The physical interaction between TFIIB and wild-type Nopp140 or several deletion mutants of Nopp140 correlates with the ability of Nopp140 to activate the agp gene synergistically with AGP/EBP. Thus, the molecular mechanism for agp gene activation may involve the interaction of AGP/EBP and TFIIB mediated by coactivator Nopp140. PMID:8972203

  16. Demonstration of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) by double one-dimensional slab gel electrophoresis: evidence for intra- and interindividual variability of the microheterogeneity pattern in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Altland, K; Roeder, T; Jakin, H M; Zimmer, H G; Neuhoff, V

    1982-04-01

    This double one-dimensional slab gel electrophoresis technique, in the sequence polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gels, permits the selective demonstration and comparison of the micro-heterogeneity pattern of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) in as many as 96 human plasma or serum samples on one gel. The electrophoretic analysis is performed on 8 microL of serum or plasma without prior purification. Several hundred samples can be analyzed by one investigator during a working day. Densitometric evaluation of the patterns revealed two new findings: 1) The microheterogeneity pattern can be described by a parameter that is independent of the concentration of orosomucoid in plasma: the center of density of the pattern, with the peak number as coordinate. 2) There is a considerable average shift of the center of density towards more basic components among the patterns obtained for samples from hospital patients. The results suggest that followup of the intra-individual variation of the orosomucoid pattern in health and disease might help in studying the still-uncertain function of this protein as well as the diseases affecting the pattern.

  17. Analysis of Glycoproteins for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    He, Jintang; Liu, Yashu; Wu, Jing; Lubman, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins play an important role in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction. The alterations of glycoproteins are often relevant to progression of diseases and these changed glycoproteins can be important biomarkers. The lectin-based glycoproteomic technology has extensively been used for high-throughput screening of potential glycoprotein biomarkers. Here we describe a multi-lectin affinity chromatography and label-free quantitative glycoproteomic approach for discovery of glycoprotein biomarkers relevant to differentiation of glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:23625399

  18. Loop-acting diuretics do not bind to Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Brunisholz, M C; Lynn, K L; Hunt, J S

    1987-09-01

    1. Binding between the radiolabelled loop-acting diuretics ([14C]frusemide, [14C]ethacrynic acid and [3H]bumetanide) and human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein or human serum albumin in vitro was evaluated by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The diuretic action and binding to urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein of the radiolabelled diuretics in vivo, after intravenous administration, were examined in rabbits. 3. In vitro, all three radiolabelled diuretics bound strongly to human serum albumin, but not to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein. 4. Radiolabelled frusemide and bumetanide, but not ethacrynic acid, caused a diuresis in rabbits, but no binding between the drugs and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein was seen in vivo. 5. Binding to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein does not appear to be an important mechanism in the action of loop diuretics.

  19. Separation of the bovine colostrum M-1 glycoprotein into two components

    PubMed Central

    Bezkorovainy, Anatoly; Grohlich, Dietmar

    1969-01-01

    1. Two glycoproteins were isolated from the M-1 acid glycoprotein fraction of bovine colostrum. 2. The lighter glycoprotein had a molecular weight of 7200, contained about 28·4% of carbohydrate, and had an absorption maximum at 275nm. The heavier glycoprotein had a molecular weight of 12000, contained 39·0% of carbohydrate, and had no absorption maxima in the 240–300nm. range of the spectrum. 3. The carbohydrate moiety of both glycoproteins was removable from the polypeptide moiety under the conditions of the β-elimination reaction. 4. Periodate oxidation experiments showed that sialic acid was linked to galactose in both proteins. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4311442

  20. Lubrication by glycoprotein brushes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappone, Bruno; Ruths, Marina; Greene, George W.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-03-01

    Grafted polyelectrolyte brushes show excellent lubricating properties under water and have been proposed as a model to study boundary lubrication in biological system. Lubricin, a glycoprotein of the synovial fluid, is considered the major boundary lubricant of articular joints. Using the Surface Force Apparatus, we have measured normal and friction forces between model surfaces (negatively charged mica, positively charged poly-lysine and aminothiol, hydrophobic alkanethiol) bearing adsorbed layers of lubricin. Lubricin layers acts like a versatile anti-adhesive, adsorbing on all the surfaces considered and creating a repulsion similar to the force between end-grafted polymer brushes. Analogies with polymer brushes also appear from bridging experiment, where proteins molecules are end-adsorbed on two opposing surfaces at the same time. Lubricin `brushes' show good lubricating ability at low applied pressures (P<0.5MPa), especially on negatively charged surfaces like mica. At higher load, the adsorbed layers wears and fails lubricating the surfaces, while still protecting the underlying substrate from wearing. Lubricin might thus be a first example of biological polyelectrolytes providing `brush-like' lubrication and wear-protection.

  1. The human platelet alloantigens Br(a) and Brb are associated with a single amino acid polymorphism on glycoprotein Ia (integrin subunit alpha 2).

    PubMed Central

    Santoso, S; Kalb, R; Walka, M; Kiefel, V; Mueller-Eckhardt, C; Newman, P J

    1993-01-01

    The human GPIa/IIa complex, also known as integrin alpha 2 beta 1, serves as a major receptor for collagen in platelets and other cell types. In addition to its role in platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix, GPIa/IIa is also known to bear the clinically important Br(a) and Brb alloantigenic determinants, which can result in antibody-mediated platelet destruction. Immunochemical studies showed that the Br antigenic epitopes reside solely on the GP Ia subunit and do not depend on sialic acid residues. To define the polymorphism responsible for the Br alloantigen system platelet RNA PCR technique, was used to amplify GPIa mRNA transcripts. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified platelet GPIa cDNA from Br(a/a) and Brb/b individuals revealed a single A<-->G polymorphism at base 1648. MnlI RFLP analysis of cDNA from serologically determined individuals confirmed that this polymorphism segregates with Br phenotype. This single base change results in a substitution of Lys (AAG) in Br(a) to Glu (GAG) in Brb at amino acid residue 505 In spite of the reversal in charge at this position, however, we found no difference in the ability of Bra and Brb homozygous platelets to adhere to collagens types I, III, or V, nor did anti-Bra or anti-Brb alloantibodies interfere with platelet adhesion to any of these fibrillar collagens. The identification of the nucleotide substitution that defines the Bra/Brb alloantigen system will now permit both pre- and postnatal diagnosis for Br phenotype. Images PMID:7901236

  2. Isolation and characterization of calcium binding glycoproteins of cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, M.; Fliegel, L.; Wlasichuk, K. )

    1990-04-05

    Two major Ca2(+)-binding glycoproteins Mr 120,000 and 100,000 were isolated from 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonic acid -solubilized bovine heart sarcolemma membrane. Peroxidase-conjugated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin lectins bind strongly to the isolated 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins. Treatment with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of the 120-kDa glycoprotein to a form migrating at about 97 kDa. Treatment of the 100-kDa band with endoglycosidase F produced form of about 80 kDa. Endoglycosidase H digestion removes only 5% of the mass of both glycoproteins. the carbohydrate structure of both glycoproteins, is therefore, predicted to be at least 75% complex structure and 25% high mannose or hybrid structure. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins are the major Ca2(+)-binding proteins in the sarcolemma membranes. Intact and endoglycosidase-treated glycoproteins bind 45Ca2+ as analyzed by a 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Using polyclonal antibodies, the 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins were identified in muscle plasma membranes (ventricles, atria, and uterus smooth muscle). They were, however, not present in non-muscle tissues such as pancreas, liver, and kidney. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins appear to be homologous molecules as judged by their similar V8 protease peptide maps, cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody, and other physicochemical properties.

  3. Separation and partial characterization of proteinases with substrate specificity for basic amino acids from human MOLT-4 T lymphocytes: identification of those inhibited by variable-loop-V3 peptides of HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-1) envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Harvima, I T; Harvima, R J; Nilsson, G; Ivanoff, L; Schwartz, L B

    1993-01-01

    The V3 loop of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 likely plays a role in HIV-1 infectivity. Although the amino acid sequence of the V3 loop is hypervariable, it contains a conserved region, Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg, that shows similarity to the active-site Gly-Pro-Cys-Arg sequence of inter-alpha-trypsin and trypstatin proteinase inhibitors. The purpose of the present work was to identify proteinases recognizing substrates with basic amino acids in the P1 substrate site that are present in MOLT-4 cells, a human CD4-positive T helper lymphocyte cell line, and to characterize these enzymes in terms of substrate, pH and ionic-strength preferences, size and susceptibility to various inhibitors, including 24- and 36-amino-acid-long V3 loop peptides. Extraction of MOLT-4 cells at low ionic strength solubilized nearly all of the trypsin-like activity, which was separable into five peaks of activity by chromatography on Mono-Q: Peaks 1, 2a, 2b, 3 and 4. All showed a neutral pH optimum, and all except Peak 4 showed optimal activity at high ionic strength. Peak 1 preferred Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg, p-nitroanilide (-pNA) substrate; Peaks 2-4 preferred benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-Gly-Arg-pNA. Peak 1, a zinc-dependent enzyme with serine and histidine in the active site, exhibited an M(r) of 75,000 on Superose 12 and was poorly inhibited by V3 loop peptides. Peak 2 contained two overlapping peaks, called 2a and 2b, that exhibited properties of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases. Gel filtration of Peak 2 activities revealed a major peak of activity at 81 kDa and a shoulder centred at 240 kDa. Each was modestly inhibited by V3 loop peptides. Peak 3, a zinc-dependent proteinase, exhibited a molecular mass of 100 kDa by gel filtration and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by V3 loop peptides. Peak 4 exhibited a molecular mass of 1100 kDa by gel filtration and was not inhibited by V3 loop peptides. None of these enzymes could be classified as mast-cell tryptase

  4. Role of zona pellucida glycoproteins during fertilization in humans.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, scientific investigations pertaining to the role of zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins during fertilization in humans have led to new insights. This has been achieved using purified native/recombinant human zona proteins and transgenic mice expressing human ZP glycoproteins. The proposed model in mice of ZP glycoprotein-3 (ZP3) acting as primary sperm receptor and ZP glycoprotein-2 (ZP2) as secondary sperm receptor has been modified for sperm-egg binding in humans. ZP glycoprotein-1 (ZP1), ZP3, and ZP glycoprotein-4 (ZP4) have been shown to bind to the capacitated human sperm. ZP2 binds to the acrosome-reacted human spermatozoa. Further, the eggs obtained from transgenic mice expressing human ZP2 alone or in conjunction with other human instead of mouse zona proteins showed binding of human sperm, suggesting that ZP2 might also play a role in sperm-egg binding. This function has been mapped to a domain corresponding to amino acid residues 51-144 of ZP2. In contrast to mice, where ZP3 is the primary agonist for inducing the acrosome reaction, in humans, the acrosome reaction can be mediated by ZP1, ZP3, and ZP4. The effect of mutations in the genes encoding zona proteins on the ZP morphology and infertility has not been established. Further, the role of autoantibodies against ZP in women with 'unexplained infertility' leading to poor outcome of in vitro fertilization is currently controversial and needs further investigations. Understanding the role of ZP glycoproteins during human fertilization facilitates the development of new contraceptives and strategies to overcome the problem of infertility.

  5. Spectroscopic Investigation on the Primary Photoreaction of Bathy Phytochrome Agp2-Pr of Agrobacterium fabrum: Isomerization in a pH-dependent H-bond Network.

    PubMed

    Singer, Patrick; Wörner, Sybille; Lamparter, Tilman; Diller, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    Bathy phytochrome Agp2 from Agrobacterium fabrum exhibits an unusually low pKa =7.6 in the Pr state in contrast to a pKa >11 in the Pfr state, indicating a pH-dependent charge distribution and H-bond network in the Pr chromophore binding pocket around neutral pH. Here, we report on ultrafast UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy of the primary Pr photoisomerization of Agp2 at pH 6 and pH 9 and upon H2 O/D2 O buffer exchange. The triexponential Pr kinetics slows down at increased pH and pronounced pH-dependent kinetic isotope effects are observed. The results on the Pr photoreaction suggest: 1) component-wise hindered dynamics on the chromophore excited-state potential energy surface at high pH and 2) proton translocation processes either via single-proton transfer or via significant reorganization of H-bond networks. Both effects reflect the interplay between the pH-dependent charge distribution in the Pr chromophore binding pocket on the one hand and chromophore excitation and its Z→E isomerization on the other hand. PMID:27075723

  6. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  7. Alpha-2-glycoprotein 1(AZGP1) regulates biological behaviors of LoVo cells by down-regulating mTOR signaling pathway and endogenous fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ligong; Tian, Xiaoqiang; Lu, Yinghui; Jia, Min; Wu, Peng; Huang, Peilin

    2014-01-01

    AZGP1 is a multifaceted protein associated with lipid mobilization, a process that is regulated by FASN and other metabolic pathways such as mTOR signaling. The active mTOR signaling pathway has been found to be involved in a variety of tumors. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the regulation of AZGP1 and FASN. An AZGP1-expressing plasmid was transfected into a human colorectal cancer cell line (LoVo) with a low expression of AZGP1. The expression of AZGP1, FASN, eIF4E, p-mTOR, p-S6,and S6K1 were measured by Western blot analysis, and target genes were detected by RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was studied using the MTT and colony formation assays. The analysis of apoptosis and the cell cycle phase were assessed by flow cytometry. The capacity of cell migration was investigated using the transwell migration assay. We found that the expression of AZGP1 was up-regulated while the expression of FASN, eIF4E, p-mTOR, p-S6, and S6K1 were down-regulated in LoVo cells after AZGP1 was expressed. The proliferation of malignant cells was reduced in AZGP1-overexpression cells, which is consistent with an increased in the G2-arrest and apoptosis rate. Furthermore, the migration of AZGP1-overexpression cells was decreased. The overexpression of AZGP1 suppressed the activation of the mTOR pathway and endogenous FASN-regulated fatty acid synthesis, mitigating the malignant phenotype of LoVo cells. Herein, we provide evidence that AZGP1 may constitute a novel tumor suppressor for LoVo colorectal cancer cells.

  8. Salivary Mucin 19 Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Culp, David J.; Robinson, Bently; Cash, Melanie N.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Saliva functions in innate immunity of the oral cavity, protecting against demineralization of teeth (i.e. dental caries), a highly prevalent infectious disease associated with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen also linked to endocarditis and atheromatous plaques. Gel-forming mucins are a major constituent of saliva. Because Muc19 is the dominant salivary gel-forming mucin in mice, we studied Muc19−/− mice for changes in innate immune functions of saliva in interactions with S. mutans. When challenged with S. mutans and a cariogenic diet, total smooth and sulcal surface lesions are more than 2- and 1.6-fold higher in Muc19−/− mice compared with wild type, whereas the severity of lesions are up to 6- and 10-fold higher, respectively. Furthermore, the oral microbiota of Muc19−/− mice display higher levels of indigenous streptococci. Results emphasize the importance of a single salivary constituent in the innate immune functions of saliva. In vitro studies of S. mutans and Muc19 interactions (i.e. adherence, aggregation, and biofilm formation) demonstrate Muc19 poorly aggregates S. mutans. Nonetheless, aggregation is enhanced upon adding Muc19 to saliva from Muc19−/− mice, indicating Muc19 assists in bacterial clearance through formation of heterotypic complexes with salivary constituents that bind S. mutans, thus representing a novel innate immune function for salivary gel-forming mucins. In humans, expression of salivary MUC19 is unclear. We find MUC19 transcripts in salivary glands of seven subjects and demonstrate MUC19 glycoproteins in glandular mucous cells and saliva. Similarities and differences between mice and humans in the expression and functions of salivary gel-forming mucins are discussed. PMID:25512380

  9. Histochemical and structural analysis of mucous glycoprotein secreted by the gill of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Hae-Young.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were carried out to characterized various mucous cells in the gill filament, to ascertain structural characteristics of the secreted mucous glycoproteins, and to determine the ability of the gill epithelium to incorporate ({sup 14}C)glucosamine as a precursor in the biosynthesis and secretion of mucous glycoproteins. Using histochemical staining techniques, mucous cells containing neutral and acidic mucins were found in the lateral region, whereas mucous cells containing primarily neutral or sulfated mucins were found in the postlateral region. Serotonin, but not dopamine, stimulated the mucous secretion. In tissues pretreated with ({sup 14}C)glucosamine, the secreted glycoproteins contain incorporated radiolabel. Analysis by column chromatography using Bio-Gel P-2 and P-6 shows that the secretion contains two glycoprotein populations. Glycoprotein II has a molecular weight of 2.3 {times} 10{sup 4} daltons. Upon alkaline reductive borohydride cleavage of the O-glycosidic linkages of glycoprotein I, about 70% of the radiolabel was removed from the protein. Gas chromatographic analysis of the carbohydrate composition shows that the glycoproteins contains N-acetylglucosamine (GluNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), and galactose, fucose and mannose. Amino acid analysis shows that the glycoproteins are rich in serine, threonine and proline.

  10. Arenavirus Stable Signal Peptide Is the Keystone Subunit for Glycoprotein Complex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bederka, Lydia H.; Bonhomme, Cyrille J.; Ling, Emily L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rodent arenavirus glycoprotein complex encodes a stable signal peptide (SSP) that is an essential structural component of mature virions. The SSP, GP1, and GP2 subunits of the trimeric glycoprotein complex noncovalently interact to stud the surface of virions and initiate arenavirus infectivity. Nascent glycoprotein production undergoes two proteolytic cleavage events: first within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cleave SSP from the remaining precursor GP1/2 (glycoprotein complex [GPC]) glycoprotein and second within the Golgi stacks by the cellular SKI-1/S1P for GP1/2 processing to yield GP1 and GP2 subunits. Cleaved SSP is not degraded but retained as an essential glycoprotein subunit. Here, we defined functions of the 58-amino-acid lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) SSP in regard to glycoprotein complex processing and maturation. Using molecular biology techniques, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, we detected SSP at the plasma membrane of transfected cells. Further, we identified a sorting signal (FLLL) near the carboxyl terminus of SSP that is required for glycoprotein maturation and trafficking. In the absence of SSP, the glycoprotein accumulated within the ER and was unable to undergo processing by SKI-1/S1P. Mutation of this highly conserved FLLL motif showed impaired glycoprotein processing and secretory pathway trafficking, as well as defective surface expression and pH-dependent membrane fusion. Immunoprecipitation of SSP confirmed an interaction between the signal peptide and the GP2 subunit; however, mutations within this FLLL motif disrupted the association of the GP1 subunit with the remaining glycoprotein complex. PMID:25352624

  11. Glycoprotein secretion in a tracheal organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Warunek, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein secretion in the rat trachea was studied in vitro, utilizing a modified, matrix embed/perfusion chamber. Baseline parameters of the culture environment were determined by enzymatic and biochemical procedures. The effect of pilocarpine on the release of labelled glycoproteins from the tracheal epithelium was assessed. After a single stimulation with the drug, there was a significant increase in the release of /sup 14/C-glucosamine and /sup 3/H-fucose-labelled glycoprotein. The response was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after a second exposure to pilocarpine. However, no dose response was observed. Morphological analyses of the tracheal epithelial secretory cells by Alcian Blue/Periodic Acid Schiff staining showed a significant decrease in the total number of Alcian Blue staining cells and an increase in the mixed cell population after a single exposure to pilocarpine. Second stimulation with the drug showed that the trachea was able to respond again, this time with a further decrease in the number of Alcian Blue staining cells and a decrease in the PAS staining cells as well. Carbohydrate analyses after the first simulation with pilocarpine showed increased levels of N-acetyl neuraminic acid and the neutral carbohydrates, fucose and galactose, in the precipitated glycoproteins.

  12. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  13. Differential mode of interaction of ThioflavinT with native β structural motif in human α 1-acid glycoprotein and cross beta sheet of its amyloid: Biophysical and molecular docking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Nusrat, Saima; Alam, Parvez; Zaidi, Nida; Badr, Gamal; Mahmoud, Mohamed H.; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-08-01

    The present study details the interaction mechanism of Thioflavin T (ThT) to Human α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) applying various spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant in the order of 104 M-1 and the standard Gibbs free energy change value, ΔG = -6.78 kcal mol-1 for the interaction between ThT and AAG indicating process is spontaneous. There is increase in absorbance of AAG upon the interaction of ThT that may be due to ground state complex formation between ThT and AAG. ThT impelled rise in β-sheet structure in AAG as observed from far-UV CD spectra while there are minimal changes in tertiary structure of the protein. DLS results suggested the reduction in AAG molecular size, ligand entry into the central binding pocket of AAG may have persuaded the molecular compaction in AAG. Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) results showed the interaction process to be endothermic with the values of standard enthalpy change ΔH0 = 4.11 kcal mol-1 and entropy change TΔS0 = 10.82 kcal.mol- 1. Moreover, docking results suggested hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding played the important role in the binding process of ThT with F1S and A forms of AAG. ThT fluorescence emission at 485 nm was measured for properly folded native form and for thermally induced amyloid state of AAG. ThT fluorescence with native AAG was very low, while on the other hand with amyloid induced state of the protein AAG showed a positive emission peak at 485 nm upon the excitation at 440 nm, although it binds to native state as well. These results confirmed that ThT binding alone is not responsible for enhancement of ThT fluorescence but it also required beta stacked sheet structure found in protein amyloid to give proper signature signal for amyloid. This study gives the mechanistic insight into the differential interaction of ThT with beta structures found in native state of the proteins and amyloid forms, this study reinforce

  14. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  15. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  16. Square-wave voltammetry assays for glycoproteins on nanoporous gold

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Binod; Bhattarai, Jay K.; Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Fujikawa, Kohki; Catania, Rosa; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Stine, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assays (ELLA) were developed using nanoporous gold (NPG) as a solid support for protein immobilization and as an electrode for the electrochemical determination of the product of the reaction between alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and p-aminophenyl phosphate (p-APP), which is p-aminophenol (p-AP). Glycoproteins or concanavalin A (Con A) and ALP conjugates were covalently immobilized onto lipoic acid self-assembled monolayers on NPG. The binding of Con A – ALP (or soybean agglutinin – ALP) conjugate to glycoproteins covalently immobilized on NPG and subsequent incubation with p-APP substrate was found to result in square-wave voltammograms whose peak difference current varied with the identity of the glycoprotein. NPG presenting covalently bound glycoproteins was used as the basis for a competitive electrochemical assay for glycoproteins in solution (transferrin and IgG). A kinetic ELLA based on steric hindrance of the enzyme-substrate reaction and hence reduced enzymatic reaction rate after glycoprotein binding is demonstrated using immobilized Con A–ALP conjugates. Using the immobilized Con A-ALP conjugate, the binding affinity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be 105 nM, and that for transferrin was found to be 650 nM. Minimal interference was observed in the presence of 5 mg mL−1 BSA as a model serum protein in both the kinetic and competitive ELLA. Inhibition studies were performed with methyl D-mannoside for the binding of TSF and IgG to Con A-ALP; IC50 values were found to be 90 μM and 286 μM, respectively. Surface coverages of proteins were estimated using solution depletion and the BCA protein concentration assay. PMID:24611035

  17. The Crystal Structures of the N-terminal Photosensory Core Module of Agrobacterium Phytochrome Agp1 as Parallel and Anti-parallel Dimers.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Soshichiro; Scheerer, Patrick; Zubow, Kristina; Michael, Norbert; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman; Krauß, Norbert

    2016-09-23

    Agp1 is a canonical biliverdin-binding bacteriophytochrome from the soil bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum that acts as a light-regulated histidine kinase. Crystal structures of the photosensory core modules (PCMs) of homologous phytochromes have provided a consistent picture of the structural changes that these proteins undergo during photoconversion between the parent red light-absorbing state (Pr) and the far-red light-absorbing state (Pfr). These changes include secondary structure rearrangements in the so-called tongue of the phytochrome-specific (PHY) domain and structural rearrangements within the long α-helix that connects the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and FhlA (GAF) and the PHY domains. We present the crystal structures of the PCM of Agp1 at 2.70 Å resolution and of a surface-engineered mutant of this PCM at 1.85 Å resolution in the dark-adapted Pr states. Whereas in the mutant structure the dimer subunits are in anti-parallel orientation, the wild-type structure contains parallel subunits. The relative orientations between the PAS-GAF bidomain and the PHY domain are different in the two structures, due to movement involving two hinge regions in the GAF-PHY connecting α-helix and the tongue, indicating pronounced structural flexibility that may give rise to a dynamic Pr state. The resolution of the mutant structure enabled us to detect a sterically strained conformation of the chromophore at ring A that we attribute to the tight interaction with Pro-461 of the conserved PRXSF motif in the tongue. Based on this observation and on data from mutants where residues in the tongue region were replaced by alanine, we discuss the crucial roles of those residues in Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion. PMID:27466363

  18. Pre-staining of glycoprotein in SDS-PAGE by the synthesis of a new hydrazide derivative.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ayi; Zhou, Tieli; Yu, Dongdong; Shen, Yingjie; Shen, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jin, Litai; Zhang, Huajie; Wang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a new hydrazide derivative (UGF202) was synthesized and introduced as a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probe to pre-stain glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE. As low as 0.5-1 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein, avidin) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 300 stain, one of the most sensitive and commonly used glycoprotein staining kit. In addition, the specificity of the newly developed method was confirmed by the study of de-glycosylation, glycoproteins affinity enrichment and LC-MS/MS, respectively. According to the results, it is concluded that UGF202 pre-stain can provide an alternative for the visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins. PMID:26256282

  19. Pre-staining of glycoprotein in SDS-PAGE by the synthesis of a new hydrazide derivative.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ayi; Zhou, Tieli; Yu, Dongdong; Shen, Yingjie; Shen, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jin, Litai; Zhang, Huajie; Wang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a new hydrazide derivative (UGF202) was synthesized and introduced as a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probe to pre-stain glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE. As low as 0.5-1 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein, avidin) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 300 stain, one of the most sensitive and commonly used glycoprotein staining kit. In addition, the specificity of the newly developed method was confirmed by the study of de-glycosylation, glycoproteins affinity enrichment and LC-MS/MS, respectively. According to the results, it is concluded that UGF202 pre-stain can provide an alternative for the visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins.

  20. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  1. [Purification and analysis of Cimicifuga foetida glycoprotein ( CF- I )].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-jun; Chen, Yan; Song, Zhi-yin; Zhou, Dong-wen

    2007-02-01

    A kind of glycoprotein ( CF- I ) was extracted from Cimicifuga foetida and purified by DEAE-Cellulose ( DEAE-52) and Sepharose CL-4B. It was identified to be homogeneous glycoprotein complex by electrophoresis and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). alpha-glucosidic bond was detrermined by IR. Typical absorption of polysaccharide was shown in its IR spectrum. It had no typical absorption of nucleic acid or pigment by UV scanning. Glucose, galactose, mannose and arabinose were identified in CF- I with the molar ratio of 11. 94: 2. 18: 1. 38: 1 by GC. Its average MW was estimated to be 5. 8 x 10' by gel filtration. The content of total saccharide, protein and acid polysaccharide was 78% , 14. 4% and 23% respectively. It might be composed of 1-->4 and 1-->6 linked glucopyranose by periodate oxidation and Smith degration.

  2. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  3. Isolation and characterization of glycoproteins from canine tracheal pouch secretions.

    PubMed

    Liao, T H; Blumenfeld, O O; Park, S S

    1979-04-25

    Canine tracheal pouch secretions were solubilized with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate and visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Intact mucus, and water-soluble and insoluble fractions of mucus were shown to be composed of high molecular weight glycoproteins (Mr greater than or equal to 3 . 10(6)) and three major classes of proteins of lower molecular weight (Mr approximately 4 . 10(5), 2 . 10(5), and 6 . 10(4)). When the mucus secretions were further treated with a reducing agent, the glycoproteins were dissociated into subunits which appeared on the gel as three discrete bands. Separation of the high molecular weight glycoproteins from the other proteins was achieved by gel filtration on Biogel A-15m in the presence of 1% dodecyl sulfate following reduction and alkylation of mucus. These glycoproteins were further resolved, using DEAE cellulose chromatography in the presence of 6 M urea, into two protein fractions. Both fractions contained approximately 87% carbohydrate, high amounts of serine and threonine but differed significantly in contents of N-acetyl glucosamine and sialic acid; their mobility on gel electrophoresis was also different. Significant contents of cysteine were noted in both fractions. Results of this study indicate that the canine tracheal pouch preparations provide normal tracheal secretions which bear similarity in structure to the tracheobronchial secretions obtained from human patients. PMID:454656

  4. Investigation of binding mechanism of novel 8-substituted coumarin derivatives with human serum albumin and α-1-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yeggoni, Daniel Pushpa Raju; Manidhar, Darla Mark; Suresh Reddy, Cirandur; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2016-09-01

    Coumarin molecules have biological activities possessing lipid-controlling activity, anti-hepatitis C activity, anti-diabetic, anti-Parkinson activity, and anti-cancer activity. Here, we have presented an inclusive study on the interaction of 8-substituted-7-hydroxy coumarin derivatives (Umb-1/Umb-2) with α-1-glycoprotein (AGP) and human serum albumin (HSA) which are the major carrier proteins in the human blood plasma. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence emission data were found to be KUmb-1=3.1 ± .01 × 10(4) M(-1), KUmb-2 = 7 ± .01 × 10(4) M(-1), which corresponds to -6.1 and -6.5 kcal/mol of free energy for Umb-1 and Umb-2, respectively, suggesting that these derivatives bind strongly to HSA. Also these molecules bind to AGP with binding constants of KUmb-1-AGP=3.1 ± .01 × 10(3) M(-1) and KUmb-2-AGP = 4.6 ± .01 × 10(3) M(-1). Further, the distance, r between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (Umb-1/Umb-2) was calculated based on the Forster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer and the values were observed to be 1.14 and 1.29 nm in Umb-1-HSA and Umb-2-HSA system, respectively. The protein secondary structure of HSA was partially unfolded upon binding of Umb-1 and Umb-2. Furthermore, site displacement experiments with lidocaine, phenylbutazone (IIA), and ibuprofen (IIIA) proves that Umb derivatives significantly bind to subdomain IIIA of HSA which is further supported by docking studies. Furthermore, Umb-1 binds to LYS402 with one hydrogen bond distance of 2.8 Å and Umb-2 binds to GLU354 with one hydrogen bond at a distance of 2.0 Å. Moreover, these molecules are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups of carbon-3 of coumarin derivatives.

  5. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  6. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  7. Preparation of Concanavalin A-Chelating Magnetic Nanoparticles for Selective Enrichment of Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liping; Feng, Shun; Li, Shanshan; Song, Peipei; Wang, Jide

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a soft and nondestructive approach was developed to prepare concanavalin A-chelating magnetic nanoparticles (Con A-MNPs) for selective enrichment of glycoproteins. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid-modified-MNPs (EDTA-MNPs) were prepared by a one-pot chemical coprecipitation method first, and then, Cu(II) cations were used as bridge groups to immobilize Con A on EDTA-MNPs. The as-prepared absorbents with a mean diameter of 15 nm showed a strong magnetic response to an externally applied magnetic field. The results of thermogravimetric analysis showed the content of immobilized Con A was up to 28 wt %. For glycoprotein ovalbumin, the maximum capacity and equilibrium constant were 72.41 mg/g and 0.6035 L/mg, respectively. The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibited a remarkable selectivity for glycoproteins and can enrich glycoproteins specifically from a mixture of glycoprotein and nonglycoprotein even at a molar ratio of 1:600. It was also successfully applied for the enrichment of glycoproteins from real egg white samples. We expect that our finding will serve as a helpful template for others to design new adsorbents for enriching glycoproteins.

  8. Preparation of biointeractive glycoprotein-conjugated hydrogels through metabolic oligosacchalide engineering.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Matsunaga, Aki; Fujii, Shuetsu

    2014-09-17

    In the current study, synthetic hydrogels containing metabolically engineered glycoproteins of mammalian cells were prepared for the first time and selectin-mediated cell adhesion on the hydrogel was demonstrated. A culture of HL-60 cells was supplemented with an appropriate volume of aqueous solution of N-methacryloyl mannosamine (ManMA) to give a final concentration of 5 mM. The cells were then incubated for 3 days to deliver methacryloyl groups to the glycoproteins of the cells. A transparent hydrogel was formed via redox radical polymerization of methacryloyl functionalized glycoproteins with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and a cross-linker. Conjugation of the glycoproteins into the hydrogel was determined using Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. The surface density of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on the hydrogels was also detected using gold-colloid-labeled immunoassay. Finally, selectin-mediated cell adhesion on hydrogels containing glycoproteins was demonstrated. Selectin-mediated cell adhesion is considered an essential step in the progression of various diseases; therefore, hydrogels having glycoproteins could be useful in therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  9. Structure and Function of RSV Surface Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Jason S.; Ray, William C.; Peeples, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The two major glycoproteins on the surface of the RSV virion, the attachment glycoprotein (G) and the fusion (F) glycoprotein, control the initial phases of infection. G targets the ciliated cells of the airways, and F causes the virion membrane to fuse with a target cell membrane. The F protein is the major target for antiviral drug development, and both G and F glycoproteins are the antigens targeted by neutralizing antibodies induced by infection. In this chapter we review the structure and function of the RSV surface glycoproteins, including recent X-ray crystallographic data of the F glycoprotein in its pre- and postfusion conformations, and discuss how this information informs antigen selection and vaccine development. PMID:24362685

  10. Effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, P.M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-25

    Influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. To determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, (5,6-TH)fucose and (1- UC)mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the ( UC)mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the ( UC)mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the (TH)fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the ( UC)mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure.

  11. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  12. Functional roles of membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; McGregor, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are mediated by a number of membrane glycoproteins. On the basis of structural homologies, several families of cell adhesion molecules (integrins, selectins, immunoglobulins, cadherins, leucine-rich glycoproteins) have been established. Since 1991, a new family of CD36-like proteins has been identified. CD36 is a cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a large variety of ligands. CD36 has been implicated in thrombosis, vascular biology, lipid metabolism and atherogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize our present knowledge on this important, multifunctional glycoprotein. PMID:21043590

  13. Immunogenicity in mice of human metapneumovirus with a truncated SH glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, A B; Fenwick, F; Robinson, M J; Toms, G L

    2014-04-01

    The SH glycoprotein of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is twice the size of that of human respiratory syncytial virus and possesses a large, hydrophilic luminal domain. The glycoprotein is located on the surface of the virion and of virus infected cells and, if immunogenic, might be expected to play a role in anti-viral immunity. Initial attempts to study anti-SH antibody immunogenicity were thwarted by the instability of the SH gene on passage both in human bronchial epithelial cells and in mice. Repeated passage of virus isolates in human bronchial epithelial cells in culture resulted in the appearance and eventual predominance of HMPV mutants lacking all or most of the luminal domain of SH coincidental with the loss of productive infection in mouse lungs. Where infection was established in mice with an early cell culture passage, the virus recovered from mouse lung differed markedly from the inoculum, carrying 19 coding mutations in the SH luminal domain. Immunization of mice with a mutant virus variant expressing only 14 amino acids of the luminal domain of SH induced a cross-reactive antibody response to both the F glycoprotein and the SH glycoprotein but a largely sub-group specific response to the G glycoprotein. Similar patterns of response were achieved by immunization with individual HMPV glycoproteins expressed from recombinant vaccinia viruses. Recombinant truncated SH glycoprotein induced sub-group cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing wild-type virus. Recombinant F glycoprotein also induced cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies whilst recombinant G glycoprotein induced largely strain-specific, non-neutralizing antibodies.

  14. Lipid modification gives rise to two distinct Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein populations.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    The S-layer glycoprotein is the sole component of the protein shell surrounding Haloferax volcanii cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of the S-layer glycoprotein predicts the presence of a C-terminal membrane-spanning domain. However, several earlier observations, including the ability of EDTA to selectively solubilize the protein, are inconsistent with the presence of a trans-membrane sequence. In the present report, sequential solubilization of the S-layer glycoprotein by EDTA and then with detergent revealed the existence of two distinct populations of the S-layer glycoprotein. Whereas both S-layer glycoprotein populations underwent signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation, base hydrolysis followed by mass spectrometry revealed that a lipid, likely archaetidic acid, modified only the EDTA-solubilized version of the protein. These observations are consistent with the S-layer glycoprotein being initially synthesized as an integral membrane protein and subsequently undergoing a processing event in which the extracellular portion of the protein is separated from the membrane-spanning domain and transferred to a waiting lipid moiety.

  15. Identification of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein variant resistant to cold inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Aemro; Finzi, Andrés; Pancera, Marie; Courter, Joel R; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein trimer consists of gp120 and gp41 subunits and undergoes a series of conformational changes upon binding to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4, that promote virus entry. Surprisingly, we found that the envelope glycoproteins of some HIV-1 strains are functionally inactivated by prolonged incubation on ice. Serial exposure of HIV-1 to extremes of temperature, followed by expansion of replication-competent viruses, allowed selection of a temperature-resistant virus. The envelope glycoproteins of this virus resisted cold inactivation due to a single passage-associated change, H66N, in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Histidine 66 is located within the gp41-interactive inner domain of gp120 and, in other studies, has been shown to decrease the sampling of the CD4-bound conformation by unliganded gp120. Substituting asparagine or other amino acid residues for histidine 66 in cold-sensitive HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins resulted in cold-stable phenotypes. Cold inactivation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins occurred even at high pH, indicating that protonation of histidine 66 is not necessary for this process. Increased exposure of epitopes in the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein accompanied cold inactivation, but shedding of gp120 did not. An amino acid change in gp120 (S375W) that promotes the CD4-bound state or treatment with soluble CD4 or a small-molecule CD4 mimic resulted in increased cold sensitivity. These results indicate that the CD4-bound intermediate of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins is cold labile; avoiding the CD4-bound state increases temperature stability.

  16. Mutational analysis of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G for membrane fusion domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Drone, C; Sat, E; Ghosh, H P

    1993-07-01

    The spike glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) induces membrane fusion at low pH. We used linker insertion mutagenesis to characterize the domain(s) of G glycoprotein involved in low-pH-induced membrane fusion. Two or three amino acids were inserted in frame into various positions in the extracellular domain of G, and 14 mutants were isolated. All of the mutants expressed fully glycosylated proteins in COS cells. However, only seven mutant G glycoproteins were transported to the cell surface. Two of these mutants, D1 and A6, showed wild-type fusogenic properties. The mutant A2 had a temperature-sensitive defect in the transport of the mutant G glycoprotein to the cell surface. The other four mutants, H2, H5, H10, and A4, although present in cell surface, failed to induce cell fusion when cells expressing these mutant glycoproteins were exposed to acidic pH. These four mutant G proteins could form trimers, indicating that the defect in fusion was not due to defective oligomerization. One of these mutations, H2, is within a region of conserved, uncharged amino acids that has been proposed as a possible fusogenic sequence. The mutation in H5 was about 70 amino acids downstream of the mutation in H2, while mutations in H10 and A4 were about 300 amino acids downstream of the mutation in H2. Conserved sequences were also noted in the H10 and A4 segment. The results suggest that in the case of VSV G glycoprotein, the fusogenic activity may involve several spatially separated regions in the extracellular domain of the protein.

  17. A double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence sensing material for glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Yun, Yaguang; Hu, Yongjin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    A novel strategy was developed to prepare double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence material for highly specific enrichment and sensing of glycoprotein. The novel double responsive smart sensing material was synthesized by choosing Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as modal protein, the grapheme oxide (GO) as support material, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as fluorescence signal reporter, N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAAM) and 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as functional monomers. The structure and component of smart sensing material was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), respectively. These results illustrated the smart sensing material was prepared successfully. The recognition characterizations of smart sensing material were evaluated, and results showed that the fluorescence intensity of smart sensing material was reduced gradually, as the concentration of protein increased, and the smart sensing material showed selective recognition for HRP among other proteins. Furthermore, the recognition ability of the smart sensing material for glycoprotein was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Therefore, this strategy opens up new way to construct smart material for detection of glycoprotein. PMID:27236725

  18. Identification and expression of a human cytomegalovirus early glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C P; Vesole, D H; Nelson, J; Oldstone, M B; Stinski, M F

    1989-01-01

    A human cytomegalovirus early gene which possesses three temporally regulated promoters is located in the large unique component of the viral genome between 0.054 and 0.064 map units (C.-P. Chang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 63:281-290, 1989). This gene contains a major open reading frame (ORF) located 233 bases downstream of the cap site of an early unspliced RNA. The major ORF predicts a polypeptide of 17 kilodaltons (kDa) which contains a glycoproteinlike signal and anchor domains as well as potential N-glycosylation sites. Antisera were prepared against synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences within the major ORF. The antisera detected a viral glycoprotein of 48 kDa in infected cells and recognized the in vitro-translated 17-kDa protein early-gene product. The viral glycoprotein, designated gp48, was modified by N-linked glycans and possibly O-linked glycans. The synthesis of gp48 occurred in the absence of viral DNA replication but accumulated to the highest levels at late times after infection. Since gp48 was found in the virion, it is considered an early structural glycoprotein. Images PMID:2545908

  19. Glycoproteins That Exhibit Extensive Size Polymorphisms in Dictyostelium Discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E.; Gooley, A. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Williams, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Electrophoretic variants which arise from amino acid substitutions, leading to charge differences between proteins are ubiquitous and have been used extensively for genetic analysis. Less well documented are polymorphisms in the size of proteins. Here we report that a group of glycoproteins, which share a common carbohydrate epitope, vary in size in different isolates of the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum. One of these proteins, PsA, a developmentally regulated prespore-specific surface glycoprotein, has previously been shown to exist in three size forms due to allelic variation at the pspA locus on linkage group I. In this report, a second glycoprotein, PsB, which is also prespore specific but found inside prespore cells, is studied. PsB maps to linkage group II and exhibits at least four different sizes in the isolates examined. We propose that the size polymorphisms are the product of allelic variation at the pspB locus, due to differences in the number of repeat units. PMID:2731733

  20. A double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence sensing material for glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Yun, Yaguang; Hu, Yongjin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    A novel strategy was developed to prepare double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence material for highly specific enrichment and sensing of glycoprotein. The novel double responsive smart sensing material was synthesized by choosing Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as modal protein, the grapheme oxide (GO) as support material, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as fluorescence signal reporter, N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAAM) and 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as functional monomers. The structure and component of smart sensing material was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), respectively. These results illustrated the smart sensing material was prepared successfully. The recognition characterizations of smart sensing material were evaluated, and results showed that the fluorescence intensity of smart sensing material was reduced gradually, as the concentration of protein increased, and the smart sensing material showed selective recognition for HRP among other proteins. Furthermore, the recognition ability of the smart sensing material for glycoprotein was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Therefore, this strategy opens up new way to construct smart material for detection of glycoprotein.

  1. Clinical applications of bacterial glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Kelly M; Smith, Jeffrey C; Twine, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    There is an ongoing race between bacterial evolution and medical advances. Pathogens have the advantages of short generation times and horizontal gene transfer that enable rapid adaptation to new host environments and therapeutics that currently outpaces clinical research. Antibiotic resistance, the growing impact of nosocomial infections, cancer-causing bacteria, the risk of zoonosis, and the possibility of biowarfare all emphasize the increasingly urgent need for medical research focussed on bacterial pathogens. Bacterial glycoproteins are promising targets for alternative therapeutic intervention since they are often surface exposed, involved in host-pathogen interactions, required for virulence, and contain distinctive glycan structures. The potential exists to exploit these unique structures to improve clinical prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies. Translation of the potential in this field to actual clinical impact is an exciting prospect for fighting infectious diseases. PMID:26971465

  2. Benzoboroxole-functionalized magnetic core/shell microspheres for highly specific enrichment of glycoproteins under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Ma, Wanfu; Li, Dian; Yu, Meng; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun

    2014-04-01

    Efficient enrichment of specific glycoproteins from complex biological samples is of great importance towards the discovery of disease biomarkers in biological systems. Recently, phenylboronic acid-based functional materials have been widely used for enrichment of glycoproteins. However, such enrichment was mainly carried out under alkaline conditions, which is different to the status of glycoproteins in neutral physiological conditions and may cause some unpredictable degradation. In this study, on-demand neutral enrichment of glycoproteins from crude biological samples is accomplished by utilizing the reversible interaction between the cis-diols of glycoproteins and benzoboroxole-functionalized magnetic composite microspheres (Fe3O4/PAA-AOPB). The Fe3O4/PAA-AOPB composite microspheres are deliberately designed and constructed with a high-magnetic-response magnetic supraparticle (MSP) core and a crosslinked poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) shell anchoring abundant benzoboroxole functional groups on the surface. These nanocomposites possessed many merits, such as large enrichment capacity (93.9 mg/g, protein/beads), low non-specific adsorption, quick enrichment process (10 min) and magnetic separation speed (20 s), and high recovery efficiency. Furthermore, the as-prepared Fe3O4/PAA-AOPB microspheres display high selectivity to glycoproteins even in the E. coli lysate or fetal bovine serum, showing great potential in the identify of low-abundance glycoproteins as biomarkers in real complex biological systems for clinical diagnoses.

  3. Characterization of a pseudorabies virus glycoprotein gene with homology to herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 glycoprotein C.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, A K; Watson, R J; Whealy, M E; Hays, W W; Enquist, L W

    1986-01-01

    A pseudorabies virus (Becker strain) glycoprotein gene was located in the UL region at map position 0.40. The gene was identified by using open reading frame Escherichia coli plasmid expression vectors and specific antibody reagents. A 1.55-kilobase unspliced transcript from the gene was detected in pseudorabies virus-infected tissue culture cells. The DNA sequence revealed a single open reading frame of 1,437 base pairs encoding 479 amino acids. The predicted primary translation product has a molecular weight of 50,860 and contains features of a typical herpesvirus glycoprotein. An E. coli expression plasmid was constructed that contained essentially all of the open reading frame for this gene. Antibodies raised in rabbits against the protein expressed in bacteria by this plasmid immunoprecipitated pseudorabies virus-specific glycoproteins of 92,000 and 74,000 daltons from infected cell extracts. It is likely that these two forms represent different glycosylation states of the protein. Images PMID:3009851

  4. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the plant cell wall)

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the chemistry and architecture of plant cells walls, the extracellular matrices that taken together shape the plant and provide mechanical support for the plant. Cell walls are dynamic structures that regulate, or are the site of, many physiological processes, in addition to being the cells' first line of defense against invading pathogens. In the past year we have examined the role of the cell wall enzyme ascorbic acid oxidase as related to the structure of the wall and its possible interactions with hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the wall.

  5. Effects of natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitors on anticancer drug efflux transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Nabekura, Tomohiro; Hiroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Uwai, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein plays an important role in cancer chemotherapy. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play critical roles in development and progression of cancer. In this study, the effects of natural compounds that can inhibit NF-κB activation on the function of P-glycoprotein were investigated using human MDR1 gene-transfected KB/MDR1 cells. The accumulation of daunorubicin or rhodamine 123, fluorescent substrates of P-glycoprotein, in KB/MDR1 cells increased in the presence of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE), licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, lupeol, zerumbone, thymoquinone, emodin, and anethol had no effects. The ATPase activities of P-glycoprotein were stimulated by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated NF-κB activation was inhibited by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, and xanthohumol. KB/MDR1 cells were sensitized to vinblastine cytotoxicity by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol, showing that these natural NF-κB inhibitors reverse multidrug resistance. These results suggest that natural compounds, such as CAPE, licochalcone A, and anacardic acid, have dual inhibitory effects on the anticancer drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein and NF-κB activation, and may become useful to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Aspartic acid 413 is important for the normal allosteric functioning of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Woodbury, R.L.; Okita, T.W.

    1996-11-01

    As part of a structure-function analysis of the higher-plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP), we used a random mutagenesis approach in combination with a novel bacterial complementation system to isolate over 100 mutants that were defective in glycogen production. One mutant of the large subunit M27 was identified by its capacity to only partially complement a mutation in the structural gene for the bacterial AGP (glg C), as determined by its light-staining phenotype when cells were exposed to I{sub 2} vapors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzymatic pyrophosphorylysis assays of M27 cell extracts showed that the level of expression and AGP activity was comparable to those of cells that expressed the wildtype recombinant enzyme. Kinetic analysis indicated that the M27 AGP displays normal Michaelis constant values for the substrates glucose-1-phosphate and ATP but requires 6- to 10-fold greater levels of 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) than the wild-type recombinant enzyme for maximum activation. DNA sequence analysis showed that M27 contains a single point mutation that resulted in the replacement of aspartic acid 413 to alanine. Substitution of a lysine residue at this site almost completely abolished activation by 3-PGA. Aspartic acid 413 is adjacent to a lysine residue that was previously identified by chemical modification studies to be important in the binding of 3-PGA. The kinetic properties of M27 corroborate the importance of this region in the allosteric regulation of a higher-plant AGP. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Design and synthesis of human ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) inhibitors by peptide coupling of diverse chemical scaffolds on carboxyl and amino termini of (S)-valine-derived thiazole amino acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyakam; Prasad, Nagarajan Rajendra; Chufan, Eduardo E; Patel, Bhargav A; Wang, Yi-Jun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T

    2014-05-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) serves as a therapeutic target for the development of multidrug resistance reversal agents. In this study, we synthesized 21 novel compounds by peptide coupling at corresponding carboxyl and amino termini of (S)-valine-based bis-thiazole and monothiazole derivatives with diverse chemical scaffolds. Using calcein-AM efflux assay, we identified compound 28 (IC50 = 1.0 μM) carrying 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl and 2-aminobenzophenone groups, respectively, at the amino and carboxyl termini of the monothiazole zwitter-ion. Compound 28 inhibited the photolabeling of P-gp with [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin with IC50 = 0.75 μM and stimulated the basal ATP hydrolysis of P-gp in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 ATPase = 0.027 μM). Compound 28 at 3 μM reduced resistance in cytotoxicity assay to paclitaxel in P-gp-expressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cell lines. Biochemical and docking studies showed site-1 to be the preferable binding site for 28 within the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp.

  8. Design and synthesis of human ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) inhibitors by peptide coupling of diverse chemical scaffolds on carboxyl and amino termini of (S)-valine-derived thiazole amino acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyakam; Prasad, Nagarajan Rajendra; Chufan, Eduardo E; Patel, Bhargav A; Wang, Yi-Jun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T

    2014-05-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) serves as a therapeutic target for the development of multidrug resistance reversal agents. In this study, we synthesized 21 novel compounds by peptide coupling at corresponding carboxyl and amino termini of (S)-valine-based bis-thiazole and monothiazole derivatives with diverse chemical scaffolds. Using calcein-AM efflux assay, we identified compound 28 (IC50 = 1.0 μM) carrying 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl and 2-aminobenzophenone groups, respectively, at the amino and carboxyl termini of the monothiazole zwitter-ion. Compound 28 inhibited the photolabeling of P-gp with [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin with IC50 = 0.75 μM and stimulated the basal ATP hydrolysis of P-gp in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 ATPase = 0.027 μM). Compound 28 at 3 μM reduced resistance in cytotoxicity assay to paclitaxel in P-gp-expressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cell lines. Biochemical and docking studies showed site-1 to be the preferable binding site for 28 within the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp. PMID:24773054

  9. Chemical synthesis of intentionally misfolded homogeneous glycoprotein: a unique approach for the study of glycoprotein quality control.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Dedola, Simone; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2012-05-01

    Biosynthesis of glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum employs a quality control system, which discriminates and excludes misfolded malfunctional glycoproteins from a correctly folded one. As chemical tools to study the glycoprotein quality control system, we systematically synthesized misfolded homogeneous glycoproteins bearing a high-mannose type oligosaccharide via oxidative misfolding of a chemically synthesized homogeneous glycopeptide. The endoplasmic reticulum folding sensor enzyme, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT), recognizes a specific folding intermediate, which exhibits a molten globule-like hydrophobic nature.

  10. Identification of a glycoprotein produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    1999-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileocecum and colon in vitro. Two separate chromosomally encoded invasion loci (tia and tib) have been cloned from this strain. These loci direct nonadherent and noninvasive laboratory strains of E. coli to adhere to and invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane protein that is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes. TibA is synthesized as a 100-kDa precursor (preTibA) that must be modified for biological activity. Outer membranes of recombinant E. coli expressing TibA or preTibA were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted to nitrocellulose. The presence of glycoproteins was detected by oxidization of carbohydrates with periodate and labeling with hydrazide-conjugated digoxigenin. Only TibA could be detected as a glycoprotein. Complementation experiments with tib deletion mutants of ETEC strain H10407 demonstrate that the TibA glycoprotein is expressed in H10407, that the entire tib locus is required for TibA synthesis, and that TibA is the only glycoprotein produced by H10407. Protease treatment of intact H10407 cells removes the carbohydrates on TibA, suggesting that they are surface exposed. TibA shows homology with AIDA-I from diffuse-adhering E. coli and with pertactin precursor from Bordetella pertussis. Both pertactin and AIDA-I are members of the autotransporter family of outer membrane proteins and are afimbrial adhesins that play an important role in the virulence of these organisms. Analysis of the predicted TibA amino acid sequence indicates that TibA is also an autotransporter. Analysis of the tib locus DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame with similarity to RfaQ, a glycosyltransferase. The product of this tib locus open reading frame is proposed to be responsible for Tib

  11. Identification of a Glycoprotein Produced by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    1999-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileocecum and colon in vitro. Two separate chromosomally encoded invasion loci (tia and tib) have been cloned from this strain. These loci direct nonadherent and noninvasive laboratory strains of E. coli to adhere to and invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane protein that is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes. TibA is synthesized as a 100-kDa precursor (preTibA) that must be modified for biological activity. Outer membranes of recombinant E. coli expressing TibA or preTibA were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted to nitrocellulose. The presence of glycoproteins was detected by oxidization of carbohydrates with periodate and labeling with hydrazide-conjugated digoxigenin. Only TibA could be detected as a glycoprotein. Complementation experiments with tib deletion mutants of ETEC strain H10407 demonstrate that the TibA glycoprotein is expressed in H10407, that the entire tib locus is required for TibA synthesis, and that TibA is the only glycoprotein produced by H10407. Protease treatment of intact H10407 cells removes the carbohydrates on TibA, suggesting that they are surface exposed. TibA shows homology with AIDA-I from diffuse-adhering E. coli and with pertactin precursor from Bordetella pertussis. Both pertactin and AIDA-I are members of the autotransporter family of outer membrane proteins and are afimbrial adhesins that play an important role in the virulence of these organisms. Analysis of the predicted TibA amino acid sequence indicates that TibA is also an autotransporter. Analysis of the tib locus DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame with similarity to RfaQ, a glycosyltransferase. The product of this tib locus open reading frame is proposed to be responsible for Tib

  12. Platelet interaction with von Willebrand factor is enhanced by shear-induced clustering of glycoprotein Ibα

    PubMed Central

    Gitz, Eelo; Koopman, Charlotte D.; Giannas, Alèkos; Koekman, Cornelis A; van den Heuvel, Dave J.; Deckmyn, Hans; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Gerritsen, Hans C.; Urbanus, Rolf T.

    2013-01-01

    Initial platelet arrest at the exposed arterial vessel wall is mediated through glycoprotein Ibα binding to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor. This interaction occurs at sites of elevated shear force, and strengthens upon increasing hydrodynamic drag. The increased interaction requires shear-dependent exposure of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain, but the contribution of glycoprotein Ibα remains ill defined. We have previously found that glycoprotein Ibα forms clusters upon platelet cooling and hypothesized that such a property enhances the interaction with von Willebrand factor under physiological conditions. We analyzed the distribution of glycoprotein Ibα with Förster resonance energy transfer using time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Perfusion at a shear rate of 1,600 s−1 induced glycoprotein Ibα clusters on platelets adhered to von Willebrand factor, while clustering did not require von Willebrand factor contact at 10,000 s−1. Shear-induced clustering was reversible, not accompanied by granule release or αIIbβ3 activation and improved glycoprotein Ibα-dependent platelet interaction with von Willebrand factor. Clustering required glycoprotein Ibα translocation to lipid rafts and critically depended on arachidonic acid-mediated binding of 14-3-3ζ to its cytoplasmic tail. This newly identified mechanism emphasizes the ability of platelets to respond to mechanical force and provides new insights into how changes in hemodynamics influence arterial thrombus formation. PMID:23753027

  13. The hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum L. Properties of the mucin and of the glycoprotein component

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, S.; Jevons, F. R.

    1965-01-01

    1. The composition of the hypobranchial mucin from Buccinum undatum is reported. 2. The amino acid composition was determined; aspartic acid and glutamic acid contribute almost 24% of the total amino acids in the mucin. 3. Serine, threonine and alanine, in the proportions 2:1:1 respectively, were detected as N-terminal residues, implying the presence of at least four protein chains. 4. A glycoprotein component was isolated by phenol precipitation. 5. The glycoprotein contained 8% of neutral sugars comprising glucose, galactose, mannose and fucose, and 4·5% of hexosamine, comprising glucosamine and galactosamine in equal proportions. 6. A method is described for the preparation of glycopeptides from the glycoprotein. 7. The comparative biochemistry of the mucin is discussed. PMID:5881659

  14. The hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum L. Properties of the mucin and of the glycoprotein component.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S; Jevons, F R

    1965-12-01

    1. The composition of the hypobranchial mucin from Buccinum undatum is reported. 2. The amino acid composition was determined; aspartic acid and glutamic acid contribute almost 24% of the total amino acids in the mucin. 3. Serine, threonine and alanine, in the proportions 2:1:1 respectively, were detected as N-terminal residues, implying the presence of at least four protein chains. 4. A glycoprotein component was isolated by phenol precipitation. 5. The glycoprotein contained 8% of neutral sugars comprising glucose, galactose, mannose and fucose, and 4.5% of hexosamine, comprising glucosamine and galactosamine in equal proportions. 6. A method is described for the preparation of glycopeptides from the glycoprotein. 7. The comparative biochemistry of the mucin is discussed.

  15. Characterization of the rabbit homolog of human MUC1 glycoprotein isolated from bladder by affinity chromatography on immobilized jacalin.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, T; Xin, P; Buckley, M S; Erickson, D R; Bhavanandan, V P

    2000-07-01

    The urinary bladder is lined by transitional epithelium, the glycocalyx on the luminal surface has interesting properties and is implicated in protective functions. Glycoconjugates are major components of the glycocalyx, but their biochemical nature is not well understood. Previous studies on rabbit bladder indicated the presence of significant levels of sialoglycoproteins compared to glycosaminoglycans in the epithelium. In this study, rabbit explant cultures were radiolabeled by precursor sugars or amino acids and a major lectin-reactive glycoprotein of rabbit bladder mucosa was isolated by affinity chromatography on jacalin-agarose. The radiolabeled glycoprotein was purified to homogeneity by a second cycle on the lectin column, followed by gel filtration and density gradient centrifugation. The average molecular mass of the glycoprotein was estimated to be 245 kDa and 210 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, respectively. Its buoyant density was 1.40 g/ml, suggesting a carbohydrate content of approximately 50%. The percent distribution of glucosamine-derived tritium label in sialic acid, galactosamine, and glucosamine was 30, 52, and 18, respectively. The glycoprotein consisted entirely of small sialylated and neutral oligosaccharides O-glycosidically linked to serine and threonine residues. The same glycoprotein could be immunoprecipitated with an antibody against the carboxy terminal 17 amino acid peptide of human MUC1 mucin glycoprotein. This suggests that this mucin glycoprotein is the rabbit homolog of MUC1 glycoprotein, which has been previously established to be a component of human bladder urothelium and has been purified from human urine and biochemically characterized.

  16. Isolation and partial chemical characterization of a 64,000-dalton glycoprotein of human cytomegalovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.R.; Zaia, J.A.; Balce-Directo, L.; Ting, Y.P.

    1984-01-01

    A guanidinium chloride extract of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine- and (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled virions plus dense bodies of human cytomegalovirus (Towne) was separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the eluate revealed the major peak to be a glycoprotein with a relative mass of 64,000. This glycoprotein (HCMVgp64) was characterized by amino acid analysis and a high-pressure liquid chromatographic map of its tryptic peptides.

  17. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrell, M.F.; Nauss, J.M.; Donohue, T.M. Jr.; Tuma, D.J.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on protein and glycoprotein synthesis and secretion were studied in rat liver slices. Liver slices from rats fed ethanol for 4-5 wk showed a decreased ability to incorporate (/sup 14/C)glucosamine into medium trichloracetic acid-precipitable proteins when compared to the pair-fed controls; however, the labeling of hepatocellular glycoproteins was unaffected by chronic ethanol treatment. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled secretory (serum) glycoproteins with antiserum against rat serum proteins showed a similar marked inhibition in the appearance of glucosamine-labeled proteins in the medium of slices from ethanol-fed rats. Minimal effects, however, were noted in the labeling of intracellular secretory glycoproteins. Protein synthesis, as determined by measuring (/sup 14/C)leucine incorporation into medium and liver proteins, was decreased in liver slices from ethanol-fed rats as compared to the pair-fed controls. This was the case for both total proteins as well as immunoprecipitable secretory proteins, although the labeling of secretory proteins retained in the liver slices was reduced to a lesser extent than total radiolabeled hepatic proteins. When the terminal sugar, (/sup 14/C)fucose, was employed as a precursor in order to more closely focus on the final steps of hepatic glycoprotein secretion, liver slices obtained from chronic ethanol-fed rats exhibited impaired secretion of fucose-labeled proteins into the medium. When ethanol (5 or 10 mM) was added to the incubation medium containing liver slices from the ethanol-fed rats, the alterations in protein and glycoprotein synthesis and secretion caused by the chronic ethanol treatment were further potentiated. The results of this study indicate that liver slices prepared from chronic ethanol-fed rats exhibit both impaired synthesis and secretion of proteins and glycoproteins, and these defects are further potentiated by acute ethanol administration.

  18. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi; Mori, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-23

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER.

  19. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ–ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ–ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER. PMID:26572623

  20. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers.

  1. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  2. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  3. Binding partners for the myelin-associated glycoprotein of N2A neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Kelm, S

    1999-02-01

    The myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) has been proposed to be important for the integrity of myelinated axons. For a better understanding of the interactions involved in the binding of MAG to neuronal axons, we performed this study to identify the binding partners for MAG on neuronal cells. Experiments with glycosylation inhibitors revealed that sialylated N-glycans of glycoproteins represent the major binding sites for MAG on the neuroblastoma cell line N2A. From extracts of [3H]glucosamine-labelled N2A cells several glycoproteins with molecular weights between 20 and 230 kDa were affinity-precipitated using immobilised MAG. The interactions of these proteins with MAG were sialic acid-dependent and specific for MAG. PMID:10037148

  4. Confident assignment of site-specific glycosylation in complex glycoproteins in a single step.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Kshitij; Staples, Gregory O; Leymarie, Nancy; Leon, Deborah R; Turiák, Lilla; Huang, Yu; Yip, Shun; Hu, Han; Heckendorf, Christian F; Zaia, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    A glycoprotein may contain several sites of glycosylation, each of which is heterogeneous. As a consequence of glycoform diversity and signal suppression from nonglycosylated peptides that ionize more efficiently, typical reversed-phase LC-MS and bottom-up proteomics database searching workflows do not perform well for identification of site-specific glycosylation for complex glycoproteins. We present an LC-MS system for enrichment, separation, and analysis of glycopeptides from complex glycoproteins (>4 N-glycosylation sequons) in a single step. This system uses an online HILIC enrichment trap prior to reversed-phase C18-MS analysis. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the system using a set of glycoproteins including human transferrin (2 sequons), human alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (5 sequons), and influenza A virus hemagglutinin (9 sequons). The online enrichment renders glycopeptides the most abundant ions detected, thereby facilitating the generation of high-quality data-dependent tandem mass spectra. The tandem mass spectra exhibited product ions from both glycan and peptide backbone dissociation for a majority of the glycopeptides tested using collisionally activated dissociation that served to confidently assign site-specific glycosylation. We demonstrated the value of our system to define site-specific glycosylation using a hemagglutinin containing 9 N-glycosylation sequons from a single HILIC-C18-MS acquisition.

  5. Recognition of glycoprotein peroxidase via Con A-carrying self-assembly layer on gold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Songqin; Wang, Kewei; Du, Dan; Sun, Yueming; He, Lin

    2007-07-01

    We have successfully fabricated a self-assembled layer of concanavalin A (Con A) on a gold surface for recognition of glycoproteins. The type IV Con A is covalently bound to 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on gold with a 2-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboximido)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium tetrafluoroborate (TNTU) linkage. The binding interaction between glycoproteins and self-assembled Con A is studied using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model glycoprotein. Voltammetric, electrochemical impedance studies, and photometric activity measurements show the presence of both specific and nonspecific bindings of HRP to the Con A interface. The specific binding is attributed to the Con A-sugar interaction where Con A selectively recognizes the glycosylation sites of HRP. The catalytic current of the HRP-loaded electrode, because of catalytic oxidation of thionine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), is found to be proportional to the HRP concentrations in the incubation solution. A linear correlation coefficient of 0.993 was obtained over a wide HRP concentration range of 12.5 microg/mL to 1 mg/mL. The approach described in this study provides a simple yet selective means to immobilize glycoproteins on a solid support. The specific binding achieved is desirable in biosensor fabrication, glycoprotein separation, recognition, and purification as well as in drug-releasing systems.

  6. Envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: profound influences on immune functions.

    PubMed Central

    Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1996-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) leads to progressive destruction of the CD4+ T-cell subset, resulting in immune deficiency and AIDS. The specific binding of the viral external envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, gp120, to the CD4 molecules initiates viral entry. In the past few years, several studies have indicated that the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with cells and molecules of the immune system leads to pleiotropic biological effects on immune functions, which include effects on differentiation of CD34+ lymphoid progenitor cells and thymocytes, aberrant activation and cytokine secretion patterns of mature T cells, induction of apoptosis, B-cell hyperactivity, inhibition of T-cell dependent B-cell differentiation, modulation of macrophage functions, interactions with components of complement, and effects on neuronal cells. The amino acid sequence homologies of the envelope glycoproteins with several cellular proteins have suggested that molecular mimicry may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. This review summarizes work done by several investigators demonstrating the profound biological effects of envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 on immune system cells. Extensive studies have also been done on interactions of the viral envelope proteins with components of the immune system which may be important for eliciting a "protective immune response." Understanding the influences of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins on the immune system may provide valuable insights into HIV-1 disease pathogenesis and carries implications for the trials of HIV-1 envelope protein vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:8801439

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Chandipura virus glycoprotein G

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Eduard; Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Gaudin, Yves; Albertini, Aurélie A.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion in members of the Rhabdoviridae virus family is mediated by the G glycoprotein. At low pH, the G glycoprotein catalyzes fusion between viral and endosomal membranes by undergoing a major conformational change from a pre-fusion trimer to a post-fusion trimer. The structure of the G glycoprotein from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV G), the prototype of Vesiculovirus, has recently been solved in its trimeric pre-fusion and post-fusion conformations; however, little is known about the structural details of the transition. In this work, a soluble form of the ectodomain of Chandipura virus G glycoprotein (CHAV Gth) was purified using limited proteolysis of purified virus; this soluble ectodomain was also crystallized. This protein shares 41% amino-acid identity with VSV G and thus its structure could provide further clues about the structural transition of rhabdoviral glycoproteins induced by low pH. Crystals of CHAV Gth obtained at pH 7.5 diffracted X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. These crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 150.3, b = 228.2, c = 78.8 Å. Preliminary analysis of the data based on the space group and the self-rotation function indicated that there was no trimeric association of the protomers. This unusual oligomeric status could result from the presence of fusion intermediates in the crystal. PMID:22949203

  8. A high boronate avidity monolithic capillary for the selective enrichment of trace glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Daojin; Li, Yang; Li, Xinglin; Bie, Zijun; Pan, Xianghua; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Boronate affinity materials, as effective sample enrichment sorbents for glycoproteomic analysis, have attracted increasing attention in recent years. However, most of boronate affinity materials suffer from an apparent limitation, limited binding strength. As a result, extraction of glycoproteins of trace concentration is rather difficult or impossible. In this study, we present a high boronate avidity monolithic capillary. Branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) was used as a scaffold to amplify the number of boronic acid moieties. While 2,4-difluoro-3-formyl-phenylboronic acid (DFFPBA), which exhibited ultrahigh affinity toward cis-diol-containing compounds, was employed as an affinity ligand. Due to the PEI-assisted synergistic multivalent binding, the monolithic column exhibited high boronate avidity toward glycoproteins, with binding constants of 10(-6)-10(-7)M. Such binding strength was the highest among already reported boronic acid-functionalized materials that can be used for glycoproteomic analysis. Besides, the boronate avidity monolithic column exhibited one additional beneficial feature, lowered binding pH (≥6.5). These features greatly favored the selective enrichment of trace glycoproteins from real samples. The feasibility for practical applications was demonstrated with the selective enrichment of trace glycoproteins in human saliva. As compared with other boronate avidity/affinity materials, the boronate avidity monolithic capillary exhibited the best performance.

  9. Characterization of the oligosaccharide units of the bovine erythrocyte membrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Emerson, W A; Kornfeld, S

    1976-04-20

    The major glycoprotein of the bovine erythrocyte membrane was purified by extraction of the ghosts with lithium 3,5-diiodosalicylate followed by phenol-water extraction and acidification. The glycoprotein contains 20% protein and 80% carbohydrate by weight and gives a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an estimated molecular weight of 230000 daltons. The carbohydrate composition of the glycoprotein was determined to be (in residues relative to sialic acid): sialic acid, 1.0; fucose, less than 0.01; mannose, 0.1; galactose, 3.3; N-acetylgalactosamine, 0.9; and N-acetylglucosamine, 2.4. Pronase digestion of the isolated glycoprotein followed by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration resulted in the separation of a small pool of glycopeptides (pool III), which included all of the mannose-containing glycopeptides, from the bulk of the glycopeptide material which was in the void fractions of the column (pool I). Alkaline borohydride treatment released over 95% of the oligosaccharide units in pool I and approximately 30% of the oligosaccharide units in pool III. These oligosaccharides were isolated by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The oligosaccharides released from pool I had molecular weights of 1100-1400 daltons and contained sialic acid, galactose, and N-acetylglucosamine in molar ratios of 0.5-1:3:2 as well as a partial residue of N-acetylgalactosaminitol. The oligosaccharides released from pool III by alkali had molecular weights of 1300-1600 daltons and contained sialic acid, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-ACETYLgalactosaminitol in molar ratios of 1-2:2:1:1:1. These data indicate that the majority of the oligosaccharide units of the bovine erythrocyte glycoprotein are linked O-glycosidically to the peptide backbone of the molecule. PMID:1268191

  10. Fast and efficient online release of N-glycans from glycoproteins facilitating liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry glycomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Jmeian, Yazen; Hammad, Loubna A; Mechref, Yehia

    2012-10-16

    A novel online enzyme reactor incorporating peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) on a monolithic polymer support has been developed to allow the rapid simultaneous release of both neutral and acidic N-linked glycans from glycoproteins. The PNGase F monolithic reactor was fabricated in a fused silica using glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate polymer. The reactor was coupled to a C8 trap and a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) HPLC-chip. This arrangement was interfaced to an ion trap mass spectrometer for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses. The performance of the PNGase F reactor was optimized using the MS signal for the disialylated biantennary N-glycan derived from fetuin. Optimum conditions for glycan release were attained at room temperature using a loading flow rate of 2 μL/min and a reaction time of 6 min. The loading capacity of the reactor was determined to be around 2 pmol of glycoprotein. The online digestion and MS characterization experiments resulted in sensitivities as high as 100 fmol of glycoprotein and 0.1 μL of human blood serum. The enzyme reactor activity was also shown to remain stable after 1 month of continuous use. Both small and large glycoproteins as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans, fucolsylated glycans, sialylated glycans, and hybrid structures were studied. The model glycoproteins included ribonuclease B, fetuin, α(1)-acid glycoprotein, immunoglobulin, and thyroglobulin. All N-glycans associated with these model glycoproteins were detected using the online PNGase F reactor setup.

  11. Biogenesis of microsomal membrane glycoproteins in rat liver. III. Release of glycoproteins from the Golgi fraction and their transfer to microsomal membranes

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The presence in the Golgi fraction of glycoproteins destined to be incorporated into the microsomal membrane was investigated. When incubated in sucrose, washed Golgi vesicles released four major, weakly acidic glycoproteins, some of which could be incorporated into microsomal membranes by incubation. Double labeling with [3H]glucosamine and [14C]leucine demonstrated the incorporation of both protein and oligosaccharide moieties, and the main peak of radioactivity was associated with the 70,000 mol wt region after SDS- gel electrophoresis. The proteins that could be incorporated into microsomes were probably associated to a large extent with the outer surface of the Golgi membrane. Centrifugation of the proteins released from the Golgi in a KBr solution (p = 1.24) resulted in a separation of glycoproteins, those in the top layer most actively incorporated into microsomes. The lipoglycoproteins in the top layer that could be incorporated appeared in the 70,000 mol wt region after SDS-gel electrophoresis, as did the corresponding proteins isolated from the supernate. These results suggest that glycoproteins with completed oligosaccharide chains are released from the Golgi system to the cytosol and are subsequently transferred to microsomes as constitutive membrane components. PMID:1202020

  12. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  13. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers. PMID:23255236

  14. Isolation of oligomannose-type glycans from bean glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Ye, J; Wold, F

    1993-02-15

    We have isolated individual oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives from the total soluble glycoproteins from kidney beens (Phaseolus vulgaris) and from lima beans (Phaseolus limensis). The protein/glycoprotein mixture was digested exhaustively by pronase, and the glycan-containing fractions were separated from free amino acids and peptides by gel filtration. The oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives were finally fractionated on Dowex 50 (C. C. Huang, H.E. Meyer, and R. Montgomery, Carbohydr. Res. 13, 127-137, 1970), and the individual fractions were characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, and ion exchange chromatography. With the procedures described, only oligomannose derivatives were obtained from the beans. In the case of kidney beans, six different derivatives were observed and characterized, Man9GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man8GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man7GlcNAc2Asn, and Man6GlcNAc2Asn. Under identical conditions the lima beans yielded primarily the Man9GlcNAc2Asn derivative along with a small amount of the two Man8GlcNAc2Asn derivatives. The oligomannose structures can be isolated in reasonable quantities (2-20 mg) from about 200 g of dry beans. PMID:8465965

  15. An altered platelet granule glycoprotein in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, W J; Berndt, M C; Castaldi, P A

    1984-01-01

    The protein profiles of washed platelets from nine patients with essential thrombocythemia were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In four patients, an additional protein band (reduced Mr of 170,000) was clearly identified in both unstimulated platelet preparations and thrombin-released supernatant fractions. This band was also evident, though to a lesser extent, in three more patients, but it could not be located in the two remaining patients nor in any of ten controls. Subsequent characterization of the 170,000 reduced protein in one patient indicated that (a) it was glycosylated, as judged by periodic acid-Schiff staining, and (b) that native protein was a disulfide-linked multimer (possibly trimeric), which (c) partially bound to the activated platelet plasma membrane in the presence of calcium, and (d) was immune precipitated by anti-glycoprotein G antisera. The combined evidence is consistent with the 170,000 reduced protein being a modified form of the normal subunit of the platelet alpha-granule constituent, glycoprotein G (also termed thrombospondin and thrombin-sensitive protein). Images PMID:6365970

  16. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for viral glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-09-01

    Protection against mucosally transmitted infections probably requires immunity at the site of pathogen entry, yet there are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) represents a family of organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo. Here we show that diverse PEI forms have potent mucosal adjuvant activity for viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. A single intranasal administration of influenza hemagglutinin or herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D with PEI elicited robust antibody-mediated protection from an otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen, which were taken up by antigen-presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted dendritic cell trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host double-stranded DNA that triggered Irf3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  17. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  18. Selective extraction and enrichment of glycoproteins based on boronate affinity SPME and determination by CIEF-WCID.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixian; Xia, Zhining; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-07-30

    In this study, a new thin-film boronic acid coating was developed for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by capillary isoelectric focusing with whole-column imaging detection (CIEF-WCID). Boronate functionalized particles of phenylboronic acid (PBA) and 3-aminophenylboronic acid (3-aPBA) were utilized as boronate affinity solid phase coating on thin-film stainless steel blades for selective extraction and enrichment of glycoproteins. The process of extraction and elution could be easily controlled by adjusting pH. To test specificity, asialofetuin and lactoferrin were selected as glycoproteins test molecules, while BSA and myoglobin were used as control non-glycoproteins in this study. The boronate affinity coating was characterized. The effect of buffer, pH, extraction profiles and elution profiles were investigated. The developed method was successfully applied to extract glycoproteins from standard buffer, PBS, human plasma and 10-fold diluted human blood using two kinds of boronate affinity blades. Boronate affinity SPME could be a promising tool for selective extraction and enrichment of low-abundance glycoproteins in real biological samples.

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) has a novel structure.

    PubMed Central

    Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Elango, N; Norrby, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    Amino acid sequence of human respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) was deduced from the DNA sequence of a recombinant plasmid and confirmed by limited amino acid microsequencing of purified 90K G protein. The calculated molecular mass of the protein encoded by the only long open reading frame of 298 amino acids was 32,588 daltons and was somewhat smaller than the 36K polypeptide translated in vitro from mRNA selected by this plasmid. Inspection of the sequence revealed a single hydrophobic domain of 23 amino acids capable of membrane insertion at 41 residues from the N-terminus. There was no N-terminal signal sequence and the hydrophilic N-terminal 20 residues probably represent the cytoplasmic tail of the protein. The N-terminally oriented membrane insertion was somewhat analogous to paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and influenza neuraminidase (NA). The protein was moderately hydrophilic and rich in hydroxy-amino acids. It was both N- and O-glycosylated with the latter contributing significantly to the net molecular mass 90K. Images PMID:4069997

  20. Glycoproteins in human parotid saliva assessed by lectin probes after resolution by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G H; Proctor, G B; Pankhurst, C L; Linden, R W; Shori, D K; Zhang, X S

    1996-01-01

    Human parotid salivary glycoproteins separated by gradient sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and electroblotted onto nitrocellulose have been investigated using a battery of biotinylated lectin probes of characterized sugar specificity. Lectin binding, detected on blots using avidin-biotin complex (ABC) and a chemiluminescence generating substrate, was recorded on photographic film and compared with the original fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) stained blots or with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250-stained gels run in parallel. A number of glycoprotein bands which were undetected by protein stains or the periodic acid Schiff reaction were revealed by lectins. Binding by lectins from Concanavalia ensiformis, Lens culinaris, Limax flavus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Ricinus communis, Triticum vulgaris, Lotus tetragonobulus and Ulex europaeus indicated that sialylated and fucosylated triantennary and bisected, N-linked complex sugar chains were present on many glycoproteins in addition to the major glycosylated proline-rich glycoprotein (GI). Binding with lectins from Arachis hypogaea and Dolichos biflorus indicated that the O-linked sugar chains were confined to the alpha-heavy chain of Ig A. Comparison of lectin binding in samples from five healthy individuals revealed differences in a number of glycoproteins in addition to the previously characterized G1 and CON 1/CON 2 polymorphisms and demonstrated that the H blood group antigen was expressed mainly on G1 in parotid saliva. This study will be used as a basis upon which to study salivary glycoproteins in diseases affecting parotid glands.

  1. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  2. Post-Synthetic Defucosylation of AGP by Aspergillus nidulans α-1,2-Fucosidase Expressed in Arabidopsis Apoplast Induces Compensatory Upregulation of α-1,2-Fucosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady V.; Reem, Nathan T.; Young, Zachary T.; Chambers, Lauran; Zabotina, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls are essential components of plant cells which perform a variety of important functions for the different cell types, tissues and organs of a plant. Besides mechanical function providing cell shape, cell walls participate in intercellular communication, defense during plant-microbe interactions, and plant growth. The plant cell wall consists predominantly of polysaccharides with the addition of structural glycoproteins, phenolic esters, minerals, lignin, and associated enzymes. Alterations in the cell wall composition created through either changes in biosynthesis of specific constituents or their post-synthetic modifications in the apoplast compromise cell wall integrity and frequently induce plant compensatory responses as a result of these alterations. Here we report that post-synthetic removal of fucose residues specifically from arabinogalactan proteins in the Arabidopsis plant cell wall induces differential expression of fucosyltransferases and leads to the root and hypocotyl elongation changes. These results demonstrate that the post-synthetic modification of cell wall components presents a valuable approach to investigate the potential signaling pathways induced during plant responses to such modifications that usually occur during plant development and stress responses. PMID:27448235

  3. Post-Synthetic Defucosylation of AGP by Aspergillus nidulans α-1,2-Fucosidase Expressed in Arabidopsis Apoplast Induces Compensatory Upregulation of α-1,2-Fucosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady V; Reem, Nathan T; Young, Zachary T; Chambers, Lauran; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    Cell walls are essential components of plant cells which perform a variety of important functions for the different cell types, tissues and organs of a plant. Besides mechanical function providing cell shape, cell walls participate in intercellular communication, defense during plant-microbe interactions, and plant growth. The plant cell wall consists predominantly of polysaccharides with the addition of structural glycoproteins, phenolic esters, minerals, lignin, and associated enzymes. Alterations in the cell wall composition created through either changes in biosynthesis of specific constituents or their post-synthetic modifications in the apoplast compromise cell wall integrity and frequently induce plant compensatory responses as a result of these alterations. Here we report that post-synthetic removal of fucose residues specifically from arabinogalactan proteins in the Arabidopsis plant cell wall induces differential expression of fucosyltransferases and leads to the root and hypocotyl elongation changes. These results demonstrate that the post-synthetic modification of cell wall components presents a valuable approach to investigate the potential signaling pathways induced during plant responses to such modifications that usually occur during plant development and stress responses. PMID:27448235

  4. Purification and characterization of novel whey glycoprotein WGP-88 which binds to a monoclonal antibody to PAS-4 glycoprotein in the bovine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, S; Azuma, N; Kurisaki, J; Kanno, C

    1997-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody to the PAS-4 glycoprotein (78 kDa) of the bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) specifically recognized PAS-4, and was named KAS4. A component recognized by KAS4 was found in whey protein, this being a glycoprotein of 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE and named WGP-88. WGP-88 was purified and characterized in comparison with PAS-4. WGP-88 had apparent pI values of 6.45 and 6.39, while those of PAS-4 were 7.39 and 7.35. Neuraminidase digestion shifted the pI values of WGP-88 to 6.57 and of PAS-4 to 7.52. WGP-88 was rich in polar amino residues (44.9 mol%), while PAS-4 was abundant in nonpolar amino acid residues (48.7 mol%). WGP-88 contained 17.1% of carbohydrate and PAS-4 had 7.2%. The results of reductive hydrolysis, N-glycanase digestion, and a lectin blot analysis suggested that N- and O-linked sugar chains were contained in both glycoproteins. WGP-88 and PAS-4 had a different N-terminal amino acid sequence. WGP-88 and PAS-4 respectively inhibited competitively the binding of KAS4 to PAS-4 and WGP-88. Our studies revealed WGP-88 recognized by KAS4 mAb to be a novel whey protein and to have different biochemical properties from those of PAS-4.

  5. Carbohydrate Structure of Sindbis Virus Glycoprotein E2 from Virus Grown in Hamster and Chicken Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Sindbis virus was used as a probe to examine glycosylation processes in two different species of cultured cells. Parallel studies were carried out analyzing the carbohydrate added to Sindbis glycoprotein E2 when the virus was grown in chicken embryo cells and BHK cells. The Pronase glycopeptides of Sindbis glycoprotein E2 were purified by a combination of ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Four glycopeptides were resolved, ranging in molecular weight from 1,800 to 2,700. Structures are proposed for each of the four glycopeptides, based on data obtained by quantitative composition analyses, methylation analyses, and degradation of the glycopeptides using purified exo- and endoglycosidases. The largest three glycopeptides (S1, S2, and S3) have similar structures but differ in the extent of sialylation. All three contain N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, and fucose, in a structure similar to oligosaccharides found on other glycoproteins. Glycopeptide S1 has two residues of sialic acid, whereas glycopeptides S2 and S3 contain 1 and 0 residues of sialic acid, respectively. The smallest glycopeptide, S4, contains only N-acetyglucosamine and mannose, and is also similar to mannose-rich oligosaccharides found on other glycoproteins. Each of the complex glycopeptides (S1, S2, or S3) from virus grown in BHK cells is indistinguishable from the corresponding glycopeptides derived from virus grown in chicken cells. Glycopeptide S4 is also very similar in size, composition, and sugar linkages from virus derived from the two hosts. These results suggest that chicken cells and BHK cells have similar glycosylation mechanisms and glycosylate Sindbis glycoprotein E2 in nearly identical ways. PMID:430605

  6. Identification of a glycoprotein ligand for E-selectin on mouse myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    E-selectin is an inducible endothelial cell adhesion molecule for neutrophils which functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin. Using a recombinant, antibody-like form of mouse E-selectin, we have searched for glycoprotein ligands on mouse neutrophils and the neutrophil progenitor cell line 32D cl 3. We have identified a 150-kD glycoprotein as the only protein which could be affinity-isolated with soluble E- selectin from [35S]methionine/[35S]cysteine-labeled 32D cl 3 cells. Binding of this protein was strictly Ca(2+)-dependent, was blocked by a cell adhesion-blocking mAb against mouse E-selectin, and required the presence of sialic acid on the 150-kD ligand. This glycoprotein was also affinity-isolated from mature neutrophils, in addition to a minor component at 250 kD, but could not be isolated from several other non- myeloid cell lines. The 150-kD glycoprotein was the only protein from 32D cl 3 cells, which was detectable by silver-staining after a one- step affinity-isolation. PMID:7682218

  7. An update on post-translational modifications of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins: toward a model highlighting their contribution to plant cell wall architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Velasquez, Silvia M.; Jamet, Elisabeth; Estevez, José M.; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composite structures mainly composed of polysaccharides, also containing a large set of proteins involved in diverse functions such as growth, environmental sensing, signaling, and defense. Research on cell wall proteins (CWPs) is a challenging field since present knowledge of their role into the structure and function of cell walls is very incomplete. Among CWPs, hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich O-glycoproteins (HRGPs) were classified into three categories: (i) moderately glycosylated extensins (EXTs) able to form covalent scaffolds; (ii) hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs); and (iii) Hyp/proline (Pro)-Rich proteins (H/PRPs) that may be non-, weakly- or highly-glycosylated. In this review, we provide a description of the main features of their post-translational modifications (PTMs), biosynthesis, structure, and function. We propose a new model integrating HRGPs and their partners in cell walls. Altogether, they could form a continuous glyco-network with non-cellulosic polysaccharides via covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions, thus strongly contributing to cell wall architecture. PMID:25177325

  8. Purification and characterization of nucleolin and its identification as a transcription repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, T H; Tsai, W H; Lee, Y M; Lei, H Y; Lai, M Y; Chen, D S; Yeh, N H; Lee, S C

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the acute-phase response genes, such as that for alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP), involves both positive and negative transcription factors. A positive transcription factor, AGP/EBP, and a negative transcription factor, factor B, have been identified as the two most important factors responsible for the induction of the AGP gene. In this paper we report the purification, characterization, and identification of a B-motif-binding factor from the mouse hepatoma cell line 129p. The purified factor has been identified as nucleolin by amino acid sequence analysis. Biochemical and functional studies further established that nucleolin is a transcription repressor for regulation of AGP and possibly other acute-phase response genes. Thus, in addition to the many known functions of nucleolin, such as rRNA transcription, processing, ribosome biogenesis, and the shuttling of proteins between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, it may also function as a transcriptional repressor. Images PMID:8065340

  9. Sweet new world: glycoproteins in bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M Alexander; Riley, Lee W; Benz, Inga

    2003-12-01

    In eukaryotes, the combinatorial potential of carbohydrates is used for the modulation of protein function. However, despite the wealth of cell wall and surface-associated carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, the accepted dogma has been that prokaryotes are not able to glycosylate proteins. This has now changed and protein glycosylation in prokaryotes is an accepted fact. Intriguingly, in Gram-negative bacteria most glycoproteins are associated with virulence factors of medically significant pathogens. Also, important steps in pathogenesis have been linked to the glycan substitution of surface proteins, indicating that the glycosylation of bacterial proteins might serve specific functions in infection and pathogenesis and interfere with inflammatory immune responses. Therefore, the carbohydrate modifications and glycosylation pathways of bacterial proteins will become new targets for therapeutic and prophylactic measures. Here we discuss recent findings on the structure, genetics and function of glycoproteins of medically important bacteria and potential applications of bacterial glycosylation systems for the generation of novel glycoconjugates.

  10. HPLC-MS/MS Analyses Show That the Near-Starchless aps1 and pgm Leaves Accumulate Wild Type Levels of ADPglucose: Further Evidence for the Occurrence of Important ADPglucose Biosynthetic Pathway(s) Alternative to the pPGI-pPGM-AGP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Francisco José; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; Montero, Manuel; Pujol, Pablo; Galarza, Regina; Kaneko, Kentaro; Oikawa, Kazusato; Wada, Kaede; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In leaves, it is widely assumed that starch is the end-product of a metabolic pathway exclusively taking place in the chloroplast that (a) involves plastidic phosphoglucomutase (pPGM), ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and starch synthase (SS), and (b) is linked to the Calvin-Benson cycle by means of the plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI). This view also implies that AGP is the sole enzyme producing the starch precursor molecule, ADPG. However, mounting evidence has been compiled pointing to the occurrence of important sources, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, of ADPG. To further explore this possibility, in this work two independent laboratories have carried out HPLC-MS/MS analyses of ADPG content in leaves of the near-starchless pgm and aps1 mutants impaired in pPGM and AGP, respectively, and in leaves of double aps1/pgm mutants grown under two different culture conditions. We also measured the ADPG content in wild type (WT) and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid two different ADPG cleaving enzymes, and in aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC, a bacterial AGP. Furthermore, we measured the ADPG content in ss3/ss4/aps1 mutants impaired in starch granule initiation and chloroplastic ADPG synthesis. We found that, irrespective of their starch contents, pgm and aps1 leaves, WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid ADPG cleaving enzymes, and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC accumulate WT ADPG content. In clear contrast, ss3/ss4/aps1 leaves accumulated ca. 300 fold-more ADPG than WT leaves. The overall data showed that, in Arabidopsis leaves, (a) there are important ADPG biosynthetic pathways, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, (b) pPGM and AGP are not major determinants of intracellular ADPG content, and (c) the contribution of the chloroplastic ADPG pool to the total ADPG pool is low. PMID:25133777

  11. The amino acid exchange R28E in ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) abrogates interleukin-6 receptor-dependent but retains CNTF receptor-dependent signaling via glycoprotein 130 (gp130)/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR).

    PubMed

    Wagener, Eva-Maria; Aurich, Matthias; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Floss, Doreen M; Garbers, Christoph; Breusing, Kati; Rabe, Björn; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-06-27

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, therapeutic application of CNTF reduced body weight in mice and humans. CNTF binds to high or low affinity receptor complexes consisting of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR or IL-6R·gp130·LIFR, respectively. Clinical studies of the CNTF derivative Axokine revealed intolerance at higher concentrations, which may rely on the low-affinity binding of CNTF to the IL-6R. Here, we aimed to generate a CNTFR-selective CNTF variant (CV). CV-1 contained the single amino acid exchange R28E. Arg(28) is in close proximity to the CNTFR binding site. Using molecular modeling, we hypothesized that Arg(28) might contribute to IL-6R/CNTFR plasticity of CNTF. CV-2 to CV-5 were generated by transferring parts of the CNTFR-binding site from cardiotrophin-like cytokine to CNTF. Cardiotrophin-like cytokine selectively signals via the CNTFR·gp130·LIFR complex, albeit with a much lower affinity compared with CNTF. As shown by immunoprecipitation, all CNTF variants retained the ability to bind to CNTFR. CV-1, CV-2, and CV-5, however, lost the ability to bind to IL-6R. Although all variants induced cytokine-dependent cellular proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation via CNTFR·gp130·LIFR, only CV-3 induced STAT3 phosphorylation via IL-6R·gp130·LIFR. Quantification of CNTF-dependent proliferation of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR expressing cells indicated that only CV-1 was as biologically active as CNTF. Thus, the CNTFR-selective CV-1 will allow discriminating between CNTFR- and IL-6R-mediated effects in vivo.

  12. Postnatal changes in sialylation of glycoproteins in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Oda-Tamai, S; Kato, S; Akamatsu, N

    1991-01-01

    Glycoproteins containing N-linked oligosaccharides were prepared from plasma and liver microsomes of rats aged 0-5 weeks, and galactose and sialic acid content were determined. The sialic acid/galactose ratios in plasma membrane N-glycans remained at about 1 throughout the postnatal period, suggesting that most of the galactose residues are sialylated. In the same way, it was suggested that most of the galactose residues of microsomal N-glycans were sialylated at 0, 4 and 5 weeks of age, but that the degree of sialylation was lower at the other ages, with a minimum at 2 weeks. When the activities of sialyltransferase and galactosyltransferase in liver Golgi membranes were determined, age-dependent changes were found, not only in the specific activities of the enzymes, but also in the Golgi membrane content per g of liver. The activity of galactosyltransferase per g of liver increased immediately after birth, whereas that of sialyltransferase remained at a low level for 2 weeks and then increased to a constant level at 4 weeks. It is probable that this delayed increase in the activity of sialyltransferase results in the decreased sialylation of microsomal N-glycans at 1, 2 and 3 weeks. Sialyltransferase was solubilized from the liver microsomes of rats aged 2, 3 and 4 weeks and characterized. Phosphocellulose column chromatography separated the activity into two subfractions, designated transferase I and transferase II in the order of elution. The increase in total sialyltransferase activity during this period was caused mainly by an increase in transferase I. Rechromatography of each transferase from 3-week-old rats after neuraminidase treatment showed that transferase I but not transferase II contained sialic acid residue(s) and that desialylated transferase I was eluted in a similar way as transferase II. Although the apparent Km value for CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid and the heat stability of transferase I were different from those of transferase II, the

  13. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2-33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  14. Human platelet glycoprotein V: characterization of the polypeptide and the related Ib-V-IX receptor system of adhesive, leucine-rich glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, M J; Hagen, F S; Yagi, M; Roth, G J

    1993-01-01

    Human platelet glycoprotein (GP) V (M(r) 83,300), whose primary structure is reported here, is a part of the Ib-V-IX system of surface glycoproteins (GPs Ib alpha, Ib beta, V, IX) that constitute the receptor for von Willebrand factor (vWf) and mediate the adhesion of platelets to injured vascular surfaces in the arterial circulation, a critical initiating event in hemostasis. System members share physical associations, leucine-rich glycoprotein (LRG) structures, and a congenital deficiency state, Bernard-Soulier syndrome. With PCR techniques and platelet cDNA templates, 1.4 kb of GP V cDNA sequence was obtained that encodes 469 GP V amino acids. A genomic 3.5-kb BamHI fragment was then isolated that includes 3.46 kb of GP V cDNA sequence: the 1.7-kb open reading frame plus 2 bases of the 5' and 1.8 kb of the 3' untranslated regions. Northern blot analysis reveals three GP V platelet transcripts of 3.8, 4.2, and 5.2 kb. A 16-amino acid signal peptide is present. Mature GP V is a 544-amino acid transmembrane protein with a 504-amino acid extracellular domain that encompasses a set of 15 tandem LRG repeats in a "flank-LRG center-flank" array [Roth, G. J. (1991) Blood 77, 5-19] along with eight putative N-linked glycosylation sites and cleavage sites for thrombin and calpain. GP V is a transmembrane, adhesive LRG protein that plays an undefined, but potentially critical, role in the expression and/or function of the Ib-V-IX receptor for vWf/shear-dependent platelet adhesion in arteries. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7690959

  15. Studies on the antitumor activity and isolation of the glycoprotein from the gonad of Chlamys (Azumapecten) farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qian-Qun; Fang, Yu-Chun; Wang, Chang-Yun; Xiao, Hang; Qin, Yu-Qing

    1998-12-01

    After being degreased with acetone, the female gonad of Chlamys (Azumapecten) farreri was extracted with water, and then subjected to DEAE—cellulose column chromatography and purified by Sephadex G-100 chromatography to obtain a pure female gonad glycoprotein (FGGP). The IR spectra, electrophoresis and chemical analysis of FGGP indicated that it was a kind of acid glycoprotein and that the content of total protein and sugar were 54.8% and 40%, respectively. Pharmacological tests showed that FGGP could inhibit (inhibition rate of 40.87%) the growth of Sarcoma 180 of mice.

  16. Fatty acid acylation of salivary mucin in rat submandibular glands

    SciTech Connect

    Slomiany, B.L.; Murty, V.L.; Takagi, A.; Tsukada, H.; Kosmala, M.; Slomiany, A.

    1985-11-01

    The acylation of salivary mucin with fatty acids and its biosynthesis was investigated by incubating rat submandibular salivary gland cells with (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and (/sup 3/H)proline. The elaborated extracellular and intracellular mucus glycoproteins following delipidation, Bio-Gel P-100 chromatography, and CsCl equilibrium density gradient centrifugation were analyzed for the distribution of the labeled tracers. The incorporation of both markers into mucus glycoprotein increased steadily with time up to 4 h, at which time about 65% of (/sup 3/H)palmitate and (/sup 3/H)proline were found in the extracellular glycoprotein and 35% in the intracellular glycoprotein. The incorporation ratio of proline/palmitate, while showing an increase with incubation time in the extracellular glycoprotein, remained essentially unchanged with time in the intracellular glycoprotein and at 4 h reached respective values of 0.14 and 1.12. The fact that the proline/palmitate incorporation ratio in the intracellular glycoprotein at 1 h of incubation was 22 times higher than in the extracellular and 8 times higher after 4 h suggests that acylation occurs intracellularly and that fatty acids are added after apomucin polypeptide synthesis. As the incorporation of palmitate within the intracellular mucin was greater in the mucus glycoprotein subunit, it would appear that fatty acid acylation of mucin subunits preceeds their assembly into the mucus glycoprotein polymer.

  17. Unusual molecular architecture of the machupo virus attachment glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Thomas A; Crispin, Max; Graham, Stephen C; Harvey, David J; Grimes, Jonathan M; Jones, E Yvonne; Stuart, David I

    2009-08-01

    New World arenaviruses, which cause severe hemorrhagic fever, rely upon their envelope glycoproteins for attachment and fusion into their host cell. Here we present the crystal structure of the Machupo virus GP1 attachment glycoprotein, which is responsible for high-affinity binding at the cell surface to the transferrin receptor. This first structure of an arenavirus glycoprotein shows that GP1 consists of a novel alpha/beta fold. This provides a blueprint of the New World arenavirus attachment glycoproteins and reveals a new architecture of viral attachment, using a protein fold of unknown origins.

  18. Native functionality and therapeutic targeting of arenaviral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Zeltina, Antra; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Surface glycoproteins direct cellular targeting, attachment, and membrane fusion of arenaviruses and are the primary target for neutralizing antibodies. Despite significant conservation of the glycoprotein architecture across the arenavirus family, there is considerable variation in the molecular recognition mechanisms used during host cell entry. We review recent progress in dissecting these infection events and describe how arenaviral glycoproteins can be targeted by small-molecule antivirals, the natural immune response, and immunoglobulin-based therapeutics. Arenaviral glycoprotein-mediated assembly and infection pathways present numerous opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27104809

  19. Release of an Mr 140,000 glycoprotein in the culture media of certain human sarcoma and melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bízik, J; Grófová, M; Svec, J

    1985-03-01

    A 140 K glycoprotein was detected in the culture media of human sarcoma and melanoma cell lines by labeling with several radioactive amino acid and sugar precursors, followed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In contrast to this, in the culture media of metabolically labeled embryonic and skin fibroblasts this glycoprotein was not found. Likewise, a protein with an identical molecular weight of 140 K was also found in culture media after cell surface labeling of the neoplastic cells but not in the culture media from control cells. The [35S]methionine-labeled 140 K was not split by collagenase and did not appear to be a fragment of fibronectin. We discuss the possibility that secretion of the 140 K glycoprotein is a transformation-related phenomenon.

  20. Use of hydrazine to release in intact and unreduced form both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides from glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Patel, T; Bruce, J; Merry, A; Bigge, C; Wormald, M; Jaques, A; Parekh, R

    1993-01-19

    The use of hydrazine to release unreduced N- and O-linked oligosaccharides from glycoproteins has been investigated using several "standard" glycoproteins of previously defined glycosylation. It is shown that hydrazinolysis can be used to release intact N- and O-linked oligosaccharides in an unreduced form. The release of O-linked oligosaccharides occurs with a lower temperature dependence than the release of N-linked oligosaccharides, and the kinetic parameters governing release of oligosaccharides from these standard glycoproteins have been determined. These parameters allow a definition of reaction conditions under which anhydrous hydrazinolysis can be used to selectively release O-linked oligosaccharides (60 degrees C, 5 h) or release both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides (95 degrees C, 4 h) in high yield (> 85%) from all glycoproteins investigated (n = 11). Under these reaction conditions, the recovered N- and O-linked oligosaccharides are structurally intact (as judged by 600-MHz 1H-NMR, laser-desorption mass spectrometry, HPAEC-PAD, gel filtration, and glycosidase digestion), with the possible exception of certain N- and O-acyl substituents of sialic acid. This use of mild hydrazinolysis therefore allows both the simultaneous and sequential chemical release from glycoproteins of O- and N-linked oligosaccharides in their intact unreduced form.

  1. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  2. Cytochemical characterization of glycoproteins in the developing acrosome of rats. An ultrastructural study using lectin histochemistry, enzymes and chemical deglycosylation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Menárguez, J A; Ballesta, J; Avilés, M; Castells, M T; Madrid, J F

    1992-01-01

    The composition and distribution of rat acrosomal glycoproteins during spermiogenesis have been investigated at light and electron microscopic level by means of a variety of morphological techniques including the application of lectins conjugated to peroxidase, digoxigenin and colloidal gold, enzyme and chemical deglycosylation procedures and conventional histochemistry. Results obtained with lectin histochemistry in combination with beta-elimination reaction and endoglucosaminidase F/peptide N-glycosidase F digestion suggest that glycoproteins of mature acrosomes contain both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. N-linked chains of acrosomal glycoproteins contain mannose and external residues of N-acetylglucosamine and galactose. They also have fucose residues linked to the core region of the oligosaccharide side chains. O-linked oligosaccharide chains contain external residues of both galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. Mannose, fucose, galactose and N-acetylglucosamine residues were detected in acrosomes at all steps of spermiogenesis. N-acetylgalactosamine residues were only observed in the late steps of the spermiogenesis. N-acetylneuraminic acid residues were not detected throughout the acrosomal development. At initial stages of acrosome formation, glycoproteins were preferentially distributed over the acrosomic granules. In cap phase spermatids, lectin binding sites were homogeneously distributed throughout the acrosomes; however, in mature spermatozoa, glycoproteins were predominantly located over the outer acrosomal membrane. PMID:1500300

  3. Laurus nobilis L. Seed Extract Reveals Collateral Sensitivity in Multidrug-Resistant P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Saab, Antoine M; Guerrini, Alessandra; Zeino, Maen; Wiench, Benjamin; Rossi, Damiano; Gambari, Roberto; Sacchetti, Gianni; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The frequent failure of standard cancer chemotherapy requires the development of novel drugs capable of killing otherwise drug-resistant tumors. Here, we have investigated a chloroform extract of Laurus nobilis seeds. Fatty acids and 23 constituents of the volatile fraction were identified by gas chromotography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in good agreement with (1)H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrum. Multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-expressing CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells were hypersensitive (collaterally sensitive) toward this extract compared to drug-sensitive CCRF-CEM cells, whereas CEM/ADR5000 cells were 2586-fold resistant to doxorubicin as control drug. Collateral sensitivity was verified by measurement of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. The log10IC50 values of 3 compounds in the extract (limonene, eucalyptol, oleic acid) did not correlate with mRNA expression of the P-glycoprotein-coding ABCB1/MDR1 gene and accumulation of the P-glycoprotein substrate rhodamine in the NCI panel of tumor cell lines. A microarray-based profile of 20 genes predicted resistance to doxorubicin and 7 other anticancer drugs involved in the multidrug resistance phenotype but not to limonene, eucalyptol and oleic acid. In conclusion, our results show that Laurus nobilis seed extract is suitable to kill multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein expressing tumor cells.

  4. Analysis of a novel linkage unit of O-linked carbohydrates from the crystalline surface layer glycoprotein of Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum S102-70.

    PubMed Central

    Messner, P; Christian, R; Kolbe, J; Schulz, G; Sleytr, U B

    1992-01-01

    The surface layer glycoprotein of Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum S102-70 was shown to contain a new type of glycan chain. Different from all known eubacterial glycoproteins, the saccharide moiety consists only of six sugar residues without any repeat sequences. Proteolytic digestion of purified S-layer glycoprotein resulted in isolation of several glycopeptide fractions. These are composed of the same hexasaccharide portion but are linked to oligopeptides of different length. One of them contains only a single amino acid. As concluded from chemical analyses and proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of this preparation, the hexasaccharide moiety is linked via a novel O-glycosidic linkage. This is a beta-D-glucose residue linked to the phenolic hydroxyl group of tyrosine in intact S-layer glycoprotein. Images PMID:1551844

  5. Automated sample preparation facilitated by PhyNexus MEA purification system for oligosaccharide mapping of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Prater, Bradley D; Anumula, Kalyan R; Hutchins, Jeff T

    2007-10-15

    A reproducible high-throughput sample cleanup method for fluorescent oligosaccharide mapping of glycoproteins is described. Oligosaccharides are released from glycoproteins using PNGase F and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid (anthranilic acid, AA). A PhyNexus MEA system was adapted for automated isolation of the fluorescently labeled oligosaccharides from the reaction mixture prior to mapping by HPLC. The oligosaccharide purification uses a normal-phase polyamide resin (DPA-6S) in custom-made pipette tips. The resin volume, wash, and elution steps involved were optimized to obtain high recovery of oligosaccharides with the least amount of contaminating free fluorescent dye in the shortest amount of time. The automated protocol for sample cleanup eliminated all manual manipulations with a recycle time of 23 min. We have reduced the amount of excess AA by 150-fold, allowing quantitative oligosaccharide mapping from as little as 500 ng digested recombinant immunoglobulin G (rIgG). This low sample requirement allows early selection of a cell line with desired characteristics (e.g., oligosaccharide profile and high specific productivity) for the production of glycoprotein drugs. In addition, the use of Tecan or another robotic platform in conjunction with this method should allow the cleanup of 96 samples in 23 min, a significant decrease in the amount of time currently required to process such a large number of samples.

  6. A novel proline-rich glycoprotein associated with the extracellular matrix of vascular bundles of Brassica petioles.

    PubMed

    Davies, H A; Findlay, K; Daniels, M J; Dow, J M

    1997-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAC204, MAC236, MAC265) which recognise extracellular matrix glycoproteins implicated in plant-microbe interactions has been used to study glycoprotein antigens in petioles of turnip (Brassica campestris L.). While MAC204 recognised two glycoproteins (gp120 and gp45) with apparent M(r) 120,000 and 45,000 in petiole extracts made with 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris) buffer containing sodium dodecyl sulfate, MAC236 recognised gp120 but not gp45, and MAC265 gave no or only weak reactivity. Tissue dissection studies established that gp120 was predominantly associated with the vascular bundle whereas gp45 was largely associated with the pith. This was consistent with results from tissue prints probed with MAC204 and MAC236 which also suggested a vascular localisation for gp120. Immunoelectronmicroscopy showed that MAC204 and MAC236 both labelled three-way junctions between cells of the phloem and sclerid fibres. Both gp120 and gp45 were shown to carry epitopes in common with known hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Unlike gp45, gp120 could be extracted from petioles with Tris buffer alone and then isolated from this extract by trichloroacetic acid treatment (which left gp120 soluble), followed by size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Amino acid analysis revealed gp120 to be a novel glycoprotein, particularly rich in proline, lysine, valine and threonine but relatively poor in hydroxyproline. The most abundant sugars were arabinose and galactose. The potential role of this very basic cell surface glycoprotein in plant defence against microbes is discussed.

  7. Swainsonine: an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing.

    PubMed Central

    Elbein, A D; Solf, R; Dorling, P R; Vosbeck, K

    1981-01-01

    Swainsonine, an indolizidine alkaloid, inhibits the processing of asparagine-linked glycoproteins in both cell-free extracts and animal cells in culture. Thus, in a liver particulate enzyme preparation, swainsonine at 0.1-1.0 microM inhibited the mannosidase that releases [3H]mannose from a high mannose glycopeptide but only slightly inhibited the release of glucose from a glucose-labeled glycopeptide. MDCK and Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture incorporate [2-3H]mannose and [6-3H]glucosamine into both high mannose and complex types of oligosaccharides. When these cells were incubated with swainsonine and then labeled with mannose or glucosamine, there was a dramatic decrease in the amount of label in the complex type of glycopeptide and a substantial increase in the radioactivity in the high mannose type. This change was monitored by the increase in radioactivity that became susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H with increasing concentrations of swainosine. The endoglucosaminidase H-released oligosaccharide(s) from swainsonine-treated cells was larger and more homogeneous than that from controls and eluted from Bio-Gel P-4 at the position of Man9GlcNAc. Several tissue culture cell lines were grown in the presence of swainsonine to determine its effect on cell surface glycoproteins. Cells grown in the alkaloid showed an increased capacity to bind Escherichia coli B886, a bacterium that binds to high mannose glycoproteins. These cells also showed an increasing binding of [3H]concanavalin A. PMID:6801650

  8. Swainsonine: an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing.

    PubMed

    Elbein, A D; Solf, R; Dorling, P R; Vosbeck, K

    1981-12-01

    Swainsonine, an indolizidine alkaloid, inhibits the processing of asparagine-linked glycoproteins in both cell-free extracts and animal cells in culture. Thus, in a liver particulate enzyme preparation, swainsonine at 0.1-1.0 microM inhibited the mannosidase that releases [3H]mannose from a high mannose glycopeptide but only slightly inhibited the release of glucose from a glucose-labeled glycopeptide. MDCK and Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture incorporate [2-3H]mannose and [6-3H]glucosamine into both high mannose and complex types of oligosaccharides. When these cells were incubated with swainsonine and then labeled with mannose or glucosamine, there was a dramatic decrease in the amount of label in the complex type of glycopeptide and a substantial increase in the radioactivity in the high mannose type. This change was monitored by the increase in radioactivity that became susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H with increasing concentrations of swainosine. The endoglucosaminidase H-released oligosaccharide(s) from swainsonine-treated cells was larger and more homogeneous than that from controls and eluted from Bio-Gel P-4 at the position of Man9GlcNAc. Several tissue culture cell lines were grown in the presence of swainsonine to determine its effect on cell surface glycoproteins. Cells grown in the alkaloid showed an increased capacity to bind Escherichia coli B886, a bacterium that binds to high mannose glycoproteins. These cells also showed an increasing binding of [3H]concanavalin A. PMID:6801650

  9. [Lactoferrin - a glycoprotein of great therapeutic potentials].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Kamińska, Ewa; Michalski, Piotr; Lauterbach, Jan Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein, which is present in most biological fluids with particularly high levels in colostrum and in mammalian milk. Bovine lactoferrin is more than 70% homologous with human lactoferrin. Most of the clinical trials have used bovine lactoferrin for supplementation. This review summarizes the recent advances in explaining the mechanisms, which are responsible for the multifunctional roles of lactoferrin, and presents its potential prophylactic and therapeutic applications. On the ground of the results of preliminary clinical observations, authors suggest beneficial effect of lactoferrin supplementation on the prevalence of necrotizing enterocolitis in infants with birth weight below 1250 grams. PMID:27442696

  10. Early and Delayed Effects of Naturally Occurring Asbestos on Serum Biomarkers of Inflammation and Metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies recently showed that intratracheal (IT) instillation of Libby amphibole (LA) increases circulating acute-phase proteins (APP; a-2 macroglobulin, A2M; and a-1 acid glycoprotein, AGP) and inflammatory biomarkers (osteopontin and lipocalin) in rats. In this study, objectives...

  11. Effects of carbohydrate precursors of glycoproteins on retention performance of a brightness discrimination task in rats.

    PubMed

    Popov, N; Hecker, C; Riechert, U; Matthies, H

    1985-01-01

    The influence of intraventricularly applied carbohydrate precursors of glycoproteins on acquisition and retention of a brightness discrimination task in rats was tested. The injection of 0.8 mumoles L-fucose/animal, N-acetylneuraminic acid or D-galactosamine as well as 2.4 mumoles/animal D-galactose or D-glucosamine 30 min before starting the behavioural experiments significantly improved the retention performance of the acquired behaviour. The intraventricular application of 2.4 mumoles D-mannose/animal had no influence on the behavioural parameters tested. The results are discussed in the light of an activation of glycoprotein formation in brain tissue mainly by carbohydrates which occupy terminal positions in the oligosaccharide chains.

  12. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  13. Effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of both Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg) on renal response to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Weiner, I David

    2014-02-15

    The Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins, Rh B and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhbg and Rhcg, respectively), are ammonia-specific transporters expressed in renal distal nephron and collecting duct sites that are necessary for normal rates of ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the effect of their combined deletion from the renal collecting duct (CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO) on basal and acidosis-stimulated acid-base homeostasis. Under basal conditions, urine pH and ammonia excretion and serum HCO3(-) were similar in control (C) and CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice. After acid-loading for 7 days, CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice developed significantly more severe metabolic acidosis than did C mice. Acid loading increased ammonia excretion, but ammonia excretion increased more slowly in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO and it was significantly less than in C mice on days 1-5. Urine pH was significantly more acidic in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice on days 1, 3, and 5 of acid loading. Metabolic acidosis increased phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-3 and decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in both genotypes, and these changes were significantly greater in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO than in C mice. We conclude that 1) Rhbg and Rhcg are critically important in the renal response to metabolic acidosis; 2) the significantly greater changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression in acid-loaded CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO compared with acid-loaded C mice cause the role of Rhbg and Rhcg to be underestimated quantitatively; and 3) in mice with intact Rhbg and Rhcg expression, metabolic acidosis does not induce maximal changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression despite the presence of persistent metabolic acidosis.

  14. Monospecific and common glycoprotein ligands for E- and P-selectin on myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    E- and P-selectin are inducible cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells, which function as Ca(2+)-dependent lectins and mediate the binding of neutrophils and monocytes. We have recently identified a 150- kD glycoprotein ligand for E-selectin on mouse myeloid cells, using a recombinant antibody-like form of mouse E-selectin. Here, we report that this ligand does not bind to an analogous P-selectin fusion protein. Instead, the chimeric P-selectin-IgG protein recognizes a 160- kD glycoprotein on the mouse neutrophil progenitor 32D cl 3, on mature mouse neutrophils and on human HL60 cells. The binding is Ca(2+)- dependent and requires the presence of sialic acid on the ligand. This P-selectin-ligand is not recognized by E-selectin. Removal of N-linked carbohydrate side chains from the 150-kD and the 160-kD monospecific selectin ligands abolishes the binding of both ligands to the respective selectin. Treatment of HL60 cells with Peptide: N- glycosidase F inhibited cell binding to P- and E-selectin. In addition, glycoproteins of 230 and 130 kD were found on mature mouse neutrophils, which bound both to E- and P-selectin in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The signals detected for these ligands were 15-20-fold weaker than those for the monospecific ligands. Both proteins were heavily sialylated and selectin-binding was blocked by removal of sialic acid, but not by removal of N-linked carbohydrates. Our data reveal that E- and P-selectin recognize two categories of glycoprotein ligands: one type requires N-linked carbohydrates for binding and is monospecific for each of the two selectins and the other type binds independent of N- linked carbohydrates and is common for both endothelial selectins. PMID:7512971

  15. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel. PMID:3394948

  16. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel.

  17. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  18. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces

    PubMed Central

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell carcinomas, such as cervical, larynx, oral cavity, skin and lung cancer. This small sialomucin is also seen on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in lung adenocarcinomas, as well as in breast and pancreatic tumors. In most cancers, a high level of podoplanin expression, both in cancer cells, as well as in CAFs, is correlated with an increased incidence of metastasis to lymph nodes and shorter survival time of patients. Little is known about the biological role of podoplanin, however research carried out on mice with a knock-out gene of this glycoprotein shows that the presence of podoplanin determines normal development of lungs, the lymphatic system and heart. Podoplanin on cancer cells and CAFs seems to play an important role in the development and progression of various cancers. However, its role in these processes is both unclear and controversial. In this review, the role of podoplanin in both physiological processes and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:27186410

  19. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces.

    PubMed

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell carcinomas, such as cervical, larynx, oral cavity, skin and lung cancer. This small sialomucin is also seen on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in lung adenocarcinomas, as well as in breast and pancreatic tumors. In most cancers, a high level of podoplanin expression, both in cancer cells, as well as in CAFs, is correlated with an increased incidence of metastasis to lymph nodes and shorter survival time of patients. Little is known about the biological role of podoplanin, however research carried out on mice with a knock-out gene of this glycoprotein shows that the presence of podoplanin determines normal development of lungs, the lymphatic system and heart. Podoplanin on cancer cells and CAFs seems to play an important role in the development and progression of various cancers. However, its role in these processes is both unclear and controversial. In this review, the role of podoplanin in both physiological processes and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:27186410

  20. Evidence for glycoprotein transport into complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Madeleine; Moog, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Maier, Uwe G; Hempel, Franziska

    2013-06-25

    Diatoms are microalgae that possess so-called "complex plastids," which evolved by secondary endosymbiosis and are surrounded by four membranes. Thus, in contrast to primary plastids, which are surrounded by only two membranes, nucleus-encoded proteins of complex plastids face additional barriers, i.e., during evolution, mechanisms had to evolve to transport preproteins across all four membranes. This study reveals that there exist glycoproteins not only in primary but also in complex plastids, making transport issues even more complicated, as most translocation machineries are not believed to be able to transport bulky proteins. We show that plastidal reporter proteins with artificial N-glycosylation sites are indeed glycosylated during transport into the complex plastid of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Additionally, we identified five endogenous glycoproteins, which are transported into different compartments of the complex plastid. These proteins get N-glycosylated during transport across the outermost plastid membrane and thereafter are transported across the second, third, and fourth plastid membranes in the case of stromal proteins. The results of this study provide insights into the evolutionary pressure on translocation mechanisms and pose unique questions on the operating mode of well-known transport machineries like the translocons of the outer/inner chloroplast membranes (Toc/Tic).

  1. Role of envelope glycoproteins in intracellular virus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The possible role viral glycoproteins in intracellular maturation was studied by using two different viruses, avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a coronavirus, and Punta Toro virus (PTV), a bunyavirus. Using the antibiotic tunicamycin, which inhibits glycosylation of N-linked glycoproteins, it was shown that coronavirus particles are formed in the absence of glycosylation. Analysis of the protein composition of these particles indicated that they contain an unglycosylated form of the membrane-associated E1 glycoprotein but lack the E2 spike glycoprotein. A cDNA clone derived from the PTV M RNA genome segment, which encodes the G1 and G2 glycoproteins, was cloned into vaccinia virus. Studies by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the glycoproteins synthesized from this recombinant were found to accumulate intracellularly at the Golgi complex, where virus budding usually takes place. Surface immunoprecipitation and {sup 125}I-protein A binding assays also demonstrated that a majority of the glycoproteins are retained intracellularly and are not transported to the cellular surface. The sequences which encode the G1 and G2 glycoproteins were independently cloned into vaccinia virus as well.

  2. Decoration of proteins with sugar chains: recent advances in glycoprotein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Chemical or chemoenzymatic synthesis is an emerging approach to produce homogeneous glycoproteins, which are hard to obtain by conventional biotechnology methods. Recent advances in the synthetic methodologies for the decoration of protein molecules with oligosaccharides provide several remarkable syntheses of homogeneous glycoproteins. This short review highlights several of the latest syntheses of glycoproteins including therapeutically important glycoproteins, a highly glycosylated protein, and unnatural glycoproteins in order to illustrate the power of the modern glycoprotein synthesis. Structurally defined glycoproteins are a novel material for understanding the molecular basis of glycoprotein functions and for the development of the next generation of biopharmaceuticals.

  3. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of fungal wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing Yuan; de Groot, Piet W J; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2008-01-01

    The manifold functions of fungal wall glycoproteins include maintenance of cell wall integrity, homotypic and heterotypic adhesion, biofilm formation, acquisition of iron and sterols, protein degradation and coping with oxidative stress. Transcriptome studies indicate that the expression levels of most cell wall glycoproteins can vary widely and are tightly controlled. However, owing to their complex and variable glycosylation, fungal wall glycoproteins are difficult to analyze using traditional proteomics approaches. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have enabled rapid and sensitive identification and quantitation of fungal wall glycoproteins; this will be particularly useful for studying the dynamics of the subproteome of fungal wall glycoproteins, and for the development of novel vaccines and diagnostic tools.

  4. Aberrant expression of a chemokinetic glycoprotein in psoriatic skin.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, S; Schmalsteig, F C; Brysk, M M; Hendrick, S J; Solomon, A R

    1987-05-01

    Clinically involved and uninvolved skin samples of 6 psoriatic patients, 4 samples each of normal skin specimens, basal cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma were studied by an indirect immunofluorescence technique. The monospecific antibody used in this study was directed against a 30 kD glycoprotein, normally expressed by the terminally differentiated corneocytes. Functional characterization of this glycoprotein was evaluated by neutrophil cell movement assays. The involved and uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients expressed the 30 kD glycoprotein not only in the stratum corneum but in all the viable epidermal layers as well. Functional studies revealed this glycoprotein to be a potent chemokinetic molecule. These results suggest that the 30 kD glycoprotein is an intrinsic chemokinetic molecule of the terminally differentiated corneocytes, and its precocious and aberrant expression in psoriatic epidermis is potentially responsible for some of the pathophysiologic aspects of psoriasis. PMID:3302266

  5. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  6. Array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desired glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Yongtae; Son, Young Dok; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kim, Eunkyung; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jung Hoe; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and in vivo biological function of a glycoprotein is significantly affected by its glycosylation profile. For the development of glycoproteins with therapeutic applications, selection of cell lines producing a glycoprotein with adequate glycoform is crucial. Here, we demonstrate an array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid and efficient selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desirable glycosylation. Our approach relies on microengraving and interrogation of glycoproteins produced by individual cells in a microwell array in terms of glycosylation profile as well as the produced amount. On the basis of statistical analysis of the interrogation, single cells which are predicted to produce a desired glycoprotein are selected, retrieved, and expanded. We applied the approach to human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO)-producing CHO cells and verified the selection of a single CHO cell that produces rhEPO with a high sialylation degree. Human erythropoietin (hEPO) bearing highly sialylated oligosaccharide was shown to display a much longer plasma half-life, resulting in high therapeutic efficacy. This method may find widespread use in the clonal selection for the production of other glycoproteins with specific glycosylation as well as analysis of the heterogeneity in cell populations in a high-throughput manner.

  7. Properties of potato lectin and the nature of its glycoprotein linkages

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Anthony K.; Desai, Nila N.; Neuberger, Albert; Creeth, J. Michael

    1978-01-01

    1. Potato lectin is a glycoprotein that contains about 47% (by weight) l-arabinose, 3% d-galactose and 11% hydroxyproline. It has a monomeric molecular weight of about 50000 and probably exists as a monomer–dimer system in aqueous solution, with the monomer predominating. It has a very high viscosity, which would indicate either that the molecule is very expanded or that it is an elongated ellipsoid. 2. After prolonged proteolytic digestion of a reduced and carboxymethylated derivative of the lectin, a glycopeptide was isolated (of mol.wt. 32000–34000) that included all the carbohydrate and hydroxyproline of the original glycoprotein but less than 30% of the total original amino acid residues. 3. The arabinose of the glycoprotein is present exclusively as the β-arabinofuranoside and this includes those residues that are directly linked to the hydroxyproline residues of the polypeptide chain. All the arabinose of the glycoprotein is linked to the polypeptide chain through the hydroxyproline residues; the ratio of arabinose to hydroxyproline is 3.4:1. Although α-arabinofuranosides are known to be present in arabinans and arabinogalactans, the natural occurrence of β-arabinofuranosides has not previously been reported. 4. Nine or ten serine residues of the polypeptide chain are substituted with single α-galactopyranoside residues that can be removed by the action of α-galactosidase from coffee beans but not by a β-galactosidase. This is the first report of an α-galactoside linkage to serine. The effect of α-galactosidase is much greater on a glycopeptide from which the arabinose has been already removed, which indicates a steric hindrance of the galactosidase action by adjacent chains of arabinosides. 5. In 0.5m-NaOH (pH13.7), galactose residues were removed from the serine residues of the glycopeptide by a process of β-elimination. This reaction took place very slowly in the intact glycopeptide but much more rapidly when the arabinofuranoside residues

  8. Structural characterization of the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating glycoproteins of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Lin, Chia-Wei; Aebi, Markus; Eichler, Jerry; Guerardel, Yann

    2016-07-01

    N-Glycosylation is a post-translational modification performed in all three domains of life. In the halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii, glycoproteins such as the S-layer glycoprotein are modified by an N-linked pentasaccharide assembled by a series of Agl (archaeal glycosylation) proteins. In the present study, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to define the structure of this glycan attached to at least four of the seven putative S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation sites, namely Asn-13, Asn-83, Asn-274 and Asn-279. Such approaches detected a trisaccharide corresponding to glucuronic acid (GlcA)-β1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, a tetrasaccharide corresponding to methyl-O-4-GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, and a pentasaccharide corresponding to hexose-1,2-[methyl-O-4-]GlcA-β-1,4-galacturonic acid-α1,4-GlcA-β1,4-glucose-β1-Asn, with previous MS and radiolabeling experiments showing the hexose at the non-reducing end of the pentasaccharide to be mannose. The present analysis thus corrects the earlier assignment of the penultimate sugar as a methyl ester of a hexuronic acid, instead revealing this sugar to be a methylated GlcA. The assignments made here are in good agreement with what was already known of the Hfx. volcanii N-glycosylation pathway from previous genetic and biochemical efforts while providing new insight into the process. PMID:26863921

  9. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  10. Inhibitory effect of glycoprotein isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO on activities of allergy-mediators in compound 48/80-stimulated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the anti-allergy potentials of glycoprotein (90kDa) isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO (OFI glycoprotein) in vivo (ICR mice) and in vitro (RBL-2H3 cells). At first, to know whether the OFI glycoprotein has an inhibitory ability for allergy in vivo, we evaluated the activities of allergy-related factors such as histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in compound 48/80 (8 ml/kg BW)-treated ICR mice. After that, we studied to found the effect for anti-allergy in vitro such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, arachidonic acid, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in compound 48/80 (5 microg/ml)-treated RBL-2H3 cells. Our results showed that the OFI glycoprotein (5 mg/kg) inhibited histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in mice serum. Also OFI glycoprotein (25 microg/ml) has suppressive effects on the expression of MAPK (ERK1/2), and on protein expression of anti-allergic proteins (iNOS and COX-2). Thus, we speculate that the OFI glycoprotein is an example of natural compound that blocks anti-allergic signal transduction pathways.

  11. The N-glycan Glycoprotein Deglycosylation Complex (Gpd) from Capnocytophaga canimorsus Deglycosylates Human IgG

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Manfredi, Pablo; Mally, Manuela; Moes, Suzette; Jenö, Paul; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2011-01-01

    C. canimorsus 5 has the capacity to grow at the expenses of glycan moieties from host cells N-glycoproteins. Here, we show that C. canimorsus 5 also has the capacity to deglycosylate human IgG and we analyze the deglycosylation mechanism. We show that deglycosylation is achieved by a large complex spanning the outer membrane and consisting of the Gpd proteins and sialidase SiaC. GpdD, -G, -E and -F are surface-exposed outer membrane lipoproteins. GpdDEF could contribute to the binding of glycoproteins at the bacterial surface while GpdG is a endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase cleaving the N-linked oligosaccharide after the first N-linked GlcNAc residue. GpdC, resembling a TonB-dependent OM transporter is presumed to import the oligosaccharide into the periplasm after its cleavage from the glycoprotein. The terminal sialic acid residue of the oligosaccharide is then removed by SiaC, a periplasm-exposed lipoprotein in direct contact with GpdC. Finally, most likely degradation of the oligosaccharide proceeds sequentially from the desialylated non reducing end by the action of periplasmic exoglycosidases, including β-galactosidases, β-N-Acetylhexosaminidases and α-mannosidases. PMID:21738475

  12. A Particle-Associated Glycoprotein Signal Peptide Essential for Virus Maturation and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Dirk; Pietschmann, Thomas; Picard-Maureau, Marcus; Berg, Angelika; Heinkelein, Martin; Thurow, Jana; Knaus, Petra; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Rethwilm, Axel

    2001-01-01

    Signal peptides (SP) are key determinants for targeting glycoproteins to the secretory pathway. Here we describe the involvement in particle maturation as an additional function of a viral glycoprotein SP. The SP of foamy virus (FV) envelope glycoprotein is predicted to be unusually long. Using an SP-specific antiserum, we demonstrate that its proteolytic removal occurs posttranslationally by a cellular protease and that the major N-terminal cleavage product, gp18, is found in purified viral particles. Analysis of mutants in proposed signal peptidase cleavage positions and N-glycosylation sites revealed an SP about 148 amino acids (aa) in length. FV particle release from infected cells requires the presence of cognate envelope protein and cleavage of its SP sequence. An N-terminal 15-aa SP domain with two conserved tryptophan residues was found to be essential for the egress of FV particles. While the SP N terminus was found to mediate the specificity of FV Env to interact with FV capsids, it was dispensable for Env targeting to the secretory pathway and FV envelope-mediated infectivity of murine leukemia virus pseudotypes. PMID:11390578

  13. EBV glycoproteins: where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2015-01-01

    Glycoproteins are critical to virus entry, to spread within and between hosts and can modify the behavior of cells. Many viruses carry only a few, most found in the virion envelope. EBV makes more than 12, providing flexibility in how it colonizes its human host. Some are dedicated to getting the virus through the cell membrane and on toward the nucleus of the cell, some help guide the virus back out and on to the next cell in the same or a new host. Yet others undermine host defenses helping the virus persist for a lifetime, maintaining a presence that is mostly tolerated and serves to perpetuate EBV as one of the most common infections of man. PMID:26843889

  14. The use of chimeric virus-like particles harbouring a segment of hantavirus Gc glycoprotein to generate a broadly-reactive hantavirus-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-02-07

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80-89) or site #4 (aa 280-289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications.

  15. The Use of Chimeric Virus-like Particles Harbouring a Segment of Hantavirus Gc Glycoprotein to Generate a Broadly-Reactive Hantavirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80–89) or site #4 (aa 280–289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications. PMID:24513568

  16. Four glycoproteins are expressed in the cat zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Stetson, I; Avilés, M; Moros, C; García-Vázquez, F A; Gimeno, L; Torrecillas, A; Aliaga, C; Bernardo-Pisa, M V; Ballesta, J; Izquierdo-Rico, M J

    2015-04-15

    The mammalian oocyte is surrounded by a matrix called the zona pellucida (ZP). This envelope participates in processes such as acrosome reaction induction, sperm binding and may be involved in speciation. In cat (Felis catus), this matrix is composed of at least three glycoproteins called ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4. However, recent studies have pointed to the presence of a fourth protein in several mammals (rat, human, hamster or rabbit), meaning that a reevaluation of cat ZP is needed. For this reason, the objective of this research was to analyze the protein composition of cat ZP by means of proteomic analysis. Using ZP from ovaries and oocytes, several peptides corresponding to four proteins were detected, yielding a coverage of 33.17%, 71.50%, 50.23%, and 49.64% for ZP1, ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4, respectively. Moreover, the expression of four genes was confirmed by molecular analysis. Using total RNA isolated from cat ovaries, the complementary deoxyribonucleic acids encoding cat ZP were partially amplified by reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, ZP1 was totally amplified for the first time in this species. As far as we are aware, this is the first study that confirms the presence of four proteins in cat ZP.

  17. The microfibril-associated glycoproteins (MAGPs) and the microfibrillar niche.

    PubMed

    Mecham, Robert P; Gibson, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    The microfibril-associated glycoproteins MAGP-1 and MAGP-2 are extracellular matrix proteins that interact with fibrillin to influence microfibril function. The two proteins are related through a 60 amino acid matrix-binding domain but their sequences differ outside of this region. A distinguishing feature of both proteins is their ability to interact with TGFβ family growth factors, Notch and Notch ligands, and multiple elastic fiber proteins. MAGP-2 can also interact with αvβ3 integrins via a RGD sequence that is not found in MAGP-1. Morpholino knockdown of MAGP-1 expression in zebrafish resulted in abnormal vessel wall architecture and altered vascular network formation. In the mouse, MAGP-1 deficiency had little effect on elastic fibers in blood vessels and lung but resulted in numerous unexpected phenotypes including bone abnormalities, hematopoietic changes, increased fat deposition, diabetes, impaired wound repair, and a bleeding diathesis. Inactivation of the gene for MAGP-2 in mice produced a neutropenia yet had minimal effects on bone or adipose homeostasis. Double knockouts had phenotypes characteristic of each individual knockout as well as several additional traits only seen when both genes are inactivated. A common mechanism underlying all of the traits associated with the knockout phenotypes is altered TGFβ signaling. This review summarizes our current understanding of the function of the MAGPs and discusses ideas related to their role in growth factor regulation. PMID:25963142

  18. Interaction modes and approaches to glycopeptide and glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Chun; Su, Wan-Chih; Huang, Bao-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Obena, Rofeamor P

    2014-02-21

    Protein glycosylation has received increased attention for its critical role in cell biology and diseases. Developing new methodologies to discern phenotype-dependent glycosylation will not only elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cell signaling cascades but also accelerate biomarker discovery for disease diagnosis or prognosis. In the analytical pipeline, enrichment at either the protein or peptide level is the most critical prerequisite for analyzing heterogeneous glycan composition, linkage, site occupancy and carrier proteins. Because the critical factor for choosing a suitable enrichment method is primarily a particular technique's selectivity and affinity towards target glycoproteins/glycopeptides, it is important to fully understand the working principles for the different approaches. For mechanistic insight into the enrichment protocol, we focused on the fundamental chemical and physical processes for the commonly used approaches based on: (a) glycan/peptide physicochemical properties (hydrophilic interactions, chelation/coordination chemistry) and (b) glycan-specific recognition (lectin-based affinity, covalent bond formation by hydrazide/boronic acid). Various interaction modes, such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interaction, multivalency, and metal- or water-mediated stabilization, are discussed in detail. In addition, we will review the design of and modifications to such methods, hyphenated approaches, and glycoproteomic applications. Finally, we will outline challenges to existing strategies and offer novel proposals for glycoproteome enrichment. PMID:24336240

  19. Extracellular matrix glycoproteins and diffusion barriers in human astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zámecník, J; Vargová, L; Homola, A; Kodet, R; Syková, E

    2004-08-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and changes in the size and geometry of the extracellular space (ECS) in tumour tissue are thought to be of critical importance in influencing the migratory abilities of tumour cells as well as the delivery of therapeutic agents into the tumour. In 21 astrocytic neoplasms, the ECM composition was investigated in situ by the immunohistochemical detection of ECM glycoproteins (tenascin, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin, collagen types I-VI). To explain the changes in ECS size and to detect barriers to diffusion in the tumour tissue, the ECM composition, the cellularity, the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive tumour cell processes and the proliferative activity of the tumours were compared with the size and geometry of the ECS. The ECS volume fraction and the complex of hindrances to diffusion in the ECS (i.e. the tortuosity) were revealed by the real-time iontophoretic tetramethylammonium method. Increased proliferative activity of the tumours correlated with increased ECS volume fraction and tortuosity. The tortuosity of the tumour tissue was not significantly influenced by tumour cell density. Higher tortuosity was found in low-grade astrocytomas associated with the presence of a dense net of GFAP-positive fibrillary processes of the tumour cells. The increase in tortuosity in high-grade tumours correlated with an increased accumulation of ECM molecules, particularly of tenascin. We conclude that the increased malignancy of astrocytic tumours correlates with increases in both ECS volume and ECM deposition.

  20. Castanospermine inhibits glucosidase I and glycoprotein secretion in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sasak, V W; Ordovas, J M; Elbein, A D; Berninger, R W

    1985-01-01

    We studied the effect of the plant alkaloid castanospermine on the biosynthesis and secretion of human hepatoma glycoproteins. The HepG-2 cells, grown in the presence or absence of the alkaloid, were labelled with [2-3H]mannose and then the labelled glycopeptides were prepared by Pronase digestion. This material was analysed by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. Castanospermine caused an accumulation of high-mannose oligosaccharides, by 70-75% over control. The major accumulated product, which could also be labelled with [3H]galactose and was only partially susceptible to alpha-mannosidase digestion, was identified by h.p.l.c. as a Glc3Man9GlcNAc. Thus the alkaloid inhibits glucosidase I in the human hepatoma cells. Analysis of total glycoproteins secreted by the cells into the medium revealed the presence of only complex oligosaccharides in both control and treated cultures, and the amount of the oligosaccharides labelled with radioactive mannose, galactose or N-acetylmannosamine, secreted by treated cells, was decreased by about 60%. The rate of secretion of total protein labelled with [35S]methionine and precipitated from the medium with trichloroacetic acid was inhibited by up to 40% in the presence of castanospermine. Pulse-chase studies utilizing [35S]methionine labelling were performed to study the effect of the alkaloid on secretion of individual plasma proteins. Immunoprecipitation at different chase times with monospecific antisera showed that castanospermine markedly decreased the secretion rates of alpha 1-antitrypsin, caeruloplasmin and, to a lesser extent, that of antithrombin-III. Secretions of apolipoprotein E, a glycoprotein containing only O-linked oligosaccharide(s), and albumin, a non-glycosylated protein, were not affected by the drug. It is suggested that castanospermine inhibits secretion of at least some glycoproteins containing N-linked oligosaccharides, owing to the inhibition

  1. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  2. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  7. Glycoprotein degradation in the blind loop syndrome: identification of glycosidases in jejunal contents.

    PubMed

    Prizont, R

    1981-02-01

    Contents obtained from jejunum of normal controls, self-emptying and self-filling blind loop rats were analyzed for the presence of glycoprotein-degrading glycosidases. The blind loop syndrome was documented by the increased fat excretion and slower growth rate of self-filling blind loop rats 6 wk after surgery. With p-nitrophenylglycosides as substrate, the specific activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, a potential blood group A destroying glycosidase, was 0.90+/-0.40 mU/mg of protein. This level was 23-fold higher than the specific activity of normal controls. In partially purified self-filling blind loop contents, the activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was 9- to 70-fold higher than activities of self-emptying and normal controls. Antibiotic treatment with chloromycetin and polymyxin decreased 24-fold the glycosidase levels in self-filling blind loops. In experiments with natural substrate, the blood group A titer of a20,000g supernate from normal jejunal homogenates decreased 128-fold after 24-h incubation with blind loop contents. Normal contents failed to diminish the blood group reactivity of the natural substrate. Furthermore, blind loop contents markedly decreased the blood group A titer of isolated brush borders. Incubation between blind loop bacteria and mucosal homogenates or isolated brush borders labeled with d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine revealed increased production of labeled ether extractable organic acids. Likewise, intraperitoneal injection of d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine into self-filling blind loop rats resulted in incorporation of the label into luminal short chain fatty acids. These results suggest that glycosidases may provide a mechanism by which blind loop bacteria obtain sugars from intestinal glycoproteins. The released sugars are used and converted by bacteria into energy and organic acids. This use of the host's glycoproteins would allow blind loop bacteria to grow and survive within the lumen independent of exogenous sources.

  8. Naturally occurring variability in the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 and development of cell entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brower, Evan T; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-23

    Naturally occurring genetic variability across HIV-1 subtypes causes amino acid polymorphisms in encoded HIV-1 proteins including the envelope glycoproteins associated with viral entry. The effects of amino acid polymorphisms on the mechanism of HIV-1 entry into cells, a process initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor, are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that amino acid polymorphisms affect the structural stability and domain cooperativity of gp120 and that those differences are reflected in the binding mechanism of the viral envelope glycoprotein to the cell surface receptor and coreceptor. Moreover, subtype differences also affect the binding behavior of experimental HIV cell entry inhibitors. While gp120-A has a slightly lower denaturation temperature than gp120-B, the most notable stability difference is that for gp120-B the van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratio (DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH) is 0.95 whereas for gp120-A is 0.6, indicative of more cooperative domain/domain interactions in gp120-B, as this protein more closely approaches a two-state transition. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that CD4 and 17b (a surrogate antibody for the chemokine coreceptor) exhibit 7- and 3-fold weaker binding affinities for gp120-A. The binding of these proteins as well as that of the experimental entry inhibitor NBD-556 induces smaller conformational changes in gp120-A as evidenced by significantly smaller binding enthalpies and binding entropies. Together, these results describe the effects of gp120 polymorphisms on binding to host cell receptors and emphasize that guidelines for developing future entry inhibitors must recognize and deal with genomic differences between HIV strains.

  9. Site-directed ELISA identifies a highly antigenic region of the simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P R; Parks, D E; Norrby, E; Lerner, R A; Purcell, R H; Chanock, R M

    1988-06-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein (gp32) of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) contains a highly antigenic region that includes amino acid residues 606-628. A synthetic peptide representing this region was highly immunoreactive with sera from SIV-infected primates in a site-directed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This reactivity extended across four primate species from three genera and identified infection with at least two distinct isolates of SIV. This site-directed ELISA represents a simple, accessible method with broad specificity for screening large numbers of primates for antibodies against SIV.

  10. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M; Li, Yue; Miller, David S; Finnell, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.

  11. Arabinogalactan proteins 6 and 11 are required for stamen and pollen function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Levitin, Bella; Richter, Dganit; Markovich, Inbal; Zik, Moriyah

    2008-11-01

    Successful male reproductive function in plants is dependent on the correct development and functioning of stamens and pollen. AGP6 and AGP11 are two homologous Arabidopsis genes encoding cell wall-associated arabinogalactan glycoproteins (AGPs). Both genes were found to be specifically expressed in stamens, pollen grains and pollen tubes, suggesting that these genes may play a role in male organ development and function. RNAi lines with reduced AGP6 and AGP11 expression were generated. These, together with lines harboring point mutations in the coding region of AGP6, were used to show that loss of function in AGP6 and AGP11 led to reduced fertility, at least partly as a result of inhibition of pollen tube growth. Our results also suggest that AGP6 and AGP11 play an additional role in the release of pollen grains from the mature anther. Thus, our study demonstrates the involvement of specific AGPs in pollen tube growth and stamen function.

  12. Identification of the S-layer glycoproteins and their covalently linked glycans in the halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Lü, Yang; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Zhongfu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Yuanming; Han, Jing; Xiang, Hua; Du, Yuguo; Jin, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Haloarcula hispanica is one of members of the Halobacteriaceae, which displays particularly low restriction activity and is therefore important as one of the most tractable haloarchaea for archaeal genetic research. Although the Har. hispanica S-layer protein has been reported glycosylated, the S-layer glycoprotein and its glycosylation have not been investigated yet. In this study, the S-layer proteins of Har. hispanica were extracted and characterized. The S-layer was found containing two different glycoproteins which shared highly similar amino acid sequences. The genes coding for these two S-layer glycoproteins were found next to each other in the genome. Moreover, the N- and O-linked glycans were released from these two S-layer glycoproteins for structural determination. Based on the mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, the N-glycan was determined as a branched trisaccharide containing a 225 Da residue corresponded to a 2-amino-6-sulfo-2, 6-dideoxy-quinovose, which was the first time that a naturally occurring form of sulfoquinovosamine was identified. Besides, the O-glycan was characterized as a Glcα-1,4-Gal disaccharide by mass spectrometry combined with monosaccharide composition analysis and glycosidase treatment. The determination of the N- and O-glycan structure will be helpful for studying the diverse protein glycosylation pathways in archaea utilizing H. hispanica as a new model.

  13. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paatero, G.I.L. ); Gahmberg, C.G. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  14. Regenerated bacterial cellulose microfluidic column for glycoproteins separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuntao; Zhu, Chunlin; Huang, Yang; Nie, Ying; Yang, Jiazhi; Shen, Ruiqi; Sun, Dongping

    2016-02-10

    To analysis and separate glycoproteins, a simple strategy to prepare regenerated bacterial cellulose (RBC) column with concanavalin A (Con A) lectin immobilized in microfluidic system was applied. RBC was filled into microchannel to fabricate RBC microcolumn after bacterial cellulose dissolved in NaOH-sulfourea water solution. Lectin Con A was covalently connected onto RBC matrix surface via Schiff-base formation. Lysozyme (non-glycoprotein) and transferrin (glycoprotein) were successfully separated based on their different affinities toward the immobilized Con A. Overall, the RBC microfluidic system presents great potential application in affinity chromatography of glycoproteins analysis, and this research represents a significant step to prepare bacterial cellulose (BC) as column packing material in microfluidic system. What is more, troublesome operations for lectin affinity chromatography were simplified by integrating the microfluidic chip onto a HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) system.

  15. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  16. Concanavalin A binding glycoprotein in human stratum corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Miller, J.

    1984-03-01

    A mannose-containing 40K glycoprotein has been identified in the stratum corneum of normal human epidermis. It is apparently membrane-bound and in the intact epidermis it is inaccessible to either concanavalin A or to trypsin. After it is detergent-solubilized, it can be labeled with concanavalin A or destroyed with trypsin. There is little or none of this glycoprotein in the viable cells of the epidermis.

  17. Localization of the papain cleavage site of H-2 glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ewenstein, B M; Freed, J H; Mole, L E; Nathenson, S G

    1976-01-01

    The antigenic products of the murine H-2K and H-2D genes are glycoproteins of about 45,000 molecular weight which are tightly integrated within the cell surface membrane. A glycoprotein fragment (FAg, antigenic fragment) of 37,000 daltons carrying the carbohydrate, antigenic sites, and the associated putative beta2-microglobulin of 12,000 daltons can be generated by papain cleavage either of the native molecules in the cell membrane or of immune precipitates made from the antigen solubilized by nonionic detergent. Partial NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the native H-2 glycoprotein and of the papain-cleaved glycoprotein fragment establish that the fragment is, in fact, the NH2-terminal portion of the native molecule. Thus, the cleavage by papain proteolysis is near the COOH-terminus, and removal of the COOH-terminal portion (Fm, membrane fragment) converts the glycoprotein to a water-soluble form. This observation suggests that the NH2-terminus of the native glycoprotein extends out of the hydrophobic bilayer of the cell membrane, and that the COOH-terminus contains the membrane binding region and is buried within the bilayer. PMID:1062805

  18. Identification and characterization of a 38 kDa glycoprotein functionally associated with mating activity of Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Marzia; Della Giovampaola, Cinzia; Trielli, Francesca; Focarelli, Riccardo; Rosati, Floriana; Umberta Delmonte Corrado, Maria

    2008-05-01

    In Paramecium primaurelia mating interactions take place immediately after mixing mating-competent cells of opposite mating types. The cells clump in clusters (mating reaction) and then separate in pairs. Previous results have shown that sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates are present on the cell surface and are involved in mating-cell pairing. In order to identify the sialic acid-containing glycoprotein(s), we first metabolically radiolabelled non-mating-competent cells with D-[6-(3)H]galactose, and then analyzed the radiolabelled proteins by anion exchange chromatography. We characterized a 38 kDa (gp38) sialic acid-containing glycoprotein and raised the corresponding polyclonal antibody by means of which we localized the antigen at the level of the oral region of non-mating-competent cells and on the ciliary surface of mating-competent cells. Immunoblot analysis of the ciliary protein fraction showed that the anti-gp38 serum interacted with a 38 kDa protein in both mating types I and II cells. We also demonstrated the functional activity of gp38 in the mating reaction by means of anti-gp38 antibody competition assays. PMID:17870426

  19. The oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein belongs to a distinct family of proteins and contains the HNK-1 carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The complete primary structure of the human oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), a glycophospholipid-linked membrane protein of oligodendrocytes and central nervous system myelin, has been determined. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts a polypeptide of 433 amino acids which includes a 17-amino acid leader sequence. OMgp consists of four domains: (a) a short cysteine-rich motif at the NH2 terminus; (b) a series of tandem leucine-rich repeats (LRs) present in several other proteins where they may play roles in adhesion; (c) a serine/threonine-rich region that contains probable attachment sites for O-linked carbohydrates; and (d) a hydrophobic COOH-terminal segment that is likely to be cleaved concomitant with the attachment of lipid during biosynthesis of OMgp. OMgp shares the first three of its four domains with the platelet glycoprotein Ib, which is responsible for the initial adhesion of platelets to the exposed subendothelium during hemostasis. Together with glycoprotein Ib and several other proteins, OMgp belongs to a family of proteins that contain both an NH2-terminal cysteine-rich motif and an adjacent series of LRs. In addition, we report that a subpopulation of OMgp molecules contains the HNK-1 carbohydrate, which has been shown to mediate interactions among cells in the central nervous system. PMID:1688857

  20. Homology modelling of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Domicevica, Laura; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that exports a huge range of compounds out of cells and is thus one of the key proteins in conferring multi-drug resistance in cancer. Understanding how it achieves such a broad specificity and the series of conformational changes that allow export to occur form major, on-going, research objectives around the world. Much of our knowledge to date has been derived from mutagenesis and assay data. However, in recent years, there has also been great progress in structural biology and although the structure of human P-gp has not yet been solved, there are now a handful of related structures on which homology models can be built to aid in the interpretation of the vast amount of experimental data that currently exists. Many models for P-gp have been built with this aim, but the situation is complicated by the apparent flexibility of the system and by the fact that although many potential templates exist, there is large variation in the conformational state in which they have been crystallized. In this review, we summarize how homology modelling has been used in the past, how models are typically selected and finally illustrate how MD simulations can be used as a means to give more confidence about models that have been generated via this approach.

  1. Antifreeze glycoprotein agents: structural requirements for activity.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio A; Marshall, Sergio H; Guzman, Fanny

    2011-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are considered to be the most efficient means to reduce ice damage to cell tissues since they are able to inhibit growth and crystallization of ice. The key element of antifreeze proteins is to act in a non-colligative manner which allows them to function at concentrations 300-500 times lowers than other dissolved solutes. During the past decade, AFGPs have demonstrated tremendous potential for many pharmaceutical and food applications. Presently, the only route to obtain AFGPs involves the time consuming and expensive process of isolation and purification from deep-sea polar fishes. Unfortunately, it is not amenable to mass production and commercial applications. The lack of understanding of the mechanism through which the AFGPs inhibit ice growth has also hampered the realization of industrial and biotechnological applications. Here we report the structural motifs that are essential for antifreeze activity of AFGPs, and propose a unified mechanism based on both recent studies of short alanine peptides and structure activity relationship of synthesized AFGPs.

  2. Characterization of the putative fusogenic domain in vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Ghosh, H P

    1994-04-01

    The envelope glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus induces membrane fusion at low pH. Site-directed mutagenesis of specific amino acids within a segment spanning amino acids 123 to 137 of G protein, which is highly conserved in vesiculoviruses and was previously shown by us to be involved in fusogenic activity (Y. Li, C. Drone, E. Sat, and H. P. Ghosh, J. Virol. 67:4070-4077, 1993), was used to determine the role of this region in low-pH-induced membrane fusion. The mutant glycoproteins expressed in COS cells were assayed for acid-pH-induced cell-cell fusion. Substitution of the variant Pro-123 with Leu had no effect on the fusogenic activity, while substitution of conserved Phe-125 and Asp-137 with Tyr and Asn, respectively, shifted the pH optimum of membrane fusion to a more acidic pH value and decreased the fusion efficiency. The deletion of amino acid residues 124 to 127, 131 to 137, or 124 to 137 produced mutants defective in transport. Mutation of the conserved residues Gly-124 and Pro-127 to Ala and to Gly or Leu, respectively, inhibited cell-cell fusion activity by about 90% without affecting transport of the mutant proteins to the cell surface, suggesting that these two residues may be present within the fusion peptide and thus may be directly involved in fusion. This highly conserved domain containing neutral amino acids of G protein may therefore represent the putative fusion domain of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein.

  3. PCR cloning and characterization of multiple ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase cDNAs from tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.; Gianfagna, T.

    1998-01-01

    Four ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) cDNAs were cloned from tomato fruit and leaves by the PCR techniques. Three of them (agp S1, agp S2, and agp S3) encode the large subunit of AGP, the fourth one (agp B) encodes the small subunit. The deduced amino acid sequences of the cDNAs show very high identities (96-98%) to the corresponding potato AGP isoforms, although there are major differences in tissue expression profiles. All four tomato AGP transcripts were detected in fruit and leaves; the predominant ones in fruit are agp B and agp S1, whereas in leaves they are agp B and agp S3. Genomic southern analysis suggests that the four AGP transcripts are encoded by distinct genes.

  4. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis. PMID:26631293

  5. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis.

  6. Recognition and invasion of human erythrocytes by malarial parasites: contribution of sialoglycoproteins to attachment and host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.J.; Blankenberg, T.; Sensabaugh, G.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1984-05-01

    The receptivity of human erythrocytes to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites can be decreased by neuraminidase or trypsin treatment, an observation that supports a role for the erythrocyte sialoglycoproteins (glycophorins) in invasion. We have found that ..cap alpha../sub 1/-acid glycoprotein (AGP), added to in vitro cultures, can restore invasion of enzyme-treated human erythrocytes. AGP is structurally different from the glycophorins although it does carry 12% sialic acid. Its ability to restore receptivity to desialylated cells is dependent on its sialic acid complement, its concentration, and its binding to the erythrocyte surface. We present evidence that AGP forms a bridge between the merozoite and the enzyme-treated erythrocyte that allows the stronger and more complex interactions of invasion to proceed. We suggest that the glycophorins play the same role on the surface of the intact erythrocyte. 31 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  7. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described.

  8. Reglucosylation by UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 delays glycoprotein secretion but not degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Abla; Patel, Nishant; Tamura, Taku; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) is a central quality control gatekeeper in the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The reglucosylation of glycoproteins supports their rebinding to the carbohydrate-binding ER molecular chaperones calnexin and calreticulin. A cell-based reglucosylation assay was used to investigate the role of UGT1 in ER protein surveillance or the quality control process. UGT1 was found to modify wild-type proteins or proteins that are expected to eventually traffic out of the ER through the secretory pathway. Trapping of reglucosylated wild-type substrates in their monoglucosylated state delayed their secretion. Whereas terminally misfolded substrates or off-pathway proteins were most efficiently reglucosylated by UGT1, the trapping of these mutant substrates in their reglucosylated or monoglucosylated state did not delay their degradation by the ER-associated degradation pathway. This indicated that monoglucosylated mutant proteins were actively extracted from the calnexin/calreticulin binding-reglucosylation cycle for degradation. Therefore trapping proteins in their monoglucosylated state was sufficient to delay their exit to the Golgi but had no effect on their rate of degradation, suggesting that the degradation selection process progressed in a dominant manner that was independent of reglucosylation and the glucose-containing A-branch on the substrate glycans. PMID:25428988

  9. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of the proteins and glycoproteins of purified human platelet surface and intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Crawford, N

    1984-08-15

    By using highly purified surface and intracellular membrane fractions prepared from human platelets by free-flow electrophoresis, the polypeptide and glycopeptides of these membranes have been characterized by high-resolution gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions. Silver staining and a variety of glycoprotein-staining procedures have been applied to identify the major components. The principal finding was the clear disparity between the distribution patterns for these two membrane fractions. There are proportionately more low-Mr acidic components present in the intracellular membrane than in the surface-derived membrane. Of the major platelet surface glycoproteins GPIb, IIb, IIIa and IIIb (or IV) well expressed in the surface membrane only, GPIIb and IIIa appear as trace components in the intracellular membrane. The cytoskeleton proteins, actin, myosin, tropomyosin, actin-binding protein and alpha-actinin are prominent features of the surface membrane and essentially absent from the intracellular membrane. Neuraminidase treatment at the whole-cell level, before homogenization, which is an essential requirement for good resolution of the two membrane subfractions, modifies a number of the glycoprotein subunits with respect to their pI characteristics, suggesting much molecular micro-heterogeneity with respect to sialic acid content. A comparison of the staining characteristics of the major glycoproteins with periodic acid/Schiff's reagent and concanavalin A/peroxidase detection and a combined procedure revealed significant differences in associated carbohydrate structures, and the major concanavalin A-binding component was shown to be GPIIIa. These observations are discussed in the context of functional activities of both membrane systems in the physiological behaviour of the platelet.

  10. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression of functional bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein gIV in transfected bovine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tikoo, S K; Fitzpatrick, D R; Babiuk, L A; Zamb, T J

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein gIV was mapped, cloned, and sequenced. The gene is situated between map units 0.892 and 0.902 and encodes a predicted protein of 417 amino acids with a signal sequence cleavage site between amino acids 18 and 19. Comparison of the BHV-1 amino acid sequence with the homologous glycoproteins of other alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gD, revealed significant homology in the amino-terminal half of the molecules, including six invariant cysteine residues. The identity of the open reading frame was verified by expression of the authentic recombinant BHV-1 gIV in bovine cells by using eucaryotic expression vectors pRSDneo (strong, constitutive promoter) and pMSG (weak, dexamethasone-inducible promoter). Constitutive expression of gIV proved toxic to cells, since stable cell lines could only be established when the gIV gene was placed under the control of an inducible promoter. Expression of gIV was cell associated and localized predominantly in the perinuclear region, although nuclear and plasma membrane staining was also observed. Radioimmunoprecipitation revealed that the recombinant glycoprotein was efficiently processed and had a molecular weight similar to that of the native form of gIV expressed in BHV-1-infected bovine cells. Recombinant gIV produced in the transfected bovine cells induced cell fusion, polykaryon formation, and nuclear fusion. In addition, expression of gIV interfered with BHV-1 replication in the transfected bovine cells. Images PMID:2168991

  11. Isolation and characterization of lung connective-tissue glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lafuma, C; Moczar, M; Robert, L

    1982-01-01

    1. Glycoproteins of hamster, rat and baboon lung parenchyma were investigated by using [14C]glucosamine incorporation in vitro followed by sequential extraction of the macromolecular components and characterization of the glycoproteins in the extracts. 2. Slices of lung parenchyma maintained in vitro incorporated [U-14C]glucosamine linearly with time into non-diffusible macromolecules for up to 5h. All the macromolecule-associated 14C label was present as [14C]glucosamine. 3. These 14C-labelled macromolecules were extracted from previously delipidated and salt-extracted lung by 5M-guanidinium chloride in the presence of dithiothreitol and proteinase inhibitors before (extract A1) and after (extract A2) hydrolysis of the collagen by collagenase. The [14C]glucosamine-labelled glycoproteins in extracts A1 and A2 contained 55 and 5% respectively of the total [14C]glucosamine incorporated in the lung of all three species studied. 4. The [14C]glucosamine-labelled glycoproteins were analysed by gel-filtration chromatography, sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. The major [14C]glucosamine-labelled glycoproteins of baboon lung parenchyma had apparent mol.wts. of about 400 000, 140 000 and 65 000 with isoelectric points respectively of 4.8, 5.4 and 5.4. The hamster lung glycoproteins with isoelectric points of 4.1 and 5.8 were devoid of hydroxyproline and contained galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. These experiments indicate that several distinct glycoproteins are synthesized in situ by the cells of pulmonary parenchyma and may well play a role in its structure and function. PMID:7115303

  12. A carbohydrate-binding affinity ligand for the specific enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; El Khoury, Graziella; Zhang, Peiqing; Rudd, Pauline M; Lowe, Christopher R

    2016-04-29

    One challenge facing the production of glycoprotein therapeutics is the lack of stable and selective affinity ligands for their enrichment. Synthetic affinity ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction represent a desirable option, particularly those incorporating benzoboroxole and its derivatives, which have been shown to enrich glycoproteins under physiological conditions. Thus, an Ugi ligand, A21C11I8, comprising 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenylboronic acid was synthesised on aldehyde-functionalised Sepharose™. Immobilised A21C11I8 displayed affinity for the glycosylated protein, glucose oxidase (GOx), which bound primarily through its glycan moiety. The ligand had a preference for sugar alcohols and the furanose form of the monosaccharides tested. Compared with immobilised 3-aminophenylboronic acid and Concanavalin A, the Ugi ligand was able to purify GOx from spiked Escherichia coli supernatants with retention of its maximum enzymatic activity and protein recovery. Glycan profiles of human immunoglobulin G tested on A21C11I8 columns suggested that the adsorbent possesses the potential to resolve sialylated and neutral glycoforms. The benzoboroxole-functionalised Ugi ligand may find application in selective glycoform separation.

  13. Determinant for endoplasmic reticulum retention in the luminal domain of the human cytomegalovirus US3 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungwook; Park, Boyoun; Ahn, Kwangseog

    2003-02-01

    US3 of human cytomegalovirus is an endoplasmic reticulum resident transmembrane glycoprotein that binds to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and prevents their departure. The endoplasmic reticulum retention signal of the US3 protein is contained in the luminal domain of the protein. To define the endoplasmic reticulum retention sequence in more detail, we have generated a series of deletion and point mutants of the US3 protein. By analyzing the rate of intracellular transport and immunolocalization of the mutants, we have identified Ser58, Glu63, and Lys64 as crucial for retention, suggesting that the retention signal of the US3 protein has a complex spatial arrangement and does not comprise a contiguous sequence of amino acids. We also show that a modified US3 protein with a mutation in any of these amino acids maintains its ability to bind class I molecules; however, such mutated proteins are no longer retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and are not able to block the cell surface expression of class I molecules. These findings indicate that the properties that allow the US3 glycoprotein to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and bind major histocompatibility complex class I molecules are located in different parts of the molecule and that the ability of US3 to block antigen presentation is due solely to its ability to retain class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:12525649

  14. Topography of the simian rotavirus nonstructural glycoprotein (NS28) in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Au, K S; Estes, M K

    1988-06-01

    The simian rotavirus SA11 genome segment 10 codes for a nonstructural glycoprotein, NS28, that has been hypothesized to be involved in budding of viral particles into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Previous studies had suggested that NS28 is an integral membrane protein of the ER, possibly a transmembrane protein. We have examined the topography of NS28 inserted in microsomal membranes following cell-free translation of genome segment 10 transcripts. These transcripts were obtained either by hybrid selection of mRNA synthesized by the endogenous viral RNA polymerase or by in vitro transcription of genome segment 10 cDNA using SP6 polymerase. Full-length and truncated gene 10 transcripts were translated in a cell-free system supplemented with dog pancreatic microsomes. The existence of a cytoplasmic domain of the translation product was demonstrated by protease protection experiments. An 18,000 (18K) mol wt glycosylated polypeptide was protected from digestion with proteinase K and trypsin, whereas chymotrypsin digestion yielded a 23K mol wt glycosylated polypeptide. Correlation of these biochemical data with the known sequence of NS28 suggests that a 10K mol wt hydrophilic, carboxy-terminal fragment (from amino acid number 86 to amino acid number 175) of this glycoprotein is exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the ER membrane. A model of how NS28 folds in the ER membrane is proposed. PMID:2835861

  15. Aldosterone-induced glycoproteins: electrophysiological-biochemical correlation.

    PubMed

    Szerlip, H M; Weisberg, L; Geering, K; Rossier, B C; Cox, M

    1988-05-01

    Aldosterone induces the synthesis of a group of glycoproteins (GP65,70) in toad urinary bladders which are potential effectors of the natriferic action of this hormone. In the present study we have confirmed that aldosterone produces a two-phase electrophysiological response. During the early phase (less than 3 h) short-circuit current and transepithelial conductance increase in parallel, while during the late phase (greater than 3 h) short-circuit current continues to increase without any further change in conductance. By biosynthetically labeling aldosterone-treated toad bladders with [35S]methionine either during the early (h 0-2 or 1-3) or the late (h 4-6 or 7-9) phases of the natriferic response, we have demonstrated that GP65,70 is synthesized as a late effect of aldosterone. Since synthesis of GP65,70 occurs at a time when the electromotive force of the Na+ pump is increasing, and since GP65,70 biochemically resembles the beta subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, studies were undertaken to examine whether GP65,70 is the beta subunit. Purified amphibian renal beta subunit was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and was found to have an isoelectric point and Mr value similar to those of GP65,70. However, when nitrocellulose blots containing wheat germ agglutinin-purified proteins from aldosterone-treated bladders were stained with monospecific polyclonal antibodies developed against the beta subunit, GP65,70 was not recognized, whereas a group of slightly more acidic proteins of similar Mr were recognized. Thus, GP65,70 is not the beta subunit of Na+/Ka+-ATPase. Further studies are needed to determine the cellular function of GP65,70. PMID:2835098

  16. Alterations of intestinal glycoprotein hydrolases in congenital diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The diabetic BioBreed (BB{sub d}) rat was used for the study of the molecular structure of intestinal brush border sucrase-{alpha}-dextrinase (SD) and aminooligopeptidase (AOP) in diabetes mellitus. The specific catalytic activity of S-D and AOP in the BB{sub d} rat is normal. However, solid-phase radioimmunoassay revealed loss of some antigenic determinants in the BB{sub d} rat. S-D and AOP migrated abnormally on 6% SDS-gel electrophoresis in the BB{sub d} rat. S was larger (+5 kDa), D was either smaller (-5 kDa) or unaltered, and AOP was smaller (-5 kDa) in the BB{sub d} than in the normal Wistar. The structural abnormalities were independent of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis and restored to normal by daily insulin treatment (NPH, 3-4 units/rat) for two to three weeks. Newly-synthesized brush border hydrolases were examined after 6 hours of intraperitoneal injection of ({sup 35}S) methionine (2 mCi) and found to be altered, suggesting that structural abnormality appeared acutely during intracellular synthesis rather than being due to slow extracellular modifications such as non-enzymatic glycosylation. Deglycosylation of brush border proteins by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid resulted in an apoprotein with normal electrophoretic migration in BB{sub d}, indicating that the alteration was due to the carbohydrates component of the glycoprotein. Pulse-chase studies with ({sup 35}S) methionine were consistent with normal protein an co-translational and initial N-linked carbohydrate assembly in association with the endoplasmic reticulum in BB{sub d}. However, the post-translational maturation of N-linked and addition of 0-linked carbohydrate chains in Golgi were prolonged, and produced a larger single-chain precursor of S-D in BB{sub d} than normal.

  17. Thyroid Hormone and P-Glycoprotein in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Paul J.; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sudha, Thangirala; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp; multidrug resistance pump 1, MDR1; ABCB1) is a plasma membrane efflux pump that when activated in cancer cells exports chemotherapeutic agents. Transcription of the P-gp gene (MDR1) and activity of the P-gp protein are known to be affected by thyroid hormone. A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone on integrin αvβ3 also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of L-thyroxine (T4) that blocks nongenomic actions of T4 and of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) at αvβ3. Covalently bound to a nanoparticle, tetrac as nanotetrac acts at the integrin to increase intracellular residence time of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin and etoposide that are substrates of P-gp. This action chemosensitizes cancer cells. In this review, we examine possible molecular mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of nanotetrac on P-gp activity. Mechanisms for consideration include cancer cell acidification via action of tetrac/nanotetrac on the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) and hormone analogue effects on calmodulin-dependent processes and on interactions of P-gp with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and osteopontin (OPN), apparently via αvβ3. Intracellular acidification and decreased H+ efflux induced by tetrac/nanotetrac via NHE1 is the most attractive explanation for the actions on P-gp and consequent increase in cancer cell retention of chemotherapeutic agent-ligands of MDR1 protein. PMID:25866761

  18. [Secretagogue action of glyceryl guaiacolate in tracheal submucosal glands (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Yanaura, S; Takeda, H; Misawa, M

    1982-01-01

    The effects of glyceryl guaiacolate on secretory activities of tracheal secretory cells and on behavior of mucus glycoprotein in these cells were investigated histologically and histochemically using isolated canine trachea. Following glyceryl guaiacolate treatment, the number of total glycoprotein-containing goblet cells (GC) did not change. The numbers of acid glycoprotein (AGP)-, neutral glycoprotein (NGP)-, and sulphated glycoprotein (SGP)-containing GC were also unaltered in a concentration range of 10(-7) to 10(-4)M. On the other hand the acinar inner diameter of the submucosal gland (SG) and the acinar inner diameter to wall ratio significantly increased, while thickness of acinus significantly decreased with 10(-6), 10(-5) and 10(-4)M glyceryl guaiacolate. AGP and SGP contents in glandular cells markedly decreased, while the ratio of the numbers of AGP- to NGP-containing glandular cell were the same, suggesting that glyceryl guaiacolate does not change the quality of mucus glycoprotein in GC and SG. Glyceryl guaiacolate produced a marked increase in total saccharide, protein, and N-acetylhexosamine concentrations in the incubation fluid. These findings suggest that glyceryl guaiacolate has no influence on the secretory activity of GC, but markedly stimulates the activity of SG. The secretagogue effect of the agent would be ascribable to stimulation of mucus discharge, but not stimulation of mucus synthesis. PMID:7061026

  19. P-glycoprotein activity and biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Vaalburg, W. . E-mail: w.vaalburg@pet.umcg.nl; Hendrikse, N.H.; Elsinga, P.H.; Bart, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2005-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a transmembrane drug efflux pump encoded by the MDR-1 gene in humans. Most likely P-gp protects organs against endogenous and exogenous toxins by extruding toxic compounds such as chemotherapeutics and other drugs. Many drugs are substrates for P-gp. Since P-gp is also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, P-gp substrates reach lower concentrations in the brain than in P-gp-negative tissues. Failure of response to chemotherapy of malignancies can be due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Many tumors are multidrug resistant (MDR); resistant to several structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. Several mechanisms are involved in MDR of which P-gp is studied most extensively. P-gp extrudes drugs out of tumor cells resulting in decreased intracellular drug concentrations, leading to the MDR phenotype. Furthermore, the MDR-1 gene exhibits several single nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which result in different transport capabilities. P-gp functionality and the effect of P-gp modulation on the pharmacokinetics of novel and established drugs can be studied in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) using carbon-11 and fluorine-18-labeled P-gp substrates and modulators. PET may demonstrate the consequences of genetic differences on tissue pharmacokinetics. Inhibitors such as calcium-channel blockers (verapamil), cyclosporin A, ONT-093, and XR9576 can modulate the P-gp functionality. With PET the effect of P-gp modulation on the bioavailability of drugs can be investigated in humans in vivo. PET also allows the measurement of the efficacy of newly developed P-gp modulators.

  20. Physical Properties of the Glycoprotein Mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Davis, William; Superfine, Richard; Boucher, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Epithelial cell surfaces are covered by a protective gel known as mucus. The physiological function of this gel depends on its rheological properties, and these properties are largely derived from the secreted glycoprotein mucin. The genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the adhesion of thick, viscous mucus on these tissues. In the lungs, this results in the interruption of mucus transport thus compromising the first line of defense against pathogens in these tissues. In order to restore the flow of tracheobronchial mucus out of the body, knowledge of the molecular and physical properties of mucin and mucin solutions would be greatly beneficial. The present model for these molecules is that of a long linear strand consisting of highly glycosylated regions linked by cystein-rich globular regions. It is thought that the globular regions may interact either through intermolecular disulfide bonds or through hydrophobic interactions. It has also been speculated that the glycosylated regions may have lectin-like interactions. In the present work, single mucin molecules were imaged at high resolution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Phase mode imaging was used to map the interactions between functionalized AFM tips and the molecular topography. Additionally, using force-distance curves with the AFM, the adhesion between mucin bound tips and cell surface glycocalyx and glycocalyx-like model surfaces, was measured. And, finally, the viscoelastic properties of mucin solutions were measured using the recently developed technique, single particle tracking microrheology. A model is being developed that will incorporate the properties of mucins beginning at the single molecule and ending with the bulk viscoelastic properties.

  1. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Identification of Potential Glycoprotein Biomarkers in Estrogen Receptor Positive (ER+) and Negative (ER-) Human Breast Cancer Tissues by LC-LTQ/FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Semaan, Suzan M.; Wang, Xu; Marshall, Alan G.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most fatal cancer in American women. To increase the life expectancy of patients with breast cancer new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and drug targets must be identified. A change in the glycosylation on a glycoprotein often causes a change in the function of that glycoprotein; such a phenomenon is correlated with cancerous transformation. Thus, glycoproteins in human breast cancer estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tissues and those in the more advanced stage of breast cancer, estrogen receptor negative (ER-) tissues, were compared. Glycoproteins showing differences in glycosylation were examined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis with double staining (glyco- and total protein staining) and identified by reversed-phase nano-liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap/ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Among the identified glycosylated proteins are alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1-antitrypsin, calmodulin, and superoxide dismutase mitochondrial precursor that were further verified by Western blotting for both ER+ and ER- human breast tissues. Results show the presence of a possible glycosylation difference in alpha-1-antitrypsin, a potential tumor-derived biomarker for breast cancer progression, which was expressed highest in the ER- samples. PMID:22773931

  3. Glycan specificity of myelin-associated glycoprotein and sialoadhesin deduced from interactions with synthetic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Bovin, N; Hasegawa, A; Ishida, H; Kiso, M; Kelm, S

    1998-12-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and sialoadhesin (Sn) bind to sialylated glycans on cell surfaces and are thought to be involved in cell-cell interactions. In order to investigate how the interactions of these proteins are influenced by the glycan structure, we compared the inhibitory potencies of different synthetic monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent polyacrylamide derivatives. Using oligosaccharides with modifications in the sialic acid, galactose or N-acetylglucosamine moieties, we could demonstrate that both MAG and Sn bind with high preference to alpha2,3-linked sialic acid and interact at least with the three terminal monosaccharide units. For MAG, contacts with even more distant monosaccharides are likely, since pentasaccharides are bound better than trisaccharides. Also, an additional sialic acid at position six of the third-terminal monosaccharide unit enhances binding to MAG, whereas it does not influence binding to Sn significantly. Modifications of the sialic acid glycerol side chain demonstrated that the hydroxy groups at positions 8 and 9 are required for binding to both proteins. Surprisingly, MAG binds 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid significantly better than N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas Sn prefers the latter structure. These results indicate that the interactions of MAG and Sn are mainly with sialic acid and that additional contacts with the subterminal galactose and N-acetylglucosamine residues also contribute to the binding strength, although to a lesser degree. PMID:9874234

  4. Linkage of a membrane skeleton to integral membrane glycoproteins in human platelets. Identification of one of the glycoproteins as glycoprotein Ib.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J E

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether platelets contain a membrane skeleton. Platelets were labeled by a sodium periodate/sodium [3H]borohydride method and lysed with Triton X-100. Much of the filamentous actin could be sedimented at low g forces (15,600 g, 4 min), but some of the actin filaments required high-speed centrifugation for their sedimentation (100,000 g, 3 h). The latter filaments differed from those in the low-speed pellet in that they could not be depolymerized by Ca2+ and could not be sedimented at low g forces even from Triton X-100 lysates of platelets that had been activated with thrombin. Actin-binding protein sedimented with both types of filaments, but 3H-labeled membrane glycoproteins were recovered mainly with the high-speed filaments. The primary 3H-labeled glycoprotein recovered with this "membrane skeleton" was glycoprotein (GP) Ib. Approximately 70% of the platelet GP Ib was present in this skeleton. Several other minor glycoproteins, including greater than 50% of the GP Ia and small amounts of three unidentified glycoproteins of Mr greater than 200,000, were also recovered with the membrane skeleton. The Triton X-100 insolubility of GP Ib, GP Ia, a minor membrane glycoprotein of 250,000 Mr, and actin-binding protein resulted from their association with actin filaments as they were rendered Triton X-100-soluble when actin filaments were depolymerized with deoxyribonuclease I and co-isolated with actin filaments on sucrose gradients. When isolated platelet plasma membranes were extracted with Triton X-100, actin, actin-binding protein, and GP Ib were recovered as the Triton X-100 residue. These studies show that unstimulated platelets contain a membrane skeleton composed of actin filaments and actin-binding protein that is distinct from the rest of the cytoskeleton and is attached to GP Ib, GP Ia, and a minor glycoprotein of 250,000 Mr on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:2932470

  5. Monodisperse boronate polymeric particles synthesized by a precipitation polymerization strategy: particle formation and glycoprotein response from the standpoint of the Flory-Huggins model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianxi; Qu, Yanyan; Yang, Kaiguang; Wu, Qi; Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-02-12

    The development of a highly specific recognition system for glycoprotein capture from complex biological samples is a prerequisite to the success of mass spectra-based glycoproteomics analysis. To achieve this purpose, a one-pot precipitation polymerization (PP) strategy with a novel solvent system composed of water/ethanol (4:1, v/v) is described for preparing boronate-affinity polymeric micro/nano particles using 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as the functional monomer and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBA) alone or together with divinylbenzene (DVB) as the cross-linker(s). The proposed polymerization strategy not only affords monodisperse polymeric submicrometer particles with a smooth surface and controllable size, ranging from 300 to 700 nm, but also increases the loading capacity of boronic acid, which could hardly be achieved by other polymerization methods, thus leading to the specific recognition of glycoproteins. The effects of solvent systems and monomers on the morphology and boronate-affinity capacity of prepared materials were further investigated based on the Flory-Huggins model. It was proved that the reaction rate of various monomers during particle formation might be the key factor affecting the affinity capacity for glycoproteins. Our results demonstrated that under the theoretical guidance of the Flory-Huggins model the PP strategy with a selected monomer and solvent system might provide a good approach to prepare submicrometer polymer particles with plenty of boronic acid groups on the surface to achieve a highly selective enrichment of glycoproteins. PMID:24422433

  6. Glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC) and carbohydrate detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Huang, Xinyi; Burton, Andrew J; Swift, Karl A D

    2015-08-14

    Molecular labeling and detection techniques are essential to research in life science. Here, a method for glycoprotein labeling/carbohydrate detection through glycan replacement, termed glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC), is described. In this method, a glycoprotein is first treated with specific glycosidases to remove certain sugar residues, a procedure that creates acceptor sites for a specific glycosyltransferase. A 'clickable' monosaccharide is then installed onto these sites by the glycosyltransferase. This modified glycoprotein is then conjugated to a reporter molecule using a click chemistry reaction. For glycoproteins that already contain vacant glycosylation sites, deglycosylation is not needed before the labeling step. As a demonstration, labeling on fetal bovine fetuin, mouse immunoglobulin IgG and bacterial expressed human TNFα and TNFβ are shown. Compared to traditional ways of protein labeling, labeling at glycosylation sites with GLCC is considerably more specific and less likely to have adverse effects, and, when utilized as a method for carbohydrate detection, this method is also highly specific and sensitive.

  7. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  8. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M.; Li, Yue; Miller, David S.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.—Wang, X., Cabrera, R. M., Li, Y., Miller, D. S., Finnell, R. H. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice. PMID:23212123

  9. The effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, P M; Elbein, A D

    1985-11-25

    The influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. In order to determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation or where in the processing pathway fucosylation occurred, influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, [5,6-3H]fucose and [1-14C]mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the [14C]mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the [14C]mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the [3H]fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the [14C]mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure. PMID:3932356

  10. Localization and synthesis of an antigenic determinant of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D that stimulates the production of neutralizing antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.H.; Dietzschold, B.; Ponce de Leon, M.; Long, D.; Golub, E.; Varrichio, A.; Pereira, L.; Eisenberg, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    An antigenic determinant capable of inducing type-common herpes simplex virus (HSV)-neutralizing antibodies has been located on glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV type 1 (HSV-1). A peptide of 16 amino acids corresponding to residues 8 to 23 of the mature glycoprotein (residues 33 to 48 of the predicted gD-1 sequence) was synthesized. This peptide reacted with an anti-gD monoclonal antibody (group VII) previously shown to neutralize the infectivity of HSV-1 and HSV-2. The peptide was also recognized by polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified gD-1 but was less reactive with anti-gD2 sera. Sera from animals immunized with the synthetic peptide reacted with native gD and neutralized both HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  11. P-Glycoprotein Transport of Neurotoxic Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Sarah E; Skagen, Kasse; Veit, Joachim; Dalton, Rachel; Woodahl, Erica L

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Altered transport of neurotoxic pesticides has been proposed in Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether these pesticides are P-gp substrates. We used three in vitro transport models, stimulation of ATPase activity, xenobiotic-induced cytotoxicity, and inhibition of rhodamine-123 efflux, to evaluate P-gp transport of diazinon, dieldrin, endosulfan, ivermectin, maneb, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)), and rotenone. Diazinon and rotenone stimulated ATPase activity in P-gp-expressing membranes, with Vmax values of 22.4 ± 2.1 and 16.8 ± 1.0 nmol inorganic phosphate/min per mg protein, respectively, and Km values of 9.72 ± 3.91 and 1.62 ± 0.51 µM, respectively, compared with the P-gp substrate verapamil, with a Vmax of 20.8 ± 0.7 nmol inorganic phosphate/min per mg protein and Km of 0.871 ± 0.172 μM. None of the other pesticides stimulated ATPase activity. We observed an increased resistance to MPP(+) and rotenone in LLC-MDR1-WT cells compared with LLC-vector cells, with 15.4- and 2.2-fold increases in EC50 values, respectively. The resistance was reversed in the presence of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. None of the other pesticides displayed differential cytotoxicity. Ivermectin was the only pesticide to inhibit P-gp transport of rhodamine-123, with an IC50 of 0.249 ± 0.048 μM. Our data demonstrate that dieldrin, endosulfan, and maneb are not P-gp substrates or inhibitors. We identified diazinon, MPP(+), and rotenone as P-gp substrates, although further investigation is needed to understand the role of P-gp transport in their disposition in vivo and associations with Parkinson's disease.

  12. Core Structure of S2 from the Human Coronavirus NL63 Spike Glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng,Q.; Deng, Y.; Liu, J.; van der Hoek, L.; Berkhout, B.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) has recently been identified as a causative agent of acute respiratory tract illnesses in infants and young children. The HCoV-NL63 spike (S) protein mediates virion attachment to cells and subsequent fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. This viral entry process is a primary target for vaccine and drug development. HCoV-NL63 S is expressed as a single-chain glycoprotein and consists of an N-terminal receptor-binding domain (S1) and a C-terminal transmembrane fusion domain (S2). The latter contains two highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) sequences that are each extended by 14 amino acids relative to those of the SARS coronavirus or the prototypic murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus. Limited proteolysis studies of the HCoV-NL63 S2 fusion core identify an {alpha}-helical domain composed of a trimer of the HR segments N57 and C42. The crystal structure of this complex reveals three C42 helices entwined in an oblique and antiparallel manner around a central triple-stranded coiled coil formed by three N57 helices. The overall geometry comprises distinctive high-affinity conformations of interacting cross-sectional layers of the six helices. As a result, this structure is unusually stable, with an apparent melting temperature of 78 {sup o}C in the presence of the denaturant guanidine hydrochloride at 5 M concentration. The extended HR regions may therefore be required to prime the group 1 S glycoproteins for their fusion-activating conformational changes during viral entry. Our results provide an initial basis for understanding an intriguing interplay between the presence or absence of proteolytic maturation among the coronavirus groups and the membrane fusion activity of their S glycoproteins. This study also suggests a potential strategy for the development of improved HCoV-NL63 fusion inhibitors.

  13. Elucidation of N-glycosites within human plasma glycoproteins for cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Drake, Penelope; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Brad; Fisher, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Glycans are an important class of post-translational modifications that decorate a wide array of protein substrates. These cell-type specific molecules, which are modulated during developmental and disease processes, are attractive biomarker candidates as biology regarding altered glycosylation can be used to guide the experimental design. The mass spectrometry (MS)-based workflow described here incorporates chromatography on affinity matrices formed from lectins, proteins that bind specific glycan motifs. The goal was to design a relatively simple method for the rapid analysis of small plasma volumes (e.g., clinical specimens). As increases in sialylation and fucosylation are prominent among cancer-associated modifications, we focused on Sambucus nigra agglutinin and AAL, which bind sialic acid- and fucose-containing structures, respectively. Positive controls (fucosylated and sialylated human lactoferrin glycopeptides), and negative controls (high-mannose glycopeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae invertase) were used to monitor the specificity of lectin capture and optimize the workflow. Multiple Affinity Removal System 14-depleted, trypsin-digested human plasma from healthy donors served as the target analyte. Samples were loaded onto the lectin columns and separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into flow through and bound fractions, which were treated with PNGase F, an amidase that removes N-linked glycans and marks the underlying asparagine glycosite by a +1 Da mass shift. The deglycosylated peptide fractions were interrogated by HPLC ESI-MS/MS on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The method allowed identification of 122 human plasma glycoproteins containing 247 unique glycosites. Notably, glycoproteins that circulate at ng/mL levels (e.g., cadherin-5 at 0.3-4.9 ng/mL, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin which is present at ∼2.5 ng/mL) were routinely observed, suggesting that this method enables the detection of

  14. The heptapeptide LSARLAF mediates platelet activation through phospholipase Cgamma2 independently of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Andrew C; Wonerow, Peter; Marshall, Stuart J; Frampton, Jon; Gartner, T Kent; Watson, Steve P

    2004-01-01

    The seven-amino-acid peptide LSARLAF has been reported to activate platelets via the integrin GPIIb-IIIa (glycoprotein IIb-IIIa). Activation by LSARLAF is reinforced by release of ADP and thromboxanes, but the initiating event in the signalling cascade is not known. In the present study, we demonstrate that LSARLAF stimulates Src kinase-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of many of the proteins in the GPIIb-IIIa cascade, including the tyrosine kinase Syk, the adapter SLP-76 (SH2-containing leucocyte phosphoprotein of 76 kDa) and PLCgamma2 (phospholipase Cgamma2). A critical role for PLCgamma2 in signalling by LSARLAF was demonstrated by abolition of aggregation in PLCgamma2-/- murine platelets to low concentrations of the peptide, although a partial recovery was seen with higher concentrations. In sharp contrast with the GPIIb-IIIa-regulated signalling cascade, aggregation was inhibited in murine platelets deficient in the adapter LAT (linker for activation of T-cells) and the Fc receptor gamma-chain. Aggregation was also partially inhibited by the cholesterol-lowering reagent, beta-methyl-cyclodextrin, at concentrations that disrupt membrane rafts, but do not interfere with signalling by GPIIb-IIIa. Furthermore, LSARLAF also stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation in GPIIb-deficient murine platelets, confirming that the integrin is not critical for activation of intracellular signalling pathways. LSARLAF also stimulated Ca2+ elevation in RBL-2H3 cells, which lack the platelet glycoproteins GPIIb, GPVI and GPIb. These results demonstrate that LSARLAF activates platelets through a PLCgamma2-dependent pathway that lies downstream of Src kinases and which is partially dependent on the Fc receptor gamma-chain, LAT and lipid rafts. The mechanism of cell activation by LSARLAF remains to be established, although the present results indicate that more than one surface glycoprotein may mediate this response. PMID:14558887

  15. The Alphavirus E3 Glycoprotein Functions in a Clade-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The 80 trimeric, glycoprotein spikes that cover the surface of alphavirus particles are required for mediating viral entry into a host cell. Spike assembly is a regulated process that requires interactions between five structural proteins, E3, E2, 6K and its translational frameshift product TF, and E1. E3 is a small, ∼65-amino-acid glycoprotein that has two known functions: E3 serves as the signal sequence for translocation of the E3-E2-6K-E1 polyprotein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and cleavage of E3 from E2 is essential for virus maturation. Nonetheless, when E3 is replaced with an ER signal sequence, spikes do not form and infectious particles are not assembled, suggesting an additional role(s) for E3 in the viral life cycle. To further investigate the role of E3 in spike assembly, we made chimeric viruses in which E3 from one alphavirus species is replaced with E3 from another species. Our results demonstrate that when E3 is interchanged between alphavirus species that belong to the same virus clade, viral titers and particle morphologies and compositions are similar to what are observed for the parental virus. In contrast, for chimeras in which E3 is derived from a different clade than the parental virus, we observed reduced titers and the formation of particles with atypical morphologies and protein compositions. We further characterized the E3 chimeras using a combination of structure-function and revertant analyses. This work revealed two specific interactions between E3 and its cognate E2 glycoprotein that are important for regulating spike assembly. PMID:23035234

  16. New insight into p-glycoprotein as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Breier, Albert; Gibalova, Lenka; Seres, Mario; Barancik, Miroslav; Sulova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer tissue is a phenomenon in which cancer cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to a large group of unrelated drugs with different mechanisms of pharmacological activity. Mechanisms that reduce cell sensitivity to damage induced by a variety of chemicals were found to be caused by diverse, albeit well-defined, phenotypic alterations. The molecular basis of MDR commonly involves overexpression of the plasma membrane drug efflux pump - P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This glycoprotein is an ABCB1 member of the ABC transporter family. Cells that develop MDR of this type express massive amounts of P-gp that can induce a drug resistance of more than 100 times higher than normal cells to several drugs, which are substrates of P-gp. Expression of P-gp could be inherent to cancer cells with regard to the specialized tissues from which the cells originated. This is often designated as intrinsic Pgp- mediated MDR. However, overexpression of P-gp may be induced by selection and/or adaptation of cells during exposure to anticancer drugs; this particular example is known as acquired P-gp-mediated MDR. Drugs that are potential inducers of P-gp are often substrates of this transporter. However, several substances that have been proven to not be transportable by P-gp (such as cisplatin or alltrans retinoic acid) could induce minor improvements in P-gp overexpression. It is generally accepted that the drug efflux activity of Pgp is a major cause of reduced cell sensitivity to several compounds. However, P-gp may have side effects that are independent of its drug efflux activity. Several authors have described a direct influence of P-gp on the function of proteins involved in regulatory pathways, including apoptotic progression (such as p53, caspase-3 and Pokemon). Moreover, alterations of cell regulatory pathways, including protein expression, glycosylation and phosphorylation, have been demonstrated in cells overexpressing P-gp, which may consequently induce

  17. New insight into p-glycoprotein as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Breier, Albert; Gibalova, Lenka; Seres, Mario; Barancik, Miroslav; Sulova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer tissue is a phenomenon in which cancer cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to a large group of unrelated drugs with different mechanisms of pharmacological activity. Mechanisms that reduce cell sensitivity to damage induced by a variety of chemicals were found to be caused by diverse, albeit well-defined, phenotypic alterations. The molecular basis of MDR commonly involves overexpression of the plasma membrane drug efflux pump - P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This glycoprotein is an ABCB1 member of the ABC transporter family. Cells that develop MDR of this type express massive amounts of P-gp that can induce a drug resistance of more than 100 times higher than normal cells to several drugs, which are substrates of P-gp. Expression of P-gp could be inherent to cancer cells with regard to the specialized tissues from which the cells originated. This is often designated as intrinsic Pgp- mediated MDR. However, overexpression of P-gp may be induced by selection and/or adaptation of cells during exposure to anticancer drugs; this particular example is known as acquired P-gp-mediated MDR. Drugs that are potential inducers of P-gp are often substrates of this transporter. However, several substances that have been proven to not be transportable by P-gp (such as cisplatin or alltrans retinoic acid) could induce minor improvements in P-gp overexpression. It is generally accepted that the drug efflux activity of Pgp is a major cause of reduced cell sensitivity to several compounds. However, P-gp may have side effects that are independent of its drug efflux activity. Several authors have described a direct influence of P-gp on the function of proteins involved in regulatory pathways, including apoptotic progression (such as p53, caspase-3 and Pokemon). Moreover, alterations of cell regulatory pathways, including protein expression, glycosylation and phosphorylation, have been demonstrated in cells overexpressing P-gp, which may consequently induce

  18. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  19. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing.

  20. Mutagenesis of the La Crosse Virus glycoprotein supports a role for Gc (1066-1087) as the fusion peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Soldan, Samantha S.; Stachelek, Karen M.; Roth, Susan M.; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco . E-mail: scarano@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2007-02-20

    The La Crosse Virus (LACV) M segment encodes two glycoproteins (Gn and Gc), and plays a critical role in the neuropathogenesis of LACV infection as the primary determinant of neuroinvasion. A recent study from our group demonstrated that the region comprising the membrane proximal two-thirds of Gc, amino acids 860-1442, is critical in mediating LACV fusion and entry. Furthermore, computational analysis identified structural similarities between a portion of this region, amino acids 970-1350, and the E1 fusion protein of two alphaviruses: Sindbis virus and Semliki Forrest virus (SFV). Within the region 970-1350, a 22-amino-acid hydrophobic segment (1066-1087) is predicted to correlate structurally with the fusion peptides of class II fusion proteins. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of key amino acids in this 22-amino acid segment and determined the functional consequences of these mutations on fusion and entry. Several mutations within this hydrophobic domain affected glycoprotein expression to some extent, but all mutations either shifted the pH threshold of fusion below that of the wild-type protein, reduced fusion efficiency, or abrogated cell-to-cell fusion and pseudotype entry altogether. These results, coupled with the aforementioned computational modeling, suggest that the LACV Gc functions as a class II fusion protein and support a role for the region Gc 1066-1087 as a fusion peptide.

  1. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of beta-2-glycoprotein III aids in the diagnosis of an inherited deficiency of this serum protein and a variety of...

  2. N-Glycosylation Profiling of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Envelope Glycoprotein 5

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a positive-sense ssRNA virus whose envelope contains four glycoproteins and three nonglycosylated proteins. Glycans of major envelope glycoprotein 5 (GP5) are proposed as important for virus assembly and entry into permissive cells. Structural characterization of GP5 glycans would facilitate the mechanistic understanding of these processes. Thus, we purified the PRRSV type 2 prototype strain, VR2332, and analyzed the virion-associated glycans by both biochemical and mass spectrometric methods. Endoglycosidase digestion showed that GP5 was the primary protein substrate, and that the carbohydrate moieties were primarily complex-type N-glycans. Mass spectrometric analysis (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) of GP5 N-glycans revealed an abundance of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) oligomers in addition to sialic acids. GlcNAc and LacNAc accessibility to ligands was confirmed by lectin co-precipitation. Our findings help to explain PRRSV infection of cells lacking sialoadhesin and provide a glycan database to facilitate molecular structural studies of PRRSV. PMID:25726973

  3. Antioxidant activity of glycoprotein purified from Undaria pinnatifida measured by an in vitro digestion model.

    PubMed

    Rafiquzzaman, S M; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Yu-Ri; Nam, Taek-Jeong; Kong, In-Soo

    2013-11-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of glycoprotein purified from Undaria pinnatifida Harvey (UPGP). On SDS-PAGE, UPGP migrated as a single band with a molecular weight of approximately 10 kDa and confirmed by staining with Schiff's reagent as glycoprotein. It consists of a carbohydrate component (42.53%) and protein component (57.47%). Amino acid profile, FT-IR spectrum and enzymatic glycosylation analysis suggested that protein is linked with carbohydrate by O-glycosylation. UPGP showed dose-dependent antioxidant activities as detected by different assays before and after in vitro digestion. The IC50 values of undigested UPGP were 0.25 ± 0.03, 0.08 ± 0.005, 0.69 ± 0.12, and 0.25 ± 0.08 mg/mL for DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, and NO, respectively. Following in vitro digestion, the antioxidant activities of UPGP were decreased during the gastric phase compared to those of undigested UPGP, with an increase occurring during the duodenal phase in all assays. However, the reducing power was unchanged after in vitro digestion. Furthermore, UPGP showed protective activity against oxidative DNA damage both undigested, after saliva and duodenal phase of digestion. These results indicate that the antioxidant and DNA protection activities of UPGP may be pH-dependent and assay specific.

  4. Functional characterization of the Sindbis virus E2 glycoprotein by transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K.; Kuhn, Richard J. . E-mail: kuhnr@purdue.edu

    2007-06-20

    The glycoprotein envelope of alphaviruses consists of two proteins, E1 and E2. E1 is responsible for fusion and E2 is responsible for receptor binding. An atomic structure is available for E1, but one for E2 has not been reported. In this study, transposon linker-insertion mutagenesis was used to probe the function of different domains of E2. A library of mutants, containing 19 amino acid insertions in the E2 glycoprotein sequence of the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV), was generated. Fifty-seven independent E2 insertions were characterized, of which more than half (67%) gave rise to viable virus. The wild-type-like mutants identify regions that accommodate insertions without perturbing virus production and can be used to insert targeting moieties to direct SINV to specific receptors. The defective and lethal mutants give insight into regions of E2 important for protein stability, transport to the cell membrane, E1-E2 contacts, and receptor binding.

  5. A Potato cDNA Encoding a Homologue of Mammalian Multidrug Resistant P-Glycoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A homologue of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene was obtained while screening a potato stolon tip cDNA expression library with S-15-labeled calmodulin. The mammalian MDR gene codes for a membrane-bound P-glycoprotein (170-180 kDa) which imparts multidrug resistance to cancerous cells. The potato cDNA (PMDR1) codes for a polypeptide of 1313 amino acid residues (ca. 144 kDa) and its structural features are very similar to the MDR P-glycoprotein. The N-terminal half of the PMDR1-encoded protein shares striking homology with its C-terminal half, and each half contains a conserved ATP-binding site and six putative transmembrane domains. Southern blot analysis indicated that potato has one or two MDR-like genes. PMDR1 mRNA is constitutively expressed in all organs studied with higher expression in the stem and stolon tip. The PMDR1 expression was highest during tuber initiation and decreased during tuber development.

  6. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G. . E-mail: vtgusk@lsu.edu

    2007-04-10

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion.

  7. Molecular characterization and expression of glycoprotein gene of Hantavirus R22 strain isolated from Rattus norvegicus in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, X A; Ruo, S L; Tang, Y W; Fisher-Hoch, S P; McCormick, J B

    1991-09-01

    A cDNA containing the complete open reading frame of the M genome segment of Hantavirus R22 strain isolated from Rattus norvegicus in China, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and then cloned. The M segment is 3656 nucleotides in length with a predicted region of 3402 bases encoding a precursor glycoprotein of 1134 amino acids subsequently processed into viral glycoproteins 1 and 2 (G1 and G2). A strain comparison between R22 and SR11 (isolated from a rat in Japan), and Hantaan 76-118 (isolated from Apodemus in Korea), and Hallnas B1 (isolated from a bank vole in Sweden) revealed 95%, 74%, and 53% homologies at the deduced amino acid sequence level respectively. This suggests that the rodent host species may be a more important determinant of genetic relationships than geographic proximity. Six potential asparagine linked glycosylation sites (five in G1 and one in G2) were identified, and among them all are conserved in SR11, five in Hantaan virus and four in Hallnas B1 virus. Although different degrees of homology exist among these four viruses at amino acid sequence level, more than 90% of the cysteine residues are conserved, suggesting that structural homology may be very strong between the Hantaviruses. Genetic differences in the M segment genome of R22 and SR11 viruses, within the same serotype viruses, were found as random coding changes; some limited to single amino acids, others in clusters. A recombinant vaccinia virus that contained the fully activated M segment cDNA of R22 was constructed. This recombinant virus expressed two glycoproteins G1 and G2 identical to R22 virus G1 and G2 in molecular weight, cleavage pattern and cellular immunofluorescent patterns.

  8. SJSZ glycoprotein (38 kDa) inhibits cell cycle and oxidative stress in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2013-05-01

    The initiation stage of liver cancer is closely related to abnormal cell proliferation as observed for other types of carcinogenesis. Recently, we isolated a glycoprotein from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein), which consists of a carbohydrate moiety (52.64%) and a protein moiety (47.36%). In this study, the antitumoric mechanism of SJSZ glycoprotein during the initiation stage in N-Methyl-N`-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG; 40 mg/kg, BW)-induced ICR was investigated. First, we evaluated the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and activities of antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT)] in mouse liver tissue and serum. The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cell cycle-related factors [cyclin D1/ cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4], cell cycle inhibitors (CKIs; p53, p21, and p27), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were then assessed using Western Blot analysis. The results of this analysis showed that the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW) decreased the levels of LDH, ALT, TBARS, and the expression of AFP but it increased the activity of hepatic anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT). In addition, the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW)was shown to decrease the expression of cyclin D1/CDK4 and PCNA and increase the expression of CKIs (p53, p21, and p27). The results in this study indicate that the SJSZ glycoprotein displays anti-oxidative stress and anti-cell proliferation activity in MNNG induced ICR.

  9. Boronate affinity monolith with a gold nanoparticle-modified hydrophilic polymer as a matrix for the highly specific capture of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ci; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Qun; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Shen; Wu, Qi; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-07-01

    As low abundance is the great obstacle for glycoprotein analysis, the development of materials with high efficiency and selectivity for glycoprotein enrichment is a prerequisite in glycoproteome research. Herein, we report a new kind of hydrophilic boronate affinity monolith by attaching 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (MPBA) with 2-mercaptoethylamine (MPA) on the gold nanoparticle-modified poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate)) monolith for glycoprotein enrichment. With poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate as the cross-linker and the further modification of gold nanoparticles, the matrix has advantages of good hydrophilicity and enhanced surface area, which are beneficial to improve the enrichment selectivity and efficiency for glycoproteins. The attachment of MPBA and MPA provide intramolecular BN coordination, which could further enhance the specificity of glycoprotein capture. Such a boronate affinity monolith was applied to enrich horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from the mixture of HRP and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and high selectivity was obtained even at a mass ratio of 1:1000. In addition, the binding capacity of ovalbumin on such monolith reached 390 μg g(-1) . Furthermore, the average recovery of HRP on the prepared affinity monoliths was (84.8±1.9) %, obtained in three times enrichment with the same column. Finally, the boronate affinity monolith was successfully applied for the human-plasma glycoproteome analysis. As a result, 160 glycoproteins were credibly identified from 9 μg of human plasma, demonstrating the great potential of such a monolith for large-scale glycoproteome research.

  10. Magnetic enzyme reactors for isolation and study of heterogeneous glycoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korecká, Lucie; Ježová, Jana; Bílková, Zuzana; Beneš, Milan; Horák, Daniel; Hradcová, Olga; Slováková, Marcela; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2005-05-01

    The newly developed magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with defined hydrophobicity and porosity were used for the preparation of magnetic enzyme reactors. Magnetic particles with immobilized proteolytic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain and with enzyme neuraminidase were used to study the structure of heterogeneous glycoproteins. Factors such as the type of carrier, immobilization procedure, operational and storage stability, and experimental conditions were optimized.

  11. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David; Mao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state. PMID:22710864

  12. Glycoproteins identified from heart failure and treatment models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Kass, David A; van Eyk, Jennifer E; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Conduction abnormalities can lead to dyssynchronous contraction, which significantly worsens morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can reverse ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function. Although the underlying molecular changes are unknown, the use of a canine model of dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF) and CRT has shown that there are global changes across the cardiac proteome. This study determines changes in serum glycoprotein concentration from DHF and CRT compared to normal. We hypothesize that CRT invokes protective or advantageous pathways that can be reflected in the circulating proteome. Two prong discovery approaches were carried out on pooled normal, DHF, and CRT samples composed of individual canine serum to determine the overall protein concentration and the N-linked glycosites of circulating glycoproteins. The level of the glycoproteins was altered in DHF and CRT compared to control sera, with 63 glycopeptides substantially increased in DHF and/or CRT. Among the 32 elevated glycosite-containing peptides in DHF, 13 glycopeptides were reverted to normal level after CRT therapy. We further verify the changes of glycopeptides using label-free LC-MS from individual canine serum. Circulating glycoproteins such as alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, galectin-3-binding protein, and collectin-10 show association to failing heart and CRT treatment model.

  13. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  14. Glycoprotein expression by adenomatous polyps of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roney, Celeste A.; Xie, Jianwu; Xu, Biying; Jabour, Paul; Griffiths, Gary; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-03-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Specificity in diagnostic imaging for detecting colorectal adenomas, which have a propensity towards malignancy, is desired. Adenomatous polyp specimens of the colon were obtained from the mouse model of colorectal cancer called adenomatous polyposis coli-multiple intestinal neoplasia (APC Min). Histological evaluation, by the legume protein Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1), determined expression of the glycoprotein α-L-fucose. FITC-labelled UEA-1 confirmed overexpression of the glycoprotein by the polyps on fluorescence microscopy in 17/17 cases, of which 13/17 included paraffin-fixed mouse polyp specimens. In addition, FITC-UEA-1 ex vivo multispectral optical imaging of 4/17 colonic specimens displayed over-expression of the glycoprotein by the polyps, as compared to non-neoplastic mucosa. Here, we report the surface expression of α-L-fucosyl terminal residues by neoplastic mucosal cells of APC specimens of the mouse. Glycoprotein expression was validated by the carbohydrate binding protein UEA-1. Future applications of this method are the development of agents used to diagnose cancers by biomedical imaging modalities, including computed tomographic colonography (CTC). UEA-1 targeting to colonic adenomas may provide a new avenue for the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma by CT imaging.

  15. Changes of glycoprotein patterns in sera of humans under stress.

    PubMed

    Barisic, K; Lauc, G; Dumic, J; Pavlovic, M; Flogel, M

    1996-02-01

    Stress exhibits adverse effects on many vital processes in which glycoproteins play a significant role(e.g. cell-cell/matrix interactions, immune response, neoplastic growth, implantation, prenatal development), yet only scarce attention has been directed towards studying stress induced changes in glycoprotein patterns. Using SDS-electrophoresis, blotting and digoxigenin-labelled lectins (Sambucus nigra agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, Maackia amurensis agglutinin and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin),sera were analysed from 30 individuals chosen randomly from a severely stressed population of 309 male volunteers with no specific medical symptoms. Significant changes were found in glycoprotein pattern and content, compared with healthy controls of matching age and sex. Occasionally minor non-specific deviations from the reference values for several analytes (haemoglobin, glucose, bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase) were detected in the tested group, but glycoprotein GP4S (Mr = 45 000), detected by Datura stramonium agglutinin and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, appeared in 96.7% of samples of the stressed population. The same population also revealed an approximately 500-fold increase of GP37 in comparison with the control sera. These results suggest that stress, as a non-specific syndrome, induces specific biochemical changes, which could be of diagnostic relevance as risk makers before any more serious symptoms of stress-related consequences have developed.

  16. Blepharmone: a conjugation-inducing glycoprotein in the ciliate blepharisma.

    PubMed

    Miyake, A; Beyer, J

    1974-08-16

    Gamone 1 of Blepharisma intermedium was isolated, identified as a slightly basic glycoprotein (mizoleclular weight, 2 x 10(5)), and designated as blepharmnone. At the concentration of 6 x 10(-8) milligram per milliliter, it specifically transforms matinig type 2 cells, so that they can conjugate in about 2 hours.

  17. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  18. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  19. The cholesterol-binding motif of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 regulates lateral sorting and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Roland; Levental, Ilya; Gramatica, Andrea; Scolari, Silvia; Buschmann, Volker; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Enveloped viruses often use membrane lipid rafts to assemble and bud, augment infection and spread efficiently. However, the molecular bases and functional consequences of the partitioning of viral glycoproteins into microdomains remain intriguing questions in virus biology. Here, we measured Foerster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) to study the role of distinct membrane proximal regions of the human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein gp41 for lipid raft partitioning in living Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). Gp41 was labelled with a fluorescent protein at the exoplasmic face of the membrane, preventing any interference of the fluorophore with the proposed role of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains in lateral organization of gp41. Raft localization was deduced from interaction with an established raft marker, a fluorescently tagged glycophosphatidylinositol anchor and the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) was identified as the crucial lateral sorting determinant in CHO-K1 cells. Interestingly, the raft association of gp41 indicates a substantial cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the plasma membrane microdomains. In complementary fluorescence polarization microscopy, a distinct CRAC requirement was found for the oligomerization of the gp41 variants. Our data provide further insight into the molecular basis and biological implications of the cholesterol dependent lateral sorting of viral glycoproteins for virus assembly at cellular membranes.

  20. Purification and molecular properties of two cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum.

    PubMed

    Dohi, Y; Ohba, K; Yoneyama, Y

    1983-05-30

    Two cytoplasmic cadmium-binding glycoproteins from the hepatopancreas of a whelk, Buccinum tenuissimum, were purified to homogeneity by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and two DEAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatographies in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. These two cadmium-binding glycoproteins, termed FIIA and FIIB, each showed a single band after electrophoresis on 10% polyacrylamide gel at pH 8.9. The molecular weight of FIIA was estimated as 8000 and that of FIIB as 13000 by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Based on molecular weights of 6500 and 11900 for the protein moiety of FIIA and FIIB, respectively, the total number of amino acid residues was 52 in the former and 94 in the latter. Three and two cysteine residues in FIIA and FIIB, respectively, were titratable with p-chloromercuribenzoate. FIIB also contained two more half-cystine residues. The sugar contents of FIIA and FIIB were about 20.5% and 8.7% by weight, respectively, consisting of galactose, mannose, fucose and amino sugar. The purified glycoproteins FIIA and FIIB contained about 0.6% and 1.0% cadmium by weight, respectively, and both showed strong metal-binding capacity, especially for cadmium, copper and mercury. The apparent cadmium dissociation constants for FIIA and FIIB after treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol were 7.3 X 10(-6) and 9.1 X 10(-7) M, respectively. Cadmium contents at saturation were nearly 6 and 8 gatom per mole for FIIA and FIIB, respectively.

  1. The nucleotide sequence of an equine herpesvirus 4 gene homologue of the herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein H gene.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, L; Cullinane, A A; Onions, D E

    1990-08-01

    The equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) gene glycoprotein H (gH) gene homologue was localized by virtue of the conserved genomic position of this gene throughout members of the herpesvirus family. The gene maps immediately downstream of the thymidine kinase gene at approximately 0.49 to 0.51 map units within genomic fragment BamH1 C. The EHV-4 gH primary translation product is predicted to be a polypeptide of Mr 94,100, 855 amino acids long, which possesses features characteristic of a membrane glycoprotein, namely an N-terminal signal sequence, a large hydrophilic domain containing 11 putative N-linked glycosylation sites, a C-terminal transmembrane domain, and a charged cytoplasmic tail. Comparison to other herpesvirus glycoproteins revealed identities of 85%, 26% and 32% with the gH counterparts of the alphaherpesviruses EHV-1, herpes simplex virus 1 and varicella-zoster virus, respectively, and of 17% and 18% with those of human cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus. The EHV-4 gH exhibits features previously reported to be conserved throughout the gH polypeptides of herpesviruses of all three subgroups. A region of direct repeat elements and a possible origin of DNA replication are located immediately downstream of the gH gene. PMID:2167933

  2. The first biantennary bacterial secondary cell wall polymer and its influence on S-layer glycoprotein assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christian; Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Graninger, Michael; Matecko, Irena; Müller, Norbert; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The cell surface of Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus DSM 10155 is covered with a square surface (S)-layer glycoprotein lattice. This S-layer glycoprotein, which was extracted with aqueous buffers after a freeze-thaw cycle of the bacterial cells, is the only completely water-soluble S-layer glycoprotein to be reported to date. The purified S-layer glycoprotein preparation had an overall carbohydrate content of 19%. Detailed chemical investigations indicated that the S-layer O-glycans of previously established structure accounted for 13% of total glycosylation. The remainder could be attributed to a peptidoglycan-associated secondary cell wall polymer. Structure analysis was performed using purified secondary cell wall polymer-peptidoglycan complexes. NMR spectroscopy revealed the first biantennary secondary cell wall polymer from the domain Bacteria, with the structure alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->4)-[alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)]-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->O)-PO(2)(-)-O-PO(2)(-)-(O-->6)-MurNAc- (where MurNAc is N -acetylmuramic acid). The neutral polysaccharide is linked via a pyrophosphate bond to the C-6 atom of every fourth N -acetylmuramic acid residue, in average, of the A1gamma-type peptidoglycan. In vivo, the biantennary polymer anchored the S-layer glycoprotein very effectively to the cell wall, probably due to the doubling of motifs for a proposed lectin-like binding between the polymer and the N-terminus of the S-layer protein. When the cellular support was removed during S-layer glycoprotein isolation, the co-purified polymer mediated the solubility of the S

  3. A new Ebola virus nonstructural glycoprotein expressed through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Mehedi, Masfique; Falzarano, Darryl; Seebach, Jochen; Hu, Xiaojie; Carpenter, Michael S; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) gene encodes the nonstructural soluble glycoprotein (sGP) but also produces the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP₁,₂) through transcriptional editing. A third GP gene product, a small soluble glycoprotein (ssGP), has long been postulated to be produced also as a result of transcriptional editing. To identify and characterize the expression of this new EBOV protein, we first analyzed the relative ratio of GP gene-derived transcripts produced during infection in vitro (in Vero E6 cells or Huh7 cells) and in vivo (in mice). The average percentages of transcripts encoding sGP, GP₁,₂, and ssGP were approximately 70, 25, and 5%, respectively, indicating that ssGP transcripts are indeed produced via transcriptional editing. N-terminal sequence similarity with sGP, the absence of distinguishing antibodies, and the abundance of sGP made it difficult to identify ssGP through conventional methodology. Optimized 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis analyses finally verified the expression and secretion of ssGP in tissue culture during EBOV infection. Biochemical analysis of recombinant ssGP characterized this protein as a disulfide-linked homodimer that was exclusively N glycosylated. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized a new EBOV nonstructural glycoprotein, which is expressed as a result of transcriptional editing of the GP gene. While ssGP appears to share similar structural properties with sGP, it does not appear to have the same anti-inflammatory function on endothelial cells as sGP.

  4. Effect of the carbohydrate moiety on the secondary structure of beta 2-glycoprotein. I. Implications for the biosynthesis and folding of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M T; Watzlawick, H; Putnam, F W; Schmid, K; Brossmer, R

    1990-07-01

    By use of six highly purified exoglycosidases with well-defined specificity, the oligosaccharide units of human plasma beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2I) were modified by sequential enzymatic degradation. The released monosaccharides (NeuAc, Gal, GlcNAc, and Man) were quantified, and the carbohydrate compositions of the resulting glycoprotein (gp) derivatives were determined. The gp was found to be both partially sialylated and galactosylated. These findings which are in agreement with earlier reports suggest that the carbohydrate moiety of beta 2I possesses more bi- than tri-antennas, probably three of the former and two of the latter carbohydrate units. Circular dichroic (CD) spectra of native beta 2I and its derivatives were measured in aqueous buffer and 2-chloroethanol (2-CE). Analysis of these spectra for elements of secondary structure showed beta 2I and most of the derivatives to contain predominantly beta-sheet and beta-turn structures. The lack of alpha-helical structures in aqueous buffer was noted. Removal of a large portion of the carbohydrate moiety did not alter the CD spectra or secondary structure of beta 2I in either aqueous buffer or in 2-CE. However, after enzymatic removal of approximately 96% of the carbohydrate moiety, large significant changes in the spectra and secondary structures were observed. In aqueous buffer a shift in the wavelength minimum occurred, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the molar ellipticity and the amount of beta-turn, with a reduction in random coil. One-third of the amino acids which were originally in random coil conformation assumed beta-turns after removal of 96% of the carbohydrate moiety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Development of glycoprotein capture-based label-free method for the high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Min; Wang, Fangjun; Yao, Zhenzhen; Dong, Liwei; Ye, Mingliang; Wang, Hongyang; Zou, Hanfa

    2011-07-01

    A robust, reproducible, and high throughput method was developed for the relative quantitative analysis of glycoprotein abundances in human serum. Instead of quantifying glycoproteins by glycopeptides in conventional quantitative glycoproteomics, glycoproteins were quantified by nonglycosylated peptides derived from the glycoprotein digest, which consists of the capture of glycoproteins in serum samples and the release of nonglycopeptides by trypsin digestion of captured glycoproteins followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem MS analysis of released peptides. Protein quantification was achieved by comparing the spectrum counts of identified nonglycosylated peptides of glycoproteins between different samples. This method was demonstrated to have almost the same specificity and sensitivity in glycoproteins quantification as capture at glycopeptides level. The differential abundance of proteins present at as low as nanogram per milliliter levels was quantified with high confidence. The established method was applied to the analysis of human serum samples from healthy people and patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to screen differential glycoproteins in HCC. Thirty eight glycoproteins were found with substantial concentration changes between normal and HCC serum samples, including α-fetoprotein, the only clinically used marker for HCC diagnosis. The abundance changes of three glycoproteins, i.e. galectin-3 binding protein, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, and thrombospondin 1, which were associated with the development of HCC, were further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In conclusion, the developed method was an effective approach to quantitatively analyze glycoproteins in human serum and could be further applied in the biomarker discovery for HCC and other cancers.

  6. Glycoprotein L Disruption Reveals Two Functional Forms of the Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Glycoprotein H▿

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Laurent; May, Janet S.; Colaco, Susanna; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus glycoprotein H (gH) and gL associate to form a heterodimer that plays a central role in virus-driven membrane fusion. When archetypal alpha- or betaherpesviruses lack gL, gH misfolds and progeny virions are noninfectious. In order to define the role that gL plays in gamma-2 herpesvirus infections, we disrupted its coding sequence in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68). MHV-68 lacking gL folded gH into a conformation antigenically distinct from the form that normally predominates on infected cells. gL-deficient virions bound less well than the wild type to epithelial cells and fibroblasts. However, they still incorporated gH and remained infectious. The cell-to-cell spread of gL-deficient viruses was remarkably normal, as was infection, dissemination, and latency establishment in vivo. Viral membrane fusion was therefore gL independent. The major function of gL appeared to be allowing gH to participate in cell binding prior to membrane fusion. This function was most important for the entry of MHV-68 virions into fibroblasts and epithelial cells. PMID:17050601

  7. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count.

  8. Mapping and sequence of the gene for the pseudorabies virus glycoprotein which accumulates in the medium of infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rea, T J; Timmins, J G; Long, G W; Post, L E

    1985-01-01

    RNA from pseudorabies virus (PRV)-infected cells was translated in a reticulocyte lysate with and without the addition of dog pancreas microsomes. Upon addition of the microsomes to the translation reaction, an additional prominent protein product was observed that was not present when microsomes were omitted. The gene coding for this processed protein and its lower-molecular-weight precursor was mapped within the small unique region of the genome by hybridization of mRNA to cloned fragments of PRV DNA and translation of the selected mRNAs. A fragment of the coding region of this gene was inserted into an open reading frame cloning vector to express part of this gene as a hybrid protein in Escherichia coli. This hybrid protein was injected into mice to raise an antiserum which was found to precipitate the glycoprotein which accumulates in the medium of PRV-infected cells. This allows us to conclude that the gene for the "excreted" glycoprotein (gX) maps to the small unique region of the genome, and that the precursor of this glycoprotein is readily processed by dog pancreas microsomes. The region of the PRV genome which codes for this glycoprotein was sequenced and found to include an open reading frame coding for 498 amino acids, flanked by sequences which contain features common to eucaryotic promoters and polyadenylation signals. The predicted protein sequence includes a hydrophobic sequence at the N-terminus which could be a signal sequence, and a hydrophobic sequence followed by a hydrophilic sequence at the C-terminus. Images PMID:2983115

  9. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of glycoprotein from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-ming; Liu, Hong-bai; Yin, Jia-sheng; Lu, Tong-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus with immunological methods, the surface glycoprotein of a recent IHNV-Sn isolated from farmed rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in China was amplified and cloned into pET27b(+) vector (designated as pET27b-G ). The expression of recombinant plasmid pET27b-G in E. coli BL21(DE3) was induced and determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The predicted molecular weight of glycoprotein protein was approximately 55 kD and was confirmed in this study. The inclusion body of glycoprotein was treated with urea at different urea concentrations, and dialyzed into PBS buffer. Purified glycoprotein with high concentration was obtained after dialyzed in the PBS buffer. Antisera against glycoprotein were produced from immunized rabbits. The prepared antisera could react specifically with both the recombinant glycoprotein and natural glycoprotein of the IHNV-Sn isolated in the test of indirect ELISA, and the titer against the recombinant glycoprotein was 1:20,000. IFA showed that the antisera can recognize the glycoprotein located on the surface of IHNV-Sn and IHNV reference strain. These results indicated that the expressed glycoprotein was immunogenical and antigenical and could be functional as the natural IHNV glycoprotein. These results established a foundation for further study on vaccine and rapid diagnosis of IHNV.

  10. The human fibroblast receptor for gp86 of human cytomegalovirus is a phosphorylated glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Keay, S; Baldwin, B

    1992-01-01

    A human embryonic lung (HEL) cell receptor for gp86 of human cytomegalovirus that functions in virus-cell fusion was further characterized. Anti-idiotype antibodies that mimic gp86 were used to immunoprecipitate the 92.5-kDa fibroblast membrane receptor for gp86, which was preincubated with various endoglycosidases. The receptor, which has a pI ranging from 5.3 to 5.6, appears to be a glycoprotein with primarily N-linked sugar residues, some of which have high concentrations of mannose and some of which are complex oligosaccharides. Western blots (immunoblots) of electrophoretically transferred receptor incubated with various biotinylated lectins confirmed the presence of sugar moieties, including N-acetylglucosamine, glucose or mannose, and galactose, but not fucose or N-acetylgalactosamine. This gp86 receptor from uninfected HEL cells also incorporated radiolabeled phosphate from orthophosphoric acid, indicating that it is a constitutively phosphorylated receptor. Images PMID:1321272

  11. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for glycoproteins with innate and adaptive immune activating properties

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-01-01

    There are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use, despite protection against many mucosally-transmitted infections probably requiring immunity at the site of pathogen entry1. Polyethyleneimines (PEI) are organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro, and gene and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo2, 3. Here we show that PEI has unexpected and unusually potent mucosal adjuvant activity in conjunction with viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. Single intranasal administration of influenza HA or HSV-2 gD with PEI elicited robust protection from otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen that were taken up by antigen presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted DC trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host dsDNA that triggered Irf-3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  12. Naturally Occurring Variability in the Envelope Glycoprotein of HIV-1 and the Development of Cell Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brower, Evan T.; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring genetic variability across HIV-1 subtypes causes amino acid polymorphisms in encoded HIV-1 proteins including the envelope glycoproteins associated with viral entry. The effects of amino acid polymorphisms on the mechanism of HIV-1 entry into cells, a process initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor, are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that amino acid polymorphisms affect the structural stability and domain cooperativity of gp120 and that those differences are reflected in the binding mechanism of the viral envelope glycoprotein to the cell surface receptor and coreceptor. Moreover, subtype differences also affect the binding behavior of experimental HIV cell entry inhibitors. While gp120-A has a slightly lower denaturation temperature than gp120-B, the most notable stability difference is that for gp120-B the van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratio (ΔHvH/ΔH) is 0.95 whereas for gp120-A is 0.6, indicative of more cooperative domain/domain interactions in gp120-B, as this protein more closely approaches a two-state transition. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that CD4 and 17b (a surrogate antibody for the chemokine coreceptor) exhibit 7 and 3-fold weaker binding affinities for gp120-A. The binding of these proteins as well as that of the experimental entry inhibitor NBD-556 induce smaller conformational changes in gp120-A as evidenced by significantly smaller binding enthalpies and binding entropies. Together, these results describe the effects of gp120 polymorphisms on binding to host cell receptors and emphasize that guidelines for developing future entry inhibitors must recognize and deal with genomic differences between HIV strains. PMID:20166763

  13. A simple heat dissociation method increases significantly the ELISA detection sensitivity of the nonstructural-1 glycoprotein in patients infected with DENV type-4.

    PubMed

    Lima, Monique da Rocha Queiroz; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo de; Nunes, Priscila Conrado Guerra; Sousa, Carla Santos de; Silva, Manoela Heringer da; Santos, Flavia Barreto dos

    2014-08-01

    The secreted form of the dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein has been shown to be useful for the diagnosis of DENV infections in patients' serum samples. In a number of studies, the sensitivity of the commercially available DENV NS1 glycoprotein detection assays was higher against some DENV serotypes (DENV-1>DENV-3>DENV-2=DENV-4) than others and were also lower using patients' serum samples with secondary versus primary DENV infections. In this study, 471 DENV-4 positive acute phase patients' serum samples were selected from a large panel collected in Brazil from March 2011 to October 2012 by RT-PCR and/or virus isolation followed by serotype determination. The sera from primary (n=228) and secondary (n=238) DENV-4 infections were identified using IgM and IgG capture ELISAs. The sensitivity of a commercial DENV NS1 glycoprotein detection ELISA was then assessed when these serum samples were not pre-treated or pre-treated by acid or heat dissociation prior to being tested. Acid and heat dissociation of patients' serum samples with primary and secondary DENV-4 infections increased significantly the sensitivity of the DENV NS1 glycoprotein detection ELISA from 54.4% to 77.2% (p<0.05) and 82% (p<0.05) and from 39.1% to 63.9% (p<0.05) and 73.1% (p<0.05), respectively. Treatment of DENV infected patients' serum samples using simple and rapid heat dissociation step (100°C for 5min) was, therefore, shown to be very useful for increasing the sensitivity of the DENV NS1 glycoprotein detection ELISA using serum samples from either primary or secondary DENV infected patients.

  14. Glycoproteins and glycosidases of the cervix during the periestrous period in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pluta, K; Irwin, J A; Dolphin, C; Richardson, L; Fitzpatrick, E; Gallagher, M E; Reid, C J; Crowe, M A; Roche, J F; Lonergan, P; Carrington, S D; Evans, A C O

    2011-12-01

    The cervix and its secretions undergo biochemical and physical changes under the differential influences of estrogen and progesterone. These include changes in the glycoprotein profile of the endocervix and its secretions. A comprehensive survey of such changes in cervical epithelium and cervical secretions was performed on bovine samples throughout the periestrous period. Cervical tissue samples and swabs were collected from synchronized beef heifers that were slaughtered 1) 12 h after controlled intravaginal progesterone-releasing device (CIDR) removal, 2) 24 h after CIDR removal, 3) at the onset of estrus, 4) 12 h after the onset of estrus, 5) 48 h after the onset of estrus, and 6) 7 d after the onset of estrus. Histological staining with hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff, Alcian blue, and high-iron diamine was carried out to map overall patterns of stored glycoproteins and tissue structure. Biotinylated lectins were also used to detect the presence and distribution of a range of saccharide structures. The activities of β-galactosidase, α-L-fucosidase, β-N-acetyl-hexosaminidase, and sialidase were measured in cervical swabs using specific substrates. The epithelial layer of the cervix exhibited dynamic changes in cellular hypertrophy and amounts of stored glycoprotein. The greatest content of neutral and acidic mucins was observed 48 h after onset of estrus (P < 0.05). Sialylated mucins predominated at the bases of cervical folds, whereas sulfated mucins were more abundant (P < 0.05) at their apices. The stained area of core mucin glycans changed (P < 0.05) in association with follicular versus luteal phases, whereas terminal glycans changed (P < 0.05) mainly at the time of estrus and shortly thereafter. The greatest activity of β-galactosidase and sialidase was observed 12 h after onset of estrus, whereas β-hexosaminidase and α-fucosidase peaked at the luteal time point (P < 0.05). Taken together, we suggest that the well-known changes in the

  15. Molecular cloning of a cDNA coding biliary glycoprotein I: Primary structure of a glycoprotein immunologically crossreactive with carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hinoda, Y.; Neumaier, M.; Hefta, S.A.; Drzeniek, Z.; Wagener, C.; Shively, L.; Hefta, L.J.F.; Shively, J.E.; Paxton, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced four overlapping cDNA clones from a normal adult human colon library, which together gave the entire nucleotide sequence for biliary glycoprotein I (BGPI). BGPI is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family, which is a subfamily in the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. The deduced amino acid sequence of the combined clones for BGP I revealed a 34-residue leader sequence followed by a 108-residue N-terminal domain, a 178-residue immunoglobulin-like domain, a 108-residue region specific to BGP I, a 24-residue transmembrane domain, and a 35-residue cytoplasmic domain. The nucleotide sequence of BGP I exhibited greater than 80% identity with CEA and nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA) in the leader peptide, N-terminal domain, and immunoglobulin-like domain. They propose that BGP I diverged from NCA by acquiring an immunoglobulin-like domain substantially different from the domains found in NCA or CEA and also a new cytoplasmic domain. The latter feature should result in a substantially different membrane anchorage mechanism of BGP I compared to CEA, which lacks the cytoplasmic domain and is anchored via a phosphatidylinositol-glycan structure. Protein structural analysis of BGP I isolated from human bile revealed a blocked N terminus, 129 amino acids of internal sequence that are in agreement with the translated cDNA sequence, and five glycosylation sites in the peptides sequenced.

  16. Homogeneous human complex-type oligosaccharides in correctly folded intact glycoproteins: evaluation of oligosaccharide influence on protein folding, stability, and conformational properties.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Yasutaka; Sasaoka, Shun; Okamoto, Ryo

    2012-05-01

    The N-glycosylation of proteins is generated at the consensus sequence NXS/T (where X is any amino acid except proline) by the biosynthetic process, and occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In order to investigate the influence of human complex-type oligosaccharides on counterpart protein conformation, crambin and ovomucoide, which consist of 46 and 56 amino acid residues, respectively, were selected for synthesis of model glycoproteins. These small glycoproteins were intentionally designed to be glycosylated at the α-helix (crambin: 8 position), β-sheet (crambin: 2 position) and loop position between the antiparallel β-sheets (ovomucoide: 28 position), and were synthesized by using a peptide-segment coupling strategy. After preparation of these glycosylated polypeptide chains, protein folding experiments were performed under redox conditions by using cysteine-cystine. Although the small glycoproteins bearing intentional glycosylation at the α-helix and β-sheet exhibited a suitable folding process, glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands caused multiple products. The conformational differences in the isolated homogeneous glycoproteins compared with non-glycosylated counterparts were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. These analyses suggested that this intentional N-glycosylation did not result in large conformational changes in the purified protein structures, including the case of glycosylation at the loop position between the antiparallel β-strands. In addition to these experiments, the conformational properties of three glycoproteins were evaluated by CD spectroscopy under different temperatures. The oligosaccharides on the protein surface fluctuated considerably; this was dependent on the increase in the solution temperature and was thought to disrupt the protein tertiary structure. Based on the measurement of the CD spectra, however, the glycoproteins bearing three disulfide

  17. Characterization of N-linked glycosylation on recombinant glycoproteins produced in Pichia pastoris using ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Cukan, Michael; Fisher, Richard; Li, Huijuan; Stadheim, Terrance A; Gerngross, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    The production of recombinant therapeutic glycoproteins is an active area of research and drug development. Typically, improvements in therapeutic glycoprotein efficacy have focused on engineering additional N-glycosylation sites into the primary amino acid sequence or attempting to control a particular glycoform profile on a protein through process improvements. Recently, a number of alternative expression systems have appeared that are challenging the dominance of mammalian cell culture. Our laboratory has focused on the re-engineering of the secretory pathway in the yeast Pichia pastoris to perform glycosylation reactions that mimic processing of N-glycans in humans. We have demonstrated that human antibodies with specific human N-glycan structures can be produced in glycoengineered lines of Pichia pastoris and that antibody-mediated effector functions can be optimized by generating specific glycoforms. In this chapter we provide detailed protocols for the analysis of glycosylation on intact glycoproteins by MALDI-TOF and site specific N-glycan occupancy on digested glycoprotein using ESI-MS.

  18. Frostbite Protection in Mice Expressing an Antifreeze Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Martin; Mattessich, Sarah; Rembisz, Alison; Acar, Ali; Shapiro, Martin; Booth, Carmen J.; Neelakanta, Girish; Fikrig, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms in northern latitudes are seasonally exposed to cold temperatures. To improve survival under cold stress, they use diverse mechanisms to increase temperature resistance and prevent tissue damage. The accumulation of anti-freeze proteins that improve cold hardiness occurs in diverse species including plants, arthropods, fish, and amphibians. We previously identified an Ixodes scapularis anti-freeze glycoprotein, named IAFGP, and demonstrated its cold protective function in the natural tick host and in a transgenic Drosophila model. Here we show, in a transgenic mouse model expressing an anti-freeze glycoprotein, that IAFGP protects mammalian cells and mice from cold shock and frostbite respectively. Transgenic skin samples showed reduced cell death upon cold storage ex vivo and transgenic mice demonstrated increased resistance to frostbite injury in vivo. IAFGP actively protects mammalian tissue from freezing, suggesting its application for the prevention of frostbite, and other diseases associated with cold exposure. PMID:25714402

  19. Marine Natural Products with P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its role in drug metabolism and multi-drug resistance (MDR) in several human pathogens and diseases. P-gp is a major cause of drug resistance in cancer, parasitic diseases, epilepsy and other disorders. This review article aims to summarize the research findings on the marine natural products with P-glycoprotein inhibitor properties. Natural compounds that modulate P-gp offer great possibilities for semi-synthetic modification to create new drugs and are valuable research tools to understand the function of complex ABC transporters. PMID:24451193

  20. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  1. Rheologic studies on middle ear effusions and their mucus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J E; Green, G G; Birchall, J P; Pearson, J P

    1989-04-01

    The properties of pooled thick and thin middle ear effusions, from children with otitis media with effusion, were studied by viscometry. Mucus glycoproteins were responsible for effusion viscosity. Their percentage by weight in thick and thin effusions was 25% and 8.2%, respectively. N-acetylcysteine and 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol caused a 39% viscosity drop in a 5-mg/mL glycoprotein solution, whereas S-carboxymethylcysteine had no effect. Treatment of thick effusions with 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol initially caused a viscosity decrease followed by a gradual increase. Higher reducing agent concentrations (0.5 mol/L) caused a more rapid decrease followed by a rapid increase, presumably by causing nonspecific aggregation of reduced protein molecules. These results suggest that the concentration of and the time that a mucolytic is in the middle ear would be of prime importance in achieving the desired decrease in viscosity.

  2. Binding of PAI-1 to endothelial cells stimulated by thymosin beta4 and modulation of their fibrinolytic potential.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2006-01-13

    Our previous studies showed that thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) induced the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via the AP-1 dependent mechanism and its enhanced secretion. In this work we provide evidence that the released PAI-1 is accumulated on the surface of HUVECs, exclusively in its active form, in a complex with alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) that is also up-regulated and released from the cells. This mechanism is supported by several lines of experiments, in which expression of both proteins was analyzed by flow cytometry and their colocalization supported by confocal microscopy. PAI-1 did not bind to quiescent cells but only to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells. In contrast, significant amounts of AGP were found to be associated with the cells overexpressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) without Tbeta4 treatment. The AGP.PAI-1 complex was accumulated essentially at the basal surface of endothelial cells, and such cells showed (a) morphology characteristic for strongly adhered and spread cells and (b) significantly reduced plasmin formation. Taken together, these results provide the evidence supporting a novel mechanism by which active PAI-1 can be bound to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells, thus influencing their adhesive properties as well as their ability to generate plasmin.

  3. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, J.; Burcham, T. S.; Feeney, R. E.; Kerr, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins are reported. To isolate the influence of different solutions and supercooling alone, a system was devised that nucleated crystals in the middle of a uniformly supercooled sample. Alternatively, single crystals of selected orientation were inserted into free liquid surface. A crystallization rate up to five times greater than that in pure water was found. A mechanism explaining these results is suggested.

  4. Structural Insights into the Human Metapneumovirus Glycoprotein Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Leyrat, Cedric; Paesen, Guido C.; Charleston, James; Renner, Max

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus is a major cause of respiratory tract infections worldwide. Previous reports have shown that the viral attachment glycoprotein (G) modulates innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to incomplete immunity and promoting reinfection. Using bioinformatics analyses, static light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that the extracellular region of G behaves as a heavily glycosylated, intrinsically disordered polymer. We discuss potential implications of these findings for the modulation of immune responses by G. PMID:25031352

  5. Alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein phenotype frequencies in Cook Islanders.

    PubMed

    Abe, S; Kurisaki, E; Mizusawa, I; Hiraiwa, K

    1991-01-01

    The polymorphism of the alpha 2-HS-glycoprotein (A2HS) was analysed in Rarotonga and Mangaia, the Cook Islands. The A2HS*2 frequency was found to be the highest value among all populations studied up to now. There was a significant difference in A2HS*2 gene frequencies between the two populations, Rarotonga (0.62) and Mangaia (0.76). PMID:2050386

  6. Requirements within the Ebola Viral Glycoprotein for Tetherin Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Burgt, Nathan H.; Kaletsky, Rachel L.; Bates, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Tetherin is an interferon-induced, intrinsic cellular response factor that blocks release of numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, from infected cells. As with many viruses targeted by host factors, Ebola virus employs a tetherin antagonist, the viral glycoprotein (EboGP), to counteract restriction and promote virus release. Unlike other tetherin antagonists such as HIV-1 Vpu or KSHV K5, the features within EboGP needed to overcome tetherin are not well characterized. Here, we describe sequences within the EboGP ectodomain and membrane spanning domain (msd) as necessary to relieve tetherin restriction of viral particle budding. Fusing the EboGP msd to a normally secreted form of the glycoprotein effectively promotes Ebola virus particle release. Cellular protein or lipid anchors could not substitute for the EboGP msd. The requirement for the EboGP msd was not specific for filovirus budding, as similar results were seen with HIV particles. Furthermore trafficking of chimeric proteins to budding sites did not correlate with an ability to counter tetherin. Additionally, we find that a glycoprotein construct, which mimics the cathepsin-activated species by proteolytic removal of the EboGP glycan cap and mucin domains, is unable to counteract tetherin. Combining these results suggests an important role for the EboGP glycan cap and msd in tetherin antagonism. PMID:26516900

  7. Boron dependent membrane glycoproteins in symbiosome development and nodule organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Reguera, María; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2008-01-01

    During the last two decades, we have analyzed the roles of boron (B) in the development of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and nodule organogenesis. As in other plant tissues, B is needed for the maintenance of nodule cell wall structure. Moreover, several symbiotic events including rhizobial infection, nodule cell invasion and symbiosome development that involve membrane related functions (i.e., vesicle targeting, secretion, or cell surface interactions) are affected by B deficiency. Using anti-rhamnogalacturonan II (anti-RGII) antiserum and immunological techniques, we recently described membrane glycoproteins (RGII-glycoproteins) developmentally regulated in Pisum sativum nodules, which are not detected by the antibody in B-deficient nodules. RGII-glycoproteins appeared related with development processes involving extensive membrane synthesis, like symbiosome maturation or cell growth, both of them negatively affected by B deficiency. Here, we suggest that, besides maintaining cell wall structure, B is both stabilizing components of the membrane glycocalyx and promoting interactions between cell surfaces glycoconjugates that are important during the establishment of the symbiosis and during nodule development. Moreover, we hypothesize that B is playing a similar role during plant or animal embryogenesis and development. PMID:19841651

  8. Identification of glycoproteins from mouse skin tumors and plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Plasma has been the focus of testing different proteomic technologies for the identification of biomarkers due to its ready accessibility. However, it is not clear if direct proteomic analysis of plasma can be used to discover new marker proteins from tumor that are associated with tumor progression. Here, we reported that such proteins can be detected in plasma in a chemical induced skin cancer mouse model. We analyzed glycoproteins from both benign papillomas and malignant carcinomas from mice using our recently developed platform, solid-phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG) and mass spectrometry, and identified 463 unique N-linked glycosites from 318 unique glycoproteins. These include most known extracellular proteins that have been reported to play roles in skin cancer development such as thrombospondin, cathepsins, epidermal growth factor receptor, cell adhesion molecules, cadherins, integrins, tuberin, fibulin, TGFβ receptor, etc. We further investigated whether these tumor proteins could be detected in plasma from tumor bearing mice using isotope labeling and 2D-LC-MALDI-MS/MS. Two tumor glycoproteins, Tenascin-C and Arylsulfatase B, were identified and quantified successfully in plasma from tumor bearing mice. This result indicates that analysis of tumor associated proteins in tumors and plasma by method using glycopeptide capture, isotopic labeling, and mass spectrometry can be used as a discovery tool to identify candidate tumor proteins that may be detected in plasma. PMID:21072318

  9. Conformational requirements for glycoprotein reglucosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, E S; Helenius, A

    2000-03-20

    Newly synthesized glycoproteins interact during folding and quality control in the ER with calnexin and calreticulin, two lectins specific for monoglucosylated oligosaccharides. Binding and release are regulated by two enzymes, glucosidase II and UDP-Glc:glycoprotein:glycosyltransferase (GT), which cyclically remove and reattach the essential glucose residues on the N-linked oligosaccharides. GT acts as a folding sensor in the cycle, selectively reglucosylating incompletely folded glycoproteins and promoting binding of its substrates to the lectins. To investigate how nonnative protein conformations are recognized and directed to this unique chaperone system, we analyzed the interaction of GT with a series of model substrates with well defined conformations derived from RNaseB. We found that conformations with slight perturbations were not reglucosylated by GT. In contrast, a partially structured nonnative form was efficiently recognized by the enzyme. When this form was converted back to a nativelike state, concomitant loss of recognition by GT occurred, reproducing the reglucosylation conditions observed in vivo with isolated components. Moreover, fully unfolded conformers were poorly recognized. The results indicated that GT is able to distinguish between different nonnative conformations with a distinct preference for partially structured conformers. The findings suggest that discrete populations of nonnative conformations are selectively reglucosylated to participate in the calnexin/calreticulin chaperone pathway. PMID:10725325

  10. Polyethyleneimine is a potent systemic adjuvant for glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Gartlan, Kate H; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Krashias, George; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Flavell, Richard A; Sattentau, Quentin J; Wegmann, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is an organic polycation used extensively as a gene and DNA vaccine delivery reagent. Although the DNA targeting activity of PEI is well documented, its immune activating activity is not. We recently reported that PEI has robust mucosal adjuvanticity when administered intranasally with glycoprotein antigens. Here, we show that PEI has strong immune activating activity after systemic delivery. PEI administered subcutaneously with viral glycoprotein (HIV-1 gp140) enhanced antigen-specific serum IgG production in the context of mixed Th1/Th2-type immunity. PEI elicited higher titers of both antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies than alum in mice and rabbits and induced an increased proportion of antibodies reactive with native antigen. In an intraperitoneal model, PEI recruited neutrophils followed by monocytes to the site of administration and enhanced antigen uptake by antigen-presenting cells. The Th bias was modulated by PEI activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome; however its global adjuvanticity was unchanged in Nlrp3-deficient mice. When coformulated with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, PEI adjuvant potency was synergistically increased and biased toward a Th1-type immune profile. Taken together, these data support the use of PEI as a versatile systemic adjuvant platform with particular utility for induction of secondary structure-reactive antibodies against glycoprotein antigens. PMID:24844701

  11. Hantavirus Gc glycoprotein: evidence for a class II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-11-01

    Hantavirus cell entry is promoted by its envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, through cell attachment and by fusion between viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. However, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding and cell fusion has not yet been defined. In this work, a sequence presenting characteristics similar to those of class II fusion peptides (FPs) of alphavirus E1 and flavivirus E proteins is identified within the hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. A three-dimensional comparative molecular model based on crystallographic data of tick-borne encephalitis virus E protein is proposed for the Andes virus (ANDV) Gc ectodomain, which supports a feasible class II fusion-protein fold. In vitro experimental evidence is provided for the binding activity of the ANDV FP candidate to artificial membranes, as demonstrated by fluorescence anisotropy assays. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Gc glycoprotein of hantaviruses and of other members of the family Bunyaviridae directs the viral fusion activity and that it may be classified as a class II viral fusion protein.

  12. Requirements within the Ebola Viral Glycoprotein for Tetherin Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Vande Burgt, Nathan H; Kaletsky, Rachel L; Bates, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Tetherin is an interferon-induced, intrinsic cellular response factor that blocks release of numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, from infected cells. As with many viruses targeted by host factors, Ebola virus employs a tetherin antagonist, the viral glycoprotein (EboGP), to counteract restriction and promote virus release. Unlike other tetherin antagonists such as HIV-1 Vpu or KSHV K5, the features within EboGP needed to overcome tetherin are not well characterized. Here, we describe sequences within the EboGP ectodomain and membrane spanning domain (msd) as necessary to relieve tetherin restriction of viral particle budding. Fusing the EboGP msd to a normally secreted form of the glycoprotein effectively promotes Ebola virus particle release. Cellular protein or lipid anchors could not substitute for the EboGP msd. The requirement for the EboGP msd was not specific for filovirus budding, as similar results were seen with HIV particles. Furthermore trafficking of chimeric proteins to budding sites did not correlate with an ability to counter tetherin. Additionally, we find that a glycoprotein construct, which mimics the cathepsin-activated species by proteolytic removal of the EboGP glycan cap and mucin domains, is unable to counteract tetherin. Combining these results suggests an important role for the EboGP glycan cap and msd in tetherin antagonism. PMID:26516900

  13. Lectin histochemical examination of rabbit bladder glycoproteins and characterization of a mucin isolated from the bladder mucosa.

    PubMed

    Buckley, M; Xin, P; Washington, S; Herb, N; Erickson, D; Bhavanandan, V P

    2000-03-15

    The glycocalyx of the mucosal surface of urinary bladder acts as an effective barrier against invasion by pathogenic microorganisms and injury from toxic substances in the urine. Defects in these bladder mucosal components could thus be important factors in the development of diseases such as interstitial cystitis and lower urinary tract infections. However, information on the nature of glycoconjugates of mammalian bladder mucosa is very limited. In this study, the glycoconjugates of rabbit bladder were examined histochemically using biotinylated lectins with specificities for a variety of carbohydrate moieties. Three [Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Datura stramonium (DSL), and Maackia amurensis II (MAL-II)] of the lectins bound predominantly to the luminal cell layer, with decreased binding to the basal layers of the epithelium. In contrast, Ricinus communis I and Sambucus nigra lectins did not bind to the cells in the epithelium but strongly interacted with the subepithelial layers, especially the lamina propria. The intensity of the staining by Jacalin and MAL-II was significantly reduced by prior treatment of the bladder sections with O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase, indicating that the ligands of these lectins are primarily mucin glycoproteins. In parallel biochemical studies, a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein with characteristics typical of epithelial mucins was purified from the mucosa of rabbit bladder explant cultures metabolically labeled with [(3)H]glucosamine. Quantitative analysis of the sialic acid, uronic acid, and hexosamine contents of delipidated rabbit bladder mucosa revealed a larger proportion of sialoglycoproteins compared with glycosaminoglycans. Taken together, the results of histochemical and biochemical analyses indicate that glycoproteins rather than glycosaminoglycans are the major components of the bladder epithelium, and that the former include a mucin.

  14. The pseudorabies virus gII gene is closely related to the gB glycoprotein gene of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, A K; Dorney, D J; Wathen, M W; Whealy, M E; Gold, C; Watson, R J; Holland, L E; Weed, S D; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C

    1987-01-01

    We have looked for conserved DNA sequences between four herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein genes encoding gB, gC, gD, and gE and pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA, HSV-1 DNA fragments representing these four glycoprotein-coding sequences were hybridized to restriction enzyme fragments of PRV DNA by the Southern blot procedure. Specific hybridization was observed only when HSV-1 gB DNA was used as probe. This region of hybridization was localized to a 5.2-kilobase (kb) region mapping at approximately 0.15 map units on the PRV genome. Northern blot (RNA blot) analysis, with a 1.2-kb probe derived from this segment, revealed a predominant hybridizing RNA species of approximately 3 kb in PRV-infected PK15 cells. DNA sequence analysis of the region corresponding to this RNA revealed a single large open reading frame with significant nucleotide homology with the gB gene of HSV-1 KOS 321. In addition, the beginning of the sequenced PRV region also contained the end of an open reading frame with amino acid homology to HSV-1 ICP 18.5, a protein that may be involved in viral glycoprotein transport. This sequence partially overlaps the PRV gB homolog coding sequence. We have shown that the PRV gene with homology to HSV-1 gB encoded the gII glycoprotein gene by expressing a 765-base-pair segment of the PRV open reading frame in Escherichia coli as a protein fused to beta-galactosidase. Antiserum, raised in rabbits, against this fusion protein immunoprecipitated a specific family of PRV glycoproteins of apparent molecular mass 110, 68, and 55 kilodaltons that have been identified as the gII family of glycoproteins. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence indicated that the PRV gII protein shares 50% amino acid homology with the aligned HSV-1 gB protein. All 10 cysteine residues located outside of the signal sequence, as well as 4 of 6 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, were conserved between the two proteins. The primary protein sequence for HSV-1 gB regions

  15. The pyrrolidine alkaloid, 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, inhibits glycoprotein processing.

    PubMed

    Elbein, A D; Mitchell, M; Sanford, B A; Fellows, L E; Evans, S V

    1984-10-25

    2,5-Dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine (DMDP) is a pyrrolidine alkaloid that was isolated from the plant, Lonchocarpus sericeus. In the present study, DMDP was tested as an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. MDCK cells were infected with influenza virus and the virus was raised in the presence of various amounts of DMDP. The glycoproteins were labeled by the addition of [2-3H]mannose or [1-3H]galactose to the medium. The virus was isolated by differential centrifugation and treated with Pronase to obtain glycopeptides. These glycopeptides were isolated by chromatography on Bio-Gel P-4, then digested with endoglucosaminidase H (Endo H) and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel P-4 column. In the control virus, more than 70% of the glycopeptides were resistant to Endo H and were previously characterized as complex types of oligosaccharides. The remaining 20-25% are sensitive to Endo H and are of the high-mannose type. However, in the presence of DMDP (250 micrograms/ml), more than 80% of the glycopeptides are susceptible to digestion by Endo H. The oligosaccharide released by this treatment sized like a hexose11-12GlcNAc on a calibrated column of Bio-Gel P-4, and was only slightly susceptible to alpha-mannosidase treatment. This oligosaccharide was also labeled in the glucose moieties by growing the virus in [1-3H]galactose in the presence of DMDP. Following isolation, the oligosaccharide was subjected to complete methylation. Acid hydrolysis of the methylated oligosaccharide gave three methylated glucose derivatives, corresponding to 2,3,4,6-tetramethylglucose, 3,4,6-trimethylglucose, and 2,4,6-trimethylglucose in almost equal amounts. These data indicate that the oligosaccharide is a Glc3Man8-9-GlcNAc and that DMDP inhibits glucosidase I. Similar results were obtained with the cellular glycoproteins. DMDP did not inhibit the incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein in MDCK cells, nor did it inhibit virus production as measured by plaque counts or

  16. Identification and nucleotide sequence of the glycoprotein gB gene of equine herpesvirus 4.

    PubMed

    Riggio, M P; Cullinane, A A; Onions, D E

    1989-03-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the glycoprotein gB gene of equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) was determined. The gene was located within a BamHI genomic library by a combination of Southern and dot-blot hybridization with probes derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) gB DNA sequence. The predominant portion of the coding sequences was mapped to a 2.95-kilobase BamHI-EcoRI subfragment at the left-hand end of BamHI-C. Potential TATA box, CAT box, and mRNA start site sequences and the translational initiation codon were located in the BamHI M fragment of the virus, which is located immediately to the left of BamHI-C. A polyadenylation signal, AATAAA, occurs nine nucleotides past the chain termination codon. Translation of these sequences would give a 110-kilodalton protein possessing a 5' hydrophobic signal sequence, a hydrophilic surface domain containing 11 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a 3' highly charged cytoplasmic domain. A potential internal proteolytic cleavage site, Arg-Arg/Ser, was identified at residues 459 to 461. Analysis of this protein revealed amino acid sequence homologies of 47% with HSV-1 gB, 54% with pseudorabies virus gpII, 51% with varicella-zoster virus gpII, 29% with human cytomegalovirus gB, and 30% with Epstein-Barr virus gB. Alignment of EHV-4 gB with HSV-1 (KOS) gB further revealed that four potential N-linked glycosylation sites and all 10 cysteine residues on the external surface of the molecules are perfectly conserved, suggesting that the proteins possess similar secondary and tertiary structures. Thus, we showed that EHV-4 gB is highly conserved with the gB and gpII glycoproteins of other herpesviruses, suggesting that this glycoprotein has a similar overall function in each virus. PMID:2915378

  17. Environmental temperature and stocking density effects on acute phase proteins, heat shock protein 70, circulating corticosterone and performance in broiler chickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Pardis; Zulkifli, Idrus; Amat Jajuli, Nurfarahin; Farjam, Abdoreza Soleimani; Ramiah, Suriya Kumari; Amir, Anna Aryani; O'Reily, Emily; Eckersall, David

    2015-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of different stocking densities on serum corticosterone (CORT), ovotransferrin (OVT), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and ceruloplasmin (CP) concentrations, brain heat shock protein (HSP) 70 expression and performance in broiler chickens exposed to unheated and heated conditions. Day-old chicks were stocked at 0.100 m2/bird (low density (LD)) or 0.063 m2/bird (high density (HD)), in battery cages and housed in environmentally controlled rooms. From 21 to 35 days of age, birds from each stocking density group were exposed to either 24 or 32 °C. Growth performance was recorded during the heat treatment period, and blood and brain samples were collected to determine CORT, OVT, AGP, CP and HSP 70 levels on day 35. Heat treatment but not stocking density was detrimental to growth performance. There were significant temperature × density interactions for CORT, CP and OVT on day 35. Although HD elevated CORT, CP and OVT when compared to LD, the effects of the former were more obvious under heated condition. Both temperature and density had significant effect on AGP and HSP 70. In conclusion, irrespective of temperature, high stocking density was physiologically stressful to broiler chickens, as indicated by CORT, AGP, CP, OVT and HSP 70, but not detrimental to growth performance and survivability. As it was shown in the present study, AGP, CP and OVT could be useful biomarkers to determine the effect of overcrowding and high temperature on the welfare of broiler chickens.

  18. Acute phase proteins as biomarkers of urinary tract infection in dairy cows: diagnostic and prognostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Wael M; Elmoslemany, Ahmed M

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the level of acute phase proteins in dairy cows with urinary tract infection (UTI) and to evaluate their diagnostic and prognostic value. Eighty-four lactating cows with clinical and laboratory evidence of UTI and 15 healthy controls were included in this study. Serum samples were evaluated for the levels of Haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen (Fb), α1-Acid glycoprotein (AGP), total protein, and globulin. The diagnostic and prognostic performance of each parameter was evaluated by estimating the area under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC). Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium spp. were the primary bacteria associated with UTI. The levels of serum Hp, SAA, Fb, AGP, total protein, and globulin were significantly higher in UTI cows. Successfully treated cows (n = 51) had lower levels of Hp, SAA, AGP, total protein, and globulin than non-responsive cows. Overall, Hp, SAA, Fb, and AGP showed comparable diagnostic accuracy (AUROC ranged from 0.93 to 0.98). Both Hp and SAA showed high accuracy in predicting treatment response (AUROC > 0.95), whereas Fb level was of no prognostic value (AUROC = 0.48). From this study, acute phase proteins levels can be used as markers for UTI in cows and higher levels of Hp, SAA and AGP are related to poor treatment response. PMID:27348889

  19. Mutations in the putative HR-C region of the measles virus F2 glycoprotein modulate syncytium formation.

    PubMed

    Plemper, Richard K; Compans, Richard W

    2003-04-01

    The fusion (F) glycoproteins of measles virus strains Edmonston (MV-Edm) and wtF (MV-wtF) confer distinct cytopathic effects and strengths of hemagglutinin (H) interaction on a recombinant MV-Edm virus. They differ in just two amino acids, V94 and V101 in F-Edm versus M94 and F101 in F-wtF, both of which lie in the relatively uncharacterized F(2) domain. By comparing the sequence of MV F with those of the parainfluenza virus SV5 and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) F proteins, the structures of which are known, we show that MV F(2) also possesses a potential heptad repeat (HR) C domain. In NDV, the N-terminal half of HR-C interacts with HR-A in F(1) while the C-terminal half is induced to kink outward by a central proline residue. We found that this proline is part of an LXP motif conserved in all three viruses. Folding and transport of MV F require this motif to be intact and also require covalent interaction of cysteine residues that probably support the potential HR-A-HR-C interaction. Amino acids 94 and 101, both located in "d" positions of the HR-C helical wheel, lie in the potentially outwardly kinked region. We demonstrate that their effect on MV fusogenicity and glycoprotein interaction is mediated solely by amino acid 94. Substitutions at position 94 with polar or charged amino acids are tolerated poorly or not at all, while changes to smaller and more hydrophilic amino acids are tolerated in both transiently expressed F protein and recombinant virus. MV F V94A and MV F V94G viruses induce extensive syncytium formation and are relatively, or almost completely, resistant to a known inhibitor of MV glycoprotein-induced fusion. We propose that the conformational changes in MV F protein required to expose the fusion peptide involve the C-terminal half of the HR-C helix, specifically amino acid 94. PMID:12634376

  20. Dietary Supplementation of Benzoic Acid and Essential Oil Compounds Affects Buffering Capacity of the Feeds, Performance of Turkey Poults and Their Antioxidant Status, pH in the Digestive Tract, Intestinal Microbiota and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Giannenas, I; Papaneophytou, C P; Tsalie, E; Pappas, I; Triantafillou, E; Tontis, D; Kontopidis, G A

    2014-02-01

    Three trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a basal diet with benzoic acid or thymol or a mixture of essential oil blends (MEO) or a combination of benzoic acid with MEO (BMEO) on growth performance of turkey poults. Control groups were fed a basal diet. In trial 1, benzoic acid was supplied at levels of 300 and 1,000 mg/kg. In trial 2, thymol or the MEO were supplied at levels of 30 mg/kg. In trial 3, the combination of benzoic acid with MEO was evaluated. Benzoic acid, MEO and BMEO improved performance, increased lactic acid bacteria populations and decreased coliform bacteria in the caeca. Thymol, MEO and BMEO improved antioxidant status of turkeys. Benzoic acid and BMEO reduced the buffering capacity compared to control feed and the pH values of the caecal content. Benzoic acid and EOs may be suggested as an effective alternative to AGP in turkeys. PMID:25049947

  1. Dietary Supplementation of Benzoic Acid and Essential Oil Compounds Affects Buffering Capacity of the Feeds, Performance of Turkey Poults and Their Antioxidant Status, pH in the Digestive Tract, Intestinal Microbiota and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Giannenas, I.; Papaneophytou, C. P.; Tsalie, E.; Pappas, I.; Triantafillou, E.; Tontis, D.; Kontopidis, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Three trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a basal diet with benzoic acid or thymol or a mixture of essential oil blends (MEO) or a combination of benzoic acid with MEO (BMEO) on growth performance of turkey poults. Control groups were fed a basal diet. In trial 1, benzoic acid was supplied at levels of 300 and 1,000 mg/kg. In trial 2, thymol or the MEO were supplied at levels of 30 mg/kg. In trial 3, the combination of benzoic acid with MEO was evaluated. Benzoic acid, MEO and BMEO improved performance, increased lactic acid bacteria populations and decreased coliform bacteria in the caeca. Thymol, MEO and BMEO improved antioxidant status of turkeys. Benzoic acid and BMEO reduced the buffering capacity compared to control feed and the pH values of the caecal content. Benzoic acid and EOs may be suggested as an effective alternative to AGP in turkeys. PMID:25049947

  2. Interaction of hamster submaxillary sialyl-Tn and Tn glycoproteins with Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Shen, F; Herp, A; Wu, J H

    1994-04-01

    Hamster submaxillary glycoprotein (HSM), one of the simplest glycoproteins among mammalian salivary mucins, is composed of approximately equivalent amounts of protein, hexosamine and sialic acid. The Thr and Ser residues in the protein core account for more than half of all of the amino acid residues, while Lys, Glu, Pro and Ala are the major components of the remaining portion of amino acids. The carbohydrate side chains of this mucous glycoprotein have mainly the NeuAc-GalNAc-(sialyl-Tn) sequence (HSM), and those of the desialylated product (HSM-Tn) are almost exclusively unsubstituted GalNAc residues (Tn determinants). The binding properties of sialyl-Tn (HSM) and asialo-HSM (HSM-Tn) glycoproteins were tested by precipitin assay with Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc specific lectins. The HSM-Tn completely precipitated Vicia villosa (VVL both B4 and mixture of A and B), Maclura pomifera (MPL), and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin) lectins; less than 2 micrograms of HSM-Tn were required for precipitating 50% of 5.0-6.3 micrograms lectin nitrogen added. HSM-Tn also reacted well with Helix pomatia lectin (HPL), Wistaria floribunda lectin (WFL) and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA) and precipitated in each case over 81% of the lectin nitrogen added. The reactivity of HSM-Tn with other lectins (Ricinus communis, RCA1; Dolichol biflorus, DBL; Viscum album, ML-I; Arachis hypogaea, PNA, and Triticum vulgaris, WGA) was weak or negligible. The activity of sialyl-Tn (HSM) was more restricted; HSM reacted well with Jacalin, moderately with MPL and VVL-B4, but was inactive or only weakly with the other lectins used. These findings indicate that HSM and its desialylated product (HSM-Tn) are highly useful reagents for the differentiation of Tn and T/Gal specific lectins and for anti-T, Tn and Af monoclonal antibodies.

  3. Ammonia excretion in the Atlantic hagfish (Myxine glutinosa) and responses of an Rhc glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Susan L; Arnold, Justin; Blair, Salvatore D; Pray, Margaret; Bradley, Rachel; Erikson, Olivia; Walsh, Patrick J

    2015-05-01

    Hagfishes, the most ancient of the extant craniates, demonstrate a high tolerance for a number of unfavorable environmental conditions, including elevated ammonia. Proposed mechanisms of ammonia excretion in aquatic organisms include vesicular NH(4)(+) transport and release by exocytosis in marine crabs, and passive NH(3) diffusion, active NH(4)(+) transport, and paracellular leakage of NH3 or NH(4)(+) across the gills of fishes. Recently, an emerging paradigm suggests that Rhesus glycoproteins play a vital role in ammonia transport in both aquatic invertebrates and vertebrates. This study has identified an Rh glycoprotein ortholog from the gills of Atlantic hagfish. The hagfish Rhcg shares a 56-60% amino acid identity to other vertebrate Rhcg cDNAs. Sequence information was used to produce an anti-hagfish Rhcg (hRhcg) antibody. We have used hRhcg to localize protein expression to epithelial cells of the gill and the skin. In addition, we have quantified hRhcg expression following exposure to elevated plasma ammonia levels. Animals exposed to a 3 mmol/kg NH(4)Cl load resulted in significantly elevated plasma ammonia concentrations compared with controls for up to 4 h postinjection. This correlated with net ammonia excretion rates that were also significantly elevated for up to 4 h postinjection. Rhcg mRNA expression in both the gill and skin was significantly elevated by 15 min and 1 h, respectively, and hRhcg protein expression in gills was significantly elevated at 2, 4, and 8 h postinjection. These results demonstrate a potential role for Rhcg in the excretion of ammonia in the Atlantic hagfish.

  4. Characterization of epitopes on the rabies virus glycoprotein by selection and analysis of escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouzeh; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nadin-Davis, Susan A

    2016-07-15

    The glycoprotein (G) is the only surface protein of the lyssavirus particle and the only viral product known to be capable of eliciting the production of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the isolation of escape mutants resistant to monoclonal antibody (Mab) neutralization was attempted by a selection strategy employing four distinct rabies virus strains: the extensively passaged Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth (ERA) strain and three field isolates representing two bat-associated variants and the Western Canada skunk variant (WSKV). No escape mutants were generated from either of the bat-associated viral variants but two neutralization mutants were derived from the WSKV isolate. Seven independent ERA mutants were recovered using Mabs directed against antigenic sites I (four mutants) and IIIa (three mutants) of the glycoprotein. The cross-neutralization patterns of these viral mutants were used to determine the precise location and nature of the G protein epitopes recognized by these Mabs. Nucleotide sequencing of the G gene indicated that those mutants derived using Mabs directed to antigenic site (AS) III all contained amino acid substitutions in this site. However, of the four mutants selected with AS I Mabs, two bore mutations within AS I as expected while the remaining two carried mutations in AS II. WSKV mutants exhibited mutations at the sites appropriate for the Mabs used in their selection. All ERA mutant preparations were more cytopathogenic than the parental virus when propagated in cell culture; when in vivo pathogenicity in mice was examined, three of these mutants exhibited reduced pathogenicity while the remaining four mutants exhibited comparable pathogenic properties to those of the parent virus. PMID:27132040

  5. Molecular association of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein E with membrane protein Us9.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Friedman, Harvey M

    2016-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein E (gE), glycoprotein I (gI), and Us9 promote efficient anterograde axonal transport of virus from the neuron cytoplasm to the axon terminus. HSV-1 and PRV gE and gI form a heterodimer that is required for anterograde transport, but an association that includes Us9 has not been demonstrated. NS-gE380 is an HSV-1 mutant that has five amino acids inserted after gE residue 380, rendering it defective in anterograde axonal transport. We demonstrated that gE, gI and Us9 form a trimolecular complex in Vero cells infected with NS-gE380 virus in which gE binds to both Us9 and gI. We detected the complex using immunoprecipitation with anti-gE or anti-gI monoclonal antibodies in the presence of ionic detergents. Under these conditions, Us9 did not associate with gE in cells infected with wild-type HSV-1; however, using a nonionic detergent, TritonX-100, an association between Us9 and gE was detected in immunoprecipitates of both wild-type and NS-gE380-infected cells. The results suggest that the interaction between Us9 and gE is weak and disrupted by ionic detergents in wild-type infected cells. We postulate that the tight interaction between Us9 and gE leads to the anterograde spread defect in the NS-gE380 virus. PMID:27568015

  6. P-glycoprotein and its inducible expression in three bivalve species after exposure to Prorocentrum lima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Liu, Su-Li; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1) belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters responsible for multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in aquatic organisms. To provide more information of P-gp in shellfish, in this study, complete cDNA of P-gp in three bivalve species including Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Tegillarca granosa were cloned and its expressions in gill, digestive gland, adductor muscle and mantle of the three bivalves were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a toxogenic dinoflagellate. The complete sequences of R. philippinarum, S. subcrenata and T. granosa P-gp showed high homology with MDR/P-gp/ABCB proteins from other species, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the amino acid sequences of P-gp from S. subcrenata and T. granosa had a closest relationship, forming an independent branch, then grouping into the other branch with Mytilus californianus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. However, P-gp sequences from R. philippinarum were more similar to the homologs from the more distantly related Aplysia californica than to homologs from S. subcrenata and T. granosa, suggesting that bivalves P-gp might have different paralogs. P-glycoprotein expressed in all detected tissues but there were large differences between them. After exposure to P. lima, the expression of P-gp changed in the four tissues in varying degrees within the same species and between different species, but the changes in mRNA and protein level were not always synchronous.

  7. Structure of the buffalo secretory signalling glycoprotein at 2.8 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ethayathulla, Abdul S.; Srivastava, Devendra B.; Kumar, Janesh; Saravanan, Kolandaivelu; Bilgrami, Sameeta; Sharma, Sujata; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Singh, Tej P.

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of a signalling glycoprotein isolated from buffalo dry secretions (SPB-40) has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. Two unique residues, Tyr120 and Glu269, found in SPB-40 distort the shape of the sugar-binding groove considerably. The water structure in the groove is also different. The conformations of three flexible loops, His188–His197, Phe202–Arg212 and Tyr244–Pro260, also differ from those found in other structurally similar proteins. The crystal structure of a 40 kDa signalling glycoprotein from buffalo (SPB-40) has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. SPB-40 acts as a protective signalling factor by binding to viable cells during the early phase of involution, during which extensive tissue remodelling occurs. It was isolated from the dry secretions of Murrah buffalo. It was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with 19% ethanol as the precipitant. The protein was also cloned and its complete nucleotide and amino-acid sequences were determined. When compared with the sequences of other members of the family, the sequence of SPB-40 revealed two very important mutations in the sugar-binding region, in which Tyr120 changed to Trp120 and Glu269 changed to Trp269. The structure showed a significant distortion in the shape of the sugar-binding groove. The water structure in the groove is also drastically altered. The folding of the protein chain in the flexible region comprising segments His188–His197, Phe202–Arg212 and Tyr244–Pro260 shows large variations when compared with other proteins of the family.

  8. P-glycoprotein and its inducible expression in three bivalve species after exposure to Prorocentrum lima.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Liu, Su-Li; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1) belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters responsible for multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in aquatic organisms. To provide more information of P-gp in shellfish, in this study, complete cDNA of P-gp in three bivalve species including Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Tegillarca granosa were cloned and its expressions in gill, digestive gland, adductor muscle and mantle of the three bivalves were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a toxogenic dinoflagellate. The complete sequences of R. philippinarum, S. subcrenata and T. granosa P-gp showed high homology with MDR/P-gp/ABCB proteins from other species, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the amino acid sequences of P-gp from S. subcrenata and T. granosa had a closest relationship, forming an independent branch, then grouping into the other branch with Mytilus californianus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. However, P-gp sequences from R. philippinarum were more similar to the homologs from the more distantly related Aplysia californica than to homologs from S. subcrenata and T. granosa, suggesting that bivalves P-gp might have different paralogs. P-glycoprotein expressed in all detected tissues but there were large differences between them. After exposure to P. lima, the expression of P-gp changed in the four tissues in varying degrees within the same species and between different species, but the changes in mRNA and protein level were not always synchronous. PMID:26539802

  9. Selective capture of glycoproteins using lectin-modified nanoporous gold monolith.

    PubMed

    Alla, Allan J; D' Andrea, Felipe B; Bhattarai, Jay K; Cooper, Jared A; Tan, Yih Horng; Demchenko, Alexei V; Stine, Keith J

    2015-12-01

    The surface of nanoporous gold (np-Au) monoliths was modified via a flow method with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) to develop a substrate for separation and extraction of glycoproteins. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of α-lipoic acid (LA) on the np-Au monoliths were prepared followed by activation of the terminal carboxyl groups to create amine reactive esters that were utilized in the immobilization of Con A. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the surface coverages of LA and Con A on np-Au monoliths which were found to be 1.31×10(18) and 1.85×10(15)moleculesm(-2), respectively. An in situ solution depletion method was developed that enabled surface coverage characterization without damaging the substrate and suggesting the possibility of regeneration. Using this method, the surface coverages of LA and Con A were found to be 0.989×10(18) and 1.32×10(15)moleculesm(-2), respectively. The selectivity of the Con A-modified np-Au monolith for the high mannose-containing glycoprotein ovalbumin (OVA) versus negative control non-glycosylated bovine serum albumin (BSA) was demonstrated by the difference in the ratio of the captured molecules to the immobilized Con A molecules, with OVA:Con A=2.3 and BSA:Con A=0.33. Extraction of OVA from a 1:3 mole ratio mixture with BSA was demonstrated by the greater amount of depletion of OVA concentration during the circulation with the developed substrate. A significant amount of captured OVA was eluted using α-methyl mannopyranoside as a competitive ligand. This work is motivated by the need to develop new materials for chromatographic separation and extraction substrates for use in preparative and analytical procedures in glycomics.

  10. Expression of the glycoprotein gene from a fish rhabdovirus by using baculovirus vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koener, J.F.; Leong, J.A.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA fragment containing the gene encoding the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was inserted into Autographa californica baculovirus vectors under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A 66-kilodalton protein, identical in size to the glycosylated glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, was expressed at high levels in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the recombinant viruses. The expressed protein reacted with antiserum to the glycoprotein on Western blots.

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Salt-extractable Hydroxyproline-rich Glycoprotein from Aerated Carrot Discs 1

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, David A.; Varner, Joseph E.

    1980-01-01

    The salt-extractable hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) of the cell wall of aerated carrot root discs has been studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The predominant proline-labeled protein extractable from the cell wall is rich in hydroxyproline as shown by its specific loss of 3H from proline labeled in position 4 and its shift in electrophoretic mobility after labeling in the presence of an inhibitor of hydroxyproline synthesis. Unlabeled HRGP can be identified by staining gels for carbohydrate. The HRGP has been purified by ion exchange chromatography and CsCl gradient centrifugation. The HRGP consists of about 50% protein and 50% carbohydrate with an overall molecular weight of 86,000. The amino acid composition of the protein portion consists of 50% hydroxyproline, 19% basic amino acids, 12% serine, and 10% tyrosine. This glycoprotein accumulates in a salt-extractable pool in the cell wall beginning between 10 and 20 hours of aeration and may also become incorporated into the nonextractable portion of the cell wall. Images PMID:16661526

  12. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. PMID:26301520

  13. Purification and partial characterization of low molecular weight vicilin-like glycoprotein from the seeds of Citrullus lanatus.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sushila; Tomar, Anil Kumar; Jithesh, O; Khan, Meraj Alam; Yadav, R N; Srinivasan, A; Singh, Tej P; Yadav, Savita

    2011-12-01

    The watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) seeds are highly nutritive and contain large amount of proteins and many beneficial minerals such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, iron, phosphorous, zinc etc. In various parts of the world, C. lanatus seed extracts are used to cure cancer, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, and blood pressure. C. lanatus seed extracts are also used as home remedy for edema and urinary tract problems. In this study, we isolated protein fraction of C. lanatus seeds using various protein separation methods. We successfully purified a low molecular weight vicilin-like glycoprotein using chromatographic methods followed by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/MS identification. This is the first report of purification of a vicilin like polypeptide from C. lanatus seeds. In next step, we extracted mRNA from immature seeds and reverse transcribed it using suitable forward and reverse primers for purified glycoprotein. The PCR product was analysed on 1% agarose gel and was subsequently sequenced by Dideoxy DNA sequencing method. An amino acid translation of the gene is in agreement with amino acid sequences of the identified peptides.

  14. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  15. Development of matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chevrier, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the design, construction and characterization of an ultraviolet laser desorption time-of-flight [TOF] mass spectrometer and its subsequent application to glycoprotein structural analysis utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization [MALDI] mass spectrometry. At the inception of this work, commercial mass spectrometers utilizing MALDI were not available, and most reports of the phenomena utilized the 266 nm wavelength provided by frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG lasers. This work involved the design and construction of a high-voltage-extraction linear TOF mass analyzer equipped with a multiple sample inlet system and a 337 manometer, 600 picosecond pulsed nitrogen laser. In MALDI the [open quotes]matrix[close quotes], a strong absorber of a laser wavelength, is co-crystallized with the analyte. The laser photons absorbed by the matrix lead to ionization of the analyte and subsequent desorption from the surface into the gas phase. While nicotinic acid and caffeic acid were reported as effective matrices at 266 and 355 nm, respectively, several other matrices were examined for their efficiency at 337 nm, including [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and gentisic acid, which proved to be advantageous for glycoconjugate analysis. Glycoproteins, phosphoproteins, nucleic acids, and proteolytic digests were all successfully analyzed using the pulsed nitrogen laser. Analysis of numerous peptides and proteins demonstrated femtomolar sensitivity, mass range in excess of 350 kiloDaltons, mass resolution circa 700, and mass accuracy better than 0.1%. The completed instrument was utilized to analyze glycopeptides for carbohydrate sites and microheterogeneity, by performing MALDI mass spectrometry [MALDI/MS] following enzymatic and chemical reactions. In many cases, unfractionated or partially fractionated mixtures were analyzed directly thereby reducing preparative chromatography.

  16. Alteration of the pH dependence of coronavirus-induced cell fusion: effect of mutations in the spike glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, T M; Escarmis, C; Buchmeier, M J

    1991-01-01

    Infection of susceptible murine cells with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus type 4 (MHV4) results in extensive cell-cell fusion at pHs from 5.5 to 8.5. The endosomotropic weak bases chloroquine and ammonium chloride do not prevent MHV4 infection. In marked contrast, we have selected variants from a neural cell line persistently infected with MHV4 which are entirely dependent on acid pH to fuse host cells and are strongly inhibited by endosomotropic weak bases. Wild-type and variant viruses were compared at the level of the fusion-active surface (S) glycoprotein gene. Cloning and sequencing of each 4,131-base open reading frame predicted a total of eight amino acid differences which fell into three distinct clusters. Each S glycoprotein, when expressed from cDNA, was synthesized in equivalent amounts, and similar proportions were transported to the cell surface. Wild-type S induced cell-cell fusion at neutral pH, whereas variant S required prolonged exposure to acidic pH to induce fusion. Expression of hybrid S genes prepared by exchange of restriction fragments between wild-type and variant cDNAs revealed that elimination of neutral pH fusion was solely dependent on amino acid alterations at positions 1067 (Q to H), 1094 (Q to H), and 1114 (L to R). These changes lie within a predicted heptad repeat region of the transmembrane cleavage fragment of S (S2). These findings demonstrate that the pH dependence of coronavirus fusion is highly variable and that this variability can be determined by as few as three amino acid residues. Images PMID:1848311

  17. Boric acid gel enrichment of glycosylated proteins in human wound fluids.

    PubMed

    Krisp, Christoph; Kubutat, Caroline; Kyas, Andreas; Steinsträsser, Lars; Jacobsen, Frank; Wolters, Dirk

    2011-04-01

    The enrichment of glycosylated proteins by glycocapturing materials plays a pivotal role for the investigation of polysaccharide containing proteins in disease pathogenesis. Hence, we investigated a boric acid gel as a binding material for glycoprotein enrichment. The bovine proteins alpha-1-acid-glycoprotein (A1AG) and alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein (fetuin A) were spiked in human chronic wound fluids and were subsequently enriched by a boric acid gel affinity chromatography (BAGAC). The enrichment efficiency was evaluated by western blot analysis and mass spectrometry. Additionally, glycoproteins of human wound fluids from diabetes mellitus patients with chronic foot ulcers were analyzed after BAGAC enrichments. In total 104 glycoproteins were identified, with reported glycosylation sites. 60 proteins were detected in at least 2 out of 3 biological replicates and were used for quantitative analysis between the bound and unbound fractions. Almost 80% of these glycoproteins were more prominent in the bound fraction. Only 2 glycoproteins revealed higher spectral counts in the flow through fraction compared to the bound fraction. These findings demonstrate the capability of the BAGAC material to enrich glycosylated proteins from complex human wound fluids.

  18. Recent advances in glycoprotein production for structural biology: toward tailored design of glycoforms.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Satoh, Tadashi; Kato, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Because of the complexity, heterogeneity, and flexibility of the glycans, the structural analysis of glycoproteins has been eschewed until recently, with a few prominent exceptions. This aversion may have branded structural biologists as glycophobics. However, recent technological advancements in glycoprotein expression systems, employing genetically engineered production vehicles derived from mammalian, insect, yeast, and even bacterial cells, have yielded encouraging breakthroughs. The major advance is the active control of glycoform expression of target glycoproteins based on the genetic manipulation of glycan biogenetic pathways, which was previously overlooked, abolished, or considered unmanageable. Moreover, synthetic and/or chemoenzymatic approaches now enable the preparation of glycoproteins with uniform glycoforms designed in a tailored fashion.

  19. Back to the future with the AGP–Ca2+ flux capacitor

    PubMed Central

    Lamport, Derek T. A.; Varnai, Peter; Seal, Charlotte E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are ubiquitous in green plants. AGPs comprise a widely varied group of hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich cell surface glycoproteins (HRGPs). However, the more narrowly defined classical AGPs massively predominate and cover the plasma membrane. Extensive glycosylation by pendant polysaccharides O-linked to numerous Hyp residues like beads of a necklace creates a unique ionic compartment essential to a wide range of physiological processes including germination, cell extension and fertilization. The vital clue to a precise molecular function remained elusive until the recent isolation of small Hyp–arabinogalactan polysaccharide subunits; their structural elucidation by nuclear magentic resonance imaging, molecular simulations and direct experiment identified a 15-residue consensus subunit as a β-1,3-linked galactose trisaccharide with two short branched sidechains each with a single glucuronic acid residue that binds Ca2+ when paired with its adjacent sidechain. Scope AGPs bind Ca2+ (Kd ∼ 6 μm) at the plasma membrane (PM) at pH ∼5·5 but release it when auxin-dependent PM H+-ATPase generates a low periplasmic pH that dissociates AGP–Ca2+ carboxylates (pka ∼3); the consequential large increase in free Ca2+ drives entry into the cytosol via Ca2+ channels that may be voltage gated. AGPs are thus arguably the primary source of cytosolic oscillatory Ca2+ waves. This differs markedly from animals, in which cytosolic Ca2+ originates mostly from internal stores such as the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, we propose that external dynamic Ca2+ storage by a periplasmic AGP capacitor co-ordinates plant growth, typically involving exocytosis of AGPs and recycled Ca2+, hence an AGP–Ca2+ oscillator. Conclusions The novel concept of dynamic Ca2+ recycling by an AGP–Ca2+ oscillator solves the long-standing problem of a molecular-level function for classical AGPs and thus integrates three fields: AGPs, Ca2+ signalling and auxin

  20. Definition of the full extent of glycosylation of the 45-kilodalton glycoprotein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dobos, K M; Khoo, K H; Swiderek, K M; Brennan, P J; Belisle, J T

    1996-05-01

    Chemical evidence for the true glycosylation of mycobacterial proteins was recently provided in the context of the 45-kDa MPT 32 secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (K. Dobos, K. Swiderek, K.-H. Khoo, P. J. Brennan, and J. T. Belisle, Infect. Immun. 63:2846-2853, 1995). However, the full extent and nature of glycosylation as well as the location of glycosylated amino acids remained undefined. First, to examine the nature of the covalently attached sugars, the 45-kDa protein was obtained from cells metabolically labeled with D-[U-14C] glucose and subjected to compositional analysis, which revealed mannose as the only covalently bound sugar. Digestion of the protein with the endoproteinase subtilisin and analysis of products by liquid chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry on the basis of fragments demonstrating neutral losses of hexose (m/z 162) or pentose (m/z 132) revealed five glycopeptides, S7, S18, S22, S29, and S41 among a total of 50 peptides, all of which produced only m/z 162 fragmentation ion deletions. Fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and alpha-mannosidase digestion demonstrated universal O glycosylation of Thr residues with a single alpha-D-Man, mannobiose, or mannotriose unit. Linkages within the mannobiose and mannotriose were all alpha 1-2, as proven by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of oligosaccharides released by beta-elimination. Total sequences of many of the glycosylated and nonglycosylated peptides combined with published information on the deduced amino acid sequence of the entire 45-kDa protein demonstrated that the sites of glycosylation were located in Pro-rich domains near the N terminus and C terminus of the polypeptide backbone. Specifically, the Thr residues at positions 10 and 18 were substituted with alpha-D-Manp(1-->2)alpha-D-Manp, the Thr residue at position 27 was substituted with a single alpha-D-Manp, and Thr-277 was substituted with either alpha-D-Manp, alpha

  1. Inhibitory effect of plant-originated glycoprotein (27 kDa) on expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in cadmium chloride-induced BNL CL.2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium is very harmful to the environment and to human beings because of its long lifetime. The toxicity of cadmium as an industrial pollutant and a food contaminant, and as one of the major components in cigarette smoke is well known. Cadmium can cause a number of lesions in many organs, such as the kidney, the lung, the liver, the brain, the blood system. However, the mechanism of toxicity of cadmium is not yet clear. Also, it has been well known as human carcinogen which is indirectly caused inflammation-mediated hepatocarcinoma. In the present study it was demonstrated that glycoprotein (27 kDa) isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJE) protects BNL CL.2 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (10 μM). Intracellular ROS and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, activities of activator protein (AP)-1, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and arachidonic acid (AA) using immunoblot analysis or radioactivity were evaluated. The results obtained from this experiment indicated that GJE glycoprotein (100 μg/mL) inhibits the production of intracellular ROS, and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Also, it significantly suppressed inflammatory factors [expression of AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), arachidonic acid, COX-2, and MMP-9]. Taken together, these findings suggest that GJE glycoprotein might be used for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion as one of natural compounds. PMID:21924884

  2. Prominent 85-kDa oligomannosidic glycoproteins of rat brain are signal regulatory proteins and include the SHP substrate-1 for tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bartoszewicz, Z P; Jaffe, H; Sasaki, M; Möller, J R; Stebbins, J W; Gebrekristos, H; Quarles, R H

    1999-04-01

    The glycoprotein component in rat brain reacting most strongly with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) on western blots migrates as an 85-kDa band. GNA identifies mannose-rich oligosaccharides because it is highly specific for terminal alpha-mannose residues. After purification of this 85-kDa glycoprotein band by chromatography on GNA-agarose and preparative gel electrophoresis, binding of other lectins demonstrated the presence of fucose and a trace of galactose, but no sialic acid. Treatment with N-Glycanase or endoglycosidase H produced a 65-kDa band, indicating that it consisted of about one-fourth N-linked oligomannosidic carbohydrate moieties. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography and fluorescence-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis indicated that the major carbohydrate moiety is a heptasaccharide with the structure Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3)Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3) Manbeta1-4Glc-NAcbeta1-4GlcNAc (Man5GlcNAc2). Determination of amino acid sequences of peptides produced by endoproteinase digestion demonstrated that this 85-kDa mannose-rich glycoprotein component contained the SHP substrate-1 for phosphotyrosine phosphatases and at least one other member of the signal-regulatory protein (SIRP) family. The unusually high content of oligomannosidic carbohydrate moieties on these receptor-like members of the immunoglobulin superfamily in neural tissue could be of functional significance for intercellular adhesion or signaling.

  3. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pastuszak, I.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. ); Aoyagi, Takaaki ); Molyneux, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal {alpha}-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward {alpha}- and {beta}-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as {beta}-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal {alpha}-mannosidases, with estimated IC{sub 50}'s of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC{sub 50} of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl {alpha}-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man{sub 5}GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  4. HIV Entry and Envelope Glycoprotein-mediated Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Robert; Durell, Stewart; Viard, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry involves binding of the trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 to cell surface receptors, which triggers conformational changes in Env that drive the membrane fusion reaction. The conformational landscape that the lipids and Env navigate en route to fusion has been examined by biophysical measurements on the microscale, whereas electron tomography, x-rays, and NMR have provided insights into the process on the nanoscale and atomic scale. However, the coupling between the lipid and protein pathways that give rise to fusion has not been resolved. Here, we discuss the known and unknown about the overall HIV Env-mediated fusion process. PMID:23043104

  5. Ebolavirus Glycoprotein Directs Fusion through NPC1+ Endolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, James A.; D'Souza, Ryan S.; Ruas, Margarida; Galione, Antony; Casanova, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Ebolavirus, a deadly hemorrhagic fever virus, was thought to enter cells through endolysosomes harboring its glycoprotein receptor, Niemann-Pick C1. However, an alternate model was recently proposed in which ebolavirus enters through a later NPC1-negative endosome that contains two-pore Ca2+ channel 2 (TPC2), a newly identified ebolavirus entry factor. Here, using live cell imaging, we obtained evidence that in contrast to the new model, ebolavirus enters cells through endolysosomes that contain both NPC1 and TPC2. PMID:26468524

  6. Glycoprotein import: a common feature of complex plastids?

    PubMed

    Peschke, Madeleine; Hempel, Franziska

    2013-10-01

    Complex plastids evolved by secondary endosymbiosis and are, in contrast to primary plastids, surrounded by 3 or 4 envelope membranes. Recently, we provided evidence that in diatoms proteins exist that get N-glycosylated during transport across the outermost membrane of the complex plastid. This gives rise to unique questions on the transport mechanisms of these bulky proteins, which get transported across up to 3 further membranes into the plastid stroma. Here we discuss our results in an evolutionary context and speculate about the existence of plastidal glycoproteins in other organisms with complex plastids.

  7. Fusion protein of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5: nucleotide sequence of mRNA predicts a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Harris, T J; Lamb, R A

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA coding for the fusion glycoprotein (F) of the paramyxovirus, simian virus 5, has been obtained. There is a single large open reading frame on the mRNA that encodes a protein of 529 amino acids with a molecular weight of 56,531. The proteolytic cleavage/activation site of F, to yield F2 and F1, contains five arginine residues. Six potential glycosylation sites were identified in the protein, two on F2 and four on F1. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that F is extensively hydrophobic over the length of the polypeptide chain. Three regions are very hydrophobic and could interact directly with membranes: these are the NH2-terminal putative signal peptide, the COOH-terminal putative membrane anchorage domain, and the NH2-terminal region of F1. Images PMID:6093114

  8. Characterization of acetylated and acetolyzed glycoprotein high-mannose core oligosaccharides by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, P K; Dell, A; Ballou, C E

    1986-01-01

    Fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry has been applied to acetylated neutral and phosphorylated oligosaccharides from yeast glycoproteins and to their acetolysis products. Although acetylation increases the sample molecular weight and the complexity of the spectra, it also enhances the sensitivity of detection, is applicable to samples that contain salt, and is especially useful for analysis of phosphorylated derivatives. Acetylation by trifluoroacetic anhydride/glacial acetic acid is particularly convenient and can be done rapidly on a small amount of material. Acetolysis by acetic anhydride/glacial acetic acid/H2SO4 is done on the acetylated oligosaccharides, and the acetylated fragments are recovered by solvent extraction and immediately subjected to mass spectrometry. The methodology allows molecular weight determinations and sequence analysis by acetolysis to be carried out on a few micrograms of isolated oligosaccharide in a few hours. PMID:3459167

  9. Sensitive Glycoprotein Sandwich Assays by the Synergistic Effect of In Situ Generation of Raman Probes and Plasmonic Coupling of Ag Core-Au Satellite Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaoshuang; Li, Xueyuan; Chen, Dong; Du, Xuezhong

    2016-05-01

    Sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assays of glycoproteins have been proposed using p-aminothiophenol (PATP)-embedded Ag core-Au satellite nanostructures modified with p-mercaptophenylboronic acid (PMBA) and the self-assembled monolayer of PMBA on a smooth gold-coated wafer. The apparent Raman probe PATP on the surfaces of the Ag cores underwent a photodimerization to generate 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) in situ upon excitation of laser, and the in situ generated DMAB acted as the actual Raman probe with considerably strong SERS signals, which was further enhanced by the plasmonic coupling of the Ag core-Au satellite nanostructures due to the synergistic effect. The sandwich assays of glycoproteins showed high sensitivity and excellent selectivity against nonglycoproteins. The Ag core-Au satellite SERS nanostructures can be used for highly sensitive SERS assays of other analytes.

  10. Glycoprotein screening in colorectal cancer based on differentially expressed Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyun; Cheng, Zongyong; Ouyang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yanyan; Chen, Shuijiao; Wang, Chunlian; Lu, Fanggen; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the identification of new biomarkers for CRC is valuable for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to screen differentially expressed glycoproteins (especially O-glycoproteins) and to identify diagnostic or therapeutic candidates for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on different Tn antigen expression levels. Fresh cancer tissues and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from CRC patients and classified into three groups based on their Tn antigen expression: CRC with negative Tn expression (CRC Tn‑), CRC with positive Tn expression (CRC Tn+) and normal control without Tn expression (NC). Protein extractions were separated and identified by iTRAQ technology. Glycoproteins and O-glycoproteins were selected using UniProt and DAVID. Deep bioinformatic analysis, including Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KO), was used to annotate this O-glycoprotein interaction network. Subsequently, two O‑glycoproteins were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in either LS174T cells or CRC tissues. We found that 330 differentially expressed proteins were identified by iTRAQ between CRC Tn‑ and NC tissues, 317 between CRC Tn+ and NC tissues, and 316 between CRC Tn‑ and Tn+ tissues. Of the 316 proteins, 55 glycoproteins and 19 O‑glycoproteins were identified and analyzed via deep informatics. Namely, different Tn antigen expression levels in CRC led to differential protein expression patterns, especially for glycoproteins and O‑glycoproteins. Decorin and SORBS1, two representative functional O-glycoproteins, were significantly downregulated in the CRC Tn+ tissues compared with the level in the CRC Tn‑ or NC tissues. Based on this deep bioinformatic analysis, Decorin and SORBS1 are hypothesized to be involved in the TGF‑β and PPAR‑γ signaling pathways, respectively. PMID:27432485

  11. Arterial thrombosis is accelerated in mice deficient in histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Zhou, Ji; Leslie, Beverly A; Stafford, Alan R; Fredenburgh, James C; Ni, Ran; Qiao, Shengjun; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Monia, Brett P; Gross, Peter L; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-04-23

    Factor (F) XII, a key component of the contact system, triggers clotting via the intrinsic pathway, and is implicated in propagating thrombosis. Although nucleic acids are potent activators, it is unclear how the contact system is regulated to prevent uncontrolled clotting. Previously, we showed that histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) binds FXIIa and attenuates its capacity to trigger coagulation. To investigate the role of HRG as a regulator of the intrinsic pathway, we compared RNA- and DNA-induced thrombin generation in plasma from HRG-deficient and wild-type mice. Thrombin generation was enhanced in plasma from HRG-deficient mice, and accelerated clotting was restored to normal with HRG reconstitution. Although blood loss after tail tip amputation was similar in HRG-deficient and wild-type mice, carotid artery occlusion after FeCl3 injury was accelerated in HRG-deficient mice, and HRG administration abrogated this effect. To confirm that HRG modulates the contact system, we used DNase, RNase, and antisense oligonucleotides to characterize the FeCl3 model. Whereas DNase or FVII knockdown had no effect, carotid occlusion was abrogated with RNase or FXII knockdown, confirming that FeCl3-induced thrombosis is triggered by RNA in a FXII-dependent fashion. Therefore, in a nucleic acid-driven model, HRG inhibits thrombosis by modulating the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

  12. PCR based diagnosis of trypanosomiasis exploring invariant surface glycoprotein (ISG) 75 gene.

    PubMed

    Rudramurthy, G R; Sengupta, P P; Balamurugan, V; Prabhudas, K; Rahman, H

    2013-03-31

    The invariant sur